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Sample records for soluble activin type

  1. A Soluble Activin Receptor Type IIB Does Not Improve Blood Glucose in Streptozotocin-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Guo, Tingqing; Portas, Jennifer; McPherron, Alexandra C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), or insulin dependent DM, is accompanied by decreased muscle mass. The growth factor myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of muscle growth, and a loss of MSTN signaling has been shown to increase muscle mass and prevent the development of obesity, insulin resistance and lipodystrophic diabetes in mice. The effects of MSTN inhibition in a T1DM model on muscle mass and blood glucose are unknown. We asked whether MSTN inhibition would increase muscle mass and decrease hyperglycemia in mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to destroy pancreatic beta cells. After diabetes developed, mice were treated with a soluble MSTN/activin receptor fused to Fc (ACVR2B:Fc). ACVR2B:Fc increased body weight and muscle mass compared to vehicle treated mice. Unexpectedly, ACVR2B:Fc reproducibly exacerbated hyperglycemia within approximately one week of administration. ACVR2B:Fc treatment also elevated serum levels of the glucocorticoid corticosterone. These results suggest that although MSTN/activin inhibitors increased muscle mass, they may be counterproductive in improving health in patients with T1DM. PMID:25561902

  2. The effects of a soluble activin type IIB receptor on obesity and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Imo; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Dhir, Ravindra; Yin, Xiaoyan; Pistilli, Emidio; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir; Ucran, Jeffrey; Lachey, Jennifer; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin, also known as Growth and Differentiation Factor 8, is a secreted protein that inhibits muscle growth. Disruption of myostatin signaling increases muscle mass and decreases glucose, but it is unclear whether these changes are related. We treated mice on chow and high-fat diets with a soluble activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB.Fc) which is a putative endogenous signaling receptor for myostatin and other ligands of the TGF-β superfamily. After 4 weeks, RAP-031 increased lean and muscle mass, grip strength, and contractile force. RAP-031 enhanced the ability of insulin to suppress glucose production under clamp conditions in high-fat fed mice, but did not significantly change insulin-mediated glucose disposal. The hepatic insulin sensitizing effect of RAP-031 treatment was associated with increased adiponectin levels. RAP-031 treatment for 10 weeks further increased muscle mass and drastically reduced fat content in mice on either chow or high-fat diet. RAP-031 suppressed hepatic glucose production and increased peripheral glucose uptake in chow fed mice. In contrast, RAP-031 suppressed glucose production with no apparent change in glucose disposal in high-fat diet mice. Our findings demonstrate that disruption of ActRIIB signaling is a viable pharmacological approach for treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:19668253

  3. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings. PMID:19864340

  4. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings.

  5. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  6. Development of Novel Activin-Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, “fastener” residues (Lys45, Tyr96, His97, and Ala98; activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC50 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC50 ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  7. Sotatercept, a soluble activin receptor type 2A IgG-Fc fusion protein for the treatment of anemia and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Raje, Noopur; Vallet, Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Sotatercept (ACE-011), under development by Acceleron Pharma Inc in collaboration with Celgene Corp, is a chimeric protein containing the extracellular domain of the activin receptor 2A (ACVR2A) fused to the Fc domain of human IgG1. Sotatercept contains the binding site of ACVR2A and interferes with downstream signaling cascades, in particular the SMAD pathway, by sequestering activin. The murine counterpart of sotatercept, referred to as RAP-011, has been extensively evaluated in preclinical studies, in particular in models of cancer- and osteoporosis-related bone loss, and the developing companies envisage that sotatercept may also have potential for the treatment of cancer and cancer-related bone loss. In a phase I clinical trial in postmenopausal females, sotatercept increased hematocrit levels, and, in a phase II trial in patients with multiple myeloma, a trend toward improvement in osteolytic lesions as well as antitumor activity was observed. At the time of publication, phase II trials in patients with anemia were ongoing. Future clinical development will rely on an evaluation of the benefits and complications of sotatercept administration, focusing in particular on suppression of ovarian function and increases in hematocrit levels without a consequent risk of hypertension and thrombosis.

  8. Characterization of the Ligand Binding Functionality of the Extracellular Domain of Activin Receptor Type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Dianne; Grinberg, Asya V.; Liu, June; Davies, Monique V.; Castonguay, Roselyne; Maniatis, Silas; Andreucci, Amy J.; Pobre, Eileen G.; Tomkinson, Kathleen N.; Monnell, Travis E.; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Pearsall, R. Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The single transmembrane domain serine/threonine kinase activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) has been proposed to bind key regulators of skeletal muscle mass development, including the ligands GDF-8 (myostatin) and GDF-11 (BMP-11). Here we provide a detailed kinetic characterization of ActRIIB binding to several low and high affinity ligands using a soluble activin receptor type IIB-Fc chimera (ActRIIB.Fc). We show that both GDF-8 and GDF-11 bind the extracellular domain of ActRIIB with affinities comparable with those of activin A, a known high affinity ActRIIB ligand, whereas BMP-2 and BMP-7 affinities for ActRIIB are at least 100-fold lower. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that ActRIIB binds GDF-11 and activin A in different ways such as, for example, substitutions in ActRIIB Leu79 effectively abolish ActRIIB binding to activin A yet not to GDF-11. Native ActRIIB has four isoforms that differ in the length of the C-terminal portion of their extracellular domains. We demonstrate that the C terminus of the ActRIIB extracellular domain is crucial for maintaining biological activity of the ActRIIB.Fc receptor chimera. In addition, we show that glycosylation of ActRIIB is not required for binding to activin A or GDF-11. Together, our findings reveal binding specificity and activity determinants of the ActRIIB receptor that combine to effect specificity in the activation of distinct signaling pathways. PMID:20385559

  9. Activin Type 2 Receptor Restoration in MSI-H Colon Cancer Suppresses Growth and Enhances Migration With Activin

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, BARBARA H.; BECK, STAYCE E.; CABRAL, JENNIFER; CHAU, EDDY; CABRERA, BETTY L.; FIORINO, ANTONIO; SMITH, E. JULIETA; BOCANEGRA, MELANIE; CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon cancers with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) develop frameshift mutations in tumor suppressors as part of their pathogenesis. ACVR2 is mutated at its exon 10 polyadenine tract in >80% of MSI-H colon cancers, coinciding with loss of protein. ACVR2 transmits the growth effects of activin via phosphorylation of SMAD proteins to affect gene transcription. The functional effect of activin in colon cancers has not been studied. We developed and characterized a cell model in which we studied how activin signaling affects growth. Methods hMLH1 and ACVR2 mutant HCT116 cells were previously stably transferred with chromosome 2 (HCT116+chr2), restoring a single regulated copy of wild-type ACVR2 but not hMLH1. Both HCT116+chr2 and parental HCT116 cells (as well as HEC59 and ACVR2 and hMSH2 complemented HEC59+chr2 cells) were assessed for genetic complementation and biologic function. Results HCT116+chr2 cells and HEC59+chr2 cells, but not ACVR2-mutant HCT116 or HEC59 cells, acquired wild-type ACVR2 as well as expression of ACVR2 wild-type messenger RNA. Complemented ACVR2 protein complexed with ACVR1 with activin treatment, generating nuclear phosphoSMAD2 and activin-specific gene transcription. ACVR2-restored cells showed decreased growth and reduced S phase but increased cellular migration following activin treatment. ACVR2 small interfering RNA reversed these effects in complemented cells. Conclusions ACVR2-complemented MSI-H colon cancers restore activin-SMAD signaling, decrease growth, and slow their cell cycle following ligand stimulation but show increased cellular migration. Activin is growth suppressive and enhances migration similar to transforming growth factor β in colon cancer, indicating that abrogation of the effects of activin contribute to the pathogenesis of MSI-H colon cancers. PMID:17258738

  10. Generation of a specific activin antagonist by modification of the activin A propeptide.

    PubMed

    Makanji, Yogeshwar; Walton, Kelly L; Chan, Karen L; Gregorevic, Paul; Robertson, David M; Harrison, Craig A

    2011-10-01

    Elevated activin A levels in inhibin-deficient mice promote the development of gonadal tumors and induce cachexia by reducing muscle, liver, stomach, and fat mass. Because activin A is an important regulator of tissue growth, inhibiting the actions of this TGFβ family ligand may halt or reverse pathology in diseased tissues. In this study, we modified the activin A propeptide to generate a specific activin antagonist. Propeptides mediate the synthesis and secretion of all TGFβ ligands and, for some family members (e.g. TGFβ1), bind the mature growth factor with high enough affinity to confer latency. By linking the C-terminal region of the TGFβ1 propeptide to the N-terminal region of the activin A propeptide, we generated a chimeric molecule [activin/TGFβ1 propeptide (AT propeptide)] with increased affinity for activin A. The AT propeptide was 30-fold more potent than the activin A propeptide at suppressing activin-induced FSH release by LβT2 pituitary gonadotrope cells. Binding of the AT propeptide to activin A shields the type II receptor binding site, thereby reducing Smad2 phosphorylation and downstream signaling. In comparison with the commonly used activin antagonists, follistatin (IC(50) 0.42 nM), soluble activin type II receptor A-Fc (IC(50) 0.47 nM), and soluble activin type II receptor B-Fc (IC(50) 0.91 nM), the AT propeptide (IC(50) 2.6 nM) was slightly less potent. However, it was more specific, inhibiting activin A and activin B (IC(50) 10.26 nM) but not the closely related ligands, myostatin and growth differentiation factor-11. As such, the AT propeptide represents the first specific activin antagonist, and it should be an effective reagent for blocking activin actions in vivo.

  11. Activin Receptor Type IIB Inhibition Improves Muscle Phenotype and Function in a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Elisabeth R.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that causes progressive muscle atrophy and weakness. Using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer, we evaluated the potential to improve skeletal muscle weakness via systemic, postnatal inhibition of either myostatin or all signaling via the activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB). After demonstrating elevated p-SMAD3 content and differential content of ActRIIB ligands, 4-week-old male C/C SMA model mice were treated intraperitoneally with 1x1012 genome copies of pseudotype 2/8 virus encoding a soluble form of the ActRIIB extracellular domain (sActRIIB) or protease-resistant myostatin propeptide (dnMstn) driven by a liver specific promoter. At 12 weeks of age, muscle mass and function were improved in treated C/C mice by both treatments, compared to controls. The fast fiber type muscles had a greater response to treatment than did slow muscles, and the greatest therapeutic effects were found with sActRIIB treatment. Myostatin/activin inhibition, however, did not rescue C/C mice from the reduction in motor unit numbers of the tibialis anterior muscle. Collectively, this study indicates that myostatin/activin inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to increase muscle mass and strength, but not neuromuscular junction defects, in less severe forms of SMA. PMID:27870893

  12. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  13. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  14. The structure of the follistatin:activin complex reveals antagonism of both type I and type II receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.B.; Lerch, T.F.; Cook, R.W.; Woodruff, T.K.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-08

    TGF-{beta} ligands stimulate diverse cellular differentiation and growth responses by signaling through type I and II receptors. Ligand antagonists, such as follistatin, block signaling and are essential regulators of physiological responses. Here we report the structure of activin A, a TGF-{beta} ligand, bound to the high-affinity antagonist follistatin. Two follistatin molecules encircle activin, neutralizing the ligand by burying one-third of its residues and its receptor binding sites. Previous studies have suggested that type I receptor binding would not be blocked by follistatin, but the crystal structure reveals that the follistatin N-terminal domain has an unexpected fold that mimics a universal type I receptor motif and occupies this receptor binding site. The formation of follistatin:BMP:type I receptor complexes can be explained by the stoichiometric and geometric arrangement of the activin:follistatin complex. The mode of ligand binding by follistatin has important implications for its ability to neutralize homo- and heterodimeric ligands of this growth factor family.

  15. Characterization of follistatin-type domains and their contribution to myostatin and activin A antagonism.

    PubMed

    Cash, Jennifer N; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Keutmann, Henry T; Thompson, Thomas B

    2012-07-01

    Follistatin (FST)-type proteins are important antagonists of some members of the large TGF-β family of cytokines. These include myostatin, an important negative regulator of muscle growth, and the closely related activin A, which is involved in many physiological functions, including maintenance of a normal reproductive axis. FST-type proteins, including FST and FST-like 3 (FSTL3), differentially inhibit various TGF-β family ligands by binding each ligand with two FST-type molecules. In this study, we sought to examine features that are important for ligand antagonism by FST-type proteins. Previous work has shown that a modified construct consisting of the FST N-terminal domain (ND) followed by two repeating follistatin domains (FSD), herein called FST ND-FSD1-FSD1, exhibits strong specificity for myostatin over activin A. Using cell-based assays, we show that FST ND-FSD1-FSD1 is unique in its specificity for myostatin as compared with similar constructs containing domains from FSTL3 and that the ND is critical to its activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FSD3 of FST provides affinity to ligand inhibition and confers resistance to perturbations in the ND and FSD2, likely through the interaction of FSD3 of one FST molecule with the ND of the other FST molecule. Additionally, our data suggest that this contact provides cooperativity to ligand antagonism. Cross-linking studies show that this interaction also potentiates formation of 1:2 ligand-FST complexes, whereas lack of FSD3 allows formation of 1:1 complexes. Altogether, these studies support that domain differences generate FST-type molecules that are each uniquely suited ligand antagonists.

  16. A Soluble Activin Receptor IIB Fails to Prevent Muscle Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Graham, Zachary A; Collier, Lauren; Peng, Yuanzhen; Saéz, Juan C; Bauman, William A; Qin, Weiping; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2016-06-15

    Myostatin (MST) is a potent regulator of muscle growth and size. Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in marked atrophy of muscle below the level of injury. Currently, there is no effective pharmaceutical treatment available to prevent sublesional muscle atrophy post-SCI. To determine whether inhibition of MST with a soluble activin IIB receptor (RAP-031) prevents sublesional SCI-induced muscle atrophy, mice were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham-SCI; SCI+Vehicle group (SCI-VEH); and SCI+RAP-031 (SCI-RAP-031). SCI was induced by complete transection at thoracic level 10. Animals were euthanized at 56 days post-surgery. RAP-031 reduced, but did not prevent, body weight loss post-SCI. RAP-031 increased total lean tissue mass compared to SCI-VEH (14.8%). RAP-031 increased forelimb muscle mass post-SCI by 38% and 19% for biceps and triceps, respectively (p < 0.001). There were no differences in hindlimb muscle weights between the RAP-031 and SCI-VEH groups. In the gastrocnemius, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was elevated for interleukin (IL)-6 (8-fold), IL-1β (3-fold), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (8-fold) in the SCI-VEH, compared to the Sham group. Muscle RING finger protein 1 mRNA was 2-fold greater in the RAP-031 group, compared to Sham-SCI. RAP-031 did not influence cytokine expression. Bone mineral density of the distal femur and proximal tibia were decreased post-SCI (-26% and -28%, respectively) and were not altered by RAP-031. In conclusion, MST inhibition increased supralesional muscle mass, but did not prevent sublesional muscle or bone loss, or the inflammation in paralyzed muscle.

  17. Goat activin receptor type IIB knockdown by muscle specific promoter driven artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Shah, Ravi K; Patel, Utsav A; Tripathi, Ajai K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-10-10

    Activin receptor type IIB (ACVR2B) is a transmembrane receptor which mediates signaling of TGF beta superfamily ligands known to function in regulation of muscle mass, embryonic development and reproduction. ACVR2B antagonism has shown to enhance the muscle growth in several disease and transgenic models. Here, we show ACVR2B knockdown by RNA interference using muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter driven artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Among the various promoter elements tested, the ∼1.26 kb MCK promoter region showed maximum transcriptional activity in goat myoblasts cells. We observed up to 20% silencing in non-myogenic 293T cells and up to 32% silencing in myogenic goat myoblasts by MCK directed amiRNAs by transient transfection. Goat myoblasts stably integrated with MCK directed amiRNAs showed merely 8% silencing in proliferating myoblasts which was increased to 34% upon induction of differentiation at transcript level whereas up to 57% silencing at protein level. Knockdown of ACVR2B by 5'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in decreased SMAD2/3 signaling, increased expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and enhanced proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Unexpectedly, knockdown of ACVR2B by 3'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in increased SMAD2/3 signaling, reduced expression of MRFs and suppression of myogenesis. Our study offers muscle specific knockdown of ACVR2B as a potential strategy to enhance muscle mass in the farm animal species.

  18. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  19. Activin B Induces Noncanonical SMAD1/5/8 Signaling via BMP Type I Receptors in Hepatocytes: Evidence for a Role in Hepcidin Induction by Inflammation in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Canali, Susanna; Core, Amanda B; Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B; Merkulova, Maria; Wang, Chia-Yu; Schneyer, Alan L; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Babitt, Jodie L

    2016-03-01

    Induction of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin contributes to the anemia of inflammation. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) signaling is a central regulator of hepcidin expression in the liver. Recently, the TGF-β/BMP superfamily member activin B was implicated in hepcidin induction by inflammation via noncanonical SMAD1/5/8 signaling, but its mechanism of action and functional significance in vivo remain uncertain. Here, we show that low concentrations of activin B, but not activin A, stimulate prolonged SMAD1/5/8 signaling and hepcidin expression in liver cells to a similar degree as canonical SMAD2/3 signaling, and with similar or modestly reduced potency compared with BMP6. Activin B stimulates hepcidin via classical activin type II receptors ACVR2A and ACVR2B, noncanonical BMP type I receptors activin receptor-like kinase 2 and activin receptor-like kinase 3, and SMAD5. The coreceptor hemojuvelin binds to activin B and facilitates activin B-SMAD1/5/8 signaling. Activin B-SMAD1/5/8 signaling has some selectivity for hepatocyte-derived cells and is not enabled by hemojuvelin in other cell types. Liver activin B mRNA expression is up-regulated in multiple mouse models of inflammation associated with increased hepcidin and hypoferremia, including lipopolysaccharide, turpentine, and heat-killed Brucella abortus models. Finally, the activin inhibitor follistatin-315 blunts hepcidin induction by lipopolysaccharide or B. abortus in mice. Our data elucidate a novel mechanism for noncanonical SMAD activation and support a likely functional role for activin B in hepcidin stimulation during inflammation in vivo.

  20. New function of the myostatin/activin type I receptor (ALK4) as a mediator of muscle atrophy and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pasteuning-Vuhman, Svitlana; Boertje-van der Meulen, Johanna W.; van Putten, Maaike; Overzier, Maurice; ten Dijke, Peter; Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lezhnina, Ksenia V.; Ozerov, Ivan V.; Aliper, Aleksandr M.; Hoogaars, Willem M.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Loomans, Cindy J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibrosis and impaired muscle regeneration are major contributors to muscle wasting in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Muscle growth is negatively regulated by myostatin (MSTN) and activins. Blockage of these pathways may improve muscle quality and function in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) were designed specifically to block the function of ALK4, a key receptor for the MSTN/activin pathway in skeletal muscle. AON-induced exon skipping resulted in specific Alk4 down-regulation, inhibition of MSTN activity, and increased myoblast differentiation in vitro. Unexpectedly, a marked decrease in muscle mass (10%) was found after Alk4 AON treatment in mdx mice. In line with in vitro results, muscle regeneration was stimulated, and muscle fiber size decreased markedly. Notably, when Alk4 was down-regulated in adult wild-type mice, muscle mass decreased even more. RNAseq analysis revealed dysregulated metabolic functions and signs of muscle atrophy. We conclude that ALK4 inhibition increases myogenesis but also regulates the tight balance of protein synthesis and degradation. Therefore, caution must be used when developing therapies that interfere with MSTN/activin pathways.—Pasteuning-Vuhman, S., Boertje-van der Meulen, J. W., van Putten, M., Overzier, M., ten Dijke, P., Kiełbasa, S. M., Arindrarto, W., Wolterbeek, R., Lezhnina, K. V., Ozerov, I. V., Aliper, A. M., Hoogaars, W. M., Aartsma-Rus, A., Loomans, C. J. M. New function of the myostatin/activin type I receptor (ALK4) as a mediator of muscle atrophy and muscle regeneration. PMID:27733450

  1. Molecular characterization of Activin Receptor Type IIA and its expression during gonadal maturation and growth stages in rohu carp.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Siddhi; Mohanty, Mausumee; Bit, Amrita; Sahoo, Lakshman; Das, Sachidananda; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Paramananda

    2017-01-01

    Activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA), a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptor is an important regulator of physiological traits, viz., reproduction and body growth in vertebrates including teleosts. However, existing knowledge of its role in regulating fish physiology is limited. To address this, we have cloned and characterized the ActRIIA cDNA of Labeo rohita (rohu), an economically important fish species of the Indian subcontinent. Comparative expression profiling of the receptor gene at various reproductive and growth stages supports to its role in promoting oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis and skeletal muscle development via interaction with multiple ligands of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family. The full-length cDNA of rohu ActRIIA was found to be of 1587bp length encoding 528 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of the intracellular kinase domain of rohu ActRIIA has also been predicted. Phylogenetic relationship studies showed that the gene is evolutionarily conserved across the vertebrate lineage implicating that the functioning of the receptor is more or less similar in vertebrates. Taken together, these findings could be an initial step towards the use of ActRIIA as a potential candidate gene marker for understanding the complex regulatory mechanism of fish reproduction and growth.

  2. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  3. Seasonal changes in immunoreactivity of activin signaling component proteins in wild ground squirrel testes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiao; Song, Moshi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal spermatogenesis and localization of inhibin/activin subunits (alpha, betaA, betaB) in the testes of wild ground squirrel has been previously described; however, the expression pattern of activin receptors and cytoplasmic signaling SMADs has not been detected in any seasonal breeders. The objective of this study was to investigate the abundance and cellular localization of activin signaling components in testes of the wild ground squirrel during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. The immunolocalizations of ActRIIB (activin type II receptor B) and activin-related SMADs (phospho-SMAD2/3, SMAD4 and SMAD7) were observed by immunohistochemistry. Total proteins were extracted from testicular tissues in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons and were used for Western blotting analysis for ActRIIB and SMADs. Immunoreactivities of activin signaling components were greater in the testes of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level in the nonbreeding season. ActRIIB and related SMADs were widely spread in the active testes, while spermatogonia were the predominant cellular sites of activin signal transduction during arrested spermatogenesis. The dynamic regulation of activin type II receptor and SMADs indicated that the activin signal pathway played an important paracrine role in seasonal spermatogenesis of the wild ground squirrel. Furthermore, the distinct localizations and immunoreactivity of ActRIIB and SMADs might suggest different functions of activin in seasonal spermatogenesis.

  4. The role of myostatin and activin receptor IIB in the regulation of unloading-induced myofiber type-specific skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Lyle W; Knoblauch, Mark; Clarke, Mark S F

    2015-09-15

    Chronic unloading induces decrements in muscle size and strength. This adaptation is governed by a number of molecular factors including myostatin, a potent negative regulator of muscle mass. Myostatin must first be secreted into the circulation and then bind to the membrane-bound activin receptor IIB (actRIIB) to exert its atrophic action. Therefore, we hypothesized that myofiber type-specific atrophy observed after hindlimb suspension (HLS) would be related to myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and/or actRIIB. Wistar rats underwent HLS for 10 days, after which the tibialis anterior was harvested for frozen cross sectioning. Simultaneous multichannel immunofluorescent staining combined with differential interference contrast imaging was employed to analyze myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and actRIIB and myofiber type cross-sectional area (CSA) across fiber types, myonuclei, and satellite cells. Hindlimb suspension (HLS) induced significant myofiber type-specific atrophy in myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIx (P < 0.05) and MHC IIb myofibers (P < 0.05). Myostatin staining associated with myonuclei was less in HLS rats compared with controls, while satellite cell staining for myostatin remained unchanged. In contrast, the total number myonuclei and satellite cells per myofiber was reduced in HLS compared with ambulatory control rats (P < 0.01). Sarcoplasmic actRIIB staining differed between myofiber types (I < IIa < IIx < IIb) independent of loading conditions. Myofiber types exhibiting the greatest cytoplasmic staining of actRIIB corresponded to those exhibiting the greatest degree of atrophy following HLS. Our data suggest that differential expression of actRIIB may be responsible for myostatin-induced myofiber type-selective atrophy observed during chronic unloading.

  5. Complete reversal of muscle wasting in experimental cancer cachexia: Additive effects of activin type II receptor inhibition and β-2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Míriam; Busquets, Sílvia; Penna, Fabio; Zhou, Xiaolan; Marmonti, Enrica; Betancourt, Angelica; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Han, H Q; Argilés, Josep M

    2016-04-15

    Formoterol is a highly potent β2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist, which is a muscle growth promoter in many animal species. Myostatin/activin inhibition reverses skeletal muscle loss and prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of a combination of the soluble myostatin receptor ActRIIB (sActRIIB) and the β2-agonist formoterol in the cachectic Lewis lung carcinoma model. The combination of formoterol and sActRIIB was extremely effective in reversing muscle wasting associated with experimental cancer cachexia in mice. Muscle weights from tumor-bearing animals were completely recovered following treatment and this was also reflected in the measured grip strength. This combination increased food intake in both control and tumor-bearing animals. The double treatment also prolonged survival significantly without affecting the weight and growth of the primary tumor. In addition, it significantly reduced the number of metastasis. Concerning the mechanisms for the preservation of muscle mass during cachexia, the effects of formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be additive, since formoterol reduced the rate of protein degradation (as measured in vitro as tyrosine release, using incubated isolated individual muscles) while sActRIIB only affected protein synthesis (as measured in vivo using tritiated phenylalanine). Formoterol also increased the rate of protein synthesis and this seemed to be favored by the presence of sActRIIB. Combining formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be a very promising treatment for experimental cancer cachexia. Further studies in human patients are necessary and may lead to a highly effective treatment option for muscle wasting associated with cancer.

  6. Targeting the Activin Type IIB Receptor to Improve Muscle Mass and Function in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-01-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg−1 body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg−1 dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg−1), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies. PMID:21356379

  7. Targeting the activin type IIB receptor to improve muscle mass and function in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D; Ahima, Rexford S; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-03-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg(-1) body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg(-1) dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg(-1)), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies.

  8. Effect of Cyclodextrin Types and Co-Solvent on Solubility of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    PubMed Central

    Charumanee, Suporn; Okonogi, Siriporn; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan; Wolschann, Peter; Viernstein, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the solubility of piroxicam (Prx) depending on the inclusion complexation with various cyclodextrins (CDs) and on ethanol as a co-solvent. The phase-solubility method was applied to determine drug solubility in binary and ternary systems. The results showed that in systems consisting of the drug dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures, the drug solubility increased exponentially with a rising concentration of ethanol. The phase solubility measurements of the drug in aqueous solutions of CDs, β-CD and γ-CD exhibited diagrams of AL-type, whereas 2,6-dimethyl-β-CD revealed AP-type. The destabilizing effect of ethanol as a co-solvent was observed for all complexes regardless of the CD type, as a consequence of it the lowering of the complex formation constants. In systems with a higher concentration of ethanol, the drug solubility was increased in opposition to the decreasing complex formation constants. According to this study, the type of CDs played a more important role on the solubility of Prx, and the use of ethanol as a co-solvent exhibited no synergistic effect on the improvement of Prx solubility. The Prx solubility was increased again due to the better solubility in ethanol. PMID:27763573

  9. Variations in activin receptor, inhibin/activin subunit and follistatin mRNAs in human prostate tumour tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schaik, R H N van; Wierikx, C D J; Timmerman, M A; Oomen, M H; Weerden, W M van; Kwast, T H van der; Steenbrugge, G J van; Jong, F H de

    1999-01-01

    The possible role of activin in the regulation of malignant prostatic growth was studied using RNAase protection assays of activin receptors, inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin mRNAs in the human prostatic carcinoma cell lines LNCaP-FGC, -R and -LNO, in human prostatic carcinoma xenografts and in human prostatic tissue. Activin receptor types IA (ActRIA), IB (ActRIB), IIA (ActRIIA) and IIB (ActRIIB) mRNAs were generally expressed in prostate pithelial cells, with significantly lower levels of ActRIB mRNA in prostate tumour aterial when compared to non-malignant tissue (P< 0.05; Mann–Whitney U -test). Inhibin/activin βA- and βB-subunit mRNA expression was also found in prostate tissue. Androgen-independent xenografts expressed significantly lower amounts of βB-subunit mRNA when compared to androgen-dependent xenografts (P< 0.05). While βB-subunit mRNA was expressed by LNCaP-FGC and -LNO cells, virtually no expression was found in the androgen-independent LNCaP-R line. Inhibin α-subunit mRNA levels were low or undetectable in all samples investigated. Follistatin mRNA was undetectable in LNCaP-sublines, while low levels were found in prostatic tissues. In androgen-independent LNCaP-R cells, activin inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that prostate tumour progression is accompanied by a decrease of the inhibitory effect of locally produced activin by either a decrease in the expression of activin βB-subunit mRNA or by a decrease of ActRIB mRNA levels. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10638976

  10. Regulation of development of rat stem and progenitor Leydig cells by activin.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Wang, Y; Li, X; Liu, S; Wang, G; Lin, H; Zhu, Q; Guo, J; Chen, H; Ge, H-S; Ge, R-S

    2017-01-01

    Stem Leydig cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into adult Leydig cells via intermediate stages of progenitor and immature Leydig cells. However, the exact regulatory mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that the development of stem or progenitor Leydig cells depends upon locally produced growth factors. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression levels of activin type I receptor (Acvr1) and activin A receptor type II-like 1 (Acvrl1) were stem > progenitor = immature = adult Leydig cells. This indicates that their ligand activin might play an important role in stem and progenitor Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation. When seminiferous tubules were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 3 days, it concentration-dependently increased EdU incorporation into stem Leydig cells by up to 20-fold. When progenitor Leydig cells were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 2 days, it concentration-dependently increased (3) H-thymidine incorporation into progenitor Leydig cells by up to 200%. Real-time PCR analysis showed that activin A primarily increased Pcna expression but reduced Star, Hsd3b1, and Cyp17a1 expression levels. Activin A also significantly inhibited the basal and luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production. In conclusion, activin A primarily stimulates the proliferation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells, but inhibits the differentiation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells into the Leydig cell lineage in rat testis.

  11. Activins and inhibins: Novel regulators of thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Licona-Limon, Paula; Aleman-Muench, German; Macias-Silva, Marina; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Soldevila, Gloria

    2009-04-03

    Activins and inhibins are members of the transforming growth factor-{beta} superfamily that act on different cell types and regulate a broad range of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we provide the first evidence that activins and inhibins regulate specific checkpoints during thymocyte development. We demonstrate that both activin A and inhibin A promote the DN3-DN4 transition in vitro, although they differentially control the transition to the DP stage. Whereas activin A induces the accumulation of a CD8{sup +}CD24{sup hi}TCR{beta}{sup lo} intermediate subpopulation, inhibin A promotes the differentiation of DN4 to DP. In addition, both activin A and inhibin A appear to promote CD8{sup +}SP differentiation. Moreover, inhibin {alpha} null mice have delayed in vitro T cell development, showing both a decrease in the DN-DP transition and reduced thymocyte numbers, further supporting a role for inhibins in the control of developmental signals taking place during T cell differentiation in vivo.

  12. Involvement of activin signaling in abnormalities of mouse vagina exposed neonatally to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2011-06-01

    Perinatal exposure to a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), causes cervicovaginal adenosis and permanent hyperplastic cornified vaginal epithelium with keratinization in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of the induction of vaginal abnormalities by DES, we have focused on activin A signaling. We have found that the βA-subunit mRNA is mainly expressed in the neonatal vaginal stroma, whereas activin A receptor type IB is localized in the neonatal vaginal epithelium. SMAD2, the intracellular signaling protein, is phosphorylated in the neonatal vagina. Cell proliferation in the vaginal epithelium grown in vitro is reduced by DES treatment or by activin signaling suppression through inhibin treatment. Thus, activin A (a homodimer of the βA-subunit) in the stroma stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in the neonatal vagina. DES treatment decreases the expression of the βA-subunit and activin receptor IIB but increases the expression of the βB-subunit and inhibin receptor. Neonatal DES treatment inhibits the phosphorylation of SMAD2 in the vaginal epithelium, indicating the inhibition of activin A signaling in the vaginal epithelium by neonatal DES treatment. Treatment with DES or inhibin, a native antagonist of activin, induces adenosis-like structures and keratinization in the vagina grown in vitro. These data suggest that the suppression of activin A signaling by DES is involved in the induction of cervicovaginal adenosis and keratinization in the neonatal mouse vaginal epithelium.

  13. Activin in the Brain Modulates Anxiety-Related Behavior and Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ageta, Hiroshi; Murayama, Akiko; Migishima, Rika; Kida, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is an endocrine hormone that regulates differentiation and proliferation of a wide variety of cells. In the brain, activin protects neurons from ischemic damage. In this study, we demonstrate that activin modulates anxiety-related behavior by analyzing ACM4 and FSM transgenic mice in which activin and follistatin (which antagonizes the activin signal), respectively, were overexpressed in a forebrain-specific manner under the control of the αCaMKII promoter. Behavioral analyses revealed that FSM mice exhibited enhanced anxiety compared to wild-type littermates, while ACM4 mice showed reduced anxiety. Importantly, survival of newly formed neurons in the subgranular zone of adult hippocampus was significantly decreased in FSM mice, which was partially rescued in ACM4/FSM double transgenic mice. Our findings demonstrate that the level of activin in the adult brain bi-directionally influences anxiety-related behavior. These results further suggest that decreases in postnatal neurogenesis caused by activin inhibition affect an anxiety-related behavior in adulthood. Activin and its signaling pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for anxiety disorder as well as ischemic brain injury. PMID:18382659

  14. Activin A Stimulates Aromatase via the ALK4-Smad Pathway in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Juan; Qu, Juan; Lu, Pinhong; Mao, Yundong; Qi, Xiaochen; Ji, Hui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease. We previously found that the expression of Activin A was upregulated in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis. The results of the present study indicated that Activin A induced estradiol secretion and P450arom expression in endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) derived from endometriosis patients. The mechanism of estrogenic synthesis was regulated by the Activin-Smad pathway in endometrial lesions. The data showed that the effect of Activin A on ESCs was partially abrogated by pretreatment with an inhibitor of ALK4 (the type I receptor, ActRIB) and Smad4-siRNA. Cumulatively, these data suggest that Activin A promotes the secretion of estradiol from ESCs by increasing the expression of P450arom via the ALK4-Smad pathway. These findings indicate the ALK4-Smad pathway may promote ectopic lesion survival and development. PMID:27833918

  15. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  16. Regulation of FSHβ induction in LβT2 cells by BMP2 and an Activin A/BMP2 chimera, AB215.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Woo; Ahn, Chihoon; Shim, Sun Young; Gray, Peter C; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-10-01

    Activins and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) share activin type 2 signaling receptors but utilize different type 1 receptors and Smads. We designed AB215, a potent BMP2-like Activin A/BMP2 chimera incorporating the high-affinity type 2 receptor-binding epitope of Activin A. In this study, we compare the signaling properties of AB215 and BMP2 in HEK293T cells and gonadotroph LβT2 cells in which Activin A and BMP2 synergistically induce FSHβ. In HEK293T cells, AB215 is more potent than BMP2 and competitively blocks Activin A signaling, while BMP2 has a partial blocking activity. Activin A signaling is insensitive to BMP pathway antagonism in HEK293T cells but is strongly inhibited by constitutively active (CA) BMP type 1 receptors. By contrast, the potencies of AB215 and BMP2 are indistinguishable in LβT2 cells and although AB215 blocks Activin A signaling, BMP2 has no inhibitory effect. Unlike HEK293T, Activin A signaling is strongly inhibited by BMP pathway antagonism in LβT2 cells but is largely unaffected by CA BMP type 1 receptors. BMP2 increases phospho-Smad3 levels in LβT2 cells, in both the absence and the presence of Activin A treatment, and augments Activin A-induced FSHβ. AB215 has the opposite effect and sharply decreases basal phospho-Smad3 levels and blocks Smad2 phosphorylation and FSHβ induction resulting from Activin A treatment. These findings together demonstrate that while AB215 activates the BMP pathway, it has opposing effects to those of BMP2 on FSHβ induction in LβT2 cells apparently due to its ability to block Activin A signaling.

  17. Activin A induces skeletal muscle catabolism via p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Zhang, Guohua; Sin, Ka Wai Thomas; Liu, Zhelong; Lin, Ren‐Kuo; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Activation of type IIB activin receptor (ActRIIB) in skeletal muscle leads to muscle atrophy because of increased muscle protein degradation. However, the intracellular signalling mechanism that mediates ActRIIB‐activated muscle catabolism is poorly defined. Methods We investigated the role of p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinases (MAPK) in mediating ActRIIB ligand activin A‐activated muscle catabolic pathways in C2C12 myotubes and in mice with perturbation of this kinase pharmacologically and genetically. Results Treatment of C2C12 myotubes with activin A or myostatin rapidly activated p38 MAPK and its effector C/EBPβ within 1 h. Paradoxically, Akt was activated at the same time through a p38 MAPK‐independent mechanism. These events were followed by up‐regulation of ubiquitin ligases atrogin1 (MAFbx) and UBR2 (E3α‐II), as well as increase in LC3‐II, a marker of autophagosome formation, leading to myofibrillar protein loss and myotube atrophy. The catabolic effects of activin A were abolished by p38α/β MAPK inhibitor SB202190. Using small interfering RNA‐mediated gene knockdown, we found that the catabolic activity of activin A was dependent on p38β MAPK specifically. Importantly, systemic administration of activin A to mice similarly activated the catabolic pathways in vivo, and this effect was blocked by SB202190. Further, activin A failed to activate the catabolic pathways in mice with muscle‐specific knockout of p38β MAPK. Interestingly, activin A up‐regulated MuRF1 in a p38 MAPK‐independent manner, and MuRF1 did not appear responsible for activin A‐induced myosin heavy chain loss and muscle atrophy. Conclusions ActRIIB‐mediated activation of muscle catabolism is dependent on p38β MAPK‐activated signalling. PMID:27897407

  18. Activin A programs human TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Wu, Jennifer; Arumemi, Fortuna; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Dahlberg, Carol; Miller, Andrew T.; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular helper T (TFH) cells are CD4+ T cells specialized in helping B cells and are associated both with protective antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. The promise of targeting TFH cells therapeutically has been limited by fragmentary understanding of extrinsic signals regulating human TFH cell differentiation. A screen of a human protein library identified activin A as new regulator of TFH cell differentiation. Activin A orchestrated expression of multiple TFH-associated genes, independently or in concert with additional signals. TFH programming by activin A was antagonized by the cytokine IL-2. Activin A’s capacity to drive TFH cell differentiation in vitro was conserved for non-human primates but not mice. Finally, activin A-induced TFH programming was dependent on SMAD2 and SMAD3 signaling and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:27376469

  19. Overexpression of activin-A and -B in malignant mesothelioma – Attenuated Smad3 signaling responses and ERK activation promote cell migration and invasive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminen, Jenni A.; Yin, Miao; Rönty, Mikko; Sutinen, Eva; Pasternack, Arja; Ritvos, Olli; Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Koli, Katri

    2015-03-01

    Activin-A and activin-B, members of the TGF-β superfamily, are regulators of reproductive functions, inflammation and wound healing. These dimeric molecules regulate various cellular activities such as proliferation, migration and suvival. Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos exposure related tumor affecting mainly pleura and it usually has a dismal prognosis. Here, we demonstrate that both activin-A and -B are abundantly expressed in mesothelioma tumor tissue as well as in cultured primary and established mesothelioma cells. Migratory and invasive mesothelioma cells were also found to have attenuated activation of the Smad2/3 pathway in response to activins. Migration and invasive growth of the cells in three-dimentional matrix was prevented by inhibition of activin activity using a soluble activin receptor 2B (sActR2B-Fc). This was associated with decreased ERK activity. Furthermore, migration and invasive growth was significantly inhibited by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Mesothelioma tumors are locally invasive and our results clearly suggest that acivins have a tumor-promoting function in mesothelioma through increasing expression and switching from canonical Smad3 pathway to non-canonical ERK pathway signaling. Blocking activin activity offers a new therapeutic approach for inhibition of mesothelioma invasive growth. - Highlights: • Activin-A and activin-B are highly expressed in mesothelioma. • Mesothelioma cell migration and invasive growth can be blocked with sActR2B. • Activin induced Smad3 activity is attenuated in invasive mesothelioma cells. • Activins induce ERK activity in mesothelioma cells.

  20. Activin A, B and AB decrease progesterone production by down-regulating StAR in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Shi, Feng-Tao; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-09-05

    Activins are homo- or heterodimers of inhibin β subunits that play important roles in the reproductive system. Our previous work has shown that activins A (βAβA), B (βBβB) and AB (βAβB) induce aromatase/estradiol, but suppress StAR/progesterone production in human granulosa-lutein cells. However, the underlying molecular determinants of these effects have not been examined. In this continuing study, we used immortalized human granulosa cells (SVOG) to investigate the effects of activins in regulating StAR/progesterone and the potential mechanisms of action. In SVOG cells, activins A, B and AB produced comparable down-regulation of StAR expression and progesterone production. In addition, all three activin isoforms induced equivalent phosphorylation of both SMAD2 and SMAD3. Importantly, the activin-induced down-regulation of StAR, increase in SMAD2/3 phosphorylation, and decrease in progesterone were abolished by the TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542. Interestingly, the small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ALK4 but not ALK5 reversed the activin-induced suppression of StAR. Furthermore, the knockdown of SMAD4 or SMAD2 but not SMAD3 abolished the inhibitory effects of all three activin isoforms on StAR expression. These results provide evidence that activins A, B and AB down-regulate StAR expression and decrease progesterone production in human granulosa cells, likely via an ALK4-mediated SMAD2/SMAD4-dependent pathway. Our findings provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory effects of activins on human granulosa cell steroidogenesis.

  1. Two distinct transmembrane serine/threonine kinases from Drosophila melanogaster form an activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Wrana, J L; Tran, H; Attisano, L; Arora, K; Childs, S R; Massagué, J; O'Connor, M B

    1994-01-01

    A transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase, Atr-I, that is structurally related to receptors for members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family has been cloned from Drosophila melanogaster. The spacing of extracellular cysteines and the cytoplasmic domain of Atr-I resemble most closely those of the recently described mammalian type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. When expressed alone in test cells, Atr-I is unable to bind TGF-beta, activin, or bone morphogenetic protein 2. However, Atr-I binds activin efficiently when coexpressed with the distantly related Drosophila activin receptor Atr-II, with which it forms a heteromeric complex. Atr-I can also bind activin in concert with mammalian activin type II receptors. Two alternative forms of Atr-I have been identified that differ in an ectodomain region encompassing the cysteine box motif characteristic of receptors in this family. Comparison of Atr-I with other type I receptors reveals the presence of a characteristic 30-amino-acid domain immediately upstream of the kinase region in all these receptors. This domain, of unknown function, contains a repeated Gly-Ser sequence and is therefore referred to as the GS domain. Maternal Atr-I transcripts are abundant in the oocyte and widespread during embryo development and in the imaginal discs of the larva. The structural properties, binding specificity, and dependence on type II receptors define Atr-I as an activin type I receptor from D. melanogaster. These results indicate that the heteromeric kinase structure is a general feature of this receptor family. Images PMID:8289834

  2. Activin B promotes endometrial cancer cell migration by down-regulating E-cadherin via SMAD-independent MEK-ERK1/2-SNAIL signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2016-01-01

    High-risk type II endometrial cancers account for ~30% of cases but ~75% of deaths due, in part, to their tendency to metastasize. Histopathological studies of type II endometrial cancers (non-endometrioid, mostly serous) suggest overproduction of activin B and down-regulation of E-cadherin, both of which are associated with reduced survival. Our previous studies have shown that activin B increases the migration of type II endometrial cancer cell lines. However, little is known about the relationship between activin B signaling and E-cadherin in endometrial cancer. We now demonstrate that activin B treatment significantly decreases E-cadherin expression in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner in KLE and HEC-50 cell lines. Interestingly, these effects were not inhibited by knockdown of SMAD2, SMAD3 or SMAD4. Rather, the suppressive effects of activin B on E-cadherin were mediated by MEK-ERK1/2-induced production of the transcription factor SNAIL. Importantly, activin B-induced cell migration was inhibited by forced-expression of E-cadherin or pre-treatment with the activin/TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 or the MEK inhibitor U0126. We have identified a novel SMAD-independent pathway linking enhanced activin B signaling to reduced E-cadherin expression and increased migration in type II endometrial cancer. PMID:27223076

  3. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H.; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S.; Burnham, Mandy E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this TGF-β superfamily member. TNFα (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil activating common β (βc) chain-signaling cytokines (IL-5, IL-3, GM-CSF). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a βc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme MMP-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared to circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for post-transcriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that, an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil–derived activin A, which plays an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  4. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N

    2015-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a "murinized" ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis.

  5. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in Hepcidin transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Jacqueline M.; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E.; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N.

    2014-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a “murinized” ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis. PMID:25236856

  6. Identification of a Drosophila activin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, S R; Wrana, J L; Arora, K; Attisano, L; O'Connor, M B; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    Activins are cytokines of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily that control various events during vertebrate embryo development and cell differentiation in the adult, and act through transmembrane receptors that contain a cytoplasmic protein-serine/threonine kinase domain. We describe the identification, deduced primary structure, and expression pattern of Atr-II, a receptor serine/threonine kinase found in Drosophila. With the exception of the spacing of 10 cysteine residues, the extracellular domain of Atr-II is very dissimilar from those of vertebrate activin receptors, yet it binds activin with high affinity and specificity. The kinase domain sequence of Atr-II is 60% identical to those of activin receptors from vertebrates, suggesting similarities in their signaling mechanisms. Maternal Atr-II transcript and its product are abundant in the oocyte. During development, the highest levels of Atr-II transcript and protein are observed in the mesoderm and gut. The possible role of an activin signaling system in Drosophila development is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415726

  7. Regulation of hepcidin expression by inflammation-induced activin B

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Yohei; Sugiyama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Osamu; Murakami, Masaru; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Activin B is induced in response to inflammation in the liver and enhances hepcidin expression, but the source of activin B and the molecular mechanism underlying hepcidin induction are not clear yet. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation induced inhibin βB but not inhibin α or inhibin βA expression in the liver, implicating activin B induction. Immunoreactive inhibin βB was detected in endothelial cells and Kupffer cells in LPS-treated liver. Activin B, but not activin A or activin AB, directly increased hepcidin expression. Activin B induced phosphorylation and activation of Smad1/5/8, the BMP-regulated (BR)-Smads. The stimulation of hepcidin transcription by activin B was mediated by ALK2 and ActRIIA, receptors for the TGF-β family. Unexpectedly, activin B-induced hepcidin expression and BR-Smad phosphorylation were resistant to the effects of LDN-193189, an ALK2/3/6 inhibitor. ALK2 and ActRIIA complex formation in response to activin B may prevent the approach of LDN-193189 to ALK2 to inhibit its activity. Activin B also induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, the TGF-β/activin-regulated (AR)-Smad, and increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, a gene related to liver fibrogenesis, through ALK4 and ActRIIA/B. Activin B-induced activation of the BR-Smad pathway was also detected in non-liver-derived cells. The present study reveals the broad signaling of activin B, which is induced in non-parenchymal cells in response to hepatic inflammation, in hepatocytes. PMID:27922109

  8. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin β3 via SMAD2/3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-10-13

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin βB subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin B (βB dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin β3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin β3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin β3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers.

  9. Activin Potentiates Proliferation in Mature Avian Auditory Sensory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Ty, Sidya; Campbell, Sean; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and other mammals are highly susceptible to permanent hearing and balance deficits due to an inability to regenerate sensory hair cells lost to inner ear trauma. In contrast, nonmammalian vertebrates, such as birds, robustly regenerate replacement hair cells and restore hearing and balance functions to near-normal levels. There is considerable interest in understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for this difference in regenerative capacity. Here we report on involvement of the TGFβ superfamily type II activin receptors, Acvr2a and Acvr2b, in regulating proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium. Cultured, posthatch avian auditory sensory epithelium treated with Acvr2a and Acvr2b inhibitors shows decreased proliferation of support cells, the cell type that gives rise to new hair cells. Conversely, addition of activin A, an Acvr2a/b ligand, potentiates support cell proliferation. Neither treatment (inhibitor or ligand) affected hair cell survival, suggesting a specific effect of Acvr2a/b signaling on support cell mitogenicity. Using immunocytochemistry, Acvr2a, Acvr2b, and downstream Smad effector proteins were differentially localized in avian and mammalian auditory sensory epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that signaling through Acvr2a/b promotes support cell proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium and that this signaling pathway may be incomplete, or actively blocked, in the adult mammalian ear. PMID:20071511

  10. Activin B Regulates Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Skin Wound Healing via Activation of the MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Pengcheng; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Min; Yan, Yuan; Chen, Yinghua; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2017-04-07

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including skin cells, and they can provide an abundant source of cells for skin tissue engineering and skin wound healing. The purpose of this study is to explore the therapeutic effects of activin B in combination with ADSCs and the possible signaling mechanism. In this study, we found that activin B was able to promote ADSC migration by inducing actin stress fiber formation in vitro. In vivo, activin B in combination with ADSCs was capable of enhancing α-SMA expression and wound closure. This combined treatment also promoted fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and accelerated re-epithelialization and collagen deposition. Moreover, activin B in combination with ADSCs boosted angiogenesis in the wound area. Further study of the mechanism revealed that activation of JNK and ERK signaling, but not p38 signaling, were required for activin B-induced ADSC actin stress fiber formation and cell migration. These results showed that activin B was able to activate JNK and ERK signaling pathways to induce actin stress fiber formation and ADSC migration to promote wound healing. These results suggest that combined treatment with activin B and ADSCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for the management of serious skin wounds.

  11. Role of Activin-A and Myostatin and Their Signaling Pathway in Human Myometrial and Leiomyoma Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Soriful; Catherino, William H.; Protic, Olga; Janjusevic, Milijana; Gray, Peter Clarke; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Ciavattini, Andrea; Lamanna, Pasquale; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi; Petraglia, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Context: Uterine leiomyomas are highly prevalent benign tumors of premenopausal women and the most common indication for hysterectomy. However, the exact etiology of this tumor is not fully understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of activin-A and myostatin and their signaling pathways in human myometrial and leiomyoma cells. Design: This was a laboratory study. Setting: Myometrial and leiomyoma cells (primary and cell lines) were cultured in vitro. Patients: The study included premenopausal women who were admitted to the hospital for myomectomy or hysterectomy. Interventions: Primary myometrial and leiomyoma cells and/or cell lines were treated with activin-A (4 nM) and myostatin (4 nM) for different days of interval (to measure proliferation rate) or 30 minutes (to measure signaling molecules) or 48 hours to measure proliferating markers, extracellular matrix mRNA, and/or protein expression by real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunocytochemistry. Results: We found that activin-A and myostatin significantly reduce cell proliferation in primary myometrial cells but not in leiomyoma cells as measured by a CyQUANT cell proliferation assay kit. Reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 were also observed in myometrial cells in response to activin-A and myostatin treatment. Activin-A also significantly increased mRNA expression of fibronectin, collagen1A1, and versican in primary leiomyoma cells. Finally, we found that activin-A and myostatin activate Smad-2/3 signaling but do not affect ERK or p38 signaling in both myometrial and leiomyoma cells. Conclusions: This study results suggest that activin-A and myostatin can exert antiproliferative and/or fibrotic effects on these cell types via Smad-2/3 signaling. PMID:24606069

  12. Activin and TGF-β effects on brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Griselda; Velasco, Iván

    2012-11-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family members are ubiquitously expressed, participating in the regulation of many processes in different cell types both in embryonic and adult stages. Several members of this family, including Activins, TGF-β1-3 and Nodal, have been implicated in the development and maintenance of various organs, in which stem cells play important roles. Although TGF-β was initially considered an injury-related cytokine, it became clear that not only TGF-β, but other members of this family, play critical roles in morphogenesis and cell lineage specification. During brain development, Activin and TGF-βs as well as their cognate receptors, are expressed in different patterns. The roles of Activin and TGF-β during CNS development are sometimes contradictory, because these proteins present different actions depending on the cell type and the context. The aim of this review is to summarize current information on the actions of TGF-β members during developing brain, and also on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPC). We focus on the TGF-β subgroup, specifically on the effects of TGF-β1 and Activin A. In the first section we describe the main characteristics of the ligands, its receptors as well as the proteins and mechanisms involved in signaling. Next, we discuss the main advances concerning TGF-β1 and Activin actions during brain development and their roles in NSPC fate decision and neuroprotection both in vitro and in vivo. The emerging picture from these studies suggests that these growth factors can be used to manipulate neurogenesis and might help to achieve restoration after brain deterioration.

  13. Testicular activin and follistatin levels are elevated during the course of experimental autoimmune epididymo–orchitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Nour; Michel, Vera; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Wahle, Eva; Hayward, Susan; Ludlow, Helen; de Kretser, David M.; Loveland, Kate L.; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Meinhardt, Andreas; Hedger, Mark P.; Fijak, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune epididymo-orchitis (EAEO) is a model of chronic inflammation, induced by immunisation with testicular antigens, which reproduces the pathology of some types of human infertility. Activins A and B regulate spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis, but are also pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrotic cytokines. Expression of the activins and their endogenous antagonists, inhibin and follistatin, was examined in murine EAEO. Adult untreated and adjuvant-treated control mice showed no pathology. All mice immunised with testis antigens developed EAEO by 50 days, characterised by loss of germ cells, immune cell infiltration and fibrosis in the testis, similar to biopsies from human inflamed testis. An increase of total CD45+ leukocytes, comprising CD3+ T cells, CD4 + CD8− and CD4 + CD25+ T cells, and a novel population of CD4 + CD8+ double positive T cells was also detected in EAEO testes. This was accompanied by increased expression of TNF, MCP-1 and IL-10. Activin A and B and follistatin protein levels were elevated in EAEO testes, with peak activin expression during the active phase of the disease, whereas mRNA expression of the inhibin B subunits (Inha and Inhbb) and activin receptor subunits (Acvr1b and Acvr2b) were downregulated. These data suggest that activin–follistatin regulation may play a role during the development of EAEO. PMID:28205525

  14. Seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunits in the wild male ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt).

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Wei; Song, Moshi; Zhang, Mengyuan; Li, Ben; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and the immunolocalization of the inhibin alpha and inhibin/activin (betaA and betaB) subunits during the breeding and non-breeding seasons in the wild male ground squirrel. The testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter were measured, and histological observations of testes were performed. The sections of the testes were immunostained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method (ABC) using polyclonal antisera raised against porcine inhibin alpha, inhibin/activin betaA and inhibin/activin betaB during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. There were marked variations in testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter between the breeding and non-breeding seasons, and all types of spermatogenic cells, including spermatozoa, were found in the breeding season. In addition, immunoreactivity was also detected for the inhibin alpha, betaA and betaB subunits in Sertoli and Leydig cells during the breeding season, but immunostaining was only present for the inhibin alpha and inhibin/activin betaB subunits in Sertoli cells during the non-breeding season. These results suggest that seasonal changes in testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter of wild ground squirrels are correlated with changes in spermatogenesis, and the cellular localization of the inhibin/activin subunits showed season related changes in the breeding and non-breeding seasons.

  15. Serum activin B concentration as predictive biomarker for ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Pooja; Senthilkumar, G P; Rajendiran, Soundravally; Sivaraman, K; Soundararaghavan, S; Kulandhasamy, Maheshwari

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of activin B in discriminating tubal ectopic pregnancy (tEP) from intrauterine miscarriages (IUM), and normal viable intrauterine pregnancy (IUP). We included 28 women with tEP, 31 women with IUM, and 29 normal IUP, confirmed both by clinical examination and ultrasonography. Serum activin B concentration was measured at the time of admission using the ELISA kit. The median serum activin B concentration was found to be significantly decreased in both tEP (p=0.004) and IUM (p=0.022) compared to normal IUP. When compared between tEP and IUM, activin B concentrations did not differ significantly. ROC analysis of activin B and free β-hCG demonstrated AUC of 0.722 and 0.805, respectively to discriminate tEP from viable IUP. The model including both activin B and free β-hCG improved the discriminating potential with greater AUC (0.824), and specificity (93%) than individual one. To discriminate tEP from IUM, activin B, free β-hCG and combination of both performed poorly. We conclude that serum activin B concentration is lower in tubal ectopic pregnancy, and can discriminate it from normal pregnancy with moderate accuracy. It also shows improved diagnostic potential along with free β-hCG, but cannot distinguish tEP from IUM reliably.

  16. The role of activin in mammary gland development and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Karen A; Schneyer, Alan L; Hagen, Mary J; Jerry, D Joseph

    2011-06-01

    TGFβ contributes to mammary gland development and has paradoxical roles in breast cancer because it has both tumor suppressor and tumor promoter activity. Another member of the TGFβ superfamily, activin, also has roles in the developing mammary gland, but these functions, and the role of activin in breast cancer, are not well characterized. TGFβ and activin share the same intracellular signaling pathways, but divergence in their signaling pathways are suggested. The purpose of this review is to compare the spatial and temporal expression of TGFβ and activin during mammary gland development, with consideration given to their functions during each developmental period. We also review the contributions of TGFβ and activin to breast cancer resistance and susceptibility. Finally, we consider the systemic contributions of activin in regulating obesity and diabetes; and the impact this regulation has on breast cancer. Elevated levels of activin in serum during pregnancy and its influence on pregnancy associated breast cancer are also considered. We conclude that evidence demonstrates that activin has tumor suppressing potential, without definitive indication of tumor promoting activity in the mammary gland, making it a good target for development of therapeutics.

  17. Activin Signaling in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Neuropsychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Link, Andrea S.; Zheng, Fang; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Activins are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family and serve as multifunctional regulatory proteins in many tissues and organs. In the brain, activin A, which is formed by two disulfide-linked βA subunits, is recognized as the predominant player in activin signaling. Over the last years, considerable progress has been made in elucidating novel and unexpected functions of activin in the normal and diseased brain and in deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms. Initially identified as a neurotrophic and protective factor during development and in several forms of acute injury, the scope of effects of activin A in the adult central nervous system (CNS) has been considerably broadened by now. Here, we will highlight recent findings that bear significance for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of various neuropsychiatric diseases and might hold promise for novel therapeutic strategies. While the basal level of activin A in the adult brain is low, significant short-term up-regulation occurs in response to increased neuronal activity. In fact, brief exposure to an enriched environment (EE) is already sufficient to considerably strengthen activin signaling. Enhancement of this pathway tunes the performance of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in a fashion that impacts on cognitive functions and affective behavior, counteracts death-inducing signals through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), and stimulates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We will discuss how impaired activin signaling is involved in anxiety disorders, depression, drug dependence, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and how reinforcement of activin signaling might be exploited for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27242425

  18. Structures of an ActRIIB:activin A complex reveal a novel binding mode for TGF-beta ligand:receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.B.; Woodruff, T.K.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-08

    The TGF-{beta} superfamily of ligands and receptors stimulate cellular events in diverse processes ranging from cell fate specification in development to immune suppression. Activins define a major subgroup of TGF-{beta} ligands that regulate cellular differentiation, proliferation, activation and apoptosis. Activins signal through complexes formed with type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. We have solved the crystal structure of activin A bound to the extracellular domain of a type II receptor, ActRIIB, revealing the details of this interaction. ActRIIB binds to the outer edges of the activin finger regions, with the two receptors juxtaposed in close proximity, in a mode that differs from TGF-{beta}3 binding to type II receptors. The dimeric activin A structure differs from other known TGF-{beta} ligand structures, adopting a compact folded-back conformation. The crystal structure of the complex is consistent with recruitment of two type I receptors into a close packed arrangement at the cell surface and suggests that diversity in the conformational arrangements of TGF-{beta} ligand dimers could influence cellular signaling processes.

  19. Structures of an ActRIIB:activin A complex reveal a novel binding mode for TGF-β ligand:receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Thomas B.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2003-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily of ligands and receptors stimulate cellular events in diverse processes ranging from cell fate specification in development to immune suppression. Activins define a major subgroup of TGF-β ligands that regulate cellular differentiation, proliferation, activation and apoptosis. Activins signal through complexes formed with type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. We have solved the crystal structure of activin A bound to the extracellular domain of a type II receptor, ActRIIB, revealing the details of this interaction. ActRIIB binds to the outer edges of the activin finger regions, with the two receptors juxtaposed in close proximity, in a mode that differs from TGF-β3 binding to type II receptors. The dimeric activin A structure differs from other known TGF-β ligand structures, adopting a compact folded-back conformation. The crystal structure of the complex is consistent with recruitment of two type I receptors into a close packed arrangement at the cell surface and suggests that diversity in the conformational arrangements of TGF-β ligand dimers could influence cellular signaling processes. PMID:12660162

  20. An activin A/BMP2 chimera, AB204, displays bone-healing properties superior to those of BMP2.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Esquivies, Luis; Ahn, Chihoon; Gray, Peter C; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2) has been used clinically to treat bone fractures in human patients. However, the high doses of rhBMP2 required for a therapeutic response can cause undesirable side effects. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Activin A/BMP2 (AB2) chimera, AB204, promotes osteogenesis and bone healing much more potently and effectively than rhBMP2. Remarkably, 1 month of AB204 treatment completely heals tibial and calvarial defects of critical size in mice at a concentration 10-fold lower than a dose of rhBMP2 that only partially heals the defect. We determine the structure of AB204 to 2.3 Å that reveals a distinct BMP2-like fold in which the Activin A sequence segments confer insensitivity to the BMP2 antagonist Noggin and an affinity for the Activin/BMP type II receptor ActRII that is 100-fold greater than that of BMP2. The structure also led to our identification of a single Activin A-derived amino acid residue, which, when mutated to the corresponding BMP2 residue, resulted in a significant increase in the affinity of AB204 for its type I receptor BMPRIa and a further enhancement in AB204's osteogenic potency. Together, these findings demonstrate that rationally designed AB2 chimeras can provide BMP2 substitutes with enhanced potency for treating non-union bone fractures.

  1. An Activin A/BMP2 chimera displays bone healing properties superior to those of BMP2

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Esquivies, Luis; Ahn, Chihoon; Gray, Peter C.; Ye, Sang-kyu; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (rhBMP2) has been used clinically to treat bone fractures in human patients. However, the high doses of rhBMP2 required for a therapeutic response can cause undesirable side effects. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Activin A/BMP2 (AB2) chimera, AB204, promotes osteogenesis and bone healing much more potently and effectively than rhBMP2. Remarkably, 1 month of AB204 treatment completely heals tibial and calvarial defects of critical size in mice at a concentration 10-fold lower than a dose of rhBMP2 that only partially heals the defect. We determine the structure of AB204 to 2.3 Å that reveals a distinct BMP2-like fold in which the Activin A sequence segments confer insensitivity to the BMP2 antagonist Noggin and an affinity for the Activin/BMP type II receptor ActRII that is 100-fold greater than that of BMP2. The structure also led to our identification of a single Activin A-derived amino acid residue which when mutated to the corresponding BMP2 residue resulted in a significant increase in the affinity of AB204 for its type I receptor BMPRIa and a further enhancement in AB204's osteogenic potency. Together, these findings demonstrate that rationally designed AB2 chimeras can provide BMP2 substitutes with enhanced potency for treating non-union bone fractures. PMID:24692083

  2. Activin receptor-like kinases: a diverse family playing an important role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loomans, Holli A; Andl, Claudia D

    2016-01-01

    The role and function of the members of the TGFβ superfamily has been a substantial area of research focus for the last several decades. During that time, it has become apparent that aberrations in TGFβ family signaling, whether through the BMP, Activin, or TGFβ arms of the pathway, can result in tumorigenesis or contribute to its progression. Downstream signaling regulates cellular growth under normal physiological conditions yet induces diverse processes during carcinogenesis, ranging from epithelial- to-mesenchymal transition to cell migration and invasion to angiogenesis. Due to these observations, the question has been raised how to utilize and target components of these signaling pathways in cancer therapy. Given that these cascades include both ligands and receptors, there are multiple levels at which to interfere. Activin receptor-like kinases (ALKs) are a group of seven type I receptors responsible for TGFβ family signal transduction and are utilized by many ligands within the superfamily. The challenge lies in specifically targeting the often-overlapping functional effects of BMP, Activin, or TGFβ signaling during cancer progression. This review focuses on the characteristic function of the individual receptors within each subfamily and their recognized roles in cancer. We next explore the clinical utility of therapeutically targeting ALKs as some have shown partial responses in Phase I clinical trials but disappointing outcomes when used in Phase II studies. Finally, we discuss the challenges and future directions of this body of work. PMID:27904762

  3. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-03-11

    The 2.07 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron-sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial {beta}-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the human homolog is likely to be modeled well by the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin structure.

  4. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips Jr, George N.

    2008-09-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske ferredoxin from M. musculus was solved at 2.07 Å resolution, revealing an iron–sulfur cluster-binding domain with similar architecture to the Rieske-type domains of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases. The ferredoxin was also shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases. The 2.07 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron–sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial β-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the

  5. Activin Enhances α- to β-Cell Transdifferentiation as a Source For β-Cells In Male FSTL3 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa L; Andrzejewski, Danielle; Burnside, Amy; Schneyer, Alan L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes results from inadequate β-cell number and/or function to control serum glucose concentrations so that replacement of lost β-cells could become a viable therapy for diabetes. In addition to embryonic stem cell sources for new β-cells, evidence for transdifferentiation/reprogramming of non-β-cells to functional β-cells is accumulating. In addition, de-differentiation of β-cells observed in diabetes and their subsequent conversion to α-cells raises the possibility that adult islet cell fate is malleable and controlled by local hormonal and/or environmental cues. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the activin antagonist, follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) resulted in β-cell expansion and improved glucose homeostasis in the absence of β-cell proliferation. We recently reported that activin directly suppressed expression of critical α-cell genes while increasing expression of β-cell genes, supporting the hypothesis that activin is one of the local hormones controlling islet cell fate and that increased activin signaling accelerates α- to β-cell transdifferentiation. We tested this hypothesis using Gluc-Cre/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) α-cell lineage tracing technology combined with FSTL3 knockout (KO) mice to label α-cells with YFP. Flow cytometry was used to quantify unlabeled and labeled α- and β-cells. We found that Ins+/YFP+ cells were significantly increased in FSTL3 KO mice compared with wild type littermates. Labeled Ins+/YFP+ cells increased significantly with age in FSTL3 KO mice but not wild type littermates. Sorting results were substantiated by counting fluorescently labeled cells in pancreatic sections. Activin treatment of isolated islets significantly increased the number of YFP+/Ins+ cells. These results suggest that α- to β-cell transdifferentiation is influenced by activin signaling and may contribute substantially to β-cell mass.

  6. Structure and activation of pro-activin A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelu; Fischer, Gerhard; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Activins are growth factors with multiple roles in the development and homeostasis. Like all TGF-β family of growth factors, activins are synthesized as large precursors from which mature dimeric growth factors are released proteolytically. Here we have studied the activation of activin A and determined crystal structures of the unprocessed precursor and of the cleaved pro-mature complex. Replacing the natural furin cleavage site with a HRV 3C protease site, we show how the protein gains its bioactivity after proteolysis and is as active as the isolated mature domain. The complex remains associated in conditions used for biochemical analysis with a dissociation constant of 5 nM, but the pro-domain can be actively displaced from the complex by follistatin. Our high-resolution structures of pro-activin A share features seen in the pro-TGF-β1 and pro-BMP-9 structures, but reveal a new oligomeric arrangement, with a domain-swapped, cross-armed conformation for the protomers in the dimeric protein. PMID:27373274

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 interacts with activin and GnRH to modulate gonadotrophin secretion in LbetaT2 gonadotrophs.

    PubMed

    Nicol, L; Faure, M-O; McNeilly, J R; Fontaine, J; Taragnat, C; McNeilly, A S

    2008-03-01

    We have shown previously that, in sheep primary pituitary cells, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP)-4 inhibits FSHbeta mRNA expression and FSH release. In contrast, in mouse LbetaT2 gonadotrophs, others have shown a stimulatory effect of BMPs on basal or activin-stimulated FSHbeta promoter-driven transcription. As a species comparison with our previous results, we used LbetaT2 cells to investigate the effects of BMP-4 on gonadotrophin mRNA and secretion modulated by activin and GnRH. BMP-4 alone had no effect on FSH production, but enhanced the activin+GnRH-induced stimulation of FSHbeta mRNA and FSH secretion, without any effect on follistatin mRNA. BMP-4 reduced LHbeta mRNA up-regulation in response to GnRH (+/-activin) and decreased GnRH receptor expression, which would favour FSH, rather than LH, synthesis and secretion. In contrast to sheep pituitary gonadotrophs, which express only BMP receptor types IA (BMPRIA) and II (BMPRII), LbetaT2 cells also express BMPRIB. Smad1/5 phosphorylation induced by BMP-4, indicating activation of BMP signalling, was the same whether BMP-4 was used alone or combined with activin+/-GnRH. We hypothesized that activin and/or GnRH pathways may be modulated by BMP-4, but neither the activin-stimulated phosphorylation of Smad2/3 nor the GnRH-induced ERK1/2 or cAMP response element-binding phosphorylation were modified. However, the GnRH-induced activation of p38 MAPK was decreased by BMP-4. This was associated with increased FSHbeta mRNA levels and FSH secretion, but decreased LHbeta mRNA levels. These results confirm 1. BMPs as important modulators of activin and/or GnRH-stimulated gonadotrophin synthesis and release and 2. important species differences in these effects, which could relate to differences in BMP receptor expression in gonadotrophs.

  8. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  9. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C. . E-mail: glorioso@pitt.edu

    2007-04-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection.

  10. Action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cheknev, S.B.; Saidov, M.Z.; Koval'chuk, L.V.; Pavlyuk, A.S.; Arion, V.Ya.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a study of the action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells (NKC) in vitro. The K-562 chronic human myeloid leukemia cells, cultured in vitro, used as targets were labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine. The experimental results indicate that T-activin can depress NKC activity but under certain conditions, it can also stimulate NKC. T-activin possesses immunoregulatory properties relative to NKC activity in vitro.

  11. [Effect of T-activin on enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Arion, V Ia; Khromenkov, Iu I; Tagirova, A K; Karaulov, A V; Breusov, Iu N

    1987-01-01

    Effect of T-activin on some xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and several immunity parametres in secondary immune deficiency (subacute and chronic benzene intoxication) were investigated. T-activin was shown to regulate the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme system. The compound decreased the enzymatic activity in subacute benzene intoxication, approaching their values up to the control level. In chronic benzene intoxications, which were accompanied by decrease in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity, except of glutathione-S-transferase, T-activin stimulated these enzymes. At the same time, T-activin increased some immunological parameters in these models. Thymus-tropic peptides appear to be the bioregulators of some in vivo systems.

  12. Activin A induces growth arrest through a SMAD- dependent pathway in hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Activin A, an important member of transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is reported to inhibit proliferation of mature hepatocyte. However, the effect of activin A on growth of hepatic progenitor cells is not fully understood. To that end, we attempted to evaluate the potential role of activin A in the regulation of hepatic progenitor cell proliferation. Results Using the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model, activin A expression decreased immediately after partial hepatectomy and then increased from the 9th to 15th day post surgery, which is associated with the attenuation of oval cell proliferation. Activin A inhibited oval cell line LE6 growth via activating the SMAD signaling pathway, which manifested as the phosphorylation of SMAD2/3, the inhibition of Rb phosphorylation, the suppression of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, and the promotion of p21WAF1/Cip1 and p15INK4B expression. Treatment with activin A antagonist follistatin or blocking SMAD signaling could diminish the anti-proliferative effect of activin A. By contrast, inhibition of the MAPK pathway did not contribute to this effect. Antagonizing activin A activity by follistatin administration enhanced oval cell proliferation in the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model. Conclusion Activin A, acting through the SMAD pathway, negatively regulates the proliferation of hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:24628936

  13. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (CD35) in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, J; Sadallah, S; Schifferli, J A; Villard, J; Nicod, L P

    1998-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) (CD35; C3b/C4b receptor) is a transmembrane protein of many haematopoietic cells. Once cleaved, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) exerts opposite effects as a powerful inhibitor of complement. This study addressed both the question of whether sCR1 was found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of normals and patients with various inflammatory disease, and its possible origin. In this retrospective study covering specimen and clinical data of 124 patients with acute and chronic inflammatory lung pathologies, BAL supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique for sCR1. Correlations were made between the sCR1 levels obtained and the constituents of BAL. Human alveolar macrophages were cultivated in order to determine their secretory capacity of sCR1. Alveolar macrophages from normal subjects were shown to release sCR1 in vitro. In addition, sCR1 was present in BAL of normal controls and was significantly increased in acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases such as interstitial lung fibrosis and sarcoidosis. In BAL of ARDS, bacterial, and P. carinii pneumonia, there was a good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil counts. In sarcoidosis, a correlation was found with BAL lymphocyte counts. Serum sCR1 was not increased in patients compared to controls. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is found in the bronchoalveolar lavage in health as well as in acute and chronic inflammatory disease. Alveolar macrophages are capable of releasing sCR1 in vitro and may be the main physiological source of sCR1 in the alveoli. The good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil or lymphocyte numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory diseases suggests a predominant role of leucocytes for the release of sCR1 in such conditions. The release of this

  14. Activin B: detection by an immunoenzymometric assay in human serum during ovarian stimulation and late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vihko, K K; Bläuer, M; Kujansuu, E; Vilska, S; Albäck, T; Tuimala, R; Tuohimaa, P; Punnonen, R

    1998-04-01

    A recently developed immunoenzymometric assay for activin B has been characterized further by measurement during ovarian stimulation and pregnancy. The assay is based on a monoclonal anti-peptide antibody, anti-betaB(101-115). In addition to quantitative analyses, the antibody has been used for immunohistochemical localization of the activin betaB-subunit in human term placenta. Serum samples obtained from patients suffering from tubal factor infertility who were admitted for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment protocols or from patients with proven fertility who were admitted for laparoscopic tubal ligation were collected. The aim was to correlate serum activin B concentrations with other parameters during IVF and with phases of the menstrual cycle. Serum samples obtained from healthy pregnant volunteers were studied to correlate activin B concentrations with clinical parameters. During the IVF treatment protocols, activin B was detectable in all patients studied, and a significant negative correlation was observed between serum activin B and oestradiol concentrations. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in activin B concentrations when serum samples obtained from patients at different phases of the menstrual cycle were compared, and low concentrations of activin B were observed in the samples obtained from these patients. During pregnancy, a positive correlation was observed between serum activin B concentrations and gestational age. In immunohistochemical analyses of human placental tissue obtained from healthy parturients, the activin betaB-subunit was present in trophoblast, amniotic epithelial and Hofbauer cells. The results suggest a potential clinical application in female reproductive medicine for serum activin B measurements.

  15. A reassessment of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Spinale, Joann M; Mariani, Laura H; Kapoor, Shiv; Zhang, Jidong; Weyant, Robert; Song, Peter X; Wong, Hetty N; Troost, Jonathan P; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Gipson, Debbie S; Kretzler, Matthias; Nihalani, Deepak; Holzman, Lawrence B

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) is a causative circulating factor for and a biomarker of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here we undertook validation of these assumptions in both mouse and human models. Injection of recombinant suPAR in wild-type mice did not induce proteinuria within 24 h. Moreover, a disease phenotype was not seen in an inducible transgenic mouse model that maintained elevated suPAR concentrations for 6 weeks. Plasma and urine suPAR concentrations were evaluated as clinical biomarkers in 241 patients with glomerular disease from the prospective, longitudinal multicenter observational NEPTUNE cohort. The serum suPAR concentration at baseline inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the urine suPAR/creatinine ratio positively correlated with the urine protein/creatinine ratio. After adjusting for eGFR and urine protein, neither the serum nor urine suPAR level was an independent predictor of FSGS histopathology. A multivariable mixed-effects model of longitudinal data evaluated the association between the change in serum suPAR concentration from baseline with eGFR. After adjusting for baseline suPAR concentration, age, gender, proteinuria, and time, the change in suPAR from baseline was associated with eGFR, but this association was not different for patients with FSGS as compared with other diagnoses. Thus these results do not support a pathological role for suPAR in FSGS.

  16. Soluble human complement receptor type 1 inhibits complement-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Swift, A J; Collins, T S; Bugelski, P; Winkelstein, J A

    1994-09-01

    Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is a powerful inhibitor of complement activation. Because of this ability, sCR1 may prove to be an important therapeutic agent that can be used to block the immunopathologic effects of uncontrolled complement activation in a variety of clinically significant disorders. Although several previous studies have examined the ability of sCR1 to inhibit complemented-mediated immunopathologic damage, there is no information on its ability to interfere with the host's defense against infection. In the current experiments sCR1 exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro. Not only di sCR1 inhibit complement-dependent opsonization of the pneumococcus but at higher concentrations it also inhibited the ingestion of bacteria which had been previously opsonized. Furthermore, when rats were injected with sCR1, it inhibited both their serum hemolytic activity and serum opsonic activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Finally, for rats treated with sCR1, the 50% lethal dose was S. pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data demonstrate that sCR1 significantly inhibits complement-mediated host against bacterial infection.

  17. Activin A in the Regulation of Corneal Neovascularization and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poulaki, Vassiliki; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Kruse, Friedrich E.; Radetzky, Sven; Iliaki, Eirini; Kirchhof, Bernd; Joussen, Antonia M.

    2004-01-01

    Activin A, a dimeric glycoprotein that belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, governs cellular differentiation in a wide variety of models and has been implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis. We examined the role of activin A and its downstream signaling pathway in a murine model of inflammatory corneal neovascularization induced by mechanical injury (debridement), and in vitro in corneal epithelial cells. Activin A expression increased steadily from day 2 until day 8 after mechanical debridement in vivo, paralleling vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Administration of recombinant activin A in mice increased the area of neovascularization, VEGF expression, and the kinase activities of p38 and p42/44 MAPKs after mechanical debridement. Systemic inhibition of activin A in vivo with a neutralizing antibody reduced the area of neovascularization, VEGF expression, and p38 and p42/44 MAPK activity, whereas administration of an isotype-matched control antibody had no effect. In vitro treatment with activin A increased VEGF secretion, as well as p38 and p42/44 MAPK activity in corneal epithelial cells, whereas concurrent administration of specific inhibitors of p38 or p42/44 MAPK abolished the stimulatory effect of activin A on VEGF production. We conclude that activin A stimulates inflammatory corneal angiogenesis by increasing VEGF levels through a p38 and p42/44 MAPK-dependent mechanism. PMID:15039217

  18. Expression, localization and control of activin A release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lavinia E; Bloise, Enrrico; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Massai, Lauretta; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Apa, Rosanna; Luisi, Stefano; Severi, Filiberto M; Petraglia, Felice; Reis, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Activin-A is a member of the TGFβ superfamily found in maternal and umbilical cord blood throughout gestation. We investigated whether human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express activin-A in vivo and tested the effects of vasoactive (endothelin-1), pro-inflammatory (interferon-γ, interleukin-8) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone, urocortin) factors on activin-A release by isolated HUVEC in vitro. Activin βA subunit protein and mRNA were strongly localized in the endothelial cells of umbilical veins and were also detectable in scattered cells of the cord connective tissue. Dimeric activin-A was detected in the HUVEC culture medium at picomolar concentrations. Activin-A release by HUVEC decreased after cell incubation with urocortin (p < 0.01), whereas no effect was observed with interleukin-8, interferon-γ, endothelin-1 or dexamethasone. In summary, activin-A is present in the human umbilical vein endothelium in vivo and is produced and released by isolated HUVEC. Activin-A secretion is inhibited in vitro by urocortin, a neuropeptide with predominantly anti-inflammatory action.

  19. Role of activin-A in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and COPD.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Fien M; Bracke, Ken R; Amatngalim, Gimano D; Verleden, Geert M; Van Pottelberge, Geert R; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Joos, Guy F; Brusselle, Guy G

    2014-04-01

    Activin-A is a pleiotropic cytokine belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and has been implicated in asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of activin-A and its endogenous inhibitor, follistatin, in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unknown. We first quantified activin-A and follistatin in the lungs of air- or cigarette smoke-exposed mice and in the lungs of patients with COPD by immunohistochemistry, ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR. We subsequently studied the effect of cigarette smoke on primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Next, activin-A signalling was antagonised in vivo by administration of follistatin in mice exposed to air or cigarette smoke for 4 weeks. Protein levels of activin-A were increased in the airway epithelium of patients with COPD compared with never-smokers and smokers. Cigarette smoke-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells expressed higher levels of activin-A and lower levels of follistatin. Both mRNA and protein levels of activin-A were increased in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice, whereas follistatin levels were reduced upon cigarette smoke exposure. Importantly, administration of follistatin attenuated the cigarette smoke-induced increase of inflammatory cells and mediators in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in mice. These results suggest that an imbalance between activin-A and follistatin contributes to the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and COPD.

  20. Safety and toxicological evaluation of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Marone, Palma Ann; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Bagchi, Manashi; Shiojima, Yoshiaki

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the broad-spectrum safety of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen (NEXT-II) derived from chicken sternum cartilage. The presence of epitope in NEXT-II was confirmed by using a commercial kit. The acute oral LD₅₀ of NEXT-II was found to be greater than 5000 mg/kg bw in rats, while the single-dose acute dermal LD₅₀ was greater than 2000 mg/kg bw. The primary dermal irritation index (PDII) of NEXT-II was found to be 1.8 and classified as slightly irritating to the skin. In primary eye irritation studies, the maximum mean total score (MMTS) of NEXT-II was observed to be 7.3 and classified as minimally irritating to the eye. Long-term safety studies were conducted in dogs over a period of 150 d, and no significant changes were observed in body weight, heart rate, respiration rate and blood chemistry. NEXT-II does not induce mutagenicity in the bacterial reverse mutation test in five Salmonella typhimurium strains either with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, two experiments were conducted to assess the potential of NEXT-II to induce mutations with and without metabolic activation at the mouse lymphoma thymidine kinase locus using the cell line L5178Y. No biologically relevant increase of mutants was observed. Also, no dose-dependent toxicity was observed. Furthermore, colony sizing showed no clastogenic effects induced by NEXT-II under the experimental conditions. These studies demonstrated the broad spectrum of safety of NEXT-II.

  1. Soluble AXL: a possible circulating biomarker for neurofibromatosis type 1 related tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Gunnar; Peng, Po-Chun; Huang, Po-Yuan; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Kuo, Min-Liang; Chen, Chin-Tin; Lee, Ming-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common tumor predisposition disorder affecting 1/3500 worldwide. Patients are at risk of developing benign (neurofibromas) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). The AXL receptor tyrosine kinase has been implicated in several kinds of cancers, but so far no studies have investigated the role of AXL in NF1 related tumorigenesis. Recently, the soluble fraction from the extracellular domain of AXL (sAXL) has been found in human plasma, and its level was correlated to poor prognosis in patients with renal cancer. Compared to normal human Schwann cells, a significantly high expression level of AXL was found in three of the four MPNST cell lines and two of the three primary MPNST tissues. Similarly, the level of sAXL in conditioned media corresponded to the protein and mRNA levels of AXL in the MPNST cell lines. Furthermore, in two different human MPNST xenograft models, the human sAXL could be detected in the mouse plasma. Its level was proportionate to the size of the xenograft tumors, while no human sAXL was detect prior to the formation of the tumors. Treatment with a newly developed photodynamic therapy, prevented further tumor growth and resulted in drastically reduced the levels of sAXL compared to that of the control group. Finally, the level of sAXL was significantly increased in patients with plexiform tumors compared to patients with only dermal neurofibromas, further supporting the role of sAXL as a marker for NF1 related tumor burden.

  2. Recombinant soluble CD137 prevents type one diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kachapati, Kritika; Bednar, Kyle J; Adams, David E; Wu, Yuehong; Mittler, Robert S; Jordan, Michael B; Hinerman, Jennifer M; Herr, Andrew B; Ridgway, William M

    2013-12-01

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are genetically programmed to spontaneously develop type one diabetes (T1D). Multiple Insulin dependent diabetes (Idd) genetic loci have been identified but their functional effects are mostly poorly understood. TnfsfR9, expressing the protein product CD137, is a strong candidate gene in the Idd9.3 locus, and NOD.B10 Idd9.3 mice are significantly protected from type one diabetes (T1D). We previously showed that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a deficiency in the numbers of CD137(pos) T regulatory cells, that CD137(pos) Tregs are the source of soluble CD137 (sCD137), and that NOD mice have low serum levels of sCD137. To test the hypothesis that correcting low levels of sCD137 could affect the disease, we constructed a lentiviral vector producing recombinant sCD137; this physiologic sCD137 is glycosylated and exists primarily as a dimer. NOD mice treated with the recombinant sCD137 are protected from developing T1D. Insulitis is significantly decreased, but not eliminated in the sCD137 treated mice, however insulin producing pancreatic beta cells are preserved despite residual insulitis. To begin to understand the protective immune mechanisms of sCD137, we tested sCD137 in vitro. It was previously suggested that sCD137 simply blocked the interaction between CD137 (on T cells) and CD137 ligand (on antigen presenting cells (APCs)). Here however, we use an APC independent assay and demonstrate that sCD137 can actively suppress highly purified CD4 T cells in a CD137L dependent fashion. These results support the hypothesis that sCD137 acts in a negative feedback loop to actively suppress over-zealous immune responses, and that it can be used clinically to suppress autoimmunity. sCD137 is an important Treg derived natural immunosuppressive molecule that regulates effector T cells to avert diabetes in vivo.

  3. Fabrication and optical nonlinearities of composite films derived from the water-soluble Keplerate-type polyoxometalate and chloroform-soluble porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zonghai; Zhou, Yunshan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Di; Mu, Cuncun; Ren, Haizhou; Shehzad, Farooq Khurum; Li, Jiaqi

    2015-03-07

    Composite films derived from the water-soluble Keplerate-type polyoxometalate (NH4)42[Mo132O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]·ca. 300H2O·ca. 10CH3COONH4 (denoted (NH4)42{Mo132}) and chloroform-soluble tetraphenylporphyrin perchlorate [H2TPP](ClO4)2 are successfully fabricated by a layer-by-layer self-assembly method and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The structure of the {Mo132} and [H2TPP](2+) in the films remain intact in light of the results of UV-vis spectroscopy and XPS. UV-vis spectra measurements reveal that the amounts of deposition of {Mo132} and [H2TPP](2+) remain constant in every adsorption cycle in the composite films assembly process. Nonlinear optical properties of the composite films have been investigated by using the Z-scan technique at a wavelength of 532 nm and pulse width of 7 ns. The results show that the composite films have notable nonlinear saturated absorption and self-defocusing effects. The combination of {Mo132} with [H2TPP](2+) can result in composite films with remarkably enhanced optical nonlinearities. The interfacial charge transfer induced by laser from porphyrin to POM in the films is thought to play a key role in the enhancement of NLO response. The third-order NLO susceptibility χ((3)) of the composite films increases with the increase of film thickness.

  4. Activin A is increased in the nucleus accumbens following a cocaine binge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Jun; Martin, Jennifer A.; Gancarz, Amy M.; Adank, Danielle N.; Sim, Fraser J.; Dietz, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Drug addiction is a long-lasting disease characterized by compulsive drug intake mediated in part by neuronal and biological adaptations in key brain areas, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). While we previously demonstrated involvement of the activin 2a receptor in drug taking, the role of its ligand, activin A, in cocaine relapse is unknown. Activin A levels in the NAc were assessed via ELISA and immunohistochemistry (in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) following a cocaine binge paradigm. Cocaine exposure significantly increased the levels of activin A in the NAc of animals that had self-administered cocaine prior to the 14-day withdrawal compared with levels in saline controls. This was accompanied by an increase in the proportion of IBA1+ microglia in the NAc that were immunopositive for activin A. In contrast, the proportions of NeuN+ neurons and GFAP+ astrocytes that were immunopositive for activin A remained unaltered. In conclusion, these data suggest that increased secretion of activin A, particularly from microglia, in the NAc represents a novel potential target for the treatment of cocaine relapse. PMID:28272550

  5. Activin inhibits binding of transcription factor Pit-1 to the growth hormone promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Struthers, R S; Gaddy-Kurten, D; Vale, W W

    1992-01-01

    Activin A is a potent growth and differentiation factor related to transforming growth factor beta. In somatotrophs, activin suppresses the biosynthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and cellular proliferation. We report here that, in MtTW15 somatotrophic tumor cells, activin decreased GH mRNA levels and inhibited expression of transfected GH promoter--chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes. Deletion mapping of nucleotide sequences mediating this inhibition led to the identification of a region that has previously been characterized as binding the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1/GHF-1. Characterization of nuclear factor binding to this region demonstrated that binding of Pit-1 to the GH promoter is lost on activin treatment. These results indicate that activin-induced repression of GH biosynthesis is mediated by the loss of tissue-specific transcription factor binding to the GH promoter and suggest a possible general mechanism for other activin responses, whereby activin regulates the function of other POU- or homeodomain-containing transcription factors. Images PMID:1454833

  6. Activin A Predicts Left Ventricular Remodeling and Mortality in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jeng-Feng; Hsu, Shun-Yi; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Semon; Hsieh, Chien-An; Jang, Shih-Jung; Liu, Chih-Jen; Huang, Hsuan-Li; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Activin A levels increase in a variety of heart diseases including ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the level of activin A can be beneficial in predicting left ventricular remodeling, heart failure, and death in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods We enrolled 278 patients with STEMI who had their activin A levels measured on day 2 of hospitalization. Echocardiographic studies were performed at baseline and were repeated 6 months later. Thereafter, the clinical events of these patients were followed for a maximum of 3 years, including all-cause death and readmission for heart failure. Results During hospitalization, higher activin A level was associated with higher triglyceride level, lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and lower left ventricular end diastolic ventricular volume index (LVEDVI) in multivariable linear regression model. During follow-up, patients with activin A levels > 129 pg/ml had significantly lower LVEF, and higher LVEDVI at 6 months. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that activin A level > 129 pg/ml was a predictor of all-cause death (p = 0.022), but not a predictor of heart failure (p = 0.767). Conclusions Activin A level > 129 pg/ml predicts worse left ventricular remodeling and all-cause death in STEMI. PMID:27471355

  7. The effect of soluble complement receptor type 1 on hyperacute xenograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, S K; Baldwin, W M; Marsh, H C; Lin, S S; Yeh, C G; Bollinger, R R

    1991-11-01

    In the guinea pig-to-rat model of hyperacute xenograft (Xg) rejection, the effect of complement inhibition using systemically administered soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) on discordant cardiac Xg survival was investigated. In PBS-treated control Xg recipients (n = 13), hyperacute rejection was rapid, with a mean Xg survival of 17 +/- 4 min. Therapy with sCR1 prolonged survival of cardiac Xgs in a dose-dependent manner. A 3 mg/kg bolus of sCR1 (n = 4) prolonged Xg survival to 64 +/- 29 min (not significant). Increasing the sCR1 dose to 5.9 mg/kg (n = 4) significantly delayed Xg rejection to 71 +/- 17 min (P-0.026, log-rank test vs. control). In 10 recipients treated with 15 mg/kg sCR1, mean Xg survival was further prolonged to 189 +/- 36 min (P-0.0004) with no adverse effects. While 2 of 8 recipients receiving 60 mg/kg sCR1 died with functioning Xgs at 30 and 300 min due to anastomotic bleeding, Xg survival averaged over 12 hr (747 +/- 100 min, P-0.0004) in the remaining 6 recipients. sCR1 administration significantly inhibited serum complement activity in a parallel dose-dependent fashion, with the 60 mg/kg dose reducing complement activity by 95 +/- 1 and 96 +/- 1% five and 30 min following Xg reperfusion, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed rat IgM bound to all cardiac Xgs in control as well as sCR1-treated recipients. In addition, serial histologic examination of cardiac Xgs harvested within 21 min of graft reperfusion revealed occlusive platelet aggregates within the coronary vessels as well as interstitial hemorrhage and myocardial necrosis in Xgs from control recipients, all of which were only minimally present in Xgs from recipients treated with sCR1. These studies show that complement inhibition with sCR1 significantly delays hyperacute cardiac Xg rejection in this discordant model and may be an important component in a therapeutic protocol for xenotransplantation.

  8. Humidity effects on soluble core mechanical and thermal properties (polyvinyl alcohol/microballoon composite) type CG extendospheres, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report for the study of humidity effects and loading rate on soluble core (PVA/MB composite material) mechanical and thermal properties under Contract No. 100345. This report describes test results procedures employed, and any unusual occurrences or specific observations associated with this test program. The primary objective of this work was to determine if cured soluble core filler material regains its tensile and compressive strength after exposure to high humidity conditions and following a drying cycle. Secondary objectives include measurements of tensile and compressive modulus, and Poisson's ratio, and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) for various moisture exposure states. A third objective was to compare the mechanical and thermal properties of the composite using 'SG' and 'CG' type extendospheres. The proposed facility for the manufacture of soluble cores at the Yellow Creek site incorporates no capability for the control of humidity. Recent physical property tests performed with the soluble core filler material showed that prolonged exposure to high humidity significantly degradates in strength. The purpose of these tests is to determine if the product, process or facility designs require modification to avoid imparting a high risk condition to the ASRM.

  9. Effects of Activin A on the phenotypic properties of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Hideki; Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naohide; Wada, Naohisa; Koori, Katsuaki; Hasegawa, Daigaku; Hamano, Sayuri; Yuda, Asuka; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Akamine, Akifumi

    2014-09-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue plays an important role in tooth preservation by structurally maintaining the connection between the tooth root and the bone. The mechanisms involved in the healing and regeneration of damaged PDL tissue, caused by bacterial infection, caries and trauma, have been explored. Accumulating evidence suggests that Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and a dimer of inhibinβa, contributes to tissue healing through cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation of various target cells. In bone, Activin A has been shown to exert an inhibitory effect on osteoblast maturation and mineralization. However, there have been no reports examining the expression and function of Activin A in human PDL cells (HPDLCs). Thus, we aimed to investigate the biological effects of Activin A on HPDLCs. Activin A was observed to be localized in HPDLCs and rat PDL tissue. When PDL tissue was surgically damaged, Activin A and IL-1β expression increased and the two proteins were shown to be co-localized around the lesion. HPDLCs treated with IL-1β or TNF-α also up-regulated the expression of the gene encoding inhibinβa. Activin A promoted chemotaxis, migration and proliferation of HPDLCs, and caused an increase in fibroblastic differentiation of these cells while down-regulating their osteoblastic differentiation. These osteoblastic inhibitory effects of Activin A, however, were only noted during the early phase of HPDLC osteoblastic differentiation, with later exposures having no effect on differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that Activin A could be used as a therapeutic agent for healing and regenerating PDL tissue in response to disease, trauma or surgical reconstruction.

  10. Activin a release into cerebrospinal fluid in a subset of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David J; Nguyen, Phuong; Adamides, Alexios A; Bye, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Kossmann, Thomas; Vallance, Shirley; Murray, Lynnette; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria C

    2006-09-01

    Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily and has been demonstrated to be elevated during inflammation and to have neuroprotective properties following neural insults. In this study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced a response in activin A or in the concentrations of its binding protein, follistatin. Thirty-nine patients with severe TBI had daily, matched cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples collected post-TBI and these were assayed for activin A and follistatin using specific immunoassays. Concentrations of both molecules were assessed relative to a variety of clinical parameters, such as the Glasgow Coma Score, computer tomography classification of TBI, measurement of injury markers, cell metabolism and membrane breakdown products. In about half of the patients, there was a notable increase in CSF activin A concentrations in the first few days post-TBI. There were only minor perturbations in either serum activin or in either CSF or serum follistatin concentrations. The CSF activin A response was not related to any of the common TBI indices, but was strongly correlated with two common markers of brain damage, neuronal specific enolase and S100-beta. Further, activin A levels were also associated with indices of metabolism, such as lactate and pyruvate, excitotoxicity (glutamate) and membrane lipid breakdown products such as glycerol. In one of the two patients who developed a CSF infection, activin A concentrations in CSF became markedly elevated. Thus, some TBI patients have an early release of activin A into the CSF that may result from activation of inflammatory and/or neuroprotective pathways.

  11. The potential role of activin and follistatin in lung transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Snell, James N; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β super-family, is a key regulator of multiple biological pathways including the physiological processes of organ development and homeostasis; as well as the pathological processes of inflammation, remodelling and fibrosis. Dysregulation of activin A and its naturally occurring antagonist follistatin, contribute to the development of disease in multiple organ systems. In this review, we summarize the regulation of activin A, its dysregulated expression in a number of respiratory diseases and postulate its potential role in contributing to allograft dysfunction following lung transplantation.

  12. An Activin Receptor IA/Activin-Like Kinase-2 (R206H) Mutation in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Pacheco-Tovar, Deyanira; Bollain-Y-Goytia, Juan José; Torres Del Muro, Felipe; Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Pacheco-Tovar, María Guadalupe; Castañeda-Ureña, María; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an exceptionally rare genetic disease that is characterised by congenital malformations of the great toes and progressive heterotopic ossification (HO) in specific anatomical areas. This disease is caused by a mutation in activin receptor IA/activin-like kinase-2 (ACVR1/ALK2). A Mexican family with one member affected by FOP was studied. The patient is a 19-year-old female who first presented with symptoms of FOP at 8 years old; she developed spontaneous and painful swelling of the right scapular area accompanied by functional limitation of movement. Mutation analysis was performed in which genomic DNA as PCR amplified using primers flanking exons 4 and 6, and PCR products were digested with Cac8I and HphI restriction enzymes. The most informative results were obtained with the exon 4 flanking primers and the Cac8I restriction enzyme, which generated a 253 bp product that carries the ACVR1 617G>A mutation, which causes an amino acid substitution of histidine for arginine at position 206 of the glycine-serine (GS) domain, and its mutation results in the dysregulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling that causes FOP.

  13. Role of activins and inducible nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of ectopic pregnancy in patients with or without Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Bassem; Al-Azemi, Majedah; Geary, Ian; Eley, Adrian; Ledger, William

    2009-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy (EP), infertility, and chronic pelvic pain in women. Activins and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are produced by the human fallopian tube, and we speculate that tubal activins and iNOS may be involved in the immune response to C. trachomatis in humans and their pathological alteration may result in tubal pathology and the development of EP. Blood and fallopian tubes were collected from 14 women with EP. Sera were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (chsp60) and the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis. Confirmation of C. trachomatis serology was made using the microimmunofluorescence test. The patients were classified into three groups according to their serological results, and immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR were performed to investigate the expression of candidate molecules by tubal epithelial cells among the three groups. This is the first study to show an increase in the expression of activin betaA subunit, type II receptors, follistatin, and iNOS within the human fallopian tube of EP patients who were serologically positive for C. trachomatis. A similar expression profile was observed in the fallopian tubes with detectable antibodies only against chsp60. These results were shown at the mRNA and protein levels. We suggest that tubal activin A, its type II receptors, follistatin, and NO could be involved in the microbial-mediated immune response within the fallopian tube, and their pathological expression may lead to tubal damage and the development of EP.

  14. Solubility of 238U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using "US in vitro" digestion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-04-01

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by "US P in vitro" digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 - 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 - 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  15. Pituitary gonadotropins FSH and LH are oppositely regulated by the activin/follistatin system in a basal teleost, the eel.

    PubMed

    Aroua, Salima; Maugars, Gersende; Jeng, Shan-Ru; Chang, Ching-Fong; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    European eels are blocked at a prepubertal silver stage due to a deficient production of pituitary gonadotropins. We investigated the potential role of activin/follistatin system in the control of eel gonadotropins. Through the development of qPCR assays for European eel activin β(B) and follistatin, we first analyzed the tissue distribution of the expression of these two genes. Both activin β(B) and follistatin are expressed in the brain, pituitary and gonads. In addition, a striking expression of both transcripts was also found in the retina and in adipose tissue. The effects of recombinant human activins and follistatin on eel gonadotropin gene expression were studied using primary cultures of eel pituitary cells. Activins A and B strongly stimulated FSHβ subunit expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, activin reduced LHβ expression, an inhibitory effect which was highlighted in the presence of testosterone, a known activator of eel LHβ expression. No effect of activin was observed on other pituitary hormones. Follistatin antagonized both the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of activin on FSHβ and LHβ expression, respectively. Activin is the first major stimulator of FSH expression evidenced in the eel. These results in a basal teleost further support the ancient origin and strong conservation of the activin/follistatin system in the control of FSH in vertebrates. In contrast, the opposite regulation of FSH and LH may have emerged in the teleost lineage.

  16. Tissue absence initiates regeneration through follistatin-mediated inhibition of activin signaling.

    PubMed

    Gaviño, Michael A; Wenemoser, Danielle; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-09-10

    Regeneration is widespread, but mechanisms that activate regeneration remain mysterious. Planarians are capable of whole-body regeneration and mount distinct molecular responses to wounds that result in tissue absence and those that do not. A major question is how these distinct responses are activated. We describe a follistatin homolog (Smed-follistatin) required for planarian regeneration. Smed-follistatin inhibition blocks responses to tissue absence but does not prevent normal tissue turnover. Two activin homologs (Smed-activin-1 and Smed-activin-2) are required for the Smed-follistatin phenotype. Finally, Smed-follistatin is wound-induced and expressed at higher levels following injuries that cause tissue absence. These data suggest that Smed-follistatin inhibits Smed-Activin proteins to trigger regeneration specifically following injuries involving tissue absence and identify a mechanism critical for regeneration initiation, a process important across the animal kingdom. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00247.001.

  17. Bathophenanthroline disulfonate and soluble CD4 as probes for early events of HIV type 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Demaria, S; Tilley, S A; Pinter, A; Bushkin, Y

    1995-01-01

    We report here that a metalloprotease inhibitor, bathophenanthroline disulfonate (Bphe-ds), neutralizes both laboratory-adapted and primary strains of HIV-1. Presaturation of Bphe-ds with zinc does not alter its neutralizing activity, suggesting that the metal-chelating ability of Bphe-ds is not required for neutralization. Bphe-ds blocks infection of CD4+ cells at the stage of viral entry, not through a direct viricidal effect, but by interfering with both binding and postbinding events. This drug interacts with HIV-1 envelope, blocking almost completely the binding of three MAbs that recognize epitopes overlapping the CD4-binding site on gp120, but has no effect on the binding of MAbs directed to the cellular receptor CD4. The exposure of epitopes in the V2 and V3 but not C5 domains of gp120 is partially decreased in the presence of Bphe-ds, suggesting that the drug induces conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein(s). Binding of both virions and soluble gp120 to CD4+ cells is inhibited by this drug in a dose-dependent manner. This contrasted with the effects of soluble CD4, which actually increased binding of virions to cells at 4 degrees C, while inhibiting the binding of soluble gp120. Bphe-ds also increases shedding of gp120 from cells infected with HIV-1IIIB. Thus, Bphe-ds appears to be an envelope-directed inhibitor of HIV-1 that neutralizes HIV-1 infectivity via multiple mechanisms.

  18. Activin receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gancarz, Amy M; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin M; Mueller, Lauren E; Humby, Monica S; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A; Dietz, Karen C; Neve, Rachael L; Dietz, David M

    2015-07-01

    Activin receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, was upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally altered cocaine seeking while governing morphological plasticity in NAc neurons. Thus, Activin/Smad3 signaling is induced following withdrawal from cocaine, and such regulation may be a key molecular mechanism underlying behavioral and cellular plasticity in the brain following cocaine self-administration.

  19. Activin B promotes initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qin; Zhang, Min; Kong, Yanan; Chen, Shixuan; Chen, Yinghua; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Lei; Lang, Weiya; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Activin B has been reported to promote the regeneration of hair follicles during wound healing. However, its role in the development and life cycle of hair follicles has not been elucidated. In our study, the effect of activin B on mouse hair follicles of cultured and neonatal mouse skin was investigated. In these models, PBS or activin B (5, 10 or 50 ng/ml) was applied, and hair follicle development was monitored. Hair follicle initiation and development was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, alkaline phosphatase activity staining, Oil Red O+ staining, and the detection of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling cell apoptosis. Activin B was found to efficiently induce the initiation of hair follicles in the skin of both cultured and neonatal mice and to promote the development of hair follicles in neonatal mouse skin. Moreover, activin-B-treated hair follicles were observed to enter the anagen stage from the telogen stage and to remain in the anagen stage. These results demonstrate that activin B promotes the initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

  20. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  1. Substantial Increases Occur in Serum Activins and Follistatin during Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, David M.; Bensley, Jonathan G.; Phillips, David J.; Levvey, Bronwyn J.; Snell, Greg I.; Lin, Enjarn; Hedger, Mark P.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation exposes the donated lung to a period of anoxia. Re-establishing the circulation after ischemia stimulates inflammation causing organ damage. Since our published data established that activin A is a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, we assessed the roles of activin A and B, and their binding protein, follistatin, in patients undergoing lung transplantation. Methods Sera from 46 patients participating in a published study of remote ischemia conditioning in lung transplantation were used. Serum activin A and B, follistatin and 11 other cytokines were measured in samples taken immediately after anaesthesia induction, after remote ischemia conditioning or sham treatment undertaken just prior to allograft reperfusion and during the subsequent 24 hours. Results Substantial increases in serum activin A, B and follistatin occurred after the baseline sample, taken before anaesthesia induction and peaked immediately after the remote ischemia conditioning/sham treatment. The levels remained elevated 15 minutes after lung transplantation declining thereafter reaching baseline 2 hours post-transplant. Activin B and follistatin concentrations were lower in patients receiving remote ischemia conditioning compared to sham treated patients but the magnitude of the decrease did not correlate with early transplant outcomes. Conclusions We propose that the increases in the serum activin A, B and follistatin result from a combination of factors; the acute phase response, the reperfusion response and the use of heparin-based anti-coagulants. PMID:26820896

  2. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-22

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis.

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of inhibin/activin subunits in the wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt) ovary.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Weng, Jiaju; Zhang, Haolin; Li, Xiaonan; Zhang, Mengyuan; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The intraovarian function of gonadally produced inhibin and activin has been extensively studied in experimental models for decades, yet their presence and function have been rarely reported in wild rodents. With our seasonal breeding model, the wild ground squirrel, we aimed to investigate the possible roles of these peptides in the seasonal folliculogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting have been used to detect the cellular localization and expression patterns of inhibin/activin subunits (α, β(A) and β(B)). In the breeding season ovary, all three subunits were present in granulosa cells, theca cells of antral follicles and interstitial cells, with the strongest immunostaining in granulosa cells. Following ovulation, the corpora lutea become a major site of inhibin/activin synthesis. In the nonbreeding season ovary, inhibin/activin α and β(A) subunits were weakly immunopositive in granulosa cells of early stage follicles, while β(B) subunit was undetectable. The expression level of inhibin/activin subunit proteins were generally higher in the ovaries of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level during the nonbreeding season. The dynamic expression of inhibin/activin subunits indicated that they might play important paracrine and/or autocrine roles during the seasonal folliculogenesis of the wild ground squirrel.

  4. NMR characterisation of inulin-type fructooligosaccharides as the major water-soluble carbohydrates from Matricaria maritima (L.).

    PubMed

    Cérantola, Stéphane; Kervarec, Nelly; Pichon, Roger; Magné, Christian; Bessieres, Marie-Anne; Deslandes, Eric

    2004-10-04

    By use of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy including 2D 1H,1H DQF-COSY/TOCSY and 1H,13C HMQC/HMBC experiments, the main water-soluble carbohydrate components extracted from leaves of Matricaria maritima were identified as oligofructans composed of a linear chain of (2-->1)-linked beta-D-fructofuranosyl residues specifying an inulin-type structure. Alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->2)-[beta-D-Fruf-(2-->1)-beta-D-Frucf]n-(2-->1)-beta-D-Fruf.

  5. Inhibition of activin A ameliorates skeletal muscle injury and rescues contractile properties by inducing efficient remodeling in female mice.

    PubMed

    Yaden, Benjamin C; Wang, Yan X; Wilson, Jonathan M; Culver, Alexander E; Milner, Andrea; Datta-Mannan, Amita; Shetler, Pamela; Croy, Johnny E; Dai, Guoli; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, provides pleiotropic regulation of fibrosis and inflammation. We aimed at determining whether selective inhibition of activin A would provide a regenerative benefit. The introduction of activin A into normal muscle increased the expression of inflammatory and muscle atrophy genes Tnf, Tnfrsf12a, Trim63, and Fbxo32 by 3.5-, 10-, 2-, and 4-fold, respectively. The data indicate a sensitive response of muscle to activin A. Two hours after cardiotoxin-induced muscle damage, local activin A protein expression increased by threefold to ninefold. Neutralization of activin A with a specific monoclonal antibody in this muscle injury model decreased the muscle protein levels of lymphotoxin α and Il17a by 32% and 42%, respectively. Muscle histopathological features showed that activin A antibody-treated mice displayed an increase in muscle degradation, with the concomitant 9.2-fold elevation in F4/80-positive cells 3 days after injury. At the same time, the number of Pax7/Myod1-positive cells also increased, indicative of potentiated muscle precursor activation. Ultimately, activin A inhibition resulted in rapid recovery of muscle contractile properties indicated by a restoration of maximum and specific force. In summary, selective inhibition of activin A with a monoclonal antibody in muscle injury leads to the early onset of tissue degradation and subsequent enhanced myogenesis, thereby accelerating muscle repair and functional recovery.

  6. Influence of activin A supplementation during human embryonic stem cell derivation on germ cell differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Galbha; Heindryckx, Björn; Warrier, Sharat; O'Leary, Thomas; Van der Jeught, Margot; Lierman, Sylvie; Vossaert, Liesbeth; Deroo, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; De Sutter, Petra

    2013-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are more similar to "primed" mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs). mEpiSCs, which are derived in Activin A, show an increased propensity to form primordial germ cell (PGC)-like cells in response to bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4). Hence, we hypothesized that hESCs derived in the presence of Activin A may be more competent in differentiating towards PGC-like cells after supplementation with BMP4 compared to standard hESC lines. We were able to successfully derive two hESC lines in the presence of Activin A, which were pluripotent and showed higher base levels of STELLA and cKIT compared to standard hESC lines derived without Activin A addition. Furthermore, upon differentiation as embryoid bodies in the presence of BMP4, we observed upregulation of VASA at day 7, both at the transcript and protein level compared to standard hESC lines, which appeared to take longer time for PGC specification. Unlike other hESC lines, nuclear pSMAD2/3 presence confirmed that Activin signalling was switched on in Activin A-derived hESC lines. They were also responsive to BMP4 based on nuclear detection of pSMAD1/5/8 and showed endodermal differentiation as a result of GATA-6 expression. Hence, our results provide novel insights into the impact of hESC derivation in the presence of Activin A and its subsequent influence on germ cell differentiation potential in vitro.

  7. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1–25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria. PMID:28091558

  8. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-16

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1-25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria.

  9. A soluble bone morphogenetic protein type IA receptor increases bone mass and bone strength.

    PubMed

    Baud'huin, Marc; Solban, Nicolas; Cornwall-Brady, Milton; Sako, Dianne; Kawamoto, Yoshimi; Liharska, Katia; Lath, Darren; Bouxsein, Mary L; Underwood, Kathryn W; Ucran, Jeffrey; Kumar, Ravindra; Pobre, Eileen; Grinberg, Asya; Seehra, Jasbir; Canalis, Ernesto; Pearsall, R Scott; Croucher, Peter I

    2012-07-24

    Diseases such as osteoporosis are associated with reduced bone mass. Therapies to prevent bone loss exist, but there are few that stimulate bone formation and restore bone mass. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ superfamily, which act as pleiotropic regulators of skeletal organogenesis and bone homeostasis. Ablation of the BMPR1A receptor in osteoblasts increases bone mass, suggesting that inhibition of BMPR1A signaling may have therapeutic benefit. The aim of this study was to determine the skeletal effects of systemic administration of a soluble BMPR1A fusion protein (mBMPR1A-mFc) in vivo. mBMPR1A-mFc was shown to bind BMP2/4 specifically and with high affinity and prevent downstream signaling. mBMPR1A-mFc treatment of immature and mature mice increased bone mineral density, cortical thickness, trabecular bone volume, thickness and number, and decreased trabecular separation. The increase in bone mass was due to an early increase in osteoblast number and bone formation rate, mediated by a suppression of Dickkopf-1 expression. This was followed by a decrease in osteoclast number and eroded surface, which was associated with a decrease in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) production, an increase in osteoprotegerin expression, and a decrease in serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5b) concentration. mBMPR1A treatment also increased bone mass and strength in mice with bone loss due to estrogen deficiency. In conclusion, mBMPR1A-mFc stimulates osteoblastic bone formation and decreases bone resorption, which leads to an increase in bone mass, and offers a promising unique alternative for the treatment of bone-related disorders.

  10. Characterization of a constitutive type III nitric oxide synthase in human U937 monocytic cells: stimulation by soluble CD23.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, V; Dugas, N; Abadie, A; Amirand, C; Zhao, H; Dugas, B; Kolb, J P

    1997-01-01

    The soluble cleavage fragment of the low-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor/CD23 (sCD23 25000 MW) and antibodies directed against their receptors on monocytes, CD11b and CD11c, stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO) by these cells and we have suggested that the enzyme involved could be related to the endothelial constitutive type III nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS). In the present work, we have analysed the characteristic properties of this NOS isoform in the model of the human promonocytic cells U937 By reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the presence of an mRNA coding for type III NOS was found in U937 cells and the corresponding protein was detected by immunofluorescence in permeabilized cells with a specific anti-ecNOS monoclonal antibody (mAb). Membrane extracts displayed a NOS activity dependent on the presence of calcium and calmodulin in the reaction medium and that was abrogated in the presence of EGTA. Recombinant soluble CD23 (25000 MW) was found to trigger an NO-dependent cGMP accumulation in these cells, which was abrogated by calcium chelators and inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin complex. Moreover, sCD23 elicited a transient augmentation of intracytoplasmic free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i that was dependent on the presence of calcium in the external buffer and was prevented in the presence of EGTA, indicating that it was due to a calcium influx. In conclusion, human promonocytic cells such as U937 exhibit a functional type III NOS that can be stimulated by calcium-raising agents, such as sCD23. Images Figure 1 PMID:9378507

  11. Brugia malayi soluble and excretory-secretory proteins attenuate development of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Amdare, N; Khatri, V; Yadav, R S P; Tarnekar, A; Goswami, K; Reddy, M V R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the modulation of the host-immune system by pathogens-like filarial parasites offers an alternate approach to prevent autoimmune diseases. In this study, we have shown that treatment with filarial proteins prior to or after the clinical onset of streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes (T1D) can ameliorate the severity of disease in BALB/c mice. Pre-treatment with Brugia malayi adult soluble (Bm A S) or microfilarial excretory-secretory (Bm mf ES) or microfilarial soluble (Bm mf S) antigens followed by induction of diabetes led to lowering of fasting blood glucose levels with as many as 57.5-62.5% of mice remaining nondiabetic. These proteins were more effective when they were used to treat the mice with established T1D as 62.5-71.5% of the mice turned to be nondiabetic. Histopathological examination of pancreas of treated mice showed minor inflammatory changes in pancreatic islet cell architecture. The therapeutic effect was found to be associated with the decreased production of cytokines TNF-α & IFN-γ and increased production of IL-10 in the culture supernatants of splenocytes of treated mice. A switch in the production of anti-insulin antibodies from IgG2a to IgG1 isotype was also seen. Together these results provide a proof towards utilizing the filarial derived proteins as novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  12. Activin Signaling Targeted by Insulin/dFOXO Regulates Aging and Muscle Proteostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Kang, Ping; Hernandez, Ana Maria; Tatar, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Reduced insulin/IGF signaling increases lifespan in many animals. To understand how insulin/IGF mediates lifespan in Drosophila, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing analysis with the insulin/IGF regulated transcription factor dFOXO in long-lived insulin/IGF signaling genotypes. Dawdle, an Activin ligand, is bound and repressed by dFOXO when reduced insulin/IGF extends lifespan. Reduced Activin signaling improves performance and protein homeostasis in muscles of aged flies. Activin signaling through the Smad binding element inhibits the transcription of Autophagy-specific gene 8a (Atg8a) within muscle, a factor controlling the rate of autophagy. Expression of Atg8a within muscle is sufficient to increase lifespan. These data reveal how insulin signaling can regulate aging through control of Activin signaling that in turn controls autophagy, representing a potentially conserved molecular basis for longevity assurance. While reduced Activin within muscle autonomously retards functional aging of this tissue, these effects in muscle also reduce secretion of insulin-like peptides at a distance from the brain. Reduced insulin secretion from the brain may subsequently reinforce longevity assurance through decreased systemic insulin/IGF signaling. PMID:24244197

  13. Follistatin antagonizes activin signaling and acts with notum to direct planarian head regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Newmark, Phillip A

    2013-01-22

    Animals establish their body plans in embryogenesis, but only a few animals can recapitulate this signaling milieu for regeneration after injury. In planarians, a pluripotent stem cell population and perpetual signaling of polarity axes collaborate to direct a steady replacement of cells during homeostasis and to power robust regeneration after even severe injuries. Several studies have documented the roles of conserved signaling pathways in maintaining and resetting axial polarity in planarians, but it is unclear how planarians reestablish polarity signaling centers after injury and whether these centers serve to influence identity decisions of stem cell progeny during their differentiation. Here we find that a planarian Follistatin homolog directs regeneration of anterior identity by opposing an Activin/ActR-1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Follistatin and Notum, a Wnt inhibitor, are mutually required to reestablish an anterior signaling center that expresses both cues. Furthermore, we show that the direction of cells down particular differentiation paths requires regeneration of this anterior signaling center. Just as its amphibian counterpart in the organizer signals body plan and cell fate during embryogenesis, planarian Follistatin promotes reestablishment of anterior polarity during regeneration and influences specification of cell types in the head and beyond.

  14. Activin A suppresses osteoblast mineralization capacity by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and impairing matrix vesicle (MV) production.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rodrigo D A M; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-10-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration.

  15. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  16. Immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunit proteins during the breeding season in testes and scented glands of muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoting; Zhang, Haolin; Weng, Jiaju; Sheng, Xia; Lu, Lu; Hu, Xiao; Liu, Shuqiang; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cellular immunolocalization of inhibin a and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits in the muskrat testes and scented glands during the breeding season. Inhibin α and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits were expressed in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells of testes and glandular cells of scented glands, respectively. Also, positive signals of inhibin α and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits by Western blotting were both observed in testicular and scented glandular tissues. These results suggested that the testes and scented glands of the muskrats had the ability to synthesize inhibins and activins and that activins and inhibins might play an important role in testicular and scented glandular function in muskrats.

  17. Low miR-143/miR-145 Cluster Levels Induce Activin A Overexpression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Which Contributes to Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Bufalino, Andreia; Cervigne, Nilva K.; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Macedo, Carolina Carneiro Soares; Sobral, Lays Martin; Miguel, Marcia Costa; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Lambert, Daniel W.; Salo, Tuula A.; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated expression of activin A is reported in several tumors, but its biological functions in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are unknown. Here, we investigate whether activin A can play a causal role in OSCCs. Activin A expression was assessed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in OSCC tissues. Low activin A-expressing cells were treated with recombinant activin A and assessed for apoptosis, proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Those phenotypes were also evaluated in high activin A-expressing cells treated with follistatin (an activin A antagonist) or stably expressing shRNA targeting activin A. Transfections of microRNA mimics were performed to determine whether the overexpression of activin A is regulated by miR-143/miR-145 cluster. Activin A was overexpressed in OSCCs in comparison with normal oral mucosa, and high activin A levels were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation and poor survival. High activin A levels promoted multiple properties associated with malignant transformation, including decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT. Both miR-143 and miR-145 were markedly downregulated in OSCC cell lines and in clinical specimens, and inversely correlated to activin A levels. Forced expression of miR-143 and miR-145 in OSCC cells significantly decreased the expression of activin A. Overexpression of activin A in OSCCs, which is controlled by downregulation of miR-143/miR-145 cluster, regulates apoptosis, proliferation and invasiveness, and it is clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival. PMID:26317418

  18. Cell proliferation in mouse tissues after thymectomy and t-activin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, S.G.; Arion, V.Y.; Brevsov, Y.N.; Kremli, S.M.

    1985-06-01

    Cell proliferation was studied in mouse tissues on a model of immunodeficiency, namely at different times after splenectomy, and also after immunocorrection with the thymus preparation T-Activin, which is known to restore many functions of the T system of immunity. Mice either received thymectomy, mock thymectomy, or were injected with T-Activin. Tritium-thymidine was injected before the mice were killed. The results of investigation of mitotic activity during the 24-h period in the corneal epithelium 9 days after thymectomy are presented. Thymectomy performed on adult animals leads to a decrease in the intensity of cell proliferation in the epithelial tissues and to a disturbance of the rhythm of proliferation soon after the operation. The experiments show that a lyphocyte function such as the regulation of proliferation remains sensitive to T-Activin, an immunoactive factor of the thymus.

  19. Effect of guava (Psidium guajava Linn.) leaf soluble solids on glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Szu-Chuan; Cheng, Fang-Chi; Wu, Ning-Jung

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of aqueous and ethanol soluble solid extracts of guava (Psidium guajava Linn.) leaves on hypoglycemia and glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide were injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to induce type 2 diabetes. Acute and long-term feeding tests were carried out, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to follow the changes in plasma glucose and insulin levels was performed to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of guava leaf extracts in diabetic rats.The results of acute and long-term feeding tests showed a significant reduction in the blood sugar level in diabetic rats fed with either the aqueous or ethanol extract of guava leaves (p < 0.05). Long-term administration of guava leaf extracts increased the plasma insulin level and glucose utilization in diabetic rats. The results also indicated that the activities of hepatic hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in diabetic rats fed with aqueous extracts were higher than in the normal diabetic group (p < 0.05). On the other hand, diabetic rats treated with the ethanol extract raised the activities of hepatic hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (p < 0.05) only. The experiments provided evidence to support the antihyperglycemic effect of guava leaf extract and the health function of guava leaves against type 2 diabetes.

  20. Activin-receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gancarz, Amy M.; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L.; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin; Mueller, Lauren E.; Humby, Monica S.; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A.; Dietz, Karen C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Dietz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a life-long relapsing disorder that results from long-term adaptations within the brain. We find that Activin-receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, is upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally alter cocaine seeking, while governing morphological plasticity in nucleus accumbens neurons. These findings reveal that Activin/Smad3 signaling is induced following withdrawal from cocaine, and such regulation may be a key molecular mechanism underlying behavioral and cellular plasticity in the brain following cocaine self-administration. PMID:26030849

  1. Effects of the Activin A–Follistatin System on Myocardial Cell Apoptosis through the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Mao, Cuiying; Li, Jiayu; Han, Fanglei; Yang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background: A previous study suggested that activin A inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis. This study thus aimed to explore the effects of the activin A–follistatin system on myocardial cell apoptosis in heart failure (HF) rats in order to determine whether or not the mechanism operates through the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) pathway. Methods: Myocardial infarction (MI) by vascular deprivation was used to induce HF. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect activin A, follistatin and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) contents in serum. Immunohistochemical staining for activin A, follistatin, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) and caspase-3 was performed on the myocardial tissue. The activin A-stimulated apoptosis of H9c2 cells was tested by flow cytometry. Western blot was used to detect the expression levels of activin A, follistatin and ERS-related proteins. Results: It was found that the high expression of activin A could cause activin A–follistatin system imbalance, inducing myocardial cell apoptosis via ERS in vivo. When HF developed to a certain stage, the expression of follistatin was upregulated to antagonize the expression of activin A. Activin A inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis with a low concentration and promoted apoptosis with a high concentration in vitro, also via ERS. Conclusion: Activin A–follistatin system participated in ERS-mediated myocardial cell apoptosis in HF. PMID:28208629

  2. Role of soluble epoxide hydrolase in exacerbation of stroke by streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jouihan, Sari A; Zuloaga, Kristen L; Zhang, Wenri; Shangraw, Robert E; Krasnow, Stephanie M; Marks, Daniel L; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2013-10-01

    Hyperglycemia worsens stroke, yet rigorous glycemic control does not improve neurologic outcome. An alternative is to target downstream molecular mediator(s) triggered by hyperglycemia but independent of prevailing glycemia. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential mediator of injury via its metabolism of neuroprotective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). We tested whether hyperglycemia exacerbates cerebral injury by upregulating sEH and decreasing brain EET levels. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was modeled by streptozotocin (STZ; 50 mg/kg per day intraperitoneally, 5 days) in male mice. At 4 weeks, STZ-treated and control mice underwent 45-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with or without sEH blockade by trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB; 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally daily for 6 days before MCAO). The STZ-treated mice had increased sEH mRNA expression in cerebral vessels and decreased EET concentrations in brain. There was no difference in cortical perfusion between groups. The STZ-treated mice sustained larger brain infarct than controls. Pretreatment with t-AUCB eliminated the difference in infarct size and EETs concentration between STZ-treated mice and controls, without altering glycemia. We conclude that type 1 diabetes mellitus upregulates sEH mRNA and decreases concentrations of neuroprotective EETs within the brain, leading to worse stroke outcome. The data indicate that sEH antagonism may be beneficial in the setting of hyperglycemic stroke.

  3. Wounds increase activin in skin and a vasoactive neuropeptide in sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Cruise, Bethany A; Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K

    2004-07-01

    Successful healing of skin wounds requires sensory innervation and the release of vasoactive neuropeptides that dilate blood vessels and deliver serum proteins to the wound, and that cause pain that protects from further injury. Activin has been proposed as a target-derived regulator of sensory neuropeptides during development, but its role in the mature nervous system is unknown. While adult skin contains a low level of activin, protein levels in skin adjacent to a wound increase rapidly after an excision. Neurons containing the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased in sensory ganglia that projected to the wounded skin, but not in ganglia that projected to unwounded skin, suggesting that neurons respond to a local skin signal. Indeed, many adult sensory neurons respond with increased CGRP expression to the application of activin in vitro and utilize a smad-mediated signal transduction pathway in this response. A second skin-derived factor nerve growth factor (NGF) also increased in wounded skin and increased CGRP in cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons but with lower efficacy. Together, these data support the hypothesis that activin made by skin cells regulates changes in sensory neuropeptides following skin injury, thereby promoting vasodilation and wound healing.

  4. Role of activin, inhibin, and follistatin in the pathogenesis of bovine cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Stangaferro, Matías L; Matiller, Valentina; Díaz, Pablo U; Ortega, Hugo H; Rey, Florencia; Rodríguez, Fernanda M; Silva, Manuel A; Salvetti, Natalia R

    2014-08-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of infertility in dairy cattle. Although many researchers have focused their work on the endocrine changes related to this disease, evidence indicates that intraovarian components play an important role in follicular persistence. Activin, inhibin, and follistatin participate as intraovarian regulatory molecules involved in follicular cell proliferation, differentiation, steroidogenesis, oocyte maturation, and corpus luteum function. Given the importance of these factors in folliculogenesis, we examined the expression and immunolocalization of activin/inhibin βA-subunit, inhibin α-subunit, and follistatin in the ovaries of healthy estrus-synchronized cows and in those of cows with spontaneous or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced COD. We also studied inhibin B (α βB) levels in serum and follicular fluid. We found an increased expression of the βA-subunit of activin A/inhibin A, the α-subunit of inhibin, and follistatin in granulosa cells of spontaneous follicular cysts by immunohistochemistry, and decreased concentrations of inhibin B (α βB) in the follicular fluid of spontaneous follicular cysts. These results, together with those previously obtained, indicate that the expression of the components of the activin-inhibin-follistatin system is altered. This could lead to multiple alterations in important functions in the ovary like the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, follicular proliferation/apoptosis, and steroidogenesis, which may contribute to the follicular persistence and endocrine changes found in cattle with COD.

  5. Collaboration between a soluble C-type lectin and calreticulin facilitates white spot syndrome virus infection in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Yi-Hui; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) mainly infects crustaceans through the digestive tract. Whether C-type lectins (CLs), which are important receptors for many viruses, participate in WSSV infection in the shrimp stomach remains unknown. In this study, we orally infected kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus to model the natural transmission of WSSV and identified a CL (designated as M. japonicus stomach virus-associated CL [MjsvCL]) that was significantly induced by virus infection in the stomach. Knockdown of MjsvCL expression by RNA interference suppressed the virus replication, whereas exogenous MjsvCL enhanced it. Further analysis by GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation showed that MjsvCL could bind to viral protein 28, the most abundant and functionally relevant envelope protein of WSSV. Furthermore, cell-surface calreticulin was identified as a receptor of MjsvCL, and the interaction between these proteins was a determinant for the viral infection-promoting activity of MjsvCL. The MjsvCL-calreticulin pathway facilitated virus entry likely in a cholesterol-dependent manner. This study provides insights into a mechanism by which soluble CLs capture and present virions to the cell-surface receptor to facilitate viral infection.

  6. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subrata Kumar; Mohtarin, Sabreena; Mudi, Sonchita Rani; Anwar, Taznuva; Banu, Laila Anjuman; Alam, Sheikh Md Khorshed; Fariduddin, Md; Arslan, M Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR) and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n = 40) and people with prediabetes (n = 52) and diabetes (n = 66) were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p < 0.001) and people with prediabetes (p = 0.005); and HOMA-%B was found significantly deteriorated in people with diabetes (p < 0.001) compared to control subjects and people with prediabetes. However, serum sRAGE levels did not show any significant alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  7. Antiinflammatory effects of soluble complement receptor type 1 promote rapid recovery of ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Eror, A T; Stojadinovic, A; Starnes, B W; Makrides, S C; Tsokos, G C; Shea-Donohue, T

    1999-02-01

    We examined the effect of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) on mucosal injury and inflammation in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Groups of vehicle- and sCR1-treated rats underwent 30 min of mesenteric ischemia followed by 60 or 120 min of reperfusion. When compared to vehicle-treated rats, treatment with sCR1 (12 mg/kg) prior to 120 min of reperfusion significantly reduced mucosal injury, neutrophil infiltration, leukotriene B4 production, and restored villus height to control levels. The protective effect of sCR1 evident at 120 min of reperfusion was not observed at 60 min of reperfusion despite rapid inactivation of complement. These data suggest that complement inhibition minimized mucosal disruption by facilitating mucosal restitution or interrupting the inflammatory process. Delayed administration of sCR1 for 30 or 60 min into the reperfusion period progressively reduced the protection. sCR1-mediated rapid recovery of rat intestine after ischemia/reperfusion underscores the fundamental role of complement activation in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury.

  8. Induction of tolerance against the arthritogenic antigen with type-II collagen peptide-linked soluble MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Kyung; Jung, Sundo; Park, Se-Ho

    2016-06-01

    In murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), self-reactive T cells can recognize peptide antigens derived from type-II collagen (CII). Activation of T cells is an important mediator of autoimmune diseases. Thus, T cells have become a focal point of study to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of recombinant MHC class II molecules in the regulation of antigen-specific T cells by using a self peptide derived from CII (CII260-274; IAGFKGEQGPKGEPG) linked to mouse I-A(q) in a murine CIA model. We found that recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules could be recognized by CII-specific T cells and inhibit the same T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the development of CIA in mice was successfully prevented by in vivo injection of recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules. Thus, treatment with recombinant soluble MHC class II molecules in complex with an immunodominant self-peptide might offer a potential therapeutic for chronic inflammation in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 331-336].

  9. Serum Activin A and Follistatin Levels in Gestational Diabetes and the Association of the Activin A-Follistatin System with Anthropometric Parameters in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Näf, Silvia; Escote, Xavier; Ballesteros, Mónica; Yañez, Rosa Elena; Simón-Muela, Inmaculada; Gil, Pilar; Albaiges, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Context The Activin A-Follistatin system has emerged as an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism with possible repercussions on fetal growth. Objective To analyze circulating activin A, follistatin and follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) levels and their relationship with glucose metabolism in pregnant women and their influence on fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. Design and methods A prospective cohort was studied comprising 207 pregnant women, 129 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 78 with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their offspring. Activin A, follistatin and FSTL3 levels were measured in maternal serum collected in the early third trimester of pregnancy. Serial fetal ultrasounds were performed during the third trimester to evaluate fetal growth. Neonatal anthropometry was measured to assess neonatal adiposity. Results Serum follistatin levels were significantly lower in GDM than in NGT pregnant women (8.21±2.32 ng/mL vs 9.22±3.41, P = 0.012) whereas serum FSTL3 and activin A levels were comparable between the two groups. Serum follistatin concentrations were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and positively with ultrasound growth parameters such as fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of the third trimester and percent fat mass at birth. Also, in the stepwise multiple linear regression analysis serum follistatin levels were negatively associated with HOMA-IR (β = −0.199, P = 0.008) and the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (β = −0.138, P = 0.049). Likewise, fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of third trimester and percent fat mass at birth were positively determined by serum follistatin levels (β = 0.214, P = 0.005 and β = 0.231, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions Circulating follistatin levels are reduced in GDM compared with NGT pregnant women and they are positively associated with fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. These data suggest a role of the Activin

  10. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Production and Trichloroethylene Degradation by a Type I Methanotroph, Methylomonas methanica 68-1

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sung-Cheol; Bowman, John P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A methanotroph (strain 68-1), originally isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer, was identified as the type I methanotroph Methylomonas methanica on the basis of intracytoplasmic membrane ultrastructure, phospholipid fatty acid profile, and 16S rRNA signature probe hybridization. Strain 68-1 was found to oxidize naphthalene and TCE via a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and thus becomes the first type I methanotroph known to be able to produce this enzyme. The specific whole-cell sMMO activity of 68-1, as measured by the naphthalene oxidation assay and by TCE biodegradation, was comparatively higher than sMMO activity levels in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b grown in the same copper-free conditions. The maximal naphthalene oxidation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 551 ± 27 and 321 ± 16 nmol h-1 mg of protein -1, respectively. The maximal TCE degradation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 2,325 ± 260 and 995 ± 160 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The substrate affinity of 68-1 sMMO to naphthalene (Km, 70 ± 4 μM) and TCE (Km, 225 ± 13 μM), however, was comparatively lower than that of the sMMO of OB3b, which had affinities of 40 ± 3 and 126 ± 8 μM, respectively. Genomic DNA slot and Southern blot analyses with an sMMO gene probe from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b showed that the sMMO genes of 68-1 have little genetic homology to those of OB3b. This result may indicate the evolutionary diversification of the sMMOs. Images PMID:16348920

  11. Activin-like kinase 2 functions in peri-implantation uterine signaling in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Caterina; Tripurani, Swamy K; Large, Michael J; Edson, Mark A; Creighton, Chad J; Hawkins, Shannon M; Kovanci, Ertug; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lydon, John P; Pangas, Stephanie A; DeMayo, Francesco J; Matzuk, Martin M

    2013-11-01

    Implantation of a blastocyst in the uterus is a multistep process tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory network of interconnected ovarian, uterine, and embryonic factors. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands and receptors are expressed in the uterus of pregnant mice, and BMP2 has been shown to be a key regulator of implantation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the BMP type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2), during mouse pregnancy by producing mice carrying a conditional ablation of Alk2 in the uterus (Alk2 cKO mice). In the absence of ALK2, embryos demonstrate delayed invasion into the uterine epithelium and stroma, and upon implantation, stromal cells fail to undergo uterine decidualization, resulting in sterility. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) expression is suppressed during decidualization in Alk2 cKO females. These findings and the similar phenotypes of Cebpb cKO and Alk2 cKO mice lead to the hypothesis that BMPs act upstream of CEBPB in the stroma to regulate decidualization. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down ALK2 in human uterine stromal cells (hESC) and discovered that ablation of ALK2 alters hESC decidualization and suppresses CEBPB mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of decidualizing hESC confirmed that BMP signaling proteins, SMAD1/5, directly regulate expression of CEBPB by binding a distinct regulatory sequence in the 3' UTR of this gene; CEBPB, in turn, regulates the expression of progesterone receptor (PGR). Our work clarifies the conserved mechanisms through which BMPs regulate peri-implantation in rodents and primates and, for the first time, uncovers a linear pathway of BMP signaling through ALK2 to regulate CEBPB and, subsequently, PGR during decidualization.

  12. Activin-Like Kinase 2 Functions in Peri-implantation Uterine Signaling in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Caterina; Tripurani, Swamy K.; Large, Michael J.; Edson, Mark A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Hawkins, Shannon M.; Kovanci, Ertug; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lydon, John P.; Pangas, Stephanie A.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of a blastocyst in the uterus is a multistep process tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory network of interconnected ovarian, uterine, and embryonic factors. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands and receptors are expressed in the uterus of pregnant mice, and BMP2 has been shown to be a key regulator of implantation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the BMP type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2), during mouse pregnancy by producing mice carrying a conditional ablation of Alk2 in the uterus (Alk2 cKO mice). In the absence of ALK2, embryos demonstrate delayed invasion into the uterine epithelium and stroma, and upon implantation, stromal cells fail to undergo uterine decidualization, resulting in sterility. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) expression is suppressed during decidualization in Alk2 cKO females. These findings and the similar phenotypes of Cebpb cKO and Alk2 cKO mice lead to the hypothesis that BMPs act upstream of CEBPB in the stroma to regulate decidualization. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down ALK2 in human uterine stromal cells (hESC) and discovered that ablation of ALK2 alters hESC decidualization and suppresses CEBPB mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of decidualizing hESC confirmed that BMP signaling proteins, SMAD1/5, directly regulate expression of CEBPB by binding a distinct regulatory sequence in the 3′ UTR of this gene; CEBPB, in turn, regulates the expression of progesterone receptor (PGR). Our work clarifies the conserved mechanisms through which BMPs regulate peri-implantation in rodents and primates and, for the first time, uncovers a linear pathway of BMP signaling through ALK2 to regulate CEBPB and, subsequently, PGR during decidualization. PMID:24244176

  13. Relationship of protein molecular structure to metabolisable proteins in different types of dried distillers grains with solubles: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peiqiang; Nuez-Ortín, Waldo G

    2010-11-01

    To date, there has been no study of protein molecular structures affected by bioethanol processing in relation to protein nutritive values of the new co-products of bioethanol production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between protein molecular structures (in terms of protein α-helix and β-sheet spectral intensity and their ratio and amide I to amide II spectral intensity and their ratio) and protein rumen degradation kinetics (rate and extent), estimated protein intestinal digestibility and total truly absorbed protein in small intestine (metabolisable protein) in different types of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), such as wheat DDGS, maize DDGS and blend DDGS (wheat:maize = 70:30). The protein molecular structures of the different types of DDGS affected by processing were identified using diffuse reflectance IR Fourier transform spectroscopy. The results showed that the protein structure α-helix to β-sheet ratio in the DDGS had a strongly negative correlation with estimated intestinal digestibility of ruminally undegraded protein (%dRUP, R - 0.95, P = 0.04), tended to have a significant correlation with the protein PC subfraction (which was undegradable and contained proteins associated with lignin and tannins and heat-damaged proteins) (R 0.91, P = 0.09) and had no correlation (P>0.10) with rumen degradation kinetics (rate and extent), total intestinally absorbed protein supply and degraded protein balance. However, the protein amide I to amide II ratio in the DDGS had a strongly positive correlation with soluble crude protein (CP) (R 0.99, P < 0.01), protein PA subfraction (which was instantaneously solubilised at time zero) (R 0.99, P < 0.01), protein PB2 subfraction (which was intermediately degradable) (R - 0.95, P = 0.04) and total digestible CP (R 0.95, P = 0.04). The amide I to amide II ratio also had strongly negative correlations with ruminally undegraded protein (%RUP: R - 0.96, P = 0.03) and the

  14. Evaluation of soluble CD200 levels in type 2 diabetic foot and nephropathic patients: Association with disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Hasan Onur; Yalcin, Arzu Didem; Celik, Betul; Seyman, Derya; Tetik, Gulsum; Gursoy, Bensu; Kose, Sukran; Gumuslu, Saadet

    2014-01-01

    Background CD200 (OX-2) is a novel immune-effective molecule, existing in a cell membrane-bound form, as well as in a soluble form in serum (s OX-2), which acts to regulate inflammatory and acquired immune responses. Material/Methods We planned this study to evaluate the sOX-2 levels of type 2 diabetic foot (group B), and compare it with that of healthy controls (group A). The patient group had the following values: DM period: 27.9±10.3 year [mean ±SD], HbA1c: 9.52±2.44% [mean ±SD]. Results Blood samples for sCD200 measurement were always taken in the morning between 8 and 10 A.M.. The results were reported as means of duplicate measurements. Concentrations of sOX-2 in the serum samples were quantified using an ELISA kit. Serum hs-CRP levels were measured using an hs-CRP assay kit. The sOX-2 level in group B was 173.8±3.1 and in group A was 70.52±1.2 [p<0.0001). In subgroup analysis of T2DM-DFI patients, we noticed that sOX-2 levels were higher in WGS (Wagner grading system) I and II patients than in WGS III and IV patients. The HbA1c, BUN, creatinine, hs-CRP levels, and sedimentation rates were higher in the patient group (p<0.0001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.005, and p<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions We suggest that there are vascular, immunologic, and neurologic components in DFI, whereas autoimmune diseases and inflammatory skin disorders have only an immunologic component. This is possibly evidence of a pro-inflammatory effect seen in DFI as a vascular complication. PMID:24964809

  15. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels and Idiopathic FSGS in Children: A Single-Center Report

    PubMed Central

    Price, Heather E.; Gallon, Lorenzo; Langman, Craig B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives FSGS is the primary cause of childhood nephrotic syndrome leading to ESRD. Permeability factors, including circulating serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), have been postulated as putative causes in adults with primary FSGS. Similar results have yet to be proven in children. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This cross-sectional single-center study assessed the association of serum suPAR in children with FSGS or other glomerular and nonglomerular kidney diseases. Results This study examined 110 samples retrieved from 99 individuals (between January 2011 and April 2012), aged 1–21 years; of these individuals, 20 had primary FSGS, 24 had non-FSGS glomerular disease, 26 had nonglomerular kidney disease, and 29 were healthy controls. suPAR levels were not significantly different in children with FSGS, non-FSGS glomerular disease, and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, suPAR levels (median [25%–75%]) were higher in children with nonglomerular kidney disease (3385 pg/ml [2695–4392]) versus FSGS (2487 pg/ml [2191–3351]; P<0.05). Female patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria (U-Pr/Cr >2) had lower suPAR levels than those without proteinuria (2380 pg/ml [2116–2571] versus 3125 pg/ml [2516–4198], respectively; P<0.001). This trend was not seen among male participants; suPAR levels in all female participants were lower than in male participants (P=0.03). Thirty-four patients studied were kidney transplant recipients; transplant status was not associated with suPAR levels in patients with FSGS or non-FSGS diagnoses, independent of proteinuria, race, or sex (P>0.05). Conclusions On the basis of these results, circulating suPAR is unlikely the leading cause for childhood idiopathic FSGS. PMID:23620441

  16. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  17. Effect of type of fiber, site of fermentation, and method of analysis on digestibility of soluble and insoluble fiber in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abad-Guamán, R; Carabaño, R; Gómez-Conde, M S; García, J

    2015-06-01

    The effect of type of fiber, site of fermentation, method for quantifying insoluble and soluble dietary fiber, and their correction for intestinal mucin on fiber digestibility were examined in rabbits. Three diets differing in soluble fiber were formulated (8.5% soluble fiber, on DM basis, in the low soluble fiber [LSF] diet; 10.2% in the medium soluble fiber [MSF] diet; and 14.5% in the high soluble fiber [HSF] diet). They were obtained by replacing half of the dehydrated alfalfa in the MSF diet with a mixture of beet and apple pulp (HSF diet) or with a mix of oat hulls and soybean protein (LSF diet). Thirty rabbits with ileal T-cannulas were used to determine ileal and fecal digestibility. Cecal digestibility was determined by difference between fecal and ileal digestibility. Insoluble fiber was measured as NDF, insoluble dietary fiber (IDF), and in vitro insoluble fiber, whereas soluble fiber was calculated as the difference between total dietary fiber (TDF) and NDF (TDF-NDF), IDF (TDF-IDF), and in vitro insoluble fiber (TDF-in vitro insoluble fiber). The intestinal mucin content was used to correct the TDF and soluble fiber digestibility. Ileal and fecal concentration of mucin increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (P < 0.01). Once corrected for intestinal mucin, ileal and fecal digestibility of TDF and soluble fiber increased whereas cecal digestibility decreased (P < 0.01). Ileal digestibility of TDF increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (12.0 vs. 28.1%; P < 0.01), with no difference in the cecum (26.4%), resulting in a higher fecal digestibility from the LSF to the HSF diet group (P < 0.01). Ileal digestibility of insoluble fiber increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (11.3 vs. 21.0%; P < 0.01), with no difference in the cecum (13.9%) and no effect of fiber method, resulting in a higher fecal digestibility for rabbits fed the HSF diet compared with the MSF and LSF diet groups (P < 0.01). Fecal digestibility of NDF was higher compared with

  18. [Molecular cloning of activin betaA subunit mature peptide from peafowl and its application in taxonomy and phylogeny].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fang-Dong; Tong, Xin-Xin; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-03-01

    The sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide have been amplified from white peafowl, blue peafowl (pavo cristatus) and green peafowl (pavo muticus) genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The target fragments were cloned into the vector pMD18-T and sequenced. The length of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide is 345bp, which encoded a peptide of 115 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide demonstrated that the identity of nucleotide is 98.0% between blue peaflowl and green peafowl, and the identity of that is 98.8% between blue peaflowl and white peafow. Sequences comparison in NCBI revealed that the sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during evolution process. In addition, the restriction enzyme map of activins is high similar between white peafowl and blue peafowl. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Mega 2 and Clustalxldx software. The result showed that white peafowl has a closer relationship to blue peafowl than to green peafowl. Considered the nucleotide differences of peafowls' activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides, a highly conserved region, we supported that white peafowl was derived from blue peafowl, and it is more possible the hybrid but just the product of color mutation, or maybe as a subspecies of Pavo genus.

  19. Soluble Forms of Intercellular and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecules Independently Predict Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hemant; Mamtani, Manju; Peralta, Juan; Almeida, Marcio; Dyer, Thomas D.; Goring, Harald H.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Mahaney, Michael C.; Olvera, Rene L.; Almasy, Laura; Glahn, David C.; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Curran, Joanne E.; Blangero, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the role of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in inducing endothelial dysfunction is fairly well-established the etiological role of endothelial dysfunction in the onset of T2D is still a matter of debate. In the light of conflicting evidence in this regard, we conducted a prospective study to determine the association of circulating levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vessel cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1) with incident T2D. Methods Data from this study came from 1,269 Mexican Americans of whom 821 initially T2D-free individuals were longitudinally followed up in the San Antonio Family Heart Study. These individuals were followed for 9752.95 person-years for development of T2D. Prospective association of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 with incident T2D was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and mixed effects Cox proportional hazards modeling to account for relatedness among study participants. Incremental value of adhesion molecule biomarkers was studied using integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) indexes. Results Decreasing median values for serum concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were observed in the following groups in this order: individuals with T2D at baseline, individuals who developed T2D during follow-up, individuals with prediabetes at baseline and normal glucose tolerant (NGT) individuals who remained T2D-free during follow-up. Top quartiles for sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were strongly and significantly associated with homeostatic model of assessment—insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Mixed effects Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed that after correcting for important clinical confounders, high sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were associated with 2.52 and 1.99 times faster progression to T2D as compared to low concentrations, respectively. Individuals with high concentrations for both sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 progressed to T2D 3.42 times faster than those with low

  20. The Role of Activin A and B and the Benefit of Follistatin Treatment in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Doreen Y.P.; Lu, Bo; Hayward, Susan; de Kretser, David M.; Cowan, Peter J.; Dwyer, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activins, members of the TGF-β superfamily, are key drivers of inflammation and are thought to play a significant role in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), a process inherent to renal transplantation that negatively impacts early and late allograft function. Follistatin (FS) is a protein that binds activin and inhibits its activity. This study examined the response of activin A and B in mice after renal IRI and the effect of exogenous FS in modulating the severity of renal injury. Methods Mice were treated with recombinant FS288 or vehicle before renal IRI surgery. Activin A, B, and FS levels in the serum and kidney, and renal injury parameters were measured at 3, 6, and 24 hours after reperfusion. Results Serum and kidney activin B levels were increased within 6 hours postrenal IRI, accompanied by renal injury—increased serum creatinine, messenger (m)RNA expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL); endothelial activation—increased E-selectin mRNA; and systemic inflammation—increased serum levels of IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and TNF-α. Further injury was potentiated by an upsurge in activin A by 24 hours, with further increases in serum creatinine, KIM-1 and NGAL mRNA expression. Follistatin treatment significantly reduced the level of serum activin B and subsequently blunted the increase in activin A. Renoprotection was evident with the attenuated rise in serum creatinine, KIM-1 and NGAL expression, tubular injury score, renal cell apoptosis, and serum IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels. Conclusions We propose that activin B initiates and activin A potentiates renal injury after IRI. Follistatin treatment, through binding and neutralizing the actions of activin B and subsequently activin A, reduced renal IRI by minimizing endothelial cell activation and dampening the systemic inflammatory response. These data support the potential clinical application of FS

  1. Synthesis and photophysical properties of water-soluble sulfonato-Salen-type Schiff bases and their applications of fluorescence sensors for Cu2+ in water and living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Cai, Peiying; Feng, Yan; Cheng, Jinghui; Xiang, Haifeng; Liu, Jin; Wu, Di; Zhou, Xiangge

    2012-07-20

    A series of water-soluble sulfonato-Salen-type ligands derived from different diamines including 1,2-ethylenediamine (Et-1-Et-4), 1,2-cyclohexanediamine (Cy-1 and Cy-2), 1,2-phenylenediamine (Ph-1-Ph-3 and PhMe-1-PhMe-4), and dicyano-1,2-ethenediamine (CN-1) has been designed and prepared. Sulfonate groups of ligands ensure good stability and solubility in water without affecting their excited state properties. These ligands exhibit strong UV/Vis-absorption and blue, green, or orange fluorescence. Time-dependent-density functional theory calculations have been undertaken to reveal the influence of ligand nature, especially sulfonate groups, on the frontier molecular orbitals. Since their fluorescence is selectively quenched by Cu(2+), the sulfonato-Salen-type ligands can be used as highly selective and sensitive turn-off fluorescence sensors for the detection of Cu(2+) in water and fluorescence imaging in living cells.

  2. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  3. MODULATION OF AMNIOTIC FLUID ACTIVIN-A AND INHIBIN-A IN WOMEN WITH PRETERM PREMATURE RUPTURE OF THE MEMBRANES AND INFECTION-INDUCED PRETERM BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Victor A.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Oliver, Emily A.; Duzyj, Christina M.; Lipkind, Heather; Pettker, Christian M.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    PROBLEM Activins and inhibins are important modulators of inflammatory processes. We explored activation of amniotic fluid (AF) activin-A and inhibin-A system in women with intra-amniotic infection and preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). METHOD OF STUDY We analyzed 78 AF samples: “2nd trimester-control” (n=12), “3rd trimester-control” (n=14), preterm labor with intact membranes [positive-AF-cultures (n=13), negative-AF-cultures (n=13)] and PPROM [positive-AF-cultures (n=13), negative-AF-cultures (n=13)]. Activin-A levels were evaluated ex-vivo following incubation of amniochorion and placental villous explants with Gram-negative (LPS) or Gram-positive (Pam3Cys) bacterial mimics. Ability of recombinant activin-A and inhibin-A to modulate inflammatory reactions in fetal membranes was explored through explants’ IL-8 release. RESULTS Activin-A and inhibin-A were present in human AF and were gestational age-regulated. Activin-A was significantly upregulated by infection. Lower inhibin-A levels were seen in PPROM. LPS elicited release of activin-A from amniochorion, but not from villous explants. Recombinant activin-A stimulated IL-8 release from amniochorion, an effect that was not reversed by inhibin-A. CONCLUSION Human AF activin-A and inhibin-A are involved in biological processes linked to intra-amniotic infection/inflammation induced preterm birth. PMID:21992678

  4. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shu-ichi; Tanaka, Suguru; Maeda, Daichi; Morita, Hideaki; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Ito, Takahide; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events. Purpose We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) among cardiac inpatients. Methods and Results In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women) admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P<0.001), LVMI (R = 0.16, P = 0.014) and BNP (R = 0.46, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, the highest suPAR tertile (> 3236 pg/mL) was associated with low LVEF (< 50%) and elevated BNP (> 300 pg/mL) with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–12.1) and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32–21.8), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR)), C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR) to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR) and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046) and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029). Conclusions suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis. PMID:28135310

  5. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis.

  6. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28123053

  7. Activin A accelerates the progression of fetal oocytes throughout meiosis and early oogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Jin; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Wang, Jun-Jie; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Li, Lan; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Activins can exert several roles in ovary development. However, little is known about their involvement in early mammalian oogenesis. In this study, we reported that activin receptors (including ActRIA, ActRIB, ActRIIA, and ActRIIB) are expressed throughout the development of the mouse ovaries from 12.5 days postcoitum (dpc) to 21 days postparturition (dpp). Moreover, we found that in vitro, the addition of activin A (ActA) to the culture medium of 12.5 dpc ovarian tissues accelerated the progression of oocytes throughout meiotic prophase I stages. This result was reproduced in vivo following administration of ActA to pregnant mice. The in vitro effect of ActA was associated with increased expression of premeiotic and meiotic genes (including Dazl, Spo11, Stra8, Scp3, and Rec8) in the ovarian tissues. Mechanistically, ActA-dependent SMAD3 signaling modulated the expression of members of the retinoic acid (RA) system, including the RA degradation CYP26B1 enzyme and the RA receptors. Finally, ActA promoted the survival and growth of fetal and early postnatal oocytes and primordial follicle assembly both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study identifies new roles of ActA in early oogenesis and suggested that ActA and RA might cooperate in promoting meiosis in female germ cells.

  8. Serum Level of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Is Associated with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 10 in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alan C. H.; Lam, Joanne K. Y.; Shiu, Sammy W. M.; Wong, Ying; Betteridge, D. John; Tan, Kathryn C. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, and soluble forms of the receptor (sRAGE) can counteract the detrimental action of the full-length receptor by acting as decoy. Soluble RAGE is produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] and/or by proteolytic cleavage of the membrane-bound receptor. We have investigated the role of A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) in the ectodomain shedding of RAGE. Methods Constitutive and insulin-induced shedding of RAGE in THP-1 macrophages by ADAM10 was evaluated using an ADAM10-specific metalloproteinase inhibitor. Serum ADAM10 level was measured in type 1 diabetes and control subjects, and the association with serum soluble RAGE was determined. Serum total sRAGE and esRAGE were assayed by ELISA and the difference between total sRAGE and esRAGE gave an estimated measure of soluble RAGE formed by cleavage (cRAGE). Results RAGE shedding (constitutive and insulin-induced) was significantly reduced after inhibition of ADAM10 in macrophages, and insulin stimulated ADAM10 expression and activity. Diabetic subjects have higher serum total sRAGE and esRAGE (p<0.01) than controls, and serum ADAM10 was also increased (p<0.01). Serum ADAM10 correlated with serum cRAGE in type 1 diabetes (r = 0.40, p<0.01) and in controls (r = 0.31. p<0.01) but no correlations were seen with esRAGE. The association remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, smoking status and HbA1c. Conclusion Our data suggested that ADAM10 contributed to the shedding of RAGE. Serum ADAM10 level was increased in type 1 diabetes and was a significant determinant of circulating cRAGE. PMID:26325204

  9. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  10. The Effects of Fibroblast Co-Culture and Activin A on in vitro Growth of Mouse Preantral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Karimpour Malekshah, Abbasali; Heidari, Mahmoud; Parivar, Kazem; Azami, Nasrin Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to evaluate fibroblast co-culture and Activin A on in vitro maturation and fertilization of mouse preantral follicles. Methods: The ovaries from 12-14-day-old mice were dissected, and 120-150 μm preantral follicles were cultured individually in α-MEM as based medium for 12 days. A total number of 456 follicles were cultured in four conditions: (i) base medium as control group (n = 113), (ii) base medium supplemented with 30 ng/ml Activin A (n = 115), (iii) base medium co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (n = 113), and (iv) base medium supplemented with 30 ng/ml Activin A and co-cultured with fibroblast (n = 115). Rate of growth, survivability, antrum formation, ovulation, embryonic development and steroid production were evaluated. Analysis of Variance and Duncan test were applied for analyzing. Results: Both co-culture and co-culture + Activin A groups showed significant difference (P<0.05) in growth (on days 4, 6, and 8 of culture period) and survival rates. However, there was no significant difference in antrum formation, ovulation rate, and embryonic development of ovulated oocytes. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the estradiol production on days 8, 10, and 12 between co-culture + Activin A and the control group. Progesterone production also was significant (P<0.05) in co-culture + Activin A group on days 6, 8, 10, and 12 compared to control group. Conclusion: Fibroblast co-culture and Activin A promoted growth and survivability of preantral follicles. However, simultaneous use of them was more efficient. PMID:24375163

  11. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or multiple copies of the SASP-C gene, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha/beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  12. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and uv (ultraviolet) radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of (i) one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; (ii) multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or (iii) multiple copies of the SASP-C genes, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha-beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  13. Solubility of {sup 238}U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using “US in vitro” digestion method

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-04-29

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by “US P in vitro” digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 – 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 – 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  14. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm.

  15. Differential regulation of cellular tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization by the envelope gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatatos, L; Werner, A; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1994-01-01

    Using recombinant and mutant viruses generated between two human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that display differences in cell tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization, we show that these two properties of the virus are regulated by different mechanisms. Whereas there is an association between V3 loop conformation and a particular cellular tropism, soluble CD4 neutralization sensitivity appears to be determined by amino acid differences in the C2 domain of the envelope gp120 that modulate the stability of gp120-gp41 association. Our findings further illustrate the importance of functional interactions among different regions of the envelope gp120 in regulating the biological phenotypes of human immunodeficiency virus and suggest that additional probing of the V3 loop with monoclonal antibodies may identify specific structural features of this loop that determine cell tropism. Images PMID:8035496

  16. Activin A secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells induces neuronal development and neurite outgrowth in an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease: neurogenesis induced by MSCs via activin A.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Kim, Jong Hwa; Sung, Ji-Hee; Na, Duk L; Chang, Jong Wook

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of memory in addition to cortical atrophy. Cortical atrophy in AD brains begins in the parietal and temporal lobes, which are near the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of this study was to activate the neurogenesis in the SVZ of AD brains by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from SVZ of 4-month-old 5XFAD mice. Co-culture of hMSCs with SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. To examine the inducing factor of neurogenesis, human cytokine array was performed with co-cultured media, and revealed elevated release of activin A from hMSCs. Also, we confirmed that the mRNA levels of activin A and activin receptor in the SVZ of 5XFAD mice were significantly lower than normal mice. Treatment of human recombinant activin A in SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that use of hMSCs and activin A to recover neurogenesis in future studies of cortical regeneration to treat AD.

  17. Activin/Nodal signaling controls divergent transcriptional networks in human embryonic stem cells and in endoderm progenitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie; Teo, Adrian; Pauklin, Siim; Hannan, Nicholas; Cho, Candy H-H; Lim, Bing; Vardy, Leah; Dunn, N Ray; Trotter, Matthew; Pedersen, Roger; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-08-01

    Activin/Nodal signaling is necessary to maintain pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and to induce their differentiation toward endoderm. However, the mechanisms by which Activin/Nodal signaling achieves these opposite functions remain unclear. To unravel these mechanisms, we examined the transcriptional network controlled in hESCs by Smad2 and Smad3, which represent the direct effectors of Activin/Nodal signaling. These analyses reveal that Smad2/3 participate in the control of the core transcriptional network characterizing pluripotency, which includes Oct-4, Nanog, FoxD3, Dppa4, Tert, Myc, and UTF1. In addition, similar experiments performed on endoderm cells confirm that a broad part of the transcriptional network directing differentiation is downstream of Smad2/3. Therefore, Activin/Nodal signaling appears to control divergent transcriptional networks in hESCs and in endoderm. Importantly, we observed an overlap between the transcriptional network downstream of Nanog and Smad2/3 in hESCs; whereas, functional studies showed that both factors cooperate to control the expression of pluripotency genes. Therefore, the effect of Activin/Nodal signaling on pluripotency and differentiation could be dictated by tissue specific Smad2/3 partners such as Nanog, explaining the mechanisms by which signaling pathways can orchestrate divergent cell fate decisions.

  18. A truncated, activin-induced Smad3 isoform acts as a transcriptional repressor of FSHβ expression in mouse pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Youn; Zhu, Jie; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-08-06

    The receptor-regulated protein Smad3 is key player in the signaling cascade stimulated by the binding of activin to its cell surface receptor. Upon phosphorylation, Smad3 forms a heterocomplex with Smad2 and Smad4, translocates to the nucleus and acts as a transcriptional co-activator. We have identified a unique isoform of Smad3 that is expressed in mature pituitary gonadotropes. 5' RACE revealed that this truncated Smad3 isoform is transcribed from an ATG site within exon 4 and consists of 7 exons encoding half of the linker region and the MH2 region. In pituitary cells, the truncated Smad3 isoform was phosphorylated upon activin treatment, in a manner that was temporally distinct from the phosphorylation of full-length Smad3. Activin-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 and the truncated Smad3 isoform was blocked by both follistatin and siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smad3. The truncated Smad3 isoform antagonized Smad3-mediated, activin-responsive promoter activity. We propose that the pituitary gonadotrope contains an ultra-short, activin-responsive feedback loop utilizing two different isoforms of Smad3, one which acts as an agonist (Smad3) and another that acts as an intracrine antagonist (truncated Smad3 isoform) to regulate FSHβ production.

  19. Changes in the reproductive function and developmental phenotypes in mice following intramuscular injection of an activin betaA-expressing plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Nyeu; Park, Moon Nyeo; Jung, Hoi Kyung; Cho, Chunghee; Mayo, Kelly E; Cho, Byung-Nam

    2008-01-01

    Background The TGF-beta family protein activin has numerous reported activities with some uncertainty in the reproductive axis and development. The precise roles of activin in in vivo system were investigated using a transient gain of function model. Methods To this end, an expression plasmid, pCMV-rAct, with the activin betaA cDNA fused to the cytomegalovirus promoter, was introduced into muscle of the female adult mice by direct injection. Results Activin betaA mRNA was detected in the muscle by RT-PCR and subsequent Southern blot analysis. Activin betaA was also detected, and western blot analysis revealed a relatively high level of serum activin with correspondingly increased FSH. In the pCMV-rAct-injected female mice, estrus stage within the estrous cycle was extended. Moreover, increased numbers of corpora lutea and a thickened granulosa cell layer with a small antrum in tertiary follicles within the ovary were observed. When injected female mice were mated with males of proven fertility, a subset of embryos died in utero, and most of those that survived exhibited increased body weight. Conclusion Taken together, our data reveal that activin betaA can directly influence the estrous cycle, an integral part of the reproduction in female mice and activin betaA can also influence the embryo development as an endocrine fashion. PMID:19077325

  20. Resistance of primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to soluble CD4 is independent of CD4-rgp120 binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, A; Smith, D H; Marsters, S A; Riddle, L; Gregory, T J; Ho, D D; Capon, D J

    1991-01-01

    The infection of human cells by laboratory strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be blocked readily in vitro by recombinant soluble CD4 and CD4-immunoglobulin hybrid molecules. In contrast, infection by primary isolates of HIV-1 is much less sensitive to blocking in vitro by soluble CD4-based molecules. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference between HIV-1 strains, we isolated the gp120-encoding genes from several CD4-resistant and CD4-sensitive HIV-1 strains and characterized the CD4-binding properties of their recombinant gp120 (rgp120) products. Extensive amino acid sequence variation was found between the gp120 genes of CD4-resistant and CD4-sensitive HIV-1 isolates. However, the CD4-binding affinities of rgp120 from strains with markedly different CD4 sensitivities were essentially the same, and only small differences were observed in the kinetics of CD4 binding. These results suggest that the lower sensitivity of primary HIV-1 isolates to neutralization by CD4-based molecules is not due to lower binding affinity between soluble CD4 and free gp120. PMID:1871120

  1. Specificity and Structure of a High Affinity Activin Receptor-like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Townson, Sharon A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Greppi, Chloe; Lowden, Patricia; Sako, Dianne; Liu, June; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Liharska, Katia; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra; Grinberg, Asya V.

    2012-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), an endothelial cell-specific type I receptor of the TGF-β superfamily, is an important regulator of normal blood vessel development as well as pathological tumor angiogenesis. As such, ALK1 is an important therapeutic target. Thus, several ALK1-directed agents are currently in clinical trials as anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics. Given the biological and clinical importance of the ALK1 signaling pathway, we sought to elucidate the biophysical and structural basis underlying ALK1 signaling. The TGF-β family ligands BMP9 and BMP10 as well as the three type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII have been implicated in ALK1 signaling. Here, we provide a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of BMP9 and BMP10 interactions with ALK1 and type II receptors. Our data show that BMP9 displays a significant discrimination in type II receptor binding, whereas BMP10 does not. We also report the crystal structure of a fully assembled ternary complex of BMP9 with the extracellular domains of ALK1 and ActRIIB. The structure reveals that the high specificity of ALK1 for BMP9/10 is determined by a novel orientation of ALK1 with respect to BMP9, which leads to a unique set of receptor-ligand interactions. In addition, the structure explains how BMP9 discriminates between low and high affinity type II receptors. Taken together, our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into ALK1 signaling that could serve as a basis for novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22718755

  2. The Bacillus subtilis HBsu Protein Modifies the Effects of α/β-Type, Small Acid-Soluble Spore Proteins on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Margery A.; Setlow, Peter

    2000-01-01

    HBsu, the Bacillus subtilis homolog of the Escherichia coli HU proteins and the major chromosomal protein in vegetative cells of B. subtilis, is present at similar levels in vegetative cells and spores (∼5 × 104 monomers/genome). The level of HBsu in spores was unaffected by the presence or absence of the α/β-type, small acid-soluble proteins (SASP), which are the major chromosomal proteins in spores. In developing forespores, HBsu colocalized with α/β-type SASP on the nucleoid, suggesting that HBsu could modulate α/β-type SASP-mediated properties of spore DNA. Indeed, in vitro studies showed that HBsu altered α/β-type SASP protection of pUC19 from DNase digestion, induced negative DNA supercoiling opposing α/β-type SASP-mediated positive supercoiling, and greatly ameliorated the α/β-type SASP-mediated increase in DNA persistence length. However, HBsu did not significantly interfere with the α/β-type SASP-mediated changes in the UV photochemistry of DNA that explain the heightened resistance of spores to UV radiation. These data strongly support a role for HBsu in modulating the effects of α/β-type SASP on the properties of DNA in the developing and dormant spore. PMID:10715001

  3. Mechanical properties and solubility in water of corn starch-collagen composite films: Effect of starch type and concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenhang; Ye, Ran; Liu, Anjun; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Yana

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the possibility of enhancing the properties of collagen with three different maize starches: waxy maize starch, normal starch, and high amylose starch. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that starch-collagen films had a rougher surface compared to pure collagen films which became smoother upon heating. Amylose starch and normal starch increased the tensile strength of unheated collagen films in both dry and wet states, while all starches increased tensile strength of collagen film by heating. Depending upon the amylose content and starch concentrations, film solubility in water decreased with the addition of starch. DSC thermograms demonstrated that addition of all starches improved the thermal stability of the collagen film. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results indicated that except for high amylose starch, the crystallinity of both starch and collagen was significantly decreased when subject to heating. FTIR spectra indicated that intermolecular interactions between starch and collagen were enhanced upon heating.

  4. Controls on iron distributions in the deep water column of the North Pacific Ocean: Iron(III) hydroxide solubility and marine humic-type dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Saori; Kuma, Kenshi; Manabe, Eri; Sugie, Koji; Takata, Hyoe; Isoda, Yutaka; Toya, Kenji; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Takagi, Shohgo; Kamei, Yoshihiko; Sakaoka, Keiichiro

    2009-08-01

    Dissolved Fe in the western and central North Pacific Ocean was characterized by surface depletion, middepth maxima and, below that, a slight decrease with depth similar to the vertical distributions of nutrients, apparent oxygen utilization, Fe(III) hydroxide solubility, and humic-type fluorescence (H-flu) intensity. Dissolved Fe concentrations ([D-Fe], <0.22-μm fraction) in the deep water column were one-half lower in the central region (0.3-0.6 nM) than the western region (0.5-1.2 nM) although the Fe(III) solubility ([Fe(III)sol], <0.025-μm fraction) levels and distributions in deep waters were almost the same between both regions with middepth maxima (˜0.6 nM) at 500-1500-m depth range and then a gradual decrease to ˜0.3 nM at 5000-m depth. Higher [D-Fe] than [Fe(III)sol] in the deep water column of the western region results from the higher production of dissolved Fe from the decomposition of sinking particulate organic matter in the western region than the central region because of the high atmospheric and/or lateral Fe inputs in the western region. Similarity between [D-Fe] level and [Fe(III)sol] value at each deep water depth in the central region may be attributed to [D-Fe] being nearly in the solubility equilibrium with Fe(III) hydroxide in seawater. Strong linear correlation between [D-Fe] and H-flu intensity in the central region and relatively similar linear relationships between [Fe(III)sol] and H-flu intensity in the western and central regions are the first confirmation that humic-type fluorescent dissolved organic matter may be responsible for [D-Fe] in the deep water column as natural organic ligands complexing with Fe(III).

  5. Actions of activin A, connective tissue growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 on the development of the bovine preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    Kannampuzha-Francis, Jasmine; Tribulo, Paula; Hansen, Peter J

    2016-05-17

    The reproductive tract secretes bioactive molecules collectively known as embryokines that can regulate embryonic growth and development. In the present study we tested four growth factors expressed in the endometrium for their ability to modify the development of the bovine embryo to the blastocyst stage and alter the expression of genes found to be upregulated (bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and keratin 8, type II (KRT8)) or downregulated (NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) and S100 calcium binding protein A10 (S100A10)) in embryos competent to develop to term. Zygotes were treated at Day 5 with 0.01, 0.1 or 1.0 nM growth factor. The highest concentration of activin A increased the percentage of putative zygotes that developed to the blastocyst stage. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) increased the number of cells in the inner cell mass (ICM), decreased the trophectoderm : ICM ratio and increased blastocyst expression of KRT8 and ND1. The lowest concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reduced the percentage of putative zygotes becoming blastocysts. Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 increased total cell number at 0.01 nM and expression of S100A10 at 1.0 nM, but otherwise had no effects. Results confirm the prodevelopmental actions of activin A and indicate that CTGF may also function as an embryokine by regulating the number of ICM cells in the blastocyst and altering gene expression. Low concentrations of HGF were inhibitory to development.

  6. Ah Receptor Activation by Dioxin Disrupts Activin, BMP, and WNT Signals During the Early Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Inhibits Cardiomyocyte Functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Kurita, Hisaka; Carreira, Vinicius; Ko, Chia-I; Fan, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates gene-environment interactions. Genome-wide expression profiling during differentiation of mouse ES cells into cardiomyocytes showed that AHR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; Dioxin (TCDD), its prototypical ligand, disrupted the expression of multiple homeobox transcription factors and inhibited cardiomyocyte contractility. Here we treated ES cells with TCDD at daily differentiation intervals to investigate whether TCDD-induced loss of contractility had a developmental window of sensitivity. Surprisingly, contractility was an AHR-dependent TCDD target solely between differentiation days 0 and 3 during the period of panmesoderm development, when TCDD also disrupted expression of genes in the TGFβ/BMP2/4 and wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)signaling pathways, suppressed the secretion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4), WNT3a, and WNT5a and elevated the secretion of Activin A, as determined by ELISA of the secreted proteins in the culture medium. Supplementing the culture medium with BMP4, WNT3a, or WNT5a during the first 3 days of differentiation successfully countered TCDD-induced impairment of contractility, while anti-WNT3a, or anti-WNT5a antibodies or continuous Noggin (a BMP4 antagonist) or Activin A treatment inhibited the contractile phenotype. In Ahr(+/+), but not in Ahr(-) (/) (-) ES cells, TCDD treatment significantly increased mitochondrial copy number, suggestive of mitochondrial stress and remodeling. Sustained AHR activation during ES cell differentiation appears to disrupt the expression of signals critical to the ontogeny of cardiac mesoderm and cause the loss of contractility in the resulting cardiomyocyte lineage.

  7. Ah Receptor Activation by Dioxin Disrupts Activin, BMP, and WNT Signals During the Early Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Inhibits Cardiomyocyte Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Kurita, Hisaka; Carreira, Vinicius; Ko, Chia-I; Fan, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates gene-environment interactions. Genome-wide expression profiling during differentiation of mouse ES cells into cardiomyocytes showed that AHR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; Dioxin (TCDD), its prototypical ligand, disrupted the expression of multiple homeobox transcription factors and inhibited cardiomyocyte contractility. Here we treated ES cells with TCDD at daily differentiation intervals to investigate whether TCDD-induced loss of contractility had a developmental window of sensitivity. Surprisingly, contractility was an AHR-dependent TCDD target solely between differentiation days 0 and 3 during the period of panmesoderm development, when TCDD also disrupted expression of genes in the TGFβ/BMP2/4 and wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)signaling pathways, suppressed the secretion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4), WNT3a, and WNT5a and elevated the secretion of Activin A, as determined by ELISA of the secreted proteins in the culture medium. Supplementing the culture medium with BMP4, WNT3a, or WNT5a during the first 3 days of differentiation successfully countered TCDD-induced impairment of contractility, while anti-WNT3a, or anti-WNT5a antibodies or continuous Noggin (a BMP4 antagonist) or Activin A treatment inhibited the contractile phenotype. In Ahr+/+, but not in Ahr−/− ES cells, TCDD treatment significantly increased mitochondrial copy number, suggestive of mitochondrial stress and remodeling. Sustained AHR activation during ES cell differentiation appears to disrupt the expression of signals critical to the ontogeny of cardiac mesoderm and cause the loss of contractility in the resulting cardiomyocyte lineage. PMID:26572662

  8. The stability of water- and fat-soluble vitamin in dentifrices according to pH level and storage type.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Eun; Choi, Yong-Jun; Park, Yong-Duk; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vitamin stabilities in dentifrices by analyzing various vitamins according to the level and storage temperature. The stabilities of water- and fat-soluble vitamins were investigated in buffer solution at different pH values (4, 7, 8, 10 and 11) for 14 days and in dentifrices at different pH (7 and 10) for 5 months at two temperature conditions (room and refrigeration temperature) by analyzing the remaining amounts using HPLC methods. In the buffer solution, the stability of vitamins B1 , B6 and C was increased as the pH values increased. Vitamins E and K showed poor stability at pH 4, and vitamin B3 showed poor stability at pH 11. In dentifrices, the storage temperature highly influenced vitamin stability, especially vitamins C and E, but the stabilities of vitamins B1 and C according to pH values did not correspond to the buffer solution tests. Vitamin B group was relatively stable in dentifrices, but vitamin C completely disappeared after 5 months. Vitamin K showed the least initial preservation rates. Vitamins were not detected in commercial dentifrices for adults and detected amounts were less than the advertised contents in dentifrices for children.

  9. An Activin/Furin Regulatory Loop Modulates the Processing and Secretion of Inhibin α- and βB-Subunit Dimers in Pituitary Gonadotrope Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Antenos, Monica; Zhu, Jie; Jetly, Niti M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2008-01-01

    Of all ligands of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, inhibins and activins are a physiologically relevant pair that are functional antagonists of each other. Activin stimulates whereas inhibin blocks follicle-stimulating hormone biosynthesis and secretion from pituitary gonadotrope cells, and together, inhibin and activin control the pituitary gonadal axis essential for normal reproductive function. Sharing a similar β-subunit, the secretion of inhibin heterodimers (α/β) or activin homodimers (β/β) as mature bioactive ligands depends, in part, on the proteolytic processing of precursor proteins. A short loop regulatory pathway controlling precursor processing and dimer secretion was discovered. Activin stimulates endogenous inhibin α- and βB-subunit mRNA, protein, and proteolytic processing. Simultaneously, activin stimulated the proconvertase furin through a Smad2/3-dependent process. The data provide a mechanism where the regulation of furin and inhibin subunits cooperates in an important positive short feedback loop. This regulatory loop augments the secretion of bioactive mature activin B, as well as inhibin B dimers, necessary for local follicle-stimulating hormone β regulation. PMID:18826955

  10. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  11. Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Idriss, S D; Gudi, T; Casteel, D E; Kharitonov, V G; Pilz, R B; Boss, G R

    1999-04-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  12. Accumulation of a soluble form of human nectin-2 is required for exerting the resistance against herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Y; Ozaki, K; Iwamori, N; Takakuwa, H; Ono, E

    2016-03-01

    Cell entry of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) requires the interaction of viral glycoprotein D (gD) with the receptor nectin-1 and herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM). In addition, it is known that nectin-2 is also functional as a receptor for HSV-2, although the binding to the gD is weak. To examine an antiviral potential of a soluble form of human nectin-2 (hNectin-2Ig), transfected Vero cells expressing the entire ectodomain of nectin-2 fused to the Fc portion of human IgG were established. Specific binding of hNectin-2Ig to HSV-2 gD was confirmed by ELISA. Competitive ELISA demonstrated that accumulation of hNectin-2Ig in transfected cells increased significantly in a cell culture time dependent manner. Viral growth of several HSV-2 strains was significantly inhibited in the transfected cells that were cultured for 72 hr compared with control Vero cells, but not in cells that were cultured for 24 hr. These results indicate that accumulation of a soluble form of nectin-2 is required for exerting the resistance against HSV-2 infection.

  13. Amount of dietary fat and type of soluble fiber independently modulate postabsorptive conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A in mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Deming, D M; Boileau, A C; Lee, C M; Erdman, J W

    2000-11-01

    Current dietary guidelines recommend a decrease in fat intake and an increase in fiber consumption. Decreased bioavailability (BV) of carotenoids is thought to be associated with both of these recommendations. A 2 x 4 factorial design was used to test the effects of dietary fat level at 10 or 30% of total energy and fiber type using no fiber, silica, citrus pectin or oat gum (7 g/100 g) on beta-carotene (betaC) BV in 4- to 5-wk-old Mongolian gerbils. We assessed BV as both accumulation of betaC and bioconversion of betaC to vitamin A (VA) in tissues. A VA- and betaC-deficient diet was fed for 1 wk followed by one of eight isocaloric, semipurified diets supplemented with carrot powder [ approximately 1 microgram betaC, 0.5 microgram alpha-carotene (alphaC)/kJ diet] for 2 wk (n = 12/group). Increasing dietary fat resulted in higher VA (P: = 0.074) and lower betaC (P: = 0.0001) stores in the liver, suggesting that consumption of high fat diets enhances conversion of betaC to VA. The effect of soluble fiber on hepatic VA storage was dependent on fiber type. Consumption of citrus pectin resulted in lower hepatic VA stores and higher hepatic betaC stores compared with all other groups, suggesting less conversion of betaC to VA. In contrast, consumption of oat gum resulted in hepatic VA and betaC stores that were higher (P = 0.012) and lower (P = 0.022), respectively, than those of citrus pectin-fed gerbils. The level of dietary fat consumed with soluble fiber had no interactive effects on hepatic VA, betaC or alphaC stores. Results demonstrate that betaC BV is independently affected by dietary fat level and type of soluble fiber, and suggest that these dietary components modulate postabsorptive conversion of betaC to VA. This study confirms the negative effects of citrus pectin on betaC BV, and suggests that oat gum does not adversely affect betaC BV.

  14. Identification and expression of Smads associated with TGF-beta/activin/nodal signaling pathways in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynuchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Smad proteins are essential components of the TGF-beta/activin/nodal family signaling pathway. We report the identification and characterization of transcripts representing 3 receptor Smads (Smad2a, Smad2b, Smad3), 2 common Smads (Smad4a, Smad4b) and one inhibitory Smad (Smad7). Phylogenetic an...

  15. Activin Plays a Key Role in the Maintenance of Long-Term Memory and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ageta, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Shiro; Miura, Masami; Masuda, Masao; Migishima, Rika; Hino, Toshiaki; Takashima, Noriko; Murayama, Akiko; Sugino, Hiromu; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Kida, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    A recent study has revealed that fear memory may be vulnerable following retrieval, and is then reconsolidated in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these processes. Activin [beta]A, a member of the TGF-[beta] superfamily, is increased in activated neuronal circuits and regulates…

  16. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of bone morphogenetic proteins and activins in the skin: potential benefits for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Moura, J; da Silva, L; Cruz, M T; Carvalho, E

    2013-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins are phylogenetically conserved proteins, belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, that signal through the phosphorylation of receptor-regulated Smad proteins, activating different cell responses. They are involved in various steps of skin morphogenesis and wound repair, as can be evidenced by the fact that their expression is increased in skin injuries. BMPs play not only a role in bone regeneration but are also involved in cartilage, tendon-like tissue and epithelial regeneration, maintain vascular integrity, capillary sprouting, proliferation/migration of endothelial cells and angiogenesis, promote neuron and dendrite formation, alter neuropeptide levels and are involved in immune response modulation, at least in animal models. On the other hand, activins are involved in wound repair through the regulation of skin and immune cell migration and differentiation, re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and also promote the expression of collagens by fibroblasts and modulate scar formation. This review aims at enunciating the effects of BMPs and activins in the skin, namely in skin development, as well as in crucial phases of skin wound healing, such as inflammation, angiogenesis and repair, and will focus on the effects of these proteins on skin cells and their signaling pathways, exploring the potential therapeutic approach of the application of BMP-2, BMP-6 and activin A in chronic wounds, particularly diabetic foot ulcerations.

  17. Activin A Modulates CRIPTO-1/HNF4α+ Cells to Guide Cardiac Differentiation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duelen, Robin; Gilbert, Guillaume; Patel, Abdulsamie; de Schaetzen, Nathalie; De Waele, Liesbeth; Roderick, Llewelyn; Sipido, Karin R.; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Buyse, Gunnar M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells in basic and translational cardiac research requires efficient differentiation protocols towards cardiomyocytes. In vitro differentiation yields heterogeneous populations of ventricular-, atrial-, and nodal-like cells hindering their potential applications in regenerative therapies. We described the effect of the growth factor Activin A during early human embryonic stem cell fate determination in cardiac differentiation. Addition of high levels of Activin A during embryoid body cardiac differentiation augmented the generation of endoderm derivatives, which in turn promoted cardiomyocyte differentiation. Moreover, a dose-dependent increase in the coreceptor expression of the TGF-β superfamily member CRIPTO-1 was observed in response to Activin A. We hypothesized that interactions between cells derived from meso- and endodermal lineages in embryoid bodies contributed to improved cell maturation in early stages of cardiac differentiation, improving the beating frequency and the percentage of contracting embryoid bodies. Activin A did not seem to affect the properties of cardiomyocytes at later stages of differentiation, measuring action potentials, and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. These findings are relevant for improving our understanding on human heart development, and the proposed protocol could be further explored to obtain cardiomyocytes with functional phenotypes, similar to those observed in adult cardiac myocytes. PMID:28163723

  18. Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-diabetic Post-menopausal Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Md Ruhul, A; Sharmin, H; Luthfor, A; Farzana, S; Liaquat, A

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional comparative study was aimed at investigating the iron status of a group of post-menopausal women with and without diabetes. Thirty-five post-menopausal women in each group were selected purposively from among patients attending the out-patient department of Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), a specialist hospital, and two of its satellite clinics, all in Dhaka. Patients were enrolled based on their existing records. The subjects were matched on age, menstrual status and fasting status at blood draw. Ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) and fasting plasma glucose were measured by standard methods. Dietary information was collected by a specific food frequency questionnaire. No significant difference in plasma ferritin [62.02 ng/ml, (range: 4.68-288.89) vs 54.25 ng/ml (range: 4.58-137.17); p=0.28] was observed between the groups. But a higher level of plasma sTfR was found in diabetic women [(21.12 nmol/l (range: 7.91-39.79) vs 17.63 nmol/l (range: 10.30-110.00); p<0.01]. TFR-F index showed no difference between diabetic and control (p=0.25). Significantly a lower hemoglobin level [10.58±0.67 g/dl vs11.76±1.5 g/dl; p<0.01] was detected in diabetic women. Plasma sTfR (log) did not show any significant association with the dietary parameters and iron indices. No significant association between fasting glucose, ferritin and sTfR was seen except for haemoglobin (r=0.39, p=0.05). Total iron intake recorded was more than the requirement, and was significantly higher in control group [38.11mg/day (range: 19.83-105.63) vs 56.65 mg/day (range: 29.75-109.54); p<0.01)]. More than 97 % of total iron was of plant origin. No differences in heme iron [0.85 mg/day (range: 0.09-4.07) vs. 0.96 mg/day (range: 0.04-4.34), p= 0.17] and vitamin C intake was observed between the groups. Iron indices of non-diabetic women were within the normal range. A higher level of sTfR and a

  19. Engagement of soluble resistance-related calcium binding protein (sorcin) with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 inhibits type I interferon response in cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaying; Wang, Jianchang; Liu, Jue; Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Yongqiang; Xue, Yanfei; Li, Xiaoqi; Cao, Hong; Zheng, Shijun J

    2013-09-27

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, highly contagious animal disease caused by FMD virus (FMDV). Although FMDV-induced immunosuppression in host has been well established, the exact molecular mechanism for such induction is not very clear. We report here the identification of FMDV VP1 as an interferon-suppressor by interacting with soluble resistance-related calcium binding protein (sorcin). We found that VP1 suppressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or Sendai virus (SeV)-induced type I interferon response in HEK293T cells, and that this suppression could be completely abolished by knockdown of sorcin by shRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of sorcin inhibited type I interferon response. Conversely, TNF- or SeV-induced type I interferon response increased when sorcin knocked down, leading to inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. Thus, VP1-induced suppression of type I interferon is mediated by interacting with sorcin, a protein that appears to regulate cell response to viral infections.

  20. Comparative effects of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone on plasma levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Oz Gul, Ozen; Tuncel, Ercan; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Ulukaya, Engin; Gul, Cuma Bulent; Kiyici, Sinem; Oral, Arzu Yilmaztepe; Guclu, Metin; Ersoy, Canan; Imamoglu, Sazi

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) have been associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Preliminary evidence has suggested that thiazolidinediones have the ability to modulate circulating levels of this molecule in the hyperglycemic milieu. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the differential effect of 2 different thiazolidinediones-pioglitazone and rosiglitazone-on plasma levels of sRAGE in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Sixty type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects were randomly assigned to receive pioglitazone (30 mg/d, n = 19), rosiglitazone (4 mg/d, n = 20), or placebo (medical nutrition therapy, n = 21) for 12 weeks. Changes in plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and sRAGE were evaluated at baseline and after 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, the pioglitazone (P < .001) group had a significant increase from baseline in sRAGE values that was not seen in the medical nutrition therapy and rosiglitazone groups. We conclude that, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, pioglitazone-but not rosiglitazone-significantly raised sRAGE, which may contribute to its antiatherogenic effects.

  1. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva-related Activated Activin-like Kinase Signaling Enhances Osteoclast Formation during Heterotopic Ossification in Muscle Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whereas the inhibition of TGF-β signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-β in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  2. Solubility-limited extrinsic n-type doping of a high electron mobility polymer for thermoelectric applications.

    PubMed

    Schlitz, Ruth A; Brunetti, Fulvio G; Glaudell, Anne M; Miller, P Levi; Brady, Michael A; Takacs, Christopher J; Hawker, Craig J; Chabinyc, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    The thermoelectric properties of a highperformance electron-conducting polymer, (P(NDIOD-T2), extrinsically doped with dihydro-1H-benzoimidazol-2-yl (NDBI) derivatives, are reported. The highest thermoelectric power factor that has been reported for a solution-processed n-type polymer is achieved; and it is concluded that engineering polymerdopant miscibility is essential for the development of organic thermoelectrics.

  3. Accurate, quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble type I, II, and III /sup 3/H-acetylated collagens by bacterial and tissue collagenases

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, S.K.; Mookhtiar, K.A.; Van Wart, H.E.

    1986-11-01

    Accurate and quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble /sup 3/H-acetylated rat tendon type I, bovine cartilage type II, and human amnion type III collagens by both bacterial and tissue collagenases have been developed. The assays are carried out at any temperature in the 1-30/sup 0/C range in a single reaction tube and the progress of the reaction is monitored by withdrawing aliquots as a function of time, quenching with 1,10-phenanthroline, and quantitation of the concentration of hydrolysis fragments. The latter is achieved by selective denaturation of these fragments by incubation under conditions described in the previous paper of this issue. The assays give percentages of hydrolysis of all three collagen types by neutrophil collagenase that agree well with the results of gel electrophoresis experiments. The initial rates of hydrolysis of all three collagens are proportional to the concentration of both neutrophil or Clostridial collagenases over a 10-fold range of enzyme concentrations. All three assays can be carried out at collagen concentrations that range from 0.06 to 2 mg/ml and give linear double reciprocal plots for both tissue and bacterial collagenases that can be used to evaluate the kinetic parameters K/sub m/ and k/sub cat/ or V/sub max/. The assay developed for the hydrolysis of rat type I collagen by neutrophil collagenase is shown to be more sensitive by at least one order of magnitude than comparable assays that use rat type I collagen fibrils or gels as substrate.

  4. High Yield Production of a Soluble Human Interleukin-3 Variant from E. coli with Wild-Type Bioactivity and Improved Radiolabeling Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hercus, Timothy R.; Barry, Emma F.; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J.; Webb, Andrew I.; Lopez, Angel F.; Young, Ian G.; Murphy, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) is a polypeptide growth factor that regulates the proliferation, differentiation, survival and function of hematopoietic progenitors and many mature blood cell lineages. Although recombinant hIL-3 is a widely used laboratory reagent in hematology, standard methods for its preparation, including those employed by commercial suppliers, remain arduous owing to a reliance on refolding insoluble protein expressed in E. coli. In addition, wild-type hIL-3 is a poor substrate for radio-iodination, which has been a long-standing hindrance to its use in receptor binding assays. To overcome these problems, we developed a method for expression of hIL-3 in E. coli as a soluble protein, with typical yields of >3mg of purified hIL-3 per litre of shaking microbial culture. Additionally, we introduced a non-native tyrosine residue into our hIL-3 analog, which allowed radio-iodination to high specific activities for receptor binding studies whilst not compromising bioactivity. The method presented herein provides a cost-effective and convenient route to milligram quantities of a hIL-3 analog with wild-type bioactivity that, unlike wild-type hIL‑3, can be efficiently radio-iodinated for receptor binding studies. PMID:23991218

  5. Ultraviolet irradiation of DNA complexed with. alpha. /. beta. -type small, acid-soluble proteins from spores of Bacillus or Clostridium species makes spore photoproduct but not thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, W.L.; Setlow, B.; Setlow, P. )

    1991-10-01

    UV irradiation of complexes of DNA and an {alpha}/{beta}-type small, acid-soluble protein (SASP) from Bacillus subtilis spores gave decreasing amounts of pyrimidine dimers and increasing amounts of spore photoproduct as the SASP/DNA ratio was increased. The yields of pyrimidine dimers and spore photoproduct were < 0.2% and 8% of total thymine, respectively, when DNA saturated with SASP was irradiated at 254 nm with 30 kJ/m{sup 2}; in the absence of SASP the yields were reversed - 4.5% and 0.3%, respectively. Complexes of DNA with {alpha}/{beta}-type SASP from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, or Clostridium bifermentans spores also gave spore photoproduct upon UV irradiation. However, incubation of these SASPs with DNA under conditions preventing complex formation or use of mutant SASPs that do not form complexes did not affect the photoproducts formed in vitro. These results suggest that the UV photochemistry of bacterial spore DNA in vivo is due to the binding of {alpha}/{beta}-type SASP, a binding that is known to cause a change in DNA conformation in vitro from the B form to the A form. The yields of spore photoproduct in vitro were significantly lower than in vivo, perhaps because of the presence of substances other than SASP in spores. It is suggested that as these factors diffuse out in the first minutes of spore germination, spore photoproduct yields become similar to those observed for irradiation of SASP/DNA complexes in vitro.

  6. High yield production of a soluble human interleukin-3 variant from E. coli with wild-type bioactivity and improved radiolabeling properties.

    PubMed

    Hercus, Timothy R; Barry, Emma F; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Webb, Andrew I; Lopez, Angel F; Young, Ian G; Murphy, James M

    2013-01-01

    Human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) is a polypeptide growth factor that regulates the proliferation, differentiation, survival and function of hematopoietic progenitors and many mature blood cell lineages. Although recombinant hIL-3 is a widely used laboratory reagent in hematology, standard methods for its preparation, including those employed by commercial suppliers, remain arduous owing to a reliance on refolding insoluble protein expressed in E. coli. In addition, wild-type hIL-3 is a poor substrate for radio-iodination, which has been a long-standing hindrance to its use in receptor binding assays. To overcome these problems, we developed a method for expression of hIL-3 in E. coli as a soluble protein, with typical yields of >3mg of purified hIL-3 per litre of shaking microbial culture. Additionally, we introduced a non-native tyrosine residue into our hIL-3 analog, which allowed radio-iodination to high specific activities for receptor binding studies whilst not compromising bioactivity. The method presented herein provides a cost-effective and convenient route to milligram quantities of a hIL-3 analog with wild-type bioactivity that, unlike wild-type hIL‑3, can be efficiently radio-iodinated for receptor binding studies.

  7. Solubility assessment of 232Th from various types of soil in Malaysia using USP and DIN In Vitro digestion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Perama, Yasmin Mohd Idris; Salih, Fitri Hakeem Mohd; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2016-11-01

    The overall results of the study showed that the concentrations of 232Th radionuclide using DIN digestion method during gastric phase are 0.0015 mg/kg - 0.0554 mg/kg and 0.0015 mg/kg - 0.0139 mg/kg during intestinal phase, respectively. As for USP digestion method during gastric phase are between 0.0877 mg/kg - 0.4964 mg/kg and 0.0207 mg/kg - 0.2291 mg/kg. The results from the measurements in various types of soils indicates some elevation of 232Th concentration in some types of soil compared to UNSCEAR reference values, in which may be a result from the impact of previous mining activity in the surrounding area and considered to be safe. In general, the results of 232Th concentrations from in vitro extraction technique is considered to be safe. By natural processes, thorium ingestion is getting transferred to living beings through different pathways and need to be monitored in order to assess possible hazards. Environmental studies are generally carried out to trace the pathway of radionuclides/radiotoxic elements to reach living organism. Environmental monitoring and meaningful interpretation of data from man-made pollution are more complicated without adequate knowledge about the natural abundance of radioactive elements in the environment.

  8. Upregulation of contractile endothelin type B receptors by lipid-soluble cigarette smoking particles in rat cerebral arteries via activation of MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-11-15

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of stroke. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Endothelin system plays key roles in the pathogenesis of stroke. The present study was designed to examine if lipid-soluble (dimethyl sulfoxide-soluble) cigarette smoke particles (DSP) induces upregulation of contractile endothelin type B (ET{sub B}) receptors in rat cerebral arteries and if activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) mediate the upregulation of contractile endothelin receptors in the cerebral arteries. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum free medium for 24 h in the presence of DSP with or without specific inhibitors: MEK specific (U0126), p38 specific (SB202190), JNK specific (SP600125), NF-{kappa}B specific (BMS-345541) or (IMD-0354), transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D), or translation blocker (cycloheximide). Contractile responses to the ET{sub B} receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of the ET{sub B} receptors were studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results show that organ culture per se induced transcriptional upregulation of contractile ET{sub B} receptors in the cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells. This upregulation was further increased at the translational level by addition of DSP to the organ culture, but this increase was not seen by addition of nicotine or water-soluble cigarette smoke particles to the organ culture. The increased upregulation of contractile ET{sub B} receptors by DSP was abrogated by U0126, SP600125, actinomycin D, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in this process include activation of MEK and JNK MAPK-mediated transcription and translation of new contractile ET{sub B} receptors. Thus, the MAPK-mediated upregulation of contractile ET{sub B

  9. Biochemical Characterization of the Lactobacillus reuteri Glycoside Hydrolase Family 70 GTFB Type of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Enzymes That Synthesize Soluble Dietary Starch Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuxiang; van der Kaaij, Rachel Maria; Leemhuis, Hans; Pijning, Tjaard; van Leeuwen, Sander Sebastiaan; Jin, Zhengyu

    2015-01-01

    4,6-α-Glucanotransferase (4,6-α-GTase) enzymes, such as GTFB and GTFW of Lactobacillus reuteri strains, constitute a new reaction specificity in glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) and are novel enzymes that convert starch or starch hydrolysates into isomalto/maltopolysaccharides (IMMPs). These IMMPs still have linear chains with some α1→4 linkages but mostly (relatively long) linear chains with α1→6 linkages and are soluble dietary starch fibers. 4,6-α-GTase enzymes and their products have significant potential for industrial applications. Here we report that an N-terminal truncation (amino acids 1 to 733) strongly enhances the soluble expression level of fully active GTFB-ΔN (approximately 75-fold compared to full-length wild type GTFB) in Escherichia coli. In addition, quantitative assays based on amylose V as the substrate are described; these assays allow accurate determination of both hydrolysis (minor) activity (glucose release, reducing power) and total activity (iodine staining) and calculation of the transferase (major) activity of these 4,6-α-GTase enzymes. The data show that GTFB-ΔN is clearly less hydrolytic than GTFW, which is also supported by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of their final products. From these assays, the biochemical properties of GTFB-ΔN were characterized in detail, including determination of kinetic parameters and acceptor substrate specificity. The GTFB enzyme displayed high conversion yields at relatively high substrate concentrations, a promising feature for industrial application. PMID:26253678

  10. Combinatorial actions of Tgfβ and Activin ligands promote oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipankar J; Zameer, Andleeb; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Huynh, Jimmy; Mahase, Sean; Laitman, Benjamin M; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Mitiku, Nesanet; Urbanski, Mateusz; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V; Casaccia, Patrizia; Hayot, Fernand; Bottinger, Erwin P; Brown, Chester W; John, Gareth R

    2014-06-01

    In the embryonic CNS, development of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes is limited by bone morphogenetic proteins, which constitute one arm of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgfβ) family and signal canonically via Smads 1/5/8. Tgfβ ligands and Activins comprise the other arm and signal via Smads 2/3, but their roles in oligodendrocyte development are incompletely characterized. Here, we report that Tgfβ ligands and activin B (ActB) act in concert in the mammalian spinal cord to promote oligodendrocyte generation and myelination. In mouse neural tube, newly specified oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) are first exposed to Tgfβ ligands in isolation, then later in combination with ActB during maturation. In primary OLP cultures, Tgfβ1 and ActB differentially activate canonical Smad3 and non-canonical MAP kinase signaling. Both ligands enhance viability, and Tgfβ1 promotes proliferation while ActB supports maturation. Importantly, co-treatment strongly activates both signaling pathways, producing an additive effect on viability and enhancing both proliferation and differentiation such that mature oligodendrocyte numbers are substantially increased. Co-treatment promotes myelination in OLP-neuron co-cultures, and maturing oligodendrocytes in spinal cord white matter display strong Smad3 and MAP kinase activation. In spinal cords of ActB-deficient Inhbb(-/-) embryos, apoptosis in the oligodendrocyte lineage is increased and OLP numbers transiently reduced, but numbers, maturation and myelination recover during the first postnatal week. Smad3(-/-) mice display a more severe phenotype, including diminished viability and proliferation, persistently reduced mature and immature cell numbers, and delayed myelination. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in mammalian spinal cord, Tgfβ ligands and ActB together support oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation.

  11. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  12. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-product (sRAGE)/pentosidine ratio: a potential risk factor determinant for type 2 diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Zhi Xiang; Chua, Kek Heng; Iqbal, Tajunisah; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2013-04-03

    This study aims to investigate potential diabetic retinopathy (DR) risk factors by evaluating the circulating levels of pentosidine, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-product (sRAGE), advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) as well as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in DR patients. A total of 235 healthy controls, 171 type 2 diabetic without retinopathy (DNR) and 200 diabetic retinopathy (DR) patients were recruited. Plasma was extracted for the estimation of pentosidine, sRAGE, AOPP levels and GPx activity whereas peripheral blood mononuclear cells were disrupted for SOD activity measurement. DNR and DR patients showed significantly higher levels of plasma pentosidine, sRAGE and AOPP but lower GPx and SOD activities when compared to healthy controls. The sRAGE/pentosidine ratio in DR patients was significantly lower than the ratio detected in DNR patients. Proliferative DR patients had significantly higher levels of plasma pentosidine, sRAGE, AOPP and sRAGE/pentosidine ratio than non-proliferative DR patients. High HbA1c level, long duration of diabetes and low sRAGE/pentosidine ratio were determined as the risk factors for DR. This study suggests that sRAGE/pentosidine ratio could serve as a risk factor determinant for type 2 DR as it has a positive correlation with the severity of DR.

  13. Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens are internalized by human dendritic cells through multiple C-type lectins and suppress TLR-induced dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Ellis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Engering, Anneke; García Vallejo, Juan Jesus; Bank, Christine M C; Sanchez-Hernandez, Marta; van Kooyk, Yvette; van Die, Irma

    2007-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by helminths, the parasite eggs induce a T helper 2 cell (T(H)2) response in the host. Here, the specific role of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in initiation and polarization of the egg-specific T cell responses was examined. We demonstrate that immature DCs (iDCs) pulsed with schistosome soluble egg antigens (SEA) do not show an increase in expression of co-stimulatory molecules or cytokines, indicating that no conventional maturation was induced. The ability of SEA to affect the Toll-like receptor (TLR) induced maturation of iDCs was examined by copulsing the DCs with SEA and TLR-ligands. SEA suppressed both the maturation of iDCs induced by poly-I:C and LPS, as indicated by a decrease in co-stimulatory molecule expression and production of IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-alpha. In addition, SEA suppressed T(H)1 responses induced by the poly-I:C-pulsed DCs, and skewed the LPS-induced mixed response towards a T(H)2 response. Immature DCs rapidly internalized SEA through the C-type lectins DC-SIGN, MGL and the mannose receptor and the antigens were targeted to MHC class II-positive lysosomal compartments. The internalization of SEA by multiple C-type lectins may be important to regulate the response of the iDCs to TLR-induced signals.

  14. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  15. Macrophages from the synovium of active rheumatoid arthritis exhibit an activin A-dependent pro-inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    Soler Palacios, Blanca; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Izquierdo, Elena; Criado, Gabriel; Nieto, Concha; Municio, Cristina; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Pablos, Jose Luis; Corbí, Angel L; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease whose pathogenesis and severity correlates with the presence of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines within the inflamed synovium. Macrophage-derived cytokines fuel the pathological processes in RA and are targets of clinically successful therapies. However, although macrophage polarization determines cytokine production, the polarization state of macrophages in RA joints remains poorly defined. To dissect the molecular basis for the tissue-damaging effects of macrophages in RA joints, we undertook the phenotypic and transcriptomic characterization of ex vivo isolated CD14(+) RA synovial fluid (RA-SF) macrophages. Flow cytometry and gene profiling indicated that RA-SF macrophages express pro-inflammatory polarization markers (MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2), lack expression of markers associated with homeostatic and anti-inflammatory polarization (IGF1, HTR2B) and exhibit a transcriptomic profile that resembles the activin A-dependent gene signature of pro-inflammatory in vitro-generated macrophages. In fact, high levels of Smad-activating activin A were found in RA-SF and, accordingly, the Smad signalling pathway was activated in ex vivo-isolated RA-SF macrophages. In vitro experiments on monocytes and macrophages indicated that RA-SF promoted the acquisition of pro-inflammatory markers (INHBA, MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2) but led to a significant reduction in the expression of genes associated with homeostasis and inflammation resolution (FOLR2, SERPINB2, IGF1, CD36), thus confirming the pro-inflammatory polarization ability of RA-SF. Importantly, the macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF was inhibited by an anti-activin A-neutralizing antibody, thus demonstrating that activin A mediates the pro-inflammatory macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF. Moreover, and in line with these findings, multicolour immunofluorescence evidenced that macrophages within RA synovial membranes (RA-SM) also express pro

  16. The novel formulation design of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) type O/W microemulsion I: enhancing effects on oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble compounds in rats and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Araya, Hiroshi; Nagao, Shunsuke; Tomita, Mikio; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    We examined the design of the versatile novel self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) type O/W microemulsion formulation which enhances the oral bioavailability by raising the solubility of poorly water soluble compounds. Namely, seven kinds of poorly water soluble compounds such as disopyramide, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, tolbutamide, and other new compounds, as the model compounds were used to compare the plasma concentration profile of the compound following single oral administration of each compound to rats and beagle dogs as a solution, an oily solution, a suspension (or a powder), an O/W microemulsion, and a SEDDS type O/W microemulsion. And the enhancing effect of the SEDDS type O/W microemulsion on the gastrointestinal absorption of these compounds was evaluated. In the components of the SEDDS type O/W microemulsion, medium chain fatty acid triglyceride (MCT), diglyceryl monooleate (DGMO-C), polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil 40 (HCO-40), and ethanol were used as an oil, a lipophilic surfactant, a hydrophilic surfactant, and a solubilizer, at the mixture ratio of 25/5/45/25 (w/w%), respectively. Thereby, to six kinds of the model compounds except disopyramide, the solubility was from 340 to 98,000 times that in water, and the AUCs in plasma concentration of the compound were equivalent to that of solution or O/W microemulsion administration, or was increased by 1.5 to 78 times that of suspension administration. Accordingly, this novel SEDDS type O/W microemulsion is the versatile, useful formulation which enhances the oral bioavailability by raising the solubility of poorly water soluble compounds.

  17. Transcription factor KLF6 upregulates expression of metalloprotease MMP14 and subsequent release of soluble endoglin during vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; Blanco, Francisco J; Roqué, Mercè; Friedman, Scott L; Suzuki, Toru; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    After endothelial injury, the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) translocates into the cell nucleus to regulate a variety of target genes involved in angiogenesis, vascular repair and remodeling, including components of the membrane transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor complex such as endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. The membrane metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14 or MT1-MMP) targets endoglin to release soluble endoglin and is involved in vascular inflammation and endothelial tubulogenesis. However, little is known about the regulation of MMP14 expression during vascular wounding. In vitro denudation of monolayers of human endothelial cell monolayers leads to an increase in the KLF6 gene transcriptional rate, followed by an upregulation of MMP14 and release of soluble endoglin. Concomitant with this process, MMP14 co-localizes with endoglin in the sprouting endothelial cells surrounding the wound border. MMP14 expression at mRNA and protein levels is increased by ectopic KLF6 and downregulated by KLF6 suppression in cultured endothelial cells. Moreover, after wire-induced endothelial denudation, Klf6 (+/-) mice show lower levels of MMP14 in their vasculature compared with their wild-type siblings. Ectopic cellular expression of KLF6 results in an increased transcription rate of MMP14, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that KLF6 interacts with MMP14 promoter in ECs, this interaction being enhanced during wound healing. Furthermore, KLF6 markedly increases the transcriptional activity of different reporter constructs of MMP14 gene promoter. These results suggest that KLF6 regulates MMP14 transcription and is a critical player of the gene expression network triggered during endothelial repair.

  18. A soluble deletion mutant of the human complement receptor type 1, which lacks the C4b binding site, is a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Scesney, S M; Makrides, S C; Gosselin, M L; Ford, P J; Andrews, B M; Hayman, E G; Marsh, H C

    1996-08-01

    The human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35), is a single-chain glycoprotein consisting of 30 repeating homologous protein domains known as short consensus repeats (SCR) followed by transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The SCR themselves, considered in groups of seven, form long homologous repeats (LHR) which have been designated LHR-A, -B, -C, and -D for the most common human allotype of CR1. A soluble deletion mutant of CR1 which lacks the first seven N-terminal SCR (LHR-A) as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was produced and characterized. The resulting protein, designated sCR1[desLHR-A], lacks the C4b binding site found in LHR-A, but retains the two C3b binding sites found in LHR-B and -C, respectively. The functional activities of sCR1[desLHR-A] were quantitatively compared in vitro to those of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which has been shown to retain all known functions of the native cell surface receptor. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 competed equally for the binding of dimeric C3b to erythrocyte CR1. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were similar in their capacity to serve as a cofactor in the factor I-mediated degradation of the C3b and C4b alpha chains. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were comparable in their capacity to inhibit erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production mediated by the alternative complement pathway. sCR1[desLHR-A], however, was significantly less effective an inhibitor of erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production than sCR1 under conditions which allow classical pathway activation. These results demonstrate sCR1[desLHR-A] to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro.

  19. An Improved Variant of Soybean Type 1 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Increases the Oil Content and Decreases the Soluble Carbohydrate Content of Soybeans[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo; Damude, Howard G.; Everard, John D.; Booth, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetically improved diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) variants were created to favorably alter carbon partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) seeds. Initially, variants of a type 1 DGAT from a high-oil, high-oleic acid plant seed, Corylus americana, were screened for high oil content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nearly all DGAT variants examined from high-oil strains had increased affinity for oleoyl-CoA, with S0.5 values decreased as much as 4.7-fold compared with the wild-type value of 0.94 µm. Improved soybean DGAT variants were then designed to include amino acid substitutions observed in promising C. americana DGAT variants. The expression of soybean and C. americana DGAT variants in soybean somatic embryos resulted in oil contents as high as 10% and 12%, respectively, compared with only 5% and 7.6% oil achieved by overexpressing the corresponding wild-type DGATs. The affinity for oleoyl-CoA correlated strongly with oil content. The soybean DGAT variant that gave the greatest oil increase contained 14 amino acid substitutions out of a total of 504 (97% sequence identity with native). Seed-preferred expression of this soybean DGAT1 variant increased oil content of soybean seeds by an average of 3% (16% relative increase) in highly replicated, single-location field trials. The DGAT transgenes significantly reduced the soluble carbohydrate content of mature seeds and increased the seed protein content of some events. This study demonstrated that engineering of the native DGAT enzyme is an effective strategy to improve the oil content and value of soybeans. PMID:27208257

  20. An Improved Variant of Soybean Type 1 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Increases the Oil Content and Decreases the Soluble Carbohydrate Content of Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Keith; Shen, Bo; Bermudez, Ericka; Li, Changjiang; Hunt, Joanne; Damude, Howard G; Ripp, Kevin G; Everard, John D; Booth, John R; Castaneda, Leandro; Feng, Lizhi; Meyer, Knut

    2016-06-01

    Kinetically improved diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) variants were created to favorably alter carbon partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) seeds. Initially, variants of a type 1 DGAT from a high-oil, high-oleic acid plant seed, Corylus americana, were screened for high oil content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nearly all DGAT variants examined from high-oil strains had increased affinity for oleoyl-CoA, with S0.5 values decreased as much as 4.7-fold compared with the wild-type value of 0.94 µm Improved soybean DGAT variants were then designed to include amino acid substitutions observed in promising C. americana DGAT variants. The expression of soybean and C. americana DGAT variants in soybean somatic embryos resulted in oil contents as high as 10% and 12%, respectively, compared with only 5% and 7.6% oil achieved by overexpressing the corresponding wild-type DGATs. The affinity for oleoyl-CoA correlated strongly with oil content. The soybean DGAT variant that gave the greatest oil increase contained 14 amino acid substitutions out of a total of 504 (97% sequence identity with native). Seed-preferred expression of this soybean DGAT1 variant increased oil content of soybean seeds by an average of 3% (16% relative increase) in highly replicated, single-location field trials. The DGAT transgenes significantly reduced the soluble carbohydrate content of mature seeds and increased the seed protein content of some events. This study demonstrated that engineering of the native DGAT enzyme is an effective strategy to improve the oil content and value of soybeans.

  1. Expression pattern of REIC/Dkk-3 in various cell types and the implications of the soluble form in prostatic acinar development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Watanabe, Masami; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Li, Shun-Ai; Edamura, Kohei; Huang, Peng; Yamaguchi, Ken; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takei, Kohji; Ueki, Hideo; Huh, Nam-Ho; Li, Ming; Kaku, Haruki; Na, Yanqun; Kumon, Hiromi

    2010-12-01

    The tumor suppressor REIC/Dkk-3 is a secretory protein which was originally identified to be downregulated in human immortalized cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of REIC/Dkk-3 in various cell types to characterize its physiological functions. We first examined the expression level of REIC/Dkk-3 in a broad range of cancer cell types and confirmed that it was significantly downregulated in all of the cell types. We also examined the tissue distribution pattern in a variety of normal mouse organs. Ubiquitous REIC/Dkk-3 protein expression was observed in the organs. The expression was abundant in the liver, heart and brain tissue, but was absent in the spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the subcellular localization of REIC/Dkk-3 had a punctate pattern around the nucleus, indicating its association with secretory vesicles. In cancer cells stably transfected with REIC/Dkk-3, the protein was predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) under observation with confocal microscopy. Because REIC/Dkk-3 was found to be abundantly expressed in the acinar epithelial cells of the mouse prostate, we analyzed the effects of recombinant REIC/Dkk-3 protein on the acinar morphogenesis of RWPE-1 cells, which are derived from human normal prostate epithelium. Statistically significant acinar growth was observed in the culture condition with 10 µg/ml REIC/Dkk-3 protein, implicating the soluble form in prostatic acinar development. Current results suggest that REIC/Dkk-3 may play a role in regulating the morphological process of normal tissue architecture through an autocrine and/or paracrine manner.

  2. Activin/Nodal Signaling Supports Retinal Progenitor Specification in a Narrow Time Window during Pluripotent Stem Cell Neuralization

    PubMed Central

    Bertacchi, Michele; Lupo, Giuseppe; Pandolfini, Luca; Casarosa, Simona; D’Onofrio, Mara; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.; Cremisi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Retinal progenitors are initially found in the anterior neural plate region known as the eye field, whereas neighboring areas undertake telencephalic or hypothalamic development. Eye field cells become specified by switching on a network of eye field transcription factors, but the extracellular cues activating this network remain unclear. In this study, we used chemically defined media to induce in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) toward eye field fates. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was sufficient to drive ESCs to telencephalic, but not retinal, fates. Instead, retinal progenitors could be generated from competent differentiating mouse ESCs by activation of Activin/Nodal signaling within a narrow temporal window corresponding to the emergence of primitive anterior neural progenitors. Activin also promoted eye field gene expression in differentiating human ESCs. Our results reveal insights into the mechanisms of eye field specification and open new avenues toward the generation of retinal progenitors for translational medicine. PMID:26388287

  3. Adipose stromal cells differentiation toward smooth muscle cell phenotype diminishes their vasculogenic activity due to induction of activin A secretion.

    PubMed

    Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; Lease, Benjamin R; Lu, Hongyan; March, Keith L; Traktuev, Dmitry O

    2016-09-16

    Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) support endothelial cell (EC) vasculogenesis through paracrine and cell-contact communications. In addition, ASCs differentiate towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype under different stimuli, which prompted their use as a source of mural cells in fabricating small calibre vessels. How ASCs' SMC-lineage commitment affects their subsequent communication with ECs is unknown. The vasculogenic characteristics of human ASCs in progenitor stage and after differentiation towards SMC phenotype were analysed in the present study. Exposure to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 ) or activin A has induced expression of SMC markers in ASCs. Analysis performed after treatment withdrawal revealed that secretome of pre-differentiated ASCs had a reduced potency to support EC survival and these ASCs had diminished ability to support EC vasculogenesis in vitro. Vascularization of subcutaneous implants carrying a mixture of ECs and ASCs was 50% lower when, instead of control, pre-differentiated ASCs were used. Pre-differentiated ASCs had an inferior mitogenic response to EC-produced factors. Differentiation of ASCs was accompanied by upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and a decrease in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) production; however, addition of HGF to the co-culture incubation media did not improve vasculogenesis. In parallel, ASC treatment with TGFβ1 induced secretion of activin A. Augmenting co-culture incubation media with anti-activin A IgG restored the ability of pre-differentiated ASCs to support vasculogenesis to the same degree as control ASCs. The present study suggests that TGFβ1 or activin A-induced ASC commitment to SMC phenotype negatively affects the ability of ASCs to support EC vasculogenesis in applications based on EC and ASC co-injection into target tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  5. Clinical Value of Plasma Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Term Neonates with Infection or Sepsis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Siahanidou, Tania; Margeli, Alexandra; Charoni, Stavroula; Giannaki, Maria; Vavourakis, Eustathios; Charisiadou, Athina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Background. suPAR, the soluble form of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, has been identified as a biomarker of infection in adults but its properties in neonatal infection are not known. Methods. Plasma suPAR levels were determined by ELISA in 47 term neonates with infection (19 bacterial and 28 viral) and in 18 healthy neonates as controls. Thirteen out of 47 infected neonates were septic. In all infected neonates, suPAR levels were repeated at 24 hours, 48 hours, 3–5 days, and 7–10 days following admission. Results. Plasma suPAR levels were significantly increased in infected neonates upon admission, whereas they were highest in septic neonates, in comparison with controls (P < 0.001) and correlated positively with serum CRP levels (P = 0.001). At infection subsidence, suPAR concentrations decreased significantly in comparison with baseline (P < 0.001) but remained higher than in controls (P = 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analysis resulted in significant areas under the curve for detecting either infected or septic neonates, but not for discriminating between bacterial and viral cause of infection. Conclusions. suPAR is a diagnostic biomarker of infection or sepsis in term neonates; however, it cannot discriminate bacterial from viral infections and also its utility for monitoring the response to treatment is questioned. PMID:24882949

  6. Detection of Nitric Oxide Induced by Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 Using Soluble Guanylate Cyclase beta1 Subunit Fused to a Yellow Fluorescent Protein, Venus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuichi; Ozawa, Kentaro; Komatsubara, Akira T; Zhao, Jing; Nishi, Mayumi; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important gaseous molecule involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we report the development of a high-affinity method to detect NO using soluble guanylate cyclase beta1 subunit fused to Venus, a variant of yellow fluorescent protein (sGC-Venus). We measured the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus with and without an NO donor using purified probes. At 560 nm emission, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was increased by approximately 2.5-fold by the NO donor, but the fluorescence intensities of sGC-Venus excited by other wavelengths showed much less of an increase or no significant increase. To measure NO in living cells, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was normalized to that at 488 nm excitation because it showed no significant difference with or without the NO donor. In HEK293 cells overexpressing the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor), the production of NO induced by activation of the AT1 receptor was detected using sGC-Venus. These data indicate that sGC-Venus will be a useful tool for visualizing intracellular NO in living cells and that NO might be a common tool to regulate GPCRs.

  7. Serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor as a biological marker of bacterial infection in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wentao; Han, Yuliang; Zhao, Jin; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Kai; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    The serum concentration of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects immune activation. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the usefulness of suPAR for the diagnosis and prognosis of bacterial infections. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies reporting the detection of suPAR in adult patients with bacterial infections. Seventeen studies were selected from 671 studies. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of suPAR for diagnosing infection were 0.73 and 0.79, respectively, and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.82. Subgroup analyses revealed suPAR showed similar AUC values for diagnosing sepsis and bacteremia, but the AUC for differentiating sepsis from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was only 0.68. Elevated suPAR levels were significantly associated with a high risk of death, with a pooled risk ratio of 3.37 (95% confidence interval, 2.60–4.38). The pooled sensitivity and specificity for predicting mortality were 0.70 and 0.72, respectivfely, with an AUC of 0.77. Serum suPAR could be a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of bacterial infection, but it is relatively ineffective for differentiating sepsis from SIRS. Further investigation is required to evaluate whether using of suPAR in combination with other biomarkers can improve diagnostic efficacy. PMID:27991579

  8. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in chronic liver diseases: serum levels at different stages of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Bona, D; Montalto, G; Clemenza, L; Bascone, F; Accardo, P; Bellavia, D; Craxì, A; Brai, M

    1998-10-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) is an integral membrane protein of many haematopoietic cells and plays an important role in the clearance of complement-associated immune complexes, favouring their transport to liver and spleen macrophages. A small amount of soluble CR1 (sCR1) is also found in plasma and might originate directly from release of leucocytes and other circulating cells. In previous studies, an increase in serum sCR1 level has been observed in liver cirrhosis and end-stage renal failure. High levels have also been found in patients with some haematologic malignancies. sCR1 serum levels were measured using a specific double sandwich ELISA assay. The present study demonstrates the correlation between mean serum sCR1 concentrations and disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, grouped according to the Child-Pugh classification, sCR1 rose as liver function decreased. The presence of neoplastic growth in the liver apparently does not play a role in the increase of sCR1. Serum sCR1 was not elevated in other solid malignancies. Since sCR1 accumulates in liver diseases, evaluation of its serum levels could be useful as a liver function test.

  9. An activin receptor IIA ligand trap promotes erythropoiesis resulting in a rapid induction of red blood cells and haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Carrancio, Soraya; Markovics, Jennifer; Wong, Piu; Leisten, Jim; Castiglioni, Paola; Groza, Matthew C; Raymon, Heather K; Heise, Carla; Daniel, Tom; Chopra, Rajesh; Sung, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Sotatercept (ACE-011), a recombinant human fusion protein containing the extracellular domain of the human Activin receptor IIA, binds to and inhibits activin and other members of the transforming growth factor -β (TGF-β) superfamily. Administration of sotatercept led to a rapid and sustained increase in red blood cell (RBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) in healthy volunteers (phase I clinical trials), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Mice treated with RAP-011 (murine ortholog of ACE-011) respond with a rapid (within 24 h) increase in haematocrit, Hb, and RBC count. These effects are accompanied by an equally rapid stimulation of late-stage erythroid precursors in the bone marrow (BM). RAP-011 also induces a significant increase in erythroid burst-forming units and erythropoietin, which could contribute to additional, sustained effects on RBC production. Further in vitro co-culture studies demonstrate that BM accessory cells are required for RAP-011 effects. To better understand which TGF-β family ligand(s) mediate RAP-011 effects, we evaluated the impact of several of these ligands on erythroid differentiation. Our data suggest that RAP-011 may act to rescue growth differentiation factor 11/Activin A-induced inhibition of late-stage erythropoiesis. These data define the mechanism of action of a novel agent that regulates RBC differentiation and provide the rationale to develop sotatercept for the treatment of anaemia and ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:24635723

  10. Distinct modes of SMAD2 chromatin binding and remodeling shape the transcriptional response to NODAL/Activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Davide M; Gaarenstroom, Tessa; East, Philip; Patel, Harshil; Miller, Daniel S J; Lobley, Anna; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Hill, Caroline S

    2017-01-01

    NODAL/Activin signaling orchestrates key processes during embryonic development via SMAD2. How SMAD2 activates programs of gene expression that are modulated over time however, is not known. Here we delineate the sequence of events that occur from SMAD2 binding to transcriptional activation, and the mechanisms underlying them. NODAL/Activin signaling induces dramatic chromatin landscape changes, and a dynamic transcriptional network regulated by SMAD2, acting via multiple mechanisms. Crucially we have discovered two modes of SMAD2 binding. SMAD2 can bind pre-acetylated nucleosome-depleted sites. However, it also binds to unacetylated, closed chromatin, independently of pioneer factors, where it induces nucleosome displacement and histone acetylation. For a subset of genes, this requires SMARCA4. We find that long term modulation of the transcriptional responses requires continued NODAL/Activin signaling. Thus SMAD2 binding does not linearly equate with transcriptional kinetics, and our data suggest that SMAD2 recruits multiple co-factors during sustained signaling to shape the downstream transcriptional program. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22474.001 PMID:28191871

  11. Activin A Inhibits MPTP and LPS-Induced Increases in Inflammatory Cell Populations and Loss of Dopamine Neurons in the Mouse Midbrain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Rentsch, Peggy; Tröscher, Anna R.; Bamberger, Maximilian; Li, Kong M.; Vissel, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta region and a subsequent loss of dopamine within the striatum. A promising avenue of research has been the administration of growth factors to promote the survival of remaining midbrain neurons, although the mechanism by which they provide neuroprotection is not understood. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory following acute brain injury and has been demonstrated to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against MPP+-induced degeneration in vitro. We hypothesized that activin A may offer similar anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vivo mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. We found that activin A significantly attenuated the inflammatory response induced by both MPTP and intranigral administration of lipopolysaccharide in C57BL/6 mice. We found that administration of activin A promoted survival of dopaminergic and total neuron populations in the pars compacta region both 8 days and 8 weeks after MPTP-induced degeneration. Surprisingly, no corresponding protection of striatal dopamine levels was found. Furthermore, activin A failed to protect against loss of striatal dopamine transporter expression in the striatum, suggesting the neuroprotective action of activin A may be localized to the substantia nigra. Together, these results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory effects in the MPTP and lipopolysaccharide mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28121982

  12. Experimental melanin-protein induced uveitis (EMIU) is the sole type of uveitis evoked by a diversity of ocular melanin preparations and melanin-derived soluble polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Broekhuyse, R M; Kuhlmann, E D; Winkens, H J

    1996-01-01

    Experimental melanin-protein induced uveitis (EMIU) is a CD4 T cell-mediated disease involving the choroid and iris, but sparing the retina. The present study was designed to solubilize uveitogenic antigen from melanin granules without enzymatic digestion, and to investigate some of its elements by comparison with different purified melanin preparations. Many melanin surface-derived polypeptides with molecular weights ranging from 1 to > 100 kDa were obtained by extractions of the prepurified granules with hot lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS). The mixture was electrophoretically separated into seven subfractions, each containing many components and capable of evoking the typical features of EMIU after footpad immunization of Lewis rats. The five low-molecular-weight fractions between M, 1 kDa and 30 kDa exhibited most pathogenicity which was evenly distributed among the fractions. Highly uveitogenic material remained in the melanin preparations even after multiple exhaustive extractions with LDS, and represented about 70% of the detectable protein. The uveal pathogen (UP-X) thus proved to be antigenically stable, and the major part of the pathogenic material was strongly bound to the granule surface layer. Concentrated urea solution was also capable of extracting many uveitogenic melanin polypeptides, but in a different composition than LDS did, and less effectively. Human choroidal melanin provided an LDS-soluble fraction with low pathogenicity. A single intraperitoneal injection of bovine melanin polypeptides together with pertussis toxin, but without footpad immunization in Freund's complete adjuvant, evoked EMIU as well. In all experiments, no uveitis except EMIU was observed, indicating that only one type of uveitogenic epitope was present in a wide variety of carrier molecules. An explanation for this phenomenon is discussed.

  13. Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and its soluble receptor type 1 (sTNFR I) in human active and healed leishmaniases.

    PubMed

    Nateghi Rostami, M; Seyyedan Jasbi, E; Khamesipour, A; Mohammadi, A M

    2016-04-01

    The role of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is not fully understood in human leishmaniasis. We analysed the alterations in the levels of TNF-α, soluble TNF receptor type 1 (sTNFR I), IL-17 and IL-22 productions in active and healed leishmaniases. Blood samples were collected from volunteers with active cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), the same subjects after lesion healing (healed CL = HCL), volunteers with active visceral leishmaniasis (AVL), healed VL (HVL) and healthy controls. Levels of cytokines were titrated on Leishmania Ag-stimulated PBMC culture. The mean level of TNF-α production from stimulated cells was significantly higher in ACL than controls (P < 0·001) and significantly reduced after treatment in HCL volunteers (P < 0·05). The mean level of sTNFR I production was significantly higher in ACL than controls (P < 0·001) and significantly reduced after treatment in HCL volunteers (P < 0·05). The mean level of IL-22 production in AVL was significantly higher than controls (P < 0·05) and was significantly lower in HVL compared with AVL (P < 0·001) and controls (P < 0·05). The levels of TNF-α (P = 0·0025) and sTNFR I (P < 0·01) productions from PBMCs showed significant decreasing trend after treatment in each CL volunteer. Reduction in TNF-α is associated with clinical response to treatment and healing of CL lesions due to L. major.

  14. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  15. Extended in vivo half-life of human soluble complement receptor type 1 fused to a serum albumin-binding receptor.

    PubMed

    Makrides, S C; Nygren, P A; Andrews, B; Ford, P J; Evans, K S; Hayman, E G; Adari, H; Uhlén, M; Toth, C A

    1996-04-01

    A new approach has been used to extend the T(1/2) of human soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in rats. The albumin-binding domains B2A3 (BA) and B1A2B2A3 (BABA) from Streptococcal protein G were fused to the carboxyl terminus of sCR1, and the recombinant genes were expressed and amplified in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Western blot analysis and surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated the binding of rat serum albumin to both sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA but not to sCR1. The in vitro complement inhibitory activity of the fusion proteins was shown to be similar to that of sCR1, indicating that neither the albumin-binding domains nor the presence of bovine serum albumin interfere with sCR1 function. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the T(1/2) of the distribution phase (T(1/2alpha)) was 3.3, 20.0 and 6.0 min for sCR1, sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA, respectively. The T(1/2) of the elimination phase (T(1/2beta)) was 103, 297 and 170 min for sCR1, sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA, respectively. The plasma elimination of sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA was significantly (P < .05) prolonged as compared to sCR1. The proteins showed similar tissue distribution; at 4-hr postdosing, the highest levels of 125I-radioactivity per gram of tissue were localized in the urine, blood, liver, stomach, and small intestine.

  16. Activation of FGFR(IIIc) isoforms promotes activin-induced mesendoderm development in mouse embryonic stem cells and reduces Sox17 coexpression in EpCAM+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peterslund, Janny M L; Serup, Palle

    2011-05-01

    Activin induces the formation of definitive endoderm from mouse ES cells dependent on active fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Here we report that Fgf4 is dispensable for activin A-induced differentiation of mouse ES cells into endoderm. We find that Fgf4(-/-) cells readily differentiate into definitive endoderm without exogenous administration of Fgf4. Additionally, we investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of Fgf receptor (FGFR) isoform distribution in activin A-treated ES cell cultures and find that FGFR(III)c isoforms are expressed in DE as well as non-DE populations, whereas FGFR2(III)b and FGFR4 are found specifically enriched in the DE fraction. Ligands that preferentially activate the FGFR(III)c isoforms induce mesendoderm markers T and Gsc, but reduce expression of the DE marker Sox17 in activin-induced EpCAM(+) cells. In contrast, ligands specifically activating FGFR(III)b isoforms have no effect on either population. Activation of FGFR(III)c isoforms results in a strong mitogenic effect on activin A-induced ES cell progeny early in the differentiation period whereas activation of FGFR(III)b isoforms has only a moderate mitogenic effect confined to the late differentiation period. We conclude that FGFR(III)c-isoform activation selectively drives the differentiation of mES cells toward mesendoderm and that Fgf4 is dispensable for the differentiation into definitive endoderm.

  17. Granulosa cell tumor mutant FOXL2C134W suppresses GDF-9 and activin A-induced follistatin transcription in primary granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Kirsten J.; Nonis, David; Hoang, Yvonne D.; Shimasaki, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    A single somatic FOXL2 mutation (FOXL2C134W) was identified in almost all granulosa cell tumor (GCT) patients. In the pituitary, FOXL2 and Smad3 coordinately regulate activin stimulation of follistatin transcription. We explored whether a similar regulation occurs in the ovary, and whether FOXL2C134W has altered activity. We show that in primary granulosa cells, GDF-9 and activin increase Smad3-mediated follistatin transcription. In contrast to findings in the pituitary, FOXL2 negatively regulates GDF-9 and activin-stimulated follistatin transcription in the ovary. Knockdown of endogenous FOXL2 confirmed this inhibitory role. FOXL2C134W displayed enhanced inhibitory activity, completely ablating GDF-9 and activin-induced follistatin transcription. GDF-9 and activin activity was lost when either the smad binding element or the forkhead binding element were mutated, indicating that both sites are required for Smad3 actions. This study highlights that FOXL2 negatively regulates follistatin expression within the ovary, and that the pathogenesis of FOXL2C134W may involve an altered interaction with Smad3. PMID:23567549

  18. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R.N.; Bueno, P.G.; Avó, L.R.S.; Nonaka, K.O.; Selistre-Araújo, H.S.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved. PMID:25075578

  19. [Inhibin, activin, follistatin, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta): presence in the ovary and possible role in the regulation of folliculogenesis in primates].

    PubMed

    Gougeon, A

    1994-09-01

    The aim of this review is to provide recent data concerning the ovarian production of the inhibin-related peptides and their possible role in the regulation of ovarian folliculogenesis in primates. Activin is mainly produced by recruitable follicles, whereas inhibin, FSP and TGF-beta are mainly produced by preovulatory follicles. Activin could play a key role in the selection of the follicle destined to ovulate by enhancing the responsiveness of granulosa cells to FSH. Activin inhibits production of aromatizable androgens by theca interna cells but, by stimulating the FSH-induced aromatase at the level of granulosa cells, it prepares the early selected follicle to play its further endocrine function. The full endocrine function of the preovulatory follicle is triggered, among others, by inhibin which strongly stimulates the production of aromatizable androgens by theca interna cells, by TGF-beta which may favour cytodifferentiation of granulosa cells, and by FSP which, by binding activin, suppresses the negative actions of activin on preovulatory maturation.

  20. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, R N; Bueno, P G; Avó, L R S; Nonaka, K O; Selistre-Araújo, H S; Leal, A M O

    2014-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved.

  1. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  2. The Notch ligand Delta-like 1 integrates inputs from TGFbeta/Activin and Wnt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonaro, Michael Tewari, Shruti Atamna, Wafa Lazarova, Darina L.

    2011-06-10

    Unlike the well-characterized nuclear function of the Notch intracellular domain, it has been difficult to identify a nuclear role for the ligands of Notch. Here we provide evidence for the nuclear function of the Notch ligand Delta-like 1 in colon cancer (CC) cells exposed to butyrate. We demonstrate that the intracellular domain of Delta-like 1 (Dll1icd) augments the activity of Wnt signaling-dependent reporters and that of the promoter of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) gene. Data suggest that Dll1icd upregulates CTGF promoter activity through both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct mechanism is supported by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous Smad2/3 proteins and Dll1 and by chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses that revealed the occupancy of Dll1icd on CTGF promoter sequences containing a Smad binding element. The indirect upregulation of CTGF expression by Dll1 is likely due to the ability of Dll1icd to increase Wnt signaling, a pathway that targets CTGF. CTGF expression is induced in butyrate-treated CC cells and results from clonal growth assays support a role for CTGF in the cell growth-suppressive role of butyrate. In conclusion, integration of the Notch, Wnt, and TGFbeta/Activin signaling pathways is in part mediated by the interactions of Dll1 with Smad2/3 and Tcf4.

  3. Soluble CD40 ligand is elevated in type 1 diabetic nephropathy but not predictive of mortality, cardiovascular events or kidney function.

    PubMed

    Lajer, Maria; Tarnow, Inge; Michelson, Alan D; Jorsal, Anders; Frelinger, Andrew L; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise

    2010-01-01

    Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) derived from platelets mediates atherothrombosis, leading to proinflammatory and proatherosclerotic responses. We investigated the predictive value of plasma sCD40L for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, progression towards end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and nephropathy. The study was a prospective, observational follow-up study of 443 T1DM patients with diabetic nephropathy (274 men; age 42.1 ± 10.5 years [mean ± SD], duration of diabetes 28.3 ± 8.9 years, GFR 76 ± 33 ml/min/1.73 m2) and a control group of 421 patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes and persistent normoalbuminuria (232 men; age 45.4 ± 11.5 years, duration of diabetes 27.7 ± 10.1 years) at baseline. sCD40L was measured by ELISA. Plasma sCD40L levels were higher in patients with diabetic nephropathy compared to normoalbuminuric patients (median (range) 1.54 (0.02-13.38) vs. 1.30 (0.04-20.65) µg/L, respectively p = 0.004). The patients were followed for 8.1 (0.0-12.9) years (median (range)). Among normoalbuminuric patients, sCD40L levels did not predict all-cause mortality (p = 0.33) or combined fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) (p = 0.27). Similarly, among patients with diabetic nephropathy, the covariate adjusted sCD40L levels did not predict all-cause mortality (p = 0.86) or risk of fatal and non-fatal CVD (p = 0.08). Furthermore, high levels of sCD40L did not predict development of ESRD (p = 0.85) nor rate of decline in GFR (p = 0.69). Plasma sCD40L is elevated in T1DM nephropathy but is not a predictor of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity or deterioration of kidney function

  4. Novel ball-type four dithioerythritol bridged metallophthalocyanines and their water-soluble derivatives: Synthesis and characterization, and electrochemical, electrocatalytic, electrical and gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Tanju; Altındal, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Ali Rıza; Salih, Bekir; Bekaroğlu, Ozer

    2010-11-07

    The phthalodinitrile derivative 3 was prepared by the reaction of 1,4-dithioerythritol 1 and 4-nitrophthalonitrile 2 in dry DMF as the solvent in the presence of K(2)CO(3) as the base by the method of nucleophilic substitution of an activated nitro group in an aromatic ring. The template reaction of compound 3 with the corresponding metal salts gave the novel binuclear MPcs of ball-type (M = Zn 4, Co 5, Cu 6) and their water soluble phthalocyanines 7-9 were obtained from refluxing a suspension of the compounds bearing eight OH side groups, in aqueous NaOH (%30) solution. Newly synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV/VIS, IR, MALDI TOF mass and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy techniques. The electronic spectra exhibit an intense π→π* transition of characteristic Q and B bands of the phthalocyanine core. The electrochemical measurements showed the formation of various mixed-valence oxidation and reduction species of 4 and 6 due to weak intramolecular interactions between the two MPc units. Complex 5 displayed a much higher catalytic activity than those of 4 and 6. It was found that oxygen reduction on the 5-based catalyst occurs through a direct 4-electron transfer pathway with a high water selectivity. However, the overpotential for oxygen reduction is high, probably due to a long distance between the two CoPc units in 5. A.c. and d.c. conductivity measurements were performed as a function of temperature (300-543 K) and frequency (40-10(5) Hz). It was found from d.c. measurements that the values of the pre-exponential factor σ(0) for the investigated samples are in the interval from 1.36 × 10(-3) to 6.20 × 10(2)Ω(-1) cm(-1), inferring that the conduction occurs most probably by hopping between the localized states in band tails. Based on the existing theory of a.c. conduction, it has been concluded that for the low frequency region the dominant conduction mechanism is multihopping at high temperatures (>390 K) whereas for the high frequency

  5. Effect of repetitive high-dose treatment with soluble complement receptor type 1 and cobra venom factor on discordant xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Candinas, D; Lesnikoski, B A; Robson, S C; Miyatake, T; Scesney, S M; Marsh, H C; Ryan, U S; Dalmasso, A P; Hancock, W W; Bach, F H

    1996-08-15

    Hyperacute xenograft rejection may be modified by the activation and depletion of complement (C) using cobra venom factor (CVF). This method of prolonging xenograft survival is toxic and associated with systemic inflammation, which may potentially contribute to the pathologic features of delayed xenograft rejection. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) inhibits both the classical and alternative C pathways and thus limits the production of proinflammatory products such as the anaphylatoxins. Hence, we investigated the effects of various sCR1 and CVF regimens, and combinations thereof, in the discordant guinea pig-to-Lewis rat cardiac xenograft model. Mean graft survival time (MST) was significantly prolonged with repetitive dosing (MST=22 hr) or continuous infusion of sCR1 (MST=32 hr) as compared with unmodified controls (MST=15 min). However, sCR1 did not prevent intragraft deposition of C3 or neutrophil infiltration and resulted in only partial inhibition of C-mediated hemolytic activity in vitro. Grafts in rats treated with a single dose of CVF (MST=67 hr) or repetitive doses of CVF (MST=69 hr) survived significantly longer than those treated with sCR1 alone, and lacked C3 deposition or neutrophil accumulation. Sera from these animals were completely depleted of C-mediated hemolytic activity. Animals treated with a single dose of CVF, or sCRI plus a single dose of CVF (MST=64 hr), had similar xenograft survival times. However, immunohistologic studies showed that addition of sCR1 to a single dose of CVF resulted in decreased macrophage activation and reduced levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) within xenografts as compared with that in recipients treated with CVF alone. Such decreased macrophage activation may result from the binding of C4b by sCR1, since combination therapy was associated with decreased intragraft C4b as compared with either therapy alone. High doses of sCR1 were well tolerated by rats and significantly

  6. Co-expression of Dsb proteins enables soluble expression of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against human type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Wen; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Yao, Yan-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against human IGF-1R forms inclusion body when expressed in periplasmic space of E. coli routinely. Here, we described that co-expression of appropriate disulfide bonds (Dsb) proteins known to catalyze the formation and isomerization of Dsb can markedly recover the soluble expression of target scFv in E. coli. A 50 % recovery in solubility of the scFv was observed upon co-expression of DsbC alone, and a maximum solubility (80 %) was obtained when DsbA and DsbC were co-expressed in combination. Furthermore, the soluble scFv present full antigen-binding activity with IGF-1R, suggesting its correct folding. This study also suggested that the selection of Dsb proteins should be tested case-by-case if the approach of co-expression of Dsb system is adopted to address the problem of insoluble expression of proteins carrying Dsb.

  7. Atypical Activin A and IL-10 Production Impairs Human CD16+ Monocyte Differentiation into Anti-Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Nieto, Concha; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Human CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+/lo)CD16(+) monocyte subsets comprise 85 and 15% of blood monocytes, respectively, and are thought to represent distinct stages in the monocyte differentiation pathway. However, the differentiation fates of both monocyte subsets along the macrophage (Mϕ) lineage have not yet been elucidated. We have now evaluated the potential of CD14(++) CD16(-) and CD16(+) monocytes to differentiate and to be primed toward pro- or anti-inflammatory Mϕs upon culture with GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively (subsequently referred to as GM14, M14, GM16, or M16). Whereas GM16 and GM14 were phenotypic and functionally analogous, M16 displayed a more proinflammatory profile than did M14. Transcriptomic analyses evidenced that genes associated with M-CSF-driven Mϕ differentiation (including FOLR2, IL10, IGF1, and SERPINB2) are underrepresented in M16 with respect to M14. The preferential proinflammatory skewing of M16 relative to M14 was found to be mediated by the secretion of activin A and the low levels of IL-10 produced by M16. In fact, activin A receptor blockade during the M-CSF-driven differentiation of CD16(+) monocytes, or addition of IL-10-containing M14-conditioned medium, significantly enhanced their expression of anti-inflammatory-associated molecules while impairing their acquisition of proinflammatory-related markers. Thus, we propose that M-CSF drives CD14(++)CD16- monocyte differentiation into bona fide anti-inflammatory Mϕs in a self-autonomous manner, whereas M-CSF-treated CD16(+) monocytes generate Mϕs with a skewed proinflammatory profile by virtue of their high activin A expression unless additional anti-inflammatory stimuli such as IL-10 are provided.

  8. Myostatin, activin receptor IIb, and follistatin-like-3 gene expression are altered in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, David L; Cleary, Allison S; Speaker, Kristin J; Lindsay, Sarah F; Uyenishi, Jill; Reed, Jason M; Madden, Molly C; Mehan, Ryan S

    2008-05-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth inhibitor expressed in muscle and adipose. We sought to determine whether expression of MSTN, its receptor activin RIIb (ActRIIb), or its binding protein follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) are altered in subcutaneous or visceral adipose or in skeletal muscle in response to obesity. MSTN and ActRIIb mRNA levels were low in subcutaneous (SQF) and visceral fat (VF) from wild-type mice but were 50- to 100-fold higher in both SQF and VF from ob/ob compared with wild-type mice. FSTL3 mRNA levels were increased in SQF but decreased in VF in ob/ob compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, MSTN mRNA levels were twofold greater in tibialis anterior (TA) from ob/ob mice, whereas ActRIIb and FSTL3 mRNA levels were unchanged. MSTN mRNA levels were also increased in TA and SQF from mice on a high-fat diet. Injection of ob/ob mice with recombinant leptin caused FSTL3 mRNA levels to decrease in both VF and SQF in ob/ob mice; MSTN and ActRIIb mRNA levels tended to decrease only in VF. Finally, MSTN mRNA levels and promoter activity were low in adipogenic 3T3-L1 cells, but an MSTN promoter-reporter construct was activated in 3T3-L1 cells by cotransfection with the adipogenic transcription factors SREBP-1c, C/EBPalpha, and PPARgamma. These results demonstrate that expression of MSTN and its associated binding proteins can be modulated in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle by chronic obesity and suggest that alterations in their expression may contribute to the changes in growth and metabolism of lean and fat tissues occurring during obesity.

  9. Specific activin receptor-like kinase 3 inhibitors enhance liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Daisuke; Oya, Yuki; Masuzaki, Ryota; Ray, Kevin; Engers, Darren W; Dib, Martin; Do, Nhue; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Ho, Karen; Frist, Audrey; Yu, Paul B; Bloch, Kenneth D; Lindsley, Craig W; Hopkins, Corey R; Hong, Charles C; Karp, Seth J

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacologic agents to enhance liver regeneration after injury would have wide therapeutic application. Based on previous work suggesting inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling stimulates liver regeneration, we tested known and novel BMP inhibitors for their ability to accelerate regeneration in a partial hepatectomy (PH) model. Compounds were produced based on the 3,6-disubstituted pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine core of the BMP antagonist dorsomorphin and evaluated for their ability to inhibit BMP signaling and enhance liver regeneration. Antagonists of the BMP receptor activin receptor-like kinase 3 (ALK3), including LDN-193189 (LDN; 4-[6-[4-(1-piperazinyl)phenyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]-quinoline), DMH2 (4-(2-(4-(3-(quinolin-4-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-6-yl)phenoxy)ethyl)morpholine; VU0364849), and the novel compound VU0465350 (7-(4-isopropoxyphenyl)-3-(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine; VU5350), blocked SMAD phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo, and enhanced liver regeneration after PH. In contrast, an antagonist of the BMP receptor ALK2, VU0469381 (5-(6-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)quinolone; 1LWY), did not affect liver regeneration. LDN did not affect liver synthetic or metabolic function. Mechanistically, LDN increased serum interleukin-6 levels and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation in the liver, and modulated other factors known to be important for liver regeneration, including suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and p53. These findings suggest that inhibition of ALK3 may be part of a therapeutic strategy for treating human liver disease.

  10. Binding of soluble CD4 proteins to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and infected cells induces release of envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, T K; Kirsh, R; Ellens, H; Sweet, R W; Lambert, D M; Petteway, S R; Leary, J; Bugelski, P J

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects cells after binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell surface recognition marker CD4. gp120 is noncovalently associated with the HIV transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41, and this complex is believed responsible for the initial stages of HIV infection and cytopathic events in infected cells. Soluble constructs of CD4 that contain the gp120 binding site inhibit HIV infection in vitro. This is believed to occur by competitive inhibition of viral binding to cellular CD4. Here we suggest an alternative mechanism of viral inhibition by soluble CD4 proteins. We demonstrate biochemically and morphologically that following binding, the soluble CD4 proteins sT4, V1V2,DT, and V1[106] (amino acids 1-369, 1-183, and -2 to 106 of mature CD4) induced the release of gp120 from HIV-1 and HIV-1-infected cells. gp120 release was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. The reaction was biphasic at 37 degrees C and did not take place at 4 degrees C, indicating that binding of soluble CD4 was not sufficient to release gp120. The appearance of free gp120 in the medium after incubation with sT4 correlated with a decrease in envelope glycoprotein spikes on virions and exposure of a previously cryptic epitope near the amino terminus of gp41 on virions and infected cells. The concentration of soluble CD4 proteins needed to induce the release of gp120 from virally infected cells also correlated with those required to inhibit HIV-mediated syncytium formation. These results suggest that soluble CD4 constructs may inactivate HIV by inducing the release of gp120. We propose that HIV envelope-mediated fusion is initiated following rearrangement and/or dissociation of gp120 from the gp120-gp41 complex upon binding to cellular CD4, thus exposing the fusion domain of gp41. Images PMID:2006155

  11. Bioactivity of water soluble extracts and some characteristics of white cheese during the ripening period as effected by packaging type and probiotic adjunct cultures.

    PubMed

    Erkaya, Tuba; Şengul, Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the chemical composition, proteolysis and in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme-(ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of white cheeses made using probiotic adjunct cultures (Bifidobacterium bifidum DSMZ 20456 and Lactobacillus acidophilus DSMZ 20079) were investigated. The cheeses were ripened in a vacuum package or brine for 120 d at 4 °C. The cheese samples maintained the probiotic characteristics of the viable cells as >106 cfu/g even after ripening for 120 d. The proteolysis degrees in terms of water-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (WSN/TN), trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) and phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) values in the cheeses increased throughout the ripening. The highest levels of proteolysis were found in cheese made using Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and ripened in a vacuum package. ACE-inhibitory activity of the water soluble extracts (WSEs) of the cheeses increased significantly (P < 0·05) throughout the ripening (IC50 values 82·78-140·99 μg/ml). Use of Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and packaging under vacuum significantly increased the percentage of ACE inhibiting activity. WSEs had DPPH scavenging activity (the IC50 values were 2·41-5·39 mg/ml and the inhibition values were 5·10-10·38%), increasing up to 60 d ripening. In the present study, it was observed that Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 was more effective than Bifido. bifidum DSMZ 20456 in terms of the cheese characteristics investigated.

  12. Low-solubility particles and a Trojan-horse type mechanism of toxicity: the case of cobalt oxide on human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of toxicity of metal oxide particles towards lung cells are far from being understood. In particular, the relative contribution of intracellular particulate versus solubilized fractions is rarely considered as it is very challenging to assess, especially for low-solubility particles such as cobalt oxide (Co3O4). Methods This study was possible owing to two highly sensitive, independent, analytical techniques, based on single-cell analysis, using ion beam microanalysis, and on bulk analysis of cell lysates, using mass spectrometry. Results Our study shows that cobalt oxide particles, of very low solubility in the culture medium, are readily incorporated by BEAS-2B human lung cells through endocytosis via the clathrin-dependent pathway. They are partially solubilized at low pH within lysosomes, leading to cobalt ions release. Solubilized cobalt was detected within the cytoplasm and the nucleus. As expected from these low-solubility particles, the intracellular solubilized cobalt content is small compared with the intracellular particulate cobalt content, in the parts-per-thousand range or below. However, we were able to demonstrate that this minute fraction of intracellular solubilized cobalt is responsible for the overall toxicity. Conclusions Cobalt oxide particles are readily internalized by pulmonary cells via the endo-lysosomal pathway and can lead, through a Trojan-horse mechanism, to intracellular release of toxic metal ions over long periods of time, involving specific toxicity. PMID:24669904

  13. Attenuation of corneal myofibroblast development through nanoparticle-mediated soluble transforming growth factor-β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T.; Tandon, Ashish; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore (i) the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA nanoparticles as a vector for delivering genes into human corneal fibroblasts, and (ii) whether the nanoparticle-mediated soluble extracellular domain of the transforming growth factor–β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene therapy could be used to reduce myofibroblasts and fibrosis in the cornea using an in vitro model. Methods PEI-DNA nanoparticles were prepared at a nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio of 30 by mixing linear PEI and a plasmid encoding sTGFβRII conjugated to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of human immunoglobulin. The PEI-DNA polyplex formation was confirmed through gel retardation assay. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were generated from donor corneas; myofibroblasts and fibrosis were induced with TGFβ1 (1 ng/ml) stimulation employing serum-free conditions. The sTGFβRII conjugated to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin gene was introduced into HCF using either PEI-DNA nanoparticles or Lipofectamine. Suitable negative and positive controls to compare selected nanoparticle and therapeutic gene efficiency were included. Delivered gene copies and mRNA (mRNA) expression were quantified with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and protein with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The changes in fibrosis parameters were quantified by measuring fibrosis marker α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) mRNA and protein levels with qPCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting. Cytotoxicity was determined using cellular viability, proliferation, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results PEI readily bound to plasmids to form nanoparticular polyplexes and exhibited much greater transfection efficiency (p<0.01) than the commercial reagent Lipofectamine. The PEI-DNA-treated cultures showed 4.5×104 plasmid copies/µg DNA in real-time qPCR and 7,030±87 pg/ml sTGFβRII protein in ELISA analyses, whereas Lipofectamine-transfected cultures demonstrated 1.9

  14. PCSK6 regulated by LH inhibits the apoptosis of human granulosa cells via activin A and TGFβ2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Deng-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Ming-Qing; Wu, Hai-Xia; Jin, Li-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian proprotein convertases (PCs) play an important role in folliculogenesis, as they proteolytically activate a variety of substrates such as the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily. PC subtilism/kexin 6 (PCSK6) is a member of the PC family and is ubiquitously expressed and implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. However, in human granulosa cells, the expression of the PC family members, their hormonal regulation, and the function of PCs are not clear. In this study, we found that PCSK6 is the most highly expressed PC family member in granulosa cells. LH increased PCSK6 mRNA level and PCSK6 played an anti-apoptosis function in KGN cells. Knockdown of PCSK6 not only increased the secretion of activin A and TGFβ2 but also decreased the secretion of follistatin, estrogen, and the mRNA levels of FSH receptor (FSHR) and P450AROM (CYP19A1). We also found that, in the KGN human granulosa cell line, TGFβ2 and activin A could promote the apoptosis of KGN cells and LH could regulate the follistatin level. These data indicate that PCSK6, which is regulated by LH, is highly expressed in human primary granulosa cells of pre-ovulatory follicles and plays important roles in regulating a series of downstream molecules and apoptosis of KGN cells.

  15. Altered sex hormone concentrations and gonadal mRNA expression levels of activin signaling factors in hatchling alligators from a contaminated Florida lake.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Kohno, Satomi; Cook, Robert W; Alvers, Ashley L; Hamlin, Heather J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-04-01

    Activins and estrogens participate in regulating the breakdown of ovarian germ cell nests and follicle assembly in mammals. In 1994, our group reported elevated frequencies of abnormal, multioocytic ovarian follicles in 6 month old, environmental contaminant-exposed female alligators after gonadotropin challenge. Here, we investigated if maternal contribution of endocrine disrupting contaminants to the egg subsequently alters estrogen/inhibin/activin signaling in hatchling female offspring, putatively predisposing an increased frequency of multioocytic follicle formation. We quantified basal and exogenous gonadotropin-stimulated concentrations of circulating plasma steroid hormones and ovarian activin signaling factor mRNA abundance in hatchling alligators from the same contaminated (Lake Apopka) and reference (Lake Woodruff) Florida lakes, as examined in 1994. Basal circulating plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations were greater in alligators from the contaminated environment, whereas activin/inhibin betaA subunit and follistatin mRNA abundances were lower than values measured in ovaries from reference lake animals. Challenged, contaminant-exposed animals showed a more robust increase in plasma estradiol concentration following an acute follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) challenge compared with reference site alligators. Aromatase and follistatin mRNA levels increased in response to an extended FSH challenge in the reference site animals, but not in the contaminant-exposed animals. In hatchling alligators, ovarian follicles have not yet formed; therefore, these endocrine differences are likely to affect subsequent ovarian development, including ovarian follicle assembly.

  16. FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Lina; Mfopou, Josue K.; Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen; Bouwens, Luc

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

  17. Role of inhibin and activin in the modulation of gonadotropin- and steroid-induced oocyte maturation in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    PubMed Central

    Petrino, Teresa R; Toussaint, Gesulla; Lin, Yu-Wai P

    2007-01-01

    Background Activin and inhibin are glycoproteins structurally related to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. These peptides were first described as factors that regulate the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) at the pituitary level. The possible role of inhibin and activin, at the ovarian level, in mediating the stimulatory actions of a Fundulus pituitary extract (FPE) and 17alpha,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP) on oocyte maturation was investigated in this study. Methods In vitro culture of ovarian follicles and induction of oocyte maturation were carried out in 75% Leibovitz L-15 medium. Follicles or denuded oocytes were exposed to FPE, inhibin, activin, ethanol vehicle (control group), or DHP. The competence of the follicles or denuded oocytes to respond to the hormones was assessed by scoring germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) used as an indication of the reinitiation of meiosis or oocyte maturation. DHP level was measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Addition of FPE promoted the synthesis of DHP by the granulose cells of fully grown ovarian follicles and thus stimulated GVBD in the oocyte. Presence of porcine inhibin did not hinder the synthesis of DHP stimulated by FPE, although it did inhibit the subsequent GVBD in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the action of inhibin was at the oocyte level. Similarly to the findings with FPE, inhibin also blocked the DHP-induced GVBD in intact follicles, as well as the spontaneous and steroid-induced GVBD of denuded oocyte. Inhibin straightforwardly blocked the response to a low dose of DHP throughout the culture period, while higher doses of the steroid appeared to overcome the inhibitory effect especially at later times. In contrast to inhibin, recombinant human activin A significantly enhanced DHP-induced GVBD in a dose-dependent manner after 48 hr, although activin alone was not able to induce GVBD without the presence of the steroid. Conclusion Taking together with our previous studies that

  18. Electron microscopic studies of the interaction between a Bacillus subtilis alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore protein with DNA: protein binding is cooperative, stiffens the DNA, and induces negative supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, J; Makhov, A; Santiago-Lara, L; Setlow, P

    1994-01-01

    DNA within spores of Bacillus subtilis is complexed with a group of alpha/beta-type small acid-soluble spore proteins (alpha/beta-type SASPs), which have almost identical primary sequences and DNA binding properties. Here electron microscopic and cyclization studies were carried out on alpha/beta-type SASP-DNA complexes. When an alpha/beta-type SASP was incubated with linear DNA, the protein bound cooperatively, forming a helical coating 6.6 +/- 0.4 nm wide with a 2.9 +/- 0.3 nm periodicity. alpha/beta-Type SASP binding to an 890-bp DNA was weakest at an (A+T)-rich region that was highly bent, but binding eliminated the bending. alpha/beta-Type SASP binding did not alter the rise per bp in DNA but greatly increased the DNA stiffness as measured by both electron microscopic and cyclization assays. Addition of alpha/beta-type SASPs to negatively supertwisted DNA led to protein binding without significant alteration of the plectonemically interwound appearance of the DNA. Addition of alpha/beta-type SASPs to relaxed or nicked circular DNA led to molecules that by electron microscopy appeared similar to supertwisted DNA. The introduction of negative supertwists in nicked circular DNA by alpha/beta-type SASPs was confirmed by ligation of these molecules followed by topoisomer analyses using agarose gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:8058784

  19. Targeting activin receptor-like kinase 1 inhibits angiogenesis and tumorigenesis through a mechanism of action complementary to anti-VEGF therapies.

    PubMed

    Hu-Lowe, Dana D; Chen, Enhong; Zhang, Lianglin; Watson, Katherine D; Mancuso, Patrizia; Lappin, Patrick; Wickman, Grant; Chen, Jeffrey H; Wang, Jianying; Jiang, Xin; Amundson, Karin; Simon, Ronald; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Bergqvist, Simon; Feng, Zheng; Swanson, Terri A; Simmons, Brett H; Lippincott, John; Casperson, Gerald F; Levin, Wendy J; Stampino, Corrado Gallo; Shalinsky, David R; Ferrara, Katherine W; Fiedler, Walter; Bertolini, Francesco

    2011-02-15

    Genetic and molecular studies suggest that activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) plays an important role in vascular development, remodeling, and pathologic angiogenesis. Here we investigated the role of ALK1 in angiogenesis in the context of common proangiogenic factors [PAF; VEGF-A and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)]. We observed that PAFs stimulated ALK1-mediated signaling, including Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and Id-1 expression, cell spreading, and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells (EC). An antibody specifically targeting ALK1 (anti-ALK1) markedly inhibited these events. In mice, anti-ALK1 suppressed Matrigel angiogenesis stimulated by PAFs and inhibited xenograft tumor growth by attenuating both blood and lymphatic vessel angiogenesis. In a human melanoma model with acquired resistance to a VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor, anti-ALK1 also delayed tumor growth and disturbed vascular normalization associated with VEGF receptor inhibition. In a human/mouse chimera tumor model, targeting human ALK1 decreased human vessel density and improved antitumor efficacy when combined with bevacizumab (anti-VEGF). Antiangiogenesis and antitumor efficacy were associated with disrupted co-localization of ECs with desmin(+) perivascular cells, and reduction of blood flow primarily in large/mature vessels as assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. Thus, ALK1 may play a role in stabilizing angiogenic vessels and contribute to resistance to anti-VEGF therapies. Given our observation of its expression in the vasculature of many human tumor types and in circulating ECs from patients with advanced cancers, ALK1 blockade may represent an effective therapeutic opportunity complementary to the current antiangiogenic modalities in the clinic.

  20. Endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1 heterozygous mice have a distinct pulmonary and hepatic angiogenic profile and response to anti-VEGF treatment.

    PubMed

    Ardelean, Daniela S; Jerkic, Mirjana; Yin, Melissa; Peter, Madonna; Ngan, Bo; Kerbel, Robert S; Foster, F Stuart; Letarte, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular dysplasia associated with dysregulated angiogenesis and arteriovascular malformations. The disease is caused by mutations in endoglin (ENG; HHT1) or activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; HHT2) genes, coding for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily receptors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in HHT and beneficial effects of anti-VEGF treatment were recently reported in HHT patients. To investigate the systemic angiogenic phenotype of Endoglin and Alk1 mutant mice and their response to anti-VEGF therapy, we assessed microvessel density (MVD) in multiple organs after treatment with an antibody to mouse VEGF or vehicle. Lungs were the only organ showing an angiogenic defect, with reduced peripheral MVD and secondary right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), yet distinctly associated with a fourfold increase in thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in Eng (+/-) versus a rise in angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in Alk1 (+/-) mice. Anti-VEGF treatment did reduce lung VEGF levels but interestingly, led to an increase in peripheral pulmonary MVD and attenuation of RVH; it also normalized TSP-1 and Ang-2 expression. Hepatic MVD, unaffected in mutant mice, was reduced by anti-VEGF therapy in heterozygous and wild type mice, indicating a liver-specific effect of treatment. Contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound demonstrated a reduction in hepatic microvascular perfusion after anti-VEGF treatment only in Eng (+/-) mice. Our findings indicate that the mechanisms responsible for the angiogenic imbalance and the response to anti-VEGF therapy differ between Eng and Alk1 heterozygous mice and raise the need for systemic monitoring of anti-angiogenic therapy effects in HHT patients.

  1. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  2. Production of bioactive chicken (Gallus gallus) follistatin-type proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Park, Sung Kwon; Kim, Yong Soo

    2015-12-01

    Follistatin (FST) is a cysteine-rich autocrine glycoprotein and plays an important role in mammalian prenatal and postnatal development. FST binds to and inhibit myostatin (MSTN), a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and FST abundance enhances muscle growth in animals via inhibition of MSTN activity. The objective of this study was to produce biologically active, four chicken FST-type proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system. Gibson assembly cloning method was used to insert the DNA fragments of four FST-type proteins, designated as FST288, NDFSD1/2, NDFSD1, and NDFSD1/1, into pMALc5x vector downstream of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) gene, and the plasmids containing the inserts were eventually transformed into Shuffle E. coli strain for protein expression. We observed a soluble expression of the four MBP-fused FST-type proteins, and the proteins could be easily purified by the combination of amylose and heparin resin affinity chromatography. MBP-fused FST-type proteins demonstrated their affinity to anti-FST antibody. In an in vitro reporter gene assay to examine their potencies and selectivities to different ligands (MSTN, GDF11, and activin A), the four FST-type proteins (MBP-FST288, MBP-NDFSD1/2, MBP-NDFSD1, and MBP-NDFSD1/1) showed different potency and selectivity against the three ligands from each other. Ligand selectivity of each FST-type proteins was similar to its counterpart FST-type protein of eukaryotic origin. In conclusion, we could produce four FST-type proteins having different ligand selectivity in E. coli, and the results imply that economic production of a large amount of FST-type proteins with different ligand selectivity is possible to examine their potential use in meat-producing animals.

  3. The structure-activity relationship study on 2-, 5-, and 6-position of the water soluble 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives blocking N-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Niwa, Seiji; Ohno, Seiji; Tokumasu, Munetaka; Masuzawa, Yoko; Nakanishi, Chika; Nakajo, Akira; Onishi, Tomoyuki; Koganei, Hajime; Fujita, Shin-Ichi; Takeda, Tomoko; Kito, Morikazu; Ono, Yukitsugu; Saitou, Yuki; Takahara, Akira; Iwata, Seinosuke; Shoji, Masataka

    2008-09-01

    In order to find an injectable and selective N-type calcium channel blocker, we have performed the structure-activity relationship (SAR) study on the 2-, 5-, and 6-position of 1,4-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylate derivative APJ2708 (2), which is a derivative of Cilnidipine and has L/N-type calcium channel dual inhibitory activities. As a consequence of the optimization, 6-dimethylacetal derivative 7 was found to have an effective inhibitory activity against N-type calcium channels with more than 170-fold lower activity for L-type channel compared to that of APJ2708.

  4. Soluble complement receptor type 1 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vedeler, C A; Matre, R; Sadallah, S; Schifferli, J

    1996-06-01

    Activation of complement is critically involved in inflammatory reactions in both Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Soluble human complement receptor 1 (sCR1) blocks complement activation by both classical and alternative pathways. We studied serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of sCR1 in 23 patients with GBS, 27 patients with MS and 30 controls. No significant differences were found between patients and controls. Transient liver affection probably caused high serum sCR1 levels in two patients with GBS. The serum and CSF sCR1 levels were not correlated to the disease activity of GBS and MS, nor to the relapsing-remitting or chronic-progressive forms of MS. In GBS the CSF sCR1 levels correlated with the CSF total protein concentrations (r = 0.9, P < 0.01), suggesting that sCR1 leaks from serum into CSF via a damaged blood-nerve barrier. The serum sCR1 levels in GBS were slightly higher than in MS (P < 0.05). Whether this reflects changes in the release or consumption of sCR1 in these patients is at present unknown.

  5. Recombinant soluble, multimeric HA and NA exhibit distinctive types of protection against pandemic swine-origin 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Berend Jan; Bodewes, Rogier; de Vries, Robert P; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bartelink, Willem; van Amerongen, Geert; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rottier, Peter J M

    2010-10-01

    The emergence and subsequent swift and global spread of the swine-origin influenza virus A(H1N1) in 2009 once again emphasizes the strong need for effective vaccines that can be developed rapidly and applied safely. With this aim, we produced soluble, multimeric forms of the 2009 A(H1N1) HA (sHA(3)) and NA (sNA(4)) surface glycoproteins using a virus-free mammalian expression system and evaluated their efficacy as vaccines in ferrets. Immunization twice with 3.75-microg doses of these antigens elicited strong antibody responses, which were adjuvant dependent. Interestingly, coadministration of both antigens strongly enhanced the HA-specific but not the NA-specific responses. Distinct patterns of protection were observed upon challenge inoculation with the homologous H1N1 virus. Whereas vaccination with sHA(3) dramatically reduced virus replication (e.g., by lowering pulmonary titers by about 5 log(10) units), immunization with sNA(4) markedly decreased the clinical effects of infection, such as body weight loss and lung pathology. Clearly, optimal protection was achieved by the combination of the two antigens. Our observations demonstrate the great vaccine potential of multimeric HA and NA ectodomains, as these can be easily, rapidly, flexibly, and safely produced in high quantities. In particular, our study underscores the underrated importance of NA in influenza vaccination, which we found to profoundly and specifically contribute to protection by HA. Its inclusion in a vaccine is likely to reduce the HA dose required and to broaden the protective immunity.

  6. The interaction of soluble human complement receptor type 1 (sCR1, BRL55730) with human complement component C4.

    PubMed

    Gibb, A L; Freeman, A M; Smith, R A; Edmonds, S; Sim, E

    1993-01-22

    Human CR1 is a membrane-bound protein which plays an important role in the control of the human complement system. In addition to its involvement in the processing and clearance of immune complexes with C3b or C4b on their surface, CR1 acts as a cofactor for the proteolysis of C3b and C4b by Factor I. sCR1 is a recombinant, soluble form of CR1 which retains the cofactor activities of CR1, and is of potential therapeutic value for the suppression of complement-mediated tissue damage in vivo. An assay has been established using microtitre plates to explore the binding of sCR1 to the two isotypes of C4, C4A and C4B, and to C4 fragments. Specific binding of 125I-sCR1 to C4b and ammonia-treated C4 has been demonstrated. The binding of 125I-sCR1 to ammonia-treated C4 is dependent on pH and ionic strength, decreasing with an increase in pH and with an increase in ionic strength. At physiological ionic strength, up to twice as much 125I-sCR1 bound to ammonia-treated C4A as bound to ammonia-treated C4B. This preference of sCR1 for binding to the C4A isotype has implications for the clinical association of immune complex disease with C4A null alleles.

  7. Endogenous IL-1R1 Signaling Is Critical for Cognate CD4+ T Cell Help for Induction of In Vivo Type 1 and Type 2 Antipolysaccharide and Antiprotein Ig Isotype Responses to Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, but Not to a Soluble Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Isotype Responses to Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae , but Not to a Soluble Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine1,2 Quanyi Chen, Goutam Sen, and Clifford M...intact Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn). Because type 1 IL-1R (IL-1R1) signaling is MyD88 dependent, a role for endogenous IL-1 was determined. IL-1R1... Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), a Gram-positive extracellular bacterium, elicits T cell-inde- pendent (TI) IgM responses specific for the

  8. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  9. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  10. Applications of Solubility Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  11. Up-regulation of JAM-1 in AR42J cells treated with activin A and betacellulin and the diabetic regenerating islets.

    PubMed

    Yoshikumi, Yukako; Ohno, Hideki; Suzuki, Junko; Isshiki, Masashi; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Omata, Masao; Fujita, Toshiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic AR42J cells demonstrate the pluripotency in precursor cells of the gut endoderm and also provide an excellent model system to study the differentiation of the pancreas. Using the mRNA differential display technique, we identified junctional adhesion molecule-1 (JAM-1), a component of the tight junction, was highly up-regulated during the differentiation of AR42J cells, although junctions were not formed. The expression level of JAM-1 showed an up-regulation in the mRNA level after 3 hours and in the protein level after 24 hours in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells. The expressions of its signaling molecules, PAR-3 and atypical PKC lambda, also increased after the addition of activin A + betacellulin. When JAM-1 was over-expressed in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells, tagged-JAM-1 was observed in cytoplasm as vesicular structures and JAM-1 was colocalized with Rab3B and Rab13, members of the Rab family expressed at tight junctions. In streptozotocin-induced regenerating islets, the expression of JAM-1 was also up-regulated in the mRNA level and the protein level. JAM-1 might therefore play an important role in the differentiation of AR42J cells and the regeneration of pancreatic islets.

  12. Tiling of R7 Axons in the Drosophila Visual System is Mediated Both by Transduction of an Activin Signal to the Nucleus and by Mutual Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chun-Yuan; Herman, Tory; Yonekura, Shinichi; Gao, Shuying; Wang, Jian; Serpe, Mihaela; O’Connor, Michael B.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence; Lee, Chi-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Summary The organization of neuronal wiring into layers and columns is a common feature of both vertebrate and invertebrate brains. In the Drosophila visual system, each R7 photoreceptor axon projects within a single column to a specific layer of the optic lobe. We refer to the restriction of terminals to single columns as tiling. In a genetic screen based on an R7-dependent behavior, we identified the Activin receptor Baboon and the nuclear import adaptor Importin-α3 as being required to prevent R7 axon terminals from overlapping with the terminals of R7s in neighboring columns. This tiling function requires the Baboon ligand, dActivin, the transcription factor, dSmad2, and retrograde transport from the growth cone to the R7 nucleus. We propose that dActivin is an autocrine signal that restricts R7 growth cone motility, and we demonstrate that it acts in parallel with a paracrine signal that mediates repulsion between R7 terminals. PMID:18054857

  13. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  14. Nanoemulsion delivery systems for oil-soluble vitamins: Influence of carrier oil type on lipid digestion and vitamin D3 bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-15

    The influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 encapsulated within oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared using a natural surfactant (quillaja saponin) was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model: mouth; stomach; small intestine. The rate of free fatty acid release during lipid digestion decreased in the following order: medium chain triglycerides (MCT) > corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil. Conversely, the measured bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 decreased in the following order: corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil > MCT. These results show that carrier oil type has a considerable impact on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility, which was attributed to differences in the release of bioactives from lipid droplets, and their solubilization in mixed micelles. Nanoemulsions prepared using long chain triglycerides (corn or fish oil) were most effective at increasing vitamin bioaccessibility.

  15. Crystal Structure of a Soluble Fragment of the Membrane Fusion Protein HlyD in a Type I Secretion System of Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Lee, Minho; Lee, Seunghwa; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-03-01

    The protein toxin HlyA of Escherichia coli is exported without a periplasmic intermediate by the type I secretion system (T1SS). The T1SS is composed of an inner membrane ABC transporter HlyB, an outer-membrane channel protein TolC, and a membrane fusion protein HlyD. However, the assembly of the T1SS remains to be elucidated. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of a part of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of HlyD. The long α-helical domain consisting of three α helices and a lipoyl domain was identified in the crystal structure. Based on the HlyD structure, we modeled the hexameric assembly of HlyD with a long α-helical barrel, which formed a complex with TolC in an intermeshing cogwheel-to-cogwheel manner, as observed in tripartite RND-type drug efflux pumps. These observations provide a structural blueprint for understanding the type I secretion system in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. What Should We Teach Beginners about Solubility and Solubility Products?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that consideration should be given to whether teaching solubility product calculations is at all useful. Claims that experienced teachers seriously misunderstand and misuse solubility product calculations. (DDR)

  17. Chronic Treatment with a Water-Soluble Extract from the Culture Medium of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelia Prevents Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Injury of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Iwata, Naohiro; Asano, Satoshi; Kamiuchi, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Miyano, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Hibino, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been known to increase systemic oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia and visceral obesity and aggravate cerebral ischemic injury. On the basis of our previous study regarding a water-soluble extract from the culture medium of Ganoderma lucidum mycelia (designed as MAK), which exerts antioxidative and neuroprotective effects, the present study was conducted to evaluate the preventive effects of MAK on apoptosis and necroptosis (a programmed necrosis) induced by hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. H/I was induced by a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation with hypoxia (8% O2 for 20 min) and subsequent reoxygenation. Pretreatment with MAK (1 g/kg, p.o.) for a week significantly reduced H/I-induced neurological deficits and brain infarction volume assessed at 24 h of reoxygenation. Histochemical analysis showed that MAK significantly suppressed superoxide production, neuronal cell death, and vacuolation in the ischemic penumbra, which was accompanied by a decrease in the numbers of TUNEL- or cleaved caspase-3-positive cells. Furthermore, MAK decreased the expression of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 mRNA and protein, a key molecule for necroptosis. These results suggest that MAK confers resistance to apoptotic and necroptotic cell death and relieves H/I-induced cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:25945116

  18. Learning about Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  19. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Optimizing solubility: kinetic versus thermodynamic solubility temptations and risks.

    PubMed

    Saal, Christoph; Petereit, Anna Christine

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data in guiding medicinal chemistry during lead optimization. The solubility of 465 research compounds was measured using a kinetic and a thermodynamic solubility assay. In the thermodynamic assay, polarized-light microscopy was used to investigate whether the result referred to the crystalline or to the amorphous compound. From the comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data it was noted that kinetic solubility measurements frequently yielded results which show considerably higher solubility compared to thermodynamic solubility. This observation is ascribed to the fact that a kinetic solubility assay typically delivers results which refer to the amorphous compound. In contrast, results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase. Accordingly, thermodynamic solubility data--especially when used together with an assessment of the solid state form--are deemed to be more useful in guiding solubility optimization for research compounds.

  1. Virions of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to soluble CD4 (sCD4) neutralization differ in sCD4 binding and glycoprotein gp120 retention from sCD4-sensitive isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McKeating, J A; Huang, Y X; Ashkenazi, A; Ho, D D

    1992-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are much less sensitive to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and sCD4-immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeras (CD4-IgG) than are HIV-1 strains adapted to growth in cell culture. We demonstrated that there are significant reductions (10- to 30-fold) in the binding of sCD4 and CD4-IgG to intact virions of five primary isolates compared with sCD4-sensitive, cell culture-adapted isolates RF and IIIB. However, soluble envelope glycoproteins (gp120) derived from the primary isolate virions, directly by detergent solubilization or indirectly by recombinant DNA technology, differed in affinity from RF and IIIB gp120 by only one- to threefold. The reduced binding of sCD4 to these primary isolate virions must therefore be a consequence of the tertiary or quaternary structure of the envelope glycoproteins in their native, oligomeric form on the viral surface. In addition, the rate and extent of sCD4-induced gp120 shedding from these primary isolates was lower than that from RF. We suggest that reduced sCD4 binding and increased gp120 retention together account for the relative resistance of these primary isolates to neutralization by sCD4 and CD4-IgG and that virions of different HIV-1 isolates vary both in the mechanism of sCD4 binding and in subsequent conformational changes in their envelope glycoproteins. PMID:1727487

  2. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLUBILITY PRODUCT VISUALIZATION TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Turner; A.T. Pauli; J.F. Schabron

    2004-05-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed software for the visualization of data acquired from solubility tests. The work was performed in conjunction with AB Nynas Petroleum, Nynashamn, Sweden who participated as the corporate cosponsor for this Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) task. Efforts in this project were split between software development and solubility test development. The Microsoft Windows-compatible software developed inputs up to three solubility data sets, calculates the parameters for six solid body types to fit the data, and interactively displays the results in three dimensions. Several infrared spectroscopy techniques have been examined for potential use in determining bitumen solubility in various solvents. Reflectance, time-averaged absorbance, and transmittance techniques were applied to bitumen samples in single and binary solvent systems. None of the techniques were found to have wide applicability.

  4. Activin suppresses LPS-induced Toll-like receptor, cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in normal human melanocytes by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Il; Park, Seung-Won; Kang, In Jung; Shin, Min Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2015-10-01

    Activins are dimeric growth and differentiation factors that belong to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms through which activin regulates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human melanocytes, as well as the involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cell viability assay, mRNA expression was detected by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. LPS increased the mRNA expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) and cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α], as well as the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS. Activin decreased the LPS-induced TLR and cytokine mRNA expression, as well as the LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression. In addition, activin suppressed NF-κB p65 activation and blocked inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα) degradation in LPS-stimulated melanocytes, and reduced LPS-induced p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK activation. On the whole, our results demonstrated that activin inhibited TLR and cytokine expression in LPS-activated normal human melanocytes and suppressed LPS-induced iNOS gene expression. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effects of activin were shown to be mediated through the suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR and iNOS expression, and in the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression.

  5. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L; Hamlin, Heather J; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-01-15

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here, we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses.

  6. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon C.; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L.; Hamlin, Heather J.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses. PMID:22154572

  7. Elimination of soluble sup 123 I-labeled aggregates of IgG in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Effect of serum IgG and numbers of erythrocyte complement receptor type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Halma, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Daha, M.R.; Blok, D.; Evers-Schouten, J.H.; Hermans, J.; Pauwels, E.K.; van Es, L.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Using soluble {sup 123}I-labeled aggregates of human IgG ({sup 123}I-AHIgG) as a probe, we examined the function of the mononuclear phagocyte system in 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 12 healthy controls. In SLE patients, a decreased number of erythrocyte complement receptor type 1 was associated with less binding of {sup 123}I-AHIgG to erythrocytes and a faster initial rate of elimination of {sup 123}I-AHIgG (mean +/- SEM half-maximal clearance time 5.23 +/- 0.2 minutes, versus 6.58 +/- 0.2 minutes in the controls), with possible spillover of the material outside the mononuclear phagocyte system of the liver and spleen. However, multiple regression analysis showed that serum concentrations of IgG were the most important factor predicting the rate of {sup 123}I-AHIgG elimination. IgG concentration may thus reflect immune complex clearance, which in turn, would influence the inflammatory reaction, in SLE.

  8. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  9. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  10. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  11. Effects of gonadotrophins, growth hormone, and activin A on enzymatically isolated follicle growth, oocyte chromatin organization, and steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Ola, Safiriyu Idowu; Ai, Jun-Shu; Liu, Jing-He; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    So far, standard follicle culture systems can produce blastocyst from less than 40% of the in vitro matured oocytes compared to over 70% in the in vivo counterpart. Because the capacity for embryonic development is strictly associated with the terminal stage of oocyte growth, the nuclear maturity status of the in vitro grown oocyte was the subject of this study. Mouse early preantral follicles (100-130 microm) and early antral follicles (170-200 microm) isolated enzymatically were cultured for 12 and 4 days, respectively, in a collagen-free dish. The serum-based media were supplemented with either 100 mIU/ml FSH (FSH only); 100 mIU/ml FSH + 10 mIU/ml LH (FSH-LH); 100 mIU/ml FSH + 1 mIU/ml GH (FSH-GH) or 100 mIU/ml FSH + 100 ng/ml activin A (FSH-AA). Follicle survival was highest in follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-AA group in both cultured preantral (91.8%) and antral follicles (82.7%). Survival rates in the other groups ranged between 48% (FSH only, preantral follicle culture) and 78.7% (FSH only, antral follicle culture). Estradiol and progesterone were undetectable in medium lacking gonadotrophins while AA supplementation in synergy with FSH caused increased estradiol secretion and a simultaneously lowered progesterone secretion. Chromatin configuration of oocytes from surviving follicles at the end of culture revealed that there were twice more developmentally incompetent non-surrounded nucleolus (NSN) oocytes (>65%) than the competent surrounded nucleolus (SN) oocytes (<34%). We conclude that the present standard follicle culture system does not produce optimum proportion of developmentally competent oocytes.

  12. Ionizing Radiation Alters Human Embryonic Stem Cell Properties and Differentiation Capacity by Diminishing the Expression of Activin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Luft, Sabine; Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Kulish, Ireen; Nasonova, Elena; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia; Schroeder, Insa S

    2017-03-01

    Exposure of the embryo to ionizing radiation (IR) is detrimental as it can cause genotoxic stress leading to immediate and latent consequences such as functional defects, malformations, or cancer. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells can mimic the preimplantation embryo and help to assess the biological effects of IR during early development. In this study, we describe the alterations H9 hES cells exhibit after X-ray irradiation in respect to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, genomic stability, stem cell signaling, and their capacity to differentiate into definitive endoderm. Early postirradiation, hES cells responded with an arrest in G2/M phase, elevated apoptosis, and increased chromosomal aberrations. Significant downregulation of stem cell signaling markers of the TGF beta-, Wnt-, and Hedgehog pathways was observed. Most prominent were alterations in the expression of activin receptors. However, hES cells responded differently depending on the culture conditions chosen for maintenance. Enzymatically passaged cells were less sensitive to IR than mechanically passaged ones showing fewer apoptotic cells and fewer changes in the stem cell signaling 24 h after irradiation, but displayed higher levels of chromosomal aberrations. Even though many of the observed changes were transient, surviving hES cells, which were differentiated 4 days postirradiation, showed a lower efficiency to form definitive endoderm than their mock-irradiated counterparts. This was demonstrated by lower expression levels of SOX17 and microRNA miR-375. In conclusion, hES cells are a suitable tool for the IR risk assessment during early human development. However, careful choice of the culture methods and a vigorous monitoring of the stem cell quality are mandatory for the use of these cells. Exposure to IR influences the stem cell properties of hES cells even when immediate radiation effects are overcome. This warrants consideration in the risk assessment of radiation effects during the

  13. Activin-A and Myostatin Response and Steroid Regulation in Human Myometrium: Disruption of Their Signalling in Uterine Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Bloise, Enrrico; Gray, Peter C.; Carrarelli, Patrizia; Islam, Md. Soriful; De Pascalis, Flavio; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Vale, Wylie; Castellucci, Mario; Petraglia, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Context: Investigation of activin-A (A) and myostatin (M) in human myometrium (HM) and leiomyoma (HL) will explain their involvement in human myometrial pathophysiology. Objective: We aimed to investigate A and M response and steroid regulation in HM. We also evaluated A and M expression and response in HL. Design: Tissues were analyzed and cultured. Patients: Patients included fertile (in proliferative phase) and menopausal women undergoing hysterectomy. Interventions: HM explant cultures were treated with A and M (for Smad-7 mRNA quantification) or estrogen and progesterone (for A and M mRNA quantification). A and M expression levels were also evaluated in menopausal (physiological absence of steroids) HM specimens. A and M and their receptors were evaluated in HL (n = 8, diameter 5–8 cm) compared with their matched HM. HL explants cultures were treated with A and M (for Smad7 mRNA quantification), and, to explain the absence of response, the levels of follistatin, follistatin-related gene (FLRG), and Cripto were evaluated. Results: A and M increased Smad7 expression in HM explants. A and M mRNAs were both reduced after estradiol treatment, unchanged after progesterone treatment, but were higher in menopausal than fertile (in proliferative phase) specimens. A, M, and FLRG were expressed at higher levels in HL compared with adjacent HM, whereas the receptors, follistatin, and Smad7 mRNAs resulted unchanged. Cripto mRNA was expressed only in HL. Conclusions: A and M act on human HM and are regulated by steroids. In HL there is an increase of A, M, FLRG, and Cripto expression. PMID:21177794

  14. The syndrome of central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism: IGSF1 controls TRHR and FSHB expression by differential modulation of pituitary TGFβ and Activin pathways.

    PubMed

    García, Marta; Barrio, Raquel; García-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Escudero, Adela; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Fernández, Ana; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Vallespín, Elena; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Matre, Vilborg; Hinkle, Patricia M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S; de Miguel, María P; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José Manuel; Nistal, Manuel; Alvarez, Clara V; Moreno, José C

    2017-03-06

    IGSF1 (Immunoglobulin Superfamily 1) gene defects cause central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain unclear. Based on a patient with a full deletion of IGSF1 clinically followed from neonate to adulthood, we investigated a common pituitary origin for hypothyroidism and macroorchidism, and the role of IGSF1 as regulator of pituitary hormone secretion. The patient showed congenital central hypothyroidism with reduced TSH biopotency, over-secretion of FSH at neonatal minipuberty and macroorchidism from 3 years of age. His markedly elevated inhibin B was unable to inhibit FSH secretion, indicating a status of pituitary inhibin B resistance. We show here that IGSF1 is expressed both in thyrotropes and gonadotropes of the pituitary and in Leydig and germ cells in the testes, but at very low levels in Sertoli cells. Furthermore, IGSF1 stimulates transcription of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) by negative modulation of the TGFβ1-Smad signaling pathway, and enhances the synthesis and biopotency of TSH, the hormone secreted by thyrotropes. By contrast, IGSF1 strongly down-regulates the activin-Smad pathway, leading to reduced expression of FSHB, the hormone secreted by gonadotropes. In conclusion, two relevant molecular mechanisms linked to central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism in IGSF1 deficiency are identified, revealing IGSF1 as an important regulator of TGFβ/Activin pathways in the pituitary.

  15. Angiomodulin is required for cardiogenesis of embryonic stem cells and is maintained by a feedback loop network of p63 and Activin-A.

    PubMed

    Wolchinsky, Zohar; Shivtiel, Shoham; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn Nathalie; Putin, Daria; Sprecher, Eli; Zhou, Huiqing; Rouleau, Matthieu; Aberdam, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor p63, member of the p53 gene family, encodes for two main isoforms, TAp63 and ΔNp63 with distinct functions on epithelial homeostasis and cancer. Recently, we discovered that TAp63 is essential for in vitro cardiogenesis and heart development in vivo. TAp63 is expressed by embryonic endoderm and acts on cardiac progenitors by a cell-non-autonomous manner. In the present study, we search for cardiogenic secreted factors that could be regulated by TAp63 and, by ChIP-seq analysis, identified Angiomodulin (AGM), also named IGFBP7 or IGFBP-rP1. We demonstrate that AGM is necessary for cardiac commitment of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and its regulation depends on TAp63 isoform. TAp63 directly activates both AGM and Activin-A during ESC cardiogenesis while these secreted factors modulate TAp63 gene expression by a feedback loop mechanism. The molecular circuitry controlled by TAp63 on AGM/Activin-A signaling pathway and thus on cardiogenesis emphasizes the importance of p63 during early cardiac development.

  16. Ramipril attenuates left ventricular remodeling by regulating the expression of activin A-follistatin in a rat model of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qun; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Miao; Yang, Chunyan; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zhonghui; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that overexpression of ACT A can lead to ventricular remodeling in rat models of heart failure. Furthermore, recently work studying demonstrated that stimulation of activin An expression in rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells by angiotensin II (Ang II). Ramipril is a recently developed angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. To investigate the effects of Ramipril on expression of ACT A-FS, we established the rat model of heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI), and divided into either a sham operation (SO), MI, or MI-Ramipril group. We found that Ramipril significantly attenuates collagen-I and III deposition (col-I and III). Notably, we determined that expression of ACT A and II activin receptor (ActRII) were significantly down-regulated in the non-infarcted area of the left ventricle in the Ramipril group, whereas the mRNA and protein levels of FS were markedly up-regulated. Our data suggested that Ramipril benefited left ventricular remodeling by reducing fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the left ventricle of rats after myocardial infarction. This observation was also associated with down-regulation of ACT A expression. This study elucidated a new protective mechanism of Ramipril and suggests a novel strategy for treatment of post-infarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure. PMID:27642098

  17. The syndrome of central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism: IGSF1 controls TRHR and FSHB expression by differential modulation of pituitary TGFβ and Activin pathways

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Barrio, Raquel; García-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R.; Escudero, Adela; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Fernández, Ana; de Rijke, Yolanda B.; Vallespín, Elena; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Matre, Vilborg; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.; de Miguel, María P.; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José Manuel; Nistal, Manuel; Alvarez, Clara V.; Moreno, José C.

    2017-01-01

    IGSF1 (Immunoglobulin Superfamily 1) gene defects cause central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain unclear. Based on a patient with a full deletion of IGSF1 clinically followed from neonate to adulthood, we investigated a common pituitary origin for hypothyroidism and macroorchidism, and the role of IGSF1 as regulator of pituitary hormone secretion. The patient showed congenital central hypothyroidism with reduced TSH biopotency, over-secretion of FSH at neonatal minipuberty and macroorchidism from 3 years of age. His markedly elevated inhibin B was unable to inhibit FSH secretion, indicating a status of pituitary inhibin B resistance. We show here that IGSF1 is expressed both in thyrotropes and gonadotropes of the pituitary and in Leydig and germ cells in the testes, but at very low levels in Sertoli cells. Furthermore, IGSF1 stimulates transcription of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) by negative modulation of the TGFβ1-Smad signaling pathway, and enhances the synthesis and biopotency of TSH, the hormone secreted by thyrotropes. By contrast, IGSF1 strongly down-regulates the activin-Smad pathway, leading to reduced expression of FSHB, the hormone secreted by gonadotropes. In conclusion, two relevant molecular mechanisms linked to central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism in IGSF1 deficiency are identified, revealing IGSF1 as an important regulator of TGFβ/Activin pathways in the pituitary. PMID:28262687

  18. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  19. Acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular containers enhance the solubility and bioactivity of poorly soluble pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Da; Hettiarachchi, Gaya; Nguyen, Duc; Zhang, Ben; Wittenberg, James B.; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Briken, Volker; Isaacs, Lyle

    2012-06-01

    The solubility characteristics of 40-70% of new drug candidates are so poor that they cannot be formulated on their own, so new methods for increasing drug solubility are highly prized. Here, we describe a new class of general-purpose solubilizing agents—acyclic cucurbituril-type containers—which increase the solubility of ten insoluble drugs by a factor of between 23 and 2,750 by forming container-drug complexes. The containers exhibit low in vitro toxicity in human liver, kidney and monocyte cell lines, and outbred Swiss Webster mice tolerate high doses of the container without sickness or weight loss. Paclitaxel solubilized by the acyclic cucurbituril-type containers kills cervical and ovarian cancer cells more efficiently than paclitaxel alone. The acyclic cucurbituril-type containers preferentially bind cationic and aromatic drugs, but also solubilize neutral drugs such as paclitaxel, and represent an attractive extension of cyclodextrin-based technology for drug solubilization and delivery.

  20. The maturation-inducing hormone 17a-20b-dihydroxy-4pregnen-3-one regulates gene expression of inhibin A and bambi (bone morphogenetic protein and activin membrane bound inhibitor) in the rainbow trout ovary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFb) superfamily members are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of ovarian development and steroidogenesis in mammals and birds, but their reproductive roles in fish are not well understood. The activin system, Tgfb, and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp...

  1. The soluble form of LR11 protein is a regulator of hypoxia-induced, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated adhesion of immature hematological cells.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-04-26

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells of lr11(-/-) mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11(+/+) animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche.

  2. Experimental measurement of solid solutes solubility in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Manouchehr Manouchehrian; Beiki, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The solubility of benzoic and salicylic acids was measured at a temperature range from 293 to 333 K in two types of water based nanofluids employed as the solvent. Silica and γ-alumina nanoparticles with volume concentrations of 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 % were dispersed into de-ionized water as the based fluid. The results revealed that the solubility of nanofluid followed the same trend as pure water solubility with increasing temperature. At low temperatures, below 330 K for γ-Al2O3 nanofluids and 323 K for SiO2 nanofluids, nanoparticles had no effect on solubility, but by increasing the temperature, nanofluid solubility decreased. The maximum reduction in the solubility of compounds was observed at the temperature of 333 K and in 0.1 % γ-Alumina nanofluid and 0.025 % Silica nanofluids. Nanofluids solubility decreased up to a critical nanoparticles concentration while increased by increasing nanoparticles concentration further. The maximum reduction of nanofluids solubility at critical concentration was about 12.43 % for salicylic acid and 10.24 % for benzoic acid in 0.025 % SiO2 nanofluid. Nanofluids solubility was found to be strongly dependent on nanoparticles size. Bigger nanoparticles were more effective than smaller ones on nanofluids solubility.

  3. Mixed Hydrotropy: Novel Science of Solubility Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, R. K.; Jagwani, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional furosemide tablets are practically insoluble in water, have slow onset of action (45-60 min) and poor bioavailability (39-53%), and therefore cannot be given in emergency clinical situations like hypertension or pulmonary edema. So purpose of research was to provide a fast dissolving oral dosage form of furosemide, which can provide quick onset of action by using concept of mixed hydrotropy. Initially solubility of furosemide was determined individually in 4 hydrotropic agents namely urea, sodium acetate, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate at concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40% w/v solutions using purified water as solvent. Highest solubility was obtained in 40% sodium benzoate solution. Then different combinations of 2, 3 and 4 hydrotropic agents in different ratios were used to determine solubility, so that total concentration of hydrotropic agents was always 40%. Highest solubility was obtained in solution of urea+sodium benzoate+sodium citrate at optimum ratio of 15:20:5. This optimized combination was utilized in preparing solid dispersions by common solvent technique using distilled water as solvent. Solid dispersions were evaluated for flow properties, XRD, DSC, SEM and were also compressed to form tablets. Dissolution studies of conventional and prepared tablets were done using USP Type II apparatus. It was concluded that the concept of mixed hydrotropic solid dispersion is novel, safe and cost-effective technique for enhancing bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by dissolving drug in nonionized form. The magical enhancement in solubility of furosemide is clear indication of its potential to be used in future for other poorly water-soluble drugs in which low bioavailability is major concern. PMID:22303061

  4. Bioconcentration factors and lipid solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S. ); Baughman, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The log-log relationship between bioconcentration and hydrophobicity breaks down for several medium and high molecular weight solutes that bioconcentrate either to a small extent or not at all. Much of the failure is attributed to the relatively low solubility of these compounds in lipid. Inclusion of a term in octanol solubility (in place of lipid solubility, which is generally unavailable) considerably improves the quality of the relationship (r = 0.95). It is speculated that the octanol solubility term compensates for the relatively low solubility of large compounds in lipid.

  5. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  6. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  7. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  8. Reduction of myocardial infarct size with sCR1sLe(x), an alternatively glycosylated form of human soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), possessing sialyl Lewis x.

    PubMed

    Zacharowski, K; Otto, M; Hafner, G; Marsh, H C; Thiemermann, C

    1999-11-01

    1 This study investigated the effects of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) or sCR1sLex, agents which function as a complement inhibitor or as a combined complement inhibitor and selectin adhesion molecule antagonist, respectively, on the infarct size and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) release caused by regional myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion in the rat. 2 Eighty-two, male Wistar rats were subjected to 30 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Haemodynamic parameters were continuously recorded and at the end of the experiments infarct size (with p-nitro-blue tetrazolium) and cTnT release were determined. 3 Infusion of sCR1 (1, 5 or 15 mg kg-1, each n=7) or sCR1sLe(x) (1, 5 or 15 mg kg-1, n=7, 13 or 13, respectively) 5 min prior to LAD-reperfusion caused a reduction in infarct size from 59+/-2% (PBS - control, n=12) to 46+/-6%, 25+/-9% and 37+/-6% or 42+/-6%, 35+/-6% and 35+/-4%, respectively. 4 Infusion of sCR1 (15 mg kg-1, n=5) or sCR1sLe(x) (15 mg kg-1, n=5) also reduces the myocardial TnT release from 80+/-20 ng ml-1 (control) to 13+/-7 or 4+/-1 ng ml-1, respectively. 5 Thus, sCR1 or sCRsLe(x) significantly reduce infarct size and cardiac TnT release caused by 30 min of regional myocardial ischaemia and 2 h of reperfusion in the rat. The mechanisms of the cardioprotective effects of sCR1 or sCR1sLe(x) are not entirely clear, but may be due complement inhibition and/or prevention of the adhesion and activation of neutrophils.

  9. The Soluble Form of LR11 Protein Is a Regulator of Hypoxia-induced, Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR)-mediated Adhesion of Immature Hematological Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit+ Lin− cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit+ Lin− cells of lr11−/− mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11+/+ animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit+ Lin− cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche. PMID:23486467

  10. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  11. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  12. Hormonal and photoperiodic modulation of testicular mRNAs coding for inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin in Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber.

    PubMed

    Tähkä, K M; Kaipia, A; Toppari, J; Tähkä, S; Tuuri, T; Tuohimaa, P

    1998-07-01

    Photoperiodic and hormonal modulation of mRNAs for testicular inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin were studied in a seasonally breeding rodent, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). Photoperiod-induced testicular regression had no effect on the relatively low steady-state levels of follistatin mRNA. Inhibin alpha (I alpha) and beta B (I beta B) mRNA levels were significantly higher in regressed than in active gonads, but inhibin beta A was undetectable. The effect of gonadotropin administration on testicular weight and mRNA concentrations differed between the sexually active and quiescent voles. Neither FSH (1.2 U/kg; s.c. for 5 days) nor hCG (600 IU/kg; s.c. for 5 days) affected testicular weight in sexually active voles, whereas both gonadotropins significantly increased testicular weight in photo-regressed individuals. FSH had no effect on I alpha or I beta B mRNA concentrations in the active testes, whereas excessive hCG challenge induced a decrease in the steady-state levels of these mRNAs. FSH induced an increase in I alpha mRNA concentrations in the regressed gonad, whereas both gonadotropins concomitantly down-regulated I beta B mRNA levels. In conclusion, the high expression of I alpha and I beta B mRNA in the regressed testis imply autocrine and paracrine roles for inhibin/activin in the quiescent gonad of seasonal breeders. Inhibin alpha-subunit expression is at least partly under the control of FSH in the bank vole testis.

  13. Leptin treatment reduces body fat but does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis in lean hypoleptinemic women.

    PubMed

    Brinkoetter, Mary; Magkos, Faidon; Vamvini, Maria; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2011-07-01

    Animal studies in vivo indicate that leptin treatment in extremely leptin-sensitive ob/ob mice reduces body weight exclusively by reducing fat mass and that it increases muscle mass by downregulating myostatin expression. Data from human trials are limited. Therefore, we aimed at characterizing the effects of leptin administration on fat mass, lean body mass, and circulating regulators of muscle growth in hypoleptinemic and presumably leptin-sensitive human subjects. In an open-label, single-arm trial, seven lean, strenuously exercising, amenorrheic women with low leptin concentrations (≤5 ng/ml) were given recombinant methionyl human leptin (metreleptin; 0.08 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 10 wk. In a separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, seven women were given metreleptin (initial dose: 0.08 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 3 mo, increased thereafter to 0.12 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) if menstruation did not occur), and six were given placebo for 9 mo. Metreleptin significantly reduced total body fat by an average of 18.6% after 10 wk (P < 0.001) in the single-arm trial and by 19.5% after 9 mo (placebo subtracted; P for interaction = 0.025, P for metreleptin = 0.004) in the placebo-controlled trial. There were no significant changes in lean body mass (P ≥ 0.33) or in serum concentrations of myostatin (P ≥ 0.35), follistatin (P ≥ 0.30), and activin A (P ≥ 0.20) whether in the 10-wk trial or the 9-mo trial. We conclude that metreleptin administration in lean hypoleptinemic women reduces fat mass exclusively and does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis.

  14. Discovery of 7-methoxy-6-[4-(4-methyl-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-1,3-benzothiazole (TASP0382088): a potent and selective transforming growth factor-β type I receptor inhibitor as a topical drug for alopecia.

    PubMed

    Amada, Hideaki; Asanuma, Hajime; Koami, Takeshi; Okada, Atsushi; Endo, Mayumi; Ueda, Yasuji; Naruse, Takumi; Ikeda, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    7-Methoxy-6-[4-(4-methyl-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-1,3-benzothiazole 11 (TASP0382088) was synthesized and evaluated as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type I receptor (also known as activin receptor-like kinase 5 or ALK5) inhibitor. Compound 11, a potent and selective ALK5 inhibitor, exhibited good enzyme inhibitory activity (IC50=4.8 nM) as well as inhibitory activity against TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation at a cellular level (IC50=17 nM). The introduction of a methoxy group to the benzothiazole ring in 1 and the break up of the planarity between the imidazole ring and the thiazole ring improved the solubility in the lotion base of 11. Furthermore, the topical application of 3% 11 lotion significantly inhibited Smad2 phosphorylation in mouse skin at 8 h after application (71% inhibition, compared with vehicle-treated animals).

  15. Surface state of carbon nanotubes and Hansen solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Detriche, S; Nagy, J B; Mekhalif, Z; Delhalle, J

    2009-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often described as insoluble or poorly soluble in organic solvents. In a recent study, we have reported that nonfunctionalized CNTs can be solubilized in suitably chosen organic solvents. Furthermore, their solubility could be understood in terms of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs). The present work addresses further the question of the CNTs solubility by considering a larger range of solvents. A second part is devoted to the application of the HSPs to two types of functionalized CNTs: oxidized and silanized. These results stress the critical role played by the surface state of the CNTs, on the one hand, and the interest in using the HSPs to guide solubility investigations, on the other hand.

  16. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  17. The Ksp-Solubility Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Roy W.; Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there are only a few cases in which solubility and Ksp are related in a simple way. States that illustrations of the solubility product principle for one-to-one salts are adequate for students. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  18. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  19. [Molecular cloning of the DNA sequence of activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides from panda and related species and its application in the research of phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Xi-Zhong; He, Guang-Xin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fei, Li-Song

    2002-09-01

    Activin, which is included in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) superfamily of proteins and receptors, is known to have broad-ranging effects in the creatures. The mature peptide of beta A subunit of this gene, one of the most highly conserved sequence, can elevate the basal secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary and FSH is pivotal to organism's reproduction. Reproduction block is one of the main reasons which cause giant panda to extinct. The sequence of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides has been successfully amplified from giant panda, red panda and malayan sun bear's genomic DNA by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The PCR products were cloned into the vector pBlueScript+ of Esherichia coli. Sequence analysis of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides shows that the length of this gene segment is the same (359 bp) and there is no intron in all three species. The sequence encodes a peptide of 119 amino acid residues. The homology comparison demonstrates 93.9% DNA homology and 99% homology in amino acid among these three species. Both GenBank blast search result and restriction enzyme map reveal that the sequences of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during the evolution process. Phylogeny analysis is performed with PHYLIP software package. A consistent phylogeny tree has been drawn with three different methods. The software analysis outcome accords with the academic view that giant panda has a closer relationship to the malayan sun bear than the red panda. Giant panda should be grouped into the bear family (Uersidae) with the malayan sun bear. As to the red panda, it would be better that this animal be grouped into the unique family (red panda family) because of great difference between the red panda and the bears (Uersidae).

  20. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  1. Induction of dorsal mesoderm by soluble, mature Vg1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D S; Melton, D A

    1995-07-01

    Mesoderm induction during Xenopus development has been extensively studied, and two members of the transforming growth factor-beta family, activin beta B and Vg1, have emerged as candidates for a natural inducer of dorsal mesoderm. Heretofore, analysis of Vg1 activity has relied on injection of hybrid Vg1 mRNAs, which have not been shown to direct efficient secretion of ligand and, therefore, the mechanism of mesoderm induction by processed Vg1 protein is unclear. This report describes injection of Xenopus oocytes with a chimeric activin-Vg1 mRNA, encoding the pro-region of activin beta B fused to the mature region of Vg1, resulting in the processing and secretion of mature Vg1. Treatment of animal pole explants with mature Vg1 protein resulted in differentiation of dorsal, but not ventral, mesodermal tissues and dose-dependent activation of both dorsal and ventrolateral mesodermal markers. At high doses, mature Vg1 induced formation of 'embryoids' with a rudimentary axial pattern, head structures including eyes and a functional neuromuscular system. Furthermore, truncated forms of the activin and FGF receptors, which block mesoderm induction in the intact embryo, fully inhibited mature Vg1 activity. To examine the mechanism of inhibition, we have performed receptor-binding assays with radiolabeled Vg1. Finally, follistatin, a specific inhibitor of activin beta B which is shown not to block endogenous dorsal mesoderm induction, failed to inhibit Vg1. The results support a role for endogenous Vg1 in dorsal mesoderm induction during Xenopus development.

  2. Understanding Solubility through Excel Spreadsheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Pamela

    2001-02-01

    This article describes assignments related to the solubility of inorganic salts that can be given in an introductory general chemistry course. Le Châtelier's principle, solubility, unit conversion, and thermodynamics are tied together to calculate heats of solution by two methods: heats of formation and an application of the van't Hoff equation. These assignments address the need for math, graphing, and computer skills in the chemical technology program by developing skill in the use of Microsoft Excel to prepare spreadsheets and graphs and to perform linear and nonlinear curve-fitting. Background information on the value of understanding and predicting solubility is provided.

  3. Phenylated Polyimides With Greater Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    In experiments, 3,6-diphenylpyromellitic dianhydride monomer prepared and polymerized with several different diamines. Polyimides with pendent phenyl groups along polymer backbones considerably more soluble than PMDA-based materials. Increased solubility eases processing, providing increased potential use in variety of applications. Because most polymers soluble in organic solvents, usable in microelectronics applications. Excellent thermal stabilities and high transition temperatures make them ideally suited. Many polymers extremely rigid and useful as reinforcing polymers in molecular composites. More flexible compositions useful as matrix resins in carbon-reinforced composites.

  4. Water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were <6.5%. The concentrations of vitamins found in premixes with the method were comparable to the values declared. A disadvantage of the methods mentioned above is that sample composition has to be known in advance. According to European legislation, for example, foods might be fortified with riboflavin phosphate or thiamin phosphate, vitamers which are not included in the simultaneous separations described. Vitamin B2.--Viñas et al. elaborated an LC analysis of riboflavin vitamers in foods. Vitamin B2 can be found in nature as the free riboflavin, but in most biological materials it occurs predominantly in the form of 2 coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Several methods usually involve the conversion of these coenzymes into free riboflavin before quantification of total riboflavin. According to the authors, there is growing interest to know flavin composition of foods. The described method separates the individual vitamers isocratically. Accuracy of the method is tested with 2 certified reference materials (CRMs). Vitamin B5.-Methods for the determination of vitamin B5 in foods are limited

  5. The influence of thermal treatment and type of insoluble poly(meth)acrylates on dissolution behavior of very soluble drug from hypromellose matrix tablets evaluated by multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Kubova, Katerina; Peček, Daniel; Hasserová, Kristýna; Doležel, Petr; Pavelková, Miroslava; Vyslouzil, Jakub; Muselík, Jan; Vetchy, David

    2017-03-01

    Hypromellose matrices exhibit extended burst effect immediately after contact with aqueous medium, especially when a water-soluble drug is incorporated. The objective of this study was to reduce burst effect and maintain complete dissolution of a very soluble levetiracetam over 12 h period from hypromellose K4M matrices to obtain zero-order kinetics. Desired changes were achieved by applying water dispersions of insoluble Eudragits(®) (NE, NM, RL, RS) as a granulation liquid to the drug/microcrystalline cellulose mixture during high-shear granulation (non-thermal treated set) and consequently by thermally treating granules or final tablets (TT), respectively. Applying Eudragit(®) water dispersions to the drug/microcrystalline cellulose mixture was recognized as an effective method of significantly reducing the burst release (25.4-33.7%) of levetiracetam in comparison with a reference sample without Eudragit(®). Multivariate data analysis showed that the addition of Eudragit(®) reduced burst effect, increased fitting with zero-order kinetics, and supported matrix erosion as the supplementary mechanism to predominant diffusion. Moreover, resulting PCA sub-model revealed the addition of Eudragit(®) RL and thermal treatment of tablets to be the most suitable method of all. For a 12 h dissolution profile, characterized by low burst effect and drug release close to 100% at the 12th hour, sample RL_TT was the most suitable.

  6. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  7. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  8. Method for estimating solubility parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Semiempirical correlations have been developed between solubility parameters and refractive indices for series of model hydrocarbon compounds and organic polymers. Measurement of intermolecular forces is useful for assessment of material compatibility, glass-transition temperature, and transport properties.

  9. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  10. Thermodynamics of chromium in UO2 fuel: A solubility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Martin, Ph.; Testemale, D.; Sabathier-Devals, C.; Carlot, G.; Matheron, P.; Iltis, X.; Pasquet, U.; Valot, C.; Delafoy, C.; Largenton, R.

    2014-04-01

    The solubility and speciation of chromium in doped uranium oxide are measured in carefully controlled temperature and oxygen potential conditions using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM). The examination of the samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) provides evidence that (i) chromium is soluble in the UO2 matrix under the +3 oxidation state only regardless of the sintering conditions which is in accordance with a soluble species of type CrO3/2 and (ii) soluble chromium exhibits octahedral symmetry with 6 atoms of oxygen forming CrO6 patterns in the UO2 structure. In consistency with all available experimental information including previously published data, the solubility of chromium in UO2 corresponding to each two-phase field with either Cr, CrO and Cr2O3 may be described in the ranges 1500 °C < T < 2000 °C and -460 < μO2 < -360 kJ/mol using the standard thermodynamic equations governing solubility equilibria. The characteristic parameters of the solubility laws in UO2 for the three chromium phases are derived.

  11. Semiconductor material and method for enhancing solubility of a dopant therein

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Rubia, Tomas Diaz; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2003-09-09

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  12. A Semiconductor Material And Method For Enhancing Solubility Of A Dopant Therein

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2005-03-29

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron ad indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  13. Method for enhancing the solubility of boron and indium in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  14. Method for enhancing the solubility of dopants in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; De La Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2003-09-30

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solid solubility of dopants in silicon, germanium and silicon-germanium alloys. The method involves subjecting silicon-based substrate to biaxial or compression strain. It has been determined that boron solubility was largely enhanced (more than 100%) by a compressive bi-axial strain, based on a size-mismatch theory since the boron atoms are smaller than the silicon atoms. It has been found that the large enhancement or mixing properties of dopants in silicon and germanium substrates is primarily governed by their, and to second order by their size-mismatch with the substrate. Further, it has been determined that the dopant solubility enhancement with strain is most effective when the charge and the size-mismatch of the impurity favor the same type of strain. Thus, the solid solubility of small p-type (e.g., boron) as well as large n-type (e.g., arsenic) dopants can be raised most dramatically by appropriate bi-axial (compressive) strain, and that solubility of a large p-type dopant (e.g, indium) in silicon will be raised due to size-mismatch with silicon, which favors tensile strain, while its negative charge prefers compressive strain, and thus the two effects counteract each other.

  15. Synthesis and structure of a water-soluble hexanuclear silver(I) nicotinate cluster comprised of a "cyclohexane-chair"-type of framework, showing effective antibacterial and antifungal activities: use of "sparse matrix" techniques for growing crystals of water-soluble inorganic complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsyba, Irina; Mui, Becky Bun-Kit; Bau, Robert; Noguchi, Ryusuke; Nomiya, Kenji

    2003-12-01

    The synthesis of a water-soluble anionic silver 2-mercaptonicotinate complex having effective antibacterial and antifungal properties is described. Its structure has been confirmed to be a hexameric cluster by an X-ray diffraction analysis of a mixed Na(+)/Tris(+) salt (Tris(+) = tris(hydroxymethyl)methylammonium cation). The [Ag(mna)](6)(6-) cluster has a Ag(6)S(6) core and an overall shape of twisted hexagonal cylinder with six sulfur atoms and six silver atoms alternating on a puckered drum-like surface. Each Ag atom is trigonally coordinated by one N and two S ligands. The overall [Ag(mna)](6)(6-).4Na(+).2[(HOCH(2))(3)CNH(3)](+).10H(2)O complex has a layered appearance in the crystal packing diagram, with a [Ag(mna)](6)(-) cluster layer alternating with a solvent layer consisting of sodium atoms, Tris buffer cations, and water molecules. The structure is almost identical to that of a neutral [Ag(Hmna)](6) complex reported earlier. The neutral and charged complexes are both known to possess antimicrobial activities, and some biological properties of these and related compounds are briefly discussed in this paper.

  16. In vivo amelioration of endogenous antitumor autoantibodies via low-dose P4N through the LTA4H/activin A/BAFF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Nu-Man; Hsieh, Cheng-Hao; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chang, Jung; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Jackson, Tiffany L. B.; Mold, David E.; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is associated with the development of antitumor autoantibodies in patients’ sera. Although passive treatment with antitumor antibodies has exhibited remarkable therapeutic efficacy, inhibitory effects on tumor progression by endogenous antitumor autoantibodies (EAAs) have been limited. In this study, we show that P4N, a derivative of the plant lignan nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), enhanced the production of EAAs and inhibited tumor growth at low noncytotoxic concentrations via its immunoregulatory activity. Intratumoral injection of P4N improved the quantity and quality of EAAs, and passive transfer of P4N-induced EAAs dramatically suppressed lung metastasis formation and prolonged the survival of mice inoculated with metastatic CT26 tumor cells. P4N-induced EAAs specifically recognized two surface antigens, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and F1F0 ATP synthase, on the plasma membrane of cancer cells. Additionally, P4N treatment led to B-cell proliferation, differentiation to plasma cells, and high titers of autoantibody production. By serial induction of autocrine and paracrine signals in monocytes, P4N increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production via the leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H)/activin A/B-cell activating factor (BAFF) pathway. This mechanism provides a useful platform for studying and seeking a novel immunomodulator that can be applied in targeting therapy by improving the quantity and quality of the EAAs. PMID:27856749

  17. In vivo amelioration of endogenous antitumor autoantibodies via low-dose P4N through the LTA4H/activin A/BAFF pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Nu-Man; Hsieh, Cheng-Hao; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chang, Jung; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Jackson, Tiffany L B; Mold, David E; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-11-29

    Cancer progression is associated with the development of antitumor autoantibodies in patients' sera. Although passive treatment with antitumor antibodies has exhibited remarkable therapeutic efficacy, inhibitory effects on tumor progression by endogenous antitumor autoantibodies (EAAs) have been limited. In this study, we show that P4N, a derivative of the plant lignan nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), enhanced the production of EAAs and inhibited tumor growth at low noncytotoxic concentrations via its immunoregulatory activity. Intratumoral injection of P4N improved the quantity and quality of EAAs, and passive transfer of P4N-induced EAAs dramatically suppressed lung metastasis formation and prolonged the survival of mice inoculated with metastatic CT26 tumor cells. P4N-induced EAAs specifically recognized two surface antigens, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and F1F0 ATP synthase, on the plasma membrane of cancer cells. Additionally, P4N treatment led to B-cell proliferation, differentiation to plasma cells, and high titers of autoantibody production. By serial induction of autocrine and paracrine signals in monocytes, P4N increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production via the leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H)/activin A/B-cell activating factor (BAFF) pathway. This mechanism provides a useful platform for studying and seeking a novel immunomodulator that can be applied in targeting therapy by improving the quantity and quality of the EAAs.

  18. Macrophage uptake and accumulation of folates are polarization-dependent in vitro and in vivo and are regulated by activin A.

    PubMed

    Samaniego, Rafael; Palacios, Blanca Soler; Domiguez-Soto, Ángeles; Vidal, Carlos; Salas, Azucena; Matsuyama, Takami; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; de la Torre, Inmaculada; Miranda-Carús, Maria Eugenia; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin B9, commonly known as folate, is an essential cofactor for one-carbon metabolism that enters cells through three major specialized transporter molecules (RFC, FR, and PCFT), which differ in expression pattern, affinity for substrate, and ligand-binding pH dependency. We now report that the expression of the folate transporters differs between macrophage subtypes and explains the higher accumulation of 5-MTHF-the major folate form found in serum-in M2 macrophages in vitro and in vivo. M1 macrophages display a higher expression of RFC, whereas FRβ and PCFT are preferentially expressed by anti-inflammatory and homeostatic M2 macrophages. These differences are also seen in macrophages from normal tissues involved in folate transit (placenta, liver, colon) and inflamed tissues (ulcerative colitis, RA), as M2-like macrophages from normal tissues express FRβ and PCFT, whereas TNF-α-expressing M1 macrophages from inflamed tissues are RFC+. Besides, we provide evidences that activin A is a critical factor controlling the set of folate transporters in macrophages, as it down-regulates FRβ, up-regulates RFC expression, and modulates 5-MTHF uptake. All of these experiments support the notion that folate handling is dependent on the stage of macrophage polarization.

  19. Effects of c-Jun N-terminal kinase on Activin A/Smads signaling in PC12 cell suffered from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Q; Xu, Z H; Liang, W Z; He, J T; Cui, Y; Liu, H Y; Xue, L X; Shi, W; Shao, Y K; Mang, J; Xu, Z X

    2016-02-29

    Activin A (Act A), a member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, is an early gene in response to cerebral ischemia. Growing evidences confirm the neuroprotective effect of Act A in ischemic injury through Act A/Smads signal activation. In this process, regulation networks are involved in modulating the outcomes of Smads signaling. Among these regulators, crosstalk between c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smads signaling has been found in the TGF-β induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. However, in neural ischemia, the speculative regulation between JNK and Act A/Smads signaling pathways has not been clarified. To explore this issue, an Oxygen Glucose Deprivation (OGD) model was introduced to nerve-like PC12 cells. We found that JNK signal activation occurred at the early time of OGD injury (1 h). Act A administration suppressed JNK phosphorylation. In addition, JNK inhibition could elevate the strength of Smads signaling and attenuate neural apoptosis after OGD injury. Our results indicated a negative regulation effect of JNK on Smads signaling in ischemic injury. Taken together, JNK, as a critical site for neural apoptosis and negative regulator for Act A/Smads signaling, was presumed to be a molecular therapeutic target for ischemia.

  20. GATA6 Promotes Angiogenic Function and Survival in Endothelial Cells by Suppression of Autocrine Transforming Growth Factor β/Activin Receptor-like Kinase 5 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Natali; Kattih, Badder; Breitbart, Astrid; Grund, Andrea; Geffers, Robert; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Kispert, Andreas; Wollert, Kai C.; Drexler, Helmut; Heineke, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the transcriptional regulation of angiogenesis could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. We showed here that the transcription factor GATA6 is expressed in different human primary endothelial cells as well as in vascular endothelial cells of mice in vivo. Activation of endothelial cells was associated with GATA6 nuclear translocation, chromatin binding, and enhanced GATA6-dependent transcriptional activation. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GATA6 after growth factor stimulation led to a dramatically reduced capacity of macro- and microvascular endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, or form capillary-like structures on Matrigel. Adenoviral overexpression of GATA6 in turn enhanced angiogenic function, especially in cardiac endothelial microvascular cells. Furthermore, GATA6 protected endothelial cells from undergoing apoptosis during growth factor deprivation. Mechanistically, down-regulation of GATA6 in endothelial cells led to increased expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and TGFβ2, whereas enhanced GATA6 expression, accordingly, suppressed Tgfb1 promoter activity. High TGFβ1/β2 expression in GATA6-depleted endothelial cells increased the activation of the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) and SMAD2, and suppression of this signaling axis by TGFβ neutralizing antibody or ALK5 inhibition restored angiogenic function and survival in endothelial cells with reduced GATA6 expression. Together, these findings indicate that GATA6 plays a crucial role for endothelial cell function and survival, at least in part, by suppressing autocrine TGFβ expression and ALK5-dependent signaling. PMID:21127043

  1. Formulation of soluble oils with synthetic and petroleum sulfonates

    SciTech Connect

    Eckard, A.; Riff, I.; Weaver, J.

    1997-06-01

    Metalworking fluids for metal removal are formulated to provide cooling, lubrication, and rust protection when cutting and machining metals. There are basically four types of cutting fluids: straight oils, synthetics, semisynthetic fluids and soluble oils. The last type is the most widely used for metal removal operations such as cutting, drilling and grinding. Soluble oils used for metalworking operations are normally the oil-in-water type, with oil as the internal phase and water as the external phase. The soluble oils can have rather complex compositions, usually containing two or more emulsifiers and coupling agents, as well as additives to provide rust inhibition, lubricity, detergency, resistance to bacterial attack and foam control. The dominant emulsifier in a soluble oil is usually sodium sulfonate which also has the secondary benefit of being a rust inhibitor. Soluble oil emulsions based on petroleum or synthetic sulfonates have been found to improve lubrication and cleaning of metal parts and equipment. As has been done previously, a series of emulsification studies were conducted using petroleum and synthetic sulfonates. Emulsifier level, coemulsifiers and minor formulation adjustments were made to optimize each system. This study was made using naphthenic oil basestock. Formulations were evaluated using criteria including concentrate stability, hard and soft water emulsion stability, emulsibility, foaming tendency and response to defoamers, antirust properties and cost effectiveness of individual formulations. The results of these evaluations are presented in the present paper.

  2. The Solubility Rules: Why Are All Acetates Soluble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sluys, William G.

    2001-01-01

    According to the solubility rules presented in many introductory chemistry texts, all (or most) acetate salts are soluble in aqueous solution. The thermodynamic factors that contribute to the solubility of acetates are compared with those of other slightly basic anions. In particular, the hydration enthalpy of acetate is calculated using the Born-Haber approach, from lattice energies, heats of solution, and the hydration energies of several cations. The hydration enthalpy of acetate (-375 kJ/mol) is similar to that of chloride ({355 kJ/mol), nitrite ({383 kJ/mol), and nitrate ({370 kJ/mol), which are all considerably less exothermic than fluoride ({497 kJ/mol). This was somewhat unexpected, since hydration enthalpies generally correlate well with the acid-base properties of an ion, and acetate is more basic than fluoride. Factors influencing the solubility and acid-base properties of acetates, such as the electron donating and hydrophobic nature of the methyl group, are discussed in light of the thermodynamic data.

  3. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  4. Dissolution and precipitation of fractures in soluble rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Gabrovšek, Franci; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, anhydrite, and gypsum are characterised by their large secondary permeability, which results from the interaction of water circulating through the rock and dissolving the soluble fracture walls. This highly selective dissolution process enlarges the fractures to voids and eventually cavities, which then carry the majority of flow through an aquifer along preferential flow pathes. We employ a numerical model describing the evolution of secondary porosity in a soluble rock to discuss the evolution of single fractures in different rock types. Our main focus is three-fold: The distinction of shallow versus deep flow pathes and their evolution on the one hand; the effect of precipitation of the dissolved material in the fracture, and finally the complication of fracture enlargement in fractures composed of several different soluble materials. We observe a similar evolution of void space for fractures composed of limestone and gypsum, but on different time scales. For anhydrite, owing to its difference in the kinetical rate law describing the removal of soluble rock, when compared to limestone and anhydrite, the evolution is even faster. Precipitation of the dissolved rock due to changes in the hydrochemical conditions can clog fractures fairly fast, thus changing the pattern of preferential pathways in the soluble aquifer, especially with depth. Finally, limestone fractures coated with gypsum, as frequently observed in caves, will result in a substantial acceleration of fracture enlargement with time, thus giving these fractures a hydraulical advantage over pure limestone fractures in their competition for capturing flow.

  5. Solubility enhancement studies on lurasidone hydrochloride using mixed hydrotropy

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Jyotsana R.; Pawar, Kiran T.; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Low aqueous solubility is a major problem faced during formulation development of new drug molecules. Lurasidone HCl (LRD) is an antipsychotic agent specially used in the treatments of schizophrenia and is a good example of the problems associated with low aqueous solubility. Lurasidone is practically insoluble in water, has poor bioavailability and slow onset of action and therefore cannot be given in emergency clinical situations like schizophrenia. Hence, purpose of this research was to provide a fast dissolving oral dosage form of Lurasidone. This dosage form can provide quick onset of action by using the concept of mixed hydrotropy. Initially, solubility of LRD was determined individually in nicotinamide, sodium citrate, urea and sodium benzoate at concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40% w/v solutions using purified water as a solvent. Highest solubility was obtained in 40% sodium benzoate solution. In order to decrease the individual hydrotrope concentration mixed hydrotropic agents were used. Highest solubility was obtained in 15:20:5 ratio of Nicotinamide + sodium benzoate + sodium citrate. This optimized combination was utilized in the preparation of solid dispersions by using distilled water as a solvent. Solid dispersions were evaluated for X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared to show no drug-hydrotropes interaction has occurred. This solid dispersion was compressed to form fast dissolving tablets. Dissolution studies of prepared tablets were done using USP Type II apparatus. The batch L3 tablets show 88% cumulative drug release within 14 min and in vitro dispersion time was 32 min. It was concluded that the concept of mixed hydrotropic solid dispersion is novel, safe and cost-effective technique for enhancing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. The miraculous enhancement in solubility and bioavailability of Lurasidone is clear indication of the potential of mixed hydrotropy to be used in future

  6. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  7. Combined Therapy with Renin-Angiotensin System and Calcium Channel Blockers in Type 2 Diabetic Hypertensive Patients with Proteinuria: Effects on Soluble TWEAK, PTX3, and Flow-Mediated Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mahmut Ilker; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose Luis; Sonmez, Alper; Saglam, Mutlu; Celik, Turgay; Yaman, Halil; Yenicesu, Mujdat; Eyileten, Tayfun; Moreno, Juan Antonio; Egido, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Soluble TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) and long pentraxin-3 (PTX3) concentrations have been associated with endothelial function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study tested the hypothesis that the improvement in endothelial function after initiation of angiotensin II receptor blocker (valsartan), calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) therapy, or a combination of both is directly linked to the normalization of sTWEAK and PTX3. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: One-hundred-eight diabetic CKD stage I patients with hypertension (56% men, 46.7 ± 5.3 years) were allocated to a 12-week intervention with amlodipine (10 mg/d), valsartan (160 mg/d), or their combination. Plasma levels of sTWEAK, PTX3, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were studied during the interventions. Results: All treatment strategies effectively increased FMD and reduced proteinuria, confirming a more prone reduction with the combined therapy. These improvements were followed by significant PTX3 reductions. Valsartan alone and in combination with amlodipine achieved significant incremental raises in sTWEAK plasma levels. More importantly, the changes observed in sTWEAK (β = 0.25, P = 0.006) or PTX3 (β = −0.24, P = 0.007) plasma levels were independently associated with the improvement in ultrasonographically measured FMD. Conclusions: This study shows that treatment with antihypertensive drugs improves FMD and normalizes proteinuria, PTX3, and sTWEAK in diabetic CKD stage I patients with hypertension. The improvement in FMD was independently associated with PTX3 and sTWEAK normalization. Two surrogate biomarkers of endothelial function are therefore identified with potential as therapeutic targets. The study was registered in clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00921570. PMID:20430947

  8. Activin Decoy Receptor ActRIIB:Fc Lowers FSH and Therapeutically Restores Oocyte Yield, Prevents Oocyte Chromosome Misalignments and Spindle Aberrations, and Increases Fertility in Midlife Female SAMP8 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Amelia C. L.; Lee, Se-Jin; Chaffin, Charles L.; Merchenthaler, István

    2016-01-01

    Women of advanced maternal age (AMA) (age ≥ 35) have increased rates of infertility, miscarriages, and trisomic pregnancies. Collectively these conditions are called “egg infertility.” A root cause of egg infertility is increased rates of oocyte aneuploidy with age. AMA women often have elevated endogenous FSH. Female senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) has increased rates of oocyte spindle aberrations, diminished fertility, and rising endogenous FSH with age. We hypothesize that elevated FSH during the oocyte's FSH-responsive growth period is a cause of abnormalities in the meiotic spindle. We report that eggs from SAMP8 mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) for the period of oocyte growth have increased chromosome and spindle misalignments. Activin is a molecule that raises FSH, and ActRIIB:Fc is an activin decoy receptor that binds and sequesters activin. We report that ActRIIB:Fc treatment of midlife SAMP8 mice for the duration of oocyte growth lowers FSH, prevents egg chromosome and spindle misalignments, and increases litter sizes. AMA patients can also have poor responsiveness to FSH stimulation. We report that although eCG lowers yields of viable oocytes, ActRIIB:Fc increases yields of viable oocytes. ActRIIB:Fc and eCG cotreatment markedly reduces yields of viable oocytes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated FSH contributes to egg aneuploidy, declining fertility, and poor ovarian response and that ActRIIB:Fc can prevent egg aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve ovarian response. Future studies will continue to examine whether ActRIIB:Fc works via FSH and/or other pathways and whether ActRIIB:Fc can prevent aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve stimulation responsiveness in AMA women. PMID:26713784

  9. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    PubMed

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method.

  10. The effects of a single intravenous injection of novel activin A/BMP-2 (AB204) on toxicity and the respiratory and central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae Hyup; Na, Kyuheum; Ahn, Chihoon; Cho, Jongho; Ahn, Hyun Chan; Choi, Jungyoun; Oh, Hyosun; Kim, Byong Moon; Choe, Senyon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single intravenous injection of a novel osteoinductive material, activin A/BMP-2 (AB204), to rodents on toxicity and their respiratory functions and central nervous system (CNS). A single intravenous injection of AB204 was given to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in doses of 0, 0.625, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg to observe the mortality rate, the general symptoms for 14 days. The experimental groups were also given 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively, and the respiration rate, the tidal volume and the minute volume were measured for 240 min. The experimental groups of imprinting control region (ICR) mice were given a single intravenous injection of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively. Their body temperature was taken and general behaviors were observed to evaluate the effect of AB204 on the CNS for 240 min. The study on toxicity of a single intravenous injection found no death or abnormal symptoms, abnormal findings from autopsy, or abnormal body weight gain or loss in all the experimental groups. No abnormal variation associated with the test substance was observed in the respiration rate, the tidal volume, the minute volume, body temperature or the general behaviors. On the basis of these results, the approximate lethal dose of AB204 for a single intravenous injection exceeds 10 mg/kg for SD rats and a single intravenous injection of ≤0.8 mg/kg AB204 has no effect on their respiratory system for SD rat and no effect on their CNS for ICR mice.

  11. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Madison A.; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N.; Johnston, Kathryn A.; Lopez, Karlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM−1 cm−1. No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture. PMID:26942005

  12. Soluble metalloendopeptidases and neuroendocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, Corie N; Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A

    2002-10-01

    Peptidases play a vital and often highly specific role in the physiological and pathological generation and termination of peptide hormone signals. The thermolysin-like family of metalloendopeptidases involved in the extracellular processing of neuroendocrine and cardiovascular peptides are of particular significance, reflecting both their specificity for particular peptide substrates and their utility as therapeutic targets. Although the functions of the membrane-bound members of this family, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase, are well established, a role for the predominantly soluble family members in peptide metabolism is only just emerging. This review will focus on the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the soluble metalloendopeptidases EC 3.4.24.15 (thimet oligopeptidase) and EC 3.4.24.16 (neurolysin), as well as presenting evidence that both peptidases play an important role in such diverse functions as reproduction, nociception, and cardiovascular homeostasis.

  13. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  14. Mast cell secretome: Soluble and vesicular components.

    PubMed

    Vukman, Krisztina V; Försönits, András; Oszvald, Ádám; Tóth, Eszter Á; Buzás, Edit I

    2017-02-09

    Mast cells are multifunctional master cells implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Their role has been best characterized in allergy and anaphylaxis; however, emerging evidences support their contribution to a wide variety of human diseases. Mast cells, being capable of both degranulation and subsequent recovery, have recently attracted substantial attention as also being rich sources of secreted extracellular vesicles (including exosomes and microvesicles). Along with secreted de novo synthesized soluble molecules and secreted preformed granules, the membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles represent a previously unexplored part of the mast cell secretome. In this review article we summarize available data regarding the different soluble molecules and membrane-enclosed structures secreted by mast cells. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the release mechanisms including degranulation, piecemeal degranulation, transgranulation, and secretion of different types of extracellular vesicles. Finally, we aim to give a summary of the known biological functions associated with the different mast cell-derived secretion products. The increasingly recognized complexity of mast cell secretome may provide important novel clues to processes by which mast cells contribute to the development of different pathologies and are capable of orchestrating immune responses both in health and disease.

  15. Synthesis of water soluble graphene.

    PubMed

    Si, Yongchao; Samulski, Edward T

    2008-06-01

    A facile and scalable preparation of aqueous solutions of isolated, sparingly sulfonated graphene is reported. (13)C NMR and FTIR spectra indicate that the bulk of the oxygen-containing functional groups was removed from graphene oxide. The electrical conductivity of thin evaporated films of graphene (1250 S/m) relative to similarly prepared graphite (6120 S/m) implies that an extended conjugated sp (2) network is restored in the water soluble graphene.

  16. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    condensation were not successful, but further work produced polymer under the following conditions: Synthesis Diketone I (2.40 g, 10.0 mmol) in 10 mL...goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of...extension of the original research to a Phase II effort. Diketone - Diamine Polycondensation Towards a Soluble PAni Precursor To achieve the

  17. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    Soluble organics in produced water and refinery effluents represent treatment problems for the petroleum industry. Neither the chemistry involved in the production of soluble organics nor the impact of these chemicals on total effluent toxicity is well understood. The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support a collaborative project with Shell, Chevron, Phillips, and Statoil entitled ''Petroleum and Environmental Research Forum project (PERF 9844: Manage Water-Soluble Organics in Produced Water''). The goal of this project, which involves characterization and evaluation of these water-soluble compounds, is aimed at reducing the future production of such contaminants. To determine the effect that various drilling conditions might have on water-soluble organics (WSO) content in produced water, a simulated brine water containing the principal inorganic components normally found in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) brine sources was prepared. The GOM simulant was then contacted with as-received crude oil from a deep well site to study the effects of water cut, produced-water pH, salinity, pressure, temperature, and crude oil sources on the type and content of the WSO in produced water. The identities of individual semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were determined in all as-received crude and actual produced water samples using standard USEPA Method (8270C) protocol. These analyses were supplemented with the more general measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the gas (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}), diesel (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}), and oil (C{sub 20}-C{sub 28}) carbon ranges as determined by both gas chromatographic (GC) and infrared (IR) analyses. An open liquid chromatographic procedure was also used to differentiate the saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, and polar components within the extractable TPH. Inorganic constituents in the produced water were analyzed by ion-selective electrodes and inductively

  18. [Soluble of Metals within TSP in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Feng, Chong; Qu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The dissolution of metals within aerosol particles is meaningful to evaluate the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected in Shanghai. We extracted the water soluble and acid soluble (pH = 2) metals by the mini-recirculation-leach-system and measured their concentrations by the high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The dissolution kinetics were rapid, the maximum solubility of metals could be reached in a few minutes. Overall, the average water-soluble concentrations were low for Co, Cr, Cd, V and Ni, median for Cu, Pb and Mn and high for Fe, Al, Zn and Mg. Combine the soluble metal concentrations with the back trajectory, the original air mass had significant impacts on water soluble metal concentrations. The water solubility and acid solubility were different for various metals, the water solubility of Fe was the lowest (2.0%), others followed an order: Al, Cr, V, Pb, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn, Mg, Zn. The metals' solubility was increased with the decrease of the solvent pH value. While the chemical speciation of metals was the internal cause of metals' solubility, the metals' ionic potential and the water solubility was negatively correlated.

  19. Solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs using solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao T-D; Tran, Phuong H-L; Khanh, Tran N; Van, Toi V; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-08-01

    Many new drugs have been discovered in pharmaceutical industry and exposed their surprised potential therapeutic effects. Unfortunately, these drugs possess low absorption and bioavailability since their solubility limitation in water. Solid dispersion (SD) is the current technique gaining so many attractions from scientists due to its effect on improving solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. A number of patents including the most recent inventions have been undertaken in this review to address various respects of this strategy in solubilization of poorly watersoluble drugs including type of carriers, preparation methods and view of technologies used to detect SD properties and mechanisms with the aim to accomplish a SD not only effective on enhanced bioavailability but also overcome difficulties associated with stability and production. Future prospects are as well discussed with an only hope that many developments and researches in this field will be successfully reached and contributed to commercial use for treatment as much as possible.

  20. Improved solubility of replication factor C (RFC) Walker A mutants.

    PubMed

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Bloom, Linda B

    2012-06-01

    Protein insolubility often poses a significant problem during purification protocols and in enzyme assays, especially for eukaryotic proteins expressed in a recombinant bacterial system. The limited solubility of replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been previously documented. We found that mutant forms of RFC harboring a single point mutation in the Walker A motif were even less soluble than the wild-type complex. The addition of maltose at 0.75 M to the storage and assay buffers greatly increases protein solubility and prevents the complex from falling apart. Our analysis of the clamp loading reaction is dependent on fluorescence-based assays, which are environmentally sensitive. Using wt RFC as a control, we show that the addition of maltose to the reaction buffers does not affect fluorophore responses in the assays or the enzyme activity, indicating that maltose can be used as a buffer additive for further downstream analysis of these mutants.

  1. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  2. Phase II Evaluation of Dalantercept, a Soluble Recombinant Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Receptor Fusion Protein, for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 0229N

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Filiaci, Virginia L.; Chen, Lee-may; Darus, Christopher J.; Kendrick, James E.; Sutton, Gregory; Moxley, Katherine; Aghajanian, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective This two-stage phase II study assessed activity of single agent dalantercept in patients with recurrent/persistent endometrial carcinoma (EMC). Methods Eligible patients had persistent/recurrent EMC after 1–2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and GOG performance ≤ 2. Dalantercept 1.2 mg/kg subcutaneous was administered once every 3 weeks until disease progression (PD)/development of prohibitory toxicity. Primary objectives were to estimate the proportion of patients with persistent/recurrent EMC, who survive progression-free without receiving non-protocol therapy (TPFS) for at least 6 months and to estimate the proportion having objective tumor response. Results All 28 enrolled patients were eligible and evaluable. Median age: 62 years. Most common histologies: 32% Grade 1/2 endometrioid and 54% serous tumors. Prior treatment: 1 or 2 regimens in 82% and 18% of patients, respectively. Eighteen patients received prior radiation therapy. Patients received 1–12 cycles of dalantercept, and 46% of patients received ≤2 cycles. The most common adverse events (AE) were fatigue, anemia, constipation and peripheral edema. Grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 39% and 4% of patients. One grade 5 gastric hemorrhage in a patient with a history of radiation fibrosis/small bowel obstruction was deemed possibly dalantercept-related. All patients are off study: 86% for PD. No ORs were observed; 57% had stable disease and 11% had TPFS ≥ 6 mos. Median progression-free and overall survival: 2.1 months (90% CI: 1.4–3.2) and 14.5 months (90% CI: 7.0–17.5), respectively. Conclusions Dalantercept has insufficient single agent activity in recurrent EMC to warrant further investigation at this dose level and schedule. PMID:25888978

  3. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Hanson, R S

    1992-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Fragments produced by digestion of DNA with rare cutting restriction endonucleases were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and transferred to Zeta-Probe membrane (Bio-Rad) for Southern blot analysis. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of soluble MMO by Western blot analysis and the ability to degrade TCE. The physiological groups of methanotrophs in each sample were determined by hybridizing cells with fluorescence-labelled signature probes. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Bath also produces a soluble MMO. Images PMID:1349468

  4. Highly efficient differentiation of hESCs to functional hepatic endoderm requires ActivinA and Wnt3a signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hay, David C.; Fletcher, Judy; Payne, Catherine; Terrace, John D.; Gallagher, Ronald C. J.; Snoeys, Jan; Black, James R.; Wojtacha, Davina; Samuel, Kay; Hannoun, Zara; Pryde, Anne; Filippi, Celine; Currie, Ian S.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Ross, James A.; Newsome, Philip N.; Iredale, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a valuable source of pluripotential primary cells. To date, however, their homogeneous cellular differentiation to specific cell types in vitro has proven difficult. Wnt signaling has been shown to play important roles in coordinating development, and we demonstrate that Wnt3a is differentially expressed at critical stages of human liver development in vivo. The essential role of Wnt3a in hepatocyte differentiation from hESCs is paralleled by our in vitro model, demonstrating the importance of a physiologic approach to cellular differentiation. Our studies provide compelling evidence that Wnt3a signaling is important for coordinated hepatocellular function in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that Wnt3a facilitates clonal plating of hESCs exhibiting functional hepatic differentiation. These studies represent an important step toward the use of hESC-derived hepatocytes in high-throughput metabolic analysis of human liver function. PMID:18719101

  5. The crucial role of Activin A on the formation of primordial germ cell-like cells from skin-derived stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Tan, Hui; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Yin, Shen; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul; Li, Julang; Yang, Xiao; Shi, Qing-Hua; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are founder cells of the germ cell lineage, and can be differentiated from stem cells in an induced system in vitro. However, the induction conditions need to be optimized in order to improve the differentiation efficiency. Activin A (ActA) is a member of the TGF-β super family and plays an important role in oogenesis and folliculogenesis. In the present study, we found that ActA promoted PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) formation from mouse skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) in both embryoid body-like structure (EBLS) differentiation and the co-culture stage in a dose dependent manner. ActA treatment (100 ng/ml) during EBLS differentiation stage and further co-cultured for 6 days without ActA significantly increased PGCLCs from 53.2% to 82.8%, and as well as EBLS differentiation without ActA followed by co-cultured with 100 ng/ml ActA for 4 to 12 days with the percentage of PGCLCs increasing markedly in vitro. Moreover, mice treated with ActA at 100 ng/kg body weight from embryonic day (E) 5.5-12.5 led to more PGCs formation. However, the stimulating effects of ActA were interrupted by Smad3 RNAi, and in an in vitro cultured Smad3(-/-) mouse skin cells scenario. SMAD3 is thus likely a key effecter molecule in the ActA signaling pathway. In addition, we found that the expression of some epiblast cell markers, Fgf5, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Wnt3, was increased in EBLSs cultured for 4 days or PGCLCs co-cultured for 12 days with ActA treatment. Interestingly, at 16 days of differentiation, the percentage of PGCLCs was decreased in the presence of ActA, but the expression of meiosis-relative genes, such as Stra8, Dmc1, Sycp3 and Sycp1, was increased. In conclusion, our data here demonstrated that ActA can promote PGCLC formation from SDSCs in vitro, at early stages of differentiation, and affect meiotic initiation of PGCLCs in later stages.

  6. Wettability, water sorption and water solubility of seven silicone elastomers used for maxillofacial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hulterström, Anna Karin; Berglund, Anders; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2008-01-01

    The wettability, water sorption and solubility of silicone elastomers used for maxillofacial prostheses were studied. The hypothesis was, that a material that has absorbed water would show an increase in the wettability and thus also the surface free energy of the material. Seven silicone elastomers, both addition- and condensation type polymers, were included. Five specimens of each material were subjected to treatment according to ISO standards 1567:1999 and 10477: 2004 for water sorption and solubility. The volumes of the specimens were measured according to Archimedes principle. The contact angle was measured with a contact angle goniometer at various stages of the sorption/solubility test. Wettability changed over the test period, but not according to theory. The addition type silicones showed little or no sorption and solubility, but two of the condensation type polymers tested had a significant sorption and solubility. This study showed that condensation type polymers may show too large volumetric changes when exposed to fluids, and therefore should no longer be used in prosthetic devices. The results of this study also suggests that it might be of interest to test sorption and solubility of materials that are to be implanted, since most of the materials had some solubility.

  7. Analysis of the phase solubility diagram of a phenacetin/competitor/beta-cyclodextrin ternary system, involving competitive inclusion complexation.

    PubMed

    Ono, N; Hirayama, F; Arima, H; Uekama, K

    2001-01-01

    The competitive inclusion complexations in the ternary phenacetin/competitors/beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CyD) systems were investigated by the solubility method, where m-bromobenzoic acid (m-BBA) and o-toluic acid (o-TA) were used as competitors. The solubility changes of the drug and competitors as a function of beta-CyD concentration in the ternary systems were formulated using their stability constants and intrinsic solubilities. The decrease in solubility of phenacetin by the addition of competitors could be quantitatively simulated by the formulation, when both drug and competitor give A(L) type solubility diagrams. On the other hand, when one of the guests gives a B(S) type solubility diagram, its solubility change was clearly reflected in that of the another guest, i.e., phenacetin gave an A(L) type solubility diagram in the binary phenacetin/beta-CyD system and o-TA gave a B(S) type diagram in the binary o-TA/beta-CyD system, but in the ternary phenacetin/o-TA/beta-CyD system, a new plateau region appeared in the original A(L) type diagram of phenacetin. This was explained by the solubilization theory of Higuchi and Connors. The solubility analysis of the ternary drug/competitor/CyD systems may be particularly useful for determination of the stability constant of a drug whose physicochemical and spectroscopic analyses are difficult, because they can be calculated by monitoring the solubility change of a competitor, without monitoring that of a drug. Furthermore, the present results suggest that attention should be paid to the type of the phase solubility diagram, as well as the magnitude of the stability constant and the solubility of the complex, for a rational formulation design of CyD complexes.

  8. Ice nucleation by water-soluble macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, B. G.; Budke, C.; Augustin-Bauditz, S.; Niedermeier, D.; Felgitsch, L.; Kampf, C. J.; Huber, R. G.; Liedl, K. R.; Loerting, T.; Moschen, T.; Schauperl, M.; Tollinger, M.; Morris, C. E.; Wex, H.; Grothe, H.; Pöschl, U.; Koop, T.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud glaciation is critically important for the global radiation budget (albedo) and for initiation of precipitation. But the freezing of pure water droplets requires cooling to temperatures as low as 235 K. Freezing at higher temperatures requires the presence of an ice nucleator, which serves as a template for arranging water molecules in an ice-like manner. It is often assumed that these ice nucleators have to be insoluble particles. We point out that also free macromolecules which are dissolved in water can efficiently induce ice nucleation: the size of such ice nucleating macromolecules (INMs) is in the range of nanometers, corresponding to the size of the critical ice embryo. As the latter is temperature-dependent, we see a correlation between the size of INMs and the ice nucleation temperature as predicted by classical nucleation theory. Different types of INMs have been found in a wide range of biological species and comprise a variety of chemical structures including proteins, saccharides, and lipids. Our investigation of the fungal species Acremonium implicatum, Isaria farinosa, and Mortierella alpina shows that their ice nucleation activity is caused by proteinaceous water-soluble INMs. We combine these new results and literature data on INMs from fungi, bacteria, and pollen with theoretical calculations to develop a chemical interpretation of ice nucleation and water-soluble INMs. This has atmospheric implications since many of these INMs can be released by fragmentation of the carrier cell and subsequently may be distributed independently. Up to now, this process has not been accounted for in atmospheric models.

  9. Drug Solubility: Importance and Enhancement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Savjani, Ketan T.; Gajjar, Anuradha K.; Savjani, Jignasa K.

    2012-01-01

    Solubility, the phenomenon of dissolution of solute in solvent to give a homogenous system, is one of the important parameters to achieve desired concentration of drug in systemic circulation for desired (anticipated) pharmacological response. Low aqueous solubility is the major problem encountered with formulation development of new chemical entities as well as for the generic development. More than 40% NCEs (new chemical entities) developed in pharmaceutical industry are practically insoluble in water. Solubility is a major challenge for formulation scientist. Any drug to be absorbed must be present in the form of solution at the site of absorption. Various techniques are used for the enhancement of the solubility of poorly soluble drugs which include physical and chemical modifications of drug and other methods like particle size reduction, crystal engineering, salt formation, solid dispersion, use of surfactant, complexation, and so forth. Selection of solubility improving method depends on drug property, site of absorption, and required dosage form characteristics. PMID:22830056

  10. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-29

    METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR...EQUILIBRIA AND OXIDE SOLUTION RELATIONS IN MOLTEN SALTS ............................................. 2 IV. METHODS FOR DETERMINING SOLUBILITIES

  11. Determination of solubility parameters of ionic liquids and ionic liquid/solvent mixtures from intrinsic viscosity.

    PubMed

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Wong, Yuewen; Lim, Kok Hwa; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-11-10

    The total and partial solubility parameters (dispersion, polar and hydrogen-bonding solubility parameters) of ten ionic liquids were determined. Intrinsic viscosity approaches were used that encompassed a one-dimensional method (1D-Method), and two different three-dimensional methods (3D-Method1 and 3D-Method2). The effect of solvent type, the dimethylacetamide (DMA) fraction in the ionic liquid, and dissolution temperature on solubility parameters were also investigated. For all types of effect, both the 1D-Method and 3D-Method2 present the same trend in the total solubility parameter. The partial solubility parameters are influenced by the cation and anion of the ionic liquid. Considering the effect on partial solubility parameters of the solvent type in the ionic liquid, it was observed that in both 3D methods, the dispersion and polar parameters of a 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate/solvent (60:40 vol %) mixture tend to increase as the total solubility parameter of the solvent increases.

  12. Engineered solubility tag for solution NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruschak, Amy M; Rose, Justine D; Coughlin, Michael P; Religa, Tomasz L

    2013-11-01

    The low solubility of many proteins hinders large scale expression and purification as well as biophysical measurements. Here, we devised a general strategy to solubilize a protein by conjugating it at a solvent-exposed position to a 6 kDa protein that was re-engineered to be highly soluble. We applied this method to the CARD domain of Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), which represents one member of a class of proteins that are notoriously prone to aggregation. Attachment of the tag to a cysteine residue, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at its self-association interface, improved the solubility of the ASC CARD over 50-fold under physiological conditions. Although it is not possible to use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to obtain a high quality 2D correlation spectrum of the wild type domain under physiological conditions, we demonstrate that NMR relaxation parameters of the solubilized variant are sufficiently improved to facilitate virtually any demanding measurement. The method shown here represents a straightforward approach for dramatically increasing protein solubility, enabled by ease of labeling as well as flexibility in tag placement with minimal perturbation to the target.

  13. Filtrates & Residues: An Experiment on the Molar Solubility and Solubility Product of Barium Nitrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wruck, Betty; Reinstein, Jesse

    1989-01-01

    Provides a two hour experiment using direct gravimetric methods to determine solubility constants. Provides methodology and sample results. Discusses the effect of the common ion on the solubility constant. (MVL)

  14. Use of whey protein soluble aggregates for thermal stability-a hypothesis paper.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kelsey N; Zhong, Qixin; Foegeding, Edward A

    2013-08-01

    Forming whey proteins into soluble aggregates is a modification shown to improve or expand the applications in foaming, emulsification, gelation, film-formation, and encapsulation. Whey protein soluble aggregates are defined as aggregates that are intermediates between monomer proteins and an insoluble gel network or precipitate. The conditions under which whey proteins denature and aggregate have been extensively studied and can be used as guiding principles of producing soluble aggregates. These conditions are reviewed for pH, ion type and concentration, cosolutes, and protein concentration, along with heating temperature and duration. Combinations of these conditions can be used to design soluble aggregates with desired physicochemical properties including surface charge, surface hydrophobicity, size, and shape. These properties in turn can be used to obtain target macroscopic properties, such as viscosity, clarity, and stability, of the final product. A proposed approach to designing soluble aggregates with improved thermal stability for beverage applications is presented.

  15. Solubility and speciation of atmospheric iron in buffer systems simulating cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Majestic, Brian J.; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-04-01

    The solubility of iron (Fe) in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is important to understand its chemistry and potential bioavailability to ocean phytoplankton. However, current studies on Fe solubility and its speciation are highly uncertain partly due to inconsistencies in analytical protocols. In this study, cloud-processing of atmospheric PM was simulated in acetate, formate, and oxalate buffers (pH = 4.30 ± 0.05) at 0.5, 1, 5, and 20 mM. Colorimetric analysis of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex showed that Fe solubility increased by an order of magnitude when acetate and formate concentrations increased from 0.5 mM to 5 mM, with a higher fraction of soluble Fe in acetate than in formate at lower buffer concentration (0.5 mM). Measured pH of sample extracts revealed that weak buffers are unable to maintain pH, presumably due to acidic or alkaline components of PM, requiring an optimum concentration (5 mM in this study) of acetate and formate for Fe solubility measurements. Similar extraction procedures revealed that oxalate buffer inhibits the formation of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex, especially with Fe(III)-containing solutions, rendering it unsuitable for Fe solubility measurements by Ferrozine method. Application of the optimized analytical method to PM samples from different environments showed quite variable Fe solubility, with the lowest (<1%) in dust-impacted samples and the highest (5%) in urban samples. The highest solubility (6.8%) was observed in ambient PM2.5 samples influenced by anthropogenic sources (car emissions) with more than 90% of soluble Fe in the form of Fe(II). Results from this study highlight the importance of the type and strength of buffer at a given pH for Fe solubility and provide further evidence of a higher Fe solubility in urban PM samples compared to desert dust.

  16. Amorphous solid dispersion enhances permeation of poorly soluble ABT-102: true supersaturation vs. apparent solubility enhancement.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kerstin J; Rosenblatt, Karin M; Westedt, Ulrich; Hölig, Peter; Rosenberg, Jörg; Mägerlein, Markus; Fricker, Gert; Brandl, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) represent a promising formulation approach for poorly soluble drugs. We explored the formulation-related impact of ASDs on permeation rate, apparent solubility and molecular solubility of the poorly soluble drug ABT-102. The influence of fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) as dispersion medium was also studied. ASDs were prepared by hot-melt extrusion. Permeation rate was assessed by the Caco-2 transwell assay. Cell viability and barrier integrity were assured by AlamarBlue©, TEER and permeability of the hydrophilic marker carboxyfluorescein. Apparent solubility and molecular solubility were evaluated by using centrifugation and inverse dialysis, respectively. The in vitro permeation rate of ABT-102 from aqueous dispersions of the ASD was found 4 times faster than that from the dispersions of the crystals, while apparent solubility and molecular solubility of ABT-102 were increased. Yet, a further increase in apparent solubility due to micellar solubilization as observed when dispersing the ASD in FaSSIF, did not affect molecular solubility or permeation rate. Overall, a good correlation between permeation rate and molecular solubility but not apparent solubility was seen.

  17. Ovarian follicle development in the laying hen is accompanied by divergent changes in inhibin A, inhibin B, activin A and follistatin production in granulosa and theca layers.

    PubMed

    Lovell, T M; Gladwell, R T; Groome, N P; Knight, P G

    2003-04-01

    To study the potential involvement of inhibin A (inhA), inhibin B (inhB), activin A (actA) and follistatin (FS) in the recruitment of follicles into the preovulatory hierarchy, growing follicles (ranging from 1 mm to the largest designated F1) and the three most recent postovulatory follicles (POFs) were recovered from laying hens (n=11). With the exception of <4 mm follicles and POFs, follicle walls were dissected into separate granulosa (G) and theca (T) layers before extraction. Contents of inhA, inhB, actA and FS in tissue extracts were assayed using specific two-site ELISAs and results are expressed per mg DNA. InhB content of both G and T followed a similar developmental pattern, although the content was >4-fold higher in G than in T at all stages. InhB content was very low in follicles <4 mm but increased ~50-fold (P<0.0001) to peak in 7-9 mm follicles, before falling steadily as follicles entered and moved up the follicular hierarchy (40-fold; 8 mm vs F2). In stark contrast, inhA remained very low in prehierarchical follicles (< or =9 mm) but then increased progressively as follicles moved up the preovulatory hierarchy to peak in F1 (approximately 100-fold increase; P<0.0001); In F1 >97% of inhA was confined to the G layer whereas in 5-9 mm follicles inhA was only detected in the T layer. Both inhA and inhB contents of POFs were significantly reduced compared with F1. Follicular actA was mainly confined to the T layer although detectable levels were present in G from 9 mm; actA was low between 1 and 9 mm but increased sharply as follicles entered the preovulatory hierarchy (approximately 6-fold higher in F4; P<0.0001); levels then fell approximately 2-fold as the follicle progressed to F1. Like actA, FS predominated in the T although significant amounts were also present in the G of prehierarchical follicles (4-9 mm), in contrast to actA, which was absent from the G. The FS content of T rose approximately 3-fold from 6 mm to a plateau which was sustained

  18. Calculation of Drug Solubilities by Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Lindley A.

    1981-01-01

    A method of estimating the solubilities of drugs in water is reported that is based on a principle applied in quantitative structure-activity relationships. This procedure involves correlation of partition coefficient values using the octanol/water system and aqueous solubility. (Author/MLW)

  19. Solubility Characteristics of PCBM and C60.

    PubMed

    Boucher, David; Howell, Jason

    2016-11-10

    Empirical data indicate that several good solvents for C60 and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have substantial polar and hydrogen-bonding components, which are not intrinsic to the structure of the C60 and PCBM molecules themselves. Functional solubility parameter (FSP) and convex solubility parameter (CSP) computations are performed on C60 and PCBM using solubility data available in the literature. The CSP and FSP results are compared to previously reported Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) and to the parameters calculated using additive functional group contribution methods. The CSP and FSP methods confirm the anomalously large polar and hydrogen-bonding parameters, δP and δH, obtained experimentally for C60 and PCBM. This behavior, which is quite irregular given the structure of the molecules, is due to the fact that several good solvents have high δP and δH values. Thus, these irregularities are highlighted by the CSP and FSP calculations. Additional contradictory solubility characteristics are disclosed by comparing the experimental solubility parameters to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model, additive functional group calculations, and COSMO-RS computations. The FSP solubility function strongly suggests that the solubility parameters do not accurately represent the cohesive energy density properties of C60 and PCBM, as intended, but rather they manifest the properties of the solvents, e.g., high δP and δH values, that are necessary to accommodate these molecules in the liquid phase.

  20. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  1. Soluble α-synuclein is a novel modulator of Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Megan E.; Sherman, Mathew A.; Greimel, Susan; Kuskowski, Michael; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Lesné, Sylvain E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence has emphasized soluble species of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau as pathogenic effectors in AD. Despite the fact that Aβ, tau and α-synuclein (αSyn) can promote each other’s aggregation, the potential contribution of soluble αSyn to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis is unknown. Here, we found a ~2-fold increase over controls in soluble αSyn levels in AD brains in the absence of LB cytopathology. Importantly, soluble αSyn levels were a quantitatively stronger correlate of cognitive impairment than soluble Aβ and tau levels. To examine a putative role for αSyn in modulating cognitive function, we used the Barnes circular maze to assess spatial reference memory in transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type αSyn. The results revealed that a ~3-fold elevation of αSyn in vivo induced memory deficits similar to those observed in AD mouse models. The neurobiological changes associated with this elevation of soluble αSyn included decreases in selected synaptic vesicle proteins and an alteration of the protein composition of synaptic vesicles. Finally, a synergism between Aβ/APP and human tau appears to be responsible for the abnormal elevation of soluble αSyn in transgenic mice. Altogether, our data reveal an unexpected role for soluble, intraneuronal αSyn in AD pathophysiology. PMID:22836259

  2. Light extinction method for solubility measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shui; Wang, Jingkang; Yin, Qiuxiang; Wang, Yongli

    2005-03-01

    A novel measurement method for chemical solubility determination is brought forward, in which the advantages of two kinds of traditional methods are united. The results show that the concentration of unsolved particles suspending in the solution can be determined by measuring I/I0 (ratio of the transmission intensity to the incident intensity) of the laser beam permeating through the solution according to Lamben-Beer law. The biggest relative deviation for the solubility data determined is less than 1.5% for the sparingly soluble substances and 0.3% for the opulently soluble substances. By comparison of the experimental solubility data with previous data, the light extinction method is demonstrated to be stable and reliable.

  3. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1989-01-01

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  4. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  5. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, M.

    1988-02-12

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  6. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  7. Solubility prediction of drugs in mixed solvents using partial solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Jouyban, Abolghasem; Shayanfar, Ali; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Soleymani, Jafar; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Acree, William E; York, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Solubility of drugs in binary and ternary solvent mixtures composed of water and pharmaceutical cosolvents at different temperatures were predicted using the Jouyban-Acree model and a combination of partial solubility parameters as interaction descriptors in the solution. The generally trained version of the model produced the overall mean percentage deviation values for the back-calculated solubility of drugs in binary solvents of 34.3% and the predicted solubilities in ternary solvent mixtures of 38.0%. In addition, the applicability of the trained model for predicting the solvent composition providing the maximum solubility of a drug was investigated. The results of collected solubility data of drugs in various mixed solvents and the newly measured solubility data of five drugs in ethanol + propylene glycol + water mixtures at 25°C showed that the model provided acceptable predictions and could be used in the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Molecularly designed water soluble, intelligent, nanosize polymeric carriers.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, Erhan

    2004-06-11

    Intelligent polymers, also referred as "stimuli-responsive polymers" undergo strong property changes (in shape, surface characteristics, solubility, etc.) when only small changes in their environment (changes in temperature, pH, ionic strength light, electrical and magnetic field, etc.). They have been used in several novel applications, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering scaffolds, bioseparation, biomimetic actuators, etc. The most popular member of these type of polymers is poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPA)) which exhibits temperature-sensitive character, in which the polymer chains change from water-soluble coils to water-insoluble globules in aqueous solution as temperature increases above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer. Copolymerization of NIPA with acrylic acid (AAc) allows the synthesis of both pH and temperature-responsive copolymers. This paper summarizes some of our related studies in which NIPA and its copolymers were synthesized and used as intelligent carriers in diverse applications.

  9. Solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Hybertson, Brooks M.

    2009-01-01

    The solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide was measured at P ranging from 10.0 MPa to 25.0 MPa and T of 40.0 and 50.0 °C using a simple microsampling type apparatus with a 100.5 µL sample loop to remove aliquots for off-line analysis. The system was first validated using vanillin with off-line spectrophotometric analysis, then utilized for patchoulol measurements with off-line GC-MS analysis. The measured solubility of patchoulol in supercritical CO2 ranged from mole fractions of 0.43 × 10−3 at 10.0 MPa and 50.0 °C to 9.45 × 10−3 at 25.0 MPa and 40.0 °C. PMID:19424449

  10. Regulation of the neural niche by the soluble molecule Akhirin.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Uzzal Kumar; Felemban, Athary Abdulhaleem; Riyadh, Asrafuzzaman M; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2016-06-01

    Though the adult central nervous system has been considered a comparatively static tissue with little turnover, it is well established today that new neural cells are generated throughout life. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) can self-renew and generate all types of neural cells. The proliferation of NS/PCs, and differentiation and fate determination of PCs are regulated by extrinsic factors such as growth factors, neurotrophins, and morphogens. Although several extrinsic factors that influence neurogenesis have already been reported, little is known about the role of soluble molecules in neural niche regulation. In this review, we will introduce the soluble molecule Akhirin and discuss its role in the eye and spinal cord during development.

  11. Theory and practice of supersaturatable formulations for poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku

    2015-03-01

    Candidate compounds with high activity do not always possess adequate physicochemical properties to be developed as commercial products. Notably, the development of candidates with poor aqueous solubility has been a great challenge in the past two decades. Formulations that offer supersaturated state during the dissolution process are considered effective for increasing the oral bioavailability of such candidates. Representative supersaturatable dosage forms include amorphous solid dispersions, nanocrystal formulations and self-(micro)emulsifying drug delivery systems. This review describes the characteristics of these formulations, with emphasis on the suitability of the candidates for each type of formulation, from a physicochemical viewpoint. Influence of developmental strategy on the formulation selection is also discussed. This review aims to provide guidance for selecting formulations for poorly soluble drugs based on both academic and practical backgrounds.

  12. OZONE TREATMENT OF SOLUBLE ORGANICS IN PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2002-03-14

    This project was an extension of previous research to improve the applicability of ozonation and will help address the petroleum-industry problem of treating produced water containing soluble organics. The goal of this project was to maximize oxidation of hexane-extractable organics during a single-pass operation. The project investigated: (1) oxidant production by electrochemical and sonochemical methods, (2) increasing the mass transfer rate in the reactor by forming microbubbles during ozone injection into the produced water, and (3) using ultraviolet irradiation to enhance the reaction if needed. Several types of methodologies for treatment of soluble organics in synthetic and actual produced waters have been performed. The technologies tested may be categorized as follows: (1) Destruction via sonochemical oxidation at different pH, salt concentration, ultraviolet irradiation, and ferrous iron concentrations. (2) Destruction via ozonation at different pH, salt concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentrations, ultraviolet irradiation, temperature, and reactor configurations.

  13. Role of Hansen solubility parameters in solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, K; Voelkel, A; Pietrzyńska, M; Héberger, K

    2010-08-27

    The sorbent-eluent systems combined from eight polymeric sorbents and seven solvents as eluents were used for the extraction of phenol and its oxidation products from water samples. The individual interactions between sorbents, eluents and analytes were characterized by Hansen solubility parameters. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used for revealing the dominant interactions (dispersive, polar, and hydrogen bonding type) in sorbent-analyte-eluent systems. The importance of solubility parameters was also determined by a novel procedure based on sum of ranking differences (SRD). Although PCA and ranking by SRD are based on different principles and calculations, they have provided very similar results. The recovery in a given system has been predicted from the magnitudes of mutual interactions (sorbent-analyte, sorbent-eluent, analyte-eluent) by multiple linear regression.

  14. Salt formation to improve drug solubility.

    PubMed

    Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2007-07-30

    Salt formation is the most common and effective method of increasing solubility and dissolution rates of acidic and basic drugs. In this article, physicochemical principles of salt solubility are presented, with special reference to the influence of pH-solubility profiles of acidic and basic drugs on salt formation and dissolution. Non-ideality of salt solubility due to self-association in solution is also discussed. Whether certain acidic or basic drugs would form salts and, if salts are formed, how easily they would dissociate back into their free acid or base forms depend on interrelationships of several factors, such as S0 (intrinsic solubility), pH, pKa, Ksp (solubility product) and pHmax (pH of maximum solubility). The interrelationships of these factors are elaborated and their influence on salt screening and the selection of optimal salt forms for development are discussed. Factors influencing salt dissolution under various pH conditions, and especially in reactive media and in presence of excess common ions, are discussed, with practical reference to the development of solid dosage forms.

  15. Dengue and soluble mediators of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Espada-Murao, Lyre Anni; Morita, Kouichi

    2011-12-01

    Huge emphasis has been placed on the role of the adaptive immune system in dengue pathogenesis. Yet there is increasing evidence for the importance of the innate immune system in regulating dengue infection and possibly influencing the disease. This review focuses on the interplay between the innate immune system and dengue and highlights the role of soluble immunological mediators. Type I and type II interferons of the innate immune system demonstrate non-overlapping roles in dengue infection. Furthermore, while some IFN responses to dengue are protective, others may exert disease-related effects on the host. But aside from interferons, a number of cytokines have also been implicated in dengue pathogenesis. Our expanding knowledge of cytokines indicates that these soluble mediators act upon a complicated network of events to provoke the disease. This cytokine storm is generally attributed to massive T cell activation as an outcome of secondary infection. However, there is reason to believe that innate immune response-derived cytokines also have contributory effects, especially in the context of severe cases of primary dengue infection. Another less popular but interesting perspective on dengue pathogenesis is the effect of mosquito feeding on host immune responses and viral infection. Various studies have shown that soluble factors from vector saliva have the capacity to alter immune reactions and thereby influence pathogen transmission and establishment. Hence, modulation of the innate immune system at various levels of infection is a critical component of dengue disease. In the absence of an approved drug or vaccine for dengue, soluble mediators of the innate immune system could be a strategic foothold for developing anti-viral therapeutics and improving clinical management.

  16. Oxygen solubility and permeability of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Whitcombe, Michael J; Parker, Roger; Ring, Stephen G

    2005-06-13

    The saturated oxygen concentration in a series of aqueous solutions of sorbitol (up to 35% w/w) and maltitol (up to 50% w/w) was measured using colorimetric reagent vials based on Rhodazine D. The results indicate that the solubility of oxygen in low-water carbohydrates is considerably lower than its solubility in pure water. It was concluded that the low-oxygen solubility is a major factor contributing to the barrier properties of low-water content carbohydrates used in the encapsulation of flavours, lipids, peptides and other oxidisable species.

  17. Predicting the octanol solubility of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Admire, Brittany; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2013-07-01

    The molar octanol solubility of an organic nonelectrolytes can be reasonably predicted solely from its melting point provided that its liquid (or a hypothetical super-cooled liquid) form is miscible with octanol. The aim of this work is to develop criteria to determine if the real or hypothetical liquid form of a given compound will be miscible with octanol based on its molar volume and solubility parameter. Fortunately, most organic compounds (including most drugs) conform to the criteria for complete liquid miscibility, and therefore have solubilities that are proportional to their melting points. The results show that more than 95% of the octanol solubilities studied are predicted with an error of less than 1 logarithmic unit.

  18. Acid soluble, pepsin resistant platelet aggregating material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1982-08-31

    Disclosed is an acid soluble, pepsin resistant, platelet aggregating material isolated from equine arterial tissue by extraction with dilute aqueous acid. The method of isolation and use to control bleeding are described. 4 figs.

  19. An Introduction to the Understanding of Solubility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Trevor M.; Battino, Rubin

    2001-01-01

    Explores different solubility processes and related issues, including the second law of thermodynamics and ideal mixtures, real liquids, intermolecular forces, and solids in liquids or gases in liquids. (Contains 22 references.) (ASK)

  20. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water.

  1. Organogel formation rationalized by Hansen solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Matthieu; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2011-08-07

    Some organic compounds gelate particular solvents by forming a network of anisotropic fibres. We show that Hansen solubility parameters can be used to predict the range of solvents that are likely to be gelled by any given gelator.

  2. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  3. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  4. Correlation of Catalytic Rates With Solubility Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; England, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Catalyst maximizes activity when its solubility parameter equals that of reactive species. Catalytic activities of some binary metal alloys at maximum when alloy compositions correspond to Hildebrand solubility parameters equal to those of reactive atomic species on catalyst. If this suggestive correlation proves to be general, applied to formulation of other mixed-metal catalysts. Also used to identify reactive species in certain catalytic reactions.

  5. Sibutramine characterization and solubility, a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceves-Hernández, Juan M.; Nicolás Vázquez, Inés; Hinojosa-Torres, Jaime; Penieres Carrillo, Guillermo; Arroyo Razo, Gabriel; Miranda Ruvalcaba, René

    2013-04-01

    Solubility data from sibutramine (SBA) in a family of alcohols were obtained at different temperatures. Sibutramine was characterized by using thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction technique. Solubility data were obtained by the saturation method. The van't Hoff equation was used to obtain the theoretical solubility values and the ideal solvent activity coefficient. No polymorphic phenomena were found from the X-ray diffraction analysis, even though this compound is a racemic mixture of (+) and (-) enantiomers. Theoretical calculations showed that the polarisable continuum model was able to reproduce the solubility and stability of sibutramine molecule in gas phase, water and a family of alcohols at B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory. Dielectric constant, dipolar moment and solubility in water values as physical parameters were used in those theoretical calculations for explaining that behavior. Experimental and theoretical results were compared and good agreement was obtained. Sibutramine solubility increased from methanol to 1-octanol in theoretical and experimental results.

  6. Chromatographic determination of solubilities in superheated water.

    PubMed

    Jones, Neil; Clifford, Anthony A; Bartle, Keith D; Myers, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Superheated water (SHW) is an effective solvent for the extraction of a variety of environmental pollutants, but knowledge of the solubilities in water at elevated temperatures necessary to maximise the efficiency of the process is often lacking. Ambient temperature aqueous solubilities have been measured by reverse-phase HPLC from correlations with retention factors, k, but for poorly soluble organics the eluent must contain a proportion of organic modifier followed by extrapolation to pure water. The use of SHW as mobile phase allows direct determination of aqueous solubility from measurement of k on a modified HPLC system in which the eluent is cooled before detection to improve baseline stability. Alumina-bonded octadecylsilane columns were found to be more stable in SHW chromatography than their silica-bonded counterparts. To validate the procedure, measurements of k were made between 100 and 200°C for toluene and correlated with literature solubilities; the solubilities at 170°C of a number of related aromatics were then determined from their k-values.

  7. How Soluble GARP Enhances TGFβ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fridrich, Sven; Hahn, Susanne A.; Linzmaier, Marion; Felten, Matthias; Zwarg, Jenny; Lennerz, Volker; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Stöcker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    GARP (glycoprotein A repetitions predominant) is a cell surface receptor on regulatory T-lymphocytes, platelets, hepatic stellate cells and certain cancer cells. Its described function is the binding and accommodation of latent TGFβ (transforming growth factor), before the activation and release of the mature cytokine. For regulatory T cells it was shown that a knockdown of GARP or a treatment with blocking antibodies dramatically decreases their immune suppressive capacity. This confirms a fundamental role of GARP in the basic function of regulatory T cells. Prerequisites postulated for physiological GARP function include membrane anchorage of GARP, disulfide bridges between the propeptide of TGFβ and GARP and connection of this propeptide to αvβ6 or αvβ8 integrins of target cells during mechanical TGFβ release. Other studies indicate the existence of soluble GARP complexes and a functionality of soluble GARP alone. In order to clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we expressed and purified recombinant TGFβ and a soluble variant of GARP. Surprisingly, soluble GARP and TGFβ formed stable non-covalent complexes in addition to disulfide-coupled complexes, depending on the redox conditions of the microenvironment. We also show that soluble GARP alone and the two variants of complexes mediate different levels of TGFβ activity. TGFβ activation is enhanced by the non-covalent GARP-TGFβ complex already at low (nanomolar) concentrations, at which GARP alone does not show any effect. This supports the idea of soluble GARP acting as immune modulator in vivo. PMID:27054568

  8. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  9. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept.

  10. Water-soluble extracts from defatted sesame seed flour show antioxidant activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, Sana; Katsuno, Nakako; Kanamaru, Yoshihiro; Yabe, Tomio

    2015-05-15

    Defatted white and gold sesame seed flour, recovered as a byproduct after sesame oil extraction, was extracted with 70% ethanol to obtain polar-soluble crude extracts. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the extract was evaluated by DPPH free radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC). The polar-soluble crude extracts of both sesame seed types exhibited good antioxidant capacity, especially by the ORAC method with 34,720 and 21,700 μmol Trolox equivalent/100g of white and gold sesame seed extract, respectively. HPLC, butanol extraction, and UPLC-MS analyses showed that different compounds contributed to the antioxidant activity of the polar-soluble crude extracts. Sesaminol glycosides were identified in the butanol-soluble fractions; whereas, purified water-soluble fraction contained ferulic and vanillic acids. This study shows that hydrophilic antioxidants in the purified water-soluble fraction contributed to the antioxidant activity of white and gold sesame seed polar-soluble crude extracts.

  11. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  12. Soluble proteins of chemical communication: an overview across arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Paolo; Iovinella, Immacolata; Felicioli, Antonio; Dani, Francesca R.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of chemical signals both in insects and in vertebrates is mediated by soluble proteins, highly concentrated in olfactory organs, which bind semiochemicals and activate, with still largely unknown mechanisms, specific chemoreceptors. The same proteins are often found in structures where pheromones are synthesized and released, where they likely perform a second role in solubilizing and delivering chemical messengers in the environment. A single class of soluble polypeptides, called Odorant-Binding Proteins (OBPs) is known in vertebrates, while two have been identified in insects, OBPs and CSPs (Chemosensory Proteins). Despite their common name, OBPs of vertebrates bear no structural similarity with those of insects. We observed that in arthropods OBPs are strictly limited to insects, while a few members of the CSP family have been found in crustacean and other arthropods, where however, based on their very limited numbers, a function in chemical communication seems unlikely. The question we address in this review is whether another class of soluble proteins may have been adopted by other arthropods to perform the role of OBPs and CSPs in insects. We propose that lipid-transporter proteins of the Niemann-Pick type C2 family could represent likely candidates and report the results of an analysis of their sequences in representative species of different arthropods. PMID:25221516

  13. Soluble proteins of chemical communication: an overview across arthropods.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Paolo; Iovinella, Immacolata; Felicioli, Antonio; Dani, Francesca R

    2014-01-01

    Detection of chemical signals both in insects and in vertebrates is mediated by soluble proteins, highly concentrated in olfactory organs, which bind semiochemicals and activate, with still largely unknown mechanisms, specific chemoreceptors. The same proteins are often found in structures where pheromones are synthesized and released, where they likely perform a second role in solubilizing and delivering chemical messengers in the environment. A single class of soluble polypeptides, called Odorant-Binding Proteins (OBPs) is known in vertebrates, while two have been identified in insects, OBPs and CSPs (Chemosensory Proteins). Despite their common name, OBPs of vertebrates bear no structural similarity with those of insects. We observed that in arthropods OBPs are strictly limited to insects, while a few members of the CSP family have been found in crustacean and other arthropods, where however, based on their very limited numbers, a function in chemical communication seems unlikely. The question we address in this review is whether another class of soluble proteins may have been adopted by other arthropods to perform the role of OBPs and CSPs in insects. We propose that lipid-transporter proteins of the Niemann-Pick type C2 family could represent likely candidates and report the results of an analysis of their sequences in representative species of different arthropods.

  14. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150/sup 0/C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables. (DLC)

  15. Cocrystal Transition Points: Role of Cocrystal Solubility, Drug Solubility, and Solubilizing Agents.

    PubMed

    Lipert, Maya P; Rodríguez-Hornedo, Naír

    2015-10-05

    In this manuscript we bring together concepts that are relevant to the solubilization and thermodynamic stability of cocrystals in the presence of drug solubilizing agents. Simple equations are derived that allow calculation of cocrystal solubilization and transition point solubility. Analysis of 10 cocrystals in 6 different solubilizing agents shows that cocrystal solubilization is quantitatively predicted from drug solubilization. Drug solubilizing agents such as surfactants and lipid-based media are also shown to induce cocrystal transition points, where drug and cocrystal solubilities are equal, and above which the cocrystal solubility advantage over drug is eliminated. We have discovered that cocrystal solubility at the transition point (S*) is independent of solubilizing agent, and can be predicted from knowledge of only the aqueous solubilities of drug and cocrystal. For 1:1 cocrystals, S* = (Scocrystal,aq)(2)/Sdrug,aq. S* is a key indicator of cocrystal thermodynamic stability and establishes the upper solubility limit below which cocrystal is more soluble than the constituent drug. These findings have important implications to tailor cocrystal solubility and stability in pharmaceutical formulations from commonly available drug solubility descriptors.

  16. Solubility enhancement of desloratadine by solid dispersion in poloxamers.

    PubMed

    Kolašinac, Nemanja; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Homšek, Irena; Grujić, Branka; Ðurić, Zorica; Ibrić, Svetlana

    2012-10-15

    The present study investigates the possibility of using poloxamers as solubility and dissolution rate enhancing agents of the poorly water soluble drug substance desloratadine that can be used for the preparation of immediate release tablet formulation. Two commercially available poloxamer grades (poloxamer P 188 and poloxamer P 407) were selected, and solid dispersions (SDs) containing different weight ratio of poloxamers and desloratadine were prepared by a low temperature melting method. All SDs were subjected to basic physicochemical characterization by thermal and vibrational spectroscopy methods in order to evaluate the efficiency of poloxamers as solubility enhancers. Immediate release tablets were prepared by direct compression of powdered solid dispersions according to a General Factorial Design, in order to evaluate the statistical significance of two formulation (X(1) - type of poloxamer in SD and X(2) - poloxamer ratio in SD) and one process variable (X(3) - compression force) on the drug dissolution rate. It was found that desloratadine in SDs existed in the amorphous state, and that can be largely responsible for the enhanced intrinsic solubility, which was more pronounced in SDs containing poloxamer 188. Statistical analysis of the factorial design revealed that both investigated formulation variables exert a significant effect on the drug dissolution rate. Increased poloxamer ratio in SDs resulted in increased drug dissolution rate, with poloxamer 188 contributing to a faster dissolution rate than poloxamer 407, in accordance with the results of intrinsic dissolution tests. Moreover, there is a significant interaction between poloxamer ratio in SD and compression force. Higher poloxamer ratio in SDs and higher compression force results in a significant decrease of the drug dissolution rate, which can be attributed to the lower porosity of the tablets and more pronounced bonding between poloxamer particles.

  17. Drug-polymer solubility and miscibility: Stability consideration and practical challenges in amorphous solid dispersion development.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Huang, Jun; Hussain, Munir A

    2010-07-01

    Drug-polymer solid dispersion has been demonstrated as a feasible approach to formulate poorly water-soluble drugs in the amorphous form, for the enhancement of dissolution rate and bioperformance. The solubility (for crystalline drug) and miscibility (for amorphous drug) in the polymer are directly related to the stabilization of amorphous drug against crystallization. Therefore, it is important for pharmaceutical scientists to rationally assess solubility and miscibility in order to select the optimal formulation (e.g., polymer type, drug loading, etc.) and recommend storage conditions, with respect to maximizing the physical stability. This commentary attempts to discuss the concepts and implications of the drug-polymer solubility and miscibility on the stabilization of solid dispersions, review recent literatures, and propose some practical strategies for the evaluation and development of such systems utilizing a working diagram.

  18. Water-Soluble Nanodiamond (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Jarre, G.; Liang, Y.; Betz, P.; Liang, D.; Krueger, A. Playing the surface game − Diels - Alder reactions on diamond nanoparticles. Chem. Commun. 2010, 47...currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...mg) was added under argon to a flame-dried 100 mL three- neck round-bottomed flask equipped with a stir bar and fitted with a condenser . The flask

  19. Redefining solubility parameters: the partial solvation parameters.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-21

    The present work reconsiders a classical and universally accepted concept of physical chemistry, the solubility parameter. Based on the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, a new definition of solubility parameter is proposed, which overcomes some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition and expands its range of applications. The original single solubility parameter is replaced by four partial solvation parameters reflecting the dispersion, the polar, the acidic and the basic character of the chemical compounds as expressed either in their pure state or in mixtures. Simple rules are adopted for the definition and calculation of these four parameters and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. In contrast, however, to the well known Hansen solubility parameters, their design and evaluation does not rely exclusively on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility but it makes also use of the other basic rule of compatibility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This complementarity matching becomes particularly operational with the sound definition of the acidic and basic components of the solvation parameter based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions of the quantum mechanics-based COSMO-RS theory. The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner, thus, preserving the strength and appeal of solubility parameter stemming from its simplicity. The new predictive method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceuticals and polymers. The results from quantum mechanics calculations are critically compared with the results from Abraham's acid/base descriptors.

  20. Low Soluble Syndecan-1 Precedes Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Gandley, Robin E.; Althouse, Andrew; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Bregand-White, Julia M.; McGonigal, Stacy; Myerski, Ashley C.; Gallaher, Marcia; Powers, Robert W.; Hubel, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syndecan-1 (Sdc1; CD138) is a major transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the extracellular, luminal surface of epithelial cells and syncytiotrophoblast, thus comprising a major component of the glycocalyx of these cells. The “soluble” (shed) form of Sdc1 has paracrine and autocrine functions and is normally produced in a regulated fashion. We compared plasma soluble Sdc1 concentrations, in relation to placental Sdc1 expression, in uncomplicated (control) and preeclamptic pregnancies. Methods We evaluated soluble Sdc1 across uncomplicated pregnancy, and between preeclamptic, gestational hypertensive and control patients at mid-pregnancy (20 weeks) and 3rd trimester by ELISA. Placental expression level of Sdc1 was compared between groups in relation to pre-delivery plasma soluble Sdc1. Participants were recruited from Magee-Womens Hospital. Results In uncomplicated pregnancy, plasma soluble Sdc1 rose significantly in the 1st trimester, and reached an approximate 50-fold increase at term compared to post pregnancy levels. Soluble Sdc1 was lower at mid-pregnancy in women who later developed preeclampsia (P<0.05), but not gestational hypertension, compared to controls, and remained lower at late pregnancy in preeclampsia (P<0.01) compared to controls. Sdc1 was prominently expressed on syncytiotrophoblast of microvilli. Syncytiotrophoblast Sdc1 immunostaining intensities, and mRNA content in villous homogenates, were lower in preeclampsia vs. controls (P<0.05). Soluble Sdc1 and Sdc1 immunostaining scores were inversely associated with systolic blood pressures, and positively correlated with infant birth weight percentile. Conclusion Soluble Sdc1 is significantly lower before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, with reduced expression of Sdc1 in the delivered placenta, suggesting a role for glycocalyx disturbance in preeclampsia pathophysiology. PMID:27299886

  1. Ultrasound influence on the solubility of solid dispersions prepared for a poorly soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Simone Vieira; Colombo, Fábio Belotti; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Solid dispersions have been successfully used to enhance the solubility of several poorly water soluble drugs. Solid dispersions are produced by melting hydrophilic carriers and mixing in the poorly water soluble drug. Supersaturation is obtained by quickly cooling the mixture until it solidifies, thereby entrapping the drug. The effects of using ultrasound to homogenize the molten carrier and drug mixture were studied. In particular, the increase in drug solubility for the resulting solid dispersions was analyzed. Piroxicam, which has very low water solubility, was used as a model drug. A full factorial design was used to analyze how sonication parameters affected the solubility and in vitro release of the drug. The results show that the use of ultrasound can significantly increase the solubility and dissolution rate of the piroxicam solid dispersion. Pure piroxicam presented a solubility of 13.3 μg/mL. A maximum fourfold increase in solubility, reaching 53.8 μg/mL, was observed for a solid dispersion sonicated at 19 kHz for 10 min and 475 W. The in vitro dissolution rate test showed the sonicated solid dispersion reached a maximum rate of 18%/min, a sixfold increase over the piroxicam rate of 2.9%/min. Further solid state characterization by thermal, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analyses also showed that the sonication process, in the described conditions, did not adversely alter the drug or significantly change its polymorphic form. Ultrasound is therefore an interesting technique to homogenize drug/carrier mixtures with the objective of increasing the solubility of drugs with poor water solubility.

  2. The interaction of nifedipine with selected cyclodextrins and the subsequent solubility-permeability trade-off.

    PubMed

    Beig, Avital; Miller, Jonathan M; Dahan, Arik

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and 2,6-dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DMβCD) with the lipophilic drug nifedipine and to investigate the subsequent solubility-permeability interplay. Solubility curves of nifedipine with HPβCD and DMβCD in MES buffer were evaluated using phase solubility methods. Then, the apparent permeability of nifedipine was investigated as a function of increasing HPβCD/DMβCD concentration in the hexadecane-based PAMPA model. The interaction with nifedipine was CD dependent; significantly higher stability constant was obtained for DMβCD in comparison with HPβCD. Moreover, nifedipine displays different type of interaction with these CDs; a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex was apparent with HPβCD, while 1:2 stoichiometry was apparent for DMβCD. In all cases, decreased apparent intestinal permeability of nifedipine as a function of increasing CD level and nifedipine apparent solubility was obtained. A quasi-equilibrium mass transport analysis was developed to explain this solubility-permeability interplay; the model enabled excellent quantitative prediction of nifedipine's permeability as a function of CD concentrations. This work demonstrates that when using CDs in solubility-enabling formulations, a trade-off exists between solubility increase and permeability decrease that must not be overlooked. This trade-off was found to be independent of the type of CD-drug interaction. The transport model presented here can aid in striking the appropriate solubility-permeability balance in order to achieve optimal overall absorption.

  3. Biological activities of water-soluble fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; Mashino, T.

    2009-04-01

    Three types of water-soluble fullerene derivatives were synthesized and their biological activities were investigated. C60-dimalonic acid, an anionic fullerene derivative, showed antioxidant activity such as quenching of superoxide and relief from growth inhibition of E. coli by paraquat. C60-bis(7V,7V-dimethylpyrrolidinium iodide), a cationic fullerene derivative, has antibacterial activity and antiproliferative effect on cancer cell lines. The mechanism is suggested to be respiratory chain inhibition by reactive oxygen species produced by the cationic fullerene derivative. Proline-type fullerene derivatives showed strong inhibition activities on HIV-reverse transcriptase. The IC50 values were remarkably lower than nevirapine, a clinically used anti-HIV drug. Fullerene derivatives have a big potential for a new type of lead compound to be used as medicine.

  4. Development of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for the enhancement of solubility and oral bioavailability of fenofibrate, a poorly water-soluble drug

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Kazi; Alamri, Rayan; Ahmad, Ajaz; Raish, Mohammad; Alanazi, Fars K; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) have become a popular formulation option as nanocarriers for poorly water-soluble drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the factor that can influence the design of successful lipid formulation classification system (LFCS) Type III SNEDDS formulation and improve the oral bioavailability (BA) of fenofibrate. Materials and methods LFCS Type III SNEDDS were designed using various oils, water-soluble surfactants, and/or cosolvents (in considering the polarity of the lipids) for the model anticholesterol drug, fenofibrate. The developed SNEDDS were assessed visually and by measurement of the droplet size. Equilibrium solubility of fenofibrate in the SNEDDS was conducted to find out the maximum drug loading. Dynamic dispersion studies were carried out (1/100 dilution) in water to investigate how much drug stays in solution after aqueous dispersion of the formulation. The BA of SNEDDS formulation was evaluated in the rat. Results The results from the characterization and solubility studies showed that formulations containing mixed glycerides were highly efficient SNEDDS as they had higher solubility of the drug and produced nanosized droplets. The dispersion studies confirmed that SNEDDS (containing polar mixed glycerides) can retain >98% drug in solution for >24 hours in aqueous media. The in vivo pharmacokinetics parameters of SNEDDS formulation in comparison with pure drug showed significant increase in Cmax and AUC0–t, ~78% and 67%, respectively. The oral BA of fenofibrate from SNEDDS in rats was ~1.7-fold enhanced as compared with the BA from pure drug. Conclusion Fenofibrate-loaded LFCS Type III SNEDDS formulations could be a potential oral pharmaceutical product for administering the poorly water-soluble drug, fenofibrate, with an enhanced oral BA. PMID:27366063

  5. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  6. Extraction and analysis of soluble carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Maness, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Soluble sugars are a universal component of most living organisms and a fundamental building block in biosynthetic processes. It is no wonder that both qualitative and quantitative changes in carbohydrates often accompany plant's responses to stress. Depending on the speed of onset of stress, plant tissues can exhibit rapid and very site-specific shifts in their soluble carbohydrate pool - rapid and precise tissue collection and stabilization are necessary if analytical results are to truly represent the sugar composition at the instant of harvest. Since soluble carbohydrates are, by definition, soluble in the cell's aqueous environment, they may be analyzed directly from liquids obtained from plants or they may require extraction from the plant matrix. During extraction and prior to analysis, steps should be taken to avoid change in form or quantity of sugars by endogenous active enzyme conversion or by contaminating microbial growth. Many procedures for soluble sugar analysis exist; the choice of the most appropriate analytical protocol is ultimately dictated by the depth of information required to substantiate findings for a particular purpose.

  7. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat.

  8. Melt extrusion with poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sejal; Maddineni, Sindhuri; Lu, Jiannan; Repka, Michael A

    2013-08-30

    Melt extrusion (ME) over recent years has found widespread application as a viable drug delivery option in the drug development process. ME applications include taste masking, solid-state stability enhancement, sustained drug release and solubility enhancement. While ME can result in amorphous or crystalline solid dispersions depending upon several factors, solubility enhancement applications are centered around generating amorphous dispersions, primarily because of the free energy benefits they offer. In line with the purview of the current issue, this review assesses the utility of ME as a means of enhancing solubility of poorly soluble drugs/chemicals. The review describes major processing aspects of ME technology, definition and understanding of the amorphous state, manufacturability, analytical characterization and biopharmaceutical performance testing to better understand the strength and weakness of this formulation strategy for poorly soluble drugs. In addition, this paper highlights the potential advantages of employing a fusion of techniques, including pharmaceutical co-crystals and spray drying/solvent evaporation, facilitating the design of formulations of API exhibiting specific physico-chemical characteristics. Finally, the review presents some successful case studies of commercialized ME based products.

  9. Influence of Polymer Molecular Weight on Drug-Polymer Solubility: A Comparison between Experimentally Determined Solubility in PVP and Prediction Derived from Solubility in Monomer.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Olesen, Niels Erik; Holm, Per; Langguth, Peter; Holm, René; Rades, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the influence of polymer molecular weight on drug-polymer solubility was investigated using binary systems containing indomethacin (IMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of different molecular weights. The experimental solubility in PVP, measured using a differential scanning calorimetry annealing method, was compared with the solubility calculated from the solubility of the drug in the liquid analogue N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP). The experimental solubility of IMC in the low-molecular-weight PVP K12 was not significantly different from that in the higher molecular weight PVPs (K25, K30, and K90). The calculated solubilities derived from the solubility in NVP (0.31-0.32 g/g) were found to be lower than those experimentally determined in PVP (0.38-0.40 g/g). Nevertheless, the similarity between the values indicates that the analogue solubility can provide valuable indications on the solubility in the polymer. Hence, if a drug is soluble in an analogue of the polymer, it is most likely also soluble in the polymer. In conclusion, the solubility of a given drug-polymer system is determined by the strength of the drug-polymer interactions rather than the molecular weight of the polymer. Therefore, during the first screenings for drug solubility in polymers, only one representative molecular weight per polymer is needed.

  10. Prediction of seawater solubility of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Tokura, K.; Kishi, H.; Strachan, W.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The salting-out effect by seawater constituents on the water solubilities of 11 aromatic compounds, anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene, biphenyl, naphthalene, p-nitrotoluene, p-toluidine, o-nitrophenol, m-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol and phenol was investigated. A best fit equation for the salting-out parameters, K, and distilled water solubilities, S/sub 0/, at 20/sup 0/C was found to be K = -0.0298 log S/sub 0/ + 0.114. Seawater solubilities, S, predicted for solutions of ionic strength, I, using the equation log S = (0.0298 I + 1)logS/sub 0/ - 0.114 I were in agreement with observed values within 13% and there were no significant differences between values from the Pacific Ocean seawater and those from 35% NaCl solutions. It was concluded that dissolved organic matter in seawater had an insignificant effect for the test chemicals.

  11. Diffusion and solubility of oxygen in silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenauer, W.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion and solubility of oxygen in Ag in the temperature range between 412 and 862 C was determined. The following interpolation formula was found for the solubility: L = 8.19.1/100.exp(-11 860/RT)Mol O2/g.At.Ag.at 1/.5. The process obeys the Sieverts square root law within the limits of error. The dissolution of oxygen in Ag may be accompanied by the dissociation of the oxygen molecules into atoms. The tests on Ag-foils reveal that below a temperature of about 500 C a higher solubility is simulated by the adsorption of oxygen. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in silver obeys the following equation: D = 2.72.1/100.exp(-11 000/RT)sq cm/s. The relatively low activation energy of 11 kcal/g.At suggests that the diffusion of oxygen takes places over interstitial sites.

  12. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  13. AW-101 entrained solids - Solubility versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; RC Lettau; GF Piepel

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids entrained in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. BNFL requested Battelle to dilute the AW-1-1 sample using de-ionized water to mimic expected plant operating conditions. BNFL further requested Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids present in the diluted AW-101 sample versus temperature conditions of 30, 40, and 50 C. BNFL requested these tests to assess the composition of the LAW supernatant and solids versus expected plant-operating conditions. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-7, Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of LAW Entrained Solids. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan.

  14. Cosolvency of dimethyl isosorbide for steroid solubility.

    PubMed

    Zia, H; Ma, J K; O'Donnell, J P; Luzzi, L A

    1991-04-01

    Dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), which is currently under investigation for its potential use as a pharmaceutical vehicle and drug permeation enhancer, is a water-miscible liquid with relatively low viscosity. The solubilization behavior of DMI as a cosolvent for nonpolar drugs was characterized via dielectric constant measurements of binary solvent systems containing DMI and either water, propylene glycol (PG), or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Evidence from the dielectric constant profiles and NMR studies suggest that DMI undergoes complexation with water and PG, but not with PEG, through hydrogen bonding interactions. The solvent complexation exhibited a major effect on the solubilities of prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone in the mixed solvent systems. Maximum solubility of each drug was found to occur near a DMI/water or DMI/PG concentration ratio of 1:2. In the DMI-PEG mixed system, while there is no apparent interaction between DMI and PEG molecules, the solubility of prednisone was found to increase with decreasing dielectric constant.

  15. Water-Soluble Metallocene-Containing Polymers.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Arda; Wurm, Frederik R

    2016-09-01

    Metallocenes are organometallic compounds with reversible redox profiles and tunable oxidation and reduction potentials, depending on the metal and substituents at the cyclopentadienyl rings. Metallocenes have been introduced in macromolecules to combine the redox-activity with polymer properties. There are many examples of such hydrophobic polymer materials, but much fewer water-soluble examples are found scattered across the polymer literature. However, in terms of drug delivery and other biological applications, water solubility is essential. For this very reason, all the synthetic routes to water-soluble metallocene containing polymers are collected and discussed here. The focus is on neutral ferrocene- and ruthenocene-containing and charged cobaltocenium-containing macromolecules (i.e., symmetrical sandwich complexes). The synthetic protocols, self-assembly behavior, and other benefits of the obtained materials are discussed.

  16. [Soluble nitrogen and soluble phosphorus dynamics during foliar litter decomposition in winter in alinine forest streams].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Yang, Wan-qin; Yue, Kai; Huang, Chun-ping; Peng, Yan; Wu, Fu-zhong

    2015-06-01

    In order to understand the dynamic pattern of soluble nitrogen and soluble phosphorus in the headwater streams during the process of litter decomposition in winter, a field experiment using litterbag method was conducted in an alpine forest in Western Sichuan, China. The foliar litter of two dominant canopy trees (Sabina saltuaria, and Larix mastersiana) and two shrubs (Salix paraplesia and Rhododendron lapponicum) were selected. The litterbags were placed in a headwater stream, river, riparian zone and closed canopy, and sampled in different freezing-thawing periods of winter (pre-freezing period, freezing period and thawing period). The results indicated that the soluble nitrogen content of foliar litter showed little changes over a whole winter decomposition regardless of species. In contrast, the soluble phosphorus content displayed the order as river < stream < riparian zone < closed canopy, and showed a decrease tendency in stream, river and riparian, although little changes under closed canopy over a whole winter decomposition. Correlation analysis suggested that the dynamics of soluble phosphorus content significantly correlated to the average temperature, positive accumulated temperature, negative accumulated temperature and flow velocity during the decomposition in winter. The dynamics of soluble nitrogen content only exhibited significant correlations with positive accumulated temperature. Additionally, litter quality (species) also controlled the dynamics of soluble nitrogen and soluble phosphorus content as litter decomposition proceeded. The results implied that soluble phosphorus could be more liable to loss in streams and rivers during litter decomposition compared with soluble nitrogen, which could further provide some new ideas in understanding nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in this alpine forest.

  17. Solubilities of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, J.H.; Shockley, W.E.; Greene, C.W.

    1984-07-01

    The solubility behavior of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane was investigated for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in support of the fluorocarbon absorption process. The solubility data derived from solute radioisotopes had uncertainties of approx. 0.1%. Values for Henry's law constants were initially determined under equilibrium conditions at infinite solute dilution. Based on these results, the study was extended to finite solute concentrations. Nonidealities in the two binary systems were expressed as gas phase fugacity coefficients for each solute at 10/sup 0/ intervals over the range -30 to +50/sup 0/C. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Rastak, N.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of multicomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures using solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in the VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture as a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a given range. We conducted Köhler theory calculations for 144 different mixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption about the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility distribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation nucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive calculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about organic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of activation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and density into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter κ; and (3) assuming a fixed water-soluble fraction ϵeff. The complete dissolution was able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy only when the majority (70-80%) of the material was dissolved at the point of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex mixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools for representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the activation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations. Depending mostly on the condensed-phase interactions between the organic molecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1 could be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over atmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations. Our results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility distribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for capturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility range will probably not add

  19. Soluble klotho binds monosialoganglioside to regulate membrane microdomains and growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, George; An, Sung-Wan; Al-Juboori, Saif I.; Nischan, Nicole; Yoon, Joonho; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Hilgemann, Donald W.; Xie, Jian; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Kohler, Jennifer J.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Huang, Chou-Long

    2017-01-01

    Soluble klotho, the shed ectodomain of the antiaging membrane protein α-klotho, is a pleiotropic endocrine/paracrine factor with no known receptors and poorly understood mechanism of action. Soluble klotho down-regulates growth factor-driven PI3K signaling, contributing to extension of lifespan, cardioprotection, and tumor inhibition. Here we show that soluble klotho binds membrane lipid rafts. Klotho binding to rafts alters lipid organization, decreases membrane’s propensity to form large ordered domains for endocytosis, and down-regulates raft-dependent PI3K/Akt signaling. We identify α2-3-sialyllactose present in the glycan of monosialogangliosides as targets of soluble klotho. α2-3-Sialyllactose is a common motif of glycans. To explain why klotho preferentially targets lipid rafts we show that clustering of gangliosides in lipid rafts is important. In vivo, raft-dependent PI3K signaling is up-regulated in klotho-deficient mouse hearts vs. wild-type hearts. Our results identify ganglioside-enriched lipid rafts to be receptors that mediate soluble klotho regulation of PI3K signaling. Targeting sialic acids may be a general mechanism for pleiotropic actions of soluble klotho. PMID:28069944

  20. Correlation of second virial coefficient with solubility for proteins in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chirag M; White, Edward T; Litster, James D

    2012-01-01

    In this work, osmotic second virial coefficients (B(22)) were determined and correlated with the measured solubilities for the proteins, α-amylase, ovalbumin, and lysozyme. The B(22) values and solubilities were determined in similar solution conditions using two salts, sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate in an acidic pH range. An overall decrease in the solubility of the proteins (salting out) was observed at high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions. However, for α-amylase, salting-in behavior was also observed in low concentration sodium chloride solutions. In ammonium sulfate solutions, the B(22) are small and close to zero below 2.4 M. As the ammonium sulfate concentrations were further increased, B(22) values decreased for all systems studied. The effect of sodium chloride on B(22) varies with concentration, solution pH, and the type of protein studied. Theoretical models show a reasonable fit to the experimental derived data of B(22) and solubility. B(22) is also directly proportional to the logarithm of the solubility values for individual proteins in salt solutions, so the log-linear empirical models developed in this work can also be used to rapidly predict solubility and B(22) values for given protein-salt systems.

  1. Poly(aspartic acid) with adjustable pH-dependent solubility.

    PubMed

    Németh, Csaba; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Abdullin, Timur; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2017-02-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) derivatives with adjustable pH-dependent solubility were synthesized and characterized to establish the relationship between their structure and solubility in order to predict their applicability as a basic material for enteric coatings. Polysuccinimide, the precursor of PASP, was modified with short chain alkylamines, and the residual succinimide rings were subsequently opened to prepare the corresponding PASP derivatives. Study of the effect of the type and concentration of the side groups on the pH-dependent solubility of PASP showed that solubility can be adjusted by proper selection of the chemical structure. The Henderson-Hasselbalch (HH) and the extended HH equations were used to describe the pH-dependent solubility of the polymers quantitatively. The estimate provided by the HH equation is poor, but an accurate description of the pH-dependent solubility can be found with the extended HH equation. The dissolution rate of a polymer film prepared from a selected PASP derivative was determined by fluorescence marking. The film dissolved rapidly when the pH was increased above its pKa. Cellular viability tests show that PASP derivatives are non-toxic to a human cell line. These polymers are thus of great interest as starting materials for enteric coatings.

  2. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  3. Solid dispersions of itraconazole for inhalation with enhanced dissolution, solubility and dispersion properties.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Sebti, Thami; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to produce a dry powder for inhalation (DPI) of a poorly soluble active ingredient (itraconazole: ITZ) that would present an improved dissolution rate and enhanced solubility with good aerosolization properties. Solid dispersions of amorphous ITZ, mannitol and, when applicable, D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) were produced by spray-drying hydro-alcoholic solutions in which all agents were dissolved. These dry formulations were characterized in terms of their aerosol performances and their dissolution, solubility and physical properties. Modulate differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction analyses showed that ITZ recovered from the different spray-dried solutions was in an amorphous state and that mannitol was crystalline. The inlet drying temperature and, indirectly, the outlet temperature selected during the spray-drying were critical parameters. The outlet temperature should be below the ITZ glass transition temperature to avoid severe particle agglomeration. The formation of a solid dispersion between amorphous ITZ and mannitol allowed the dry powder to be produced with an improved dissolution rate, greater saturation solubility than bulk ITZ and good aerosol properties. The use of a polymeric surfactant (such as TPGS) was beneficial in terms of dissolution rate acceleration and solubility enhancement, but it also reduced aerosol performance. For example, significant dissolution rate acceleration (f(2)<50) and greater saturation solubility were obtained when introducing 1% (w/w) TPGS (mean dissolution time dropped from 50.4 min to 36.9 min and saturation solubility increased from 20 ± 3 ng/ml to 46 ± 2 ng/ml). However, the fine particle fraction dropped from 47 ± 2% to 37.2 ± 0.4%. This study showed that mannitol solid dispersions may provide an effective formulation type for producing DPIs of poorly soluble active ingredients, as exemplified by ITZ.

  4. Chemical characterization of extractable water soluble matter associated with PM10 from Mexico City during 2000.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Castillo, M E; Olivos-Ortiz, M; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A; Cebrián, M E

    2005-11-01

    We report the chemical composition of PM10-associated water-soluble species in Mexico City during the second semester of 2000. PM10 samples were collected at four ambient air quality monitoring sites in Mexico City. We determined soluble ions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, sodium, potassium), ionizable transition metals (Zn, Fe, Ti, Pb, Mn, V, Ni, Cr, Cu) and soluble protein. The higher PM(10) levels were observed in Xalostoc (45-174 microg m(-3)) and the lowest in Pedregal (19-54 microg m(-3)). The highest SO2 average concentrations were observed in Tlalnepantla, NO2 in Merced and O3 and NO(x) in Pedregal. The concentration range of soluble sulfate was 6.7-7.9 and 19-25.5 microg m(-3) for ammonium, and 14.8-29.19 for soluble V and 3.2-7.7 ng m(-3) for Ni, suggesting a higher contribution of combustion sources. PM-associated soluble protein levels varied between 0.038 and 0.169 mg m(-3), representing a readily inhalable constituent that could contribute to adverse outcomes. The higher levels for most parameters studied were observed during the cold dry season, particularly in December. A richer content of soluble metals was observed when they were expressed by mass/mass units rather than by air volume units. Significant correlations between Ni-V, Ni-SO4(-2), V-SO4(-2), V-SO2, Ni-SO2 suggest the same type of emission source. The variable soluble metal and ion concentrations were strongly influenced by the seasonal meteoclimatic conditions and the differential contribution of emission sources. Our data support the idea that PM10 mass concentration by itself does not provide a clear understanding of a local PM air pollution problem.

  5. Water-soluble constituents of dill.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kudo, Masato; Kitajima, Junichi

    2002-04-01

    From the water-soluble portion of the methanol extract of dill (fruit of Anethum graveolens L.), which has been used as a spice and medicine, thirty-three compounds, including a new monoterpenoid, six new monoterpenoid glycosides, a new aromatic compound glucoside and a new alkyl glucoside were obtained. Their structures were clarified by spectral investigation.

  6. Golden rule for buttressing vulnerable soluble proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Berry, R Stephen

    2010-05-07

    Local weaknesses in the structure of soluble proteins have received little attention. The structure may be inherently weak at sites where hydration of the protein backbone is locally hampered by formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond which in turn is not fully stabilized through burial within a hydrophobic environment. The result is insufficient compensation for the thermodynamic cost of dehydrating the backbone polar groups. This work shows that these structural deficiencies, the unburied backbone hydrogen bonds, are compensated in natural proteins by disulfide bonds that are needed to maintain the structural integrity. Examination of all PDB-reported soluble structures reveals that, after suitable normalization, the number of disulfide bonds, X, correlates tightly with the number of unburied backbone hydrogen bonds, Y, beyond the baseline level Y = 20, revealing a simple balance relation: Y = 5X + 20. This equation introduces a 1:5 ratio associated with the buttressing of soluble proteins with structural deficiencies. The results are justified on thermodynamic grounds and have implications for biomolecular engineering as they introduce two constants of universal applicability determining the architecture of soluble proteins.

  7. Assessing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Solubility Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raviolo, Andres

    2001-01-01

    Presents a problem on solubility equilibrium which involves macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic levels of representation as a resource for the evaluation of students, and allows for assessment as to whether students have acquired an adequate conceptual understanding of the phenomenon. Also diagnoses difficulties with regard to previous…

  8. Water-soluble polymers and compositions thereof

    DOEpatents

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Gohdes, J.W.

    1999-04-06

    Water-soluble polymers including functionalization from the group of amino groups, carboxylic acid groups, phosphonic acid groups, phosphonic ester groups, acylpyrazolone groups, hydroxamic acid groups, aza crown ether groups, oxy crown ethers groups, guanidinium groups, amide groups, ester groups, aminodicarboxylic groups, permethylated polyvinylpyridine groups, permethylated amine groups, mercaptosuccinic acid groups, alkyl thiol groups, and N-alkylthiourea groups are disclosed.

  9. Water-soluble polymers and compositions thereof

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robison, Thomas W.; Gohdes, Joel W.

    2002-01-01

    Water-soluble polymers including functionalization from the group of amino groups, carboxylic acid groups, phosphonic acid groups, phosphonic ester groups, acylpyrazolone groups, hydroxamic acid groups, aza crown ether groups, oxy crown ethers groups, guanidinium groups, amide groups, ester groups, aminodicarboxylic groups, permethylated polvinylpyridine groups, permethylated amine groups, mercaptosuccinic acid groups, alkyl thiol groups, and N-alkylthiourea groups are disclosed.

  10. Water-soluble polymers and compositions thereof

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robison, Thomas W.; Gohdes, Joel W.

    1999-01-01

    Water-soluble polymers including functionalization from the group of amino groups, carboxylic acid groups, phosphonic acid groups, phosphonic ester groups, acylpyrazolone groups, hydroxamic acid groups, aza crown ether groups, oxy crown ethers groups, guanidinium groups, amide groups, ester groups, aminodicarboxylic groups, permethylated polyvinylpyridine groups, permethylated amine groups, mercaptosuccinic acid groups, alkyl thiol groups, and N-alkylthiourea groups are disclosed.

  11. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  12. A new expanded solubility parameter approach.

    PubMed

    Stefanis, Emmanuel; Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-04-15

    The partial or Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) are important properties of the various substances and very useful tools for the selection of their solvents or the prediction of their behaviour in numerous applications. Their design and evaluation relies on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility. The present work attempts to enhance the capacity of HSPs by incorporating into their evaluation the other basic rule of solubility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This is done in a simple and straightforward manner by splitting the hydrogen bonding HSP into its acidic or proton donor component and its basic or proton acceptor one. The splitting is based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions or sigma profiles of the quantum-mechanics based COSMO-RS theory. The whole development and application does not involve any sophisticated calculations or any strong specific background. The new method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceutical interest in order to verify the significant improvement over the classical HSP approach. The application of the new method requires, of course, the knowledge of the HSPs. For this reason, in Appendix A is presented an updated version of a robust and reliable group-contribution method for the calculation of the HSPs. The key features of this combined tool are critically discussed.

  13. Recombinant soluble betaglycan is a potent and isoform-selective transforming growth factor-beta neutralizing agent.

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Landeros, M M; Montiel, J L; Mendoza, V; Mendoza-Hernández, G; López-Casillas, F

    2001-01-01

    Betaglycan is an accessory receptor of members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily, which regulates their actions through ligand-dependent interactions with type II receptors. A natural soluble form of betaglycan is found in serum and extracellular matrices. Soluble betaglycan, prepared as a recombinant protein using the baculoviral expression system, inhibits the actions of TGF-beta. Because of its potential use as an anti-TGF-beta therapeutic agent, we have purified and characterized baculoviral recombinant soluble betaglycan. Baculoviral soluble betaglycan is a homodimer formed by two 110 kDa monomers associated by non-covalent interactions. This protein is devoid of glycosaminoglycan chains, although it contains the serine residues, which, in vertebrate cells, are modified by these carbohydrates. On the other hand, mannose-rich carbohydrates account for approximately 20 kDa of the mass of the monomer. End-terminal sequence analysis of the soluble betaglycan showed that Gly(24) is the first residue of the mature protein. Similarly to the natural soluble betaglycan, baculoviral soluble betaglycan has an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of 3.5 nM for TGF-beta1. Ligand competition assays indicate that the relative affinities of recombinant soluble betaglycan for the TGF-beta isoforms are TGF-beta2>TGF-beta3>TGF-beta1. The anti-TGF-beta potency of recombinant soluble betaglycan in vitro is 10-fold higher for TGF-beta2 than for TGF-beta1. Compared with a commercial pan-specific anti-TGF-beta neutralizing antibody, recombinant soluble betaglycan is more potent against TGF-beta2 and similar against TGF-beta1. These results indicate that baculoviral soluble betaglycan has the biochemical and functional properties that would make it a suitable agent for the treatment of the diseases in which excess TGF-beta plays a central physiopathological role. PMID:11256966

  14. Anhydrite solubility in differentiated arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Keppler, H.

    2015-06-01

    The solubility of anhydrite in differentiated arc magmas was experimentally studied at 200 MPa and 800-1000 °C over a range of oxygen fugacities, from 0.5 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer to the hematite-magnetite buffer. Anhydrite is stable only at oxidizing conditions (fO2 ⩾ Re-ReO2), whereas sulfides only form under reducing conditions. The solubility of anhydrite in the melt ultimately regulates the amount of sulfur available to partition between melt and fluid phase during the eruption. At oxidizing conditions, the solubility product of anhydrite increases with temperature, nbo/t and melt water content. We provide a new calibration of the anhydrite solubility product (KSP = XCaO * XSO3), which reproduces all available experimental data with greatly improved accuracy: In this equation, the molar fractions XCaO and XSO3 in the melt as well as the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms per tetrahedron (nbo/t) are calculated on an anhydrous basis (H2O refers to the melt water content, T is temperature in Kelvin). We apply our model to estimate the sulfur yield of some recent volcanic eruptions and we show that the sulfur yield of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo dacite eruption was unusually large, because only a small fraction of the sulfur was locked up in anhydrite. In general, high sulfur yields are expected when anhydrite solubility in the melt is high, i.e. for somewhat depolymerized melts. For rhyolitic systems, most of the available sulfur will be locked up in anhydrite, so that even very large eruptions may only have a small effect on global surface temperatures. Our model therefore allows improved predictions of the environmental impact of explosive volcanic eruptions.

  15. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Heat-Soluble Proteins Identified in the Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade Improve Osmotic Tolerance of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called “anhydrobiosis”. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  16. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  17. Prevention of obesity relatred metabolic diseases by processed foods containing soluble dietary fibers and flavonoids (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asians and other non-caucasians are generally more susceptible to obesity related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Viscous soluble dietary fibers such as cereal beta-glucans and psyllium reduce plasma cholesterol and postprandial glycemia in humans. We have stud...

  18. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  19. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weight ratio of 1:1 of indomethacin and lactose were ground using a high speed vibrating ball mill. Particle size was determined by electron microscopy, the reduction of crystallinity was determined by calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy was used to find evidence of any interactions between the drug and the carrier and the determination of apparent solubility allowed for the corroboration of changes in solubility. Before grinding, scanning electron microscopy showed the drug and lactose to have an average particle size of around 50 and 30 μm, respectively. After high speed grinding, indomethacin and the mixture had a reduced average particle size of around 5 and 2 μm, respectively, showing a morphological change. The ground mixture produced a solid dispersion that had a loss of crystallinity that reached 81% after 30 min of grinding while the drug solubility of indomethacin within the solid dispersion increased by 2.76 fold as compared to the pure drug. Drug activation due to hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group of the drug and the hydroxyl group of lactose as well as the decrease in crystallinity of the solid dispersion and the reduction of the particle size led to a better water solubility of indomethacin. PMID:23798775

  20. Novel electrosprayed nanospherules for enhanced aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Jin, Sung Giu; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present research was to develop a novel electrosprayed nanospherule providing the most optimized aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability for poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. Methods Numerous fenofibrate-loaded electrosprayed nanospherules were prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Labrafil® M 2125 as carriers using the electrospray technique, and the effect of the carriers on drug solubility and solvation was assessed. The solid state characterization of an optimized formulation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Oral bioavailability in rats was also evaluated for the formulation of an optimized nanospherule in comparison with free drug and a conventional fenofibrate-loaded solid dispersion. Results All of the electrosprayed nanospherule formulations had remarkably enhanced aqueous solubility and dissolution compared with free drug. Moreover, Labrafil M 2125, a surfactant, had a positive influence on the solubility and dissolution of the drug in the electrosprayed nanospherule. Increases were observed as the PVP/drug ratio increased to 4:1, but higher ratios gave no significant increases. In particular, an electrosprayed nanospherule composed of fenofibrate, PVP, and Labrafil M 2125 at the weight ratio of 1:4:0.5 resulted in a particle size of <200 nm with the drug present in the amorphous state. It demonstrated the highest solubility (32.51±2.41 μg/mL), an excellent dissolution (~85% in 10 minutes), and an oral bioavailability ~2.5-fold better than that of the free drug. It showed similar oral bioavailability compared to the conventional solid dispersion. Conclusion Electrosprayed nanospherules, which provide improved solubility and bioavailability, are promising drug delivery tools for oral administration of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. PMID:26834471

  1. Valence effects on solubility and sorption: the solubility of Tc(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    The solubilities of technetium (IV) oxides have been determined in solutions of NaCl, HCl, and synthetic groundwaters in the pH range 0 to 10. Oxides were prepared either by electroreduction from Tc(VII) solutions onto platinum electrodes or by precipitation of Tc from Tc(VII) solutions using hydrazine. In some of the determinations, the oxide was precipitated onto purified sand by use of hydrazine. The oxide-covered sand was then placed into a column and the test solution continuously recirculated through the column. The oxide plated on platinum was placed into a small cell and the test solution stirred. Solubilities were determined by measuring the beta radiation of /sup 99/Tc in the stirred or circulated solution in contact with the oxide. In the pH range 4 to 10, solubilities were in the range 7.5 x 10/sup -9/ to 5 x 10/sup -8/ mol/L, and most of the determinations were in the range 1 x 10/sup -8/ to 2 x 10/sup -8/ mol/L. In acid solutions the solubilities were generally higher for hydrazine-precipitated oxide than for the electrodeposited oxide, and they increased as the pH was lowered. Solubilities of Tc(IV) oxides will be useful for calculation of transport rates of technetium for the case of solubility-limited transport in nuclear waste repository environments.

  2. Biorelevant solubility of poorly soluble drugs: rivaroxaban, furosemide, papaverine and niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Szőke, Vera; Völgyi, Gergely; Horváth, Péter; Ambrus, Rita; Szabó-Révész, Piroska

    2013-09-01

    In this work the biorelevant solubility of four drugs representing different acid-base property, wide range of lipohilicity and low aqueous solubility was studied. The equilibrium solubility of rivaroxaban (non-ionizable), furosemide (acid), papaverine (base) and niflumic acid (ampholyte) was determined in simulated gastric fluid (SGF pH 1.2), in simulated intestinal fluid fasted state (FaSSIF pH 6.5) and fed state (FeSSIF pH 5.0) and their corresponding blank buffers at a temperature of 37 °C using saturation shake-flask method. The concentration was measured by optimized HPLC analysis. The solubilizing effect of bile acid/lipid micelles as additive components of biorelevent media (BRM) is expressed with the solubility ratio (SR: SBRM/Sblank buffer) and the food effect was estimated from SFeSSIF/SFaSSIF coefficient. It was revealed that ionization plays primarily role in solubility of compounds which undergo ionization in BRM. The solubilizing effect in FaSSIF was marginal for the neutral compound (rivaroxaban) and for molecules are anionic at pH 6.5 (furosemide and niflumic acid). The higher concentration of solubilizing agents in FeSSIF improved the solubility of papaverine carrying positive charge and niflumic acid being partially zwitterionic at pH 5.0.

  3. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  4. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  5. Solubility of hematite revisited: effects of hydration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Je-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2007-11-01

    Measured pH and dissolved ferric iron concentration ([Fe(III)diss]) in contact with well-characterized hematite indicated an equilibrium with hematite immediately after synthesis, but [Fe(III)diss] increased with hydration time to be consistent with the predicted solubility of goethite or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), hydrated analogues of hematite. X-ray diffraction did not detect structural modification of hematite after 190 days of hydration, but Mössbauer spectroscopy detected hydration that penetrated several crystalline layers. When the hematite suspension was diluted with water, solids were invariably identified as hematite, but [Fe(III)diss] and pH indicated an equilibrium with goethite or HFO. This is the first experimental confirmation that the interfacial hydration of anhydrous hematite results in higher solubility than predicted by bulk thermodynamic properties of hematite. Correspondence of the results with previously published measurements and implications for environmental chemistry of ferric oxides are also discussed.

  6. Soluble Aβ oligomer production and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Megan E.; Lesné, Sylvain E.

    2011-01-01

    For nearly 100 years following the first description of this neurological disorder by Dr. Alois Alzheimer, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles have been hypothesized to cause neuronal loss. With evidence that the extent of insoluble, deposited amyloid poorly correlated with cognitive impairment, research efforts focused on soluble forms of Aβ, also referred as Aβ oligomers. Following a decade of studies, soluble oligomeric forms of Aβ are now believed to induce the deleterious cascade(s) involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding about endogenous oligomeric Aβ production, their relative toxicity in vivo and in vitro, and explore the potential future directions needed for the field. PMID:22121920

  7. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  8. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  9. Biochemical synthesis of water soluble conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Ferdinando F.; Bernabei, Manuele

    2016-05-01

    An efficient biomimetic route for the synthesis of conducting polymers/copolymers complexed with lignin sulfonate and sodium (polystyrenesulfonate) (SPS) will be presented. This polyelectrolyte assisted PEG-hematin or horseradish peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of pyrrole (PYR), 3,4 ethyldioxithiophene (EDOT) and aniline has provided a route to synthesize water-soluble conducting polymers/copolymers under acidic conditions. The UV-vis, FTIR, conductivity and cyclic voltammetry studies for the polymers/copolymer complex indicated the presence of a thermally stable and electroactive polymers. Moreover, the use of water-soluble templates, used as well as dopants, provided a unique combination of properties such as high electronic conductivity, and processability. These polymers/copolymers are nowadays tested/evaluated for antirust features on airplanes and helicopters. However, other electronic applications, such as photovoltaics, for transparent conductive polyaniline, actuators, for polypyrrole, and antistatic films, for polyEDOT, will be proposed.

  10. Nanoparticle Solubility in Liquid Crystalline Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Joshi, Abhijeet A.; Roberts, Tyler F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystalline materials often incorporate regions (defects) where the orientational ordering present in the bulk phase is disrupted. These include point hedgehogs, line disclinations, and domain boundaries. Recently, it has been shown that defects will accumulate impurities such as small molecules, monomer subunits or nanoparticles. Such an effect is thought to be due to the alleviation of elastic stresses within the bulk phase, or to a solubility gap between a nematic phase and the isotropic defect core. This presents opportunities for encapsulation and sequestration of molecular species, in addition to the formation of novel structures within a nematic phase through polymerization and nanoparticle self-assembly. Here, we examine the solubility of nanoparticles within a coarse-grained liquid crystalline phase and demonstrate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface interactions in determining sequestration into defect regions.

  11. Hansen solubility parameter as a tool to predict cocrystal formation.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Velaga, Sitaram P

    2011-04-04

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the miscibility of a drug and coformer, as predicted by Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs), can indicate cocrystal formation and guide cocrystal screening. It was also our aim to evaluate various HSPs-based approaches in miscibility prediction. HSPs for indomethacin (the model drug) and over thirty coformers were calculated according to the group contribution method. Differences in the HSPs between indomethacin and each coformer were then calculated using three established approaches, and the miscibility was predicted. Subsequently, differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the experimental miscibility and cocrystal formation. The formation of cocrystals was also verified using liquid-assisted grinding. All except one of the drug-coformers that were predicted to be miscible were confirmed experimentally as miscible. All tested theoretical approaches were in agreement in predicting miscibility. All systems that formed cocrystals were miscible. Remarkably, two new cocrystals of indomethacin were discovered in this study. Though it may be necessary to test this approach in a wide range of different coformer and drug compound types for accurate generalizations, the trends with tested systems were clear and suggest that the drug and coformer should be miscible for cocrystal formation. Thus, predicting the miscibility of cocrystal components using solubility parameters can guide the selection of potential coformers prior to exhaustive cocrystal screening work.

  12. Ethanol effects on apparent solubility of poorly soluble drugs in simulated intestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Jonas H; Al-Tikriti, Yassir; Ragnarsson, Gert; Bergström, Christel A S

    2012-07-02

    Ethanol intake can lead to an unexpected and possibly problematic increase in the bioavailability of druglike compounds. In this work we investigated the effect of ethanol on the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble compounds in simulated intestinal fluid representing a preprandial state. A series of 22 structurally diverse, poorly soluble compounds were measured for apparent solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (37 °C) in phosphate buffer pH 6.5 (PhB6.5) and fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF, pH 6.5) with and without ethanol at 5% v/v or 20% v/v. The obtained data were used to understand for which molecules ethanol results in an increased apparent solubility and, therefore, may increase the amount of drug absorbed. In FaSSIF20%ethanol 59% of the compounds displayed >3-fold higher apparent solubility than in pure FaSSIF, whereas the effects of 5% ethanol on solubility, in most cases, were negligible. Acidic and neutral compounds were more solubilized by the addition of ethanol than by lecithin/taurocholate aggregates, whereas bases showed a more substance-specific response to the additives in the buffer. The stronger solubilizing capacity of ethanol as compared to the mixed lipid aggregates in FaSSIF was further identified through Spearman rank analyses, which showed a stronger relationship between FaSSIF20%ethanol and PhB6.5,20%ethanol (rS of 0.97) than FaSSIF20%ethanol and FaSSIF (rS of 0.86). No relationships were found between solubility changes in media containing ethanol and single physicochemical properties, but multivariate data analysis showed that inclusion of ethanol significantly reduced the negative effect of compound lipophilicity on solubility. For this data set the higher concentration of ethanol gave a dose number (Do) <1 for 30% of the compounds that showed incomplete dissolution in FaSSIF. Significant differences were shown in the melting point, lipophilicity, and dose profiles between the compounds

  13. Chemiluminescent nitrogen detection (CLND) to measure kinetic aqueous solubility.

    PubMed

    Kestranek, Aimee; Chervenak, Andrew; Longenberger, Justin; Placko, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Solubility is the dose-limiting property for in vitro studies, and therefore is a critical physicochemical property to measure in drug discovery. Solubility data can be used to guide lead optimization, troubleshoot erratic bioassay results, and identify potential downstream liabilities such as insufficient solubility for bioassays or oral bioavailability. Typically, early in vitro studies are performed using library compounds prepared as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) stock solutions, resulting in in vitro test solutions containing DMSO at low concentration (<5% v/v). Since DMSO can affect the apparent solubility, it is desirable to obtain solubility data under conditions mimicking the in vitro study. Kinetic solubility (from DMSO stock solutions) is often preferred over thermodynamic solubility (from dry powder) in early drug discovery. The protocols in this article describe a general procedure for assessing kinetic aqueous solubility of early drug discovery compounds using a miniaturized shake flask method with chemiluminescent nitrogen detection (CLND).

  14. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-28

    Sci. 2005, 97, 939-945. 40. Cataldo, F. On the Solubility Parameter of C60 and Higher Fullerenes. Fuller. Nanotub . Carbon Nanostruct. 2009, 17, 79-84...First, the cohesive energy for the naphthyl group is calculated by scaling the values for phenyl groups 17 by the number of carbons (10 for...mass of the peripheral carbon atom nearest to each silicon atom actually falls within the cube, so each corner of the cube contains a region that is

  15. Soluble Alkyl Substituted Polygermanes. Thermochromic Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-17

    are strongly thermochromic . The effect is attributed to conformational locking of the backbone which is caused by the crystallization of the side groups...are strongly thermochromic . The effect is attributed to the conformational locking of the backbone which is caused by the crystallization of the side...SYMBOL. 02 &m A -- .- h.. .. .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. RJ 5008 (52258) 1/24/86 Chemis try SOLUBLE ALKYL SUBSTITUTED POLYGERMANES: THERMOCHROMIC

  16. Water-Soluble Polyphosphazenes and Their Hydrogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-18

    T IC 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(E E L L 87. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Department of Chemistry MAY 3 119M4. REPORT NUMBER The...THEIR HYDROGELS by Harry R. Allcock Prepared for Publication in ACS Symposium Series Department of Chemistry The Pennsylvania State University...Polyphophaunes Chart I shows six different polyphosphazenes that are soluble in water. All of them were synthesized in our labomory via variants of the chemistry

  17. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory.

  18. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  19. Fluorite solubility equilibria in selected geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Jenne, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Calculation of chemical equilibria in 351 hot springs and surface waters from selected geothermal areas in the western United States indicate that the solubility of the mineral fluorite, CaF2, provides an equilibrium control on dissolved fluoride activity. Waters that are undersaturated have undergone dilution by non-thermal waters as shown by decreased conductivity and temperature values, and only 2% of the samples are supersaturated by more than the expected error. Calculations also demonstrate that simultaneous chemical equilibria between the thermal waters and calcite as well as fluorite minerals exist under a variety of conditions. Testing for fluorite solubility required a critical review of the thermodynamic data for fluorite. By applying multiple regression of a mathematical model to selected published data we have obtained revised estimates of the pK (10,96), ??Gof (-280.08 kcal/mole), ??Hof (-292.59 kcal/mole), S?? (16.39 cal/deg/mole) and CoP (16.16 cal/deg/mole) for CaF2 at 25??C and 1 atm. Association constants and reaction enthalpies for fluoride complexes with boron, calcium and iron are included in this review. The excellent agreement between the computer-based activity products and the revised pK suggests that the chemistry of geothermal waters may also be a guide to evaluating mineral solubility data where major discrepancies are evident. ?? 1977.

  20. Solubility of nitrous oxide in amine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bensetiti, Z.; Iliuta, I.; Larachi, F.; Grandjean, B.P.A.

    1999-01-01

    The solubility of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in 13 amine solvents and solutions was correlated to amine mole fractions and temperature using feedforward neural networks. This general correlation, using a massive database, predicted N{sub 2}O solubility at temperatures between 283 and 398 K in pure solvents [H{sub 2}O, monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanolamine (AMP)], in binary aqueous amine solutions [H{sub 2}O/MEA, H{sub 2}O/DEA, H{sub 2}O/MDEA, and H{sub 2}O/AMP], and in ternary aqueous amine blends [AMP/MDEA/H{sub 2}O, AMP/DEA/H{sub 2}O, DEA/MDEA/H{sub 2}O, MDEA/MEA/H{sub 2}O, and AMP/MEA/H{sub 2}O]. Combined with the N{sub 2}O analogy, this present improved correlation can be advantageously implemented in amine plant design software and procedures for the prediction of CO{sub 2} solubility in amine blend solutions over wide temperature and concentration ranges.

  1. Part 1. Characterization of roadway asphalts by solubility studies. Part 2. Development of concrete applicant organo-functional silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1. Solubility profiles describe the chemical constitution of asphalt in terms of internal solubility phenomena. In this study the solubility parameter (r) which is related to hydrogen bonding or associative interactions and the volume dependent solubility parameter (V) which is related to London dispersion forces (non-polar interactions) and the dipole-dipole polar interactions. The plot by the solubility coordinates (r, V) of the solvents and the solubility of the asphalt is termed the solubility profile. Solubility profile data can be related to roadway performance. Roadway asphalt aging can be followed visually and mathematically by the detailed analysis of time-lapsed solubility profiles of roadway core asphalts. The profiles can be used to describe the gross chemical changes without the need to identify or isolate pure substances. This report investigates thirty-two roadway projects constructed between February 1983 and August 1987 which have been monitored for condition and followed by a series of solubility profiles for up to 60 months. Part 2. A variety of organosilanes have been used as applicants to roadway surfaces thereby extending the life or service of the roadway. The aim of this research project is to synthesize and characterize several organosilane compounds with potential concrete roadway applications. Alkyltrialkoxysilanes can be used to stop salt from penetrating concrete and resultant rebar corrosion. The first area this project deals with the optimization of the catalytic synthesis of n-octyltrichloro-and n-decyltrichlorosilane and their alkoxy derivatives. The investigation includes a study of the type and amount of catalyst and a study of varying reaction conditions. The second area of research involves the synthesis and characterization of a set of UV-absorbing/VIS-emitting organosiloxanes. These compounds have potential use as roadway delineation or roadway obstruction demarkation product enhancements.

  2. The removal of kaolinite suspensions by acid-soluble and water-soluble chitosans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ying-Chien; Wu, Li-Chun; Chen, Chih-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This research compared the coagulant performance of acid-soluble chitosan with water-soluble chitosan and with coagulant mixtures of chitosan and aluminium sulfate (alum). We also assessed the coagulant performance of chitosan and poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) to remove kaolinite from turbid water. In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies under different coagulant concentrations, degrees of turbidity (NTU) and pH levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants in order to illustrate major factors affecting kaolinite coagulation. The optimal concentrations of acid- versus water- soluble chitosan required to remove kaolinite from a 300 NTU suspension were 4.0 and 10.0 mg/l, respectively-with individual efficiencies of 79.3 and 92.4%, in that order. Optimum concentrations ofwater-soluble chitosan demonstrated a broader range than that of acid-soluble chitosan. In addition, it is of note that chitosan/alum and chitosan/PAC water-soluble coagulant mixtures demonstrated much wider ranges of optimal concentrations for turbidity reduction than either alum or PAC alone. Moreover, our water-soluble chitosan coagulant mixtures produced denser floc with elevated settling velocities that favour cost savings relevant to both installation and operational expenses. Based on our observations of these noteworthy performances, we confidently propose that a coagulant mixture with a 1:1 mass ratio of chitosan and alum presents a remarkably more cost-effective alternative to the use of chitosan alone in water treatment systems.

  3. Solubility data are compiled for metals in liquid zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, I. G.; Johnson, I.

    1967-01-01

    Available data is compiled on the solubilities of various metals in liquid zinc. The temperature dependence of the solubility data is expressed using the empirical straight line relationship existing between the logarithm of the solubility and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature.

  4. Mirabilite solubility in equilibrium sea ice brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin Miles; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Santoro, Anna; Kennedy, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    The sea ice microstructure is permeated by brine channels and pockets that contain concentrated seawater-derived brine. Cooling the sea ice results in further formation of pure ice within these pockets as thermal equilibrium is attained, resulting in a smaller volume of increasingly concentrated residual brine. The coupled changes in temperature and ionic composition result in supersaturation of the brine with respect to mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) at temperatures below -6.38 °C, which consequently precipitates within the sea ice microstructure. Here, mirabilite solubility in natural and synthetic seawater derived brines, representative of sea ice at thermal equilibrium, has been measured in laboratory experiments between 0.2 and -20.6 °C, and hence we present a detailed examination of mirabilite dynamics within the sea ice system. Below -6.38 °C mirabilite displays particularly large changes in solubility as the temperature decreases, and by -20.6 °C its precipitation results in 12.90% and 91.97% reductions in the total dissolved Na+ and SO42- concentrations respectively, compared to that of conservative seawater concentration. Such large non-conservative changes in brine composition could potentially impact upon the measurement of sea ice brine salinity and pH, whilst the altered osmotic conditions may create additional challenges for the sympagic organisms that inhabit the sea ice system. At temperatures above -6.38 °C, mirabilite again displays large changes in solubility that likely aid in impeding its identification in field samples of sea ice. Our solubility measurements display excellent agreement with that of the FREZCHEM model, which was therefore used to supplement our measurements to colder temperatures. Measured and modelled solubility data were incorporated into a 1D model for the growth of first-year Arctic sea ice. Model results ultimately suggest that mirabilite has a near ubiquitous presence in much of the sea ice on Earth, and illustrate the

  5. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 95. Alkaline Earth Carbonates in Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Ca

    SciTech Connect

    De Visscher, Alex; Vanderdeelen, Jan

    2012-06-15

    The alkaline earth carbonates are an important class of minerals. This article is part of a volume in the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series that compiles and critically evaluates solubility data of the alkaline earth carbonates in water and in simple aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 1 outlined the procedure adopted in this volume, and presented the beryllium and magnesium carbonates. Part 2, the current paper, compiles and critically evaluates the solubility data of calcium carbonate. The chemical forms included are the anhydrous CaCO{sub 3} types calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, the monohydrate monohydrocalcite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot} H{sub 2}O), the hexahydrate ikaite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O), and an amorphous form. The data were analyzed with two model variants, and thermodynamic data of each form consistent with each of the models and with the CODATA key values for thermodynamics are presented.

  6. Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2000-05-18

    The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

  7. Solubility of Fe(III) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1998-01-01

    Recently Kuma et al. [K. Kuma, J. Nishioka, K. Matsunaga, Controls on iron (III) hydroxide solubility in seawater: The influence of pH and natural organic chelators, Limnol. Oceanogr. 41 (1996) 396-407] made some careful measurements of the solubility of Fe(III) in UV and non-UV irradiated seawater as a function of pH (5-8). They showed that organic compounds can increase the solubility (32-65%) at pH=8.1, apparently due to the formation of Fe(III) organic complexes. In this paper I have examined how these results can be quantified using a speciation model for Fe(III). The results indicate that the effect of pH (2-9) on coastal and open ocean waters by Kuma et al. and the earlier filtration measurement of Byrne and Kester [R.H. Byrne, D.R. Kester, Solubility of hydrous ferric oxide and iron speciation in sea water, Mar. Chem. 4 (1976) 255-274] can be adequately represented by considering the formation of FeOH 2+ and Fe(OH) 2+ using the hydrolysis constants ( K ∗1=10 -2.62, K ∗2=10 -6.0) determined by Millero et al. [F.J. Millero, W. Yao, J. Aicher, The speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters, Mar. Chem. 50 (1995) 21-39]. The solubility measurements [Kuma et al., 1996] on unaltered coastal and open ocean waters appear to require the consideration of the formation of Fe(OH) 30 ( K ∗3=10 -13.3-10 -14.3). A more careful look at these measurements indicates that the curvature between pH 7 and 8 can be attributed to the formation of complexes of Fe 3+ with organic ligands (FeL). Model speciation calculations (pH 6-8) yield total ligand concentrations of [L] T=1.2 nM and 0.17 nM for unaltered coastal and open ocean waters, respectively, assuming K' FeL=10 21. These estimates are in good agreement with the values found for ocean waters by voltammetric methods. The model calculations for the solubility of Fe(III) (0.2 nM at pH=8.1 and 0.6 nM at pH=7.65) are in good agreement with measured open ocean surface (0.2 nM) and deep waters (0.6 nM) determined by