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Sample records for sore throat systematic

  1. Sore Throat: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat Treatment By Mayo Clinic Staff A sore throat caused by a viral infection usually lasts five to ... such children. Treating bacterial infections If your sore throat is caused by a bacterial infection, your doctor ...

  2. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Pharyngitis - bacterial; Sore throat ... caused by swelling in the back of the throat (pharynx) between the tonsils and the voice box (larynx). Most sore throats are caused by colds, the flu, coxsackie virus ...

  3. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Sore Throat KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Sore Throat A A A Sore throats are common at any age and can be ... They also can be caused by a strep throat infection, although this is rare in children younger ...

  4. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Sore Throat KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Sore Throat Print A A A Sore throats are common at any age and can be ... They also can be caused by a strep throat infection, although this is rare in children younger ...

  5. Sore Throats

    MedlinePlus

    ... close quarters such as a child care center, classroom, office, prison, or military installation, you are at ... written permission. Throat Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms of Use © ...

  6. Sore Throat: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... than two weeks Causes Viruses that cause the common cold and flu (influenza) also cause most sore throats. ... Viral illnesses that cause a sore throat include: Common cold Flu (influenza) Mononucleosis (mono) Measles Chickenpox Croup — a ...

  7. Managing Sore Throat: Theory Versus Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Thomas; Tiessen, Esther

    1989-01-01

    The authors address the reliability of clinical impression in the management of sore throat. Five primary care family physicians in rural Ontario examined 222 patients with sore throats. The clinical impression of either Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) or non-GABHS pharyngitis was recorded and throat cultures were ordered in each case. The physicians predicted that 50% of the cultures would be positive for GABHS, whereas only 13.5% actually had positive results. The initial clinical diagnosis of “strep throat” was correct only one in five times. Without cultures, at least 112 patients would have been treated with antibiotics, 87 unnecessarily. The authors conclude that the clinical prediction of GABHS is inaccurate and can lead to unnecessary use of antibiotics. PMID:21249054

  8. Sore Throat - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/sorethroat.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Sore Throat - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ...

  9. Pregame Sore Throat, Postgame Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Stork, Natalie C; Smoot, M Kyle

    2016-05-01

    A collegiate football athlete presented, on game day, with an acute onset of sore throat. He was afebrile, speaking in full sentences, without signs of respiratory distress. His examination was negative for lymphadenopathy or tonsillar enlargement or exudate. Twelve hours after initial presentation, he developed acute epiglottitis. He underwent urgent fiberoptic intubation and was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and corticosteroids. Currently, there are no published reports of acute epiglottitis in athletes. Consequently, there is no evidence to guide return to play decisions. Return to play, following acute epiglottitis, should include resolution of symptoms and a graded return to play, taking into consideration the level of deconditioning the athlete experienced from hospitalization.

  10. Guideline for the management of acute sore throat.

    PubMed

    Pelucchi, C; Grigoryan, L; Galeone, C; Esposito, S; Huovinen, P; Little, P; Verheij, T

    2012-04-01

    The European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases established the Sore Throat Guideline Group to write an updated guideline to diagnose and treat patients with acute sore throat. In diagnosis, Centor clinical scoring system or rapid antigen test can be helpful in targeting antibiotic use. The Centor scoring system can help to identify those patients who have higher likelihood of group A streptococcal infection. In patients with high likelihood of streptococcal infections (e.g. 3-4 Centor criteria) physicians can consider the use of rapid antigen test (RAT). If RAT is performed, throat culture is not necessary after a negative RAT for the diagnosis of group A streptococci. To treat sore throat, either ibuprofen or paracetamol are recommended for relief of acute sore throat symptoms. Zinc gluconate is not recommended to be used in sore throat. There is inconsistent evidence of herbal treatments and acupuncture as treatments for sore throat. Antibiotics should not be used in patients with less severe presentation of sore throat, e.g. 0-2 Centor criteria to relieve symptoms. Modest benefits of antibiotics, which have been observed in patients with 3-4 Centor criteria, have to be weighed against side effects, the effect of antibiotics on microbiota, increased antibacterial resistance, medicalisation and costs. The prevention of suppurative complications is not a specific indication for antibiotic therapy in sore throat. If antibiotics are indicated, penicillin V, twice or three times daily for 10 days is recommended. At the present, there is no evidence enough that indicates shorter treatment length.

  11. When a Sore Throat Is a More Serious Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... on her hands and feet (often called Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease). Infectious mononucleosis can produce a sore throat, often with marked tonsillitis; however, most young children who are infected with the mononucleosis virus have few or no symptoms. Strep throat is ...

  12. Post-Intubation Sore Throat and Menstruation Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Orandi, Amirali; Orandi, Amirhossein; Najafi, Atabak; Hajimohammadi, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Sara; Zahabi, Somayeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Postoperative sore throat is one of the most common complications of general anesthesia and intubation with prevalence of 18%-65% in different studies. Several risk factors including female gender, postoperative nausea and vomiting and so on have been mentioned. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of postoperative sore throat in females and its association with menstrual cycles. Patients and Methods One hundred females between 18-45 years old with ASA class I or II without predicted difficult airway that were candidate for operation in supine position were enrolled in study. Patients who had pulmonary disease, smoking, common cold within two weeks prior to the operation, previous traumatic intubation history, removable dentures, any congenital or acquired deformity in face, neck, mouth and airway, any known pathology in mouth like aphthous and mouth ulcer,pregnant women, and patients with irregular cycles, and those taking oral contraceptive pills were excluded. By the same protocol general anesthesia was provided and the patients were asked to fill out a three-point scale questionnaire (Low, High, None) 1,6 and 24 hours following intubation to study and record the incidence and severity of sore throat, dysphagia and hoarseness. The date of last menstrual period had been recorded as well. Results Of 100 patients, in the first six hours, 51 patients had sore throat and 49 had no pain. During the first 6 hours, 33 patients (33%) had dysphagia and 13 patients had hoarseness at 6th postoperative hour. Age, weight, LMP, intubation time, operation and extubation time and coughing were compared to sore throat, dysphagia and hoarseness. The association between the incidence of coughing and bucking and sore throat was significant (P = 0.03). None of the parameters had a statistically meaningful association with dysphagia. Conclusions According to our results, by omitting probable risk factors of incidence of sore throat and evaluation

  13. Group A streptococcal sore throat in a periurban population of northern India: a one-year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, S.; Kumar, R.; Ray, P.; Vohra, H.; Ganguly, N. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and risk factors of group A streptococcus (GAS) sore throat among school-aged children living in a periurban slum area of Chandigarh, North India. METHODS: A total of 536 children aged 5-15 years from 261 families identified by a systematic random selection method were enrolled in the study. Episodes of sore throat were recorded through fortnightly home visits over a one-year period. The local vernacular (Hindi) terms gala kharab (bad throat) and khansi jukam (cough and cold) were used to identify symptoms of sore throat, and throat swab specimens were collected from children who had these symptoms on the day of the home visit. Bacterial culture was carried out and the isolation of GAS was confirmed using group-A-specific antiserum. FINDINGS: The incidences of sore throat and GAS sore throat were, respectively, 7.05 and 0.95 episodes per child-year. The incidence was higher in the following situations: among 11-year-olds, during the winter (November to January) and rainy (August) months (a bimodal peak), among children living in houses where there was no separate room for the kitchen, and in homes that included a tobacco smoker. CONCLUSION: The results show that the incidence of GAS sore throat was related to age, season, and indoor air pollution. PMID:11436474

  14. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  15. Tonsillitis and sore throat in children.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcomes after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy have slowly changed in Germany. However, no national guidelines exist and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies across the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under six years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i.e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (=tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more of such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  16. [Tonsillitis and sore throat in childhood].

    PubMed

    Stelter, K

    2014-03-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcome after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy slowly change in Germany since that. However, there exist no national guidelines and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies in the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under 6 years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i. e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (= tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  17. Tonsillitis and sore throat in children

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcomes after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy have slowly changed in Germany. However, no national guidelines exist and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies across the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under six years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i.e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (=tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more of such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  18. Acute sinusitis and sore throat in primary care.

    PubMed

    Del Mar, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Sore throat and acute sinusitis are not straightforward diagnoses. Trying to guess the responsible pathogen may not be the best approach. Being guided by empirical evidence may be more useful. It suggests some, but very few, benefits for antibiotics. This has to be balanced with some, but few, harms from antibiotics, including diarrhoea, rash and thrush. Prescribers should also be aware of the risk of antibiotic resistance for the individual, as well as for the population as a whole. GPs should explain the evidence for the benefits and the harms of antibiotics to patients within a shared decision-making framework.

  19. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  20. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  1. Prophylactic effect of dexamethasone in reducing postoperative sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-young; Lee, Ae-ri; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Chae, Won Seok; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong Ik

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of prophylactic dexamethasone and postintubation dexamethasone in reducing the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat (POST). Methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 70 patients between 20 and 60 years old who were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the prophylactic and postintubation groups received intravenous injection of 10 mg of dexamethasone 30 min before or after tracheal intubation, respectively. The patients were interviewed 1, 6, and 24 h after the operation. The incidence and severity of POST were recorded. Results The severity scores of POST at 1 and 6 h after the operation were significantly lower in the prophylactic group than in the postintubation group. There were no significant differences in the incidence of POST during the 24 h after the operation between the two groups (22/32 in the prophylactic group vs. 27/34 in the postintubation group, P = 0.403). Conclusions Intravenous injection of 10 mg of dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the severity of POST when administered before tracheal intubation compared with after tracheal intubation. PMID:20498806

  2. Effects of topical dexamethasone in postoperative sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Bin; Lee, Wonjin; Ki, Seunghee; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Kun Moo; Choi, Deul-Nyuck; Oh, Minkyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a complication that undermines patient satisfaction and increases discomfort in the postoperative period. The present study examined the effects of dexamethasone gargle and endotracheal tube cuff soaking on the incidence and severity of POST. Methods Ninety patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated into three groups: 0.9% normal saline gargling and tube soaking (group C), 0.05% dexamethasone solution gargling and 0.9% normal saline tube soaking (group G), 0.9% normal saline gargling and 0.05% dexamethasone tube soaking (group S). The incidence and severity of POST were then assessed and recorded at 24 hours after surgery. Results The total incidence of POST was significantly different among the groups (P < 0.05), and group S exhibited a significantly lower incidence of POST than group C (P < 0.0167). In addition, the POST intensity of group G and group S was less severe than those of group C (Both P < 0.0167). Conclusions Among patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, those who gargled with 0.05% dexamethasone solution exhibited lower severity of POST than the control group, and those whose endotracheal tube cuff was soaked in the dexamethasone solution before intubation exhibited significantly lower incidence and severity of POST than the control group. PMID:28184268

  3. Acute thoracic aortic dissection presenting as sore throat: report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Pin; Ng, Kim-Choy

    2004-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be one of the most dramatic of cardiovascular emergencies. Its symptoms can occur abruptly and progress rapidly. Prompt recognition and appropriate intervention is crucial. However, not all aortic dissections present with classic symptoms of abrupt chest, back, or abdominal pain, and the diagnosis may be missed. Aortic dissection presenting as a sore throat is quite unusual. A 53-year-old man presented with sore throat as the early symptom of an acute thoracic aortic dissection. Unfortunately, the diagnosis was delayed, and the patient died. Given the high morbidity and mortality after delayed recognition or misdiagnosis, aortic dissection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with sore throat and normal findings of neck and throat, even when there is no classic symptoms. PMID:15829145

  4. Difference between a Sore Throat, Strep, and Tonsillitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... extreme trouble swallowing (causing her to drool). Throat culture This may indicate a more serious infection. The ... examine your child and may perform a throat culture to determine the nature of the infection. To ...

  5. Ketorolac Tromethamine Spray Prevents Postendotracheal-Intubation-Induced Sore Throat after General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H. L.; Tsai, S. C.; Tsay, P. K.; Lin, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postoperative sore throat is one of the major complaints of general anesthesia in the postanesthesia care unit. This prospective study investigated the preventive effect of ketorolac tromethamine spray in postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat after general anesthesia. Methods. Surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were recruited from a medical center. Patients were randomly assigned to group K (treated with 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray) or group D (treated with distilled water spray). Before intubation, each endotracheal tube was sprayed with the appropriate solution by physicians over the 20 cm length of the cuff. Each group comprised 95 patients fitting the inclusion and exclusion criteria for whom complete data sets were collected. The intensity of the sore throat was measured at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after surgery, and data were compared. Results. The two groups had similar characteristics. Postoperative sore throat was significantly less frequent in group K than in group D (p < 0.001) and the pain intensity was significantly lower in group K than in group D at each time point (all p < 0.001). Conclusions. This study demonstrated that preanesthesia 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray could effectively decrease postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat in patients undergoing general anesthesia. PMID:28025646

  6. Strep throat

    MedlinePlus

    Pharyngitis - streptococcal; Streptococcal pharyngitis; Tonsillitis - strep; Sore throat strep ... Strep throat is most common in children between ages 5 and 15, although anyone can get it. Strep throat ...

  7. Dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat following cerebral infarction: an unexpected cause.

    PubMed

    Slade, Peter Michael Edward; Larsen, Matthew Peter

    2015-07-06

    A 75-year-old woman presented with left-sided weakness. There was no speech disturbance or reported swallowing difficulties. CT of the head revealed infarction in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. The patient was transferred to the acute stroke unit and a nasogastric tube was placed following a failed swallow screening test. The following day, on assessment, there was considerable pain on swallowing. The tone and quality of the patient's voice had deteriorated and there was significant dysphagia. Seven days later a plastic item, later identified as the patient's denture, was expectorated. Following this, the dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat rapidly resolved. The case highlights the importance of considering foreign body in the differential, and oral cavity examination in the assessment of a patient with dysphagia and sore throat is essential.

  8. The prophylactic effect of dexamethasone on postoperative sore throat in prone position surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Yoon Chan; Choi, So Ron; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Chung, Chan Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sore throat and hoarseness are common complications after general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. The position for patients can affect the incidence of postoperative sore throat (POST) by causing displacement of the endotracheal tube. This study investigated the prophylactic effect of dexamethasone in prone position surgeries. Methods One hundred-fifty patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery (18-75 yr) were randomly allocated into the normal saline group (group P, n = 50), dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg group (group D1, n = 50) or dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg group (group D2, n = 50). The incidence and severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were measured using direct interview at 1, 6, and 24 h after tracheal extubation. The severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were graded using a 4-point scale. Results At 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation, the incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in group D1 (1 h; P = 0.015, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.038) and group D2 (1 h; P < 0.001, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.017) compared to group P. There were less number of patients in the groups D1 and D2 than group P suffering from moderate grade of POST at 1, 24 h after extubation. The incidence of hoarseness at 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation was significantly lower in groups D2 than group P (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of cough among the three groups. Conclusions The prophylactic use of dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg and 0.2 mg/kg in prone surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative sore throat and dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg decreases the incidence of hoarseness. PMID:27274371

  9. [Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat].

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  10. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat.

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  11. Strep Throat (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Strep Throat KidsHealth > For Teens > Strep Throat Print A A ... hands as often as possible. Is It Strep Throat or Just a Sore Throat? Most sore throats ...

  12. Nonrheumatic myopericarditis post acute streptococcal pharyngitis: An uncommon cause of sore throat with ST segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Ali; Gelman, Daniel; Davis, Steven; Shokoohi, Hamid

    2016-12-08

    Nonrheumatic myopericarditis is an uncommon complication of acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcal infection (GAS). While the natural history of carditis complicating acute rheumatic fever is well established, the incidence, pathophysiology and clinical course of nonrheumatic myopericarditis are ill defined. Advances in rapid bedside testing for both myocardial injury and GAS pharyngitis have allowed for increasing recognition of this uncommon complication in patients presenting with a sore throat with associated chest discomfort. We describe a case of a 34years old man with GAS pharyngitis complicated by acute myopericarditis who presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation on electrocardiogram, and elevated cardiac biomarkers.

  13. A clinical score to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with sore throat

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W J; White, D; Tannenbaum, D; Low, D E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate a score based on clinical symptoms and signs for the identification of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection in general practice patients with score throat. DESIGN: A single throat swab was used as the gold standard for diagnosing GAS infection. Clinical information was recorded by experienced family physicians on standardized encounter forms. Score criteria were identified by means of logistic regression modelling of data from patients enrolled in the first half of the study. The score was then validated among the remaining patients. SETTING: University-affiliated family medicine centre in Toronto. PATIENTS: A total of 521 patients aged 3 to 76 years presenting with a new upper respiratory tract infection from December 1995 to February 1997. OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for identification of GAS infection with the score approach compared with throat culture. Proportion of patients prescribed antibiotics, throat culture use, and sensitivity and specificity with usual physician care and with score-based recommendations were compared. RESULTS: A score was developed ranging in value from 0 to 4. The sensitivity of the score for identifying GAS infection was 83.1%, compared with 69.4% for usual physician care (p = 0.06); the specificity values of the 2 approaches were similar. Among patients aged 3 to 14 years, the sensitivity of the score approach was higher than that of usual physician care (96.9% v. 70.6%) (p < 0.05). The proportion of patients receiving initial antibiotic prescriptions would have been reduced 48% by following score-based recommendations compared with observed physician prescribing (p < 0.001), without any increase in throat culture use. CONCLUSIONS: An age-appropriate sore throat score identified GAS infection in children and adults with sore throat better than usual care by family physicians, with significant reductions in unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics. A randomized trial

  14. Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1998familydoctor.org editorial staffProcedures & DevicesAttention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)March 2017April 1997familydoctor.org editorial staffInfants and ToddlersCytomegalovirusMarch ...

  15. The Effect of Green Tea Gargle Solution on Sore Throat After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Hedayat; Ariaeifar, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani Charati, Jamshid; Soleimani, Aria; Nasiri Formi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation is an essential method of keeping the airway open in patients under general anesthesia. Sore throat is a prevalent complication after endotracheal intubation. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of green tea gargling on sore throat after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients and Methods This was a single-blind, randomized clinical trial, in which 121 patients who had undergone CABG were divided into two groups: those who gargled distilled water and those who gargled a green tea solution. An hour after extubation, the patients of the intervention group were asked to gargle 30 cc of green tea, and the patients of the control group were asked to gargle 30 cc of distilled water, every 6 hours for up to 24 hours (four times per patient). A sore throat questionnaire was filled out 6, 12, and 24 hours after endotracheal extubation. Results The results showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to patient age, sex, body mass index, smoking background, and duration of anesthesia. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of sore throat before the intervention (P = 0.461) and 6 hours after the intervention (P = 0.901). However, a significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of sore throat 12 hours (P = 0.047) and 24 hours (P < 0.001) after removing the endotracheal tube. Conclusions Gargling a green tea solution, an anti-inflammatory, natural, and harmless substance, can reduce the pain of sore throat in patients after endotracheal extubation. PMID:27642569

  16. Sore throat: effective communication delivers improved diagnosis, enhanced self-care and more rational use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, A W; Bell, J; Sessa, A; Duerden, M; Altiner, A

    2013-11-01

    The majority of throat infections are of viral origin and resolve without antibiotic treatment. Despite this, antibiotic use for sore throat infections remains high, partly because it is difficult to determine when antibiotics may be useful, on the basis of physical findings alone. Antibiotics may be beneficial in bacterial throat infections under certain clinical and epidemiological circumstances; however, even many of those infections in which bacteria play a role do resolve just as quickly without antibiotics. Furthermore, non-medical factors such as patient expectations and patient pressure are also important drivers of antibiotic use. To address these issues, a behavioural change is required that can be facilitated by improved communication between primary healthcare providers and patients. In this article, we provide doctors, nurses and pharmacy staff, working in primary care or in the community, with a structured approach to sore throat management, with the aim of educating and empowering patients to self-manage their condition. The first component of this approach involves identifying and addressing patients' expectations and concerns with regard to their sore throat and eliciting their opinion on antibiotics. The second part is dedicated to a pragmatic assessment of the severity of the condition, with attention to red-flag symptoms and risk factors for serious complications. Rather than just focusing on the cause (bacterial or viral) of the upper respiratory tract infections as a rationale for antibiotic use, healthcare providers should instead consider the severity of the patient's condition and whether they are at high risk of complications. The third part involves counselling patients on effective self-management options and providing information on the expected clinical course. Such a structured approach to sore throat management, using empathetic, non-paternalistic language, combined with written patient information, will help to drive patient

  17. Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to assess the relative efficacy of a sage/echinacea spray and a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy controlled trial carried out in eleven general practices in Switzerland. A total of 154 patients (133 analyzed in per protocol collective) at least 12 years old with acute sore throat present for not more than 72 hours prior to inclusion and with a throat score ≥6 participated in the study. They used either an echinacea/sage spray or a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray with two puffs every 2 hours, in a double-dummy blinded manner, up to 10 times daily until they were symptom-free, for a maximum of 5 days. The main outcome measures was the comparison of response rates during the first three days. A response was defined as a decrease of at least 50% of the total symptoms compared to baseline. Results The echinacea/sage treatment exhibited similar efficacy to the chlorhexidine/lidocaine treatment in reducing sore throat symptoms during the first 3 days (P(x < Y) = .5083). Response rates after 3 days were 63.8% in the echinacea/sage group and 57.8% in the chlorhexidine/lidocaine group. For all secondary parameters, such as time to becoming symptom free, throat pain, and global assessments of efficacy by the physician and patient, no difference between the two treatments was seen. They were both very well tolerated. Conclusion An echinacea/sage preparation is as efficacious and well tolerated as a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. PMID:19748859

  18. Amylmetacresol/2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol, hexylresorcinol, or carrageenan lozenges as active treatments for sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Morokutti-Kurz, Martina; Graf, Christine; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Up to 80% of sore throats are caused by viruses. Several over the counter products are available which provide symptomatic, not causal relief. For such lozenges, containing the antiseptics and local anesthetics amylmetacresol (AMC) and 2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol (DCBA) or hexylresorcinol (HR), recently an additional virucidal effect was published. Therefore, we tested a set of Strepsils® lozenges, containing either HR (Max [#2]) or AMC/DCBA (Original [#3], Extra Strong [#4], Warm [#5], Orange and Vitamin C [#6], Sugar free Lemon [#7], Children/Strawberry [#8] and Soothing Honey and Lemon [#9]) for their antiviral efficiency against representatives of respiratory viruses known to cause sore throat: human rhinovirus (HRV) 1a, HRV8, influenza virus A H1N1n, Coxsackievirus A10, and human coronavirus (hCoV) OC43. The lozenges were tested head to head with Coldamaris® lozenges (#1), which contain the patented antiviral iota-carrageenan. None of the tested AMC/DCBA or HR containing lozenges shows any antiviral effectiveness against HRV8 at the tested concentrations, whereas all are moderately active against HRV1a. Only lozenge #5 shows any activity against hCoV OC43 and Coxsackievirus A10 at the tested concentrations. Similarly, only lozenge #3 is moderately active against influenza A H1N1n virus. The data indicates that neither the isolated effect of the active ingredients nor the pH but rather one or more of the excipients of the specific formulations are responsible for the antiviral effect of some of the AMC/DCBA or HR containing lozenges. In contrast, carrageenan-containing lozenges are highly active against all viruses tested. In another experiment, we showed that binding and inactivation of virus particles by iota-carrageenan are fast and highly effective. During the residence time of the lozenge in the mouth, the viral titer is reduced by 85% and 91% for influenza A virus and hCoV OC43, respectively. Carrageenan-containing lozenges are, therefore, suitable as

  19. Efficacy and safety of ambroxol lozenges in the treatment of acute uncomplicated sore throat. EBM-based clinical documentation.

    PubMed

    de Mey, Christian; Peil, Hubertus; Kölsch, Stephan; Bubeck, Jürgen; Vix, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Sore throat is the hallmark of acute pharyngitis. Although usually caused by viral infections, it is frequently treated with antibiotics. Such inappropriate use of antibiotics might best be challenged by offering efficacious and safe symptomatic pain relief instead. However, there is need for robust evidence to support such alternatives. Presently, the evidence from randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials (RCT) with the local anaesthetic ambroxol (CAS 23828-92-4) in the treatment of sore throat is being reviewed. This relates to five RCT in 1,772 patients; 1,713 were evaluable with regard to efficacy. Treatment with ambroxol lozenges was statistically significantly superior to placebo in reducing sore throat pain intensity with a high level of consistency of the estimated effect across the different studies. The effect had an early onset and lasted up to at least 3 h after a single first lozenge. The pain relief was associated with a statistically superior regression of pharyngeal redness and inflammation; with ambroxol, the overall efficacy was more frequently rated as at least "good". Treatment with the ambroxol lozenges was well tolerated. There was heterogeneity in reporting adverse events: in one later study with less severe baseline pain intensity there was more frequent reporting of hypoaesthesia of the oral cavity and tongue as an untoward phenomenon. In patients with more severe baseline pain this reflection of the medication's pharmacological action was only rarely reported as untoward. It is concluded that lozenges containing 20 mg ambroxol are a safe and efficacious treatment for acute uncomplicated sore throat of recent onset in adult patients.

  20. Gargling with sodium azulene sulfonate reduces the postoperative sore throat after intubation of the trachea.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junchi; Minami, Kouichiro; Horishita, Takafumi; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Terada, Tadanori; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2005-07-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a complication that remains to be resolved in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation. In this study, we investigated whether preoperative gargling with sodium 1,4-dimethyl-7-isopropylazulene-3-sulfonate monohydrate (sodium azulene sulfonate, Azunol) reduces POST after endotracheal intubation. Forty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into Azunol and control groups. In the Azunol group, patients gargled with 4 mg Azunol diluted with 100 mL tap water (40 microg/mL). In the control group, patients gargled with 100 mL of tap water. After emergence from general anesthesia, the patients with POST were counted and POST was evaluated using a verbal analog pain scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups by age, height, body weight, gender distribution, or duration of anesthesia and surgery. In the control group, 13 patients (65%) complained of POST, which remained 24 h later in nine patients (45%). In the Azunol group, five patients (25%) also complained of POST, which completely disappeared by 24 h later. The incidence of POST and verbal analog pain scale scores in the Azunol group decreased significantly compared with the control group. We demonstrated that gargling with Azunol effectively attenuated POST with no adverse reactions.

  1. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    PubMed Central

    Mehreen, Arifa; Waheed, Muzzamil; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Najma

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL), Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL), Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL), Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL), Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL), and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL) showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27429983

  2. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Poornajafian, Alireza; Nikzad, Naghme

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST) in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group) or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable. PMID:25371873

  3. Tolerability of ibuprofen, aspirin and paracetamol for the treatment of cold and flu symptoms and sore throat pain.

    PubMed

    Moore, N; Le Parc, J M; van Ganse, E; Wall, R; Schneid, H; Cairns, R

    2002-12-01

    This double-blind randomised study compared the tolerability of ibuprofen (up to 1.2 g daily), aspirin and paracetamol (both up to 3 g daily) for up to seven days, in patients with mild to moderate pain resulting from cold/flu symptoms or sore throat (CF/ST) (n = 2,815). The main outcome was the rate of significant adverse events (SGAE). Rates of SGAE for ibuprofen, aspirin and paracetamol were respectively 12.0%, 15.7% and 12.3%. Ibuprofen was significantly better tolerated than aspirin (p = 0.02) and had comparable tolerability with paracetamol. The latter was also true for total digestive system events and for abdominal pain and dyspepsia. In conclusion, in patients with CF/ST, ibuprofen used at over-the-counter doses is as well tolerated as paracetamol and much better tolerated than aspirin.

  4. Who really gets strep sore throat? Confounding and effect modification of a time-varying exposure on recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Dean; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Gabriel, Erin

    2016-10-30

    Unmeasured confounding is the fundamental obstacle to drawing causal conclusions about the impact of an intervention from observational data. Typically, covariates are measured to eliminate or ameliorate confounding, but they may be insufficient or unavailable. In the special setting where a transient intervention or exposure varies over time within each individual and confounding is time constant, a different tack is possible. The key idea is to condition on either the overall outcome or the proportion of time in the intervention. These measures can eliminate the unmeasured confounding either by conditioning or by use of a proxy covariate. We evaluate existing methods and develop new models from which causal conclusions can be drawn from such observational data even if no baseline covariates are measured. Our motivation for this work was to determine the causal effect of Streptococcus bacteria in the throat on pharyngitis (sore throat) in Indian schoolchildren. Using our models, we show that existing methods can be badly biased and that sick children who are rarely colonized have a high probability that the Streptococcus bacteria are causing their disease. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Throat Problems (Symptom Checker)

    MedlinePlus

    ... BMI Calculator myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Throat ProblemsThroat pain and mouth sores, along with other ... Children Shoulder Problems Skin Rashes & Other Skin Problems Throat Problems Tooth Problems Urination Problems Back to Symptoms ...

  6. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011.

  7. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Canker sores are small, round sores in your mouth. They can be on the inside of your cheek, under your tongue, or in the back of your throat. They usually have a red edge and a gray center. They can be quite painful. They are ...

  8. Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Rob D; Gabriel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method Systematic review. Data sources Randomised or quasi-randomised studies identified by searching Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro, and by recursive checking of bibliographies. Main outcome measures Muscle soreness, incidence of injury, athletic performance. Results Five studies, all of moderate quality, reported sufficient data on the effects of stretching on muscle soreness to be included in the analysis. Outcomes seemed homogeneous. Stretching produced small and statistically non-significant reductions in muscle soreness. The pooled estimate of reduction in muscle soreness 24 hours after exercising was only 0.9 mm on a 100 mm scale (95% confidence interval −2.6 mm to 4.4 mm). Data from two studies on army recruits in military training show that muscle stretching before exercising does not produce useful reductions in injury risk (pooled hazard ratio 0.95, 0.78 to 1.16). Conclusions Stretching before or after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness. Stretching before exercising does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury, but the generality of this finding needs testing. Insufficient research has been done with which to determine the effects of stretching on sporting performance. What is already known on this topicReviews of the effects of stretching before exercising have drawn conflicting conclusionsThe literature on effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury has not been systematically reviewedWhat this study addsStretching before and after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness and stretching before exercise does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury PMID:12202327

  9. Postoperative Sore Throat Prevention in Ambulatory Surgery: A Comparison between Preoperative Aspirin and Magnesium Sulfate Gargle – A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Das, Anjan; Nandy, Sabyasachi; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Mitra, Tapobrata; Halder, Partha Sarathi; Chhaule, Subinay; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postoperative sore throat (POST) frequently hampers the positive feedback of ambulatory surgery in spite of so many measures. This study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative magnesium sulfate and aspirin gargle in preventing POST after ambulatory surgery. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, randomized, and double-blinded study. Fifty-six adult patients of either sex, aged 25–50, of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, scheduled for day care surgery, were randomly allocated to Group A ([n = 28] receiving aspirin gargle [325 mg tablet]) and Group M ([n = 28] receiving magnesium sulfate [20 mg/kg] gargle). In both groups, the medications were made into 20 mL of (5% dextrose) solution. Patients were asked to gargle with this mixture for 30 s, 15 min before induction of anesthesia. Episodes of POST were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 16 h postoperatively with a four-point scale. Results: Both groups had a similar demographic profile with comparable oxygen saturation, hemodynamics, and consciousness status at immediate postoperative period. Number of patients with sore throat was significantly lower in magnesium group compared to aspirin group at 0 h (P = 0.0376), 2 h (P = 0.0429), 4 h (P = 0.0394) after the operation. POST pain score (visual analog scale) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in magnesium group compared to aspirin group after the operation at 0, 2, 4 h after operation. Conclusion: It is evident that preoperative magnesium sulfate gargle significantly attenuated the incidence and severity of POST, especially in the early postoperative period, with no adverse effects in patients undergoing day care surgery under general anesthesia. PMID:28298764

  10. The effect of ketorolac and dexamethasone on the incidence of sore throat in women after thyroidectomy: a prospective double-blinded randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background We evaluated the effect of two drugs with anti-inflammatory action, dexamethasone and ketorolac, on reduction of postoperative sore throat (POST) after general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods One hundred and ninety-two female patients scheduled to undergo general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation for thyroidectomy were enrolled in this prospective study. Participants were randomly allocated to receive intravenous medication; placebo (Group C, n = 45), ketorolac 30 mg immediately before intubation (Group Kpre, n = 47), ketorolac 30 mg at the end of surgery (Group Kpost, n = 45) and dexamethasone 10 mg (Group D, n = 43). The incidence and severity of POST and hoarseness were evaluated at 1, 6 and 24 hours after surgery. Results Incidences and severities of POST at rest and during swallowing in first 6 hours after extubation were comparable among 4 groups. At 24 hours postextubation, the incidence (P = 0.002, 95% CI of proportion differences; 0.05–0.39) and severity (P = 0.008) of POST during swallowing were significantly lower in group D than in group C. Kpre and Kpost groups did not show a greater reduction in POST than group C, despite lower rescue analgesic requirement at 1 hour after extubation in group Kpre (P = 0.006; 95% CI of proportion differences; 0.07–0.38). No intergroup differences were observed in incidences of hoarseness or adverse events. Conclusions Intravenous administration of dexamethasone 10 mg, but not ketorolac, before induction of anesthesia reduces the incidence and severity of POST during swallowing at 24 hours after thyroidectomy. PMID:28184269

  11. Intravenous dexamethasone versus ketamine gargle versus intravenous dexamethasone combined with ketamine gargle for evaluation of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Fariborzifar, Arghavan; Attari, Mohammadali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sore throat and hoarseness are the most frequent subjective complaints after tracheal intubation for general anesthesia. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle for reducing the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat (POST) and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: 140 patients (aged 16-65 year) scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into four groups of 35 subjects each: Group K, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline; Group D, were infused 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group KD, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline plus 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group P (placebo) that received saline (gargle and IV). POST was graded at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 h after operation on a four-point scale (0-3). Results: The incidence and severity of POST were significantly lower in Group KD, compared with the other groups at all times after tracheal extubation for up to 24 h (P < 0.05). Also the incidence and severity of hoarseness were significantly lower in each Groups of KD and K and D compared with group placebo (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prophylactic use of 0.2 mg/kg of IV dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle significantly reduced the incidence and severity of POST compared with using each of these drugs alone or using placebo. PMID:25371869

  12. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  13. The association of sore throat and psoriasis might be explained by histologically distinctive tonsils and increased expression of skin-homing molecules by tonsil T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdardottir, S L; Thorleifsdottir, R H; Valdimarsson, H; Johnston, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the palatine tonsils in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, particularly among patients with recurrent throat infections. However, the underlying immunological mechanism is not well understood. In this study we confirm that psoriasis tonsils are infected more frequently by β-haemolytic Streptococci, in particular Group C Streptococcus, compared with recurrently infected tonsils from patients without skin disease. Moreover, we show that tonsils from psoriasis patients contained smaller lymphoid follicles that occupied a smaller tissue area, had a lower germinal centre to marginal zone area ratio and contained fewer tingible body macrophages per unit area compared with recurrently infected tonsils from individuals without skin disease. Psoriasis patients' tonsils had a higher frequency of skin-homing [cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA+)] CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and this correlated significantly with their frequency of blood CLA+ T cells. The psoriasis patients also had a higher frequency of tonsil T cells expressing the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor that was expressed preferentially by the CLA+ T cell population. In contrast, recurrently infected tonsils of individuals without skin disease had a higher frequency of tonsil T cells expressing the activation marker CD69 and a number of chemokine receptors with unknown relevance to psoriasis. These findings suggest that immune responses in the palatine tonsils of psoriasis patients are dysregulated. The elevated expression of CLA and IL-23 receptor by tonsil T cells may promote the egression of effector T cells from tonsils to the epidermis, suggesting that there may be functional changes within the tonsils, which promote triggering or exacerbation of psoriasis. PMID:23750651

  14. Does post-exercise massage treatment reduce delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a frequent problem after unaccustomed exercise. No universally accepted treatment exists. Massage therapy is often recommended for this condition but uncertainty exists about its effectiveness. AIM: To determine whether post-exercise massage alleviates the symptoms of DOMS after a bout of strenuous exercise. METHOD: Various computerised literature searches were carried out and located seven controlled trials. RESULTS: Most of the trials were burdened with serious methodological flaws, and their results are far from uniform. However, most suggest that post-exercise massage may alleviate symptoms of DOMS. CONCLUSIONS: Massage therapy may be a promising treatment for DOMS. Definitive studies are warranted. 


 PMID:9773168

  15. Throat Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... that develop in your throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx) or tonsils. Your throat is a muscular tube ... cancer begins in the upper portion of the larynx and includes cancer that affects the epiglottis, which ...

  16. [Are antioxidant supplements effective in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Candia-Luján, Ramón; De Paz Fernández, José Antonio; Costa Moreira, Osvaldo

    2014-10-05

    Introducción: En los últimos años los suplementos antioxidantes han cobrado popularidad para contrarrestar los efectos de los radicales libres y los síntomas del daño muscular, entre los que se encuentra el dolor muscular tardío (DMT). Objetivo: realizar una revisión sistemática en diferentes bases de datos para conocer los efectos de los suplementos antioxidantes sobre el DMT. Método: Se llevó a cabo una búsqueda en las bases de datos; Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Scopus y SportDiscus y la Web Of Science (WOS). Las palabras y acrónimos usados fueron; Delayed onset muscle soreness, exercise induced muscle damage, DOMS, EIMD, antioxidant y oxidative stress. Resultados: Se identificaron 54 artículos de los cuales se recuperaron 48, todos ellos en inglés, 17 relacionados con la vitamina C y E, catorce corresponden a suplementos polifenòlicos, once a otros suplementos antioxidantes y seis a suplementos comerciales todos ellos usados para combatir, entre otras variables, el DMT. Conclusiones: Tanto las vitaminas como los suplementos comerciales presentan baja efectividad en la disminución del DMT, mientras que los polifenoles y otros suplementos antioxidantes muestran entre moderada y buena efectividad en el combate al DMT. Sin embargo, gran parte de los estudios presentan efectividad en la disminución de otros síntomas del daño muscular además de ayudar en la recuperación postejercicio.

  17. Worried Your Sore Throat May Be Strep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of the illness. A Simple Test Gives Fast Results Healthcare professionals can test for strep by ... and reduce your symptoms. Antibiotics Get You Well Fast The strep test results will help your healthcare ...

  18. Mouth or Throat Pain or Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... and tobacco. Avoid irritating spices like chili powder, cloves, curry, hot sauces, nutmeg, and pepper. Season foods ... spices, seasonings, and condiments like pepper, chili powder, cloves, nutmeg, salsa, pepper sauces, and horseradish. Avoid rough, ...

  19. Mouth Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... contains fluoride. Note that whitening toothpastes may contain hydrogen peroxide, which can irritate sore mouths. Remove and clean ... mixed with 2 cups water or 1 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon baking soda mixed with 1 ...

  20. Cold Sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... packaged as pills to be swallowed. Others are creams to be applied to the sores several times ... In general, the pills work better than the creams. For very severe infections, some antiviral drugs can ...

  1. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  2. Throat Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Throat Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Collecting | ... treatment | Getting results | see BLOOD SAMPLE Collecting A culture is a test that is often used to ...

  3. Throat Infections are Associated with Exacerbation in a Substantial Proportion of Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Thorleifsdottir, Ragna H; Eysteinsdóttir, Jenna H; Olafsson, Jón H; Sigurdsson, Martin I; Johnston, Andrew; Valdimarsson, Helgi; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur

    2016-08-23

    Streptococcal throat infections are known to trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, and several studies support the benefit of tonsillectomy. To evaluate the potential of tonsillectomy as a treatment, we used a retrospective study-specific questionnaire to assess the proportion of psoriasis patients with sore throat-associated psoriasis exacerbations. Our survey sampled 275 psoriasis patients. Of patients with plaque psoriasis, 42% reported sore throat-associated psoriasis exacerbations, and of patients with confirmed streptococcal infections, 72% reported aggravation. Notably, women and patients with early onset psoriasis were more likely to report psoriasis exacerbation after a sore throat (p < 0.001, p = 0.046, respectively). Other psoriasis aggravation factors were more common in patients with sore throat-associated exacerbations (p < 0.01). Of tonsillectomized patients, 49% reported subsequent improvement and had more frequent sore throat-associated aggravation of psoriasis than patients who did not improve after tonsillectomy (p = 0.015). These findings suggest a closer association between sore throats, streptococcal throat infections and plaque psoriasis than reported previously.

  4. Throat infections are associated with exacerbation in a substantial proportion of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Thorleifsdottir, Ragna H.; Eysteinsdottir, Jenna H.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Sigurdsson, Martin I.; Johnston, Andrew; Valdimarsson, Helgi; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal throat infections are known to trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, and several studies support the benefit of tonsillectomy. To evaluate the potential of tonsillectomy as a treatment, we used a retrospective study-specific questionnaire to assess the proportion of psoriasis patients with sore throat-associated psoriasis exacerbations. Our survey sampled 275 psoriasis patients. 42% of patients with plaque psoriasis reported sore throat-associated psoriasis exacerbations, and 72% of patients with confirmed streptococcal infections reported aggravation. Notably, women and early onset psoriasis patients were more likely to report psoriasis exacerbation after a sore throat (p<0.001, p=0.046 respectively). Other psoriasis aggravation factors were more common in patients with sore throat-associated exacerbations (p<0.01). 49% of tonsillectomized patients reported subsequent improvement and had more frequent sore throat-associated aggravation of psoriasis than patients who did not improve after tonsillectomy (p=0.015). These findings suggest a closer association between sore throats, streptococcal throat infections and plaque psoriasis than previously reported. PMID:26984718

  5. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments and Side Effects Managing Cancer-related Side Effects Skin Problems Pressure Sores A skin or pressure sore ... Content Usage Policy . Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars ... and Paying for Treatment Treatments and Side Effects Survivorship: During and After Treatment Caregivers and Family ...

  6. Throat swab culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy to tolerate. In very few people, the sensation of gagging may lead to an urge to vomit or cough. Alternative Names Throat culture and sensitivity; Culture - throat Images Throat anatomy Throat swabs References Nussenbaum B, Bradford CR. Pharyngitis in adults. In: ...

  7. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  8. Strep Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The bacteria that cause strep throat (group A streptococcus ) tend to hang out in the nose and ... Rapid Scarlet Fever Strep Test: Throat Culture Tonsillitis Pneumonia Sinusitis Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Word! ...

  9. Strep Throat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: Throat Culture; Culture, Throat; Rapid Strep Test; Rapid Antigen Detection Test; ... beta hemolytic streptococcus Related tests: Influenza Tests ; Blood Culture ; ASO ; Anti-DNase B All content on Lab ...

  10. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  11. Sore Throat? Know When To Call the Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOA Certification DO Jobs Online Doctors That DO Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest What is a DO? How Are DOs Licensed? How Are DOs Certified? Search for a DO Health Library Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library ...

  12. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. Genital sores - female

    MedlinePlus

    ... painless sores. Less common infections such as chancroid , granuloma inguinale , molluscum contagiosum , and syphilis may also cause ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 16. Read More Chancroid Donovanosis (granuloma inguinale) Genital herpes Genital warts Melanoma Molluscum contagiosum ...

  14. Canker Sores (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... open sores that have a white or yellowish coating and a red "halo" around them. They tend ... take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control. About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  15. Canker Sores (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Canker ... > For Parents > Canker Sores Print A A A What's in ...

  16. Strep Throat (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hang out in the nose and throat, so sneezing, coughing, or shaking hands can easily spread the ... people. Cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough to prevent passing fluid droplets to ...

  17. Strep Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... so important to teach kids the importance of hand washing — good hygiene can lessen their chances of getting ... to Fever Tonsils and Tonsillectomies Strep Test (Video) Hand Washing Strep Throat Tonsillitis Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  18. Scoop on Strep Throat (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Operating Room? The Scoop on Strep Throat KidsHealth > For Kids > The Scoop on Strep Throat ... bacteria to others. How Can I Prevent Strep Throat? If someone in your house has strep throat, ...

  19. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  20. Temperature in the throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani, Dariush; Mosaffa, Amir Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating probe D-branes admit horizons and temperatures a la Unruh effect. We find that the induced metrics on slow rotating probe D1-branes in holographic string solutions including warped Calabi-Yau throats have distinct thermal horizons with characteristic Hawking temperatures even if there is no black hole in the bulk Calabi-Yau. Taking the UV/IR limits of the solution, we show that the world volume black hole nucleation depends on the deformation and the warping of the throat. We find that world volume horizons and temperatures of expected features form not in the regular confining IR region but in the singular nonconfining UV solution. In the conformal limit of the UV, we find horizons and temperatures similar to those on rotating probes in the AdS throat found in the literature. In this case, we also find that activating a background gauge field form the U (1) R-symmetry modifies the induced metric with its temperature describing two different classes of black hole solutions.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    MedlinePlus

    ... not always necessary. In these tests, a tissue scraping of the sores may be examined under the ... Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute ...

  2. Practical Management of Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure sores are common in the debilitated elderly. Causal factors are unrelieved pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Preventive measures should be used for all high-risk patients, defined by general condition, mental status, degree of incontinence, amount of activity, and mobility. Principles of treating ulcers include pressure relief, reducing bacterial counts, debriding necrotic tissue, and providing a moist, clean environment. Imagesp2385-ap2389-ap2392-a PMID:21221298

  3. Scoop on Strep Throat (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Getting an X-ray Strep Throat KidsHealth > For Kids > Strep Throat Print A A A What's in ...

  4. Strep Test: Throat Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Strep Test: Throat Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Strep Test: Throat Culture A A A What's in this article? ... cultivo de exudado faríngeo What It Is A throat culture or strep test is performed by using ...

  5. Strep Test: Throat Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Strep Test: Throat Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Strep Test: Throat Culture Print A A A What's in this article? ... de exudado faríngeo What It Is A throat culture or strep test is performed by using a ...

  6. Warped Throats at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Bret

    2007-11-20

    We discuss how the detailed geometry of warped compactification can significantly impact collider data. We show how the details of the cross section for dilepton production (such as the spacing, the width, and the peaks of the KK graviton resonances) for a generic class of warped throats which are closely related to the Randall-Sundrum model depend sensitively on the precise shape of the warp factor.

  7. [A boy with blood blisters on his lips after having a sore throat].

    PubMed

    van Els, Anne L; Drewes, A J Noud

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy came to the Emergency Department with blood blisters on both lips, limiting him in his oral intake. He had no history of herpes simplex or use of any medication. The symptoms turned out to be caused by erythema exsudativum multiforme major, in most cases a self-limiting disease.

  8. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    PubMed

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  9. Perceived Muscle Soreness in Recreational Female Runners

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, D.; Smith, K.; Smeltzer, C.; Young, K.; Burns, S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if rating of perceived exertion correlated with perceived muscle soreness during delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in female runners. This study examined the pre and post running economy measures and perceived muscle soreness before and after a 30-min downhill run (DHR) at −15% grade and 70% of the subjects predetermined maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). Six female recreational runners (mean age = 24.5) performed level running at 65%, 75%, and 85% of their VO2 peak prior to DHR (baseline economy runs), as well as, immediately following and 4 successive days after the DHR. Results: Subjective response related to perceived muscle soreness increased significantly from a mean of 2 (pre DHR) to 62 (2 days post DHR) on a scale of 1–100. Creatine kinase levels and oxygen consumption increased post DHR compared to pre DHR. Rating of perceived exertion did not change between the economy runs performed prior to or at any point after the DHR. Conclusion: Perceived muscle soreness is a better tool than the RPE scale to monitor exercise intensity for recreational female runners during periods of DOMS and running economy is adversely affected by DOMS. PMID:27182336

  10. Pressure sore risk assessment in children.

    PubMed

    Waterlow, J A

    1997-07-01

    A multi-centred study was undertaken involving 300 children ranging from neonates to children aged 16 years. The purpose of the study was to investigate the possibility of designing a pressure sore risk assessment scoring system suitable for the paediatric area of care. It was found that the following conclusions can be drawn: (i) Children are at risk of developing pressure sores; (ii) A version of the adult Waterlow card was not appropriate, especially at the younger end of the scale; (iii) There are identifiable situations and treatments which do pose a risk of pressure sore development. Admission documentation and a care plan within a hospital policy is recommended as the best method of drawing nurses' attention to the risk factors involved and the measures which need to be taken to alleviate the risk of tissue damage.

  11. Orientifolds of warped throats from toric Calabi-Yau singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retolaza, Ander; Uranga, Angel

    2016-07-01

    We study the complex deformations of orientifolds of D3-branes at toric CY singularities, using their description in terms of dimer diagrams. We describe orientifold quotients that have fixed lines or fixed points in the dimer, and characterize the possibilities to deform them in terms of the behaviour of zig-zag paths under the orientifold symmetry. The resulting models are holographic duals to warped throats with orientifold planes. Our systematic construction provides a general class of configurations which includes models recently appeared in the context of de Sitter uplift by nilpotent goldstino or dynamical supersymmetry breaking.

  12. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  13. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  15. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  16. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  17. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  18. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise.

  19. Transpiration cooled throat for hydrocarbon rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Lee R.; Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective for the Transpiration Cooled Throat for Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines Program was to characterize the use of hydrocarbon fuels as transpiration coolants for rocket nozzle throats. The hydrocarbon fuels investigated in this program were RP-1 and methane. To adequately characterize the above transpiration coolants, a program was planned which would (1) predict engine system performance and life enhancements due to transpiration cooling of the throat region using analytical models, anchored with available data; (2) a versatile transpiration cooled subscale rocket thrust chamber was designed and fabricated; (3) the subscale thrust chamber was tested over a limited range of conditions, e.g., coolant type, chamber pressure, transpiration cooled length, and coolant flow rate; and (4) detailed data analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between the key performance and life enhancement variables.

  20. Delayed onset muscle soreness: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Cleak, M J; Eston, R G

    1992-08-01

    This review describes the phenomenon of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), concentrating upon the types of muscle contraction most likely to produce DOMS and the theories underlying the physiological mechanisms of DOMS. Ways of attempting to reduce the effects of DOMS are also summarized, including the application of physical and pharmacological therapies to reduce the effects of DOMS and training for reduction or prevention of DOMS.

  1. The effects of ice massage on delayed muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Yackzan, L; Adams, C; Francis, K T

    1984-01-01

    The following hypotheses were tested in the present study: (1) cryotherapy would reduce delayed muscle soreness (DMS) in eccentrically exercised muscles; (2) early cold treatment would reduce this soreness more than later postexercise treatment times; and (3) joint range of motion (ROM) would be inversely related to the subjective soreness ratings. Subjective sensations of muscular soreness and changes in elbow joint ROM were assessed in 30 subjects at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours following eccentric-biased exercise in the elbow flexors. Cold treatments were applied immediately, 24 or 48 hours following a single exercise session. In response to the eccentric exercise, significant muscle soreness increases and elbow ROM decreases were observed in all exercised muscles from 24 to 48 hours postexercise. No differences in muscle soreness or elbow ROM changes were observed between treated and untreated arms except for one. Subjects treated at 24 hours postexercise reported greater soreness in their arms compared to untreated arms just prior to treatment (24 hour postexercise). The results do not support the efficacy of cold in reducing DMS. A negative correlation between muscle soreness and elbow ROM at 48 and 72 hours postexercise indicated that an increase in soreness was associated with a decrease in ROM.

  2. Dual-throat thruster thermal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, R. L.; Obrien, C. J.; Matthews, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The dual-throat engine is one of the dual nozzle engine concepts studied for advanced space transportation applications. It provides a thrust change and an in-flight area ratio change through the use of two concentric combustors with their throats arranged in series. Test results are presented for a dual throat thruster burning gaseous oxygen and hydrogen at primary (inner) chamber pressures from 380 to 680 psia. Heat flux profiles were obtained from calorimetric cooling channels in the inner nozzle, outer or secondary chamber and the tip of the inner nozzle. Data were obtained for two nozzle spacings over a chamber pressure ratio (secondary/primary) range of 0.45 to 0.83 with both chambers firing (Mode I). Fluxes near the end of the inner nozzle were significantly higher than in Mode II when only the inner chamber was fired, due to the flow separation and recirculation caused by the back pressure imposed by the secondary chamber. As the pressure ratio increased, these heat fluxes increased and the region of high heat flux relative to Mode II extended farther upstream. The use of the gaseous hydrogen bleed flow in the secondary chamber to control heat fluxes in the primary plume attachment region was investigated in Mode II testing. A thermal model of a dual throat thruster was developed and upgraded using the experimental data.

  3. A Stereolithography Pore-Throat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, D.; Ahmadi, G.; Ferer, M.; Smith, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    A new experimental, heterogeneous pore-throat model has been designed and fabricated using stereolithography (SL). In SL production, a laser cures a thin layer of photo-sensitive resin on the surface of a vat of liquid resin; a moveable platform then submerges the cured layer and a new layer is cured on top of the previous one, creating a physical model from a computer generated model. This layered fabrication of a computer generated model has enabled the production of an experimental porous medium with improved fluid resistance properties, as compared to previously studied, constant-height etched cells. A uniform distribution of throat widths was randomly placed throughout the pore-throat matrix and the throat height of each throat was assigned to increase the range of viscous and capillary resistances within the physical model. This variation in both throat height and width generated a porous medium with fairly low porosity (43%), permeability (~400 D), and wide range of geometric resistance properties. Experimental, two-phase immiscible drainage studies in the porous flowcell were performed. Analysis of the captured images was performed with open-source image processing software. These analysis techniques utilized the capability of both ImageJ and the Gnu Image Manipulation Program to be customized with ancillary codes. This enabled batch procedures to be created that converted the original grey-scale bitmaps to binary data sets, which were then analyzed with in-house codes. The fractal dimension, Df, (measured with box-counting) and percent saturation of these experiments were calculated and shown to compare favorably to fractal predictions and previous flowcell studies. Additionally, using the computer generated pore-throat geometry, a computational fluid dynamics model of two- phase flow through the porous medium was created. This model was created using FLUENT code and the Volume of Fluid method. The percent saturation of the less-viscous invading fluid

  4. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  5. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  6. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  7. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  8. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  9. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  10. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  11. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  12. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  13. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  14. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  15. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  16. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  17. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  18. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  19. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  20. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C. Y.; Fu, D. R.; Liu, X. G.; Tian, Z. X.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  1. Throat Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Throat Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (Українська) ...

  2. Study into the correlation of dominant pore throat size and SIP relaxation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, Sabine; Prinz, Carsten; Zimathies, Annett

    2016-12-01

    There is currently a debate within the SIP community about the characteristic textural length scale controlling relaxation time of consolidated porous media. One idea is that the relaxation time is dominated by the pore throat size distribution or more specifically the modal pore throat size as determined in mercury intrusion capillary pressure tests. Recently new studies on inverting pore size distributions from SIP data were published implying that the relaxation mechanisms and controlling length scale are well understood. In contrast new analytical model studies based on the Marshall-Madden membrane polarization theory suggested that two relaxation processes might compete: the one along the short narrow pore (the throat) with one across the wider pore in case the narrow pores become relatively long. This paper presents a first systematically focused study into the relationship of pore throat sizes and SIP relaxation times. The generality of predicted trends is investigated across a wide range of materials differing considerably in chemical composition, specific surface and pore space characteristics. Three different groups of relaxation behaviors can be clearly distinguished. The different behaviors are related to clay content and type, carbonate content, size of the grains and the wide pores in the samples.

  3. Time course of muscle soreness following different types of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2001-01-01

    Background Post-exercise muscle soreness is a dull, aching sensation that follows unaccustomed muscular exertion. Primarily on the basis of previous laboratory-based research on eccentric exercise, soreness is usually said to follow an inverted U-shaped curve over time, peaking 24 – 48 hours after exercise. As such, it is often described as "delayed-onset" muscle soreness. In a study of long-distance runners, soreness seemed to peak immediately and then reduce gradually over time. The study is a secondary analysis of clinical trial data that aims to determine whether the time course of soreness following a natural exercise, long-distance running, is different from that following a laboratory-based exercise, bench-stepping. Methods This is a reanalysis of data from three previous clinical trials. The trials included 400 runners taking part in long-distance races and 82 untrained volunteers performing a bench-stepping test. Subjects completed a Likert scale of muscle soreness every morning and evening for the five days following their exercise. Results Interaction between trial and time is highly significant, suggesting a different time course of soreness following running and bench-stepping. 45% of subjects in the bench-stepping trial experienced peak soreness at the third or fourth follow-up (approximately 36 – 48 hours after exercise) compared to only 14% of those in the running trial. The difference between groups is robust to multivariate analysis incorporating possible confounding variables. Conclusion Soreness in runners following long-distance running follows a different time course to that in untrained individuals undertaking bench-stepping. Research on exercise taking place in the laboratory context does not necessarily generalize to exercise undertaken by trained athletes when engaged in their chosen sport. PMID:11701094

  4. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get genital herpes from oral sex. Genital herpes is caused by the herpes ... Genital herpes is usually caused by HSV-2; oral herpes (cold sores) is usually caused by HSV-1. ...

  5. RSRM Nozzle Anomalous Throat Erosion Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Wendel, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1996, anomalous pocketing erosion was observed in the aft end of the throat ring of the nozzle of one of the reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM 56B) used on NASA's space transportation system (STS) mission 79. The RSRM throat ring is constructed of bias tape-wrapped carbon cloth/ phenolic (CCP) ablative material. A comprehensive investigation revealed necessary and sufficient conditions for occurrence of the pocketing event and provided rationale that the solid rocket motors for the subsequent mission, STS-80, were safe to fly. The nozzles of both of these motors also exhibited anomalous erosion similar to, but less extensive than that observed on STS-79. Subsequent to this flight, the investigation to identify both the specific causes and the corrective actions for elimination of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the pocketing erosion was intensified. A detailed fault tree approach was utilized to examine potential material and process contributors to the anomalous performance. The investigation involved extensive constituent and component material property testing, pedigree assessments, supplier audits, process audits, full scale processing test article fabrication and evaluation, thermal and thermostructural analyses, nondestructive evaluation, and material performance tests conducted using hot fire simulation in laboratory test beds and subscale and full scale solid rocket motor static test firings. This presentation will provide an over-view of the observed anomalous nozzle erosion and the comprehensive, fault-tree based investigation conducted to resolve this issue.

  6. Factors in delayed onset muscular soreness of man.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, M F; Hollander, A P; Huijing, P A

    1986-02-01

    In this study 11 subjects performed exercise resulting in delayed onset muscular soreness in m. gastrocnemius with one leg, the experimental leg. The other leg served as control. Pre-exercise and 24, 48 and 72 h postexercise, soreness perception, resting EMG level of m. gastrocnemius, and volume and skin temperature of both legs were measured, and a leukocyte count was performed. Perception of soreness in m. gastrocnemius reported 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise was not accompanied by an increase in resting EMG level. This result indicates that soreness perception is not related to a tonic localized spasm in sore muscles. A rise in volume of the experimental leg relative to volume of the control leg was found 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise (P less than 0.05). It is suggested that the volume rise is due to edema formation in the experimental leg and that this edema formation is responsible for soreness perception. Since granulocytosis was not found, the hypothesis that edema formation reflects muscle inflammation is not substantiated.

  7. Effects of Fish Oil Supplementation on Postresistance Exercise Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Grant M; Gann, Joshua J; Huber, Stefan R; Andre, Thomas L; La Bounty, Paul M; Bowden, Rodney G; Gordon, Paul M; Grandjean, Peter W

    2016-07-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fish oil supplementation on the magnitude and time-course of postresistance exercise muscle soreness. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Nonresistance trained females were randomized into one of two groups: fish oil supplementation (6 g/day; 5:1 eicosapentaenoic acid to docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA)) or placebo (6 g/day corn/soy oil). After consuming the supplements for one week, participants underwent a single bout of resistance exercise consisting of 10 sets to failure of elbow flexion and leg extension machines. Muscle soreness was measured daily over the next week via grounded visual analog scale while participants continued to consume their assigned supplement. At 48 hours and one week postexercise, soreness during functional movements and limb circumferences were measured. The fish oil group perceived less static and functional muscle soreness than placebo, although the differences were not statistically significant. Effect sizes for resistance exercise-induced static and functional soreness responses were 33 to 42% lower in fish oil versus placebo without changes in upper arm and thigh circumferences. Supplementing the diet with 6 g per day of fish oil may alleviate muscle soreness experienced after resistance training in young untrained females.

  8. Do Shale Pore Throats Have a Threshold Diameter for Oil Storage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Caineng; Jin, Xu; Zhu, Rukai; Gong, Guangming; Sun, Liang; Dai, Jinxing; Meng, Depeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianming; Wu, Songtao; Liu, Xiaodan; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a nanoporous template with a controllable channel diameter was used to simulate the oil storage ability of shale pore throats. On the basis of the wetting behaviours at the nanoscale solid-liquid interfaces, the seepage of oil in nano-channels of different diameters was examined to accurately and systematically determine the effect of the pore diameter on the oil storage capacity. The results indicated that the lower threshold for oil storage was a pore throat of 20 nm, under certain conditions. This proposed pore size threshold provides novel, evidence-based criteria for estimating the geological reserves, recoverable reserves and economically recoverable reserves of shale oil. This new understanding of shale oil processes could revolutionize the related industries.

  9. Do Shale Pore Throats Have a Threshold Diameter for Oil Storage?

    PubMed

    Zou, Caineng; Jin, Xu; Zhu, Rukai; Gong, Guangming; Sun, Liang; Dai, Jinxing; Meng, Depeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianming; Wu, Songtao; Liu, Xiaodan; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2015-08-28

    In this work, a nanoporous template with a controllable channel diameter was used to simulate the oil storage ability of shale pore throats. On the basis of the wetting behaviours at the nanoscale solid-liquid interfaces, the seepage of oil in nano-channels of different diameters was examined to accurately and systematically determine the effect of the pore diameter on the oil storage capacity. The results indicated that the lower threshold for oil storage was a pore throat of 20 nm, under certain conditions. This proposed pore size threshold provides novel, evidence-based criteria for estimating the geological reserves, recoverable reserves and economically recoverable reserves of shale oil. This new understanding of shale oil processes could revolutionize the related industries.

  10. Dual throat thruster cold flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgreen, R. B.; Nickerson, G. R.; Obrien, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    The concept was evaluated with cold flow (nitrogen gas) testing and through analysis for application as a tripropellant engine for single-stage-to-orbit type missions. Three modes of operation were tested and analyzed: (1) Mode 1 Series Burn, (2) Mode 1 Parallel Burn, and (3) Mode 2. Primary emphasis was placed on the Mode 2 plume attachment aerodynamics and performance. The conclusions from the test data analysis are as follows: (1) the concept is aerodynamically feasible, (2) the performance loss is as low as 0.5 percent, (3) the loss is minimized by an optimum nozzle spacing corresponding to an AF-ATS ratio of about 1.5 or an Le/Rtp ratio of 3.0 for the dual throat hardware tested, requiring only 4% bleed flow, (4) the Mode 1 and Mode 2 geometry requirements are compatible and pose no significant design problems.

  11. Nipple care, sore nipples, and breastfeeding: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Centuori, S; Burmaz, T; Ronfani, L; Fragiacomo, M; Quintero, S; Pavan, C; Davanzo, R; Cattaneo, A

    1999-06-01

    Sore and cracked nipples are common and may represent an obstacle to successful breastfeeding. In Italy, it is customary for health professionals to prescribe some type of ointment to prevent or treat sore and cracked nipples. The efficacy of these ointments is insufficiently documented. The incidence of sore and cracked nipples was compared between mothers given routine nipple care, including an ointment (control group), and mothers instructed to avoid the use of nipple creams and other products (intervention group). Breastfeeding duration was also compared between the two groups. Eligible mothers were randomly assigned, after informed consent, to one of the two groups. No difference was found between the control (n = 96) and the intervention group (n = 123) in the incidence of sore and cracked nipples and in breastfeeding duration. However, several factors were associated with sore nipples and with breastfeeding duration. The use of a pacifier and of a feeding bottle in the hospital were both associated with sore nipples at discharge (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Full breastfeeding up to 4 months postpartum was significantly associated with the following early practices: breastfeeding on demand, rooming-in at least 20 hours/day, non-use of formula and pacifier, no test-weighing at each breastfeed. The incidence of sore and cracked nipples and the duration of breastfeeding were not influenced by the use of a nipple ointment. Other interventions, such as providing the mother with guidance and support on positioning and latching, and modifications of hospital practices may be more effective in reducing nipple problems.

  12. The effect of caffeine ingestion on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Caitlin F; Hatfield, Disa L; Riebe, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    The beneficial effects of caffeine on aerobic activity and resistance training performance are well documented. However, less is known concerning caffeine's potential role in reducing perception of pain and soreness during exercise. In addition, there is no information regarding the effects of caffeine on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle soreness, blood enzyme activity, and performance after a bout of elbow flexion/extension exercise. Nine low-caffeine-consuming males (body mass: 76.68 ± 8.13 kg; height: 179.18 ± 9.35 cm; age: 20 ± 1 year) were randomly assigned to ingest either caffeine or placebo 1 hour before completing 4 sets of 10 bicep curls on a preacher bench, followed by a fifth set in which subjects completed as many repetitions as possible. Soreness and soreness on palpation intensity were measured using three 0-10 visual analog scales before exercise, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after exercise. After a washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment group. Caffeine ingestion resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower levels of soreness on day 2 and day 3 compared with placebo. Total repetitions in the final set of exercise increased with caffeine ingestion compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion immediately before an upper-body resistance training out enhances performance. A further beneficial effect of sustained caffeine ingestion in the days after the exercise bout is an attenuation of DOMS. This decreased perception of soreness in the days after a strenuous resistance training workout may allow individuals to increase the number of training sessions in a given time period.

  13. Stretching Before and After Exercise: Effect on Muscle Soreness and Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J. C

    2005-01-01

    Reference: Herbert RD, Gabriel M. Effects of stretching before and after exercise on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review. BMJ. 2002;325:468. Clinical Question: Among physically active individuals, does stretching before and after exercise affect muscle soreness and risk of injury? Data Sources: Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (1966–February 2000), EMBASE (1988–February 2000), CINAHL (1982–1999), SPORT Discus (1949–1999), and PEDro (to February 2000). I searched the reference lists of identified studies manually until no further studies were identified. The search terms stretch, exercise, warm-up, and cool down were used in all databases except MEDLINE. In MEDLINE, an optimized OVID search strategy was used. This strategy included the terms searched in the other databases as well as terms such as flexibility, athletic injuries, sports, soreness, and muscle. Study Selection: The search was limited to English-language articles obtained from the electronic searches and the subsequent manual searches. This review included randomized or quasirandomized investigations that studied the effects of any stretching technique, before or after exercise, on delayed-onset muscle soreness, risk of injury, or athletic performance. Studies were included only if stretching occurred immediately before or after exercising. Data Extraction: Data extraction and assessment of study quality were well described. The principal outcome measures were measurements of muscle soreness and indices of injury risk. Results from the soreness studies were pooled by converting the numeric scores to percentages of the maximum possible score. These data were then reported as millimeters on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Results of comparable studies were pooled using a fixed-effects model meta-analysis. Survival analysis using a Cox regression model was calculated on the time-to-event (injury) data. Main Results: The total number of articles identified using the

  14. The effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, J; Sforzo, G; Swensen, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Methods: Eighteen volunteers were randomly assigned to either a massage or control group. DOMS was induced with six sets of eight maximal eccentric contractions of the right hamstring, which were followed 2 h later by 20 min of massage or sham massage (control). Peak torque and mood were assessed at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Range of motion (ROM) and intensity and unpleasantness of soreness were assessed at 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Neutrophil count was assessed at 6 and 24 h postexercise. Results: A two factor ANOVA (treatment v time) with repeated measures on the second factor showed no significant treatment differences for peak torque, ROM, neutrophils, unpleasantness of soreness, and mood (p > 0.05). The intensity of soreness, however, was significantly lower in the massage group relative to the control group at 48 h postexercise (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage administered 2 h after exercise induced muscle injury did not improve hamstring function but did reduce the intensity of soreness 48 h after muscle insult. PMID:12547748

  15. Inertial forces affect fluid front displacement dynamics in a pore-throat network model.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-08-01

    The seemingly regular and continuous motion of fluid displacement fronts in porous media at the macroscopic scale is propelled by numerous (largely invisible) pore-scale abrupt interfacial jumps and pressure bursts. Fluid fronts in porous media are characterized by sharp phase discontinuities and by rapid pore-scale dynamics that underlie their motion; both attributes challenge standard continuum theories of these flow processes. Moreover, details of pore-scale dynamics affect front morphology and subsequent phase entrapment behind a front and thereby shape key macroscopic transport properties of the unsaturated zone. The study presents a pore-throat network model that focuses on quantifying interfacial dynamics and interactions along fluid displacement fronts. The porous medium is represented by a lattice of connected pore throats capable of detaining menisci and giving rise to fluid-fluid interfacial jumps (the study focuses on flow rate controlled drainage). For each meniscus along the displacement front we formulate a local inertial, capillary, viscous, and hydrostatic force balance that is then solved simultaneously for the entire front. The model enables systematic evaluation of the role of inertia and boundary conditions. Results show that while displacement patterns are affected by inertial forces mainly by invasion of throats with higher capillary resistance, phase entrapment (residual saturation) is largely unaffected by inertia, limiting inertial effects on hydrological properties behind a front. Interfacial jump velocities are often an order of magnitude larger than mean front velocity, are strongly dependent on geometrical throat dimensions, and become less predictable (more scattered) when inertia is considered. Model simulations of the distributions of capillary pressure fluctuations and waiting times between invasion events follow an exponential distribution and are in good agreement with experimental results. The modeling approach provides insights

  16. Response to nestling throat ligatures by three songbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.L.; Conway, C.J.; Kirkpatrick, C.; Laroche, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    We attempted to collect diet samples using throat ligatures from nestlings of three songbird species in a riparian woodland in southeastern Arizona from May to August 2009. We had success with Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), observed adult Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens) reclaim food from nestlings, and discontinued the use of throat ligatures when we observed an adult Abert's Towhee (Pipilo aberti) remove two, 34-day-old ligatured nestlings from its nest. Previous studies have reported problems (e.g., aggression toward nestlings by adults) with throat ligatures, but we are the first to document removal (and subsequent nestling mortality) in response to this technique. We urge investigators to exercise caution when using throat ligatures on species for which evidence of the safety and efficacy of this method are lacking, especially when nestlings are small in size relative to adults. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  17. Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162649.html Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study Listerine's maker has ... A commercial brand of mouthwash can help control gonorrhea bacteria in the mouth, and daily use may ...

  18. Microbiota in the Throat and Risk Factors for Laryngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hongli; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Xia; Wu, Chunping; Cao, Pengyu; Xu, Chen; Hou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhou, Liang

    2014-12-01

    The compositions and abundances of the microbiota in the ecological niche of the human throat and the possible relationship between the microbiota and laryngeal cancer are poorly understood. To obtain insight into this, we enrolled 27 laryngeal carcinoma patients and 28 subjects with vocal cord polyps as controls. For each subject, we simultaneously collected swab samples from the upper throat near the epiglottis (site I) and tissue samples from the vestibulum laryngis to the subglottic region (site II). The microbiota of the throat were fully characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. We found 14 phyla, 20 classes, 38 orders, 85 families, and 218 genera in the throats of enrolled subjects. The main phyla were Firmicutes (54.7%), Fusobacteria (14.8%), Bacteroidetes (12.7%), and Proteobacteria (10.6%). Streptococcus (37.3%), Fusobacterium (11.3%), and Prevotella (10.6%) were identified as the three most predominant genera in the throat. The relative abundances of 23 bacterial genera in site I were significantly different from those in site II (P < 0.05). The relative proportions of 12 genera largely varied between laryngeal cancer patients and control subjects (P < 0.05). Collectively, this study outlined the spatial structure of microbial communities in the human throat. The spatial structure of bacterial communities significantly varied in two anatomical sites of the throat. The bacterial profiles of the throat of laryngeal cancer patients were strongly different from those of control subjects, and several of these microorganisms may be related to laryngeal carcinoma.

  19. Microbiota in the Throat and Risk Factors for Laryngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hongli; Zhou, Xia; Wu, Chunping; Cao, Pengyu; Xu, Chen; Hou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuezhu

    2014-01-01

    The compositions and abundances of the microbiota in the ecological niche of the human throat and the possible relationship between the microbiota and laryngeal cancer are poorly understood. To obtain insight into this, we enrolled 27 laryngeal carcinoma patients and 28 subjects with vocal cord polyps as controls. For each subject, we simultaneously collected swab samples from the upper throat near the epiglottis (site I) and tissue samples from the vestibulum laryngis to the subglottic region (site II). The microbiota of the throat were fully characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. We found 14 phyla, 20 classes, 38 orders, 85 families, and 218 genera in the throats of enrolled subjects. The main phyla were Firmicutes (54.7%), Fusobacteria (14.8%), Bacteroidetes (12.7%), and Proteobacteria (10.6%). Streptococcus (37.3%), Fusobacterium (11.3%), and Prevotella (10.6%) were identified as the three most predominant genera in the throat. The relative abundances of 23 bacterial genera in site I were significantly different from those in site II (P < 0.05). The relative proportions of 12 genera largely varied between laryngeal cancer patients and control subjects (P < 0.05). Collectively, this study outlined the spatial structure of microbial communities in the human throat. The spatial structure of bacterial communities significantly varied in two anatomical sites of the throat. The bacterial profiles of the throat of laryngeal cancer patients were strongly different from those of control subjects, and several of these microorganisms may be related to laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:25239901

  20. Observation of the laryngeal movements for throat singing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Konishi, Tomoko; Murano, Emi Z.; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Kumada, Masanobu; Kondo, Kazumasa; Niimi, Seiji

    2002-11-01

    Throat singing is a traditional singing style of people who live around the Altai Mountains. Khoomei in Tyva and Khoomij in Mongolia are representative styles of throat singing. The laryngeal voices of throat singing is classified into (i) a drone voice which is the basic laryngeal voice in throat singing and used as drone and (ii) a kargyraa voice which is very low pitched with the range outside the modal register. In throat singing, the special features of the laryngeal movements are observed by using simultaneous recording of high-speed digital images, EGG, and sound wave forms. In the drone voice, the ventricular folds (VTFs) vibrate in the same frequency as the vocal folds (VFs) but in opposite phases. In the kargyraa voice, the VTFs can be assumed to close once for every two periods of closure of the VFs, and this closing blocks airflow and contributes to the generation of the subharmonic tone of kargyraa. Results show that in throat singing the VTFs vibrate and contribute to producing the laryngeal voice, which generates the special timbre and whistle-like overtone.

  1. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source...

  2. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat drug... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration...

  3. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source...

  4. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and...

  5. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and...

  6. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat drug... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration...

  7. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  8. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  9. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  10. The effects of three modalities on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Weber, M D; Servedio, F J; Woodall, W R

    1994-11-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness is a common problem that can interfere with rehabilitation as well as activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of therapeutic massage, upper body ergometry, or microcurrent electrical stimulation on muscle soreness and force deficits evident following a high-intensity eccentric exercise bout. Forty untrained, volunteer female subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups or to a control group. Exercise consisted of high-intensity eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Resistance was reduced as subjects fatigued, until they reached exhaustion. Soreness rating was determined using a visual analog scale. Force deficits were determined by measures of maximal voluntary isometric contraction at 90 degrees of elbow flexion and peak torque for elbow flexion at 60 degrees/sec on a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and peak torque were determined at the 0 hour (before exercise) and again at 24 and 48 hours postexercise. Treatments were applied immediately following exercise and again at 24 hours after exercise. The control group subjects rested following their exercise bout. Statistical analysis showed significant increases in soreness rating and significant decreases in force generated when the 0 hour was compared with 24- and 48-hour measures. Further analysis indicated no statistically significant differences between massage, microcurrent electrical stimulation, upper body ergometry, and control groups.

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetry and Pun Comprehension: When Cowboys Have Sore Calves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulson, Seana; Severens, Els

    2007-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded as healthy participants listened to puns such as ''During branding, cowboys have sore calves.'' To assess hemispheric differences in pun comprehension, visually presented probes that were either highly related (COW), moderately related (LEG), or unrelated, were presented in either the left or right…

  12. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  13. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, epidemiology, and outcomes of murine typhus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tsioutis, Constantinos; Zafeiri, Maria; Avramopoulos, Asimakis; Prousali, Efthymia; Miligkos, Michael; Karageorgos, Spyridon A

    2017-02-01

    Murine or endemic typhus, a febrile disease caused by Rickettsia typhi, is often misdiagnosed due to its non-specific presentation. We sought to evaluate all available evidence in the literature regarding the clinical and laboratory manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, and outcomes of murine typhus. Pubmed was searched for all articles providing available data. In an effort to incorporate contemporary data, only studies from 1980 were included. Thirty-three case series including 2074 patients were included in final analysis. Available evidence suggests that the classic triad of fever, headache and rash is encountered in only one-third of patients. Other frequent symptoms were chills, malaise, myalgia, and anorexia. A tetrad of reported laboratory abnormalities consisting of elevated liver enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hypoalbuminemia was detected. Complications were observed in one-fourth of patients, reported mortality was extremely low, but untreated patients had notably longer duration of fever. Among epidemiological characteristics, a seasonal distribution with most cases reported during warmer months, was the most prominent finding. Murine typhus in children exhibits several different characteristics, with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and sore throat reported more commonly, higher frequency of anemia, lower frequency of hypoalbuminemia, hematuria and proteinuria and a much lower rate of complications. This systematic review of published evidence provides a thorough description of the clinical and laboratory features of murine typhus and highlights important differences in children.

  14. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  15. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway vs tracheal intubation: a systematic review on airway complications.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Babette F; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has advantages over the tracheal tube (TT) in terms of incidence of cough, sore throat, laryngospasm, dysphagia, dysphonia, and blood staining. This is a systematic literature review performed at the Universtity Medical Center of Utrecht. The online databases PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials. Two independent reviewers selected relevant articles after title, abstract, and full text screening. Articles were assessed on risk of bias in accordance with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Study results of the LMA and the TT were related to the method of selection of the device size and the method for cuff inflation. Of the 1718 unique articles, we included 19 studies which used the LMA Classic, the LMA Proseal, the Flexible Reinforced LMA, and the LMA Supreme compared with TT. After methodological inspection, data could not be pooled due to heterogeneity among the selected studies. Overall, no clear advantage of the LMA over the TT was found but the LMA Supreme was related to the lowest incidence of airway complications. In this review, no clear difference in incidence of postoperative airway complications could be demonstrated between LMA and TT. The LMA Supreme may reduce the incidence of airway complication in comparison to the TT but high quality randomized trials are recommended to further objectify if use of the LMA decreases the risk on postoperative airway complications.

  16. Computation of the throat area of a turbine blade ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    The throat area is a geometric parameter of the blade ring necessary to profile its blades and compute the turbine capacity. As applied to the filament flow model, the area is defined by the involute of the throat solid figure onto the plane formed by the cascade throat located on one of the cylindrical sections of the blade ring and the radius. An equation is derived for computing the area of the involute, which considers the effect of the shape of the ring's tailing outlines and the fillets at the transition from the outlines to the blade feather. Comparison of the area values for several turbines computed by the derived equation and by a more complex method based on a search for the minimum distances from the tailing edge of the blade to the suction surface of the neighboring blade in the channel revealed slight differences. The fluid-dynamic 2D analysis determined the radial boundaries of the filament bands, the parameters of the cascade that lie on a filament's cylindrical surfaces, and the flow velocity normal to the throat section of the filament. The proposed approach to computation of the throat area is common for problems of both designing and analyzing the turbine operation and allows for excluding, in practice, methodological differences in determination of the flow rate and the flow angles at the outlet of the blade ring.

  17. Investigation on Composite Throat Insert For Cryogenic Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyappan, G.; Tiwari, S. B.; Praveen, RS; Mohankumar, L.; Jathaveda, M.; Ganesh, P.

    2017-02-01

    Injector element testing is an important step in the development and qualification of the cryogenic rocket engines. For the purpose of characterising the injectors, sub scale chambers are used. In order to assess the performance of the injectors, different configurations of the injectors are tested using a combustion chamber and a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pressure distribution along the wall of the chamber and throat insert is obtained from the CFD analysis and temperature distribution is obtained from thermal analysis. Thermo-structural analysis is carried out for the sub-scale model of throat inert using temperature dependent material properties. For the experiments a sub-scale model of the thrust chamber is realised. Injector element tests are carried out for the studies. The objective of the present study is to investigate the behaviour of different throat inserts, mainly graphite, 2-D Carbon-Carbon(2D C-C), 4-D Carbon-Carbon (4D C-C) and Silica Phenolic (SP), under pressure and thermal load for repeated operation of the engine. Analytical results are compared with the test results. The paper gives the results of theoretical studies and experiments conducted with all the four type of throat material. It is concluded that 2D C-C is superior in terms of throat erosion being the least under specified combustion environment.

  18. Polymer quantization of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    SciTech Connect

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Peltola, Ari; Louko, Jorma

    2010-01-15

    We present a polymer quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein gravity in which the polymerized variable is the area of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. In the classical polymer theory, the singularity is replaced by a bounce at a radius that depends on the polymerization scale. In the polymer quantum theory, we show numerically that the area spectrum is evenly spaced and in agreement with a Bohr-Sommerfeld semiclassical estimate, and this spectrum is not qualitatively sensitive to issues of factor ordering or boundary conditions except in the lowest few eigenvalues. In the limit of small polymerization scale we recover, within the numerical accuracy, the area spectrum obtained from a Schroedinger quantization of the wormhole throat dynamics. The prospects of recovering from the polymer throat theory a full quantum-corrected spacetime are discussed.

  19. Polymer quantization of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Louko, Jorma; Peltola, Ari

    2010-01-01

    We present a polymer quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein gravity in which the polymerized variable is the area of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. In the classical polymer theory, the singularity is replaced by a bounce at a radius that depends on the polymerization scale. In the polymer quantum theory, we show numerically that the area spectrum is evenly spaced and in agreement with a Bohr-Sommerfeld semiclassical estimate, and this spectrum is not qualitatively sensitive to issues of factor ordering or boundary conditions except in the lowest few eigenvalues. In the limit of small polymerization scale we recover, within the numerical accuracy, the area spectrum obtained from a Schrödinger quantization of the wormhole throat dynamics. The prospects of recovering from the polymer throat theory a full quantum-corrected spacetime are discussed.

  20. Modulation in voluntary neural drive in relation to muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Bringard, A.; Puchaux, K.; Noakes, T. D.; Perrey, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1) spinal modulation would change after non-exhausting eccentric exercise of the plantar flexor muscles that produced muscle soreness and (2) central modulation of the motor command would be linked to the development of muscle soreness. Ten healthy subjects volunteered to perform a single bout of backward downhill walking exercise (duration 30 min, velocity 1 ms−1, negative grade −25%, load 12% of body weight). Neuromuscular test sessions [H-reflex, M-wave, maximal voluntary torque (MVT)] were performed before, immediately after, as well as 1–3 days after the exercise bout. Immediately after exercise there was a −15% decrease in MVT of the plantar flexors partly attributable to an alteration in contractile properties (−23% in electrically evoked mechanical twitch). However, MVT failed to recover before the third day whereas the contractile properties had significantly recovered within the first day. This delayed recovery of MVT was likely related to a decrement in voluntary muscle drive. The decrease in voluntary activation occurred in the absence of any variation in spinal modulation estimated from the H-reflex. Our findings suggest the development of a supraspinal modulation perhaps linked to the presence of muscle soreness. PMID:17978834

  1. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, tight sandstones, and shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2009-01-01

    Pore-throat sizes in silidclastic rocks form a continuum from the submillimeter to the nanometer scale. That continuum is documented in this article using previously published data on the pore and pore-throat sizes of conventional reservoir rocks, tight-gas sandstones, and shales. For measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median), pore-throat sizes (diameters) are generally greater than 2 μm in conventional reservoir rocks, range from about 2 to 0.03 μm in tight-gas sandstones, and range from 0.1 to 0.005 μm in shales. Hydrocarbon molecules, asphaltenes, ring structures, paraffins, and methane, form another continuum, ranging from 100 Å (0.01 μm for asphaltenes to 3.8 A (0.00038 μm) for methane. The pore-throat size continuum provides a useful perspective for considering (1) the emplacement of petroleum in consolidated siliciclastics and (2) fluid flow through fine-grained source rocks now being exploited as reservoirs.

  2. Trying Not to "Shove Religion down Their Throats"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This article attempts two tasks. First, to clarify how the claim that colleges and universities may "shove religion down students' throats" has a historical background. Second, to indicate how pedagogical strategies--like service learning, discussions, paper revisions, and "Just in Time Teaching" exercises--can be used in ways…

  3. Ear, nose and throat problems in Accident and Emergency.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tanya

    Nurses working in A&E departments throughout the UK frequently encounter patients with ear, nose and throat conditions. While the majority of these are straightforward, a small number are serious and even life-threatening. Tanya Reynolds discusses the nursing management of this group of patients and stresses the importance of appropriate assessment, pain management and referral.

  4. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... device includes the esophageal dilator; tracheal bistour (a long, narrow surgical knife); tracheal dilator; tracheal hook; laryngeal injection set; laryngeal knife; laryngeal saw; laryngeal trocar...; wire ear loop; microrule; mirror; mobilizer; ear, nose, and throat punch; ear, nose and throat...

  5. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... device includes the esophageal dilator; tracheal bistour (a long, narrow surgical knife); tracheal dilator; tracheal hook; laryngeal injection set; laryngeal knife; laryngeal saw; laryngeal trocar...; wire ear loop; microrule; mirror; mobilizer; ear, nose, and throat punch; ear, nose and throat...

  6. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... device includes the esophageal dilator; tracheal bistour (a long, narrow surgical knife); tracheal dilator; tracheal hook; laryngeal injection set; laryngeal knife; laryngeal saw; laryngeal trocar...; wire ear loop; microrule; mirror; mobilizer; ear, nose, and throat punch; ear, nose and throat...

  7. Endoscopic removal of throat-packing gauze swallowed during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshinori; Goto, Takahisa; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-09-01

    Throat packing is commonly placed in the pharynx before starting oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia to protect the airway from aspiration of blood and surgical debris. Complications such as airway obstruction may arise if any of the throat packing is retained after extubation, and less commonly, swallowing of the throat packing has been reported. We report endoscopic removal of throat packing gauze swallowed during general anesthesia.

  8. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear,...

  9. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear,...

  10. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear,...

  11. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear,...

  12. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4420 Ear, nose...; and ear, nose, and throat trocar. (b) Classification Class I (general controls). The device is exempt... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical...

  13. 21 CFR 874.4250 - Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874... throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill is a rotating drilling device, including the handpiece, that... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat electric or...

  14. 21 CFR 874.4250 - Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874... throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill is a rotating drilling device, including the handpiece, that... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat electric or...

  15. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4500 Ear..., and throat area. The device is used, for example, in microsurgical procedures to excise lesions and... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon...

  16. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4420 Ear, nose...; and ear, nose, and throat trocar. (b) Classification Class I (general controls). The device is exempt... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical...

  17. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  18. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  2. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  3. 21 CFR 874.4250 - Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4250 Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill. (a) Identification. An ear, nose,...

  4. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  5. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  6. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  7. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  8. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  9. 21 CFR 874.4250 - Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4250 Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill. (a) Identification. An ear, nose,...

  10. 21 CFR 874.4250 - Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4250 Ear, nose, and throat electric or pneumatic surgical drill. (a) Identification. An ear, nose,...

  11. Pressure-induced referred pain is expanded by persistent soreness.

    PubMed

    Doménech-García, V; Palsson, T S; Herrero, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2016-05-01

    Several chronic pain conditions are accompanied with enlarged referred pain areas. This study investigated a novel method for assessing referred pain. In 20 healthy subjects, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded and pressure stimuli (120% PPT) were applied bilaterally for 5 and 60 seconds at the infraspinatus muscle to induce local and referred pain. Moreover, PPTs were measured bilaterally at the shoulder, neck, and leg before, during, and after hypertonic saline-induced referred pain in the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The pressure and saline-induced pain areas were assessed on drawings. Subsequently, delayed onset muscle soreness was induced using eccentric exercise of the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The day-1 assessments were repeated the following day (day 2). Suprathreshold pressure stimulations and saline injections into the infraspinatus muscle caused referred pain to the frontal aspect of the shoulder/arm in all subjects. The 60-second pressure stimulation caused larger referred pain areas compared with the 5-second stimulation (P < 0.01). Compared with pressure stimulation, the saline-induced referred pain area was larger (P < 0.02). After saline-induced pain, the PPTs at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced (P < 0.05), and the 5-second pressure-induced referred pain area was larger than baseline. Pressure pain thresholds at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced at day 2 in the delayed onset muscle soreness side (P < 0.05). Compared with day 1, larger pressure and saline-induced referred pain areas were observed on day 2 (P < 0.05). Referred pain to the shoulder/arm was consistently induced and enlarged after 1 day of muscle soreness, indicating that the referred pain area may be a sensitive biomarker for sensitization of the pain system.

  12. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

    PubMed Central

    Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-01-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

  13. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    PubMed

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-06-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood.

  14. Nutritional status, pressure sores, and mortality in elderly patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Waltman, N L; Bergstrom, N; Armstrong, N; Norvell, K; Braden, B

    1991-07-01

    This prospective study aimed to determine differences in nutritional status, incidence of pressure sores, and incidence of mortality between two groups, one composed of 33 elderly, institutionalized patients with cancer and the other a matched group of 33 patients without cancer. Subjects with cancer were paired with subjects without cancer based on age (mean = 78), sex, and pressure sore risk. Skin breakdown, dietary intake, and blood and serum indices of nutritional status were studied for 12 weeks. Of the subjects with cancer, 85% developed pressure sores, compared to 70% of the subjects without cancer. Hemoglobin (Hgb) (female), serum total protein, total lymphocyte count, serum albumin, serum total iron binding capacity, and serum transferrin were significantly lower in subjects with cancer with pressure sores than in subjects without cancer with pressure sores. Total lymphocyte count and serum total protein were significantly lower in subjects with cancer with pressure sores than in subjects with cancer without pressure sores. Kwashiorkor was found in 70% of the subjects with cancer, compared to 21% of the subjects without cancer. During the study, 39% of the subjects with cancer and 15% of the subjects without cancer died. All 13 of the subjects with cancer who died had kwashiorkor and pressure sores and had died an average of three weeks after developing pressure sores. These results implicate that elderly patients with cancer who have protein deficiencies should be considered to be at risk of pressure sore development. Frequent repositioning and mattress overlays that reduce pressure and increase comfort may delay development of pressure sores.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Development of a cushion to prevent ischial pressure sores.

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, P; Davidson, L M

    1979-01-01

    A study was carried out jointly by nursing staff and technologists in an attempt to develop a cushion based on scientific principles and measurement that might prevent pressure sores. At each stage in the development clinical trials were carried out, and using the results of these together with the opinions of medical staff and patients who used the cushion the design was suitably modified. Over four years a seat was evolved that was simple to construct and fulfilled the clinical requirements for a wide range of patients while providing maximum relief of high-pressure points. The design was subsequently taken up commercially. Images Fig 3 PMID:509176

  16. Prevention is better than cure. A survey of the use of Pegasus Airwave System in pressure sore treatment.

    PubMed

    Winman, G; Ashley, L

    1992-12-01

    Pressure relieving mattresses play an important role in pressure sore prevention and healing. This study describes the current use and reported effectiveness of the Pegasus Airwave System in pressure sore prevention.

  17. Cold sore susceptibility gene-1 genotypes affect the expression of herpes labialis in unrelated human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, John D; Bhatia, Amiteshwar; Thomas, Alun

    2014-01-01

    Our group has recently described a gene on human chromosome 21, the Cold Sore Susceptibility Gene-1 (CSSG-1, also known as C21orf91), which may confer susceptibility to frequent cold sores in humans. We present here a genotype-phenotype analysis of CSSG-1 in a new, unrelated human population. Seven hundred fifty-eight human subjects were enrolled in a case/control Cold Sore Study. CSSG-1 genotyping, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) serotyping, demographic and phenotypic data was available from 622 analyzed subjects. Six major alleles (H1-H6) were tested for associations with each of the self-reported phenotypes. The statistical analysis was adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Genotype-phenotype associations were analyzed from 388 HSV1-seropositive subjects. There were significant CSSG-1 haplotype effects on annual cold sore outbreaks (P=0.006), lifetime cold sores (P=0.012) and perceived cold sore severity (P=0.012). There were relatively consistent trends toward protection from frequent and severe cold sores among those with the H3 or H5/6 haplotypes, whereas those with H1, H2, and H4 haplotypes tended to have more frequent and more severe episodes. Different alleles of the newly described gene CSSG-1 affect the expression of cold sore phenotypes in this new, unrelated human population, confirming the findings of the previous family-based study.

  18. Engine throat/nozzle optics for plume spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, R. L.; Duncan, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    The Task 2.0 Engine Throat/Nozzle Optics for Plume Spectroscopy, effort was performed under the NASA LeRC Development of Life Prediction Capabilities for Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines program. This Task produced the engineering design of an optical probe to enable spectroscopic measurements within the SSME main chamber. The probe mounts on the SSME nozzle aft manifold and collects light emitted from the throat plane and chamber. Light collected by the probe is transferred to a spectrometer through a fiber optic cable. The design analyses indicate that the probe will function throughout the engine operating cycle and is suitable for both test stand and flight operations. By detecting metallic emissions that are indicative of component degradation or incipient failure, engine shutdown can be initiated before catastrophic failure. This capability will protect valuable test stand hardware and provide enhanced mission safety.

  19. Laryngeal mask airways in ear, nose, and throat procedures.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jeff E

    2010-09-01

    The use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and its variants in ear, nose, and throat procedures have been extensively described in case reports, retrospective reviews, and randomized clinical trials. The LMA has developed a considerable following because of its lack of tracheal stimulation, which can be a considerable advantage in ear, nose, and throat (ENT) procedures. The incidence of coughing on emergence has been shown to be lower with the LMA than with the endotracheal tube (ETT). Although other approaches to smooth emergence have been described, few would argue that it is as easy to achieve a smooth emergence with an ETT as with an LMA. Although patients certainly exist for whom the LMA is contraindicated, many will experience better results with the LMA because of the features delineated in this article.

  20. Adult NREM parasomnia associated with lancinating throat pain.

    PubMed

    Bušková, Jitka; Sonka, Karel

    2014-08-15

    We report the case of a 30-year-old woman presenting with dangerous nocturnal NREM episodes with the clinical feature of lancinating throat pain. We hypothesize that the pain may have represented sensory hallucination analogous to commonly recognized visual images associated with NREM parasomnias. This case is also unusual for probable psychological triggers that could play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, as evidenced by successful psychotherapy.

  1. Homoeopathy for delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, A J; Fisher, P; Smith, C; Wyllie, S E; Lewith, G T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a model for determining whether a homoeopathic medicine is superior to placebo for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Physiotherapy department of a homoeopathic hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty eight healthy volunteers (average age 30; 41% men) undertook a 10 minute period of bench stepping carrying a small weight and were randomised to a homoeopathic medicine or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean muscle soreness in the five day period after the exercise test, symptom free days, maximum soreness score, days to no soreness, days on medication. RESULTS: The difference between group means was 0.17 in favour of placebo with 95% confidence intervals +/- 0.50. Similar results were found for other outcome measures. CONCLUSION: The study did not find benefit of the homoeopathic remedy in DOMS. Bench stepping may not be an appropriate model to evaluate the effects of a treatment on DOMS because of wide variation between subject soreness scores. PMID:9429007

  2. Warped throat solutions in string theory and their cosmological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymarsky, Anatoly

    2007-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to a study of certain examples of gauge/string duality related to warped throat backgrounds in string theory. Namely, we consider a family of IIB SUGRA solutions dual to a moduli space of certain cascading N = 1 gauge theory. This theory exhibits rich low-energy behavior, including chiral symmetry breaking and confinement. The first part of this thesis is focused on the gravity dual description of these phenomena. In particular, we discuss string theory description of the continuous gauge theory moduli space, evaluate the tension of BPS domain wall, and calculate baryonic condensates. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the embedding of the warped throat backgrounds into flux compactifications. To this end we calculate the nonperturbative superpotential of the D3-D7 system on warped conic geometries. This superpotential plays an important role in fixing Kahler moduli and is an important ingredient in constructing consistent compactification scenarios. In the last part of the thesis we apply this superpotential to a particular cosmological inflation scenario based on the dynamics of a D3-brane moving along the throat. We conclude that the realization of stringy inflation within this scenario is possible only around an inflection point of the potential and requires a fine tuning of the parameters.

  3. The effects of game and training loads on perceptual responses of muscle soreness in Australian football.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Paul G; Hopkins, Will G

    2013-05-01

    Australian Football is an intense team sport played over ~120 min on a weekly basis. To determine the effects of game and training load on muscle soreness and the time frame of soreness dissipation, 64 elite Australian Football players (age 23.8 ± 1.8 y, height 183.9 ± 3.8 cm, weight 83.2 ± 5.0 kg; mean ± SD) recorded perceptions of muscle soreness, game intensity, and training intensity on scales of 1-10 on most mornings for up to 3 competition seasons. Playing and training times were also recorded in minutes. Data were analyzed with a mixed linear model, and magnitudes of effects on soreness were evaluated by standardization. All effects had acceptably low uncertainty. Game and training-session loads were 790 ± 182 and 229 ± 98 intensity-minutes (mean ± SD), respectively. General muscle soreness was 4.6 ± 1.1 units on d 1 postgame and fell to 1.9 ± 1.0 by d 6. There was a small increase in general muscle soreness (0.22 ± 0.07-0.50 ± 0.13 units) in the 3 d after high-load games relative to low-load games. Other soreness responses showed similar timelines and magnitudes of change. Training sessions made only small contributions to soreness over the 3 d after each session. Practitioners should be aware of these responses when planning weekly training and recovery programs, as it appears that game-related soreness dissipates after 3 d regardless of game load and increased training loads in the following week produce only small increases in soreness.

  4. In vivo-in vitro comparison of deposition in three mouth-throat models with Qvar and Turbuhaler inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Gilbertson, Kyle; Finlay, Warren H

    2007-01-01

    In vitro polydisperse aerosol deposition in three mouth-throat models, namely, the USP (United States Pharmacopeia) mouth-throat (induction port), idealized mouth-throat, and highly idealized mouth-throat, was investigated experimentally. Aerosol particles emitted from two commercial inhalers, Qvar (pMDI) and Turbuhaler (DPI), were used. The in vitro deposition results in these three mouth-throat models were compared with in vivo data available from the literature. For the DPI, mouth-throat deposition was 57.3 +/- 4.5% for the USP mouth-throat, 67.8 +/- 2.2% for the idealized mouth-throat, and 69.3 +/- 1.1% for the highly idealized mouth-throat, which are all relatively close to the in vivo value of 65.8 +/- 10.1%. In contrast, for the pMDI, aerosol deposition in the idealized mouth-throat (25.8 +/- 4.2%) and the highly idealized mouth-throat (24.9 +/- 2.8%) agrees with the in vivo data (29.0 +/- 18.0%) reported in the literature better than that for the USP mouth-throat (12.2 +/- 2.7%). In both cases, the USP mouth-throat gives the lowest deposition among the three mouth-throat models studied. In summary, both the idealized mouth-throat and highly idealized mouth-throat improve the accuracy of predicted mean in vivo deposition in the mouth-throat region. This result hints at the potential applicability of either the idealized mouth-throat or highly idealized mouth-throat as a future USP mouth-throat standard to provide mean value prediction of in vivo mouth-throat deposition.

  5. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  6. [The Development of a Care Protocol for Postoperative Pressure Sore Prevention].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hui-Ling; Wang, Fang; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2015-12-01

    Pressure sores are a common complication caused by long periods of bed rest following major surgery. These sores may increase patient postoperative pain, increase the risk of infections, lengthen the pe-riod of hospitalization, and increase the duration and costs of nursing care. Therefore, maintaining the skin integrity of surgical patients is an important responsibility for operating room nurses and an indicator of nursing care quality. While pressure-sore risk assessment tools and interoperative strategies are available and used in foreign countries, there has been little related research conducted in Taiwan. After examining the relevant literature and considering the current postoperative pressure sore situation in Taiwan, the author developed a postoperative pressure sore care protocol as a reference for clinical staff. Protocol procedures include major breakthrough developments in areas such as post-survey risk assessment for pressure ulcers, pressure ulcer prevention strategies that take surgery-related risk factors into consideration, extra care and protection measures for surgical supine patients, and post-pressure sores. The developed postoperative pressure sore protocol may be incorporated into surgical care procedures during the post-surgical care period in order to effectively prevent the occurrence of post-surgery pressure ulcers. Furthermore, the developed protocol offers the potential to improve and strengthen the quality of surgical care in terms of both healthcare and post-surgical care.

  7. Ultrasound Findings of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Longo, Victor; Jacobson, Jon A; Fessell, David P; Mautner, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this series was to retrospectively characterize the ultrasound findings of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The Institutional Review Board approved our study, and informed consent was waived. A retrospective search of radiology reports using the key phrase "delayed-onset muscle soreness" and key word "DOMS" from 2001 to 2015 and teaching files was completed to identify cases. The sonograms were reviewed by 3 fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Sonograms were retrospectively characterized with respect to echogenicity (hypoechoic, isoechoic, or hyperechoic), distribution of muscle involvement, and intramuscular pattern (focal versus diffuse and well defined versus poorly defined). Images were also reviewed for muscle enlargement, fluid collection, muscle fiber disruption, and increased flow on color or power Doppler imaging. There were a total of 6 patients identified (5 male and 1 female). The average age was 22 years (range, 7-44 years). Of the 6 patients, there were a total of 11 affected muscles in 7 extremities (1 bilateral case). The involved muscles were in the upper extremity: triceps brachii in 27% (3 of 11), biceps brachii in 18% (2 of 11), brachialis in 18% (2 of 11), brachioradialis in 18% (2 of 11), infraspinatus in 9% (1 of 11), and deltoid in 9% (1 of 11). On ultrasound imaging, the abnormal muscle was hyperechoic in 100% (11 of 11), well defined in 73% (8 of 11), poorly defined in 27% (3 of 11), diffuse in 73% (8 of 11), and focal in 27% (3 of 11). Increased muscle size was found in 82% (9 of 11) and minimal hyperemia in 87.5% (7 of 8). The ultrasound findings of DOMS include hyperechoic involvement of an upper extremity muscle, most commonly appearing well defined and diffuse with increased muscle size and minimal hyperemia.

  8. Moist Heat or Dry Heat for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Hui, Timothy; Granado, Michael; Laymon, Mike; Lee, Haneul

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat is commonly used in physical therapy following exercise induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Most heat modalities used in a clinical setting for DOMS are only applied for 5 to 20 minutes. This minimal heat exposure causes little, if any, change in deep tissue temperature. For this reason, long duration dry chemical heat packs are used at home to slowly and safely warm tissue and reduce potential heat damage while reducing pain associated from DOMS. Clinically, it has been shown that moist heat penetrates deep tissue faster than dry heat. Therefore, in home use chemical moist heat may be more efficacious than dry heat to provide pain relief and reduce tissue damage following exercise DOMS. However, chemical moist heat only lasts for 2 hours compared to the 8 hours duration of chemical dry heat packs. The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effect of dry heat versus moist heat on 100 young subjects after exercise induce DOMS. Methods One hundred subjects exercised for 15 minutes accomplishing squats. Before and for 3 days after, strength, muscle soreness, tissue resistance, and the force to passively move the knee were recorded. Heat and moist heat were applied in different groups either immediately after exercise or 24 hours later. Results The research results of this study showed that immediate application of heat, either dry (8 hours application) or moist (2 hours application), had a similar preservation of quadriceps muscle strength and muscle activity. Results also revealed that the greatest pain reduction was shown after immediate application of moist heat. Never the less, immediate application of dry heat had a similar effect but to a lesser extent. Conclusion It should be noted that moist heat had not only similar benefits of dry heat but in some cases enhanced benefits, and with only 25% of the time of application of the dry heat. PMID:24171053

  9. Male tawny dragons use throat patterns to recognize rivals.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Louise; Umbers, Kate D L; Backwell, Patricia R Y; Keogh, J Scott

    2012-10-01

    The ability to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics is important for many animals, especially territorial species since it allows them to avoid unnecessary interactions with individuals that pose little threat. There are very few studies, however, that identify the proximate cues that facilitate such recognition in visual systems. Here, we show that in tawny dragons (Ctenophorus decresii), males can recognize familiar and unfamiliar conspecific males based on morphological features alone, without the aid of chemical or behavioural cues. We further show that it is the colour pattern of the throat patches (gular) that facilitates this recognition.

  10. Phylogeography and population genetics of the Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Rodríguez, Nandadevi; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Townsend Peterson, A; García-Moreno, Jaime

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed mitochondrial DNA sequence variation across 69 Amethyst-throated Hummingbirds (Lampornis amethystinus), comparing with samples of related taxa. Although this group shows discrete phenotypic variation in throat color among populations in Oaxaca and Guerrero (Mexico), the only phylogeographic structure observed was between phenotypically similar populations north and south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. As such, it appears that throat color variation is of recent origin and likely based only on minor genetic differences.

  11. Observational properties of dayside throat aurora and implications on the possible generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.-S.; Hietala, H.; Chen, X.-C.; Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Liu, J.-J.; Hu, H.-Q.; Yang, H.-G.

    2017-02-01

    Observational properties of throat aurora are investigated in detail by using 7 year continuous auroral observations obtained at Yellow River Station (magnetic latitude 76.24°N). From our inspection, throat aurora is often observed under the condition of stripy diffuse aurora contacting with the persistent discrete auroral oval, and the long-period throat aurora observations generally consist of intermittent subsequences of throat aurora brightening followed by poleward moving auroral form and throat aurora dimming. We also noticed that the orientation of throat aurora is aligned along the ionospheric convection flow, and its local time distribution shows clear dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component. These observational results indicate that factors inside the magnetosphere may play important role on occurrence of throat aurora. We thus suggest that throat aurora may present the ionospheric signature of redistribution of reconnection rate on the magnetopause by cold magnetospheric plasma flowing into the reconnection site. In addition, we also found that the occurrence rate of throat aurora clearly decreases with increase of the IMF cone angle (arccos(|Bx|/B)), which is very similar with the occurrence rate of high-speed jet (HSJ) observed in magnetosheath depending on the IMF cone angle. This is suggested as that the HSJs occurred outside the magnetosphere may also play important role for generation of throat aurora by triggering magnetopause reconnection or by direct impacting. Although further studies are needed to clarify how the throat auroras are generated in detail, the relevant observations about throat aurora have presented important implications on a variety open questions, such as distribution and generation of cold plasma structures in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause deformation, and possible relation between HSJ and reconnection.

  12. Passive Rocket Diffuser Theory: A Re-Examination of Minimum Second Throat Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure during testing without using active control systems. Among the most critical design parameters is the relative area of the diffuser throat to that of the nozzle throat. A smaller second throat is generally desirable because it decreases the stagnation-to-ambient pressure ratio the diffuser requires for nominal operation. There is a limit, however. Below a certain size, the second throat can cause pressure buildup within the diffuser and prevent it from reaching the start condition that protects the nozzle from side-load damage. This paper presents a method for improved estimation of the minimum second throat area which enables diffuser start. The new 3-zone model uses traditional quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow theory to approximate the structure of two distinct diffuser flow fields observed in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and combines them to provide a less-conservative estimate of the second throat size limit. It is unique among second throat sizing methods in that it accounts for all major conical nozzle and second throat diffuser design parameters within its limits of application. The performance of the 3-zone method is compared to the historical normal shock and force balance methods, and verified against a large number of CFD simulations at specific heat ratios of 1.4 and 1.25. Validation is left as future work, and the model is currently intended to function only as a first-order design tool.

  13. Performance predictions for an SSME configuration with an enlarged throat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, G. R.; Dang, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Two Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer program that was recently developed for NASA was used to predict the performance of a Large Throat Configuration of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Calculations indicate that the current design SSME contains a shock wave that is induced by the nozzle wall shape. In the Large Throat design an even stronger shock wave is predicted. Because of the presence of this shock wave, earlier performance predictions that have neglected shock wave effects have been questioned. The JANNAF thrust chamber performance prediction procedures given in a reference were applied. The analysis includes the effects of two dimensional reacting flow with a shock wave. The effects of the boundary layer with a regenatively cooled wall are also included. A Purdue computer program was used to compute axially symmetric supersonic nozzle flows with an induced shock, but is restricted to flows with a constant ratio of specific heats. Thus, the TDK program was also run with ths assumption and the results of the two programs were compared.

  14. Effects of ibuprofen on exercise-induced muscle soreness and indices of muscle damage.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, A E; Maughan, R J; Whiting, P H

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two volunteers participated in a two-period crossover study in which ibuprofen was tested against an identical placebo for its effectiveness in reducing muscle soreness and damage after two bouts of downhill running. Subjective soreness, quadriceps isometric strength and isometric endurance time at 50 percent of maximum strength, serum activities of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate transaminase and serum levels of creatinine and urea were recorded at intervals up to 72 hours after exercise. Each downhill run produced muscle soreness, and a decline in muscle strength and 50 percent endurance time, although these parameters were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment. All serum parameters measured increased after both runs, but for the three enzymes this increase was smaller after the second run. Serum creatine kinase and urea levels were higher in the ibuprofen group after both runs. These results indicate that ibuprofen is not an appropriate treatment for delayed onset muscle soreness and damage. PMID:2078806

  15. The effects of land vs. aquatic plyometrics on power, torque, velocity, and muscle soreness in women.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Leah E; Devor, Steven T; Merrick, Mark A; Buckworth, Janet

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in performance indicators (power, torque, and velocity) and muscle soreness between plyometric training on land and in water. Thirty-two college age women were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of an identical plyometric training program on land or in an aquatic setting. Performance indicators were assessed pretraining, midtraining, and posttraining. Muscle soreness (ordinal scale) and pain sensitivity (palpation) were assessed after a training bout (0, 48, and 96 hours) during the first week of training and when training intensity was increased (weeks 3 and 6). Performance indictors increased for both groups (pretraining < midtraining < posttraining, p < or = 0.001). Muscle soreness was significantly greater in the land compared to the aquatic plyometric training group at baseline and each time training intensity was increased, p = 0.01. Aquatic plyometrics provided the same performance enhancement benefits as land plyometrics with significantly less muscle soreness.

  16. A new postoperative management scheme for preventing sacral pressure sores in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Inoue, T; Torii, S

    1998-01-01

    Although the reliability of pressure sore surgery has improved with the advent of many different types of flaps, it is well known that the recurrence rate of pressure sores is still remarkably high in spinal cord-injured patients. This article reports the very low relapse rate of postsurgical pressure sores using air mattresses, which also helps relieve manpower requirements for care. We measured interface pressures at the sacrum for 18 spinal cord-injured patients with a ROHO air mattress (ROHO International, Inc, Belleville, IL). Based on the results, we used this mattress immediately after surgery for 19 spinal cord-injured patients with sacral pressure sores. Minimal repositioning was performed for each patient during the hospital stay. Minimal repositioning was similarly performed at home. All pressure sores healed, regardless of the type of surgical procedure, size, and degree of sore. No relapse has been found, with an average of 33.4 months after surgery. With this management, we could achieve a very low recurrence rate, require less manpower for postoperative management, as well as minimize stress for the patients.

  17. Pulsed Ultrasound Fails To Diminish Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Stay, Jeffrey C.; Richard, Mark D.; Draper, David O.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Durrant, Earlene

    1998-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of pulsed ultrasound on swelling, muscle soreness perception, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and muscular strength. Design and Setting: Eight sets of concentric and eccentric actions induced delayed-onset muscle soreness of the elbow flexors. Group 1 received 20% pulsed ultrasound treatments (1-MHz, 7 minutes, 1.5 W/ cm2 temporal peak intensity) twice a day immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Group 2 received sham treatments immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3,27, 51, and 75 hours postexercise and true treatments of pulsed ultrasound at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Group 3 received sham treatments of no ultrasonic output immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Subjects: Thirty-six college-age females. Measurements: We recorded upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and elbow-flexion strength before (pretest), immediately postexercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postexercise. Results: We noted differences over time but no treatment effect between groups or interactions between time and group for upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, or elbow-flexion strength. Conclusions: Pulsed ultrasound as used in this study did not significantly diminish the effects of delayed-onset muscle soreness on soreness perception, swelling, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and strength. PMID:16558532

  18. Influence of throat configuration and fish density on escapement of channel catfish from hoop nets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porath, Mark T.; Pape, Larry D.; Richters, Lindsey K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several state agencies have adopted the use of baited, tandemset hoop nets to assess lentic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations. Some level of escapement from the net is expected because an opening exists in each throat of the net, although factors influencing rates of escapement from hoop nets have not been quantified. We conducted experiments to quantify rates of escapement and to determine the influence of throat configuration and fish density within the net on escapement rates. An initial experiment to determine the rate of escapement from each net compartment utilized individually tagged channel catfish placed within the entrance (between the two throats) and cod (within the second throat) compartments of a single hoop net for overnight sets. From this experiment, the mean rate (±SE) of channel catfish escaping was 4.2% (±1.5) from the cod (cod throat was additionally restricted from the traditionally manufactured product), and 74% (±4.2) from the entrance compartments. In a subsequent experiment, channel catfish were placed only in the cod compartment with different throat configurations (restricted or unrestricted) and at two densities (low [6 fish per net] and high [60 fish per net]) for overnight sets to determine the influence of fish density and throat configuration on escapement rates. Escapement rates between throat configurations were doubled at low fish density (13.3 ± 5.4% restricted versus 26.7 ± 5.6% unrestricted) and tripled at high fish density (14.3 ± 4.9% restricted versus 51.9 ± 5.0% unrestricted). These results suggest that retention efficiency is high from cod compartments with restricted throat entrances. However, managers and researchers need to be aware that modification to the cod throats (restrictions) is needed for hoop nets ordered from manufacturers. Managers need to be consistent in their use and reporting of cod end throat configurations when using this gear.

  19. Tonsillectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Tonsils removal; Tonsillitis - tonsillectomy; Pharyngitis - tonsillectomy; Sore throat - tonsillectomy ... can lead to frequent or very painful sore throats. In either of these cases, the child's tonsils ...

  20. Delayed onset muscle soreness: Involvement of neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Mizumura, Kazue; Taguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is quite a common consequence of unaccustomed strenuous exercise, especially exercise containing eccentric contraction (lengthening contraction, LC). Its typical sign is mechanical hyperalgesia (tenderness and movement related pain). Its cause has been commonly believed to be micro-damage of the muscle and subsequent inflammation. Here we present a brief historical overview of the damage-inflammation theory followed by a discussion of our new findings. Different from previous observations, we have observed mechanical hyperalgesia in rats 1-3 days after LC without any apparent microscopic damage of the muscle or signs of inflammation. With our model we have found that two pathways are involved in inducing mechanical hyperalgesia after LC: activation of the B2 bradykinin receptor-nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and activation of the COX-2-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway. These neurotrophic factors were produced by muscle fibers and/or satellite cells. This means that muscle fiber damage is not essential, although it is sufficient, for induction of DOMS, instead, NGF and GDNF produced by muscle fibers/satellite cells play crucial roles in DOMS.

  1. SPECIFIC AND CROSS OVER EFFECTS OF MASSAGE FOR MUSCLE SORENESS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D.; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A.; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera‐band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non‐massaged limb. Methods: 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/− 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/− 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/− 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/− 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0‐10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff‐legged dead‐lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. Results: There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non‐massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30

  2. Anterior throat pain syndromes: causes for undiagnosed craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Shankland, Wesley E

    2010-01-01

    It is not uncommon for practitioners who treat craniofacial pain to see patients with undiagnosed throat and submandibular pain. Usually, these patients will already have been seen by their primary care physician and frequently, several others doctors including otolaryngologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and even neurologists. Far too often these patients have three common features: 1. they have endured multiple expensive diagnostic tests; 2. they have received treatment of multiple courses of antibiotics; and 3. no specific diagnosis for their pain complaints has been determined and their pain persists. In this article, five disorders, Ernest syndrome, Eagle's syndrome, carotid artery syndrome, hyoid bone syndrome and superior pharyngeal constrictor syndrome are briefly described. All five produce common symptoms, making diagnosis difficult, which is often followed by ineffective or no treatment being provided to the patient. Diagnostic criteria and suggested treatment modalities are also presented.

  3. Automatic speech segmentation using throat-acoustic correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussabayev, Rustam Rafikovich; Kalimoldayev, Maksat N.; Amirgaliyev, Yedilkhan N.; Mussabayev, Timur R.

    2016-11-01

    This work considers one of the approaches to the solution of the task of discrete speech signal automatic segmentation. The aim of this work is to construct such an algorithm which should meet the following requirements: segmentation of a signal into acoustically homogeneous segments, high accuracy and segmentation speed, unambiguity and reproducibility of segmentation results, lack of necessity of preliminary training with the use of a special set consisting of manually segmented signals. Development of the algorithm which corresponds to the given requirements was conditioned by the necessity of formation of automatically segmented speech databases that have a large volume. One of the new approaches to the solution of this task is viewed in this article. For this purpose we use the new type of informative features named TAC-coefficients (Throat-Acoustic Correlation coefficients) which provide sufficient segmentation accuracy and effi- ciency.

  4. Pharyngeal Neisseria gonorrhoeae detection in oral-throat wash specimens of male patients with urethritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takeyama, Koh; Koroku, Mikio; Tanda, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2008-12-01

    Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in the pharynx has been highlighted in the prevention of the unexpected spread of sexually transmitted diseases. We tried to clarify the detection rate of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the pharynx and the clinical relevance of oral-throat wash specimens to detect the organism in heterosexual men with gonococcal and nongonococcal urethritis. In our cohort of 79 male patients with urethritis, oral throat wash specimens were collected after they had gargled with normal saline for approximately 30 to 60 s. Positive pharyngeal N. gonorrhoeae was defined as a positive result on the strand displacement amplification test for the specimen from the oral-throat wash. N. gonorrhoeae was detected in the oral-throat wash specimens of 13 (31.7%) of the 41 male patients with gonococcal urethritis. Oral-throat wash with a nucleic acid amplification test can detect pharyngeal N. gonorrhoeae easily and efficiently.

  5. A life history study of the yellow throat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.

    1953-01-01

    Investigations concerning the life history of the Yellow-throat were made in southern Michigan during the spring and summer of 1938. Supplementary information was also obtained at Arlington, Virginia, in 1940 and at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Maryland, in 1947.....Resident males established territories almost immediately upon arrival in spring. In southern Michigan some resident males arrived at least as soon as, if not before, transient males. Most females appeared on their nesting ground about a week later. Adults were engaged in nesting activities from the time of their arrival in spring until the advent of the post-nuptial molt in late summer.....Typical Yellow-throat habitat consists of a mixture of a dense herbaceous vegetation and small woody plants in damp or wet situations. At Ann Arbor, the Yellow-throat was a common breeding species in its restricted suitable habitat. The population density in one area of suitable habitat was about 69 territorial males per 100 acres. Of 11 territorial males that were intensively studied, one was polygamous (with two mates), nine were monogamous, and one was probably monogamous (with at least one mate).....The song of the individual Yellow-throat was heard throughout the breeding season except for the courtship period. Two major types of song were the common song given while perched, and an occasional, more elaborate, flight song. Most males sing in spurts, singing at fairly regular intervals for a considerable period and then abruptly ceasing for another period. The vocabulary of both sexes included several types of call notes that appeared either to have special functions or to represent outward expressions of distinct emotional states of the bird.....Resident males were antagonistic toward each other throughout the breeding season. Most remained on well-established territories during this period. Territories of 10 monogamous males ranged in size from .8 to 1.8 acres but the territory of one polygamous male occupied

  6. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Topp, Robert; Behm, David G

    2013-12-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral shoulder served as a passive control. Two hours later, the contralateral resting shoulder received the other treatment. The participants rated the intensity of soreness (scale 0-10), and a blinded examiner took measures of pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the upper trapezius immediately before treatment and 0, 10, 20, and 60 minutes after treatment 48 hours posteccentric exercise. Immediately before treatment, the intensity of soreness was 5.0 (SD 2.2) and PPT was 138 (SD 78) kPa. In response to treatment, a significant treatment by time interaction was found for the intensity of soreness (p < 0.001) and PPT (p < 0.05). Compared with control, both active exercise and massage significantly reduced the intensity of soreness and increased PPT (i.e., reduced pain sensitivity). For both types of treatment, the greatest effect on perceived soreness occurred immediately after treatment, whereas the effect on PPT peaked 20 minutes after treatment. In conclusion, active exercise using elastic resistance provides similar acute relief of muscle soreness as compared with that using massage

  7. Detection and Isolation of Digital Dermatitis Treponemes from Bovine Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S R; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Bell, J; Blundell, R; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J

    2016-05-01

    Pressure sores cause severe pain and discomfort in hospitalized people and in farmed cattle and are often infected with unknown bacteria. Pressure sores occur on the upper legs of 6-10% of recumbent cattle and are generally considered to be caused by constant pressure, commonly on bony areas of the limbs. This study analyzed pressure sores taken from the upper limbs of 14 cattle using isolation in culture and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect treponemes associated with digital dermatitis (DD). A 100% association of DD treponemes with the pressure sores was demonstrated, but treponemes were shown not to be part of the normal skin microbiota. Immunohistochemistry showed an association of DD treponemes with lesions and particularly with the hair follicles in lesions, identifying the bacteria deep within wounds, thereby suggesting that they could contribute to lesion pathogenesis. The bacteria isolated from the pressure sore lesions were similar or identical on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to those found in DD foot lesions in cattle, suggesting the same bacteria can infect multiple lesions. Indeed, the results of this study suggest that these spirochaetal bacteria may be expanding in host range and in their ability to colonize different tissues and contribute to a range of disease manifestations in farm animals.

  8. The treatment of Staphyloccocus aureus infected sore nipples: a randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, V; Stringer, L J

    1999-09-01

    Sore, cracked nipples are commonly experienced by breastfeeding mothers. We have previously reported a strong correlation between sore, cracked nipples and S. aureus colonization. A prospective, randomized clinical trial was performed to compare four treatment regimes for S. aureus infected sore nipples. Eighty-four breastfeeding mothers were enrolled in the study. After 5 days to 7 days of treatment, only 8% of mothers showed improvement in the "optimal breastfeeding technique alone" group, 16% improved with topical mupiricin, 29% improved with topical fusidic acid, yet 79% improved with oral antibiotics (p < .0001). Optimal breastfeeding techniques and topical antibiotics ointment failed to heal most infected, sore, cracked nipples. Mastitis developed in 12% to 35% of mothers not treated with systemic antibiotics compared to 5% of mothers treated with systemic antibiotics (p < .005). In conclusion, S. aureus infected sore, cracked nipples should be diagnosed as a potentially widespread impetigo vulgaris and treated aggressively with systemic antibiotics in order to improve healing and decrease the risk of developing mastitis due to an ascending lactiferous duct bacterial infection.

  9. Survival of red-throated loons (Gavia stellata) may be linked to marine conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmutz, Joel A.

    2014-01-01

    Large variations in the summering population size of Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) have occurred in recent decades in Alaska. Little information exists about annual or seasonal survival rates of adult Red-throated Loons. This study used tracking data from satellite transmitters implanted into 33 Red-throated Loons captured on breeding areas in Alaska to estimate annual survival with the sampling effort split between two study periods: 2000–2002 and 2008–2010. Mortality was inferred from transmitted sensor data that indicated body temperature of the Red-throated Loon and voltage of the transmitter's battery. Two definitive mortalities occurred, resulting in an annual survival estimate of 0.920 (SE = 0.054). The fates of two additional Red-throated Loons were ambiguous and, when treated as mortalities, the annual survival estimate was 0.838 (SE = 0.074). All four putative mortalities occurred during the non-breeding season in the early study period. Oceanic conditions, indexed by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, appeared to differ between the study periods with higher Pacific Decadal Oscillation values associated with the early study period. Given that high values for Pacific Decadal Oscillation were also associated with the large decline of Red-throated Loons observed in Alaska during 1977–1993, this study suggests that survival of adult Red-throated Loons may vary in relation to the state of the marine ecosystem and thus contribute to long-term variation in population trends.

  10. Pain and soreness associated with a percutaneous electrical stimulation muscle cramping protocol.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Knight, Kenneth L

    2007-11-01

    Muscle cramps are difficult to study scientifically because of their spontaneity and unpredictability. Various laboratory techniques to induce muscle cramps have been explored but the best technique for inducing cramps is unclear. Electrical stimulation appears to be the most reliable, but there is a perception that it is extremely painful. Data to support this perception are lacking. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation is a tolerable method of inducing cramps with few side effects. We measured cramp frequency (HZ), pain during electrical stimulation, and soreness before, at 5 s, and 30, 60, and 90 min after cramp induction using a 100-mm visual analog scale. Group 1 received tibial nerve stimulation on 5 consecutive days; Group 2 received it on alternate days for five total treatments. Pain and soreness were mild. The highest ratings occurred on Day 1 and decreased thereafter. Intersession reliability was high. Our study showed that electrical stimulation causes little pain or soreness and is a reliable method for inducing cramps.

  11. Stable Non-Supersymmetric Throats in String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; Simic, Dusan; Trivedi, Sandip P.; /Tata Inst. /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-06-28

    We construct a large class of non-supersymmetric AdS-like throat geometries in string theory by taking non-supersymmetric orbifolds of supersymmetric backgrounds. The scale of SUSY breaking is the AdS radius, and the dual field theory has explicitly broken supersymmetry. The large hierarchy of energy scales in these geometries is stable. We establish this by showing that the dual gauge theories do not have any relevant operators which are singlets under the global symmetries. When the geometries are embedded in a compact internal space, a large enough discrete subgroup of the global symmetries can still survive to prevent any singlet relevant operators from arising. We illustrate this by embedding one case in a non-supersymmetric orbifold of a Calabi-Yau manifold. These examples can serve as a starting point for obtaining Randall-Sundrum models in string theory, and more generally for constructing composite Higgs or technicolor-like models where strongly coupled dynamics leads to the breaking of electro-weak symmetry. Towards the end of the paper, we briefly discuss how bulk gauge fields can be incorporated by introducing D7-branes in the bulk, and also show how the strongly coupled dynamics can lead to an emergent weakly coupled gauge theory in the IR with matter fields including scalars.

  12. Quantum dynamics of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    SciTech Connect

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Peltola, Ari; Louko, Jorma

    2011-02-15

    We consider the polymer quantization of the Einstein wormhole throat theory for an eternal Schwarzschild black hole. We numerically solve the difference equation describing the quantum evolution of an initially Gaussian, semiclassical wave packet. As expected from previous work on loop quantum cosmology, the wave packet remains semiclassical until it nears the classical singularity at which point it enters a quantum regime in which the fluctuations become large. The expectation value of the radius reaches a minimum as the wave packet is reflected from the origin and emerges to form a near-Gaussian but asymmetrical semiclassical state at late times. The value of the minimum depends in a nontrivial way on the initial mass/energy of the pulse, its width, and the polymerization scale. For wave packets that are sufficiently narrow near the bounce, the semiclassical bounce radius is obtained. Although the numerics become difficult to control in this limit, we argue that for pulses of finite width the bounce persists as the polymerization scale goes to zero, suggesting that in this model the loop quantum gravity effects mimicked by polymer quantization do not play a crucial role in the quantum bounce.

  13. Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov., isolated from the human throat.

    PubMed

    Huch, Melanie; De Bruyne, Katrien; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Bub, Achim; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Watzl, Bernhard; Snauwaert, Isabel; Franz, Charles M A P; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The novel, Gram-stain-positive, ovoid, lactic acid bacterial isolates LMG 27205, LMG 27206, LMG 27207(T) and MRI-F 18 were obtained from throat samples of healthy humans. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicated that these isolates belong to the genus Streptococcus, specifically the Streptococcus mitis group, with Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus mitis as the nearest neighbours (99.45 and 98.56 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the respective type strains). Genotypic fingerprinting by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), DNA-DNA hybridizations, comparative sequence analysis of pheS, rpoA and atpA and physiological and biochemical tests revealed that these bacteria formed a taxon well separated from its nearest neighbours and other species of the genus Streptococcus with validly published names and, therefore, represent a novel species, for which the name Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov. is proposed, with LMG 27207(T) ( = DSM 26920(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Quantum dynamics of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Louko, Jorma; Peltola, Ari

    2011-02-01

    We consider the polymer quantization of the Einstein wormhole throat theory for an eternal Schwarzschild black hole. We numerically solve the difference equation describing the quantum evolution of an initially Gaussian, semiclassical wave packet. As expected from previous work on loop quantum cosmology, the wave packet remains semiclassical until it nears the classical singularity at which point it enters a quantum regime in which the fluctuations become large. The expectation value of the radius reaches a minimum as the wave packet is reflected from the origin and emerges to form a near-Gaussian but asymmetrical semiclassical state at late times. The value of the minimum depends in a nontrivial way on the initial mass/energy of the pulse, its width, and the polymerization scale. For wave packets that are sufficiently narrow near the bounce, the semiclassical bounce radius is obtained. Although the numerics become difficult to control in this limit, we argue that for pulses of finite width the bounce persists as the polymerization scale goes to zero, suggesting that in this model the loop quantum gravity effects mimicked by polymer quantization do not play a crucial role in the quantum bounce.

  15. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  16. An intelligent artificial throat with sound-sensing ability based on laser induced graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Tian, He; Liu, Ying; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Pang, Yu; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Wang, Dan-Yang; Tian, Xiang-Guang; Yan, Jun-Chao; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Traditional sound sources and sound detectors are usually independent and discrete in the human hearing range. To minimize the device size and integrate it with wearable electronics, there is an urgent requirement of realizing the functional integration of generating and detecting sound in a single device. Here we show an intelligent laser-induced graphene artificial throat, which can not only generate sound but also detect sound in a single device. More importantly, the intelligent artificial throat will significantly assist for the disabled, because the simple throat vibrations such as hum, cough and scream with different intensity or frequency from a mute person can be detected and converted into controllable sounds. Furthermore, the laser-induced graphene artificial throat has the advantage of one-step fabrication, high efficiency, excellent flexibility and low cost, and it will open practical applications in voice control, wearable electronics and many other areas. PMID:28232739

  17. An intelligent artificial throat with sound-sensing ability based on laser induced graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Tian, He; Liu, Ying; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Pang, Yu; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Wang, Dan-Yang; Tian, Xiang-Guang; Yan, Jun-Chao; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-02-01

    Traditional sound sources and sound detectors are usually independent and discrete in the human hearing range. To minimize the device size and integrate it with wearable electronics, there is an urgent requirement of realizing the functional integration of generating and detecting sound in a single device. Here we show an intelligent laser-induced graphene artificial throat, which can not only generate sound but also detect sound in a single device. More importantly, the intelligent artificial throat will significantly assist for the disabled, because the simple throat vibrations such as hum, cough and scream with different intensity or frequency from a mute person can be detected and converted into controllable sounds. Furthermore, the laser-induced graphene artificial throat has the advantage of one-step fabrication, high efficiency, excellent flexibility and low cost, and it will open practical applications in voice control, wearable electronics and many other areas.

  18. Shock position sensor for supersonic inlets. [measuring pressure in the throat of a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Static pressure taps or ports are provided in the throat of a supersonic inlet, and signals indicative of the pressure at each of the ports is fed to respective comparators. Means are also provided for directing a signal indicative of the total throat pressure to the comparators. A periodic signal is superimposed on the total throat pressure so that the signal from the static pressure tabs is compared to a varying scan signal rather than to total throat pressure only. This type of comparison causes each comparator to provide a pulse width modulated output which may vary from 0% 'time on' to 100% 'time on'. The pulse width modulated outputs of the comparators are summed, filtered, and directed to a controller which operates a bypass valve such as a door whereby air is dumped from the inlet to prevent the shock wave from being expelled out the front.

  19. Extreme throat initial data set and horizon area-angular momentum inequality for axisymmetric black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dain, Sergio

    2010-11-15

    We present a formula that relates the variations of the area of extreme throat initial data with the variation of an appropriate defined mass functional. From this expression we deduce that the first variation, with fixed angular momentum, of the area is zero and the second variation is positive definite evaluated at the extreme Kerr throat initial data. This indicates that the area of the extreme Kerr throat initial data is a minimum among this class of data. And hence the area of generic throat initial data is bounded from below by the angular momentum. Also, this result strongly suggests that the inequality between area and angular momentum holds for generic asymptotically flat axially symmetric black holes. As an application, we prove this inequality in the nontrivial family of spinning Bowen-York initial data.

  20. Analytical study of striated nozzle flow with small radius of curvature ratio throats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.; White, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical method was developed which is capable of estimating the chamber and throat conditions in a nozzle with a low radius of curvature throat. The method was programmed using standard FORTRAN 4 language and includes chemical equilibrium calculation subprograms (modified NASA Lewis program CEC71) as an integral part. The method determines detailed and gross rocket characteristics in the presence of striated flows and gives detailed results for the motor chamber and throat plane with as many as 20 discrete zones. The method employs a simultaneous solution of the mass, momentum, and energy equations and allows propellant types, 0/F ratios, propellant distribution, nozzle geometry, and injection schemes to be varied so to predict spatial velocity, density, pressure, and other thermodynamic variable distributions in the chamber as well as the throat. Results for small radius of curvature have shown good comparison to experimental results. Both gaseous and liquid injection may be considered with frozen or equilibrium flow calculations.

  1. Indirect and direct methods for measuring a dynamic throat diameter in a solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbaugh, Lauren

    In a solid rocket motor, nozzle throat erosion is dictated by propellant composition, throat material properties, and operating conditions. Throat erosion has a significant effect on motor performance, so it must be accurately characterized to produce a good motor design. In order to correlate throat erosion rate to other parameters, it is first necessary to know what the throat diameter is throughout a motor burn. Thus, an indirect method and a direct method for determining throat diameter in a solid rocket motor are investigated in this thesis. The indirect method looks at the use of pressure and thrust data to solve for throat diameter as a function of time. The indirect method's proof of concept was shown by the good agreement between the ballistics model and the test data from a static motor firing. The ballistics model was within 10% of all measured and calculated performance parameters (e.g. average pressure, specific impulse, maximum thrust, etc.) for tests with throat erosion and within 6% of all measured and calculated performance parameters for tests without throat erosion. The direct method involves the use of x-rays to directly observe a simulated nozzle throat erode in a dynamic environment; this is achieved with a dynamic calibration standard. An image processing algorithm is developed for extracting the diameter dimensions from the x-ray intensity digital images. Static and dynamic tests were conducted. The measured diameter was compared to the known diameter in the calibration standard. All dynamic test results were within +6% / -7% of the actual diameter. Part of the edge detection method consists of dividing the entire x-ray image by an average pixel value, calculated from a set of pixels in the x-ray image. It was found that the accuracy of the edge detection method depends upon the selection of the average pixel value area and subsequently the average pixel value. An average pixel value sensitivity analysis is presented. Both the indirect

  2. An Integration of the Turbojet and Single-Throat Ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, C. J.; Benson, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    A turbine-engine-based hybrid propulsion system is described. Turbojet engines are integrated with a single-throat ramjet so as to minimize variable geometry and eliminate redundant propulsion components. The result is a simple, lightweight system that is operable from takeoff to high Mach numbers. Non-afterburning turbojets are mounted within the ramjet duct. They exhaust through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle into a common ramjet burner section. At low speed the ejector effect of the C-D nozzle aerodynamically isolates the relatively high pressure turbojet exhaust stream from the ramjet duct. As the Mach number increases, and the turbojet pressure ratio diminishes, the system is biased naturally toward ramjet operation. The common ramjet burner is fueled with hydrogen and thermally choked, thus avoiding the weight and complexity of a variable geometry, split-flow exhaust system. The mixed-compression supersonic inlet and subsonic diffuser are also common to both the turbojet and ramjet cycles. As the compressor face total temperature limit is approached, a two-position flap within the inlet is actuated, which closes off the turbojet inlet and provides increased internal contraction for ramjet operation. Similar actuation of the turbojet C-D nozzle flap completes the enclosure of the turbojet. Performance of the hybrid system is compared herein to that of the discrete turbojet and ramjet engines from takeoff to Mach 6. The specific impulse of the hybrid system falls below that of the non-integrated turbojet and ramjet because of ejector and Rayleigh losses. Unlike the discrete turbojet or ramjet however, the hybrid system produces thrust over the entire Mach number range. An alternate mode of operation for takeoff and low speed is also described. In this mode the C-D nozzle flap is deflected to a third position, which closes off the ramjet duct and eliminates the ejector total pressure loss.

  3. Brain Abscesses of Ear, Nose, and Throat Origin

    PubMed Central

    Couloigner, Vincent; Sterkers, Olivier; Redondo, Aimée; Rey, Alain

    1998-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed 29 cerebral abscesses of ear, nose, and throat (ENT) origin. The mean follow-up of patients was 37 months. ENT etiologies included 45% otitis media (n = 13), 48% sinusitis (n = 14), and 7% ethmoidal sinus tumors (n = 2). Thirty-eight percent (n = 5) of otogenic abscesses occurred within 15 days after a mastoidectomy. Sinogenic abscesses were never due to surgery but were associated in 31% of cases (n = 5) with anterior skull base defects. The main locations of otogenic abscesses were the temporal lobe (54%; n = 7) and the cerebellum (23%; n = 3), whereas sinogenic abscesses were located in the frontal lobe in 75% of cases (n = 12). Because of this location, sinogenic abscesses were less symptomatic than otogenic ones and had greater size and encapsulation at the time of diagnosis. Thus, they required longer antibiotic treatment (p = 0.05) and more numerous surgical drainages (p = 0.02). Bacteriologic abscesses samples were positive in 90% of cases. Bacteria found in brain abscesses were different from the ones found in ENT samples in 62% of cases. Thus, the results of ENT bacteriologic samples were not helpful for choosing adequate antibiotic agents in case of negative brain abscess samples. Although mortality was not significantly higher in otogenic abscesses (31%; n = 4) than in sinogenic ones (6%; n = 1, p = 0.08), otogenic abscesses appeared more threatening. Indeed, they represented 80% (n = 4) of lethal cases and encompassed more clinical or radiological prognosis pejorative factors than sinogenic ones (p = 0.006). In conclusion, higher danger of otogenic abscesses mainly resulted both from their temporal or cerebellous locations and from the bacteria that were more frequently resistant to antibiotics. PMID:17171060

  4. Airway Complications during and after General Anesthesia: A Comparison, Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Using Flexible Laryngeal Mask Airways and Endotracheal Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Lian, Ying; Li, Wen Xian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Flexible laryngeal mask airways (FLMAs) have been widely used in thyroidectomy as well as cleft palate, nasal, upper chest, head and neck oncoplastic surgeries. This systematic review aims to compare the incidence of airway complications that occur during and after general anesthesia when using the FLMA and endotracheal intubation (ETT). We performed a quantitative meta-analysis of the results of randomized trials. Methods A comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using the key words "flexible laryngeal mask airway" and "endotracheal intubation". Only prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the FLMA and ETT were included. The relative risks (RRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using a quality effects model in MetaXL 1.3 software to analyze the outcome data. Results Ten RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between the FLMA and ETT groups in the incidence of difficulty in positioning the airway [RR = 1.75, 95% CI = (0.70–4.40)]; the occurrence of sore throat at one hour and 24 hours postoperative [RR = 0.90, 95% CI = (0.13–6.18) and RR = 0.95, 95% CI = (0.81–1.13), respectively]; laryngospasms [RR = 0.58, 95% CI = (0.27–1.23)]; airway displacement [RR = 2.88, 95% CI = (0.58–14.33)]; aspiration [RR = 0.76, 95% CI = (0.06–8.88)]; or laryngotracheal soiling [RR = 0.34, 95% CI = (0.10–1.06)]. Patients treated with the FLMA had a lower incidence of hoarseness [RR = 0.31, 95% CI = (0.15–0.62)]; coughing [RR = 0.28, 95% CI = (0.15–0.51)] during recovery in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU); and oxygen desaturation [RR = 0.43, 95% CI = (0.26–0.72)] than did patients treated with ETT. However, the incidence of partial upper airway obstruction in FLMA patients was significantly greater than it was for ETT patients [RR = 4.01, 95% CI = (1.44–11.18)]. Conclusion This systematic review showed

  5. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  6. The experience of a sore mouth and associated symptoms in patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlton G; McGuire, Deborah B; Peterson, Douglas E; Beck, Susan L; Dudley, William N; Mooney, Kathleen H

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to describe sore mouth (SM) severity and distress, associated symptoms, and consequences in cancer chemotherapy outpatients. Secondary analysis was used in this study. A total of 223 patients in 4 treatment centers participated in the study. Data from an intervention study using a computer-based telephone communication system to assess patients' daily symptom experience were analyzed to obtain highest, average, and lowest ratings of severity and distress for SM, fatigue, trouble sleeping, feeling down/blue, and feeling anxious. Consequence data included oral intake, time spent lying down, ability to work, and daily activity. Approximately 51% reported SM, with a mean highest, average, and lowest severity score of 3.1 in cycle 2 and 3.09 in cycle 3. Sore mouth severity was correlated with severity of fatigue, feeling down/blue, feeling anxious, and trouble sleeping. Sore mouth distress was correlated with the same symptoms. Sore mouth severity was correlated with the number of 8-oz glasses of liquid consumed, effect on daily activity, time spent lying down, but not with ability to work. Half of patients experienced SM, which was associated with several other symptoms and led to specific consequences. Understanding the complex symptom experience of patients with SM, including consequences, will assist nurses in developing more comprehensive clinical assessments and interventions. In addition, the association of multiple symptoms with SM will provide a foundation for further research investigation in oral mucositis.

  7. Multidisciplinary Approach to an Extended Pressure Sore at the Lumbosacral Area

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sehoon; Lázaro, Hudson Alex

    2016-01-01

    A pressure sore wound is often extensive or complicated by local infection involving adjacent soft tissue and bone. In this case, a regional flap after simple debridement is not adequate. Here, we present a case of an extensive pressure sore in the sacral area with deep tissue infection. A 43-year-old female patient with a complicated sore with deep tissue infection had a presacral abscess, an iliopsoas abscess, and an epidural abscess in the lumbar spine. After a multidisciplinary approach performed in stages, the infection had subsided and removal of the devitalized tissue was possible. The large soft tissue defect with significant depth was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap, which was expected to act as a local barrier from vertical infection and provide tensionless skin coverage upon hip flexion. The extensive sacral sore was treated effectively without complication, and the deep tissue infection completely resolved. There was no evidence of donor site morbidity, and wheelchair ambulation was possible by a month after surgery. PMID:27896193

  8. An audit of pressure sores caused by intermittent compression devices used to prevent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Joanna; Thomas, Sunil

    2011-12-01

    When intermittent compression devices (ICDs) are used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) they can cause pressure sores in a selected group of women, undergoing long operations. A prospective audit pre and post intervention showed a reduced risk with an alternative device, without increasing the risk of VTE.

  9. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness After Inspiratory Threshold Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A. William; Road, Jeremy D.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 ± 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults. PMID:20467514

  10. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    PubMed

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery.

  11. Effects of Varying Recovery Periods on Muscle Enzymes, Soreness, and Performance in Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Potteiger, Jeffrey A.; Blessing, Daniel L.; Wilson, G. Dennis

    1992-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of varied recovery time on serum creatine kinase (CK), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), muscle soreness, and pitch velocity in baseball pitchers. Ten males who had pitching experience participated in the study. After an 18-day training period, subjects pitched three simulated games. Game A and Game B were separated by four days of rest, while Game B and Game C were separated by two days of rest. CK, LDH, and muscle soreness were evaluated at the following times: before and immediately after exercise, and six, 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. Muscle performance was evaluated by measuring pitch velocity during the games. The CK level was elevated after each game (Game A - 249 U/l; Game B - 243 U/l; and Game C - 240 U/l); then it dropped toward baseline (p≤0.01). CK post-exercise values were not different among games A, B, and C. LDH displayed a response similar to CK; however, there was a reduction over the span of the games (p≤0.05). Muscle soreness was significantly elevated immediately after exercise (p≤0.01) compared to all other measurement times. Pitch velocity was not different among games A, B, and C. Results indicate that muscle damage, as evidenced by CK release, occurs in response to baseball pitching. However CK values, muscle soreness, and pitch velocity are not significantly affected by changes in the amount of recovery time typically scheduled between games. PMID:16558126

  12. Effect of Whirlpool Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Kuligowski, Lori A.; Lephart, Scott M.; Giannantonio, Frank P.; Blanc, Rob O.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of warm whirlpool, cold whirlpool, and contrast therapy in the treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness. Design and Setting: Subjects performed eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors and received 4 treatments: immediately postexercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Treatments consisted of 24-minute treatments with warm whirlpool, cold whirlpool, contrast therapy, or no treatment. Subjects: Fifty-six sex-matched volunteers from the University of Pittsburgh. Measurements: Measurements were taken at 5 assessment times: pre-exercise (0 hours); prior to treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise; and at 96 hours postexercise. Dependent variables were degrees of resting elbow flexion, active elbow flexion, and extension; perceived soreness values on a Graphic Pain Rating Scale; and maximal voluntary isometric contraction. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (group by time) and Tukey post hoc analysis were used to determine which treatment groups differed significantly in returning subjects to pre-exercise values. Results: Cold whirlpool and contrast therapy were found to return subjects to baseline values of resting elbow flexion and perceived soreness significantly more than warm whirlpool or no treatment (P < .01). Additionally, warm whirlpool was found to be more effective than no treatment in the return of resting elbow flexion (P < .01). Conclusions: These results suggest that cold whirlpool and contrast therapy are more effective than warm whirlpool or no treatment in alleviating delayed-onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexors. PMID:16558514

  13. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  14. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  15. Evaluating the effects of pentoxifylline administration on experimental pressure sores in rats by biomechanical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Velaei, Kobra; Torkman, Giti; Rezaie, Fatemealsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Tavassol, Azaedh; Bayat, Mehernoush

    2012-01-01

    This study used a biomechanical test to evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline administration on the wound healing process of an experimental pressure sore induced in rats. Under general anesthesia and sterile conditions, experimental pressure sores generated by no. 25 Halsted mosquito forceps were inflicted on 12 adult male rats. Pentoxifylline was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily from the day the pressure sore was generated, for a period of 20 days. At the end of 20 days, rats were sacrificed and skin samples extracted. Samples were biomechanically examined by a material testing instrument for maximum stress (N mm2), work up to maximum force (N), and elastic stiffness (N/mm). In the experimental group, maximum stress (2.05±0.15) and work up to maximum force (N/mm) (63.75±4.97) were significantly higher than the control group (1.3±0.27 and 43.3±14.96, P=0.002 and P=0.035, respectively). Pentoxifylline administration significantly accelerated the wound healing process in experimental rats with pressure sores, compared to that of the control group. PMID:23091522

  16. Resource defense and monopolization in a marked population of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris)

    PubMed Central

    Rousseu, François; Charette, Yanick; Bélisle, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Resource defense behavior is often explained by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources. However, factors such as competition, habitat complexity, and individual space use may also affect the capacity of individuals to defend and monopolize resources. Yet, studies frequently focus on one or two factors, overlooking the complexity found in natural settings. Here, we addressed defense and monopolization of nectar feeders in a population of free-ranging ruby-throated hummingbirds marked with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags). Our study system consisted of a 44 ha systematic grid of 45 feeders equipped with PIT tag detectors recording every visit made at feeders. We modeled the number of visits by competitors (NVC) at feeders in response to space use by a focal individual potentially defending a feeder, number of competitors, nectar sucrose concentration, and habitat visibility. Individuals who were more concentrated at certain feeders on a given day and who were more stable in their use of the grid throughout the season gained higher exclusivity in the use of those feeders on that day, especially for males competing against males. The level of spatial concentration at feeders and its negative effect on NVC was, however, highly variable among individuals, suggesting a continuum in resource defense strategies. Although the apparent capacity to defend feeders was not affected by competition or nectar sucrose concentration, the level of monopolization decreased with increasing number of competitors and higher nectar quality. Defense was enhanced by visibility near feeders, but only in forested habitats. The reverse effect of visibility in open habitats was more difficult to interpret as it was probably confounded by perch availability, from which a bird can defend its feeder. Our study is among the first to quantify the joint use of food resource by overlapping individuals unconstrained in their use of space. Our results show the importance of

  17. Throat Swabs and Sputum Culture as Predictors of P. aeruginosa or S. aureus Lung Colonization in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Darius; Griffin, Mary; Nymon, Amanda; Koeppen, Katja; Ashare, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to frequent infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, repeated respiratory cultures are obtained to inform treatment. When patients are unable to expectorate sputum, clinicians obtain throat swabs as a surrogate for lower respiratory cultures. There is no clear data in adult subjects demonstrating the adequacy of throat swabs as a surrogate for sputum or BAL. Our study was designed to determine the utility of throat swabs in identifying lung colonization with common organisms in adults with CF. Methods Adult CF subjects (n = 20) underwent bronchoscopy with BAL. Prior to bronchoscopy, a throat swab was obtained. A sputum sample was obtained from subjects who were able to spontaneously expectorate. All samples were sent for standard microbiology culture. Results Using BAL as the gold standard, we found the positive predictive value for Pseudomonas aeruginosa to be 100% in both sputum and throat swab compared to BAL. However, the negative predictive value for P. aeruginosa was 60% and 50% in sputum and throat swab, respectively. Conversely, the positive predictive value for Staphylococcus aureus was 57% in sputum and only 41% in throat swab and the negative predictive value of S. aureus was 100% in sputum and throat swab compared to BAL. Conclusions Our data show that positive sputum and throat culture findings of P. aeruginosa reflect results found on BAL fluid analysis, suggesting these are reasonable surrogates to determine lung colonization with P. aeruginosa. However, sputum and throat culture findings of S. aureus do not appear to reflect S. aureus colonization of the lung. PMID:27711152

  18. [High-grade pressure sores in frail older high-risk persons. A retrospective postmortem case-control-study].

    PubMed

    Von Renteln-Kruse, W; Krause, T; Anders, J; Kühl, M; Heinemann, A; Püschel, K

    2004-04-01

    Some old persons at risk do develop, but others, at comparable risk, do not develop high-grade pressure sores. To evaluate potentially different risk factors, we performed a post mortem case-control study in old persons who developed high-grade pressure sores within six months until 14 days before death. Consecutive cases with pressure sores grade >/=3 and potential controls at comparably high risk for pressure sores were examined before cremation. After written informed consent had been obtained by the next relatives, all available nursing and medical records of the deceased were thoroughly evaluated. Cases and controls were matched according to age, gender, immobility, and cachexia.A total of 100 cases with 71 pressure sores grade 3 and 29 pressure sores grade 4 were compared to 100 controls with 27 pressure sores grade sores in frail older high-risk persons. Sedative drug effects and impaired patient compliance with preventive and therapeutic measures may also be associated with the development of high-grade pressure sores in old persons at high risk.

  19. Impact of an Exhaust Throat on Semi-Idealized Rotating Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of a rotating detonation engine (RDE) is used to examine the impact of an exhaust throat (i.e. a constriction) on performance. The model simulates an RDE which is premixed, adiabatic, inviscid, and which contains an inlet valve that prevents backflow from the high pressure region directly behind the rotating detonation. Performance is assessed in terms of ideal net specific impulse which is computed on the assumption of lossless expansion of the working fluid to the ambient pressure through a notional diverging nozzle section downstream of the throat. Such a semi-idealized analysis, while not real-world, allows the effect of the throat to be examined in isolation from, rather than coupled to (as it actually is) various loss mechanisms. For the single Mach 1.4 flight condition considered, it is found that the addition of a throat can yield a 9.4 percent increase in specific impulse. However, it is also found that when the exit throat restriction gets too small, an unstable type of operation ensues which eventually leads to the detonation failing. This behavior is found to be somewhat mitigated by the addition of an RDE inlet restriction across which there is an aerodynamic loss. Remarkably, this loss is overcome by the benefits of the further exhaust restrictions allowed. The end result is a configuration with a 10.3 percent improvement in ideal net specific thrust.

  20. Impact of an Exhaust Throat on Semi-Idealized Rotating Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of a rotating detonation engine (RDE) is used to examine the impact of an exhaust throat (i.e., a constriction) on performance. The model simulates an RDE which is premixed, adiabatic, inviscid, and which contains an inlet valve that prevents backflow from the high pressure region directly behind the rotating detonation. Performance is assessed in terms of ideal net specific impulse which is computed on the assumption of lossless expansion of the working fluid to the ambient pressure through a notional diverging nozzle section downstream of the throat. Such a semi-idealized analysis, while not real-world, allows the effect of the throat to be examined in isolation from, rather than coupled to (as it actually is) various loss mechanisms. For the single Mach 1.4 flight condition considered, it is found that the addition of a throat can yield a 9.4 percent increase in specific impulse. However, it is also found that when the exit throat restriction gets too small, an unstable type of operation ensues which eventually leads to the detonation failing. This behavior is found to be somewhat mitigated by the addition of an RDE inlet restriction across which there is an aerodynamic loss. Remarkably, this loss is overcome by the benefits of the further exhaust restrictions allowed. The end result is a configuration with a 10.3 percent improvement in ideal net specific thrust.

  1. Brown-headed Cowbird parasitism of the Black-throated Sparrow in central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.J.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    From 1994-1996 we investigated effects of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism on Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) nesting success in the Verde Valley of central Arizona. Of 56 Black-throated Sparrow nests, 52% were parasitized. Black-throated Sparrows appear to respond to natural parasitism by accepting the cowbird egg, deserting the nest, or burying the cowbird egg. Removal and damage of host eggs by female cowbirds effectively reduced clutch size from an average of 3.4 to 1.9 eggs. Because of this reduced clutch size, Black-throated Sparrow reproductive success was significantly lower in parasitized nests (0.2 young fledged/ nest) as compared to nonparasitized nests (1.6 young fledged/nest). When comparing cowbird parasitism between two habitat types, we found significantly higher parasitism frequencies in crucifixion-thorn (Canotia holacantha) versus creosote-bush (Larrea divaricata) habitat. We argue that this difference in parasitism is due to the greater number of tall perches (e.g., shrubs >4 m) available in crucifixion-thorn habitat, providing vantage points for female cowbirds to better find Black-throated Sparrow nests.

  2. 3-dimensional throat region segmentation from MRI data based on Fourier interpolation and 3-dimensional level set methods.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sean; Doshi, Trushali; Soraghan, John; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Di Caterina, Gaetano; Grose, Derek; MacKenzie, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A new algorithm for 3D throat region segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. The proposed algorithm initially pre-processes the MRI data to increase the contrast between the throat region and its surrounding tissues and to reduce artifacts. Isotropic 3D volume is reconstructed using the Fourier interpolation. Furthermore, a cube encompassing the throat region is evolved using level set method to form a smooth 3D boundary of the throat region. The results of the proposed algorithm on real and synthetic MRI data are used to validate the robustness and accuracy of the algorithm.

  3. Effects of Massage on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, Swelling, and Recovery of Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Zainuddin, Zainal; Newton, Mike; Sacco, Paul; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) describes muscle pain and tenderness that typically develop several hours postexercise and consist of predominantly eccentric muscle actions, especially if the exercise is unfamiliar. Although DOMS is likely a symptom of eccentric-exercise–induced muscle damage, it does not necessarily reflect muscle damage. Some prophylactic or therapeutic modalities may be effective only for alleviating DOMS, whereas others may enhance recovery of muscle function without affecting DOMS. Objective: To test the hypothesis that massage applied after eccentric exercise would effectively alleviate DOMS without affecting muscle function. Design: We used an arm-to-arm comparison model with 2 independent variables (control and massage) and 6 dependent variables (maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness). A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t tests were used to examine differences in changes of the dependent variable over time (before, immediately and 30 minutes after exercise, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days postexercise) between control and massage conditions. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training. Intervention(s): Subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic (90°·s−1) eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm on a dynamometer, separated by 2 weeks. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 3 hours after eccentric exercise; the contralateral arm received no treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic elbow flexor strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness. Results: Delayed-onset muscle soreness was significantly less for the massage condition for peak

  4. Integral throat entrance development, qualification and production for the Antares 3 nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, F. I.; Dirling, R. B.; Eitman, D. A.; Loomis, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Although design analyses of a G-90 graphite integral throat entrance for the Antares 3 solid rocket motor nozzle indicated acceptable margins of safety, the nozzle throat insert suffered a thermostructural failure during the first development firing. Subsequent re-analysis using properties measured on material from the same billet as the nozzle throat insert showed negative margins. Carbon-carbon was investigated and found to result in large positive margins of safety. The G-90 graphite was replaced by SAI fast processed 4-D material which uses Hercules HM 10000 fiber as the reinforcement. Its construction allows powder filling of the interstices after preform fabrication which accelerates the densification process. Allied 15V coal tar pitch is then used to complete densification. The properties were extensively characterized on this material and six nozzles were subjected to demonstration, development and qualification firings.

  5. Effect of Changing Throat Diameter Ratio on a Steam Supersonic Pressure Exchange Ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhussan, Khaled; Garris, Charles

    This paper will explain the structure of the flow induction in a non-steady supersonic fluid in which steam is the working fluid. The ratio of the throat diameter is varied and the analyses related to the induction processes are studied. This ejector is used for compression applications. The work to be presented herein is a Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the complex fluid mechanisms that occur inside a non-steady, three-dimensional, steam supersonic pressure exchange ejector, specifically with regard to the pressure exchange mechanisms and the induction processes between a primary fluid and a secondary fluid and how this is related to the shape of the aerodynamic shroud-diffuser surface. The results will show the correct throat diameter ratio that is capable of producing the desire affect of the flow induction in a three-dimensional supersonic, non-steady, viscous flow. The calculated throat diameter ration is about 2.90.

  6. Study of thermal throat of RBCC combustor based on one-dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-jun; Li, Jiang; Qin, Fei; He, Guo-qiang; Shi, Lei

    2015-12-01

    An analysis model was developed to better understand the formation mechanism and variation law of the thermal throat in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) combustor. This analysis model is based on one-dimensional flow equations and consideration of the variation in factors such as the area, exothermic distribution, and the fuel-rich jet of the rocket. The influence law for the thermal throat under the interaction of the exothermic distribution and the variation of the area is consistent with the heat release models for a gaseous jet and liquid kerosene. The effective cross-sectional area of the jet was calculated and incorporated into the model. The results calculated using the one-dimensional model were found to be consistent with those obtained from a three-dimensional numerical simulation. The position of the thermal throat was predicted with an error of 0.36%. The maximum relative errors of the static pressure among the corresponding points were 7.4% and 9.3% for the static temperature and total pressure, respectively. The one-dimensional model and three-dimensional numerical simulation were validated using experimental data obtained in direct-connect testing. Except for the cavity region, the maximum relative error of the corresponding points between the simulation results and test results was less than 8.9%, and that between the model results and test results was 10.4%. Compared to the fuel equivalence ratio, the expansion ratio, injection location, and exothermic rate have a significant impact on the position of the thermal throat. An optimization study of the RBCC combustor for the ramjet mode was conducted by adjusting the thermal throat. The thrust performance improved by 31.6% at Ma3 after optimization. These results indicate the important role that the one-dimensional model can play in analyzing the thermal throat and guiding the preliminary design of an RBCC combustor.

  7. Cross-field transport of electrons at the magnetic throat in an annular plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2017-01-01

    Cross-field transport of electrons has been studied at the magnetic throat of the annular Chi-Kung reactor. This annular configuration allows the creation of a low pressure argon plasma with two distinct electron heating locations by independently operating a radio-frequency antenna surrounding the outer source tube, or an antenna housed inside the inner source tube. The two antenna cases show opposite variation trends in radial profiles of electron energy probability function, electron density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The momentum and energy transport coefficients are obtained from the electron energy probability functions, and the related electron fluxes follow the path of electron cooling across the magnetic throat.

  8. Design and research on reliability-validity for 3S intraoperative risk assessment scale of pressure sore.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-lian; Hu, Juan-juan; Ma, Qiong; Wu, He-yu; Wang, Zeng-yan; Li, Ting-ting; Shen, Jian-hui; Yang, Ying

    2015-04-01

    The reliability and validity of risk assessment scale (RAS) of pressure sore during 3S surgery were investigated. RAS of pressure sore was designed independently during 3S surgery. Five operating room nursing experts were selected to consult and detect face validity. Convenient and purposive sampling of 707 samples was conducted. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure content reliability and evaluate the internal consistence of RAS. The structural reliability was investigated by exploratory factor analysis method. The results showed that the content validity index was 0.92, and Cronbach's alpha of content reliability was 0.71. Structural validity, detected by Bartlett sphericity test, was 135.3 for 707 samples with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.01). KMO value was 0.729. The accumulative variance contribution ratio of common factor was 64.63%. The exploratory factor analysis showed the factor load of every clause was larger than 0.596. It was concluded that RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery has better validity and reliability, and it could be used for evaluating and screening the high risk patients with pressure sores during surgery in order to efficiently reduce the occurrence of pressure sore during surgery. RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery is worth to be popularized.

  9. Effects of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on delayed onset muscle soreness and indices of damage.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, A E; McCormick, K; Maughan, R J; Whiting, P H; Clarkson, P M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty untrained male volunteers were required to run downhill for 45 minutes on a motor driven treadmill to induce muscle soreness. The volunteers took diclofenac or placebo before and for 72 hours after two runs 10 weeks apart, in a randomised double blind crossover design. Subjective soreness was assessed before and at intervals up to 72 hours after each run; venous blood samples, collected at the same time intervals, were used to estimate serum activities of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase and serum concentrations of creatinine and urea. Subjective soreness and the biochemical parameters increased after both runs, although the serum enzyme response to the second run was reduced. Diclofenac had no influence on the serum biochemical response to downhill running. Although overall soreness was not affected by diclofenac, individual soreness measurements were reduced by diclofenac at the first period of the study. These results suggest that diclofenac does not influence muscle damage, but may slightly reduce the associated soreness. PMID:3370401

  10. Postexercise protein supplementation improves health and muscle soreness during basic military training in Marine recruits.

    PubMed

    Flakoll, Paul J; Judy, Tom; Flinn, Kim; Carr, Christopher; Flinn, Scott

    2004-03-01

    Elevated postexercise amino acid availability has been demonstrated to enhance muscle protein synthesis acutely, but the long-term impact of postexercise protein supplementation on variables such as health, muscle soreness, and function are unclear. Healthy male US Marine recruits from six platoons (US Marine Corps Base, Parris Island, SC; n = 387; 18.9 +/- 0.1 yr, 74.7 +/- 1.1 kg, 13.8 +/- 0.4% body fat) were randomly assigned to three treatments within each platoon. Nutrients supplemented immediately postexercise during the 54-day basic training were either placebo (0 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 0 g fat), control (8, 0, 3), or protein supplement (8, 10, 3). Subjects and observers making measurements and data analysis were blinded to subject groupings. Compared with placebo and control groups, the protein-supplemented group had an average of 33% fewer total medical visits, 28% fewer visits due to bacterial/viral infections, 37% fewer visits due to muscle/joint problems, and 83% fewer visits due to heat exhaustion. Recruits experiencing heat exhaustion had greater body mass, lean, fat, and water losses. Muscle soreness immediately postexercise was reduced by protein supplementation vs. placebo and control groups on both days 34 and 54. Postexercise protein supplementation may not only enhance muscle protein deposition but it also has significant potential to positively impact health, muscle soreness, and tissue hydration during prolonged intense exercise training, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for the prevention of health problems in severely stressed exercising populations.

  11. The Affect on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Recovery for Ultrasound with Bee Venom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Kyun; Kim, Myung Chul

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom is effective in treating delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii muscle, using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test (flexion and extension), and serum creatine kinase level. [Subjects] Twenty women participated in this study. [Methods] Repeated eccentric contractions were used to induce delayed onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexor of the subjects. The subjects were randomized to be treated with ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom. We evaluated the effects of treatments in the 2 groups. Individual subjects were assessed using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test, and serum creatine kinase level. The assessment parameters were evaluated 4 times: before exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The visual analogue scale scores were significantly different before and after the experiment in both the group treated with ultrasound and the group treated with ultrasound and bee venom. The difference in elbow flexion and extension before and after the experiment was significantly different in both groups. No significant difference was found in the serum creatine kinase levels before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] Treatment with ultrasound and bee venom is effective for managing delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:25276027

  12. The affect on delayed onset muscle soreness recovery for ultrasound with bee venom.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Kyun; Kim, Myung Chul

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom is effective in treating delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii muscle, using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test (flexion and extension), and serum creatine kinase level. [Subjects] Twenty women participated in this study. [Methods] Repeated eccentric contractions were used to induce delayed onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexor of the subjects. The subjects were randomized to be treated with ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom. We evaluated the effects of treatments in the 2 groups. Individual subjects were assessed using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test, and serum creatine kinase level. The assessment parameters were evaluated 4 times: before exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The visual analogue scale scores were significantly different before and after the experiment in both the group treated with ultrasound and the group treated with ultrasound and bee venom. The difference in elbow flexion and extension before and after the experiment was significantly different in both groups. No significant difference was found in the serum creatine kinase levels before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] Treatment with ultrasound and bee venom is effective for managing delayed onset muscle soreness.

  13. 78 FR 63225 - Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  14. Effect of Caffeine on Perceived Soreness and Functionality Following an Endurance Cycling Event.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Aaron R; Tucker, Matthew A; Butts, Cory L; McDermott, Brendon P; Vingren, Jakob L; Kunces, Laura J; Lee, Elaine C; Munoz, Colleen X; Williamson, Keith H; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Ganio, Matthew S

    2017-03-01

    Caldwell, AR, Tucker, MA, Butts, CL, McDermott, BP, Vingren, JL, Kunces, LJ, Lee, EC, Munoz, CX, Williamson, KH, Armstrong, LE, and Ganio, MS. Effect of caffeine on perceived soreness and functionality following an endurance cycling event. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 638-643, 2017-Caffeine can reduce muscle pain during exercise; however, the efficacy of caffeine in improving muscle soreness and recovery from a demanding long-duration exercise bout has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine intake on ratings of perceived muscle soreness (RPMS) and perceived lower extremity functionality (LEF) following the completion of a 164-km endurance cycling event. Before and after cycling RPMS (1-to-6; 6 = severe soreness) and LEF (0-to-80; 80 = full functionality) were assessed by questionnaires. Subjects ingested 3 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or placebo pills in a randomized, double-blind fashion immediately after the ride and for the next 4 mornings (i.e., ∼800 hours) and 3 afternoons (i.e., ∼1200 hours). Before each ingestion, RPMS and LEF were assessed. Afternoon ratings of LEF were greater with caffeine ingestion the first day postride (65.0 ± 6.1 vs. 72.3 ± 6.7; for placebo and caffeine, respectively; p = 0.04), but at no other time points (p > 0.05). The caffeine group tended to have lower overall RPMS in the afternoon versus placebo (i.e., main effect of group; 1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 0.5 ± 0.2; p = 0.09). Afternoon RPMS for the legs was significantly lower in the caffeine group (main effect of caffeine; 1.3 ± 0.2 vs. 0.5 ± 0.3; p = 0.05). In conclusion, ingesting caffeine improved RPMS for the legs, but not LEF in the days following an endurance cycling event. Athletes may benefit from ingesting caffeine in the days following an arduous exercise bout to relieve feelings of soreness and reduced functionality.

  15. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  16. Broken orthodontic trans-palatal archwire stuck to the throat of orthodontic patient: is it strange?

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, H M

    2003-03-01

    Trans-palatal arch wire is in common use in orthodontic practice. This case report of broken trans-palatal wire, swallowed and stuck to the throat of an orthodontic patient, is presented in the hope that it will stress the importance of careful examination of the appliance at each scheduled visit.

  17. Winflume: Windows-based Software for the Design and Calibration of Long-throated Measuring Flumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-throated flumes and broad-crested weirs provide a practical, low-cost, flexible means of measuring open-channel flows in new and existing irrigation systems, with distinct advantages over other flume and weir devices. A primary advantage is the fact that these structures can be custom-designed ...

  18. Evaluation of four methods for the detection of streptococcal group A antigen directly from throat swabs.

    PubMed

    Betriu, C; de la Torre, F; Muñoz, P; Fernández, A; Picazo, J J

    1988-12-01

    We have compared the sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of four rapid tests for the detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci antigen directly from a throat swab. The four methods were very specific, all of them offered reproductibility and surpassed conventional culture in speed and simplicity.

  19. Vacuum polarization of a quantized scalar field in the thermal state in a long throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Arkady A.

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum polarization of scalar fields in the background of a long throat is investigated. The field is assumed to be both massive or massless, with arbitrary coupling to the scalar curvature, and in a thermal state at an arbitrary temperature. Analytical approximation for ⟨φ2⟩ren is obtained.

  20. Comparison of throat swab and nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens for rapid detection of adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie

    2015-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and throat swab (TS) specimens from individual patients were compared with regard to usefulness for adenovirus detection. In 153 adenovirus-infected patients, rapid test sensitivities with NPAs (90.8%) were nearly equivalent to those with TSs (91.5%) based on real-time polymerase chain reaction standards, indicating that NPAs are equally useful.

  1. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world’s most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers. PMID:27304964

  2. Design Data for Graphical Construction of Two-Dimensional Sharp-Edge-Throat Supersonic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Harold; Seashore, Ferris L.

    1948-01-01

    Design data are presented for the graphical construction of two-dimensional sharp-edge-throat supersonic nozzles of minimum length for test-section Mach numbers from 1.20 to 10.00. The method of characteristics used in the design is briefly reviewed.

  3. Egg flotation estimates nest age for Pacific and Red-throated Loons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, Daniel; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2007-01-01

    We used Pacific Loon (Gavia pacifica) and Red-throated Loon (G. stellata) nests with known ages to gauge the efficacy of egg flotation for determining nest age in coastal Alaska. Egg flotation accurately estimated nest age for both species; the mean ± 1SD difference between known age and age determined with egg flotation was - 0.05 ± 2.00 d and -0.02 ± 1.63 d for Pacific and Red-throated Loons, respectively. Day of nest initiation did not influence the relationship between known nest age and nest age estimated with egg flotation, indicating incubation period was not shortened in nests initiated later in the season. Additionally, we found no difference in the ability of egg flotation to estimate nest age between two widely dispersed study sites for Pacific Loons, and only a small difference between two of three widely dispersed study sites for Red-throated Loons. Thus, our described relationships between egg flotation categories and nest age should be broadly applicable for these holarctic species. We conclude that for Pacific and Red-throated Loons, egg flotation is a useful technique for determining nest age in the field to better monitor nest fate, and to quantify nest age effects on nest daily survival rate.

  4. 78 FR 61208 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Blue-throated Macaw

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... relevant to the determination (for the specific content of these comments, see http://www.regulations.gov... International (BLI) and the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) recognize the blue-throated macaw as... fidelity (Berkunsky 2012, pers. comm.). The extent to which this behavior is learned and modified is...

  5. 78 FR 2239 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Blue-Throated Macaw

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... the deaf (TDD), call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 800- 877-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY... International Council for Bird Preservation (ICBP), to list 53 foreign birds under the Act, including the blue... Spanish for the blue-throated macaw include guacamayo barba azul and guacamayo caninde. Both...

  6. Passive Rocket Diffuser Testing: Reacting Flow Performance of Four Second-Throat Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel R.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure. As one of the nation's largest rocket testing facilities, the performance and design limitations of diffusers are of great interest to NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper describes a series of tests conducted on four diffuser configurations to better understand the effects of inlet geometry and throat area on starting behavior and boundary layer separation. The diffusers were tested for a duration of five seconds with a 1455-pound thrust, LO2/GH2 thruster to ensure they each reached aerodynamic steady state. The effects of a water spray ring at the diffuser exits and a water-cooled deflector plate were also evaluated. Static pressure and temperature measurements were taken at multiple axial locations along the diffusers, and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used as a tool to aid in the interpretation of data. The hot combustion products were confirmed to enable the diffuser start condition with tighter second throats than predicted by historical cold-flow data or the theoretical normal shock method. Both aerodynamic performance and heat transfer were found to increase with smaller diffuser throats. Spray ring and deflector cooling water had negligible impacts on diffuser boundary layer separation. CFD was found to accurately capture diffuser shock structures and full-flowing diffuser wall pressures, and the qualitative behavior of heat transfer. However, the ability to predict boundary layer separated flows was not consistent.

  7. Global ENT Outreach: Taking Ear, Nose, and Throat Treatment and Surgery Techniques to Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The author, as an otolaryngologist and the Director of Global ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) Outreach, traveled to Ethiopia to help 11 children who could not breathe because of respiratory papillomas blocking their airways and who had been hospitalized for years. The disease, called juvenile respiratory papillomatosis, is what affected these 11…

  8. Numerical simulation of compressible Navier-Stokes flow in a double throat nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, James N.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    The flow through a double-throat nozzle is computed using the complete time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The computations were performed by using an existing working code with no special modifications for this particular application. The computations were performed on a Cyber 845 computer and a CRAY XMP-48 computer using three different grid sizes.

  9. NORMAL FLORA OF THE NOSE, THROAT, AND LOWER INTESTINE OF DOGS.

    PubMed

    CLAPPER, W E; MEADE, G H

    1963-03-01

    Clapper, W. E. (The Lovelace Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Albuquerque, N.M.) and G. H. Meade. Normal flora of the nose, throat, and lower intestine of dogs. J. Bacteriol. 85:643-648. 1963.-An attempt was made to isolate and identify the complete normal flora of the rectum, nose, and throat of beagles. For primary isolation, 12 different kinds of media were used. Incubation of blood agar plates and slants anaerobically, and of thioglycolate broth aerobically, allowed the growth of obligate anaerobes. From the rectal specimens, 20 species of bacteria and 10 species of fungi were isolated and identified. The organisms were similar to those found in the human intestine. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mitis, enterococci, S. lactis, Bacillus species, and coliforms other than E. coli were most frequently encountered. The frequency of occurrence was approximately the same at both samplings in more commonly cultured bacteria. Pathogenic E. coli were isolated from nearly one-third of the first specimens. These were the only human pathogens observed. In the throat cultures, 29 species of bacteria and 2 species of yeasts were identified, and 27 species of bacteria were identified from the nasal cultures. S. mitis, Neisseria, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were most often isolated. The flora was similar to that found in human nose and throat cultures, except that more Haemophilus and pneumococcus and fewer coliforms are generally found in human throats. Organisms resembling human pathogens were group A streptococci and coagulase-positive staphylococci. These were isolated infrequently. It appears that this kind of examination would reveal any significant changes in normal flora that might be related to the health of the animal.

  10. [Antibiotic sensitivity of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from throat swabs and purulent material].

    PubMed

    Jachna-Sawicka, Katarzyna; Pietrzak, Anna; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and susceptibility of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from throat swabs (142--29.9%) and purulent material (333--70.1%) taken from patients treated at University Hospital dr. A. Jurasz in Bydgoszcz Collegium Medicum. L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun in 2005-2009. Of the 475 tested strains, 156 (32.8%) were identified as S. pyogenes. This species accounted for 38.8% of strains isolated from purulent material and 19.0% of swabs from the throat. Among the strains isolated from throat swabs of 62 (43.7%) were identified as Streptococcus group C. Only 5.1% strains were identified as Streptococcus group F. All strains of beta-hemolytic streptococci were susceptible to ampicillin or penicillin, fluoroquinolones, vancomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin-susceptible strains was 83.8%, and 89.1% for clindamycin. A total of 51.3% of erythromycin resistance strains had the cMLS(B) phenotype (63.3% for strains from throat swabs and 46.3% of the purulent materials). Sensitivity to tetracycline was characterized by 51.2% of strains of beta-hemolytic streptococci. The percentage of strains susceptible to this antibiotic among isolates from throat swabs was 63.1%, and purulent material--48.0%. The lowest percentage of strains susceptible to tetracycline (14.1%) were found among S. agalactiae and Streptococcus group G (33.6%) strains. During the study time, saw an increase in the percentage of strains susceptible to tetracycline and erythromycin.

  11. Season-long increases in perceived muscle soreness in professional rugby league players: role of player position, match characteristics and playing surface.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ben D; Twist, Craig; Haigh, Julian D; Brewer, Clive; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2016-01-01

    Rugby League (RL) is a high-impact collision sport characterised by repeated sprints and numerous high-speed impacts and consequently players often report immediate and prolonged muscle soreness in the days after a match. We examined muscle soreness after matches during a full season to understand the extent to which match characteristics influence soreness. Thirty-one elite Super League players provided daily measures of muscle soreness after each of the 26 competitive fixtures of the 2012 season. Playing position, phase of the season, playing surface and match characteristics were recorded from each match. Muscle soreness peaked at day 1 and was still apparent at day 4 post-game with no attenuation in the magnitude of muscle soreness over the course of the season. Neither playing position, phase of season or playing surface had any effects on the extent of muscle soreness. Playing time and total number of collisions were significantly correlated with higher ratings of muscle soreness, especially in the forwards. These data indicate the absence "contact adaptations" in elite rugby players with soreness present throughout the entire season. Strategies must now be implemented to deal with the physical and psychological consequences of prolonged feeling of pain.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of Blue-headed Macaw (Primolius couloni): its comparison with mitogenome of Blue-throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis).

    PubMed

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid

    2016-05-01

    Primolius is a genus of midsized Macaws comprising three species. Blue-headed Macaws (Primolius couloni) are native to eastern Peru, extreme western Brazil and north-western Bolivia. In this study, full mitochondrial genome of considered species was sequenced. It is 16,995 bp long and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and a control region. Its comparison with published Blue-throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis) mitogenome revealed their high degree of identity. Primolius couloni mitogenome is the first complete genomic sequence of this genus. It will be indispensable to refine the phylogenetic relationships within the tribe Arini and will enrich the resource of markers for systematic, phylogenetic and population genetic studies.

  13. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2005-08-15

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops approximately 1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 +/- 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 +/- 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1-2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1-4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 +/- 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation

  14. Supplementation with a polyphenolic blend improves post-exercise strength recovery and muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Herrlinger, Kelli A.; Chirouzes, Diana M.; Ceddia, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise can initiate a cascade of inflammatory and oxidative stress–related events leading to delayed onset muscle soreness. Polyphenols possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective The current study examined the effects of a proprietary polyphenolic blend (PB), containing catechins and theaflavins, on exercise performance and recovery following an eccentric exercise challenge. Design Male participants (18–35 years of age) received placebo or PB at a low dose (PB-L, 1,000 mg/d) or high dose (PB-H, 2,000 mg/d) for 13 weeks. During the 13th week of supplementation, participants completed an eccentric exercise (40 min downhill treadmill run) followed by a strength assessment (peak torque on isokinetic leg extensions) pre-exercise, and 24, 48, and 96 h post-exercise. Muscle soreness (subjective questionnaire), markers of muscle stress (cortisol and creatine phosphokinase [CK]), and antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]) were also assessed. Results PB-H attenuated the decrease in peak torque observed in the placebo group from pre-exercise to 48 h (p=0.012) and 96 h (p=0.003) post-exercise. At 48 h post-exercise, PB-H reduced whole body and hamstring soreness (p=0.029) versus placebo. Chronic consumption of PB improved serum FRAP (p=0.039). As expected, serum cortisol and CK increased from pre- to post-exercise in all groups; however, by 96 h, cortisol and CK levels returned to pre-exercise levels following PB supplementation. At 96 h, the change in cortisol from pre- to post-exercise was significantly greater in placebo versus PB-H (p=0.039). Conclusion These findings show that chronic consumption of PB improved antioxidant status, reduced markers of muscle stress, and promoted strength recovery post-exercise. PMID:26689317

  15. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  16. The Use of Thermal Infra-Red Imaging to Detect Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nakhli, Hani H.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Laymon, Michael S.; Berk, Lee S.

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), also known as exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD), is commonly experienced in individuals who have been physically inactive for prolonged periods of time, and begin with an unexpected bout of exercise1-4, but can also occur in athletes who exercise beyond their normal limits of training5. The symptoms associated with this painful phenomenon can range from slight muscle tenderness, to severe debilitating pain1,3,5. The intensity of these symptoms and the related discomfort increases within the first 24 hours following the termination of the exercise, and peaks between 24 to 72 hours post exercise1,3. For this reason, DOMS is one of the most common recurrent forms of sports injury that can affect an individual’s performance, and become intimidating for many1,4. For the last 3 decades, the DOMS phenomenon has gained a considerable amount of interest amongst researchers and specialists in exercise physiology, sports, and rehabilitation fields6. There has been a variety of published studies investigating this painful occurrence in regards to its underlying mechanisms, treatment interventions, and preventive strategies1-5,7-12. However, it is evident from the literature that DOMS is not an easy pathology to quantify, as there is a wide amount of variability between the measurement tools and methods used to quantify this condition6. It is obvious that no agreement has been made on one best evaluation measure for DOMS, which makes it difficult to verify whether a specific intervention really helps in decreasing the symptoms associated with this type of soreness or not. Thus, DOMS can be seen as somewhat ambiguous, because many studies depend on measuring soreness using a visual analog scale (VAS)10,13-15, which is a subjective rather than an objective measure. Even though needle biopsies of the muscle, and blood levels of myofibre proteins might be considered a gold standard to some6, large variations in some of these blood

  17. Impact of identification of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis from throat cultures in an adult population.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Clarridge, Jill E

    2013-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) are isolated from the throat of patients with pharyngitis, although the clinical significance remains debated. We sought to determine the incidence and association with pharyngitis of SDSE in an adult veteran population. Organisms were phenotypically identified to subspecies and Lancefield group, with selective 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From 833 throat cultures, the overall frequency of SDSE was 3.4% (64% group C and 36% group G) as compared to 8.6% for S. pyogenes (GAS). SDSE was described as a large colony in only 29% of the original culture evaluations by bench technologists, and clinical symptoms were similar for GAS and SDSE. Laboratory algorithms that are limited to identification of only GAS or are based on Lancefield group or visual identification of "large-colony type" β hemolytic Lancefield group C and G streptococci may be missing or misidentifying SDSE along with Anginosus group streptococci.

  18. Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation using a one-parameter family of throat geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Gmeiner, Florian; White, Chris D E-mail: cwhite@nikhef.nl

    2008-02-15

    We demonstrate the possibility of examining cosmological signatures in the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation setup using the BGMPZ solution, a one-parameter family of geometries for the warped throat which interpolate between the Maldacena-Nunez and Klebanov-Strassler solutions. The warp factor is determined numerically and is subsequently used to calculate cosmological observables, including the scalar and tensor spectral indices, for a sample point in the parameter space. As one moves away from the Klebanov-Strassler (KS) solution for the throat, the warp factor is qualitatively different, which leads to a significant change for the observables, but also generically increases the non-Gaussianity of the models. We argue that the different models can potentially be differentiated by current and future experiments.

  19. Influence of Ginger and Cinnamon Intake on Inflammation and Muscle Soreness Endued by Exercise in Iranian Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mashhadi, Nafiseh Shokri; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza; Feizi, Awat; Hariri, Mitra; Darvishi, Leila; Barani, Azam; Taghiyar, Maryam; Shiranian, Afshin; Hajishafiee, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ginger rhizomes (rich in gingerols, shogaols, paradols and zingerone) have been used in Asia for the treatment of asthma, diabetes, and pain, and have shown potent anti-inflammatory attributes. Common spices such as Cinnamon (including cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehydeis) are used in food and many studies have focused on its anti-inflammatory components. Intense exercise can result in an inflammatory response to cell damage and also muscle soreness. The efficacy of dietary ginger and cinnamon as anti-inflammatory agents and their effectiveness in reducing muscle soreness has been investigated in limited studies on humans. Therefore, we have studied the effects of dietary ginger and cinnamon on inflammation and muscle soreness in Iranian female taekwondo players. Methods: Sixty healthy, trained women, aged 13-25 years, were enrolled in the six-week investigation and randomly categorized into three groups (cinnamon, ginger or placebo) and received 3 g of ginger, cinnamon or placebo powder each day, depending on the group they belonged to. The IL-6 level and Likert Scale of Muscle Soreness were evaluated at the beginning and the end of the study and compared among the groups. Results: Forty-nine of the participants completed the six-week intervention. There were no significant changes in the IL-6 cinnamon and ginger group when compared with the placebo group, whereas, there was a significant fall in muscle soreness in the cinnamon group and placebo (P < 0.1) and ginger group and placebo (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Administration of ginger and cinnamon in athlete women for six weeks did not show any significant change in the IL-6 level, but showed a decrease in muscle soreness in the cinnamon and ginger groups. PMID:23717759

  20. Effect of viscosity in speed measurements with double-throat Venturi tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H

    1931-01-01

    In order to clarify the viscosity effect some experiments were made in the Gottigen low-pressure tunnel with the Bruhn double-throat Venturi tube. This type of tunnel makes it possible to vary the pressure and thereby the density within wide limits and consequently, to examine the viscosity effect. This, however, did not impair the results because pressure and temperature were determined at different periods.

  1. Electroforming of a throat nozzle for a combustion facility (NASA Langley Reimbursable Program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Special procedures were developed and then utilized for plating nickel over channels of a throat nozzle section of a NASA Langley combustor facility. When tested hydrostatically, the part failed in the stainless-steel substrate and not at the interface between the plating and substrate. The procedures used for plating the part are detailed as are high-temperature property data which show that the part can withstand long-term, high-temperature exposure without suffering degradation of the plated bond.

  2. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  3. Sturge-Weber syndrome: ear, nose, and throat issues and neurologic status.

    PubMed

    Irving, Natasha D; Lim, Jae Hyung; Cohen, Bernard; Ferenc, Lisa M; Comi, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    The pathophysiology of Sturge-Weber syndrome is poorly understood, and ear, nose, and throat involvement is possible. These issues can result in frequent illnesses or airway obstruction, affecting patients' neurologic status. Patients with definite brain involvement who reported potential ear, nose, and throat issues on intake questionnaires underwent retrospective reviews of their medical records. We examined the relationships between these issues, secondary surgical interventions, and patients' neurologic status. The most common complaints involved the sinuses and frequent ear infections. Six patients underwent placement of ear tubes, leading to improvements in migraines and stroke-like episodes in one patient, and improved seizure control in four others. Obstructive sleep apnea was confirmed in three patients who underwent sleep studies. Tonsil or adenoid removal occurred in another three patients. Surgery resulted in marked improvements regarding excessive drooling, daytime sleepiness, and breathing problems. These findings suggest that ear, nose, and throat problems occur frequently in patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome, and when repeated ear infections are associated with uncontrolled seizures, early placement of ear tubes may be beneficial. Furthermore, patients with facial tissue hypertrophy may be at risk for obstructive sleep apnea, and should be appropriately evaluated.

  4. A Computational Study of a New Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational investigation of a two-dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. Several design cycles with the structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D and with experiments in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility have been completed to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. This paper presents computational results on potential design improvements for best experimental configuration tested to date. Nozzle design variables included cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle and upstream throat height. Pulsed fluidic injection was also investigated for its ability to decrease mass flow requirements. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2 to 7, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to 3 percent of the primary flow rate. Computational results indicate that increasing cavity divergence angle beyond 10 is detrimental to thrust vectoring efficiency, while increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 improves thrust vectoring efficiency at nozzle pressure ratios greater than 2, albeit at the expense of discharge coefficient. Pulsed injection was no more efficient than steady injection for the Dual Throat Nozzle concept.

  5. Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Translating-Throat Single-Expansion-Ramp Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on a high-speed, single-expansion-ramp nozzle (SERN) concept designed for efficient off-design performance. The translating-throat SERN concept adjusts the axial location of the throat to provide a variable expansion ratio and allow a more optimum jet exhaust expansion at various flight conditions in an effort to maximize nozzle performance. Three design points (throat locations) were investigated to simulate the operation of this concept at subsonic-transonic, low supersonic, and high supersonic flight conditions. The experimental study was conducted in the jet exit test facility at the Langley Research Center. Internal nozzle performance was obtained at nozzle pressure ratios (NPR's) up to 13 for six nozzles with design nozzle pressure ratios near 9, 42, and 102. Two expansion-ramp surfaces, one concave and one convex, were tested for each design point. Paint-oil flow and focusing schlieren flow visualization techniques were utilized to acquire additional flow data at selected NPR'S. The Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, was used with a two-equation k-e turbulence model for the computational study. Nozzle performance characteristics were predicted at nozzle pressure ratios of 5, 9, and 13 for the concave ramp, low Mach number nozzle and at 10, 13, and 102 for the concave ramp, high Mach number nozzle.

  6. A CFD Study of Turbojet and Single-Throat Ramjet Ejector Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ing; Hunter, Louis

    1996-01-01

    Supersonic ejector-diffuse systems have application in driving an advanced airbreathing propulsion system, consisting of turbojet engines acting as the primary and a single throat ramjet acting as the secondary. The turbojet engines are integrated into the single throat ramjet to minimize variable geometry and eliminate redundant propulsion components. The result is a simple, lightweight system that is operable from takeoff to high Mach numbers. At this high Mach number (approximately Mach 3.0), the turbojets are turned off and the high speed ramjet/scramjet take over and drive the vehicle to Mach 6.0. The turbojet-ejector-ramjet system consists of nonafterburning turbojet engines with ducting canted at 20 degrees to supply supersonic flow (downstream of CD nozzle) to the horizontal ramjet duct at a supply total pressure and temperature. Two conditions were modelled by a 2-D full Navier Stokes code at Mach 2.0. The code modelled the Fabri choke as well as the non-Fabri non critical case, using a computational throat to supply the back pressure. The results, which primarily predict the secondary mass flow rate and the mixed conditions at the ejector exit were in reasonable agreement with the 1-D cycle code (TBCC).

  7. 'Food Sticking in My Throat': Videofluoroscopic Evaluation of a Common Symptom.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle D; Crary, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of the symptom of food 'sticking' during swallowing has been reported to range from 5 to 50%, depending on the assessment setting. However, limited objective evidence has emerged to clarify factors that contribute to this symptom. Three hundred and fifteen patient records from an outpatient dysphagia clinic were reviewed to identify patients with symptoms of 'food sticking in the throat.' Corresponding videofluoroscopic swallowing studies for patients with this complaint were reviewed for the following variables: accuracy of symptom localization, identification and characteristics (anatomic, physiologic) of an explanatory cause for the symptom, and the specific swallowed material that identified the explanatory cause. One hundred and forty one patients (45%) were identified with a complaint of food 'sticking' in their throat during swallowing. Prevalence of explanatory findings on fluoroscopy was 76% (107/141). Eighty five percent (91/107) of explanatory causes were physiologic in nature, while 15% (16/107) were anatomic. The majority of explanatory causes were identified in the esophagus (71%). Symptom localization was more accurate when the explanatory cause was anatomic versus physiologic (75 vs. 18%). A non-masticated marshmallow presented with the highest diagnostic yield in identification of explanatory causes (71%). Patients complaining of 'food sticking in the throat' are likely to present with esophageal irregularities. Thus, imaging studies of swallowing function should include the esophagus. A range of materials, including a non-masticated marshmallow, is helpful in determining the location and characteristics of swallowing deficits contributing to this symptom.

  8. Utilization and Assessment of Throat Swab and Urine Specimens for Diagnosis of Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Hanumaiah, H; Raut, Wrunda C

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya is a mosquito-borne infection with clinical presentation of fever, arthralgia, and rash. The etiological agent Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is generally transmitted from primates to humans through the bites of infected Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Outbreaks of Chikungunya occur commonly with varied morbidity, mortality, and sequele according to the epidemiological, ecological, seasonal, and geographical impact. Investigations are required to be conducted as a part of the public health service to understand and report the suspected cases as confirmed by laboratory diagnosis. Holistic sampling at a time of different types would be useful for laboratory testing, result conclusion, and reporting in a valid way. The use of serum samples for virus detection, virus isolation, and serology is routinely practiced, but sometimes serum samples from pediatric and other cases may not be easily available. In such a situation, easily available throat swabs and urine samples could be useful. It is already well reported for measles, rubella, and mumps diseases to have the virus diagnosis from throat swabs and urine. Here, we present the protocols for diagnosis of CHIKV using throat swab and urine specimens.

  9. Mach Stability Improvements Using an Existing Second Throat Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Walker, Eric L.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data quality improvements at the National Transonic Facility have an intended goal of reducing the Mach number variation in a data point to within plus or minus 0.0005, with the ultimate goal of reducing the data repeatability of the drag coefficient for full-span subsonic transport models at transonic speeds to within half a drag count. This paper will discuss the Mach stability improvements achieved through the use of an existing second throat capability at the NTF to create a minimum area at the end of the test section. These improvements were demonstrated using both the NASA Common Research Model and the NTF Pathfinder-I model in recent experiments. Sonic conditions at the throat were verified using sidewall static pressure data. The Mach variation levels from both experiments in the baseline tunnel configuration and the choked tunnel configuration will be presented and the correlation between Mach number and drag will also be examined. Finally, a brief discussion is given on the consequences of using the second throat in its location at the end of the test section.

  10. Mach Stability Improvements Using an Existing Second Throat Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data quality improvements at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) have an intended goal of reducing the Mach number variation in a data point to within unit vector A plus or minus 0.0005, with the ultimate goal of reducing the data repeatability of the drag coefficient for full-span subsonic transport models at transonic speeds to within half of a drag count. This paper will discuss the Mach stability improvements achieved through the use of an existing second throat capability at the NTF to create a minimum area at the end of the test section. These improvements were demonstrated using both the NASA Common Research Model and the NTF Pathfinder-I model in recent experiments. Sonic conditions at the throat were verified using sidewall static pressure data. The Mach variation levels from both experiments in the baseline tunnel configuration and the choked tunnel configuration will be presented. Finally, a brief discussion is given on the consequences of using the second throat in its location at the end of the test section.

  11. Repeated evolution of exaggerated dewlaps and other throat morphology in lizards.

    PubMed

    Ord, T J; Klomp, D A; Garcia-Porta, J; Hagman, M

    2015-11-01

    The existence of elaborate ornamental structures in males is often assumed to reflect the outcome of female mate choice for showy males. However, female mate choice appears weak in many iguanian lizards, but males still exhibit an array of ornament-like structures around the throat. We performed a phylogenetic comparative study to assess whether these structures have originated in response to male-male competition or the need for improved signal efficiency in visually difficult environments. We found little evidence for the influence of male-male competition. Instead, forest species were more likely to exhibit colourful throat appendages than species living in open habitats, suggesting selection for signal efficiency. On at least three independent occasions, throat ornamentation has become further elaborated into a large, conspicuously coloured moving dewlap. Although the function of the dewlap is convergent, the underlying hyoid apparatus has evolved very differently, revealing the same adaptive outcome has been achieved through multiple evolutionary trajectories. More generally, our findings highlight that extravagant, ornament-like morphology can evolve in males without the direct influence of female mate choice and that failure to consider alternative hypotheses for the evolution of these structures can obscure the true origins of signal diversity among closely related taxa.

  12. Mechanisms of exercise-induced delayed onset muscular soreness: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R B

    1984-12-01

    Delayed-onset muscular soreness (DOMS), the sensation of pain and stiffness in the muscles that occurs from 1 to 5 d following unaccustomed exercise, can adversely affect muscular performance, both from voluntary reduction of effort and from inherent loss of capacity of the muscles to produce force. This reduction in performance is temporary; permanent impairment does not occur. A number of clinical correlates are associated with DOMS, including elevations in plasma enzymes, myoglobinemia, and abnormal muscle histology and ultrastructure; exertional rhabdomyolysis appears to be the extreme form of DOMS. Presently, the best treatment for DOMS appears to be muscular activity, although the sensation again returns following the exercise. Training for the specific contractile activity that causes DOMS reduces the soreness response. The etiology and cellular mechanisms of DOMS are not known, but a number of hypotheses exist to explain the phenomenon. The following model may be proposed: 1) high tensions (particularly those associated with eccentric exercise) in the contractile/elastic system of the muscle result in structural damage; 2) cell membrane damage leads to disruption of Ca++ homeostasis in the injured fibers, resulting in necrosis that peaks about 2 d post-exercise; and 3) products of macrophage activity and intracellular contents accumulate in the interstitium, which in turn stimulate free nerve endings of group-IV sensory neurons in the muscles leading to the sensation of DOMS.

  13. Effects of Inter-electrode Distance on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Microcurrent Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kang, Ji-Sun; Park, Soo-Ji; Yoon, Se-Won; Jeong, Seong-Kwan; Heo, Myoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the distance between the two electrodes on delayed onset muscle soreness during microcurrent therapy. [Methods] In this study 24 healthy women who hadn't exercised regularly for six months were selected and randomly divided into two groups. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was induced and experimental Group 1 were given microcurrent treatment with the electrodes attached at a close distance evaluated. Experimental Group 2 received the same treatment with the electrodes attached at a greater distance apart. Visual analogue scale pain and the RIII reflex were evaluated after inducing DOMS and after one day, two days, three days and four days of microcurrent treatment. [Results] The visual analogue scale and amplitude of RIII amplitude only showed significant differences with the length of time of the treatment. [Conclusion] This study found that difference of interelectrode distance has no influence on VAS pain and the RIII reflex of DOMS. Although there were no significant differences in RIII amplitude, we suspect that it may be influenced by current parameters such as frequency and intensity.

  14. Muscle soreness, swelling, stiffness and strength loss after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Cleak, M J; Eston, R G

    1992-12-01

    High-intensity eccentric contractions induce performance decrements and delayed onset muscle soreness. The purpose of this investigation was to study the magnitude and time course of such decrements and their interrelationships in 26 young women of mean(s.d.) age 21.4(3.3) years. Subjects performed 70 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors on a pulley system, specially designed for the study. The non-exercised arm acted as the control. Measures of soreness, tenderness, swelling (SW), relaxed elbow joint angle (RANG) and isometric strength (STR) were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise (AE), analysis of variance and at 24-h intervals for 11 days. There were significant (P < 0.01, analysis of variance) changes in all factors. Peak effects were observed between 24 and 96 h AE. With the exception of STR, which remained lower (P < 0.01), all variables returned to baseline levels by day 11. A non-significant correlation between pain and STR indicated that pain was not a major factor in strength loss. Also, although no pain was evident, RANG was decreased immediately AE. There was no relationship between SW, RANG and pain. The prolonged nature of these symptoms indicates that repair to damaged soft tissue is a slow process. Strength loss is considered particularly important as it continues when protective pain and tenderness have disappeared. This has implications for the therapeutic management of patients with myopathologies and those receiving eccentric exercise for rehabilitation.

  15. Combined V-Y Fasciocutaneous Advancement and Gluteus Maximus Muscle Rotational Flaps for Treating Sacral Sores

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Jeong; Moon, Suk Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae

    2016-01-01

    The sacral area is the most common site of pressure sore in bed-ridden patients. Though many treatment methods have been proposed, a musculocutaneous flap using the gluteus muscles or a fasciocutaneous flap is the most popular surgical option. Here, we propose a new method that combines the benefits of these 2 methods: combined V-Y fasciocutaneous advancement and gluteus maximus muscle rotational flaps. A retrospective review was performed for 13 patients who underwent this new procedure from March 2011 to December 2013. Patients' age, sex, accompanying diseases, follow-up duration, surgical details, complications, and recurrence were documented. Computed tomography was performed postoperatively at 2 to 4 weeks and again at 4 to 6 months to identify the thickness and volume of the rotational muscle portion. After surgery, all patients healed within 1 month; 3 patients experienced minor complications. The average follow-up period was 13.6 months, during which time 1 patient had a recurrence (recurrence rate, 7.7%). Average thickness of the rotated muscle was 9.43 mm at 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively and 9.22 mm at 4 to 6 months postoperatively (p = 0.087). Muscle thickness had not decreased, and muscle volume was relatively maintained. This modified method is relatively simple and easy for reconstructing sacral sores, provides sufficient padding, and has little muscle donor-site morbidity. PMID:27366755

  16. Muscle soreness, swelling, stiffness and strength loss after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Cleak, M J; Eston, R G

    1992-01-01

    High-intensity eccentric contractions induce performance decrements and delayed onset muscle soreness. The purpose of this investigation was to study the magnitude and time course of such decrements and their interrelationships in 26 young women of mean(s.d.) age 21.4(3.3) years. Subjects performed 70 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors on a pulley system, specially designed for the study. The non-exercised arm acted as the control. Measures of soreness, tenderness, swelling (SW), relaxed elbow joint angle (RANG) and isometric strength (STR) were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise (AE), analysis of variance and at 24-h intervals for 11 days. There were significant (P < 0.01, analysis of variance) changes in all factors. Peak effects were observed between 24 and 96 h AE. With the exception of STR, which remained lower (P < 0.01), all variables returned to baseline levels by day 11. A non-significant correlation between pain and STR indicated that pain was not a major factor in strength loss. Also, although no pain was evident, RANG was decreased immediately AE. There was no relationship between SW, RANG and pain. The prolonged nature of these symptoms indicates that repair to damaged soft tissue is a slow process. Strength loss is considered particularly important as it continues when protective pain and tenderness have disappeared. This has implications for the therapeutic management of patients with myopathologies and those receiving eccentric exercise for rehabilitation. PMID:1490222

  17. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  18. Effects of Inter-electrode Distance on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Microcurrent Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kang, Ji-Sun; Park, Soo-Ji; Yoon, Se-Won; Jeong,, Seong-Kwan; Heo, Myoung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the distance between the two electrodes on delayed onset muscle soreness during microcurrent therapy. [Methods] In this study 24 healthy women who hadn’t exercised regularly for six months were selected and randomly divided into two groups. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was induced and experimental Group 1 were given microcurrent treatment with the electrodes attached at a close distance evaluated. Experimental Group 2 received the same treatment with the electrodes attached at a greater distance apart. Visual analogue scale pain and the RIII reflex were evaluated after inducing DOMS and after one day, two days, three days and four days of microcurrent treatment. [Results] The visual analogue scale and amplitude of RIII amplitude only showed significant differences with the length of time of the treatment. [Conclusion] This study found that difference of interelectrode distance has no influence on VAS pain and the RIII reflex of DOMS. Although there were no significant differences in RIII amplitude, we suspect that it may be influenced by current parameters such as frequency and intensity. PMID:24396208

  19. Timing influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion on muscle soreness and next-day running performance.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Price, Anna; Jones, Brett

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates timing effects of a carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PROT) beverage on indicators of muscle damage and next day running performance. Nine trained subjects completed three trials of a 30 min downhill run, followed by a 1.5 mile treadmill running time trial 24 hr later in a blinded, crossover design. Either a CHO-PROT or noncaloric placebo beverage was given 30 and 5 min prior to, at the 15 min mark during, immediately after, and 30 min after the downhill running protocol. In the first treatment (T1), a total of 360 kilocalories were given 30 and 5 min prior to downhill running, as well as at the 15 min mark, with placebos used at other time points. In the second treatment (T2), an isocaloric amount was given but only immediately after and 30 min after downhill running, with placebos used at other time points. In the placebo treatment, a placebo was given at all time points. There were no significant differences in the 1.5 mile time trial or soreness between trials (p > .05). Regardless of timing, the ingestion of a CHO-PROT beverage had no effect on next day running performance or muscular soreness versus a placebo.

  20. Efficacy of massage on muscle soreness, perceived recovery, physiological restoration and physical performance in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Lam, Eddie T C; Shariat, Ardalan; Shaw, Ina; Shaw, Brandon S; Tamrin, Shamsul B M

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that sport massage after intensive exercise might improve power and perceptual recovery in athletes. However, few studies have been done in this area. This study aimed to examine the effect of massage on the performance of bodybuilders. Thirty experienced male bodybuilders were randomly assigned to either a massage group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Both groups performed five repetition sets at 75-77% of 1RM of knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The massage group then received a 30-min massage after the exercise protocol while the control group maintained their normal passive recovery. Criteria under investigation included: plasma creatine kinase (CK) level, agility test, vertical jump test, isometric torque test, and perception of soreness. All variables were measured over 6 time periods: baseline, immediately after the DOMS inducing protocol, right after the massage, and 24, 48, and 72 h after the massage. Both groups showed significant (P < .001) decreases in jumping, agility performance, and isometric torque, but significant (P < .001) increases in CK and muscle soreness levels. The massage group in general demonstrated a better recovery rate. As such, a post-exercise massage session can improve the exercise performance and recovery rate in male bodybuilders after intensive exercise.

  1. Fish oil supplementation reduces markers of oxidative stress but not muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Gray, Patrick; Chappell, Andrew; Jenkinson, Alison McE; Thies, Frank; Gray, Stuart R

    2014-04-01

    Due to the potential anti-inflammatory properties of fish-derived long chain n-3 fatty acids, it has been suggested that athletes should regularly consume fish oils-although evidence in support of this recommendation is not clear. While fish oils can positively modulate immune function, it remains possible that, due to their high number of double bonds, there may be concurrent increases in lipid peroxidation. The current study aims to investigate the effect of fish oil supplementation on exercise-induced markers of oxidative stress and muscle damage. Twenty males underwent a 6-week double-blind randomized placebo-controlled supplementation trial involving two groups (fish oil or placebo). After supplementation, participants undertook 200 repetitions of eccentric knee contractions. Blood samples were taken presupplementation, postsupplementation, immediately, 24, 48, and 72 hr postexercise and muscle soreness/maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) assessed. There were no differences in creatine kinase, protein carbonyls, endogenous DNA damage, muscle soreness or MVC between groups. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were lower (p < .05) at 48 and 72 hr post exercise and H2O2 stimulated DNA damage was lower (p < .05) immediately postexercise in the fish oil, compared with the control group. The current study demonstrates that fish oil supplementation reduces selected markers of oxidative stress after a single bout of eccentric exercise.

  2. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  3. Dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for the treatment of sacral pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chuang, Shiow-Shuh

    2015-02-01

    The sacral region is one of the most vulnerable sites for the development of pressure sores. Even when surgical reconstruction is performed, there is a high chance of recurrence. Therefore, the concept of dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for sacral pressure sore reconstruction was proposed. From September 2007 to June 2010, nine patients with grade IV sacral pressures were enrolled. Four patients received bilateral myocutaneous V-Y flaps, four patients received bilateral fasciocutaneous V-Y flaps, and one patient received bilateral rotation-advanced flaps for sacral pressure reconstruction. The flaps were designed based on the perforators of the superior gluteal artery in one patient's reconstructive procedure. All flaps' designs were based on dual-dermal-barrier fashion. The mean follow-up time was 16 months (range = 12-25). No recurrence was noted. Only one patient had a complication of mild dehiscence at the middle suture line, occurring 2 weeks after the reconstructive surgery. The dual-dermal fashion flaps are easily duplicated and versatile. The study has shown minimal morbidity and a reasonable outcome.

  4. Design and Development of Portable Support Surface and Multilayered Fabric Cover for Bed Sore Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kandha Vadivu, P

    2015-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are serious and common health concern affecting about 1.5-3 million adults and is a serious health concern for elders. Pressure ulcers or bed sores seem to be one of the most challenging inflicts to the doctors and may result in significant morbidity and mortality and are associated with high cost in terms of human sufferings, cost of treatment, and possible litigation. Though modern medical science has launched a variety of treatment methods, prevention is the best way to get rid of it. Pressure sores are best prevented by using support surfaces that are volatile in nature-like water mattress, variable pressure mattress, etc. In this research work, a portable support surface has been designed and developed for preventing bedsore. It consists of four individual components for the body part such as bodice back, hip, elbow, and heel which are likely to be affected by bedsores. Each component has volatile surface provisions in them with refilling and cleaning facility. The portable support surface is easy to wear and remove and also cheaper. Above all, the kit is user-friendly with no side effects and preferred and guaranteed by the doctors.

  5. Systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews are a type of literature review in which authors systematically search for, critically appraise, and synthesize evidence from several studies on the same topic (Grant & Booth, 2009). The precise and systematic method differentiates systematic reviews from traditional reviews (Khan, Kunz, Kleijnen, & Antes, 2003). In all types of systematic reviews, a quality assessment is done of the individual studies that meet inclusion criteria. These individual assessments are synthesized, and aggregated results are reported. Systematic reviews are considered the highest level of evidence in evidence-based health care because the reviewers strive to use transparent, rigorous methods that minimize bias.

  6. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

    PubMed

    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Mike, JN, Cole, N, Herrera, C, VanDusseldorp, T, Kravitz, L, and Kerksick, CM. The effects of eccentric contraction duration on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 773-786, 2017-Previous research has investigated the effects of either eccentric-only training or comparing eccentric and concentric exercise on changes related to strength and power expression, but no research to date has investigated the impact of altering the duration of either the concentric or the eccentric component on these parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the duration of eccentric (i.e., 2-second, 4-second vs. 6-second) muscle contractions and their effect on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness using a plate-loaded barbell Smith squat exercise. Thirty college-aged men (23 ± 3.5 years, 178 ± 6.8 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, and 11.6 ± 5.1% fat) with 3.0 ± 1.0 years of resistance training experience and training frequency of 4.3 ± 0.9 days per week were randomized and assigned to 1 of 3 eccentric training groups that incorporated different patterns of contraction. For every repetition, all 3 groups used 2-second concentric contractions and paused for 1 second between the concentric and eccentric phases. The control group (2S) used 2-second eccentric contractions, whereas the 4S group performed 4-second eccentric contractions and the 6S group performed 6-second eccentric contractions. All repetitions were completed using the barbell Smith squat exercise. All participants completed a 4-week training protocol that required them to complete 2 workouts per week using their prescribed contraction routine for 4 sets of 6 repetitions at an intensity of 80-85% one repetition maximum (1RM). For all performance data, significant group × time (G × T) interaction effects were found for average power production across all 3 sets of a squat jump protocol (p = 0.04) while vertical jump did not reach

  7. Vaginal Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself? About Stephen J. Schueler, M.D News Advertising How It Works FAQ for Consumers FAQ for Physicians Testimonials Site Map Terms of Use Contact Us FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a ...

  8. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ... Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ...

  9. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  10. Mouth Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Specialty Society Advisory Council ... Disclosure Form News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Specialty Society Advisory Council ...

  11. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Vision Leadership Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners ... tell the difference? A: The location is a good clue. Your doctor may recommend performing culture testing ...

  12. Canker sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... which can irritate the area more.) Apply a mixture of half hydrogen peroxide and half water directly ... times a day. Rinse your mouth with a mixture of half Milk of Magnesia and half Benadryl ...

  13. Mouth sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... up to 6 weeks. The following steps can make you feel better: Avoid hot beverages and foods, spicy and salty foods, and citrus. Gargle with salt water or cool water. Eat fruit-flavored ice pops. This is helpful if you have a ...

  14. Canker Sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  15. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... Terms and Conditions © 1996-2017 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... SLS is a foaming agent found in most toothpastes and mouthwashes. Finally, not getting the right nutrition, ... you brush your teeth . Brush and rinse with toothpastes and mouthwashes that don't contain sodium lauryl ...

  17. Construction and test of flexible walls for the throat of the ILR high-speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igeta, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic tests in wind tunnels are jeopardized by the lateral limitations of the throat. This influence expands with increasing size of the model in proportion to the cross-section of the throat. Wall interference of this type can be avoided by giving the wall the form of a stream surface that would be identical to the one observed during free flight. To solve this problem, flexible walls that can adapt to every contour of surface flow are needed.

  18. Comparison of bacterial communities in the throat swabs from healthy subjects and pharyngitis patients by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Kannan; Thenmozhi, Ramalingam; Sundaravadivel, Marimuthu; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2012-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was applied to characterize bacterial flora present in the throats of healthy subjects and pharyngitis patients. The 16S rRNA genes of bacteria present in throat metagenome were amplified by PCR with 6-carboxy-fluorescein (6-FAM)-labeled universal forward primer (27 F) and a universal reverse primer (1513R). The 16S rDNAs were digested with restriction enzymes with 4-bp recognition sites (MspI or RsaI) and analyzed by using an automated DNA sequencer. T-RFLP patterns were numerically analyzed using computer programs. From analysis of the throat bacterial community, patterns derived from MspI and RsaI digested samples of healthy subjects and pharyngitis patients were grouped into different clusters, though RsaI digested samples showed some uncertainty. Pharyngitis throats generated an average species richness of 9 [±2.1 (SD)] and 10 (±2.9) for MspI and RsaI digests, respectively, whereas healthy throats generated 6.3 (±1.2) and 6.1 (±1.5) in MspI and RsaI digests, respectively. These results suggest that samples from pharyngitis patients contain an unexpected diversity of causative bacteria. The pharyngitis throats were colonized with a rich diversity of bacterial species than that of healthy throats. Using T-RFLP, we are able to detect a model bacterium, Streptococcus pyogenes SF370, and T-RF patterns were consistent with the Streptococcal T-RFLP patterns. Our study indicates that T-RFLP analysis is useful for the assessment of diversity of throat bacterial flora and rapid comparison of the community structure between subjects with and without pharyngitis.

  19. Experimental Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    An axisymmetric version of the Dual Throat Nozzle concept with a variable expansion ratio has been studied to determine the impacts on thrust vectoring and nozzle performance. The nozzle design, applicable to a supersonic aircraft, was guided using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code, PAB3D. The axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept was tested statically in the Jet Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle geometric design variables included circumferential span of injection, cavity length, cavity convergence angle, and nozzle expansion ratio for conditions corresponding to take-off and landing, mid climb and cruise. Internal nozzle performance and thrust vectoring performance was determined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary injection rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. The 60 degree span of injection generally performed better than the 90 degree span of injection using an equivalent injection area and number of holes, in agreement with computational results. For injection rates less than 7 percent, thrust vector angle for the 60 degree span of injection was 1.5 to 2 degrees higher than the 90 degree span of injection. Decreasing cavity length improved thrust ratio and discharge coefficient, but decreased thrust vector angle and thrust vectoring efficiency. Increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 degrees increased thrust vector angle by 1 degree over the range of injection rates tested, but adversely affected system thrust ratio and discharge coefficient. The dual throat nozzle concept generated the best thrust vectoring performance with an expansion ratio of 1.0 (a cavity in between two equal minimum areas). The variable expansion ratio geometry did not provide the expected improvements in discharge coefficient and system thrust ratio throughout the flight envelope of typical a supersonic aircraft. At mid-climb and cruise conditions, the variable geometry

  20. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  1. Heat transfer to throat tubes in a square-chambered rocket engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Brindley, William J.

    1989-01-01

    A gaseous H2/O2 rocket engine was constructed at the NASA-Lewis to provide a high heat flux source representative of the heat flux to the blades in the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) during startup of the space shuttle main engines. The high heat flux source was required to evaluate the durability of thermal barrier coatings being investigated for use on these blades. The heat transfer, and specifically, the heat flux to tubes located at the throat of the test rocket engine was evaluated and compared to the heat flux to the blades in the HPFTP during engine startup. Gas temperatures, pressures and heat transfer coefficients in the test rocket engine were measured. Near surface metal temperatures below thin thermal barrier coatings were also measured at various angular orientations around the throat tube to indicate the angular dependence of the heat transfer coefficients. A finite difference model for a throat tube was developed and a thermal analysis was performed using the measured gas temperatures and the derived heat transfer coefficients to predict metal temperatures in the tube. Near surface metal temperatures of an uncoated throat tube were measured at the stagnation point and showed good agreement with temperatures predicted by the thermal model. The maximum heat flux to the throat tube was calculated and compared to that predicted for the leading edge of an HPFTP blade. It is shown that the heat flux to an uncooled throat tube is slightly greater than the heat flux to an HPFTP blade during engine startup.

  2. Effect of low-level phototherapy on delayed onset muscle soreness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nampo, Fernando Kenji; Cavalheri, Vinícius; Ramos, Solange de Paula; Camargo, Enilton Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of low-level phototherapy (i.e. light-emitting diode therapy [LEDtherapy] or light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation therapy [LASERtherapy]) on pain, skeletal muscle injury (creatine kinase [CK] levels and edema) and skeletal muscle function (range of movement and strength) in people undergoing an exercise protocol. (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO and LILACS up to May 2014), we included randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials and crossover studies in which study participants were allocated to receive either low-level phototherapy or placebo treatment. Phototherapy should have been applied in a single treatment session, either before or after an exercise protocol. We identified 15 studies involving 317 participants. Meta-analyses were limited by substantial heterogeneity. Compared to the placebo group, reduction in CK levels was only observed when LASERtherapy was applied before an exercise protocol (standardized mean difference = -0.66; 95 % CI = -1.30, -0.02). No between-group difference in edema, range of movement and strength were detected when phototherapy was applied before or after exercise. Evidence from this review suggests that low-level phototherapy may not have substantial effect in the treatment of skeletal muscle injury and pain caused by exercise. Definitive conclusions are limited due to the small number of included studies in each meta-analysis, disparities across the included studies and small sample sizes.

  3. Cochrane review: Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    PubMed

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip Ra; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2016-01-14

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness, or 'DOMS', affects many people after exercise and can impair future performance. It usually peaks one to four days after exercise and several strategies are used to overcome it. The effectiveness and safety of many of these strategies applied and promoted is unknown. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n  =  15) or control (n  =  17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in

  5. Throat Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause is usually a viral infection, but other causes include allergies, infection with strep bacteria or the leaking of stomach acids back up into the esophagus, called GERD. Other problems that affect ... small children, which causes a barking cough Laryngitis - swelling of the voice ...

  6. Strep Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  7. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p < 0.05). AminoL40 administration significantly mitigated the EC-induced impairment of the FSR (0.172 ± 0.018 %/h). EC decreased the paw withdrawal threshold at 1 and 2 days after EC, which indicated that EC induced muscle soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

  8. The Effect of Gender and Menstrual Phase on Serum Creatine Kinase Activity and Muscle Soreness Following Downhill Running

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Bosch, Andrew N.

    2017-01-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity reflects muscle membrane disruption. Oestrogen has antioxidant and membrane stabilising properties, yet no study has compared the CK and muscle soreness (DOMS) response to unaccustomed exercise between genders when all menstrual phases are represented in women. Fifteen eumenorrhoeic women (early follicular, EF (n = 5); late follicular, LF (n = 5); mid-luteal, ML (n = 5) phase) and six men performed 20 min of downhill running (−10% gradient) at 9 km/h. Serum CK activity and visual analogue scale rating of perceived muscle soreness were measured before, immediately, 24-h, 48-h and 72-h after exercise. The 24-h peak CK response (relative to pre-exercise) was similar between women and men (mean change (95% confidence interval): 58.5 (25.2 to 91.7) IU/L; 68.8 (31.3 to 106.3) IU/L, respectively). However, serum CK activity was restored to pre-exercise levels quicker in women (regardless of menstrual phase) than men; after 48-h post exercise in women (16.3 (−4.4 to 37.0) IU/L; 56.3 (37.0 to 75.6) IU/L, respectively) but only after 72-h in men (14.9 (−14.8 to 44.6) IU/L). Parallel to the CK response, muscle soreness recovered by 72-h in men. Conversely, the women still reported muscle soreness at 72-h despite CK levels being restored by 48-h; delayed recovery of muscle soreness appeared mainly in EF and LF. The CK and DOMS response to downhill running is gender-specific. The CK response recovers quicker in women than men. The CK and DOMS response occur in concert in men but not in women. The DOMS response in women is prolonged and may be influenced by menstrual phase. PMID:28241459

  9. The impact of a pre-loaded multi-ingredient performance supplement on muscle soreness and performance following downhill running.

    PubMed

    Ormsbee, Michael J; Ward, Emery G; Bach, Christopher W; Arciero, Paul J; McKune, Andrew J; Panton, Lynn B

    2015-01-01

    The effects of multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) on perceived soreness, strength, flexibility and vertical jump performance following eccentric exercise are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of MIPS (NO-Shotgun®) pre-loaded 4 weeks prior to a single bout of downhill running (DHR) on muscle soreness and performance. Trained male runners (n = 20) were stratified by VO2max, strength, and lean mass into two groups; MIPS (n = 10) ingested one serving daily of NO-Shotgun® for 28 days and 30 min prior to all post-testing visits, Control (CON; n = 10) consumed an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo in an identical manner as MIPS. Perceived soreness and performance measurements (strength, flexibility, and jump height) were tested on 6 occasions; 28 days prior to DHR, immediately before DHR (PRE), immediately post (POST) DHR, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-DHR. Perceived soreness significantly increased (p < 0.05) post DHR compared to PRE at all time-points, with no difference between groups. Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) increased over time (p < 0.001) with no group x time interactions (p = 0.236 and p = 0.535, respectively). Significant time effects were measured for strength (p = 0.001), flexibility (p = 0.025) and vertical jump (p < 0.001). There were no group x time interactions for any performance measurements. Consumption of MIPS for 4 weeks prior to a single bout of DHR did not affect perceived soreness, muscle damage, strength, flexibility, or jump performance compared to an isocaloric placebo in trained male runners following a single bout of DHR.

  10. The Effect of Gender and Menstrual Phase on Serum Creatine Kinase Activity and Muscle Soreness Following Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Bosch, Andrew N

    2017-02-23

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity reflects muscle membrane disruption. Oestrogen has antioxidant and membrane stabilising properties, yet no study has compared the CK and muscle soreness (DOMS) response to unaccustomed exercise between genders when all menstrual phases are represented in women. Fifteen eumenorrhoeic women (early follicular, EF (n = 5); late follicular, LF (n = 5); mid-luteal, ML (n = 5) phase) and six men performed 20 min of downhill running (-10% gradient) at 9 km/h. Serum CK activity and visual analogue scale rating of perceived muscle soreness were measured before, immediately, 24-h, 48-h and 72-h after exercise. The 24-h peak CK response (relative to pre-exercise) was similar between women and men (mean change (95% confidence interval): 58.5 (25.2 to 91.7) IU/L; 68.8 (31.3 to 106.3) IU/L, respectively). However, serum CK activity was restored to pre-exercise levels quicker in women (regardless of menstrual phase) than men; after 48-h post exercise in women (16.3 (-4.4 to 37.0) IU/L; 56.3 (37.0 to 75.6) IU/L, respectively) but only after 72-h in men (14.9 (-14.8 to 44.6) IU/L). Parallel to the CK response, muscle soreness recovered by 72-h in men. Conversely, the women still reported muscle soreness at 72-h despite CK levels being restored by 48-h; delayed recovery of muscle soreness appeared mainly in EF and LF. The CK and DOMS response to downhill running is gender-specific. The CK response recovers quicker in women than men. The CK and DOMS response occur in concert in men but not in women. The DOMS response in women is prolonged and may be influenced by menstrual phase.

  11. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  12. Effects of vibratory stimulations on maximal voluntary isometric contraction from delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Bo, Kak Hwang

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vibratory stimulation on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). [Subjects] Sixty healthy adults participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease. [Methods] The researchers induced DOMS in the musculus extensor carpi radialis longus of each participant. Subjects in the control group received no treatment. The ultrasound group received ultrasound treatment (intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2;) frequency 1 MHz; time, 10 minutes). The vibration group received vibration stimulation (frequency, 20 MHz; time, 10 minutes). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] MVIC measurements showed statistically significant differences in the vibration group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Vibratory stimulation had a positive effect on recovery of muscle function from DOMS.

  13. Effects of Vibratory Stimulations on Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Bo, Kak Hwang

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vibratory stimulation on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). [Subjects] Sixty healthy adults participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease. [Methods] The researchers induced DOMS in the musculus extensor carpi radialis longus of each participant. Subjects in the control group received no treatment. The ultrasound group received ultrasound treatment (intensity, 1.0 W/cm2; frequency 1 MHz; time, 10 minutes). The vibration group received vibration stimulation (frequency, 20 MHz; time, 10 minutes). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] MVIC measurements showed statistically significant differences in the vibration group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Vibratory stimulation had a positive effect on recovery of muscle function from DOMS. PMID:24259922

  14. Effects of tender point acupuncture on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) – a pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Kazunori; Ochi, Hideki; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is used to reduce inflammation and decrease pain in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This study investigates the efficacy of acupuncture on the symptoms of DOMS. Methods Thirty subjects were assigned randomly to there groups, namely the control, non-tender point and tender point groups. Measurement of pain with full elbow flexion was used as indices of efficacy. Measurements were taken before and after exercise, immediately after treatment and seven days after treatment. Results Significant differences in visual analog scores for pain were found between the control group and tender point group immediately after treatment and three days after exercise (P < 0.05, Dunnetts multiple test). Conclusion The results show that tender point acupuncture relieves muscle pain of DOMS. PMID:19032777

  15. Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor exercise.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Schilling, Brian K; Melcher, Dan A; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    Runners often experience delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially of the knee extensors, following prolonged running. Sagittal knee joint biomechanics are altered in the presence of knee extensor DOMS but it is unclear how muscle soreness affects lower limb biomechanics in other planes of motion. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of knee extensor DOMS on three-dimensional (3D) lower limb biomechanics during running. Thirty-three healthy men (25.8 ± 6.8 years; 84.1 ± 9.2 kg; 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed an isolated eccentric knee extensor damaging protocol to elicit DOMS. Biomechanics of over-ground running at a set speed of 3.35 m s(-1)±5% were measured before eccentric exercise (baseline) and, 24 h and 48 h following exercise in the presence of knee extensor DOMS. Knee flexion ROM was reduced at 48 h (P = 0.01; d = 0.26), and peak knee extensor moment was reduced at 24 h (P = 0.001; d = 0.49) and 48 h (P < 0.001; d = 0.68) compared to baseline. Frontal and transverse plane biomechanics were unaffected by the presence of DOMS (P > 0.05). Peak positive ankle and knee joint powers and, peak negative knee joint power were all reduced from baseline to 24 h and 48 h (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that knee extensor DOMS greatly influences sagittal knee joint angular kinetics and, reduces sagittal power production at the ankle joint. However, knee extensor DOMS does not affect frontal and transverse plane lower limb joint biomechanics during running.

  16. The efficacy of frequency specific microcurrent therapy on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Denise; Fallows, Stephen; Morris, Michael; McMakin, Carolyn

    2010-07-01

    This study compared the effects of frequency specific microcurrent (FSM) therapy versus sham therapy in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in order to determine whether specific frequencies on two channels would produce better results than single channel single frequency microcurrent therapy which has been shown to be ineffective as compared to sham treatment in DOMS. 18 male and 17 female healthy participants (mean age 32+/-4.2 years) were recruited. Following a 15-min treadmill warm-up and 5 sub-maximal eccentric muscle contractions, participants performed 5 sets of 15 maximal voluntary eccentric muscle contractions, with a 1-min rest between sets, on a seated leg curl machine. Post-exercise, participants had one of their legs assigned to a treatment (T) regime (20 min of frequency specific microcurrent stimulation), while the participant's other leg acted as control (NT). Soreness was rated for each leg at baseline and at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise on a visual analogue scale (VAS), which ranged from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain ever). No significant difference was noted at baseline p=1.00. Post-exercise there was a significant difference at 24h (T=1.3+/-1.0, NT=5.2+/-1.3, p=0.0005), at 48 h (T=1.2+/-1.1, NT=7.0+/-1.1, p=0.0005) and at 72 h (T=0.7+/-0.6, NT=4.0+/-1.6, p=0.0005). FSM therapy provided significant protection from DOMS at all time points tested.

  17. Effects of sensory-level high-volt pulsed electrical current ondelayed-onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Tourville, Timothy W; Connolly, Declan A J; Reed, Brian V

    2006-09-01

    Ten healthy males and ten healthy females aged 21.5 +/- 3.2 years (mean +/- s) participated in the study, which was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of sensory level-high volt pulsed electrical current (HVPC) on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Arm discomfort, elbow extension range of motion and isometric elbow flexion strength were obtained as baseline measurements. Delayed-onset muscle soreness was induced in the participants' dominant or non-dominant arm using two sets of 20 maximal eccentric elbow flexion contractions. After the induction of DOMS, the participants were randomly divided into an experimental condition (HVPC) or a placebo condition. The experimental condition consisted of 20 min of HVPC immediately after the induction of DOMS, and 20 min every 24 h for three consecutive days thereafter. The participants in the placebo condition received an intervention similar in design; however, no electrical current was administered. Baseline measurements were reevaluated at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the induction of DOMS. Three weeks later, the participants returned and the protocol was repeated on the contralateral limb, using the opposite intervention (HVPC or placebo). Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant increase in overall arm discomfort, decrease in elbow extension and decrease in isometric strength for both conditions over time. No significant main effect of treatment, or time-by-treatment interaction, was found for the HVPC condition when compared with the placebo condition for any variable. Sensory-level HVPC, as utilized in our application, was ineffective in reducing the measured variables associated with DOMS.

  18. The nursing rounds system: effect of patient's call light use, bed sores, fall and satisfaction level.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Bassem S; Nusair, Hussam; Al Zubadi, Nariman; Al Shloul, Shams; Saleh, Usama

    2011-06-01

    The nursing round system (NRS) means checking patients on an hourly basis during the A (0700-2200 h) shift and once every 2 h during the B (2200-0700 h) by the assigned nursing staff. The overall goal of this prospective study is to implement an NRS in a major rehabilitation centre-Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City-in the Riyadh area of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study are to measure the effect of the NRS on: (i) the use of patient call light; (ii) the number of incidences of patients' fall; (iii) the number of incidences of hospital-acquired bed sores; and (iv) the level of patients' satisfaction. All patients hospitalized in the male stroke unit will be involved in this study. For the period of 8 weeks (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) All Nursing staff on the unit will record each call light and the patient's need. Implementation of the NRS would start on 18 February 2010 and last for 8 weeks, until 18 April 2010. Data collected throughout this period will be compared with data collected during the 8 weeks period immediately preceding the implementation of the NRS (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) in order to measure the impact of the call light use. The following information were collected on all subjects involved in the study: (i) the Demographic Information Form; (ii) authors' developed NRS Audit Form; (iii) Patient Call Light Audit Form; (iv) Patient Fall Audit Record; (v) Hospital-Acquired Bed Sores Audit Form; and (vi) hospital developed Patient Satisfaction Records. The findings suggested that a significant reduction on the use of call bell (P < 0.001), a significant reduction of fall incidence (P < 0.01) while pressure ulcer reduced by 50% before and after the implementation of NRS. Also, the implementation of NRS increased patient satisfaction by 7/5 (P < 0.05).

  19. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  20. Delayed onset muscle soreness and perceived exertion following blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-01-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with either heavy-loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]), light-loads (20% 1-RM), or light-loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light-loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited due to increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study. Following four sets of elbow-flexion exercise, participants reported ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), with DOMS also recorded for seven days following each trial. DOMS was significantly greater for low-pressure continuous BFR (until 48 h post-exercise) and high-pressure intermittent BFR (until 72 h post-exercise) compared with traditional heavy-load and light-load resistance exercise. In addition, RPE was higher for heavy-load resistance exercise and high-pressure intermittent BFR compared with low-pressure continuous BFR, with all trials greater than light-load resistance exercise. For practitioners working with untrained participants, this study provides evidence to suggest that in order to minimize the perception of effort and post-exercise muscle soreness associated with BFR resistance exercise, continuous low-pressure application may be more preferential compared with intermittent high-pressure application. Importantly, these perceptual responses are relatively short-lived (∼2 days) and have previously been shown to subside after a few exercise sessions. Combined with smaller initial training volumes (set x repetitions) this may limit RPE and DOMS to strengthen uptake and adherence, and assist in program progression for muscle hypertrophy and gains in strength.

  1. Effect of Microcurrent Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: A Double-Blind Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Perrin, David H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) treatment on pain and loss of range of motion (ROM) associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: We assigned subjects to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received treatment with microcurrent stimulation (200 μA, 30 Hz, for 10 minutes, then 100 μA, 0.3 Hz, for 10 minutes) 24, 48, and 72 hours after DOMS induction. Group 2 served as a sham group and was treated using a machine altered by the manufacturer so that no current could flow through the electrodes. Subjects: DOMS was induced in the biceps brachii of the nondominant arm of 18 subjects (3 males, 15 females: age = 20.33 ± 2.3 years, ht = 170.81 ± 7.3 cm, wt = 69.61 ± 13.1 kg). Dominance was defined as the arm used by the subject to throw a ball. Measurements: Subjective pain and active elbow extension ROM were evaluated before and after treatment each day. Two methods were used to assess pain: constant pressure using a weighted Orthoplast sphere and full elbow extension to the limit of pain tolerance. Subjective pain was measured with a graphic rating scale and active elbow extension ROM using a standard, plastic, double-armed goniometer. Three repeated-measures ANOVAs (between-subjects variable was group, within- subjects variables were day and test) were used to assess ROM and pain scores for the 2 groups. Results: We found no significant difference in the measurement of subjective pain scores or elbow extension ROM when the MENS group was compared with the sham group. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the MENS treatment, within the parameters used for this experiment, was not effective in reducing the pain or loss of ROM associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness. PMID:16558582

  2. Acute effects of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinzadeh, Khadijeh; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Baghdasar, Parvin Javad; Alizadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation and pain induced by delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) as a result of eccentric exercise (EE) or unaccustomed activity cause some difficulties in exercise for athletes. The purpose of this study was to survey the effect of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptom of delayed onset muscle soreness. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, 36 healthy female subjects, who were recruited by intra dormitory calls, randomly divided into 3 groups, including: ginger intake 1 hour before exercise (GIBE), ginger intake immediately after exercise (GIAE) and placebo group (PL). Subjects consumed capsules contain 60 mg of ginger extract (equivalent of 2 g dried ginger powder) or placebo before and after exercise. The exercise protocol consisted of a 20 minute step test using a 46cm step at a rate of 15 steps per minute. The blood samples were taken before, 1, 24 and 48 hour after exercise to assay creatine kinase (CK) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Muscle pain scores, isometric strength and circumference of thigh muscle, and hip range of motion were recorded at mentioned times. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure was used to determine the differences between groups. Results: The results showed a significant reduction of pain in GIBE compared to GIAE after 24 and 48h of EE and GIAE compared to PL (p<0.05). IL-6 changed significantly in GIBE compared to PL (p<0.05) after 1, 24, and 48h after EE. The other factors didn’t change meaningfully. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that 2 grams of ginger may have anti-inflammation and analgesic effect on DOMS. PMID:26793652

  3. The Effects of High-Volt Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, David Lynn; Draper, David O.; Ricard, Mark D.; Myrer, J. William; Schulthies, Shane S.; Durrant, Earlene

    1997-01-01

    Objective: We investigated three 30-minute high-volt pulsed current electrical stimulation (HVPC) treatments of 125 pps to reduce pain, restore range of motion (ROM), and recover strength loss associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: Randomized, masked comparison of three 30-minute treatment and sham HVPC regimens over a 48-hour period. Subjects: Twenty-eight college students. Measurements: Subjects performed concentric and eccentric knee extensions with the right leg to induce muscle soreness. Assessments were made before and after the exercise bout and each treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Results: Three separate 2 × 3 × 2 ANOVAs were used to determine significant differences (p < .05) between days, treatments, and pre-post treatment effects and significant interaction among these variables. Scheffe post hoc tests showed no significant reduction in pain perception or improvement in loss of function at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Mean pain perception assessments (0 = no pain, 10 = severe pain) for the HVPC group were 2.9, 4.5, and 3.5 and for the sham group 3.8, 4.8, and 3.5). Mean ROM losses for the HVPC group were 9.0°, 22.3°, and 26.2°, and for the sham group were 9.5°, 23.1°, and 23.0°. Mean strength losses (1RM) for the HVPC group were 25.9, 25.7, and 20.8 lbs and for the sham group were 22.3, 22.3, and 13.8 lbs. Conclusions: HVPC as we studied it was ineffective in providing lasting pain reduction and at reducing ROM and strength losses associated with DOMS. PMID:16558426

  4. Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireos foraging on green anoles during migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W.; Atherton, L.S.; Payne, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Yellow-throated (Vireo flavifrons) and Red-eyed vireos (V. olivaceus) were observed feeding on green anoles (Anolis carolinensis carolinensis) at two localities in Florida and one in South Carolina. Vireos are long-distance migrants that require foods high in fatty acid content, especially when engaging in migration. It is not unlikely that vireos have an opportunistic foraging strategy to obtain the necessary food requirements, including attacking and consuming prey items such as small lizards. This note provides the first published reports of lizards taken as prey by these two species.

  5. Chronic cough management: dealing with a sensation of irritation in the throat.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Haruhiko; Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2013-11-01

    Among the various types of laryngeal paraesthesia suffered by chronic cough patients, we often encounter 'a sensation of irritation in the throat (SIT)'. Our study indicated that capsaicin cough threshold was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the SIT-positive group (13.9 μmol/L) than in the SIT-negative group (49.6 μmol/L). The establishment of treatment strategies for SIT would be advantageous for treating chronic cough patients suffering from this laryngeal sensation.

  6. Ear, Nose and Throat Foreign Bodies Removed under General Anaesthesia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shunyu, Neizekhotuo Brian; Karim, Habib Md Rezaul; Lyngdoh, Nari M; Yunus, Md.; Jamil, Md.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction For Otorhinolaryngologist, removal of Foreign Bodies (FB) from the ear, nose and throat is one of the common emergency procedures done. Most of the cases especially of the ear and nose can be managed without General Anaesthesia (GA). But in some cases GA may be needed. There are very few studies that address the scenario of ear, nose and throat foreign body that required GA for its removal and the complications associated with it. Aim This study was conducted with the aim to study the patient’s profile, types and distribution of FB removed under GA, and the associated complications. Materials and Methods The present study is a hospital based retrospective, cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology in association with Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care in North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, Shillong, Meghalaya, India from year 2009 to 2014. Information was collected from indoor patient file and operation record book. Those patients where foreign body was not found after examination under GA were excluded. Results A total of 112 cases of foreign body in ear, nose and throat removed under GA were selected. There was variation of age from youngest case being 11 months to 74 years with a slight male predominance. Two third of the patients belonged to paediatric age group. Most of the FB were inanimate with high number of inorganic type found in majority. Foreign body in food passage was found in most cases. Coin and meat bone were the common FB in children and adults respectively. We found no complications related to removal of foreign body from the food passage and nose. But some complications were seen in foreign body of ear and tracheo-bronchial tree. Conclusion Ear, nose and throat FB that required GA were seen in all age groups. FB of food passage constitute the majority. Type of foreign body varies between children and adults. In children most common types were

  7. The isolated and combined effects of selected physical activity and ibuprofen on delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, N; Rahmani-Nia, F; Ebrahim, K

    2005-08-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness refers to the skeletal muscle pain that is experienced following eccentric exercise. The aim of the present study was to examine the physiological effects of physical activity with or without ibuprofen on delayed onset muscle soreness. Forty-four non-athletic male volunteers (age 24.3 +/- 2.4 years) were randomly assigned to one of four groups: physical activity (n = 11), ibuprofen (n = 11), physical activity and ibuprofen (combination, n = 11), or control (n = 11). The physical activity programme comprised 5 min of walking and jogging, 10 min of static stretching of the hands and shoulder girdle, and 5 min of concentric movements with sub-maximal contractions. The total amount of ibuprofen consumed by a single individual was 2800 mg; this was taken from 1 h before the eccentric actions up to 48 h after it. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by performing 70 eccentric contractions of the biceps muscle of the non-dominant side on a modified arm curl machine. Perceived muscle soreness, maximal eccentric contraction, creatine kinase enzyme activity and elbow range of motion were assessed 1 h before and 1, 24 and 48 h after the eccentric actions. The results indicated that, after the eccentric actions, soreness increased (P < 0.001) across time in all groups, with the highest values being recorded at 24 h. At 24 and 48 h, greater soreness (P < 0.001) was observed in the control group than in the physical activity and combination groups. After the eccentric actions, creatine kinase increased and was elevated (P < 0.001) compared with baseline in all groups, with values returning to baseline in the physical activity and combination groups by 48 h. However, creatine kinase in the control and ibuprofen groups was still significantly higher than at baseline after 48 h. Creatine kinase was higher (P < 0.001) in the control group than in physical activity and combination groups at 24 and 48 h. There was also a reduction (P < 0.001) in

  8. Red-throated loons (Gavia stellata) breeding in Alaska, USA, are exposed to PCBs while on their Asian wintering grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmutz, J.A.; Trust, K.A.; Matz, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Red-throated loons (Gavia stellata) breeding in Alaska declined 53% during 1977-1993. We compare concentrations of environmental contaminants in red-throated loons among four nesting areas in Alaska and discuss potential ramifications of exposure on reproductive success and population trends. Eggs from the four areas had similar total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations, but eggs from the Arctic coastal plain had different congener profiles and greater toxic equivalents (TEQs) than eggs from elsewhere. Satellite telemetry data indicate that red-throated loons from the Arctic coastal plain in northern Alaska winter in southeast Asia, while those breeding elsewhere in Alaska winter in North America. Different wintering areas may lead to differential PCB accumulation among red-throated loon populations. For eggs from the Arctic coastal plain, TEQs were great enough to postulate PCB-associated reproductive effects in piscivores. The correlation between migration patterns and PCB profiles suggests that red-throated loons breeding in northern Alaska are exposed to PCBs while on their Asian wintering grounds.

  9. Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

  10. Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Dual-Throat Thrust Vectoring Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, John; Penmetsa, Naveen; Starkey, Ryan

    2016-11-01

    The dual-throat fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle is of particular interest because of its ability to provide large vector angles with minimal losses in thrust. This work investigated the performance of a dual-throat fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle for three secondary injection geometries: two spanwise oriented rectangular slots of two thicknesses, and a single spanwise oriented array of circular holes. Initial testing of the nozzles at a nozzle pressure ratio of two showed that the presence of the injection geometry alone influenced the baseline vector angle of the flow. With the introduction of secondary injection, the thinner rectangular slot was found to outperform the two other configurations at low injection percentages, while secondary injection through an array of holes trended higher at higher injection percentages. Using the experimental and computational data collected during this study, a method was developed to predict vector angle from the wall static-pressure distributions internal to the nozzle. The predicted thrust-vector angle matched the angles measured from schlieren photographs to within the measurement uncertainty across the range of injection mass flow rates tested. This work was supported by the University of Colorado Boulder Engineering Excellence Fund.

  11. [Review of ear and nose and throat involvement in IgG4-RD].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaofeng; Liu, Chang; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized disease entity. IgG4-RD is characterized by a single or multiple masses in one or more organs; a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with a high percentage of plasma cells within the lesion staining for IgG4; a peculiar pattern of fibrosis known as "storiform" fibrosis; and elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. IgG4-RD can occur in various organs, including pancreas, kidneys, lungs, retroperitoneum, and prostate gland. The head and neck involvements of IgG4-RD have been chiefly described in Mikulicz disease (MD), Küttner's tumor, orbital? inflammatory pseudotumor, and idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) previously. Recent studies reported that IgG4-RD could also involve ear, nose and throat. Here we reviewed the literatures about ear, nose and throat involvement by IgG4-RD, in order to provide some theoretical bases for the diagnosis and treatment of IgG4-RD.

  12. Decoupling limit and throat geometry of non-susy D3 brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayek, Kuntal; Roy, Shibaji

    2017-03-01

    Recently it has been shown by us that, like BPS Dp branes, bulk gravity gets decoupled from the brane even for the non-susy Dp branes of type II string theories indicating a possible extension of AdS/CFT correspondence for the non-supersymmetric case. In that work, the decoupling of gravity on the non-susy Dp branes has been shown numerically for the general case as well as analytically for some special case. Here we discuss the decoupling limit and the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane when the charge associated with the brane is very large. We show that in the decoupling limit the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane, under appropriate coordinate change, reduces to the Constable-Myers solution and thus confirming that this solution is indeed the holographic dual of a (non-gravitational) gauge theory discussed there. We also show that when one of the parameters of the solution takes a specific value, it reduces, under another coordinate change, to the five-dimensional solution obtained by Csaki and Reece, again confirming its gauge theory interpretation.

  13. Reproductive System of Brown-throated Sloth (Bradypus variegatus, Schinz 1825, Pilosa, Xenarthra): Anatomy and Histology.

    PubMed

    Favoretto, S M; daSilva, E G; Menezes, J; Guerra, R R; Campos, D B

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, habitat degradation led to the decline of some populations of brown-throated sloth. The aim of this study was to describe morphological features of the female reproductive system of the species. The oval ovaries were partially surrounded by ovarian bursa. An external cortex and an inner medulla were present. Corpora lutea and corpora albicans together with follicles at various stages of development each with a single oocyte were found in the cortex. Uterine tubes were tortuous, tubular, travelled around the perimeter of the ovary and possessed a folded mucosa with ciliated pseudostratified epithelium. Uterus was simplex, with no horns and divided into three parts: a pear-shaped cranial segment and a long caudal uterine segment (both forming the body of the uterus) and two cervices. Uterus presented three layers: mucosa, lined by pseudostratified epithelium, muscular and serosa. The cervices connected the uterus to the urogenital sinus, a distensible cavity with longitudinal mucosal folds lined by transitional epithelium that extended from the external urethral orifice and the external uterine ostia to the vulva, which was lined by a keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. Brown-throated sloth presented a bipartite clitoris with paired crura, bodies and glandes. The presence of a double cervix and a bipartite clitoris was unique features of the species.

  14. An Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Translating Throat Single Expansion-Ramp Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1996-01-01

    A translating throat single expansion-ramp nozzle (SERN) concept was designed to improve the off-design performance of a SERN with a large, fixed expansion ratio. The concept of translating the nozzle throat provides the SERN with a variable expansion ratio. An experimental and computational study was conducted to predict and verify the internal performance of this concept. Three nozzles with expansion ratios designed for low, intermediate, and high Mach number operating conditions were tested in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. Each nozzle was tested with a concave and a convex geometric expansion ramp surface design. Internal nozzle performance, paint-oil flow and focusing Schlieren flow visualization were obtained for nozzle pressure ratios (NPR's) up to 13. The Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, with a k-epsilon turbulence model was utilized to verify experimental results at selected NPR's and to predict the performance at conditions unattainable in the test facility. Two-dimensional simulations were computed with near static free-stream conditions and at nozzle pressure ratios of 5, 9, and 13 for the concave ramp, low Mach number configuration and at the design NPR of 102 for the concave ramp, high Mach number configuration. Remarkable similarities between predicted and experimental flow characteristics, as well as performance quantities, were obtained.

  15. An experimental and computational investigation of a translating throat single expansion-ramp nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1996-01-01

    A translating throat single expansion-ramp nozzle (SERN) concept was designed to improve the off-design performance of a SERN with a large, fixed expansion ratio. The concept of translating the nozzle throat provides the SERN with a variable expansion ratio. An experimental and computational study was conducted to predict and verify the internal performance of this concept. Three nozzles with expansion ratios designed for low, intermediate, and high Mach number operating conditions were tested in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. Each nozzle was tested with a concave and a convex geometric expansion ramp surface design. Internal nozzle performance, paint-oil flow and focusing Schlieren flow visualization were obtained for nozzle pressure ratios (NPR's) up to 13. The Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, with a k-epsilon turbulence model was utilized to verify experimental results at selected NPRs and to predict the performance at conditions unattainable in the test facility. Two-dimensional simulations were computed with near static free-stream conditions and at nozzle pressure ratios of 5, 9, and 13 for the concave ramp, low Mach number configuration and at the design NPR of 102 for the concave ramp, high Mach number configuration. Remarkable similarities between predicted and experimental flow characteristics, as well as performance quantities, were obtained.

  16. Solutions with throats in Hořava gravity with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellorín, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro; Sotomayor, Adrián

    2016-10-01

    By combining analytical and numerical methods, we find that the solutions of the complete Hořava theory with negative cosmological constant that satisfy the conditions of staticity, spherical symmetry and vanishing of the shift function are two kinds of geometry: (i) a solution with two sides joined by a throat and (ii) a single side with a naked singularity at the origin. We study the second-order effective action. We consider the case when the coupling constant of the (∂ln N)2 term, which is the unique deviation from general relativity (GR) in the effective action, is small. At one side, the solution with the throat acquires a kind of deformed anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptotia and at the other side, there is an asymptotic essential singularity. The deformation of AdS essentially means that the lapse function N diverges asymptotically a bit faster than AdS. This can also be interpreted as an anisotropic Lifshitz scaling that the solutions acquire asymptotically.

  17. Breeding biology and natural history of the Slate-throated Whitestart in Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggera, R.A.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We provide details on the breeding biology of the Slate-throated Whitestart (Myioborus miniatus) from 126 nests found during seven breeding seasons, 2002-2008, at Yacamb?? National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity peaked in late April and May. Only the female built the nest and incubated the eggs. Males rarely visited the nest during these stages. Mean clutch size (2.1 ?? 0.04 eggs, n = 93) was the smallest recorded for the Slate-throated Whitestart. Incubation and nestling period lengths were 15.3 ?? 0.31 (n = 21) and 10.8 ?? 0.24 (n = 7) days, respectively. Attentiveness (% of time on the nest) during incubation (59 ?? 1.6%, n = 52) was similar to other tropical warblers and much lower than northern relatives. This caused a relatively low egg temperature (34.40 ?? 0.33u C, n = ?? nests, 20 days) compared with north temperate birds. Both parents fed nestlings and increased their provisioning rates with nestling age. Growth rate based on nestling mass (k = 0.521 ?? 0.015) was faster than for other tropical passerines but slower than northern relatives. Predation was the main cause of nesting failure and rate of predation increased with age of the nest. An estimated 15% of nests were successful based on an overall Mayfield daily predation rate of 0.053 ?? 0.007. This study confirms a strong latitudinal variation in life history traits of warblers. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  18. White-throated sparrows alter songs differentially in response to chorusing anurans and other background noise.

    PubMed

    Lenske, Ariel K; La, Van T

    2014-06-01

    Animals can use acoustic signals to attract mates and defend territories. As a consequence, background noise that interferes with signal transmission has the potential to reduce fitness, especially in birds that rely on song. While much research on bird song has investigated vocal flexibility in response to urban noise, weather and other birds, the possibility of inter-class acoustic competition from anurans has not been previously studied. Using sound recordings from central Ontario wetlands, we tested if white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicolis) make short-term changes to their singing behaviour in response to chorusing spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), as well as to car noise, wind and other bird vocalizations. White-throated sparrow songs that were sung during the spring peeper chorus were shorter with higher minimum frequencies and narrower bandwidths resulting in reduced frequency overlap. Additionally, sparrows were less likely to sing when car noise and the vocalizations of other birds were present. These patterns suggest that birds use multiple adjustment strategies. This is the first report to demonstrate that birds may alter their songs differentially in response to different sources of noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  19. Association of clinical signs and symptoms of Ebola viral disease with case fatality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Chitta, Swetha; Victor, Darlyn; Kandula, Manasa; Moole, Vishnu; Ghadiam, Harshavardhan; Akepati, Anusha; Yerasi, Charan; Uppu, Achuta; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Fischer, Jacqueline; Lynch, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a public health emergency of international concern. There is limited laboratory and clinical data available on patients with EVD. This is a meta-analysis to assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Aim To assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Method Study selection criterion: EVD articles with more than 35 EVD cases that described the clinical features were included. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, Ovid journals, and CDC and WHO official websites. Statistical methods: Pooled proportions were calculated using DerSimonian Laird method (random effects model). Results Initial search identified 634 reference articles, of which 67 were selected and reviewed. Data were extracted from 10 articles (N=5,792) of EVD which met the inclusion criteria. Bleeding events (64.5% vs. 25.1%), abdominal pain (58.3% vs. 37.5%), vomiting (60.8% vs. 31.7%), diarrhea (69.9% vs. 37.8%), cough (31.6% vs. 22.3%), sore throat (47.7% vs. 19.8%), and conjunctivitis (39.3% vs. 20.3%) were more often present in pooled proportion of fatal cases as compared to EVD survivors. Conclusions Clinical features of EVD that may be associated with higher mortality include bleeding events, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, cough, sore throat, and conjunctivitis. These patients should be identified promptly, and appropriate management should be instituted immediately. PMID:26333864

  20. Sydenham chorea

    MedlinePlus

    ... sore throat. Prevention Pay careful attention to children's complaints of sore throats and get early treatment to ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  1. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness.

  2. Various Treatment Techniques on Signs and Symptoms of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Gulick, Dawn T.; Kimura, Iris F.; Sitler, Michael; Paolone, Albert; Kelly, John D.

    1996-01-01

    Eccentric activities are an important component of physical conditioning and everyday activities. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can result from strenuous eccentric tasks and can be a limiting factor in motor performance for several days after exercise. An efficacious method of treatment for DOMS would enhance athletic performance and hasten the return to activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to identify a treatment method which could assist in the recovery of DOMS. In the selection of treatment methods, emphasis was directed toward treatments that could be rendered independently by an individual, therefore making the treatment valuable to an athletic trainer in team setting. DOMS was induced in 70 untrained volunteers via 15 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the forearm extensor muscles on a Lido isokinetic dynamometer. All subjects performed a pilot exercise bout for a minimum of 9 weeks before data collection to assure that DOMS would be produced. Data were collected on 15 dependent variables: active and passive wrist flexion and extension, forearm girth, limb volume, visual analogue pain scale, muscle soreness index, isometric strength, concentric and eccentric wrist total work, concentric and eccentric angle of peak torque. Data were collected on six occasions: pre- and post-induced DOMS, 20 minutes after treatment, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups (6 treatment and 1 control). Treatments included a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, high velocity concentric muscle contractions on an upper extremity ergometer, ice massage, 10-minute static stretching, topical Amica montana ointment, and sublingual A. montana pellets. A 7 × 6 ANOVA with repeated measures on time was performed on the delta values of each of the 15 dependent variables. Significant main effects (p < .05) were found for all of the dependent variables on time only. There were no significant differences between

  3. Whole-Body Vibration While Squatting and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Women

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, Nicole C.; Black, Christopher D.; Garner, John

    2015-01-01

    Context  Research into alleviating muscle pain and symptoms in individuals after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) has been inconsistent and unsuccessful in demonstrating a useful recovery modality. Objective  To investigate the effects of short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) on DOMS over a 72-hour period after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty women volunteered to participate in 4 testing sessions and were assigned randomly to a WBV group (n = 16; age = 21.0 ± 1.9 years, height = 164.86 ± 6.73 cm, mass = 58.58 ± 9.32 kg) or a control group (n = 14; age = 22.00 ± 1.97 years, height = 166.65 ± 8.04 cm, mass = 58.69 ± 12.92 kg). Intervention(s)  Participants performed 4 sets to failure of single-legged split squats with 40% of their body weight to induce muscle soreness in the quadriceps. The WBV or control treatment was administered each day after DOMS. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Unilateral pressure-pain threshold (PPT), range of motion (ROM), thigh circumference, and muscle-pain ratings of the quadriceps were collected before and for 3 days after high-intensity exercise. Each day, we collected 3 sets of measures, consisting of 1 measure before the WBV or control treatment protocol (pretreatment) and 2 sets of posttreatment measures. Results  We observed no interactions for PPT, thigh circumference, and muscle pain (P > .05). An interaction was found for active ROM (P = .01), with the baseline pretreatment measure greater than the measures at baseline posttreatment 1 through 48 hours posttreatment 2 in the WBV group. For PPT, a main effect for time was revealed (P < .05), with the measure at baseline pretreatment greater than at 24 hours pretreatment and all other time points for the vastus medialis, greater than 24 hours pretreatment through 48 hours posttreatment 2 for the vastus lateralis, and greater than 24 hours

  4. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Klaus; Telford, Richard D; Cunningham, Ross B

    2013-01-01

    Objective Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high intensities. We investigated the effects of a marine oil complex, PCSO-524®, derived from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel (formulated as Lyprinol® and Omega XL®) on DOMS after a 30 km training run. Methods Initially, peak oxygen uptake of 32 distance runners (4 female, 28 male; median age 45 years, range 28–53) was measured on a treadmill with a 1.5 km hour−1 increase every 4 minutes starting from 8.5 km hour−1. At least 1-week after this initial test, they participated in a 30 km road run at a speed corresponding to about 70% of their individual peak oxygen uptake on a flat terrain. Before and after (0, 24, and 48 hours) the run, blood concentration of creatine kinase (CK) were measured and pain sensation was determined (pain scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = extremely painful). Runners were then matched in pairs based on maximal CK and peak oxygen uptake, and allocated randomly into two different groups. One group was supplemented with 400 mg per day of PCSO-524® for 11 weeks, the other group with an olive oil placebo. After that period, CK and pain sensations were remeasured following a second 30 km run at the same speed and on the same terrain. Results The general pattern of soreness in the PCSO-524® supplemented group was reduced by 1.1 units (standard error 0.41) compared to the placebo (P < 0.05), the effects being greater in lesser trained runners (P < 0.05). CK levels were positively associated with pain sensation (P < 0.05), but trends toward lower CK in the PCSO-524® group, which were also more pronounced in the lesser trained runners, were not statistically significant. Conclusion Pain sensations experienced by distance runners following a 30 km run were reduced by supplementation with the marine oil complex PCSO-524®, an effect which was greater in lesser trained

  5. [A double blind randomised clinical trial to assess the efficacy of the treatments of the superficial pressure sores].

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Paola; Saiani, Luisa; Laquintana, Dario; Palese, Alvisa; Perli, Serena; Andreatta, Mariarosa; Rosa, Federica; Chini, Patrizia; Soraperra, Francesca; Ventura, Ida; Suriani, Cinzia; Romani, Silvia; Zancarli, Miriam; Martini, Marta; Partel, Francesca; Bassetti, Serena; Kaisermann, Rita; Bortolotti, Chiara; Gianordoli, Mirta; Rizzoli, Ilaria; Nardelli, Roberta; Pellizzari, Enrico; Valduga, Edda; Castaman, Marta; Pordenon, Marta; Beltrame, Moira; Bertolo, Cecilia; Casasola, Eleonora; Del Pin, Patrizia; Giolo, Simonetta; Marcatti, Emanuele; Pecini, Dina; Rodaro, Marisa; Zanon, Cristina; Stefanon, Laura; Covre, Lidia; Babbo, Consuela; Martin, Irma; Roilo, Antonia; Zanutel, Marta; Sabbadin, Silvano; Boin, Laura; Caron, Alessia; Martignago, Egidio; Venturin, Valter; Greggio, Annalisa; Frigo, Paola; Lazzaron, Daniela; Tonietto, Annalisa; Zanin, Barbara; Zorzi, Silvano; Zuanon, Antonio; Salmaso, Daniele; Frison, Tiziana; Marin, Irene; Buosi, Antonella; Fiorese, Elena; Gasparin, Dino; Goat, Barbara; Saccardo, Graziella; Simonetto, Ornella; Gomiero, Silvio; Baccara, Nicoletta; Ghirardello, Lucia; Niolu, Marilena; Silvestri, Sabrina; Buffon, Maria Luisa; Casson, Paola; Santantonio, Rosy; Albore, Piersandro; Mazzorana, Elvira; Terziariol, Laura; Bulgarelli, Giuliana; Barani, Elisa; Gasparini, Patrizia; Migliori, Salvina; Sasso, Elisa; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Tognoni, Gianni; Sgaroni, Guya; Noro, Gabriele; Mattiuzzo, Mara

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the progresses of knowledge and care, pressure sores continue to be a clinically relevant problem. A double blind randomised controlled trial was organised to assess the efficacy of triticum vulgaris (Fitostimoline) vs placebo in the re-epithelisation of superficial pressure sores. Patients with stage NPUAP II or superficial pressure sores, with an expected survival of more than 3 months and eligible for a follow-up up to 8 weeks were included, over a period of 2 years in 46 clinical sites. The protocol was approved by local ethical committees and informed consent was obtained before randomisation. Medications were performed by nurses if the patient was hospitalised and by nurses or properly instructed caregivers at home. Weekly follow-up controls were assumed by nurses. Out of the 294 randomised patients 270 were included in the analyses. The two groups are comparable for the main characteristics except for Norton Scale mean values, less severe in the group assigned to active treatment (10.1+/-3.7 vs 8.9+/-3.2). The mean follow-up was of 3.8 and 4.2 weeks with a mean duration of 26+/-18 and 29+/-18 days for the experimental group and controls respectively. Seventy-six patients in the treatment group and controls (58.0 and 54.7) had their lesions re-epithelized. Adjusting results for age, initial Norton and Push scores there are no differences between treated and controls (OR 0.99 95% IC 0.60-1.67). This multicentre study, sponsored by a research group of nurses, failed to support the hypothesis that triticum vulgaris, the active component of the product Fitostimoline, given on top of recommended treatment, provides a specific therapeutic advantage in terms of frequency and timing of re-epithelization in superficial pressure sores.

  6. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    PubMed Central

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  7. The effect of a prophylactic dose of flurbiprofen on muscle soreness and sprinting performance in trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Semark, A; Noakes, T D; St Clair Gibson, A; Lambert, M I

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a prophylactic dose of a local, transcutaneously administered, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on muscle soreness, muscle damage and sprinting performance in young trained males. Twenty-five subjects aged 19+/-3 years, actively participating in rugby union and field hockey, were familiarized with the test procedure and then divided at random into an experimental group (n = 13) and a control group (n = 12). The experimental group received two patches, each containing 40 mg flurbiprofen (TransAct LAT), 12 h before an exercise bout designed to produce delayed-onset soreness (DOMS). The control group received identical non-medicated placebo patches at the same time. Delayed-onset muscle soreness was induced by an exercise protocol consisting of drop jumps (seven sets of 10 repetitions). Serum creatine kinase activity, muscle soreness, muscle girth and acceleration in a maximal sprint over 30 m were measured before the induction of DOMS and at 12, 24, 48 and 72 h thereafter. Plasma lactate concentration was measured 3 min after the 30-m sprint tests. Subjects in both groups had significantly more pain at 24 and 48 h compared with at 12 and 72 h (P < 0.05; Friedman two-way analysis of variance). Thigh girth and serum creatine kinase did not change throughout the experiment. Although plasma lactate concentrations were elevated after the 30-m sprint, there were no differences between groups or as a result of DOMS. The greatest acceleration occurred between 5 and 10 m. This was not affected by the anti-inflammatory drug or DOMS. In conclusion, the aetiology of the DOMS induced in the trained subjects in this study seems to be independent of inflammatory processes or, more specifically, of increases in prostaglandin synthesis in the muscles.

  8. Introduction of a Nozzle Throat Diameter Dependency into the SRM Dust Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabroth, S.; Wegener, P.; Oswald, M.; Wiedemann, C.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    In the exhaust gas of SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) firings, a considerable amount of very small aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particles is generally included. In order to increase motor performance and to dampen burn instabilities, aluminium is used as an additive in the propellant. During the burn process this aluminium is transformed into Al2O3. A large number of small dust particles (< 1 μ m up to about 50 μ m) is generated continuously during a burn. At the end of a burn, a second group of much larger fragments from an Al2O3 slag pool clustering inside the motor leaves the nozzle. The ESA space debris population model MASTER-2001 considers 1,032 SRM firings with the associated generation of SRM slag and dust. The resulting Al2O3 population is a major contribution to the micron size space debris environment in Earth orbit. For the modelling of each SRM dust release event a detailed knowledge of the size distribution is essential. However, the knowledge of the particle size distribution after passing the nozzle throat is poor. The current dust implementation in the MASTER-2001 space debris model therefore assumes an average motor size, since information on the actual motor size is normally not available in common databases. Thus, a fixed distribution is identically used for large upper stages as well as small apogee motors. This assumption can lead to an over-representation of large dust in regions, where mainly apogee motors are used (i.e. GEO) and an under-representation in lower altitudes, where large stages predominate. In this paper, a concept for the improvement of SRM dust size modelling is discussed. It will be shown that an introduction of a nozzle throat diameter dependency into the dust size distribution could lead to a more precise modelling of SRM dust release events. Investigations showed that there is a good correlation between the propellant mass flow and the nozzle's throat diameter, which is in turn the determining term for the actual diameter

  9. The effect of kinesio taping versus stretching techniques on muscle soreness, and flexibility during recovery from nordic hamstring exercise.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Tarik; Yagmur Gunes, Gokce; Dogan, Hanife; Ucar, Ilyas; Willems, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching, or kinesio taping (KT) on muscle soreness and flexibility during recovery from exercise. Sixty-five females were randomly assigned to four groups: PNF stretching (n = 15), static stretching (n = 16), KT (n = 17), and control (n = 17). All participants performed nordic hamstring exercise (5 sets of 8 repetitions). In all groups, hamstring flexibility at 24 h and 48 h was not changed from baseline (p > .05). The muscle soreness was measured higher at 48 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the control group (p = .04) and at 24 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the PNF group (p < .01). No significant differences were found for intervention groups compared with control group in all measurements (p > .05). The KT application and pre-exercise stretching have no contribute to flexibility at 24 h and 48 h after exercise, but may attenuate muscle soreness.

  10. Resveratrol exerts no effect on inflammatory response and delayed onset muscle soreness after a marathon in male athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Laupheimer, M W; Perry, M; Benton, S; Malliaras, P; Maffulli, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether the inflammatory response and delayed onset of muscle soreness after a marathon are altered by resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid antioxidant. Design: Double blind placebo-controlled randomised pilot study. Setting: London Marathon. Participants: Marathon race participants Interventions: 7 healthy male athletes were randomised to receive Resveratrol (600 mg Resveratrol daily for 7 days immediately before the marathon) or a placebo. Main Outcome Measurements: Blood samples taken 48 hours before and 18–32 hours after the marathon were analysed for white blood cell count (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A VAS score was taken at the same times as the blood samples to assess delayed onset muscle soreness. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of changes occurring between pre- and post- tests for WBC, CRP or VAS. Conclusions: There were no differences in immune response or delayed onset muscle soreness between resveratrol and placebo after a marathon. Further investigations are needed with longer treatment time and higher doses, analysing additional parameters such interleukins for a possible effect of resveratrol on the inflammatory response due to extensive exercise. To avoid a type II error, 17 subjects in each group would be required. PMID:25147765

  11. The influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite Rugby Union.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Trewartha, G; Kemp, S P T; Michell, R; Stokes, K A

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study investigated the influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite English Premiership Rugby Union players. Time loss (from 39.5 matches) and abrasion (from 27 matches) injury risk was compared between matches played on artificial turf and natural grass. Muscle soreness was reported over the 4 days following one match played on each surface by 95 visiting players (i.e., normally play on natural grass surfaces). There was a likely trivial difference in the overall injury burden relating to time-loss injuries between playing surfaces [rate ratio = 1.01, 90% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-1.38]. Abrasions were substantially more common on artificial turf (rate ratio = 7.92, 90% CI: 4.39-14.28), although the majority of these were minor and only two resulted in any reported time loss. Muscle soreness was consistently higher over the 4 days following a match on artificial turf in comparison with natural grass, although the magnitude of this effect was small (effect sizes ranging from 0.26 to 0.40). These results suggest that overall injury risk is similar for the two playing surfaces, but further surveillance is required before inferences regarding specific injury diagnoses and smaller differences in overall injury risk can be made.

  12. Control of scabies, skin sores and haematuria in children in the Solomon Islands: another role for ivermectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Gregor; Leafasia, Judson; Sheridan, John; Hills, Susan; Wate, Janet; Wate, Christine; Montgomery, Janet; Pandeya, Nirmala; Purdie, David

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a 3-year programme aimed at controlling scabies on five small lagoon islands in the Solomon Islands by monitoring scabies, skin sores, streptococcal skin contamination, serology and haematuria in the island children. METHODS: Control was achieved by treating almost all residents of each island once or twice within 2 weeks with ivermectin (160-250 microg/kg), except for children who weighed less than 15 kg and pregnant women, for whom 5% permethrin cream was used. Reintroduction of scabies was controlled by treating returning residents and visitors, whether or not they had evident scabies. FINDINGS: Prevalence of scabies dropped from 25% to less than 1% (P < 0.001); prevalence of sores from 40% to 21% (P < 0.001); streptococcal contamination of the fingers in those with and without sores decreased significantly (P = 0.02 and 0.047, respectively) and anti-DNase B levels decreased (P = 0.002). Both the proportion of children with haematuria and its mean level fell (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). No adverse effects of the treatments were seen. CONCLUSION: The results show that ivermectin is an effective and practical agent in the control of scabies and that control reduces the occurrence of streptococcal skin disease and possible signs of renal damage in children. Integrating community-based control of scabies and streptococcal skin disease with planned programmes for controlling filariasis and intestinal nematodes could be both practical and produce great health benefits. PMID:15682247

  13. Holographic Systematics of D-brane Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Dymarsky, Anatoly; Kachru, Shamit; Klebanov, Igor R.; McAllister, Liam; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-11-05

    We provide a systematic treatment of possible corrections to the inflaton potential for D-brane inflation in the warped deformed conifold. We consider the D3-brane potential in the presence of the most general possible corrections to the throat geometry sourced by coupling to the bulk of a compact Calabi-Yau space. This corresponds to the potential on the Coulomb branch of the dual gauge theory, in the presence of arbitrary perturbations of the Lagrangian. The leading contributions arise from perturbations by the most relevant operators that do not destroy the throat geometry. We find a generic contribution from a non-chiral operator of dimension {Delta} = 2 associated with a global symmetry current, resulting in a negative contribution to the inflaton mass-squared. If the Calabi-Yau preserves certain discrete symmetries, this is the dominant correction to the inflaton potential, and fine-tuning of the inflaton mass is possible. In the absence of such discrete symmetries, the dominant contribution comes from a chiral operator with {Delta} = 3/2, corresponding to a {phi}{sup 3/2} term in the inflaton potential. The resulting inflationary models are phenomenologically identical to the inflection point scenarios arising from specific D7-brane embeddings, but occur under far more general circumstances. Our strategy extends immediately to other warped geometries, given sufficient knowledge of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum.

  14. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Meamarbashi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role. Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized. Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS. Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered. PMID:28265543

  15. Stress and body condition in a population of largemouth bass: implications for red-sore disease

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1980-09-01

    The body conditions, K = 10/sup 5/(weight, g)/(standard length)/sup 3/, and various hematological characters were examined for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from Par Pond, a reservoir heated by effluent from a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Largemouth bass with K less than 2.0 had significantly lower (P < 0.05) hematocrits, hemoglobin concentrations, total red blood cell counts, total white blood cell counts, and lymphocyte fractions, and significantly higher granulocyte fractions and cortisol concentrations, than those with K greater than 2.0; monocyte, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte fractions were not different between the two K-factor groupings. When data were pooled, all blood variables except the reticulocyte fraction were significantly correlated with K. Hematocrit, the lymphocyte fraction, and cortisol concentration account for 20.5% of the variation in K. These data support a previous hypothesis that elevated water temperature promotes stress. Stress within the Par Pond largemouth bass population may play an important role in the epizootiology of red-sore disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila.

  16. Pilot Study on the Effect of Grounding on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dick; Hill, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether there are markers that can be used to study the effects of grounding on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and subjects Eight (8) healthy subjects were exposed to an eccentric exercise that caused DOMS in gastrocnemius muscles of both legs. Four (4) subjects were grounded with electrode patches and patented conductive sheets connected to the earth. Four (4) control subjects were treated identically, except that the grounding systems were not connected to the earth. Outcome measures Complete blood counts, blood chemistry, enzyme chemistry, serum and saliva cortisols, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy and pain levels were taken at the same time of day before the eccentric exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. Parameters consistently differing by 10% or more, normalized to baseline, were considered worthy of further study. Results Parameters that differed by these criteria included white blood cell counts, bilirubin, creatine kinase, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratios, glycerolphosphorylcholine, phosphorylcholine, the visual analogue pain scale, and pressure measurements on the right gastrocnemius. Conclusions In a pilot study, grounding the body to the earth alters measures of immune system activity and pain. Since this is the first intervention that appears to speed recovery from DOMS, the pilot provides a basis for a larger study. PMID:20192911

  17. A review of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2014-12-01

    This review is focused on the effect of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occurs after exercise. In general, high force eccentric contractions and/or unaccustomed exercise result in DOMS attributed to reduction in performance such as muscle strength and range of motion (ROM) for both athletes and non-athletes. Nutritional intervention is one of the preventive or therapeutic ways to reduce DOMS. Previous research studies have suggested the following nutrition intervention: caffeine, omega-3 fatty acids, taurine, polyphenols, and so on. Nutritional intervention with these nutrients before and after exercise was reported to be effective in reducing DOMS. These nutritional interventions have also been reported to affect inflammatory responses and oxidative stress leading to DOMS reduction. However, other studies have reported that these nutritional interventions have no effect on DOMS. It is suggested that intake of proper nutrition intervention can effectively reduce DOMS after exercise and quickly help an athlete return to exercise or training program. In addition, nutritional intervention may help both athletes and non-athletes who engage in physical therapy or rehabilitative programs after surgery or any injurious events.

  18. Influence of fatigue, stress, muscle soreness and sleep on perceived exertion during submaximal effort.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Castagna, Carlo; Hambli, Mourad; Hue, Olivier; Chamari, Karim

    2013-07-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Hooper's Index variations (i.e., self-ratings of fatigue, stress, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and sleep) on rating of perceived exertion during a 10 min submaximal exercise training session (RPE-10 min) and then check the stability and the internal consistency of RPE-10 min. Seventeen junior soccer players took part in this study. The individual Hooper's indices taken before each training session were correlated with RPE-10 min during a constant intensity and duration effort (10 min) using Pearson product moment correlation. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to assess the internal consistency of the RPE-10 min. All individual correlations between RPE-10 min and quality of sleep and quantity of fatigue, stress, and DOMS were non-significant (p>0.05). No significant correlations were resulted between RPE-10 min and Hooper's Index in all athletes. The ICC of RPE-10 min was 0.77 thus demonstrating internal consistency. The results of the present study demonstrated the objectivity and utility of RPE as a psychological tool for monitoring training during traditional soccer training. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep are not major contributors of perceived exertion during traditional soccer training without excessive training loads. It seems that psychobiological factors other than fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep may have mediated the 10 min exercise perceptual intensity.

  19. Central Projection of Pain Arising from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Leidl, Caroline; Kaschka, Miriam; Carr, Richard W.; Terekhin, Pavel; Handwerker, Hermann O.; Forster, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a subacute pain state arising 24–48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1) cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2) areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not. PMID:23056613

  20. A review of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness. Part I

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused on the effect of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occurs after exercise. In general, high force eccentric contractions and/or unaccustomed exercise result in DOMS attributed to reduction in performance such as muscle strength and range of motion (ROM) for both athletes and non-athletes. Nutritional intervention is one of the preventive or therapeutic ways to reduce DOMS. Previous research studies have suggested the following nutrition intervention: caffeine, omega-3 fatty acids, taurine, polyphenols, and so on. Nutritional intervention with these nutrients before and after exercise was reported to be effective in reducing DOMS. These nutritional interventions have also been reported to affect inflammatory responses and oxidative stress leading to DOMS reduction. However, other studies have reported that these nutritional interventions have no effect on DOMS. It is suggested that intake of proper nutrition intervention can effectively reduce DOMS after exercise and quickly help an athlete return to exercise or training program. In addition, nutritional intervention may help both athletes and non-athletes who engage in physical therapy or rehabilitative programs after surgery or any injurious events. PMID:25610818

  1. Acephate affects migratory orientation of the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Sauer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Migratory white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) were exposed to acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), an organophosphorus pesticide, to determine its effects on migratory orientation and behavior. Birds were also exposed to polarizer sheets to determine the mechanism by which acephate may affect migratory orientation. Adult birds exposed to 256 ppm acephate a.i. were not able to establish a preferred migratory orientation and exhibited random activity. All juvenile treatment groups displayed a seasonally correct southward migratory orientation. We hypothesize that acephate may have produced aberrant migratory behavior by affecting the memory of the migratory route and wintering ground. This experiment reveals that an environmentally relevant concentration of a common organophosphorus pesticide can alter migratory orientation, but its effect is markedly different between adult and juvenile sparrows. Results suggest that the survival of free-flying adult passerine migrants may be compromised following organophosphorus pesticide exposure.

  2. A model for multiple throat structures in the polar cap flow entry region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. J.; Siscoe, G. L.; Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional ionospheric convection model has been developed to produce convection patterns for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and a positive or negative IMF y component. The model consists of a movable, shear convection reversal boundary with a gap in it where flux enters the polar cap. The sign of IMF B(y) determines the dayside gap geometry. This simple model is used to simulate measured ionospheric flows from the DE 2 satellite. Roughly 35 percent of DE 2 passes that cross the dayside between 0800 and 1400 hours MLT cannot be modeled with a single narrow flow entry region. By comparing model calculations and the measured ion flows, it is shown that the dayside flow entry region to the polar cap typically spans several hours in local time. The electric field can concentrate along portions of the polar cap entrance and weaken between the concentrated regions, thus forming multiple 'throats'.

  3. Cancer of the Throat: A Physician’s Experience as a Patient

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    The author, a practicing physician, was diagnosed with throat cancer and lost his vocal cords. He endured the side effects of radiation, repeated surgeries, and the effects of prolonged hospitalizations; confronted medical mistakes and discrimination after losing his vocal cords; and struggled to regain his speech and find new meaning and purpose for his life. Facing the hardship and trials of becoming a laryngectomee illustrated to him how dependent and helpless a patient can become. Being unable to speak, eat, and breathe normally, while dealing with a potentially terminal illness, makes the patient very vulnerable, both physically and emotionally. A skillful, competent, error-free, empathetic, and caring approach that recognizes what the patient is experiencing can expedite recovery and well-being and help the patient return to a productive and meaningful life. PMID:27487313

  4. Effect of radial plasma transport at the magnetic throat on axial ion beam formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Correlation between radial plasma transport and formation of an axial ion beam has been investigated in a helicon plasma reactor implemented with a convergent-divergent magnetic nozzle. The plasma discharge is sustained under a high magnetic field mode and a low magnetic field mode for which the electron energy probability function, the plasma density, the plasma potential, and the electron temperature are measured at the magnetic throat, and the two field modes show different radial parametric behaviors. Although an axial potential drop occurs in the plasma source for both field modes, an ion beam is only observed in the high field mode while not in the low field mode. The transport of energetic ions is characterized downstream of the plasma source using the delimited ion current and nonlocal ion current. A decay of ion beam strength is also observed in the diffusion chamber.

  5. A painful stiff neck following an ear, nose, and throat surgical procedure: case report.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Elena; Copioli, Cristiana; Spagnoli, Carlotta; Mazzotta, Silvia; Ormitti, Francesca; Crisi, Girolamo; Pisani, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Grisel syndrome is a rare, nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation, typical of developmental ages and characterized by head flexion/rotation and painful fixation. Neurological symptoms may occur. It is secondary to head/neck infections and ear, nose, and throat surgery (adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, and mastoidectomy). Here, we report the case of a child who presented a painful stiff neck following an adenotonsillectomy, with imaging evidencing an atlantoaxial subluxation. The child showed improvement in his condition following a conservative treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic therapy and cervical collar. We believe it is of great significance for clinicians taking into account this peculiar condition in the differential diagnosis of a stiff neck in pediatric patients, thus avoiding misdiagnosis and delays. Indeed, its diagnosis is mainly based on a focused anamnesis associated with the detection of the typical neuroradiological findings.

  6. Lodged in the throat: internal infinities and AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Don; Yarom, Amos

    2006-01-01

    In the context of AdS3/CFT2, we address spacetimes with a certain sort of internal infinity as typified by the extreme BTZ black hole. The internal infinity is a null circle lying at the end of the black hole's infinite throat. We argue that such spacetimes may be described by a product CFT of the form CFTLotimesCFTR, where CFTR is associated with the asymptotically AdS boundary while CFTL is associated with the null circle. Our particular calculations analyze the CFT dual of the extreme BTZ black hole in a linear toy model of AdS3/CFT2. Since the BTZ black hole is a quotient of AdS3, the dual CFT state is a corresponding quotient of the CFT vacuum state. This state turns out to live in the aforementioned product CFT. We discuss this result in the context of general issues of AdS/CFT duality and entanglement entropy.

  7. Causes and time-course of vertigo in an ear, nose, and throat clinic.

    PubMed

    Isaradisaikul, Suwicha; Navacharoen, Niramon; Hanprasertpong, Charuk; Kangsanarak, Jaran; Panyathong, Rapeepun

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to review etiologies and identify the time-course of vertigo presenting in an ear, nose, and throat clinic, and serve as a reference guide for other clinics. The study includes retrospective chart review in a tertiary care, university hospital. The patient data with reported ICD-10 codes as causes of vertigo between April 2005 and December 2007 were extracted from the database. At each visit, the main diagnosis as to etiology, characteristics of the vertigo, its time-course, and patient demographic data were recorded. Of 547 cases, 17 diagnoses were made in 73.9%. Diagnostic categories included peripheral vertigo 72.9%, central vertigo 0.8%, psychogenic cause 0.2%, and unknown 26.1%. Common causes of vertigo were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) 52.5%, Meniere's disease 14.6%, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss 2.9%. Less common diagnoses were benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood 0.7%, labyrinthitis 0.7%, and vestibular schwannoma 0.3%. Rare conditions were delayed endolymphatic hydrops, Ramsey Hunt syndrome, otosyphilis, vestibular neuritis, temporal bone fracture, post-concussion syndrome, cerebellar infarction, epilepsy, cervical vertigo, Streptococcus suis meningitis, and psychogenic vertigo. Ninety-nine cases who reported remission of vertigo during the study period had median onset of the remission at 4 weeks. In the ear, nose, and throat clinic at Chiang Mai University, a tertiary university hospital, peripheral vestibular disorders were the main etiology of vertigo. The three most common causes were BPPV, Meniere's disease, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss. Half of the cases who returned for follow up had remitted symptoms within 4 weeks.

  8. Genes located in a chromosomal inversion are correlated with territorial song in white-throated sparrows.

    PubMed

    Zinzow-Kramer, W M; Horton, B M; McKee, C D; Michaud, J M; Tharp, G K; Thomas, J W; Tuttle, E M; Yi, S; Maney, D L

    2015-11-01

    The genome of the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) contains an inversion polymorphism on chromosome 2 that is linked to predictable variation in a suite of phenotypic traits including plumage color, aggression and parental behavior. Differences in gene expression between the two color morphs, which represent the two common inversion genotypes (ZAL2/ZAL2 and ZAL2/ZAL2(m) ), may therefore advance our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these phenotypes. To identify genes that are differentially expressed between the two morphs and correlated with behavior, we quantified gene expression and terrirorial aggression, including song, in a population of free-living white-throated sparrows. We analyzed gene expression in two brain regions, the medial amygdala (MeA) and hypothalamus. Both regions are part of a 'social behavior network', which is rich in steroid hormone receptors and previously linked with territorial behavior. Using weighted gene co-expression network analyses, we identified modules of genes that were correlated with both morph and singing behavior. The majority of these genes were located within the inversion, showing the profound effect of the inversion on the expression of genes captured by the rearrangement. These modules were enriched with genes related to retinoic acid signaling and basic cellular functioning. In the MeA, the most prominent pathways were those related to steroid hormone receptor activity. Within these pathways, the only gene encoding such a receptor was ESR1 (estrogen receptor 1), a gene previously shown to predict song rate in this species. The set of candidate genes we identified may mediate the effects of a chromosomal inversion on territorial behavior.

  9. Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Dual-Throat Fluidic Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmetsa, Naveen

    The dual-throat fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle concept is of particular interest because of its ability to provide large vector angles with minimal losses in thrust. This work investigates the performance of a dual-throat fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle over a range of three secondary injection geometries: two (V1, V2) spanwise oriented rectangular slots of different thicknesses and (V3) a single spanwise oriented array of circular holes. Baseline testing at a nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) of 2 showed that the presence of the injection geometry alone had a noticeable impact in vectoring the primary flow. Specifically, the smaller slot, larger slot, and hole geometries deflected the primary flow by deltaa ≈ 2°, 0.5° and - 4°, respectively. When secondary injection was introduced the smaller slot displayed better vector performance across the entire range of secondary injection mass flow rates as compared to the larger slot configuration. The circular hole geometry was less effective at low secondary injection flow rates, but came close to surpassing the performance of both slot geometries at 5% secondary injection. Increasing the NPR to 4 for all three cases greatly reduced the influence of the secondary injection geometry on the baseline nozzle performance. Specifically, the smaller slot geometry displayed a drop in thrust vectoring angle from deltaa = 12° to 8° when NPR was increased from 2 to 4. Finally, using the experimental and computational data collected during this study, a method was developed to predict vector angle from the wall static-pressure distributions internal to the nozzle. This was accomplished through integrating the pressure profiles, applying a correction factor derived from computational results, and calculating the total thrust based upon the core mass flow rate and exit pressure. The predicted thrust-vector angle matched the angles measured from the schlieren photographs to within measurement uncertainty across the range of injection

  10. Genes located in a chromosomal inversion are correlated with territorial song in white-throated sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy M.; Horton, Brent M.; McKee, Clifton D.; Michaud, Justin M.; Tharp, Gregory K.; Thomas, James W.; Tuttle, Elaina M.; Yi, Soojin; Maney, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) contains an inversion polymorphism on chromosome 2 that is linked to predictable variation in a suite of phenotypic traits including plumage color, aggression, and parental behavior. Differences in gene expression between the two color morphs, which represent the two common inversion genotypes (ZAL2/ZAL2 and ZAL2/ZAL2m), are therefore of potential interest toward understanding the molecular underpinnings of these phenotypes. To identify genes that are differentially expressed between the two morphs and correlated with behavior, we quantified both behavior and brain gene expression in a population of free-living white-throated sparrows. We quantified behavioral responses to simulated territorial intrusions (STIs) early during the breeding season. In the same birds, we then performed a transcriptome-wide analysis of gene expression in two regions, the medial amygdala and hypothalamus. Both regions are part of a ‘social behavior network’, which is rich in steroid hormone receptors and previously linked with territorial behavior. Using network analyses, we identified modules of genes that were correlated with both morph and STI-induced singing behavior. The majority of these genes were located within the inversion, demonstrating the profound effect the inversion has on the expression of genes captured by the rearrangement. Gene pathway analyses revealed that in the medial amygdala, the most prominent pathways were those related to steroid hormone receptor activity. Within these pathways, the only gene encoding such a receptor was ESR1 (estrogen receptor alpha). Our results thus suggest that ESR1 and related genes are important for behavioral differences between the morphs. PMID:26463687

  11. Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2006-01-01

    A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

  12. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women.

  13. Reproductive parameters in the critically endangered Blue-throated Macaw: limits to the recovery of a parrot under intensive management.

    PubMed

    Berkunsky, Igor; Daniele, Gonzalo; Kacoliris, Federico P; Díaz-Luque, José A; Silva Frias, Carmen P; Aramburu, Rosana M; Gilardi, James D

    2014-01-01

    Rediscovered in the wild twenty years ago, the breeding biology of wild Blue-throated Macaws remains largely unexplored, yet is essential to its effective conservation and recovery. Here, we analyse reproductive parameters in an intensively managed wild population of Blue-throated Macaws, providing the first data on the breeding biology of this critically endangered species. During the six-year study period, 2007-2012, the number of active breeding pairs either remained constant or decreased, depending on the site, and no new breeding pairs were discovered despite extensive searching. We documented nesting attempts in natural cavities in dead palms or live hardwoods, and artificial nest boxes. Egg-laying was concentrated during the end of dry season and the beginning of the wet season, August through December. Hatching failure was the greatest cause of egg losses. Half of the breeding attempts of Blue-throated Macaws produced at least one fledging, on average two, after a 85 days nestling period. An average of 4.3 nestlings per year fledged from all known wild nests combined. Each pair lost roughly 65% of its initial reproductive investment at each nesting attempt. In most successful nesting attempts of individualized pairs, a new nesting attempt was not detected the following year. All monitored breeding pairs showed high nest site fidelity, reusing hardwood-tree cavities and nest boxes. Our findings will aid conservation efforts by refining current actions and prompting new approaches towards the conservation and recovery of the Blue-throated Macaw.

  14. Reproductive Parameters in the Critically Endangered Blue-Throated Macaw: Limits to the Recovery of a Parrot under Intensive Management

    PubMed Central

    Berkunsky, Igor; Daniele, Gonzalo; Kacoliris, Federico P.; Díaz-Luque, José A.; Silva Frias, Carmen P.; Aramburu, Rosana M.; Gilardi, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Rediscovered in the wild twenty years ago, the breeding biology of wild Blue-throated Macaws remains largely unexplored, yet is essential to its effective conservation and recovery. Here, we analyse reproductive parameters in an intensively managed wild population of Blue-throated Macaws, providing the first data on the breeding biology of this critically endangered species. During the six-year study period, 2007–2012, the number of active breeding pairs either remained constant or decreased, depending on the site, and no new breeding pairs were discovered despite extensive searching. We documented nesting attempts in natural cavities in dead palms or live hardwoods, and artificial nest boxes. Egg-laying was concentrated during the end of dry season and the beginning of the wet season, August through December. Hatching failure was the greatest cause of egg losses. Half of the breeding attempts of Blue-throated Macaws produced at least one fledging, on average two, after a 85 days nestling period. An average of 4.3 nestlings per year fledged from all known wild nests combined. Each pair lost roughly 65% of its initial reproductive investment at each nesting attempt. In most successful nesting attempts of individualized pairs, a new nesting attempt was not detected the following year. All monitored breeding pairs showed high nest site fidelity, reusing hardwood-tree cavities and nest boxes. Our findings will aid conservation efforts by refining current actions and prompting new approaches towards the conservation and recovery of the Blue-throated Macaw. PMID:24941317

  15. Coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and Canine Distemper Virus in a Yellow-throated Marten ( Martes flavigula koreana) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Surim; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Hae Beom; Cho, Ho Seong; Kim, Wonil; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-04-28

    We describe coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and canine distemper virus (CDV) in a yellow-throated marten ( Martes flavigula koreana). We found Hepatozoon cysts in muscular tissue and viral inclusion bodies in the brain. Hepatozoon sp., and CDV was confirmed in blood and brain, respectively, by PCR.

  16. Female preference for sympatric vs. allopatric male throat color morphs in the mesquite lizard (Sceloporus grammicus) species complex.

    PubMed

    Bastiaans, Elizabeth; Bastiaans, Mary Jane; Morinaga, Gen; Castañeda Gaytán, José Gamaliel; Marshall, Jonathon C; Bane, Brendan; de la Cruz, Fausto Méndez; Sinervo, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Color polymorphic sexual signals are often associated with alternative reproductive behaviors within populations, and the number, frequency, or type of morphs present often vary among populations. When these differences lead to assortative mating by population, the study of such polymorphic taxa may shed light on speciation mechanisms. We studied two populations of a lizard with polymorphic throat color, an important sexual signal. Males in one population exhibit orange, yellow, or blue throats; whereas males in the other exhibit orange, yellow, or white throats. We assessed female behavior when choosing between allopatric and sympatric males. We asked whether females discriminated more when the allopatric male was of an unfamiliar morph than when the allopatric male was similar in coloration to the sympatric male. We found that female rejection of allopatric males relative to sympatric males was more pronounced when males in a pair were more different in throat color. Our findings may help illuminate how behavioral responses to color morph differences between populations with polymorphic sexual signals contribute to reproductive isolation.

  17. 76 FR 34845 - Medical Devices; Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices; Classification of the Wireless Air-Conduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 874 Medical Devices; Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices; Classification of... established by this final rule create ``requirements'' for specific medical devices under 21 U.S.C. 360k, even..., 1976 (the date of enactment of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976), generally referred to...

  18. Using Evaluability Assessment to Improve Program Evaluation for the Blue-Throated Macaw Environmental Education Project in Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvatierra da Silva, Daniela; Jacobson, Susan K.; Monroe, Martha C.; Israel, Glenn D.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluability assessment of a program to save a critically endangered bird helped prepare the Blue-throated Macaw Environmental Education Project for evaluation and program improvement. The evaluability assessment facilitated agreement among key stakeholders on evaluation criteria and intended uses of evaluation information in order to maximize…

  19. Exceeding Parents' Expectations in Ear-Nose-Throat Outpatient Facilities: The Development and Analysis of a Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margaritis, Eleftherios; Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2012-01-01

    The study attempts to develop an outpatient service quality scale by investigating the key dimensions which assess parental satisfaction and provides a recommendation on an improved health service delivery system. The survey was conducted in an Ear-Nose-Throat outpatient clinic of a Greek public pediatric hospital. A total of 127 parents in…

  20. Female Preference for Sympatric vs. Allopatric Male Throat Color Morphs in the Mesquite Lizard (Sceloporus grammicus) Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaans, Elizabeth; Bastiaans, Mary Jane; Morinaga, Gen; Castañeda Gaytán, José Gamaliel; Marshall, Jonathon C.; Bane, Brendan; de la Cruz, Fausto Méndez; Sinervo, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Color polymorphic sexual signals are often associated with alternative reproductive behaviors within populations, and the number, frequency, or type of morphs present often vary among populations. When these differences lead to assortative mating by population, the study of such polymorphic taxa may shed light on speciation mechanisms. We studied two populations of a lizard with polymorphic throat color, an important sexual signal. Males in one population exhibit orange, yellow, or blue throats; whereas males in the other exhibit orange, yellow, or white throats. We assessed female behavior when choosing between allopatric and sympatric males. We asked whether females discriminated more when the allopatric male was of an unfamiliar morph than when the allopatric male was similar in coloration to the sympatric male. We found that female rejection of allopatric males relative to sympatric males was more pronounced when males in a pair were more different in throat color. Our findings may help illuminate how behavioral responses to color morph differences between populations with polymorphic sexual signals contribute to reproductive isolation. PMID:24718297

  1. Eye, nose, hair, and throat: external anatomy of the head of a neonate gray whale (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Eschrichtiidae).

    PubMed

    Berta, Annalisa; Ekdale, Eric G; Zellmer, Nicholas T; Deméré, Thomas A; Kienle, Sarah S; Smallcomb, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    Information is scarce on gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) anatomy and that of mysticetes in general. Dissection of the head of a neonatal gray whale revealed novel anatomical details of the eye, blowhole, incisive papilla with associated nasopalatine ducts, sensory hairs, and throat grooves. Compared to a similar sized right whale calf, the gray whale eyeball is nearly twice as long. The nasal cartilages of the gray whale, located between the blowholes, differ from the bowhead in having accessory cartilages. A small, fleshy incisive papilla bordered by two blind nasopalatine pits near the palate's rostral tip, previously undescribed in gray whales, may be associated with the vomeronasal organ, although histological evidence is needed for definitive identification. Less well known among mysticetes are the numerous elongated, stiff sensory hairs (vibrissae) observed on the gray whale rostrum from the ventral tip to the blowhole and on the mandible. These hairs are concentrated on the chin, and those on the lower jaw are arranged in a V-shaped pattern. We confirm the presence of two primary, anteriorly converging throat grooves, confined to the throat region similar to those of ziphiid and physeteroid odontocetes. A third, shorter groove occurs lateral to the left primary groove. The throat grooves in the gray whale have been implicated in gular expansion during suction feeding.

  2. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p < 0.005), improved 48 h post-exercise only in the ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p < 0.001) and was not influenced by ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS.

  3. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  4. Ice‐water immersion and delayed‐onset muscle soreness: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sellwood, Kylie Louise; Brukner, Peter; Williams, David; Nicol, Alastair; Hinman, Rana

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine if ice‐water immersion after eccentric quadriceps exercise minimises the symptoms of delayed‐onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design A prospective randomised double‐blind controlled trial was undertaken. 40 untrained volunteers performed an eccentric loading protocol with their non‐dominant leg. Interventions Participants were randomised to three 1‐min immersions in either ice water (5±1°C) or tepid water (24°C). Main outcome measures Pain and tenderness (visual analogue scale), swelling (thigh circumference), function (one‐legged hop for distance), maximal isometric strength and serum creatine kinase (CK) recorded at baseline, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise. Changes in outcome measures over time were compared to determine the effect of group allocation using independent t tests or Mann–Whitney U tests. Results No significant differences were observed between groups with regard to changes in most pain parameters, tenderness, isometric strength, swelling, hop‐for‐distance or serum CK over time. There was a significant difference in pain on sit‐to‐stand at 24 h, with the intervention group demonstrating a greater increase in pain than the control group (median change 8.0 vs 2.0 mm, respectively, p = 0.009). Conclusions The protocol of ice‐water immersion used in this study was ineffectual in minimising markers of DOMS in untrained individuals. This study challenges the wide use of this intervention as a recovery strategy by athletes. PMID:17261562

  5. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-02-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2-4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration.

  6. Delayed-onset muscle soreness: a pilot study to assess analgesic study design features.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neil; Desjardins, Paul J; Cosca, Evelyn B; Parulan, Cherri; Arriaga, Anne; Poole, Kelly C; Batz, Dan M; Chang, Phoebe D

    2015-06-01

    Based on a thorough review of the available literature in the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model, we identified multiple study design characteristics that are considered to be normative in acute pain research but have not been followed in a majority of published DOMS experiments. We designed an analgesic investigation using the DOMS model that both complied with current scientifically accepted standards for the conduct of analgesic studies and demonstrated reasonable assay sensitivity. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject study compared the efficacy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% with a matching placebo in reducing pain associated with DOMS. After exercise, subjects reporting DOMS received topical diclofenac sodium gel 1% (DSG 1%) applied to one leg and placebo to the other every 6 hours for 48 hours. Pain intensity was assessed at rest, upon standing, and when walking in the 48 hours after initial drug application (T0). The primary end point was the reduction in pain intensity (SPID 24) on walking. Subjects receiving DSG 1% had less pain while walking compared with those receiving placebo at 24 hours (SPID 24 = 34.9 [22.9] and 23.6 [19.4], respectively; P = 0.032). This investigation used experimental techniques that have been vetted in the field of exercise physiology and superimposed techniques that are considered to be best practice in the field of analgesic research. Over time and with the help of colleagues in both fields of study, similar investigations will validate design features that impact the assay sensitivity of analgesic end points in DOMS models. In addition, the study confirmed the analgesic efficacy of topical DSG 1% over placebo in subjects experiencing DOMS.

  7. Temporal Pattern of the Repeated Bout Effect of Eccentric Exercise on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Michelle A.; Kimura, Iris F.; Sitler, Michael R.; Kendrick, Zebulon V.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise on perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: Subjects completed 2 identical eccentric exercise bouts separated by 6, 7, 8, or 9 weeks. The experiment was conducted in a biokinetics research laboratory. Subjects: Sixteen male and 15 female untrained subjects (age = 24.59 ± 4.42 years, height = 171.71 ± 7.81 cm, weight = 73.00 ± 11.20 kg). Measurements: Two physiologic characteristics of DOMS were measured immediately before and 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after each eccentric exercise bout. Perceived pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and muscular tenderness was measured using a punctate tenderness gauge (PTG). Results: Two 4 × 2 × 5 (group × bout × time) analyses of variance with repeated measures on the bout and time factors were performed on the VAS and PTG data. Significant (P < .05) main effects were found for group, bout, and time for the VAS and the PTG data. No significant interactions were detected. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly less perceived pain for the 9-week group than the 8-week group. The 7-week group had significantly less and the 8-week group had significantly more muscular tenderness than any other group. Perceived pain and muscular tenderness were significantly less after exercise bout 2 than after exercise bout 1. All subjects had significantly less perceived pain and muscular tenderness pre-exercise than 0 and 24 hours after the eccentric exercise bouts. Conclusions: An effective prophylaxis for perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with DOMS is the performance of an eccentric exercise bout 6 to 9 weeks before a similar exercise bout. PMID:12937441

  8. COLD VRS HEAT AFTER EXERCISE- IS THERE A CLEAR WINNER FOR MUSCLE SORENESS.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Al-Dabbak, Fuad; Laymon, Mike

    2015-08-14

    Due to the differences in the exercise type, temperature and timing of the use of cold and heat after exercise in different studies, there is no clear conclusion as to the efficacy of either modality on reducing delayed onset muscle soreness. One hundred subjects at similar fitness levels were examined. They accomplished leg squats for 15 minutes and heat and cold were applied after or 24 hours after exercise using ThermaCare heat or cold wraps. Measurements obtained were strength, the force to passively move the knee, analog visual pain scales, and blood myoglobin. Control subjects lost 24% strength after exercise. Subjects with heat or cold just after exercise only lost 4% strength (p<0.01). Cold applied after 24 hours was better than heat at 24 for strength recovery. Heat or cold applied after exercise was significantly better to prevent elastic tissue damage (p<0.01) while heat and cold immediate after exercise caused no loss in muscle myoglobin whereas heat or cold after 24 hours showed no less muscle damage from myoglobin than control subjects. Myoglobin in the control and heat and cold 24 groups averaged 135.1% of the baseline data but averaged 106.1% of baseline in the heat and cold immediate groups. For reducing pain, control subjects showed a significant amount of pain the days after exercise. But cold immediately after exercise or 24 hours later was superior to heat in reducing pain. In conclusion, both cold and heat appear to be efficacious in reducing muscle damage after exercise.

  9. TRPV1 and TRPV4 play pivotal roles in delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hiroki; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Murase, Shiori; Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Mizumura, Kazue

    2013-01-01

    Unaccustomed strenuous exercise that includes lengthening contraction (LC) often causes tenderness and movement related pain after some delay (delayed-onset muscle soreness, DOMS). We previously demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are up-regulated in exercised muscle through up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and they sensitized nociceptors resulting in mechanical hyperalgesia. There is also a study showing that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are involved in DOMS. Here we examined whether and how TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 are involved in DOMS. We firstly evaluated a method to measure the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the deep tissues in wild-type (WT) mice with a modified Randall-Selitto apparatus. WT, TRPV1-/- and TRPV4-/- mice were then subjected to LC. Another group of mice received injection of murine NGF-2.5S or GDNF to the lateral gastrocnemius (LGC) muscle. Before and after these treatments the mechanical withdrawal threshold of LGC was evaluated. The change in expression of NGF, GDNF and COX-2 mRNA in the muscle was examined using real-time RT-PCR. In WT mice, mechanical hyperalgesia was observed 6-24 h after LC and 1-24 h after NGF and GDNF injection. LC induced mechanical hyperalgesia neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. NGF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT and TRPV4-/- mice but not in TRPV1-/- mice. GDNF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT but neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. Expression of NGF and COX-2 mRNA was significantly increased 3 h after LC in all genotypes. However, GDNF mRNA did not increase in TRPV4-/- mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 contributes to DOMS downstream (possibly at nociceptors) of NGF and GDNF, while TRPV4 is located downstream of GDNF and possibly also in the process of GDNF up-regulation.

  10. Cold Vs. Heat After Exercise-Is There a Clear Winner for Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder S; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Al-Dabbak, Fuad; Laymon, Mike S

    2015-11-01

    Because of the differences in the exercise type, temperature, and timing of the use of cold and heat after exercise in different studies, there is no clear conclusion as to the efficacy of either modality on reducing delayed onset muscle soreness. One hundred subjects at similar fitness levels were examined. They accomplished leg squats for 15 minutes and heat and cold were applied after or 24 hours after exercise using ThermaCare heat or cold wraps. Measurements obtained were strength, the force to passively move the knee, analog visual pain scales, and blood myoglobin. Control subjects lost 24% strength after exercise. Subjects with heat or cold just after exercise only lost 4% strength (p < 0.01). For strength recovery, cold applied after 24 hours was better than heat at 24 hours. Heat or cold applied after exercise was significantly better to prevent elastic tissue damage (p < 0.01), whereas heat and cold immediately after exercise caused no loss in muscle myoglobin and heat or cold after 24 hours showed no less muscle damage from myoglobin than in control subjects. Myoglobin in the control and heat and cold 24-hour groups averaged 135.1% of the baseline data but averaged 106.1% of baseline in the immediate heat and cold groups. For reducing pain, control subjects showed a significant amount of pain the days after exercise. But cold immediately after exercise or 24 hours later was superior to heat in reducing pain. In conclusion, both cold and heat appear to be efficacious in reducing muscle damage after exercise.

  11. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  12. Influence of vibration on delayed onset of muscle soreness following eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiary, Amir H; Safavi‐Farokhi, Ziaeddin; Aminian‐Far, Atefeh

    2007-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which may occur after eccentric exercise, may cause some reduction in ability in sport activities. For this reason, several studies have been designed on preventing and controlling DOMS. As vibration training (VT) may improve muscle performance, we designed this study to investigate the effect of VT on controlling and preventing DOMS after eccentric exercise. Methods Fifty healthy non‐athletic volunteers were assigned randomly into two experimental, VT (n = 25) and non‐VT (n = 25) groups. A vibrator was used to apply 50 Hz vibration on the left and right quadriceps, hamstring and calf muscles for 1 min in the VT group, while no vibration was applied in the non‐VT group. Then, both groups walked downhill on a 10° declined treadmill at a speed of 4 km/hour. The measurements included the isometric maximum voluntary contraction force (IMVC) of left and right quadriceps muscles, pressure pain threshold (PPT) 5, 10 and 15 cm above the patella and mid‐line of the calf muscles of both lower limbs before and the day after treadmill walking. After 24 hours, the serum levels of creatine‐kinase (CK), and DOMS level by visual analogue scale were measured. Results The results showed decreased IMVC force (P = 0.006), reduced PPT (P = 0.0001) and significantly increased mean of DOMS and CK levels in the non‐VT group, compared to the VT group (P = 0.001). Conclusion A comparison by experimental groups indicates that VT before eccentric exercise may prevent and control DOMS. Further studies should be undertaken to ascertain the stability and effectiveness of VT in athletics. PMID:17138635

  13. Delayed-onset muscle soreness: a pilot study to assess analgesic study design features

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neil; Desjardins, Paul J.; Cosca, Evelyn B.; Parulan, Cherri; Arriaga, Anne; Poole, Kelly C.; Batz, Dan M.; Chang, Phoebe D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on a thorough review of the available literature in the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model, we identified multiple study design characteristics that are considered to be normative in acute pain research but have not been followed in a majority of published DOMS experiments. We designed an analgesic investigation using the DOMS model that both complied with current scientifically accepted standards for the conduct of analgesic studies and demonstrated reasonable assay sensitivity. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject study compared the efficacy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% with a matching placebo in reducing pain associated with DOMS. After exercise, subjects reporting DOMS received topical diclofenac sodium gel 1% (DSG 1%) applied to one leg and placebo to the other every 6 hours for 48 hours. Pain intensity was assessed at rest, upon standing, and when walking in the 48 hours after initial drug application (T0). The primary end point was the reduction in pain intensity (SPID 24) on walking. Subjects receiving DSG 1% had less pain while walking compared with those receiving placebo at 24 hours (SPID 24 = 34.9 [22.9] and 23.6 [19.4], respectively; P = 0.032). This investigation used experimental techniques that have been vetted in the field of exercise physiology and superimposed techniques that are considered to be best practice in the field of analgesic research. Over time and with the help of colleagues in both fields of study, similar investigations will validate design features that impact the assay sensitivity of analgesic end points in DOMS models. In addition, the study confirmed the analgesic efficacy of topical DSG 1% over placebo in subjects experiencing DOMS. PMID:25633158

  14. The effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Isabell, W K; Durrant, E; Myrer, W; Anderson, S

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended.

  15. [Home visiting nursing care for a terminal stage cancer patient with bed sore--coordination through exchanging of advice request memo as a useful tool].

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Sachiko; Yamada, Mai; Tayoshi, Mayumi; Kitamikado, Hatsue; Nakajima, Kazuyo; Konno, Hitomi; Akaeda, Kazuko; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Oka, Yoichi

    2010-12-01

    Visiting nursing care service was provided to a 40s female patient, who had a terminal cancer with bed sore around the sacred bones. We started the nursing service when the patient was still cared at hospital. The nursing service we provided was coordinated by the certified nurse specialized in skin and excrement care and home visiting nurse. A smooth home care transition was resulted because of the coordination provided by the two nurses. We started coaching the family while the patient was still at the hospital with a home care instruction manual until the patient was discharged. All in all, the patient and her family were at ease with two nurses' coordinated efforts. Since the patient was cared at home, her bed sore problem got worse due to an absence of caregiver. In order to solve the bed sore problem, the visiting nurse took pictures of peeled adhesive patch and the bed sore around the sacred bones to show and consult with the certified nurse. With the advice from the certified nurse, the home visiting nurse was able to care the bed sore problem manageable in size. From this experience, we learned that a proper communication channel, in this case an advice request memo exchange, between the certified nurse and visiting nurse was a useful tool for both sides in order to properly assess the patient's medical care needs.

  16. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  17. Factors influencing nest survival and productivity of Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, Daniel; Schmutz, Joel A.; McCloskey, Sarah E.; Fondell, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata) numbers in Alaska have fluctuated dramatically over the past 3 decades; however, the demographic processes contributing to these population dynamics are poorly understood. To examine spatial and temporal variation in productivity, we estimated breeding parameters at 5 sites in Alaska: at Cape Espenberg and the Copper River Delta we estimated nest survival, and at 3 sites within the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta we estimated nest survival and productivity. Nest survival varied broadly among sites and years; annual estimates (lower, upper 95% confidence interval) ranged from 0.09 (0.03, 0.29) at Cape Espenberg in 2001 to 0.93 (0.76, 0.99) at the Copper River Delta in 2002. Annual variation among sites was not concordant, suggesting that site-scale factors had a strong influence on nest survival. Models of nest survival indicated that visits to monitor nests had a negative effect on nest daily survival probability, which if not accounted for biased nest survival strongly downward. The sensitivity of breeding Red-throated Loons to nest monitoring suggests other sources of disturbance that cause incubating birds to flush from their nests may also reduce nest survival. Nest daily survival probability at the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta was negatively associated with an annual index of fox occurrence. Survival through the incubation and chick-rearing periods on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta ranged from 0.09 (0.001, 0.493) to 0.50 (0.04, 0.77). Daily survival probability during the chick-rearing period was lower for chicks that had a sibling in 2 of 3 years, consistent with the hypothesis that food availability was limited. Estimates of annual productivity on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta ranged from 0.17 to 1.0 chicks per pair. Productivity was not sufficient to maintain population stability in 2 of 3 years, indicating that nest depredation by foxes and poor foraging conditions during chick rearing can have important effects on productivity.

  18. Rare complication after VAC-therapy in the treatment of deep sore ulcers in a paraplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Citak, Mustafa; Backhaus, Manuel; Meindl, Renate; Muhr, Gert; Fehmer, Tobias

    2010-12-01

    The VAC-therapy is a safe, easy, and effective therapy for the management of chronic wounds. Known advantages of the VAC technique are the quicker wound healing by stimulating the blood flow, the formation of granulation tissue, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. The use of negative pressure treatment can decrease the number of dressing changes and length of hospital stay. However, some related complications after and during VAC therapy have been described. We here describe a rare complication during the treatment of severe os ischium sore with VAC therapy, which has not been reported in the literature yet. We report about a 43-year-old paraplegic patient, referred to our clinic from a regional hospital where he had been admitted 2 months earlier, presenting with a necrotizing fasciitis after VAC therapy during the treatment of fourth grade os ischium sore. After operative debridement and long-term antibiotics with Ciprofloxacin soft tissue closure was performed using a myocutaneous tensor fascia lata flap. Temporary stabilization was achieved by a triangle external fixateur attached to the right femur and the pelvis. After 1 week the tapping point of the muscle flap could be covered with local skin mesh-graft from the right calf as a donor site. The patient was mobilized in a wheelchair and was discharged home 3 months after admission. The VAC technique is a safe, easy, and effective means in chronic wound care management. However, the described rare complication should be kept in mind. The clinical management of VAC therapy requires a distinct indication and close clinical monitoring by experienced medical professionals. The use of VAC therapy in fourth grade sores may have deleterious consequences for the patient.

  19. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P < 0.01) from (mean ± SD (95% confidence interval)) 3098 ± 236 (2985, 3212) during MTT to 3461 ± 586 (3178, 3743) during SKI, while protein (g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) intake remained constant (MTT, 1.59 ± 0.33 (1.51, 1.66); and SKI, 1.71 ± 0.55 (1.58, 1.85)). Energy expenditure increased (P < 0.05) during SKI (6851 ± 562 (6580, 7122)) compared with MTT (5480 ± 389 (5293, 5668)) and exceeded energy intake. Protein flux, synthesis, and breakdown were all increased (P < 0.05) 24%, 18%, and 27%, respectively, during SKI compared with baseline and MTT. Whole-body protein balance was lower (P < 0.05) during SKI (-1.41 ± 1.11 (-1.98, -0.84) g·kg(-1)·10 h) than MTT and baseline. Muscle damage and soreness increased and performance decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The physiological consequences observed during short-term winter military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits.

  20. Dinosaur Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Currie, Philip J.

    1992-07-01

    In recent years dinosaurs have captured the attention of the public at an unprecedented level. At the heart of this resurgence in popular interest is an increased level of research activity, much of which is innovative in the field of paleontology. For instance, whereas earlier paleontological studies emphasized basic morphologic description and taxonomic classification, modern studies attempt to examine the role and nature of dinosaurs as living animals. More than ever before, we understand how these extinct species functioned, behaved, interacted with each other and the environment, and evolved. Nevertheless, these studies rely on certain basic building blocks of knowledge, including facts about dinosaur anatomy and taxonomic relationships. One of the purposes of this volume is to unravel some of the problems surrounding dinosaur systematics and to increase our understanding of dinosaurs as a biological species. Dinosaur Systematics presents a current overview of dinosaur systematics using various examples to explore what is a species in a dinosaur, what separates genders in dinosaurs, what morphological changes occur with maturation of a species, and what morphological variations occur within a species.

  1. Fiber type composition of the muscle responsible for throat fan extension in green anole lizards.

    PubMed

    Rosen, G J; O'Bryant, E L; Swender, D; Wade, J

    2004-01-01

    Throat fan (dewlap) extension is sexually dimorphic in green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis). Males have larger dewlaps which they display more frequently than females. Correlated with the behavior, sexual dimorphisms occur in the skeletal, muscular and neural structures responsible for dewlap extension in green anoles. We used histochemical techniques to stain for myosin ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) to determine whether sex differences also exist in fiber type composition of the ceratohyoideus, the muscle that extends the dewlap. Based on the staining pattern for the two enzymes, four fiber types were identified: fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), fast-glycolytic (FG), slow-oxidative (SO), and tonic. In the ceratohyoideus of both sexes, the predominate fiber types were FOG (approximately 43%) and FG (approximately 34%). Also in both males and females, the FOG and FG fibers had approximately twice the cross-sectional area of the SO and tonic fibers. No sex differences occurred in the percentages of FOG and FG fibers. However, males had a greater percentage of tonic fibers than females, whereas females had a greater percentage of SO fibers than males. The high proportion of FOG fibers in the anole ceratohyoideus makes it similar to other relatively fatigue-resistant muscles used in movements of moderate speed and duration. Although the precise role of tonic fibers in dewlap extension is not known, the greater percentage of these fibers in the male ceratohyoideus might be required to stabilize or maintain extension of the large dewlap apparatus in males.

  2. Supercritical-state expansions which cross the binodal line before reaching the nozzle throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Eldon L.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2012-11-01

    Three peaks have been found in time-of-flight distributions for expansions from supercritical states for both He and CO2, with the two slower peaks consisting of condensed-phase particles. It is observed that the presence of the third peak coincides with source conditions for which the expansion crosses the binodal line before reaching the nozzle throat, which crossing leads to the expanding fluid flashing, thereby creating a mixture of vapor and liquid phases. Christen et al. suggest that the two phases expand simultaneously. However, simultaneous expansions of the vapor and liquid phases through the nozzle would not be consistent with (a) the large differences in the velocities of the observed peaks and (b) the appearance of a solute (when added to the CO2) in only one of the condensed-phase peaks. However a model in which the vapor and liquid phases expand alternately, hence independently, through the nozzle is consistent with the observations. The terminal condensed-phase mass fraction in the vapor-phase expansions (both those with flashing and those without flashing) is calculated from conservation of energy and correlated as a function of a dimensionless correlating parameter introduced in earlier studies of condensations in free jets.

  3. Ear, nose, throat, head and neck surgery department functioning as a team in Nigeria: any benefit?

    PubMed

    Adobamen, P R O C; Egbage, E E

    2014-01-01

    To call attention to the synergistic benefit of working as a team in a clinical department and to encourage others, to emulate this pattern of patients' care for better results. Patients that were seen at the Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery Clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, who had the benefit of their cases reviewed by more than one consultant were included into the study. Parameters retrieved from the case notes included number of consultants that reviewed each case, age, sex of patients, diagnosis, whether there was controversy, complimentary or synergistic benefit from the team work. 124 patients completed the study. 99 patients (79.84%) were reviewed by two consultants and 25 (20.16%) were reviewed by three of the four consultants available in the department. 79 (63.71%) patients had the benefit of a complimentary management, while 38 (30.65%) had synergistic benefit from the team work. Intradepartmental team work in patient management produces synergistic benefit for patients and more experience among consultant staff.

  4. Early reproductive success of western bluebirds and ash-throated flycatchers: a landscape-contaminant perspective.

    PubMed

    Fair, Jeanne M; Myers, Orrin B

    2002-01-01

    Eggshell quality, clutch size, sex ratio, and hatching success of western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) and ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens) were studied on a landscape-soil contaminant gradient at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico from 1997 to 1999. A variety of contaminants (heavy metals, chemicals, insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorines, and radioactive isotopes) range across different spatial scales and concentrations on LANL land. This study is an example of a monitoring program over a large area with varying degree of contamination that is used to highlight locations of concern for future research. There were two locations where the flycatcher had a lower hatching success. The bluebirds at Sandia wetland, a location of concern for PCBs. had a thinner eggshell thickness index (RATCLIFFE) and the eggs were smaller than at other locations. The flycatcher had thinner eggshells than bluebirds, which could add to sensitivity to exposure to contaminants. There was no variation in clutch size or sex ratio between locations or areas closer to contaminant release sites for both species. Percent females in the clutch ranged from 0 to 100% in the WEBL and from 33 to 67% for ATFL.

  5. Unexpected Strong Polygyny in the Brown-Throated Three-Toed Sloth

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Jonathan N.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2012-01-01

    Promiscuous mating strategies are much more common than previously appreciated. So much so, that several authors have proposed that promiscuity is the “rule” rather than the exception in vertebrate mating systems. Decreasing species mobility and increasing habitat fragmentation have both been suggested to reduce the “polygyny potential” of the environment and promote other mating strategies like promiscuity in females. We explored the social and genetic mating system for one of the most sedentary extant mammals, the brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), within a highly fragmented Neotropical habitat. Surprisingly, we found that three-toed sloths were strongly polygynous, with males excluding male competitors from their core ranges, and exhibiting strong reproductive skew. Indeed, only 25% of all resident adult males sired offspring and one individual sired half of all sampled juveniles. Paradoxically, a sedentary life-history strategy seems to facilitate polygyny in fragmented landscapes because multiple females can persist within small patches of habitat, and be monopolized by a single male. Our work demonstrates that strong polygyny can arise in systems in which the polygyny potential should be extremely low, and other strategies, including promiscuity, would be favoured. Mating systems can be influenced by a multitude of factor and are dynamic, varying among taxa, over time, and across habitats; consequently, mating systems remain difficult to predict based on general ecological principles. PMID:23284687

  6. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  7. Unexpected strong polygyny in the brown-throated three-toed sloth.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Peery, M Zachariah

    2012-01-01

    Promiscuous mating strategies are much more common than previously appreciated. So much so, that several authors have proposed that promiscuity is the "rule" rather than the exception in vertebrate mating systems. Decreasing species mobility and increasing habitat fragmentation have both been suggested to reduce the "polygyny potential" of the environment and promote other mating strategies like promiscuity in females. We explored the social and genetic mating system for one of the most sedentary extant mammals, the brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), within a highly fragmented Neotropical habitat. Surprisingly, we found that three-toed sloths were strongly polygynous, with males excluding male competitors from their core ranges, and exhibiting strong reproductive skew. Indeed, only 25% of all resident adult males sired offspring and one individual sired half of all sampled juveniles. Paradoxically, a sedentary life-history strategy seems to facilitate polygyny in fragmented landscapes because multiple females can persist within small patches of habitat, and be monopolized by a single male. Our work demonstrates that strong polygyny can arise in systems in which the polygyny potential should be extremely low, and other strategies, including promiscuity, would be favoured. Mating systems can be influenced by a multitude of factor and are dynamic, varying among taxa, over time, and across habitats; consequently, mating systems remain difficult to predict based on general ecological principles.

  8. Regional cholinesterase activity in white-throated sparrow brain is differentially affected by acephate (Orthene?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Romo, G.A.; Komaragiri, M.V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of a 14-day dietary exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), were determined on cholinesterase activity in three regions (basal ganglia, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of the white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, brain. All three regions experienced depressed cholinesterase activity between 0.5-2 ppm acephate. The regions exhibited cholinesterase recovery at 2-16 ppm acephate; however, cholinesterase activity dropped and showed no recovery at higher dietary levels (>16 ppm acephate). Evidence indicates that the recovery is initiated by the magnitude of depression, not the duration. In general, as acephate concentration increased, differences in ChE activity among brain regions decreased. Three terms are introduced to describe ChE response to acephate exposure: (1) ChE resistance threshold, (2) ChE compensation threshold, and (3) ChE depression threshold. It is hypothesized that adverse effects to birds in the field may occur at pesticide exposure levels customarily considered negligible.

  9. Three-dimensional flow and lift characteristics of a hovering ruby-throated hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2014-09-06

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation is performed for a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) in hovering flight. Realistic wing kinematics are adopted in the numerical model by reconstructing the wing motion from high-speed imaging data of the bird. Lift history and the three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing in full stroke cycles are captured in the simulation. Significant asymmetry is observed for lift production within a stroke cycle. In particular, the downstroke generates about 2.5 times as much vertical force as the upstroke, a result that confirms the estimate based on the measurement of the circulation in a previous experimental study. Associated with lift production is the similar power imbalance between the two half strokes. Further analysis shows that in addition to the angle of attack, wing velocity and surface area, drag-based force and wing-wake interaction also contribute significantly to the lift asymmetry. Though the wing-wake interaction could be beneficial for lift enhancement, the isolated stroke simulation shows that this benefit is buried by other opposing effects, e.g. presence of downwash. The leading-edge vortex is stable during the downstroke but may shed during the upstroke. Finally, the full-body simulation result shows that the effects of wing-wing interaction and wing-body interaction are small.

  10. Signaling for food and sex? Begging by reproductive female white-throated magpie-jays

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jesse M. S.; Langen, Tom A.; Berg, Elena C.

    2012-01-01

    Food begging is common in nutritionally dependent young of many animals, but structurally homologous calls recur in adult signal repertoires of many species. We propose eight functional hypotheses for begging in adults; these stem from observations in birds but apply broadly to other taxa in which begging occurs. Adult cooperatively-breeding white-throated magpie-jays (Calocitta formosa) use loud begging vocalizations, particularly near the nest site during reproduction. We analysed the social context and behavioural phenology of loud calling and allofeeding in this species and compared these with predictions from each functional hypothesis. We found that reproductive females are the primary producers of beg calls, and their begging peaks during the fertile period when reproductive conflict among males and females was highest. Loud begging rates correlated positively with provisioning rates, but females called more in the pre-incubation fertile period than after they initiated incubation. Based on the context, phenology and active space of the signal, we conclude that female loud begging vocalizations function to signal nutritional need to group members, but also have been evolutionarily co-opted to advertise fertility to potential extra-pair partners. The location of calling is likely a consequence of nest guarding by breeding females to prevent intraspecific brood parasitism. PMID:23293376

  11. Effect of contact angle on capillary displacement curvatures in pore throats formed by spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Morrow, N.R. )

    1994-11-01

    The curvature of an interface in a pore depends upon the shape of the pore and the operative contact angle that the interface makes with the solid surface. Even relatively simple pores formed by the surfaces of equal spheres have a complex shape including nonaxisymmetric cross-section and converging-diverging geometry. For such pores, a theory for meniscus behavior has been devised that uses a combination of a theory for meniscus curvature in rods together with the toroidal approximation of Purcell. The results of the theory show that converging-diverging geometry tends to compensate for the effect of contact angle. This is because the position at which the nonzero contact angle meniscus has maximum curvature in a converging-diverging pore is not the narrowest part of the pore throat. Due to this compensation, the effect of contact angle on maximum meniscus curvatures for drainage is approximately proportional to cos 2/3 [theta] (rather than the cos [theta] appropriate for cylindrical tubes). Experiments on pores formed by PTFE spheres using partially wetting liquids confirmed the theoretical prediction. Contact angle measurements on the PTFE spheres also demonstrated that, because of microscopic surface roughness, receding contact angles (these being operative with respect to drainage) on ground surfaces are significantly lower than values for smooth surfaces.

  12. The effect of secondary flows on the starting pressure for a second-throat supersonic ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Jiping; Wang, Zhenguo; Luo, Wenlei

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the secondary flow on the starting pressure of a second-throat supersonic ejector has been investigated by adapting the height of the secondary flow inlet. The obtained results show that an optimum value of the secondary inlet height exists, and the starting pressure of the ejector becomes a minimum at that condition. Based on the results of the pressure measurements, a qualitative analysis has been made to clarify the flow behavior and the physical meaning of the performance diagram. It appears that the choking phenomenon of the secondary flow plays an important role in the starting process of the ejector. When the secondary inlet height is relatively small, the choked secondary flow and the supersonic primary flow could be employed to protect the static pressure in the suction chamber from being disturbed by the back pressure effect at a certain primary stagnation pressure, which is lower than the starting pressure for the case of the zero-secondary flow. However, as the secondary inlet height increases and exceeds a critical value, the static pressure in the suction chamber rapidly increases, and the starting pressure of the ejector increases accordingly.

  13. Lower cranial polyneuropathy in zoster sine herpete presenting with pain in the ear and throat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takafumi; Nakajima, Hideto; Tsukahara, Akihiro; Unoda, Kiich; Ishida, Shimon; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-10-28

    A 64-year-old woman developed acute paralysis of glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves on the left side after pain in the head and the left ear and throat. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein concentration. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-DNA was detected by PCR from cerebrospinal fluid. The diagnosis of lower cranial polyneuropathy due to VZV reactivation was made. After oral administration of an anti-viral agent and steroid, all symptoms and signs dramatically improved. Notably, there was no evidence of cutaneous or mucosal rash during the whole course of the disease. VZV reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute lower cranial polyneuropathy, especially with pain in the ear and throat, even without cutaneous or mucosal rash.

  14. Neck abscess and vocal cord paresis: delayed complications of a self-extruded long fishbone stuck in throat.

    PubMed

    Vallamkondu, V; Carlile, S; Shakeel, M; Ah-See, K W

    2013-11-18

    A 57-year-old Caucasian man, otherwise fit and well, presented with a 2-week history of dysphagia, odynophagia. Two weeks prior to the presentation, he had felt a fishbone stuck in his throat which was self-extruded after 3 days. Subsequently he developed a right anterior neck swelling and hoarseness. Transnasal endoscopic examination of larynx revealed an injected and oedematous right hemilarynx with right vocal cord paresis. An ultrasound examination of the neck confirmed a collection in the neck on the right side, and frank pus was aspirated from the neck abscess and he responded well to conservative management. Subsequent examination in follow-up had shown complete recovery of vocal cord movement. The patient did not seek medical attention immediately after getting a 5 cm fishbone extruded from the throat which resulted in significant morbidity. All patients should be alerted to the possibility of delayed complications and they should be encouraged to seek urgent medical attention.

  15. The Composition of Microbiome in Larynx and the Throat Biodiversity between Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients and Control Population

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hong-Li; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Liang; Wu, Chun-Ping; Cao, Peng-Yu; Tao, Lei; Xu, Chen; Hou, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The throat is an ecological assemblage involved human cells and microbiota, and the colonizing bacteria are important factors in balancing this environment. However, this bacterial community profile has thus been poorly investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial biology of the larynx and to analyze the throat biodiversity in laryngeal carcinoma patients compared to a control population in a case-control study. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was used. We collected tissue samples from 29 patients with laryngeal carcinoma and 31 control patients with vocal cord polyps. The findings of high-quality sequence datasets revealed 218 genera from 13 phyla in the laryngeal mucosa. The predominant communities of phyla in the larynx were Firmicutes (54%), Fusobacteria (17%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Proteobacteria (11%), and Actinobacteria (3%). The leading genera were Streptococcus (36%), Fusobacterium (15%), Prevotella (12%), Neisseria (6%), and Gemella (4%). The throat bacterial compositions were highly different between laryngeal carcinoma subjects and control population (p = 0.006). The abundance of the 26 genera was significantly different between the laryngeal cancer and control groups by metastats analysis (p<0.05). Fifteen genera may be associated with laryngeal carcinoma by partial least squares discriminant analysis (p<0.001). In summary, this study revealed the microbiota profiles in laryngeal mucosa from tissue specimens. The compositions of bacteria community in throat were different between laryngeal cancer patients and controls, and probably were related with this carcinoma. The disruption of this bio-ecological niche might be a risk factor for laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:23824228

  16. Role of putative virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes in mouse models of long-term throat colonization and pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Husmann, L K; Yung, D L; Hollingshead, S K; Scott, J R

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the role of putative virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) in causing disease, we introduced specific mutations in GAS strain B514, a natural mouse pathogen, and tested the mutant strains in two models of infection. To study late stages of disease, we used our previously described mouse model (C3HeB/FeJ mice) in which pneumonia and systemic spread of the streptococcus follow intratracheal inoculation. To study the early stages of disease, we report here a model of long-term (at least 21 days) throat colonization following intranasal inoculation of C57BL/10SnJ mice. When the three emm family genes of GAS strain B514-Sm were deleted, the mutant showed no significant difference from the wild type in induction of long-term throat colonization or pneumonia. We inactivated the scpA gene, which encodes a complement C5a peptidase, by insertion of a nonreplicative plasmid and found no significant difference from the wild type in the incidence of throat colonization. However, there was a small but statistically significant decrease in the incidence of pneumonia caused by the scpA mutant. Finally, we demonstrated a very important effect of the hyaluronic acid capsule in both models. Following intranasal inoculation of mice with a mutant in which a nonreplicative plasmid was inserted into the hasA gene, which encodes hyaluronate synthase, we found that all bacteria recovered from the throats of the mice were encapsulated revertants. Following intratracheal inoculation with the hasA mutant, the incidence of pneumonia within 72 h was significantly reduced from that of the control strain (P = 0.006). These results indicate that the hyaluronic acid capsule of S. pyogenes B514 confers an important selective advantage for survival of the bacteria in the upper respiratory tract and is also an important determinant in induction of pneumonia in our model system. PMID:9119483

  17. Dehydration and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Normothermic Men

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Michelle A; Sitler, Michael R; Kendrick, Zebulon V

    2006-01-01

    Context: A dehydrated individual who performs eccentric exercise may exacerbate skeletal muscle damage, leading to structural, contractile, and enzymatic protein denaturation, in addition to the myofiber and connective damage resulting from the eccentric muscle tension. Objective: To identify the effects of dehydration on 5 physiologic characteristics of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in normothermic men after an eccentric exercise perturbation. Design: Randomized group test-retest design. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy male volunteers randomly assigned to either a euhydration (age = 26.2 ± 4.9 years, height = 174.1 ± 6.0 cm, mass = 86.5 ± 15.3 kg) or dehydration (age = 25.8 ± 2.2 years, height = 177.2 ± 3.1 cm, mass = 84.4 ± 3.8 kg) group. Intervention(s): Subjects performed treadmill walking for 45 minutes in either a thermoneutral (euhydration) or a hot, humid (dehydration) environment. After a rest period to allow for return to the normothermic condition, DOMS was induced with a 45-minute downhill run. Main Outcome Measures: We assessed 5 physiologic characteristics of DOMS before and at intervals after the eccentric exercise. The characteristics were perceived pain of the bilateral quadriceps and overall body, bilateral punctate tenderness of the superficial quadriceps muscles, bilateral knee-flexion passive range of motion, bilateral thigh circumference, and bilateral isometric quadriceps muscle strength. Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular measures were obtained to monitor participants' heat load during exercise. Results: The experimental protocol produced a 0.9% increase in body mass of the euhydration group and a significant 2.7% decrease in body mass of the dehydration group. The downhill-running exercise perturbation induced DOMS in both the euhydrated and dehydrated participants, based on increased bilateral quadriceps and overall body perceived pain and punctate tenderness of the bilateral vastus medialis

  18. TRPV1 and TRPV4 Play Pivotal Roles in Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Hiroki; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Murase, Shiori; Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Mizumura, Kazue

    2013-01-01

    Unaccustomed strenuous exercise that includes lengthening contraction (LC) often causes tenderness and movement related pain after some delay (delayed-onset muscle soreness, DOMS). We previously demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are up-regulated in exercised muscle through up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and they sensitized nociceptors resulting in mechanical hyperalgesia. There is also a study showing that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are involved in DOMS. Here we examined whether and how TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 are involved in DOMS. We firstly evaluated a method to measure the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the deep tissues in wild-type (WT) mice with a modified Randall-Selitto apparatus. WT, TRPV1−/− and TRPV4−/− mice were then subjected to LC. Another group of mice received injection of murine NGF-2.5S or GDNF to the lateral gastrocnemius (LGC) muscle. Before and after these treatments the mechanical withdrawal threshold of LGC was evaluated. The change in expression of NGF, GDNF and COX-2 mRNA in the muscle was examined using real-time RT-PCR. In WT mice, mechanical hyperalgesia was observed 6–24 h after LC and 1–24 h after NGF and GDNF injection. LC induced mechanical hyperalgesia neither in TRPV1−/− nor in TRPV4−/− mice. NGF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT and TRPV4−/− mice but not in TRPV1−/− mice. GDNF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT but neither in TRPV1−/− nor in TRPV4−/− mice. Expression of NGF and COX-2 mRNA was significantly increased 3 h after LC in all genotypes. However, GDNF mRNA did not increase in TRPV4−/− mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 contributes to DOMS downstream (possibly at nociceptors) of NGF and GDNF, while TRPV4 is located downstream of GDNF and possibly also in the process of GDNF up-regulation. PMID:23799042

  19. Dehydration and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Hyperthermic Males

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Michelle A; Sweeney, Lori A; Kendrick, Zebulon V; Sitler, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    Context: Exercise in the heat produces cellular conditions that may leave skeletal muscle susceptible to exercise-induced microdamage. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a clinical model of contraction-induced skeletal muscle injury. Objective: To determine whether thermoregulation during exercise heat stress adversely affects muscle injury and the accompanying DOMS. Design: Randomized group test-retest design. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to either the euhydration/hyperthermic or dehydration/hyperthermic group. Intervention(s): Participants were randomly assigned to treadmill walking in a hot, humid environmental chamber (40°C and 75% relative humidity) with either oral rehydration (euhydration/hyperthermic) or fluid restriction (dehydration/hyperthermic). Immediately after heat exposure and while hyperthermic, participants performed an eccentrically biased downhill run to induce DOMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured DOMS characteristics pre-exercise and at 0.5, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postexercise. Results: Treadmill exercise and exposure to the hot ambient environment elicited a 0.9% body mass loss for the euhydrated/ hyperthermic (mean rectal temperature after 60 minutes of heat-stress trial = 38.2 ± 0.4°C) and 3.3% body mass loss for the dehydrated/hyperthermic participants (mean rectal temperature after 60 minutes of heat-stress trial = 38.1 ± 0.4°C). Quadriceps perceived pain was significantly higher (F5,40 = 18.717, P ≤ .001) than baseline at 24 and 48 hours postexercise, following the classic pattern of DOMS. Overall lower extremity perceived pain was significantly higher for the dehydration/hyperthermia group than the euhydration/hyperthermia group (F1,8 = 6.713, P = .032). Punctate tenderness of the vastus lateralis for the dehydration/hyperthermic group was 6.9% higher (F5,40 = 4.462, P = .003) than for the euhydration/ hyperthermic group. No clinically

  20. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  1. Effect of the fuel bias distribution in the primary air nozzle on the slagging near a swirl coal burner throat

    SciTech Connect

    Lingyan Zeng; Zhengqi Li; Hong Cui; Fucheng Zhang; Zhichao Chen; Guangbo Zhao

    2009-09-15

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of slagging characteristics near the burner throat region were carried out for swirl coal combustion burners used in a 1025 tons/h boiler. The gas/particle two-phase numerical simulation results and the data measured by a particle-dynamics anemometer (PDA) show that the numeration model was reasonable. For the centrally fuel-rich swirl coal combustion burner, the coal particles move in the following way. The particles first flow into furnace with the primary air from the burner throat. After traversing a certain distance, they move back to the burner throat and then toward the furnace again. Thus, particle trajectories are extended. For the case with equal air mass fluxes in the inner and outer primary air/coal mixtures, as the ratio of the coal mass flux in the inner primary air/coal mixture to the total coal mass flux increased from 40 (the reference condition) to 50%, 50 to 70%, and 70 to 100%, the maximum number density declined by 22, 11, and 4%, respectively, relative to the reference condition. In addition, the sticking particle ratio declined by 13, 14, and 8%, respectively, compared to the reference condition. 22 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Diversity Among Tacaribe Serocomplex Viruses (Family Arenaviridae) Naturally Associated with the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula) in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N.B.; Haynie, Michelle L.; Abbott, Ken D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Bayesian analyses of glycoprotein precursor and nucleocapsid protein gene sequences indicated that arenaviruses naturally associated with white-throated woodrats in central Arizona are phylogenetically closely related to the Whitewater Arroyo virus prototype strain AV 9310135, which originally was isolated from a white-throated woodrat captured in northwestern New Mexico. Pairwise comparisons of glycoprotein precursor and nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequences revealed extensive diversity among arenaviruses isolated from white-throated woodrats captured in different counties in central Arizona and extensive diversity between these viruses and Whitewater Arroyo virus strain AV 9310135. It was concluded that the viruses isolated from the white-throated woodrats captured in Arizona represent 2 novel species (Big Brushy Tank virus and Tonto Creek virus) and that these species should be included with Whitewater Arroyo virus in a species complex within the Tacaribe serocomplex (family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus). PMID:18454597

  3. The safety and effect of topically applied recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor on the healing of chronic pressure sores.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, M C; Phillips, L G; Lawrence, W T; Bishop, J B; Youngerman, J S; Hayward, P G; Broemeling, L D; Heggers, J P

    1992-01-01

    The first randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled human trials of recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for pressure sore treatment were performed. Three different concentrations of bFGF in five dosing schedules were tested for safety using hematology, serum chemistries, urinalysis, absorption, antibody formation, and signs of toxicity. Efficacy was evaluated by wound volumes, histology, and photography. No toxicity, significant serum absorption, or antibody formation occurred. In six of eight subgroups, there was a trend toward efficacy with bFGF treatment. When all subgroups were combined, comparison of the slopes of the regression curves of volume decrease over initial pressure sore volume demonstrated a greater healing effect for the bFGF-treated patients (p < 0.05). Histologically, bFGF-treated wound sections demonstrated increased fibroblasts and capillaries. More patients treated with bFGF achieved > 70% wound closure (p < 0.05). Blinded observers were able to distinguish differences in visual wound improvement between bFGF and placebo groups. These data suggest that bFGF may be effective in the treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:1417189

  4. Optimization of Tape Winding Process Parameters to Enhance the Performance of Solid Rocket Nozzle Throat Back Up Liners using Taguchi's Robust Design Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Nayani Kishore

    2016-06-01

    The throat back up liners is used to protect the nozzle structural members from the severe thermal environment in solid rocket nozzles. The throat back up liners is made with E-glass phenolic prepregs by tape winding process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the optimization of process parameters of tape winding process to achieve better insulative resistance using Taguchi's robust design methodology. In this method four control factors machine speed, roller pressure, tape tension, tape temperature that were investigated for the tape winding process. The presented work was to study the cogency and acceptability of Taguchi's methodology in manufacturing of throat back up liners. The quality characteristic identified was Back wall temperature. Experiments carried out using L{9/'} (34) orthogonal array with three levels of four different control factors. The test results were analyzed using smaller the better criteria for Signal to Noise ratio in order to optimize the process. The experimental results were analyzed conformed and successfully used to achieve the minimum back wall temperature of the throat back up liners. The enhancement in performance of the throat back up liners was observed by carrying out the oxy-acetylene tests. The influence of back wall temperature on the performance of throat back up liners was verified by ground firing test.

  5. Glucose transporter expression in an avian nectarivore: the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris).

    PubMed

    Welch, Kenneth C; Allalou, Amina; Sehgal, Prateek; Cheng, Jason; Ashok, Aarthi

    2013-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT) proteins play a key role in the transport of monosaccharides across cellular membranes, and thus, blood sugar regulation and tissue metabolism. Patterns of GLUT expression, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4, have been well characterized in mammals. However, relatively little is known about patterns of GLUT expression in birds with existing data limited to the granivorous or herbivorous chicken, duck and sparrow. The smallest avian taxa, hummingbirds, exhibit some of the highest fasted and fed blood glucose levels and display an unusual ability to switch rapidly and completely between endogenous fat and exogenous sugar to fuel energetically expensive hovering flight. Despite this, nothing is known about the GLUT transporters that enable observed rapid rates of carbohydrate flux. We examined GLUT (GLUT1, 2, 3, & 4) expression in pectoralis, leg muscle, heart, liver, kidney, intestine and brain from both zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris). mRNA expression of all four transporters was probed using reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In addition, GLUT1 and 4 protein expression were assayed by western blot and immunostaining. Patterns of RNA and protein expression of GLUT1-3 in both species agree closely with published reports from other birds and mammals. As in other birds, and unlike in mammals, we did not detect GLUT4. A lack of GLUT4 correlates with hyperglycemia and an uncoupling of exercise intensity and relative oxidation of carbohydrates in hummingbirds. The function of GLUTs present in hummingbird muscle tissue (e.g. GLUT1 and 3) remain undescribed. Thus, further work is necessary to determine if high capillary density, and thus surface area across which cellular-mediated transport of sugars into active tissues (e.g. muscle) occurs, rather than taxon-specific differences in GLUT density or kinetics, can account for observed rapid rates of sugar flux into these tissues.

  6. Comparison of fasciocutaneous V-Y and rotational flaps for defect coverage of sacral pressure sores: a critical single-centre appraisal.

    PubMed

    Djedovic, Gabriel; Metzler, Julia; Morandi, Evi M; Wachter, Tanja; Kühn, Shafreena; Pierer, Gerhard; Rieger, Ulrich M

    2017-03-06

    Pressure sore rates remain high in both nursing homes as well as in hospitals. Numerous surgical options are available for defect coverage in the sacral region. However, objective data is scarce as to whether a specific flap design is superior to another. Here, we aim to compare two fasciocutaneous flap designs for sacral defect coverage: the gluteal rotation flap and the gluteal V-Y flap. All primary sacral pressure sores of grades III-IV that were being covered with gluteal fasciocutaneous rotational or V-Y flaps between January 2008 and December 2014 at our institution were analysed. A total of 41 patients received a total of 52 flaps. Of these, 18 patients received 20 gluteal rotational flaps, and 23 patients received 32 V-Y flaps. Both groups were comparable with regards to demographics, comorbidities and complications. Significantly more V-Y flaps were needed to cover smaller defects. Mean length of hospital stay was significantly prolonged when surgical revision had to be carried out. Both flap designs have proven safe and reliable for defect coverage after sacral pressure sores. Gluteal rotational flaps appear to be more useful for larger defects. Both flap designs facilitate their reuse in case of pressure sore recurrence. Complication rates appear to be comparable in both designs and to the current literature.

  7. Initial diagnosis of anemia from sore mouth and improved classification of anemias by MCV and RDW in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shin-Yu; Wu, Hong-Cheng

    2004-12-01

    Thirty patients with a wide range of sore mouth that led to the diagnosis of iron deficiency in 12 patients, pernicious anemia in 8 patients, combined deficiency of iron and vitamin B12 in 2 patients, and anemia of chronic disease in 8 patients were investigated. The oral signs and symptoms included glossitis, glossodynia, angular cheilitis, recurrent oral ulcer, oral candidosis, diffuse erythematous mucositis, and pale oral mucosa. The values of hemoglobin in 30 patients varied from normal to severe life-threatening levels, but none had developed generalized symptoms sufficiently advanced to arouse suspicions of anemia before they visited the Oral Medicine Clinic. The aim of this paper is to describe a retrospective study of 30 patients with oral changes as the initial manifestation of nutritional deficiency or anemia of chronic diseases. Improved diagnosis and classification of anemia based on the mean and heterogeneity of red cell size will be discussed.

  8. Colonisation and interaction between S. epidermidis and S. aureus in the nose and throat of healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fredheim, E G A; Flægstad, T; Askarian, F; Klingenberg, C

    2015-01-01

    Nasal colonisation with Staphylococcus aureus is a risk factor for developing nosocomial infections. It has been reported that S. epidermidis may produce a serine protease (Esp) inhibiting S. aureus biofilm formation and nasal colonisation. We aimed to analyse the correlation between S. aureus nasal and/or throat carriage and co-colonisation with S. epidermidis strains carrying esp, and the inhibitory effects of S. epidermidis culture supernatants on S. aureus biofilm formation and growth. We obtained 114 S. epidermidis isolates from the nose and 74 S. aureus from the nose and/or throat of healthy adolescents. S. aureus biofilm formation was analysed in a microtitre plate assay and the prevalence of ica, encoding biofilm formation, and esp was analysed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Inhibitory effects of S. epidermidis culture supernatants on S. aureus biofilm formation and growth was analysed in vitro. esp prevalence and expression was correlated with inhibitory effects. We detected biofilm formation in 45/74 (61%) S. aureus strains. The ica operon was more prevalent in isolates colonising the nose (12/15; 80%) versus isolates colonising the throat only (8/46; 17%). Almost two-thirds of S. epidermidis culture supernatants displayed high (≥ 50%) S. aureus biofilm inhibitory activity, without affecting growth. We found no correlation between the level of inhibitory activity and S. aureus colonisation. esp was ubiquitous in S. epidermidis, but esp expression did not correlate with biofilm inhibitory activity. S. epidermidis culture supernatants inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation, but do not affect bacterial growth. esp expression was not correlated with the inhibitory effects observed.

  9. Progenitor cell therapy for sacral pressure sore: a pilot study with a novel human chronic wound model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic wounds are a major health-care issue, but research is limited by the complexity and heterogeneity in terms of wound etiology as well as patient-related factors. A suitable animal model that replicates the situation in humans is not available. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to present a standardized human wound model and the data of a pilot study of topically applied progenitor cells in a sacral pressure sore. Methods Three patients underwent cell harvest from the iliac crest at the time of the initial debridement. Forty-eight hours after bone marrow harvest and debridement, the CD34+ selected cell suspension was injected into the wound. With the aid of a laser scanner, three-dimensional analyses of wound morphometry were performed until the defect was reconstructed with a local flap 3 weeks after debridement. Results Decreases in volume to 60% ± 6% of baseline on the sham side and to 52% ± 3% of baseline on the cell side were measured. Histologic work-up revealed no signs of metaplastic, dysplastic, or neoplastic proliferation/differentiation after progenitor cell treatment. CD34+ cells were detected in the biopsies of day 0. Conclusions The pressure sore wound model allows investigation of the initial 3 weeks after cell-based therapy. Objective outcome analysis in terms of wound volume and histology can be performed without, or with, minimal additional morbidity, and the anatomy of the sacral area allows a control and study side in the same patient. Therefore, this model can serve as a standard for wound-healing studies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00535548. PMID:24476740

  10. Increased technetium uptake is not equivalent to muscle necrosis: scintigraphic, morphological and intramuscular pressure analyses of sore muscles after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, A. G.; Friden, J.; Hargens, A. R.; Lang, G. H.; Thornell, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    A scintigraphic technique employing technetium pyrophosphate uptake was used to identify the area of skeletal muscle damage in the lower leg of four runners 24 h after an ultramarathon footrace (160 km). Most of the race had been run downhill which incorporated an extensive amount of eccentric work. Soreness was diffuse throughout the posterior region of the lower leg. In order to interpret what increased technetium uptake reflects and to express extreme endurance related damages, a biopsy was taken from the 3-D position of abnormal uptake. In addition, intramuscular pressures were determined in the deep posterior compartment. Scintigraphs revealed increased technetium pyrophosphate uptake in the medial portion of the gastrocnemius muscle. For 3698 fibres analysed, 33 fibres (1%) were necrotic, while a few other fibres were either atrophic or irregular shaped. A cluster of necrotic fibres occurred at the fascicular periphery for one subject and fibre type grouping occurred for another. Ultrastructural analysis revealed Z-line streaming near many capillaries and variously altered subsarcolemmal mitochondria including some with paracrystalline inclusions. The majority of the capillaries included thickened and irregular shaped endothelial cells. Intramuscular pressures of the deep posterior compartment were slightly elevated (12-15 mmHg) for three of the four subjects. Increased technetium uptake following extreme endurance running does not just reflect muscle necrosis but also subtle fibre abnormalities. Collectively, these pathological findings are attributed to relative ischaemia occurring during the race and during pre-race training, whereas, intramuscular pressure elevations associated with muscle soreness are attributed to mechanical stress caused by extensive eccentric work during the race.

  11. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    McGRATH, Ryan P; Whitehead, James R; Caine, Dennis J

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretching on DOMS. Young adult participants (N=57) were randomly assigned to a PNF stretching group (n=19), a static stretching group (n=20), and to a no-stretching control group (n=18). All participants completed exercise designed to induce DOMS prior to post-exercise experimental stretching protocols. Participants rated their soreness level on a pain scale 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. A 3 × 2 mixed ANOVA showed there was an effect for time (p<.01). Post hoc testing revealed that DOMS pain significantly decreased (p<.05) from 24 to 48 hours post-exercise for the PNF and control groups, but not for the static stretching group. Other analyses revealed a significant correlation (r=.61, p<.01) between the pre- and post-exercise stretch scores and the 48 hour post-exercise pain score for the PNF group. Consistent with the results of previous research on post-exercise static stretching, these results indicate that post-exercise PNF stretching also does not prevent DOMS. However, the correlation analysis suggests it is possible the pre-stretch muscle contractions of the post-exercise PNF protocol may have placed a load on an already damaged muscle causing more DOMS for some participants.

  12. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    McGRATH, RYAN P.; WHITEHEAD, JAMES R.; CAINE, DENNIS J.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretching on DOMS. Young adult participants (N=57) were randomly assigned to a PNF stretching group (n=19), a static stretching group (n=20), and to a no-stretching control group (n=18). All participants completed exercise designed to induce DOMS prior to post-exercise experimental stretching protocols. Participants rated their soreness level on a pain scale 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. A 3 × 2 mixed ANOVA showed there was an effect for time (p<.01). Post hoc testing revealed that DOMS pain significantly decreased (p<.05) from 24 to 48 hours post-exercise for the PNF and control groups, but not for the static stretching group. Other analyses revealed a significant correlation (r=.61, p<.01) between the pre- and post-exercise stretch scores and the 48 hour post-exercise pain score for the PNF group. Consistent with the results of previous research on post-exercise static stretching, these results indicate that post-exercise PNF stretching also does not prevent DOMS. However, the correlation analysis suggests it is possible the pre-stretch muscle contractions of the post-exercise PNF protocol may have placed a load on an already damaged muscle causing more DOMS for some participants. PMID:27182398

  13. Effects of Cavity on the Performance of Dual Throat Nozzle During the Thrust-Vectoring Starting Transient Process.

    PubMed

    Gu, Rui; Xu, Jinglei

    2014-01-01

    The dual throat nozzle (DTN) technique is capable to achieve higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without compromising thrust efficiency significantly during vectoring operation. The excellent performance of the DTN is mainly due to the concaved cavity. In this paper, two DTNs of different scales have been investigated by unsteady numerical simulations to compare the parameter variations and study the effects of cavity during the vector starting process. The results remind us that during the vector starting process, dynamic loads may be generated, which is a potentially challenging problem for the aircraft trim and control.

  14. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of

  15. Effects of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation (2. 45 GHz) on the foraging behavior of the white-throated sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, F.E.; Patterson, D.A.; Kunz, T.H.; Battista, S.P.; Byman, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation on the foraging behavior of the White-throated Sparrow was examined using an optimal foraging laboratory technique. Birds were exposed to microwaves for seven days at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power densities of 0.0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 25.0 mW/cm/sup 2/. Even though there were differences in foraging behaviors among power densities no trend was found for a dose response effect. Birds showed no significant differences in foraging behaviors among pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure periods.

  16. Blockage corrections for three-dimensional-flow closed-throat wind tunnels, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, John G

    1950-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wing-tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject.

  17. Blockage corrections for three-dimensional-flow closed-throat wind tunnels, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, John G

    1947-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wind-tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject.

  18. Blockage Corrections for Three-Dimensional-Flow Closed-Throat Wind Tunnels, with Consideration of the Effect of Compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, J. G.

    1951-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional, unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wind tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject

  19. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch

    PubMed Central

    Vanderduys, Eric Peter; Reside, April E.; Grice, Anthony; Rechetelo, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta) using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection. PMID:26934622

  20. Comparison of the noise characteristics of two low pressure ratio fans with a high throat Mach number inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesoky, H. L.; Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustics data obtained in experiments with two low pressure ratio 50.8 cm (20 in.) diameter model fans differing in design tip speed were compared. Determination of the average throat Mach number used to compare high Mach inlet noise reduction characteristics was based on a correlation of inlet wall static pressure measurements with a flow field calculation. The largest noise reductions were generally obtained with the higher tip speed fan. At a throat Mach number of 0.79, the difference in noise reduction was about 3.5 db with static test conditions. Although the noise reduction increased for the lower tip speed fan with a simulated flight velocity of 41 m/sec (80 knots), it was still about 2 db less than that of the high tip speed fan which was only tested at the static condition. However, variations in acoustic performance could not be absolutely attributed to the different fan designs because of differences in inlet lip contours which resulted in small variations of peak wall Mach number and axial extend of supersonic and near-sonic flow.

  1. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch.

    PubMed

    Vanderduys, Eric Peter; Reside, April E; Grice, Anthony; Rechetelo, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta) using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection.

  2. The 2D versus 3D imaging trade-off: The impact of over- or under-estimating small throats for simulating permeability in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C. A.; Crandell, L. E.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical reactions in the subsurface can alter the porosity and permeability of a porous medium through mineral precipitation and dissolution. While effects on porosity are relatively well understood, changes in permeability are more difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling is used to estimate the permeability of a porous medium using pore and throat size distributions. These distributions can be determined from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections or from 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images of small cores. Each method has unique advantages as well as unique sources of error. 3D CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network without the inherent geometry-based biases of 2D images but is limited by resolutions around 1 μm. 2D SEM imaging has the advantage of higher resolution, and the ability to examine sub-grain scale variations in porosity and mineralogy, but is limited by the small size of the sample of pores that are quantified. A pore network model was created to estimate flow permeability in a sand-packed experimental column investigating reaction of sediments with caustic radioactive tank wastes in the context of the Hanford, WA site. Before, periodically during, and after reaction, 3D images of the porous medium in the column were produced using the X2B beam line facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab. These images were interpreted using 3DMA-Rock to characterize the pore and throat size distributions. After completion of the experiment, the column was sectioned and imaged using 2D SEM in backscattered electron mode. The 2D images were interpreted using erosion-dilation to estimate the pore and throat size distributions. A bias correction was determined by comparison with the 3D image data. A special image processing method was developed to infer the pore space before reaction by digitally removing the precipitate. The different sets of pore

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of Korean yellow-throated marten, Martes flavigula (Carnivora, Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Kuem Hee; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitogenome sequence of Martes flavigula, which is an endangered and endemic species in South Korea, was determined. The genome is 16,533 bp in length and its gene arrangement pattern, gene content, and gene organization is identical to those of martens. The control region was located between the tRNAPro and tRNAPhe genes and is 1087 bp in length. This mitogenome sequence data might be an important role in the preservation of genetic resources by allowing researchers to conduct phylogenetic and systematic analyses of Mustelidae.

  4. Doreen Norton OBE, MSc, SRN, FRCN (1922-2007): Pioneer who revolutionised pressure sore management and geriatric nursing to international acclaim.

    PubMed

    Denham, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Doreen Norton was a delightful, widely respected nurse who devoted her life to improving the care of elderly people. She researched the neglected problem of pressure sores, revolutionised their nursing care, and thus achieved international fame. Her Pressure Sore Scale was established as a management tool and is still used today. She was a key member of the design team that produced the 'King's Fund Bed', researched equipment required on geriatric wards, assessed all geriatric long stay units in Scotland and established research as a valuable nursing tool within her profession and health authorities. She lectured extensively and her publications attracted worldwide acclamation. After her retirement, she was subsequently appointed to the world's first Chair of Gerontological Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio.

  5. The relationship between positioning, the breastfeeding dynamic, the latching process and pain in breastfeeding mothers with sore nipples.

    PubMed

    Blair, Anna; Cadwell, Karin; Turner-Maffei, Cindy; Brimdyr, Kajsa

    2003-07-01

    In recognition of the irrefutable disadvantages of not breastfeeding to the mother, baby, society and the environment, increasing the duration of breastfeeding has become a focus of national and international health objectives. However, many mothers experience such painful sore nipples that they stop breastfeeding before they intended. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between various aspects of optimal breastfeeding (e.g. the positioning of the baby at the mother's breast, the positioning of the baby's head and mouth, the breastfeeding dynamic and the latching process) using a guided assessment and documentation tool and the breastfeeding mother's level of reported pain on a five-point verbal descriptor scale. Ninety-five healthy postpartum breastfeeding mothers who sequentially reported sore nipples within ten days of giving birth to healthy, term babies in a hospital in Latvia participated in the study. Each mother's midwife observed, assessed and documented a breastfeed using a guidance assessment form, the Lactation Assessment Tool (LAT). Each mother scored her own pain during breastfeeding. Four attribute categories were scored and examined as related to the pain levels of the mother: the baby's face position (chin and nose and head position, cheekline, lip flange and angle of mouth opening); the baby's body position (height at the breast, body rotation and body in relation to mother's body); the breastfeeding dynamic (change in breastfeeding pattern (suck vs swallow) and movement of mother's breast) and the latching process of the baby (root, gape, seal and suck). No significant difference was found between the mother's level of reported pain and the assessed head position, body position or breastfeeding dynamic attributes of the baby. However, more optimal latching process behaviour of the baby (rooting, gaping, sealing, and sucking behaviour) are slightly related to lower levels of reported pain (r(88) = -0.09, p > 0.05). This should

  6. Piroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, J-L.; Monfils, T.; Deby-Dupon, G.; Fafchamps, M.; Venneman, I.; Crielaard, J-M.; Juchmès-Ferir, A.; Lhermerout, C.; Lamy, M.; Deby, C.

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), ten healthy male subjects were studied. Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, each subject performed two isokinetic tests separated by a period of at least 6 weeks: once with placebo, and once with piroxicam (Feldene®). They were given one capsule containing either placebo or piroxicam (20 mg) per day for 6 days with initial doses given starting 3 days prior to isokinetic testing. Exercise consisted of eight stages of five maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases, on a Kin Trex device at 60°/s angular velocity. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS were evaluated using a visual analogue scale immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after each test. The mean plasma concentration of PGE2 measured at rest and after exercise was significantly lower in the group treated with piroxicam (p < 0.05). However, statistical analysis (two-way ANOVA test) revealed that exercise did not cause any significant change of mean plasma PGE2 over time in either of the two groups. Eccentric work was followed by severe muscle pain in extensor and flexor muscle groups. Maximal soreness was noted 48 h postexercise. Serum creatine kinase activity and the serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly, and reached peak values 48 h after exercise in both experimental conditions (p < 0.001). By paired t-test, it appeared that there were no significant differences in the serum levels of these two markers of muscle damage between the two groups at any time point. We conclude that: (1) oral administration of piroxicam fails to reduce muscle damage and DOMS caused by strenuous eccentric exercise; and (2) the hypothetical role of increased PGE2 production in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, DOMS, and reduced isokinetic

  7. To Compare the Effect of Vibration Therapy and Massage in Prevention of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

    PubMed Central

    Imtiyaz, Shagufta; Veqar, Zubia; Shareef, M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of vibration therapy and massage in prevention of DOMS. Methods: Pre-test and Post-test Control-Group Design was used, 45 healthy female non athletic Subjects were recruited and randomly distributed to the three groups (15 subject in each group). After the subject’s initial status was measured experimental groups received vibration therapy (50 Hz vibration for five minutes) or massage therapy (15 minutes) intervention and control group received no treatment, just prior to the eccentric exercise. Subjects were undergoing the following measurements to evaluate the changes in the muscle condition: muscle soreness (pain perception), Range of Motion (ROM), Maximum Isometric Force (MIF), Repetition maximum (RM), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and Cretain Kinase (CK) level. All the parameters except LDH, CK and 1RM were measured before, immediately post intervention, immediately post exercise, 24 hours post exercise, 48 hours post exercise and 72 hours post exercise. LDH, CK and 1 RM were measured before and 48 hours post exercise. Result: Muscle soreness was reported to be significantly less for experimental (vibration and massage) group (p=0.000) as compared to control group at 24, 48, and 72 hours of post-exercise. Experimental and control group did not show any significant difference in MIF immediate (p=0.2898), 24 hours (p=0.4173), 48 hours (p=0.752) and 72 hours (p=0.5297) of post-exercise. Range of motion demonstrated significant recovery in experimental groups in 48 hours (p=0.0016) and 72 hours (p=0.0463). Massage therapy showed significant recovery in 1RM (p=0.000) compared to control group and vibration therapy shows significantly less LDH level (p=0.000) 48 hours of post exercise compare to control group. CK at 48 hours of post exercise in vibration group (p=0.000) and massage group showed (p=0.002) significant difference as compared to control group. Conclusion: Vibration therapy and massage are equally effective in

  8. The effect of pulsating electrostatic field application on the development of delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) symptoms after eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gatterer, Hannes; Peters, Philippe; Philippe, Marc; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to establish whether pulsating electrostatic field application, shown to increase blood flow and metabolic activity and to function as an ion pump, is able to reduce muscle pain after exercise-induced muscle damage. [Subjects and Methods] Seven participants (4 males, 3 females) performed two sessions of downhill running separated by at least 4 weeks. After the running sessions, participants were either treated for 45 min with a pulsating electrostatic field (field intensity, 9000 V; current, <9 mA; frequency, 50 Hz) or a sham treatment. The order of the intervention was random, and the condition was blinded for the participants. Muscle soreness score, creatine kinase, and jump ability were assessed before and up to 48 hours after running. [Results] Twenty-four and 48 hours after the downhill running, the muscle soreness score tended to be less increased after pulsating electrostatic field administration when compared with the sham setting (changes in muscle soreness score: 3.7±1.6 vs. 5.7±2.2 after 24 h and 3.1±2.0 vs. 5.4±3.2 after 48 h, respectively). No further differences were detected. [Conclusion] The outcomes show that a pulsating electrostatic field might be a promising treatment to reduce muscle soreness after exercise-induced muscle damage. However, further studies are needed to confirm the present outcomes and to establish the mechanism by which a pulsating electrostatic field may reduce muscle pain. PMID:26644654

  9. The effect of pulsating electrostatic field application on the development of delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) symptoms after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Gatterer, Hannes; Peters, Philippe; Philippe, Marc; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to establish whether pulsating electrostatic field application, shown to increase blood flow and metabolic activity and to function as an ion pump, is able to reduce muscle pain after exercise-induced muscle damage. [Subjects and Methods] Seven participants (4 males, 3 females) performed two sessions of downhill running separated by at least 4 weeks. After the running sessions, participants were either treated for 45 min with a pulsating electrostatic field (field intensity, 9000 V; current, <9 mA; frequency, 50 Hz) or a sham treatment. The order of the intervention was random, and the condition was blinded for the participants. Muscle soreness score, creatine kinase, and jump ability were assessed before and up to 48 hours after running. [Results] Twenty-four and 48 hours after the downhill running, the muscle soreness score tended to be less increased after pulsating electrostatic field administration when compared with the sham setting (changes in muscle soreness score: 3.7±1.6 vs. 5.7±2.2 after 24 h and 3.1±2.0 vs. 5.4±3.2 after 48 h, respectively). No further differences were detected. [Conclusion] The outcomes show that a pulsating electrostatic field might be a promising treatment to reduce muscle soreness after exercise-induced muscle damage. However, further studies are needed to confirm the present outcomes and to establish the mechanism by which a pulsating electrostatic field may reduce muscle pain.

  10. Foraging behaviour of the Scale-throated Hermit Phaethornis eurynome Lesson, 1832 (Aves, Trochilidae) in Vriesea incurvata Gaudich (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Silva, B G; Piratelli, A J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we tested for density-dependent relationships between visitation rates of the Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) and the plant density and flower number of the bromeliad Vriesea incurvata, by comparing plots with varying densities of this bromeliad. Eight 100 m2 plots were established at least 200 m from each other; four plots contained 10-15 individuals of V. incurvata each, whereas the other four contained 4-5 individuals each. The visitors, number of visits, behaviour (nectar thief or potential pollinator) and the height of foraging were recorded during focal observations on the plants. The number of visits of P. eurynome varied according to the local density of V. incurvata, showing that the heterogeneous distribution of this bromeliad species may promote adjustments in the pollinator populations, through resource variation at a local scale.

  11. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E. |; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

  12. [Rapid diagnosis of influenza infection by PCR method--detection of influenza virus HA gene in throat swab].

    PubMed

    Morishita, T; Kobayashi, S; Miyake, T; Ishihara, Y; Isomura, S; Nakajima, S; Nakajima, K

    1992-07-01

    We studied the detection of the HA gene of human influenza viruses in throat swabs obtained from the outbreaks of influenza in school children utilizing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Sensitivity and specificity of the PCR method was compared to conventional virus isolation using MDCK cells. Three pairs of primers for PCR in detecting the HA genes of AH1, AH3, and B influenza viruses showed both subtype and type specificity. The dilution experiments showed that influenza viruses, as few as 1.1-3.5 plaque-forming units per 50 microliters, were sufficient for the detection of HA genes by PCR method and the detection rate by PCR method was 2-3 fold higher than that by conventional method. Our results showed that the PCR method was a fast, sensitive and reliable method for the diagnosis of influenza infections.

  13. Principle component analysis of exposure variation analysis during computer work at presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Samani, A; Kawczyński, A; Chmura, J; Madeleine, P

    2012-01-01

    Eleven healthy volunteers took part in three sessions where computer work was performed for 10 min in each session. The recordings were made on two consecutive days. After the first session, the subjects underwent a series of high intensity eccentric exercises of shoulder elevation to induce muscle soreness. The second session was performed immediately after the exercises and third session 24 hours after the exercise. Surface electromyography (EMG) of descending and ascending trapezius, deltoideus anterior and serratus anterior was recorded. Exposure variation analysis (EVA) centroid and marginal distribution was computed. Principle component analysis (PCA) was performed on both cases. Describing more than 80% of variance, first eight components for EVA marginal distributions and first four ones for EVA centroid were picked to be investigated. The sole EVA amplitude levels played a practically significant role to describe the variation in EVA marginal distribution. However, a significant pattern of load redistribution to superficial muscles was not found. This may suggest investigating the role of deep muscles in redistribution of load during computer work in response to high level eccentric contractions.

  14. Effects of dietary carbohydrate on delayed onset muscle soreness and reactive oxygen species after contraction induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Close, G; Ashton, T; Cable, T; Doran, D; Noyes, C; McArdle, F; MacLaren, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs after unaccustomed exercise and has been suggested to be attributable to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies have shown increased ROS after lengthening contractions, attributable to invading phagocytes. Plasma glucose is a vital fuel for phagocytes, therefore carbohydrate (CHO) status before exercise may influence ROS production and DOMS Objective: To examine the effect of pre-exercise CHO status on DOMS, ROS production, and muscle function after contraction induced muscle damage. Method: Twelve subjects performed two downhill runs, one after a high CHO diet and one after a low CHO diet. Blood samples were drawn for analysis of malondialdehyde, total glutathione, creatine kinase, non-esterified fatty acids, lactate, glucose, and leucocytes. DOMS and muscle function were assessed daily. Results: The high CHO diet resulted in higher respiratory exchange ratio and lactate concentrations than the low CHO diet before exercise. The low CHO diet resulted in higher non-esterified fatty acid concentrations before exercise. DOMS developed after exercise and remained for up to 96 hours, after both diets. A biphasic response in creatine kinase occurred after both diets at 24 and 96 hours after exercise. Malondialdehyde had increased 72 hours after exercise after both diets, and muscle function was attenuated up to this time. Conclusions: Downhill running resulted in increased ROS production and ratings of DOMS and secondary increases in muscle damage. CHO status before exercise had no effect. PMID:16306505

  15. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  16. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  17. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  18. Role of TNF-α/TNFR1 in intense acute swimming-induced delayed onset muscle soreness in mice.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Cardoso, Renato D R; Martins-Pinge, Marli C; Tatakihara, Roberto I; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sergio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2014-04-10

    The injection of cytokines such as TNF-α induces muscle pain. Herein, it was addressed the role of endogenous TNF-α/TNFR1 signaling in intense acute swimming-induced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Mice were exposed to water during 30 s (sham) or to a single session of 30-120 min of swimming. Intense acute swimming induced a dose-dependent (time of exercise-dependent) muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which peaked after 24 h presenting characteristics of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The intense acute swimming (120 min)-induced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in etanercept (soluble TNF receptor) treated and TNFR1 deficient ((-/-)) mice. TNF-α levels increased 2 and 4 h after intense acute swimming in soleus muscle (but not in gastrocnemius), and spinal cord, respectively. Exercise induced an increase of myeloperoxidase activity and decrease in reduced glutathione levels in an etanercept-sensitive and TNFR1-dependent manners in the soleus muscle, but not in the gastrocnemius muscle. Concluding, TNF-α/TNFR1 signaling mediates intense acute swimming-induced DOMS by an initial role in the soleus muscle followed by spinal cord, inducing muscle inflammatory hyperalgesia and oxidative stress. The knowledge of these mechanisms might contribute to improve the training of athletes, individuals with physical impairment and intense training such as military settings.

  19. Short-term antibiotic treatment has differing long-term impacts on the human throat and gut microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, H.; Jernberg, C.; Andersson, A.F.; Sjolund-Karlsson, M.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2010-01-15

    Antibiotic administration is the standard treatment for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, the long-term consequences of this treatment on the human indigenous microbiota are relatively unexplored. Here we studied short- and long-term effects of clarithromycin and metronidazole treatment, a commonly used therapy regimen against H. pylori, on the indigenous microbiota in the throat and in the lower intestine. The bacterial compositions in samples collected over a four year period were monitored by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene using 454-based pyrosequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). While the microbial communities of untreated control subjects were relatively stable over time, dramatic shifts were observed one week after antibiotic treatment with reduced bacterial diversity in all treated subjects in both locations. While the microbiota of the different subjects responded uniquely to the antibiotic treatment some general trends could be observed; such as a dramatic decline in Actinobacteria in both throat and feces immediately after treatment. Although the diversity of the microbiota subsequently recovered to resemble the pre treatment states, the microbiota remained perturbed in some cases for up to four years post treatment. In addition, four years after treatment high levels of the macrolide resistance gene erm(B) were found, indicating that antibiotic resistance, once selected for, can persist for longer periods of time than previously recognized. This highlights the importance of a restrictive antibiotic usage in order to prevent subsequent treatment failure and potential spread of antibiotic resistance.

  20. Warm Springs, Early Lay Dates, and Double Brooding in a North American Migratory Songbird, the Black-Throated Blue Warbler

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Sillett, T. Scott; Lany, Nina K.; Kaiser, Sara A.; Rodenhouse, Nicholas L.; Webster, Michael S.; Holmes, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have correlated the advancement of lay date in birds with warming climate trends, yet the fitness effects associated with this phenological response have been examined in only a small number of species. Most of these species–primarily insectivorous cavity nesters in Europe–exhibit fitness declines associated with increasing asynchrony with prey. Here, we use 25 years of demographic data, collected from 1986 to 2010, to examine the effects of spring temperature on breeding initiation date, double brooding, and annual fecundity in a Nearctic - Neotropical migratory songbird, the black-throated blue warbler (Setophaga caerulescens). Data were collected from birds breeding at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA, where long-term trends toward warmer springs have been recorded. We found that black-throated blue warblers initiated breeding earlier in warmer springs, that early breeders were more likely to attempt a second brood than those starting later in the season, and that double brooding and lay date were linked to higher annual fecundity. Accordingly, we found selection favored earlier breeding in most years. However, in contrast to studies of several other long-distance migratory species in Europe, this selection pressure was not stronger in warmer springs, indicating that these warblers were able to adjust mean lay date appropriately to substantial inter-annual variation in spring temperature. Our results suggest that this North American migratory songbird might not experience the same fecundity declines as songbirds that are unable to adjust their timing of breeding in pace with spring temperatures. PMID:23565154