Science.gov

Sample records for southeast denver colorado

  1. Denver, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-248-092 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- The location of Denver, Colorado - on the western edge of the High Plains, at the junction of the South Platte River and Clear Creek east of the Rocky Mountains - is graphically displayed. Mount Evans and its surroundings are already covered by snow on October 8, 1994. Clear Creek was one of the first areas in the Rockies where gold was discovered by American prospectors in the 19th century, which led to the settlement of Denver. The growth of 20th century Denver, dominantly to the west and south, is apparent. Stapleton Field, close to downtown Denver, is being replaced by the new regional airport well out on the plains.

  2. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Denver, Colorado, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Denver Quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, F.A.; Dickinson, K.A.; Nash, J.T.; Otton, J.K.; Dodge, H.W.; Granger, H.C.; Robinson, K.; McDonnell, J.R.; Yancey, C.L.

    1982-09-01

    Nine areas in the Denver 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Colorado have been identified as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits containing a minimum of 100 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at grades of 0.01% or better. Six of these areas are in metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Front Range, one is in sedimentary rocks of South Park, and two are in sedimentary rocks of the Great Plains. Favorable areas and the classes of deposits for which they are thought to be favorable are: Area A, The Foothills Favorable Environment (700 km/sup 2/ to a depth of 1500 m); Areas B-D, The Silver Plume Granite Favorable Environment; Area E, Southern Elkhorn Upthrust Favorable Environment; Area F, South Park Favorable Environments (27 km/sup 2/ in units of variable thickness); Area G, Dawson Arkose Favorable Environment (3600 km/sup 2/ with an estimated thickness of 50 m); and Area H, Fox Hills Formation Favorable Environment (700 km/sup 2/ with an estimated thickness of 38 m). Other areas and environments in the Denver Quadrangle have uranium occurences and some have yielded small amounts of uranium ore in the past (for example the Central City district). These areas are ranked as unfavorable because in our judgment the evidence does not suggest favorability for deposits of the minimum size. However, neither empirical data nor genetic models for uranium deposits are adequate presently to make determinations of favorability with confidence, and changes of rank are to be expected in the future.

  4. Community College of Denver. North Campus, Denver, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John D.

    1976-01-01

    The soon-to-be-completed North Campus of the Community College of Denver demonstrates a conviction on the part of the state and the design team that the use of solar energy is economically and technologically and alternative to the continued consumption of fossil fuel. (Author/MLF)

  5. Community College of Denver. North Campus, Denver, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John D.

    1976-01-01

    The soon-to-be-completed North Campus of the Community College of Denver demonstrates a conviction on the part of the state and the design team that the use of solar energy is economically and technologically and alternative to the continued consumption of fossil fuel. (Author/MLF)

  6. 76 FR 35010 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado... funerary objects in the possession/control of the Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver.... ] History and Description of the Remains In July 1990, human remains representing a minimum of 10...

  7. Denver Developmental Screening Test: Cultural Variations in Southeast Asian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Virginia; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Denver Developmental Screening Tests (DDST) was administered to 25 Southeast Asian children (one to five years old) and scores of 150 other DDSTs performed on Southeast Asian children were reviewed. Findings suggested that scores may reflect differences in social and cultural experiences between these children and the standardization sample.…

  8. 77 FR 13629 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park..., NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866-4531... funerary objects under the control of History Colorado, Denver, CO. The human remains were recovered...

  9. 77 FR 11573 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park..., NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866-4531... History Colorado, Denver, CO. The exact locations from which the human remains were recovered are...

  10. 77 FR 13627 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park.... ADDRESSES: Sheila Goff, NAGPRA Liaison, History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303... human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of History Colorado, Denver, CO....

  11. 78 FR 72700 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Colorado, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from the vicinity of Mora, in Mora County, NM. This... individual were removed from the vicinity of Mora, in Mora County, NM, by a private citizen. Sometime...

  12. Groundwater availability of the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2011-01-01

    The Denver Basin aquifer system is a critical water resource for growing municipal, industrial, and domestic uses along the semiarid Front Range urban corridor of Colorado. The confined bedrock aquifer system is located along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountain Front Range where the mountains meet the Great Plains physiographic province. Continued population growth and the resulting need for additional water supplies in the Denver Basin and throughout the western United States emphasize the need to continually monitor and reassess the availability of groundwater resources. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated large-scale regional studies to provide updated groundwater-availability assessments of important principal aquifers across the United States, including the Denver Basin. This study of the Denver Basin aquifer system evaluates the hydrologic effects of continued pumping and documents an updated groundwater flow model useful for appraisal of hydrologic conditions.

  13. Aquifers of the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topper, R.

    2004-01-01

    Development of the Denver Basin for water supply has been ongoing since the late 1800s. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of the water-yielding strata of Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within four overlying formations. The four statutory aquifers contained in these formations are named the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills. For water rights administrative purposes, the outcrop/subcrop of the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer defines the margins of the Basin. Initial estimates of the total recoverable groundwater reserves in storage, under this 6700-mi2 area, were 295 million acre-ft. Recent geologic evidence indicates that the aquifers are very heterogeneous and their composition varies significantly with distance from the source area of the sediments. As a result, available recoverable reserves may be one-third less than previously estimated. There is no legal protection for pressure levels in the aquifer, and water managers are becoming increasingly concerned about the rapid water level declines (30 ft/yr). Approximately 33,700 wells of record have been completed in the sedimentary rock aquifers of the Denver Basin for municipal, industrial, agricultural, and domestic uses.

  14. 77 FR 42510 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park..., Denver, CO 80203, telephone (303) 866-4561. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance... Colorado, Denver, CO. One set of remains was discovered in Rio Blanco County, CO. The exact locations...

  15. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-340-1606, Denver Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, P.

    1985-07-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) (PCE) at Denver Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Denver, Colorado in July, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a company representative to determine if a health hazard from exposure to PCE existed during the commercial laundry and dry cleaning processes. A noise evaluation was also requested. The author concludes that a health hazard exists due to overexposure to PCE and noise at the facility. Recommendations include replacing the present transfer system by a dry/to/dry closed system if possible, improving work practices, removing clothing from each machine at the same time replacing or cleaning and oiling the bearings in the dryers, and establishing an educational program to instruct new employees on the hazards of chemical and noise exposure.

  16. 76 FR 5432 - United Western Bank Denver, Colorado; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision United Western Bank Denver, Colorado; Notice of Appointment of Receiver... as sole Receiver for United Western Bank, Denver, Colorado, (OTS No. 06679) on January 21,...

  17. Colorado: Groundwork Denver / Healthy Air for Northeast Denver (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Groundwork Denver, Inc., on behalf of the Healthy Air for Northeast Denver (HAND) Partnership, is the recipient of Level II CARE funding. HAND is a collaborative partnership borne out of the Northeast Denver Environmental Initiative.

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-91-161-2225, Denver Police Department, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.A.; McCammon, C.S.

    1992-05-01

    In response to a request from the Denver Police Department (SIC-9221) in Denver, Colorado, an investigation was made into lead (7439921) exposures during the use of different ammunition on the firing range. Ventilation rates were measured and personal breathing zone air samples were collected for ten officers during the firing of .45 caliber pistols. Nonlead primers were not yet available for .45 caliber ammunition. Air lead exposure ranged from 1.0 to 16 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/cu m). A slight improvement was noted in ventilation since an earlier NIOSH study had been performed at this site. The improvement resulted from the removal of a 3 foot high partition along the floor on the firing line. There was still, however, turbulent air flow across the entire firing line and backflow in some of the shooting booths. The author concludes that there was no health hazard from lead overexposure at this site at this time, but recommends use of jacketed bullets, nonlead primers, and administrative controls to minimize lead exposures.

  19. Vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barkmann, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Denver Basin is a structural basin on the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountain Front Range, Colorado, containing approximately 3000 ft of sediments that hold a critical groundwater resource supplying many thousands of households with water. Managing this groundwater resource requires understanding how water gets into and moves through water-bearing layers in a complex multiple-layered sedimentary sequence. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of permeable sandstone interbedded with impermeable shale that has been subdivided into four principle aquifers named, in ascending order, the Laramie-Fox Hills, Arapahoe, Denver, and Dawson aquifers. Although shale can dominate the stratigraphic interval containing the aquifers, there is very little empirical data regarding the hydrogeologic properties of the shale layers that control groundwater flow in the basin. The amount of water that flows vertically within the basin is limited by the vertical hydraulic conductivity through the confining shale layers. Low vertical flow volumes translate to low natural recharge rates and can have a profound negative impact on long-term well yields and the economic viability of utilizing the resource. To date, direct measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity from cores of fine-grained sediments have been published from only five locations; and the data span a wide range from 1??10-3 to 1??10-11 cm/sec. This range may be attributable, in part, to differences in sample handling and analytical methods; however, it may also reflect subtle differences in the lithologic characteristics of the fine-grained sediments such as grain-size, clay mineralogy, and compaction that relate to position in the basin. These limited data certainly call for the collection of additional data.

  20. Region 8: Colorado Denver, Pagosa Springs and Telluride Adequate Letter (8/18/2000)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan, Pagosa Springs and Tellurides' Particulate Matter (PM10) maintenance plans for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate

  1. South Platte Watershed from the Headwaters to the Denver Metropolitan Area (Colorado) Systems Thinking

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    South Platte Watershed from the Headwaters to the Denver Metropolitan Area (Colorado) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating

  2. Poncho field - Cretaceous J sandstone stratigraphic traps - Denver basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, F.G.; Ziegler, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    Distributary channel and delta destructional sandstones of Early Cretaceous age are important reservoirs for stratigraphic traps in the J sandstone at Poncho field, Adams and Arapahoe Counties, Colorado. Cores and logs from the field area reveal a lowermost, nonproductive, northeast-trending delta front sandstoe (J-3); a middle complex of southeast- and east-trending, productive distributary channel sandstones (J-2) that grade into tightly cemented delta fringe marine sediments to the southeast and northeast; and an upper, northeast trending, productive delta destructional sandstone (J-1). Vertical and lateral sequences of sedimentary structures, textures, trace fossil assemblages, and geometry and trend of sandstone bodies suggest that these units were part of a wave-dominated delta complex that prograded to the east and southeast from the area of Lonetree field. Thin section and SEM analyses reveal that the principal cements in both reservoir sandstones are quartz overgrowths, kaolinite, and chlorite, and that the bulk of the porosity is secondary and related to dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspar grains. Porosities and permeabilities are most variable and lowest in the nonproductive delta front sandstones, averaging 15% and 7 md; variable and intermediate in the productive distributary channel sandstones, averaging 16% and 28 md; and most uniform and highest in the overlying delta destructional sandstones, averaging 21% and 88 md.

  3. OUTLOOK BY DENVER AREA OCCUPATIONS. OCCUPATIONS IN COLORADO, PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins.

    EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS FOR 1960, ESTIMATED EMPLOYMENT FOR 1965 AND 1970, ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL WORKERS NEEDED BY 1970, AND SALARY INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED FOR A WIDE RANGE OF OCCUPATIONS IN THE DENVER AREA. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM A DENVER STUDY, "JOBS AND THE FUTURE," BY ROBERT VAUGHAN OF THE MOUNTAIN STATES TELEPHONE CO., 1962, AND…

  4. Model Study of Diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP) Contamination, Rocky Mountain Arsenal Near Denver, Colorado. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    8217, < ," ’ ,• , • - - " , • . ,:... u.•..... , - - • ’- - .... ’ " ,/ •N OIL 10 COLORADO WATER RESOURCESI *v j,/N"u \\ \\I ’K t3 MODEL STUDY OF DIMP...Gruundwater study of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal and some surrounding area: Colorado Dept. Health, Water Quality Control Div., 21 p. Smith, R. 0., Schneider...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE .5 FUNDING NUMBERSMODEL STUDY OF DIISOPROPYLMETHYLPHOSPHONATE (DIMP) CONTAMINATION, ROCKY MOUNTAIN ARSENAL NEAR DENVER

  5. Follow-up of 2003 human West Nile virus infections, Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Jennifer L; Harmon, Heath; Vogt, Richard L

    2006-07-01

    Tri-County Health Department and Boulder County Public Health conducted a follow-up study of all nonfatal West Nile virus (WNV) cases reported during 2003 in 4 metropolitan Denver, Colorado, counties. Self-reported patient information was obtained approximately 6 months after onset. A total of 656 (81.2%) eligible WNV patients are included in this study.

  6. Advancing Student Achievement through Labor-Management Collaboration (Denver, Colorado, February 15-16, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of a conference entitled "Advancing Student Achievement through Labor-Management Collaboration" held in Denver, Colorado last February 15-16, 2011. This first-of-its-kind conference on labor-management collaboration is a historic effort to transform the relationships among local superintendents, school…

  7. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report: Denver, Colorado - August 9-11, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  8. Financing Solar Installations with New Markets Tax Credits: Denver, Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-09-01

    Fact sheet provides a brief overview of New Markets Tax Credits (NMTCs), a third-party financing incentive for solar installations in the public sector. NMTCs are intended to encourage economic activity in low-income and disadvantaged neighborhoods. The use of NMTCs in an innovative solar project transaction by the City of Denver, Colorado, is highlighted.

  9. Zeolites replacing plant fossils in the Denver formation, Lakewood, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Well-developed crystals of heulandite and stilbite, within fossil wood, occur in sedimentary rocks in Lakewood, Jefferson County. The rocks belong to the Denver formation, a locally fossiliferous deposit of fluvial claystone, siltstone, sandstone and conglomerate, containing some volcanic mudflows (andesitic) of late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age. Altered volcanic glass released Na and Ca into the ground-water and subsequently zeolites were crystallized in the open spaces between grains and within fossil plant structures. Minor pyrite, quartz (jasper), calcite and apatite also occur as replacements of fossil wood. Similar zeolite occurrences in other areas are reviewed.-R.S.M.

  10. 76 FR 17444 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Colorado Historical Society... remains was made by the Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado) professional staff in...

  11. Does Attending a Charter School Reduce the Likelihood of Being Placed into Special Education? Evidence from Denver, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.; Carpenter, Dick M., II; Clayton, Grant

    2017-01-01

    We use administrative data to measure whether attending a charter school in Denver, Colorado, reduces the likelihood that students are newly classified as having a disability in primary grades. We employ an observational approach that takes advantage of Denver's Common Enrollment System, which allows us to observe each school that the student…

  12. Total Immersion: Sharon Morris--Colorado State Library, Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    It has been an unconventional career path. Sharon Morris has been a children's librarian, a collection development librarian, a product manager for CARL, and an academic advisor in a graduate library science program. Today she's coordinator for AskColorado, the 24/7 online reference service recognized as 2004 Project of the Year by the Colorado…

  13. Total Immersion: Sharon Morris--Colorado State Library, Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    It has been an unconventional career path. Sharon Morris has been a children's librarian, a collection development librarian, a product manager for CARL, and an academic advisor in a graduate library science program. Today she's coordinator for AskColorado, the 24/7 online reference service recognized as 2004 Project of the Year by the Colorado…

  14. The Urban Heat Island and its Influence on Precipitation in Denver, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunen, Diana R.

    Anthropogenic modification of the climate is an unintended yet serious effect of urbanization and it is happening in every city across the globe in the form of the urban heat island. The purpose of this study was to see if Denver, Colorado exhibits evidence of an urban heat island using meteorological data and if there has been a change in precipitation amounts since the urbanization of the city. It was concluded that Denver, Colorado does have an urban heat island that varies seasonally throughout the year with an average magnitude of 3.57°C during the day and 3.82°C at night. The summer season exhibits the most prominent urban heat island of 4.22°C during the night. Overall, there has been a significant decrease in precipitation for the study area that can possibly be attributed to the urbanization of Denver. A non-significant but still noteworthy increase in precipitation in a small area downwind of southern Denver could be due to the urban heat island around the city.

  15. Aerobiology of the Colorado Rockies: pollen count comparisons between Vail and Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Silvers, W S; Ledoux, R A; Dolen, W K; Morrison, M R; Nelson, H S; Weber, R W

    1992-11-01

    Pollen patterns were compared between Vail, CO (8,200 feet elevation), Aspen, CO (7,900 feet) and Denver, CO (5,280 feet) from 1984 through 1988. Counts were obtained at all sites with a volumetric intermittent cycling rotating impaction sampler. Aspen and Denver were compared in 1984, and Vail and Denver from 1985 through 1988. While counts were generally lower in the mountain sites than Denver, certain pollens, especially trees, were quite high. Ragweed was essentially absent from Aspen and Vail, and chenopod-amaranth counts were very low. Cedar, pine, and aspen frequently pollinated despite active snowfall.

  16. Alternatives for Containment of Polluted Groundwater, Basin A Vicinity, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Denver, Colorado I 3 Basin A’ 4 Location of possible/known sources of groundwater pollution in Basin A’ 5 Location of test borings in/near Basin A’ 6...thought or reported to be significant sources of groundwater pollution . The areas are listed on Table 2. The current general concensus concerning...major source of groundwater pollution in PMlA, studies of soil contamination have been concentrated in that particular area. (Another area where soil

  17. MMU development at the Martin Marietta plant in Denver, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1980-07-25

    S80-36889 (24 July 1980) --- Astronaut Bruce McCandless II uses a simulator at Martin Marietta?s space center near Denver to develop flight techniques for a backpack propulsion unit that will be used on Space Shuttle flights. The manned maneuvering unit (MMU) training simulator allows astronauts to "fly missions" against a full scale mockup of a portion of the orbiter vehicle. Controls of the simulator are like those of the actual MMU. Manipulating them allows the astronaut to move in three straight-line directions and in pitch, yaw and roll. One possible application of the MMU is for an extravehicular activity chore to repair damaged tiles on the vehicle. McCandless is wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU).

  18. Geologic controls of subdivision damage near Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    This case study investigates the geologic controls on damaging ground deformations in a residential subdivision near Denver, Colo. Moderate to severe damage has occurred in certain areas where linear, parallel heave features with up to 0.3 in (1 ft) of differential displacement have formed across roads and under houses. Other areas have small, localized depressions that have formed in the roadsides with no discernable damage to nearby houses. Still other areas show no evidence of ground movements. The bedrock beneath the subdivision consists of steeply dipping Cretaceous strata of the Benton Shale, Niobrara Formation, and Pierre Shale. Quaternary soil deposits and fill, 0-16 m (0-53 ft) thick, overlie the bedrock. The most pronounced and damaging linear-heave features are coincident with steeply dipping, silty claystone with thin layers of very highly plastic bentonite. These heave features diminish as the depth to bedrock increases, and become small to negligible where the bedrock is overlain by 3 m (10 ft) or more of overburden soil deposits or fill. In contrast, areas having no visible damage and those having localized surface depressions are typically underlain by 1-12 m (3-39 ft) of alluvial-terrace deposits or fill. The depressions appear to have been caused by settlement over improperly filled water-and-sewer line trenches. The overall relationship between geology and ground deformations as seen in this subdivision may be useful for predicting, and thereby reducing, damage for future subdivision projects. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering ?? ASCE.

  19. The changing face of academic health centers: a path forward for the University of Colorado Denver.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M Roy; Krugman, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    This article describes a decade of major changes at an academic health center (AHC) and university. The authors describe two major changes undertaken at the University of Colorado and its AHC during the past 10 years and the effects of these changes on the organization as a whole. First, the AHC's four health professional schools and two partner hospitals were completely relocated from a space-limited urban campus to a closed Army base. The impact of that change and the management of its potential disruption of academic programs are discussed in detail. In the middle of this total relocation, the AHC campus was consolidated with a general academic campus within the University of Colorado system, compounding the challenge. The authors describe the strategies employed to implement this major consolidation, including changing the organizational structure and selecting the new name of the university--the University of Colorado Denver.

  20. Limited access to syringes for injection drug users in pharmacies in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Koester, Stephen K; Bush, Trevor W; Lewis, Beth A

    2002-01-01

    To determine the availability of syringes for injection drug users (IDUs) from pharmacies in Denver. Single-group, uncontrolled, noncomparative study. Denver, Colorado. 23 randomly selected pharmacies in the Denver metropolitan area and 3 additional pharmacies located near drug-buying locations. Attempt by eight trained IDU "research assistants" to purchase packages of 10 U-100 insulin syringes without a prescription from pharmacies. Successful purchase of syringes; reasons for refusal. Of 26 pharmacies, 4 reported not stocking syringes, 3 did not sell syringes to any research assistants, 10 sold to some research assistants but not to others, and 9 sold to all research assistants. Of 206 purchase attempts, 54% were successful. In 37.9% of 95 refusals, the pharmacist reported that syringes were not sold at the store, and in 28.4% the pharmacist refused to sell because the research assistant did not produce diabetic identification or answer insulin-related questions. No differences in pharmacy response were found with respect to the racial or ethnic characteristics of the research assistant. Price varied substantially within and among stores. No pharmacies that sold syringes to research assistants were open 24 hours per day. While IDUs who live near a pharmacy that regularly sells syringes and IDUs with a convincing diabetes story may have adequate access to syringes, others face inconsistent availability. Price fluctuations and limited hours of those pharmacies that sell syringes may be additional barriers to access to sterile syringes for IDUs in Denver.

  1. 78 FR 74162 - Sysco Denver LLC, a Subsidiary of Sysco Corporation, IT Department, Denver, Colorado; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sysco Denver LLC, a Subsidiary of Sysco Corporation, IT Department... workers and former workers of Sysco Denver LLC., a subsidiary of Sysco Corporation, IT Department, Denver... at the subject firm were engaged in activities related to the supply of information technology (IT...

  2. Building America Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center, Denver, Colorado (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a 'Power of Zero Energy Center' linked to its model home in the Stapleton community of Denver. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. The case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  3. Land-use classification map of the greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The Greater Denver area, in the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado, is an area of rapid population growth and expanding land development. At present no overall land-use policy exists for this area, although man individuals and groups are concerned about environmental, economic, and social stresses caused by population pressures. A well-structured land-use policy for the entire Front Range Urban Corridor, in which compatible land uses are taken into account, could lead to overall improvements in land values. A land classification map is the first step toward implementing such a policy.

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: A Production Builder's Passive House - Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    Brookfield Home’s first project is in a community called Midtown in Denver, Colorado, in which the builder took on the challenge of increased energy efficiency by creating a Passive House (PH)-certified model home. Brookfield worked with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team IBACOS to create the home, evaluate advanced building technologies, and use the home as a marketing tool for potential homebuyers. Brookfield also worked with KGA studio architects to create a new floor plan that would be constructed to the PH standard as an upgrade option.

  5. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denver, Colorado: Epidemiology and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Haukoos, Jason S.; Witt, Gary; Gravitz, Craig; Dean, Julianne; Jackson, David M.; Candlin, Thomas; Vellman, Peter; Riccio, John; Heard, Kennon; Kazutomi, Tom; Luyten, Dylan; Pineda, Gilbert; Gunter, Jeff; Biltoft, Jennifer; Colwell, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in the United States is approximately 6 per 10,000 population and survival remains low. Relatively little is known about the performance characteristics of a two-tiered EMS system split between fire-based basic life support dispersed from fixed locations and hospital-based advanced life support dispersed from non-fixed locations. The objectives of this study were to, therefore, describe the incidence of CA in Denver, Colorado and to define the prevalence of survival with good neurological function in the context of this EMS system. Methods Setting: A two-tiered hospital-based EMS system for the County of Denver, and 10 receiving hospitals. Population: Consecutive adult patients who experienced non-traumatic out-of-hospital CA from January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2004. Design: Retrospective cohort study using standardized abstraction methodology. Data Collection: Demographic and prehospital arrest characteristics and treatment data, and survival data using the Utstein template. Outcome: Good neurologic survival defined by a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) Score of 1 or 2. Results During the study period, 1,985 arrests occurred. Of these, 715 (36%) had attempted resuscitation by paramedics and constitute our study sample. The median age was 65 (IQR: 52–78) years, 69% were male, 41% had witnessed arrest, 25% had bystander CPR performed, and 30% had VF or pulseless VT as their initial rhythm. Of the 715 patients, 545 (76%) were transported to a hospital, 223 (31%) had return of spontaneous circulation, 175 (25%) survived to hospital admission, 58 (8%) survived to hospital discharge, and 42 (6%, 95% CI: 4%–8%) had a good neurologic outcome. Conclusions Out-of-hospital CA survival in Denver, Colorado is similar to other United States communities. PMID:20370778

  6. Geohydrology of the shallow aquifers in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1996-01-01

    The Denver metropolitan area is underlain by shallow layers of water-bearing sediments (aquifers) consisting of unconsolidated gravel, sand, silt, and clay. The depth to water in these aquifers is less than 20 feet in much of the area, and the aquifers provide a ready source of water to numerous shallow, small-capacity wells. The shallow depth to water also makes the aquifers susceptible to contamination from the land surface. Water percolating downward from residential, commercial, and industrial property, spills of hazardous materials, and leaks from underground storage tanks and pipelines can cause contaminants to enter the shallow aquifers. Wet basements, unstable foundation materials, and waterlogged soils also are common in areas of very shallow ground water.Knowledge of the extent, thickness, and water-table altitude of the shallow aquifers is incomplete. This, coupled with the complexity of development in this large metropolitan area, makes effective use, management, and protection of these aquifers extremely difficult. Mapping of the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of these aquifers would provide the general public and technical users with information needed to better use, manage, and protect this water resource. A study to map the geohydrology of shallow aquifers in the Denver metropolitan area was begun in 1994. The work was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army-Rocky Mountain Arsenal, U.S. Department of Energy-Rocky Flats Field Office, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Colorado Department of Natural Resources-State Engineers Office, Denver Water Department, Littleton-Englewood Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Willows Water District, and the cities of Aurora, Lakewood, and Thornton.This report presents the results of a systematic mapping of the extent, thickness, and water-table altitude of the shallow

  7. Median-permeability contour maps of the J sandstone, Dakota Group, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Gautier, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Permeability values compiled in this J sandstone study were determined from cores from 134 widely scattered boreholes. Median permeabilities, rather than average permeabilities, were used in order to minimize the effect of anomalous samples. Thirty-five oil companies and independent operators supplied core data. Core Laboratories of Denver, Colorado analyzed the core, which was submitted over a period of 25 years.

  8. The Assessment of Informal Factors Affecting Teaching and Learning in a Ghetto High School; Denver, Colorado, Manual High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunwell, Robert R.; And Others

    The problem undertaken by this study was the assessment of social, psychological, and philosophic factors present in the educational climate of an urban ghetto high school (Denver, Colorado Manual High School), as a preliminary step to the diagnosis and development of an enhanced educational program. Seventy-eight teachers and 798 students…

  9. A snapshot of substance abuse among homeless and runaway youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, James M; Hopfer, Christian; Hooks, Sabrina; White, Roxane; Petersen, Jerene; Pirkopf, John

    2004-06-01

    We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered were asked to fill out a brief survey asking about past nine month use of the following substances: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, hallucinogens, ecstasy and ketamine, and HIV risk behaviors. Chi-square analyses of the association of substance used and gender, age, living situation, and ethnicity were conducted. In addition, the use of any club drug was examined. One-hundred-eighty-six homeless or runaway youth were surveyed; 74 percent were between 16 and 25. Rates of use over the last nine months were as follows: alcohol, 69 percent; marijuana, 75 percent; methamphetamine, 18 percent; cocaine, 19 percent; heroin, 12 percent; hallucinogens, 30 percent; ecstasy, 25 percent; and ketamine, 13 percent. Eleven percent reported trading sex for drugs, money, food, or shelter; and 13 percent reported sharing needles. There were significant associations between living situation and use of marijuana, cocaine and hallucinogens. Prevalence rates of club drugs show 75 percent, 77 percent and 77 percent of homeless or runaway youth ihaving used ecstasy, ketamine and hallucinogens one to three times per month over the last nine months, respectively. Prevalence rates of substance use among homeless youth in the Denver metropolitan are similar to rates reported in other larger metropolitan areas. Routine screening for every substance needs to be part of the assessment for all homeless youth. Initial data points to a need for more research exploring protective factors among this population and to better understand the prevalence of club drug use.

  10. Selected hydrologic data for the south Platte River through Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, N.E.; Blakely, S.R.; Hammond, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the cities of Littleton and Englewood, Colorado, studied the effects of the discharge of treated effluent from the Bi-City Waste Water Treatment Plant on low-flow conditions of the South Platte River. An 18-mile reach of the South Platte River, beginning below Chatfield Reservoir, through the Denver metropolitan area was studied. Chatfield Reservoir was used to regulate the flow of the South Platte River on four occasions between October 1982 and January 1984. Each flow-regulation period was used to achieve a stable, low-flow condition. Data collection during low flow allowed for the study of waste assimilation during both warm- and cold-water conditions. Water quality, streamflow, channel geometry, traveltime, mixing-zone, reaeration, and benthic-oxygen demand data were collected at selected instream, tributary, and effluent sites. This report presents data collected during four periods of low flow along the South Platte River. (USGS)

  11. High-Penetration Photovoltaics Standards and Codes Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 20, 2010: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Herig, C.; Bower, W.

    2010-09-01

    Effectively interconnecting high-level penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems requires careful technical attention to ensuring compatibility with electric power systems. Standards, codes, and implementation have been cited as major impediments to widespread use of PV within electric power systems. On May 20, 2010, in Denver, Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), held a workshop to examine the key technical issues and barriers associated with high PV penetration levels with an emphasis on codes and standards. This workshop included building upon results of the High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid workshop held in Ontario California on February 24-25, 2009, and upon the stimulating presentations of the diverse stakeholder presentations.

  12. Effects of autocorrelation upon LANDSAT classification accuracy. [Richmond, Virginia and Denver, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Richmond, Virginia and Denver, Colorado were study sites in an effort to determine the effect of autocorrelation on the accuracy of a parallelopiped classifier of LANDSAT digital data. The autocorrelation was assumed to decay to insignificant levels when sampled at distances of at least ten pixels. Spectral themes developed using blocks of adjacent pixels, and using groups of pixels spaced at least 10 pixels apart were used. Effects of geometric distortions were minimized by using only pixels from the interiors of land cover sections. Accuracy was evaluated for three classes; agriculture, residential and "all other"; both type 1 and type 2 errors were evaluated by means of overall classification accuracy. All classes give comparable results. Accuracy is approximately the same in both techniques; however, the variance in accuracy is significantly higher using the themes developed from autocorrelated data. The vectors of mean spectral response were nearly identical regardless of sampling method used. The estimated variances were much larger when using autocorrelated pixels.

  13. Mental health and substance abuse indicators among homeless youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Merscham, Carrie; Van Leeuwen, James M; McGuire, Megan

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of mental health evaluations from 182 homeless youth residing in a Denver, Colorado, shelter. The literature on homeless youth, although developing, is still somewhat limited as it relates to mental health, substance abuse, and trauma. This study was motivated by clinically observed high rates of mental illness, trauma, dangerousness issues, and drug and alcohol abuse. Using archival data from mental health evaluations conducted over two years, variables including gender, age, ethnicity, primary diagnosis, drug of choice, trauma history, suicidal ideation, homicidal ideation, and legal history were assessed. Results discovered significantly higher than expected diagnoses of mental illness and associations between drug of choice and diagnosis, trauma history and suicidal ideation, and trauma history and diagnosis. Results suggest a strong need for co-occurring treatment, trauma-focused therapy, and attention to both mental illness and substance abuse in homeless youth.

  14. Invasive pneumococcal disease and pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Denver, Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Nelson, George E; Gershman, Kenneth A; Swerdlow, David L; Beall, Bernard W; Moore, Matthew R

    2012-02-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia was a complication during previous influenza pandemics but was not evident initially during pandemic (H1N1) 2009. During October 2009 in Denver, Colorado, USA, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 peaked simultaneously, which suggests a link. We compared cases of IPD in October 2009 with cases in February 2009, the most recent peak month of seasonal influenza. During October 2009, we observed 58 IPD cases, which was 3× the average number of IPD cases that usually occur in October in Denver. Patients with IPD in October 2009 were younger and more likely to have chronic lung disease than patients who had IPD in February 2009; a total of 10/47 patients had influenza, and 33/53 patients had influenza-like illness. Thus, ≈17%-62% cases of IPD may have been associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Pneumococcal disease prevention strategies should be emphasized during future influenza pandemics.

  15. Environmental Characteristics Associated With Pedestrian–Motor Vehicle Collisions in Denver, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Sebert Kuhlmann, Anne K.; Thomas, Deborah; R. Sain, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined patterns of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions and associated environmental characteristics in Denver, Colorado. Methods. We integrated publicly available data on motor vehicle collisions, liquor licenses, land use, and sociodemographic characteristics to analyze spatial patterns and other characteristics of collisions involving pedestrians. We developed both linear and spatially weighted regression models of these collisions. Results. Spatial analysis revealed global clustering of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions with concentrations in downtown, in a contiguous neighborhood, and along major arterial streets. Walking to work, population density, and liquor license outlet density all contributed significantly to both linear and spatial models of collisions involving pedestrians and were each significantly associated with these collisions. Conclusions. These models, constructed with data from Denver, identified conditions that likely contribute to patterns of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions. Should these models be verified elsewhere, they will have implications for future research directions, public policy to enhance pedestrian safety, and public health programs aimed at decreasing unintentional injury from pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions and promoting walking as a routine physical activity. PMID:19608966

  16. Analysis of meteorologic variables and seasonal aeroallergen pollen counts in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Glassheim, J W; Ledoux, R A; Vaughan, T R; Damiano, M A; Goodman, D L; Nelson, H S; Weber, R W

    1995-08-01

    The observation of low levels of weed pollens following a freeze and an early autumn snowfall in Denver, Colorado led to this analysis of meteorologic variables and pollen counts. The purpose of this study was to examine, in depth, the relationship between observed pollen counts and a selection of independent meteorologic variables. We prospectively studied in 1991 daily high and low temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, barometric pressure, percent sunshine, wind velocity and direction, tree, grass, and weed pollen, as well as dates of the first frost/freeze. Similar data were retrospectively analyzed for 1987-1990. Correlation coefficients for the prospective data were as high as .611 for high temperature and cottonwood and .718 for high temperature and maple (P < .001). High and low temperature showed strong correlations with the combined weed counts (.598 and .628, respectively, P < .001). Denver weed pollens appear impacted more by temperature and less by precipitation and humidity, while the converse is true for tree and grass pollen. However, weed pollen, especially sage, may appreciably rebound after freezing temperatures. While separate meteorologic variables may have high correlations with specific pollen counts in a given year, such effect is not consistent and varies from year to year.

  17. Traversing the triangulum: the intersection of tobacco, legalised marijuana and electronic vaporisers in Denver, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Emily Anne; Popova, Lucy; Ling, Pamela M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the intersection of tobacco, legalised marijuana and electronic vaporiser use among young adults in the ‘natural laboratory’ of Colorado, the first state with legalised retail marijuana. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 32 young adults (18–26 years old) in Denver, Colorado, in 2015 to understand the beliefs and practices related to the use of tobacco, marijuana and vaporisers. Results We found ambiguity about whether the phrase ‘to smoke’ refers to the use of tobacco or marijuana products. Smoking marijuana blunts (emptied cigarillo or tobacco wrap filled with marijuana) was common, but few interpreted this as tobacco use. Marijuana vaporisers were used to circumvent public consumption laws (eg, while at work or when driving). Young adults considered secondhand tobacco smoke dangerous, but perceived secondhand marijuana smoke as benign. Discussion Using tobacco products as a delivery method for marijuana (eg, blunts) might be increasing and normalising tobacco use among young adults. Surveillance should explicitly ask about use of tobacco products for marijuana. Marijuana vaporisers, often indistinguishable from nicotine vaporisers, may be used to circumvent public consumption laws; communities concerned about use of marijuana in public spaces should include vaporisers (for nicotine or marijuana) in smoke-free regulations. Tobacco, marijuana and electronic vaporisers should be studied together, rather than separately. This approach is essential in informing research and policy as more US states and countries worldwide move to legalise marijuana. PMID:27697954

  18. Special report: highlights of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Summer Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Denver, Colorado, June 26-28, 2008.

    PubMed

    Trepman, Elly; Thordarson, David B; Ross, Steven D K; Pinney, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The Twenty-Fourth Annual Summer Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) was held 26-28 June 2008 at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colorado. There were 442 registrants in attendance, including 81 individuals from 21 countries outside the United States. There were 176 abstracts submitted, and 46 (26%) abstracts were accepted for podium presentation.

  19. Orion EM-1 Crew Module Structural Test Article Move for Transport from Kennedy Space Center to Lockheed Martin in Denver Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-24

    The Guppy aircraft arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center, to transport the Orion EM-1 Crew Module (CM) Structural Test Article (STA) to Lockheed Martin in Denver Colorado. The Orion EM-1 CM STA is loaded onto a transport truck at the Operations & Checking Building (O&C) and moved to the SLF. Following this, workers load the spacecraft hardware onto the Guppy aircraft. The Guppy takes off from the SLF, in route to Denver Colorado.

  20. Occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected blood in Denver, Colorado, police officers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R E; Henderson, N; O'Keefe, K; Wood, R C

    1994-05-01

    The authors undertook a study of Denver, Colorado, police department officers to measure their risk of exposure to blood and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by type of work assignment and to document how exposures occurred. From December 1989 through March 1991, 137 officers reported an exposure to either blood or saliva, and 42 exposures to blood were independently documented. The overall rate of exposure to HIV-infected blood for medium and high risk assignments was 0.10 per 10,000 person-days. Thirty-two source persons underwent voluntary testing for HIV antibodies, and five (15.6%) were seropositive. Two thirds of the 42 blood exposures occurred in circumstances in which 1) there was little or no time for the officer to put on protective gloves and clothing because the officer was restraining or being assaulted by a suspect or 2) gloves would have not been protective because of penetration by needles. The authors conclude that Denver police officers rarely have percutaneous or mucosal exposures to blood, but when they do, the risk of exposure to HIV-infected blood is quite high. A health department can provide to police officers a number of services: evaluation of an incident involving contact with blood or body fluids to determine whether there was potential for disease transmission; information about modes of transmission and prevention of bloodborne diseases; serologic testing of source persons; HIV counseling for exposed officers and source persons; documentation for worker's compensation claims; and consultation regarding the use of zidovudine for postexposure prophylaxis.

  1. Abstracts for the 4th Annual Congress on Medicine & Science in Ultra-Endurance Sports, May 30, 2017, Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The 4th Annual Congress on Medicine & Science in Ultra-Endurance Sports will be held on May 30, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. While prior meetings have been multiple-day events, the 2017 Congress will be an intense 1-day preconference to the American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting. Details of this Congress, as well as past and future meetings, can be found at the Ultra Sports Science Foundation Web site: http://ultrasportsscience.us.

  2. Data from core analyses, aquifer testing, and geophysical logging of Denver Basin bedrock aquifers at Castle Pines, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, S.G.; Banta, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains data pertaining to the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the bedrock aquifers of the Denver basin at a site near Castle Pines, Colorado. Data consist of a lithologic- description of about 2,400 ft of drill core and laboratory determinations of mineralogy, grain size, bulk and grain density, porosity, specific yield, and specific retention for selected core samples. Water-level data, atmospheric-pressure measurements, aquifer-compression measurements, and borehole geophysical logs also are included.

  3. Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in elderly ambulatory outpatients in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Linnebur, Sunny A; Vondracek, Sheryl F; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Ruscin, J Mark; McDermott, Michael T

    2007-03-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common in the elderly. However, previous studies have utilized 25-hydroxvvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations as low as <16 ng/mL for defining vitamin D insufficiency. Moreover, most of the studies have been conducted in European patients, in certain geographic areas of the United States, or in institutionalized elderly. The goal of this study was to characterize vitamin D concentrations in ambulatory elderly living in metropolitan Denver, Colorado, utilizing 25(OH)D concentrations <32 ng/mL as the definition for vitamin D insufficiency. Ambulatory older adults (aged 65-89 years) with clinic visits during December 2005 and January 2006 were enrolled. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, and albumin were measured; height and weight were also measured. Data regarding dietary and over-the-counter vitamin D intake were collected, as well as information on body mass index, history of osteoporosis, osteoporosis treatment, and history of falls and fractures. Eighty patients (mean [SD] age, 77.8 [5.3] years; age range, 66-89 years) completed the study; there were no dropouts. The majority of patients were white (88%) and female (68%). Fifty-nine (74%) were found to have vitamin D insufficiency. Mean total and over-the-counter vitamin D intake was significantly higher in sufficient (P < 0.01) and insufficient (P < 0.05) patients compared with deficient patients, but dietary intake did not differ significantly between groups. The majority of patients who were vitamin D insufficient consumed more than the recommended 400 to 600 IU/d of vitamin D. Obese patients were found to have significantly lower 25(OH)D concentrations (P < 0.001) and higher PTH concentrations (P = 0.04) than nonobese patients. Vitamin D insufficiency is prevalent in ambulatory, and especially obese, elderly living in Denver, Colorado, despite vitamin D intake consistent with national recommendations. Dietary intake of vitamin

  4. Modeling Methane Leakage from Faulty Wellbores in the Denver-Julesburg Basin, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackey, G.; Rajaram, H.; Karra, S.; Sherwood, O.; Burke, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Regulations in the state of Colorado mandate that all oil and gas wells be constructed with surface casings that extend 50 feet below the depth of the deepest potable aquifer, and production casings that are cemented to at least 200 feet above the shallowest producing formation. Building wells in accordance with the minimum regulations leaves an uncemented annulus between the production casing and the surrounding rock matrix, extending from the bottom of the surface casing to the top of the production casing cement. In Colorado, this annulus is sealed at the ground surface by the "bradenhead valve". Stray methane can enter the uncemented annulus through faulty cement in the producing formation or an intermediate gas-bearing zone and migrate upwards along the production casing. The gas dissolves into the annular fluid and accumulates below the bradenhead valve building pressure. Data from the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) indicates that 1,492 wells in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) Basin have recorded bradenhead pressures greater than 20 psi since 2007. A leak of this kind creates the potential for both the single-phase transport of dissolved methane and the multiphase transport of methane gas away from the well. The degree to which methane transport occurs depends not only on the size of the leak but also the construction of the wellbore. In Colorado, the definition of potable groundwater has changed with time. To meet increasing demands for water, drinking water wells have been drilled deeper. As a result, there are potentially 4,144 wells in the DJ Basin with surface casings too shallow to protect the deepest potable aquifer. In this work, we investigate how a methane leak into the open annulus of an oil and gas wellbore, could result in the transport of dissolved and gas phase methane into a nearby drinking water aquifer. We construct a multiphase wellbore model that computes the pressure distribution and gas fraction along the uncemented

  5. A summary of urban runoff studies in the Denver Metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, S.R.; Mustard, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Denver metropolitan area has been the subject of urban-runoff studies for several years. The first studies, started in about 1968, usually were concerned only with the quantity of urban runoff. In 1974, studies were begun that included both quantity and quality of urban runoff. In 1979, Denver was selected as one of the cities to be included in the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program. The Denver study was called the Denver Regional Urban Runoff Program and was a cooperative study between the Denver Regional Council of Governments and the U.S. Geological Survey. This report presents the major conclusions of the pre-Denver Regional Urban Runoff Program studies and a summary of the various elements of the Denver Regional Urban Runoff Program. The report summarizes and references urban-runoff studies in the Denver metropolitan area and is a reference guide for planners and other persons interested in urban runoff. (USGS)

  6. The quality of our Nation's waters: water quality in the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado, 2003-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Mahler, Barbara J.; Paschke, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Availability and sustainability of groundwater in the Denver Basin aquifer system depend on water quantity and water quality. The Denver Basin aquifer system underlies about 7,000 square miles of the Great Plains in eastern Colorado and is the primary or sole source of water for domestic and public supply in many areas of the basin. Use of groundwater from the Denver Basin sandstone aquifers has been instrumental for development of the south Denver metropolitan area and other areas, but has resulted in a decline in water levels in some parts of the system. Human activities in many areas have adversely affected the quality of water in the aquifer system, especially the shallow parts. Groundwater in deeper parts of the system used for drinking water, once considered isolated from the effects of overlying land use, is increasingly vulnerable to contamination from human activities and geologic materials. Availability and sustainability of high-quality groundwater are vital to the economic health of the Denver Basin area.

  7. Hydrologic effects of pumpage from the Denver basin bedrock aquifers of northern El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Denver groundwater basin underlies a 6,700 sq-mi area in eastern Colorado. To assess current conditions of the four bedrock aquifers in the basin, water levels, streamflow gain and loss, and other data were collected. Current aquifer conditions in the southern part of the basin and likely response to various 100-year pumping scenarios were analyzed using a digital finite-difference model. Simulated predevelopment flow through the bedrock aquifers was about 59 cu ft/sec. Water level changes between 1978 and 1985, likely caused by variations in precipitation and in pumping and by lowering of the water table in the overlying Black Squirrel Creek alluvial aquifer, ranged from rises of more than 40 ft to declines of as much as 80 ft. In 1985, pumping from the bedrock aquifers was about 56 cu ft/sec. Simulations indicate that 43% of the pumpage came from a decrease in volume of groundwater in storage; 37% came from induced recharge and captured discharge. The remaining 20% came from a transient high rate of recharge from precipitation. A baseline 100-yr simulation, beginning in 1985, indicated minimal drawdowns for constant pumping at 1985 rates in the southern part of the basin. Other simulations indicated that the pumpage required to supply the needs of the projected population would be accompanied by drawdowns of as much as 1,300 ft and by large decreases in amount of groundwater in storage. Pumpage from a hypothetical well field, located where the aquifers are thickest , and from the aquifers underlying Colorado Springs also was simulated. (USGS)

  8. Hydrologic data for the drainage basins of Chatfield and Cherry Creek Lakes, Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, J.W.; Arnold, L.M.; Reed, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Chatfield and Cherry Creek Lakes are flood control lakes constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and leased to the Colorado Division of Parks and Recreation. Both lakes are in the Denver metropolitan area and provide a variety of recreational activities, including boating, camping, fishing, picnicking, and swimming. The projected increase of urban development in the drainage basins of Chatfield and Cherry Creek lakes could increase the constituent loads delivered to the lakes. Due to the eutrophic condition of Cherry Creek Lake and the potential eutrophic condition of Chatfield Lake, increased constituent loads could affect the suitability of the lakes for recreation. A monitoring program was started to determine the constituent loads of the drainage basins to both lakes. A network of monitoring stations was established to collect ambient water quality samples, storm runoff water quality samples, precipitation, and stream discharge. In the Cherry Creek basin 12 observation wells were established in the alluvium upgradient from Cherry Creek lake. Water levels and water quality data were collected to determine the quantity and quality of groundwater entering Cherry Creek lake. Data were collected from January through December 1982. The data may be used to evaluate the present and projected impact of urbanization in the drainage basins and the effect of increased constituent loads delivered to Chatfield and Cherry Creek lakes. (Author 's abstract)

  9. On-road measurements of vehicle NO2/NOx emission ratios in Denver, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Robert J.; Dubé, William P.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Eilerman, Scott J.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Brown, Steven S.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) emitted by on-road combustion engines are important contributors to tropospheric ozone production. The NOx fraction emitted as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is usually presumed to be small but can affect ozone production and distribution, and this fraction is generally not reported in emissions inventories. We have developed an accurate method for determination of this primary NO2 emission and demonstrated it during measurement of on-road vehicle emission plumes from a mobile laboratory during July and August 2014 in the region between Denver and Greeley in Colorado. During a total of approximately 90 h of sampling from an instrumented mobile laboratory, we identified 1867 vehicle emission plumes, which were extracted using an algorithm that looks for rapid and large increases in measured NOx. We find a distribution of NO2/NOx emissions similar to a log-normal profile, with an average emission ratio of 0.053 ± 0.002 per sampled NOx plume. The average is not weighted by the total NOx emissions from sampled vehicles, which is not measured here, and so may not represent the NO2/NOx ratio of the total NOx emission if this ratio is a function of NOx itself. Although our current data set does not distinguish between different engine types (e.g., gasoline, light duty diesel and heavy duty diesel), the ratio is on the low end of recent reports of vehicle fleet NO2 to NOx emission ratios in Europe.

  10. Water-quality data for Arvada Reservoir, Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britton, L.J.; Gaggiani, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological water quality data were collected and compiled for five sites in Arvada Reservoir, one site in Ralston Creek, and two sites in Croke Canal, in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado. The purpose of the data collection was to determine the water quality of Arvada Reservoir, evaluate the effect of source waters on the reservoir , and determine the trophic state of the reservoir. Data collected include reservoir profile measurements with depth and inflow measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Secchi disk depth measurements also are reported. In addition, water samples were analyzed periodically for concentrations of major chemical constituents, nutrients, trace elements, and selected radiochemicals; for densities and relative abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton; and for concentrations of chlorophyll alpha. Results of algal growth potential determinations are included. This report describes sampling site locations and methods of data collection and analyses and presents qualitative and quantitative results of water quality data collected during the study. Sampling began during June 1983 and continued through September 1985. (USGS)

  11. Cured and broiled meat consumption in relation to childhood cancer: Denver, Colorado (United States)

    PubMed

    Sarasua, S; Savitz, D A

    1994-03-01

    The association between cured and broiled meat consumption by the mother during pregnancy and by the child was examined in relation to childhood cancer. Five meat groups (ham, bacon, or sausage; hot dogs; hamburgers; bologna, pastrami, corned beef, salami, or lunch meat; charcoal broiled foods) were assessed. Exposures among 234 cancer cases (including 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL], 45 brain tumor) and 206 controls selected by random-digit dialing in the Denver, Colorado (United States) standard metropolitan statistical area were compared, with adjustment for confounders. Maternal hot-dog consumption of one or more times per week was associated with childhood brain tumors (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-5.4). Among children, eating hamburgers one or more times per week was associated with risk of ALL (OR = 2.0, CI = 0.9-4.6) and eating hot dogs one or more times per week was associated with brain tumors (OR = 2.1, CI = 0.7-6.1). Among children, the combination of no vitamins and eating meats was associated more strongly with both ALL and brain cancer than either no vitamins or meat consumption alone, producing ORs of two to seven. The results linking hot dogs and brain tumors (replicating an earlier study) and the apparent synergism between no vitamins and meat consumption suggest a possible adverse effect of dietary nitrites and nitrosamines.

  12. Water Sources and Quantity for Energy Development in Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waskom, R.; Kallenberger, J.; Boone, K.; Plombon, B.; Ryan, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, Colorado has experienced a significant rise in oil and gas development with the greatest concentration of activity occurring in the Denver-Julesburg Basin (DJB) in the Northeast corner of the state. According to the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, as of June 2014, there are approximately 52,200 active oil and gas wells statewide, with over 21,300 located in Weld County, the epicenter of the DJB. In this water-scarce region, much attention is paid to the source and quantity of water being used to produce energy. This information is not readily accessible, but is of great importance to many. In response, our research team is undertaking an evaluation of water quantity impacts and tradeoffs associated with oil and gas development. Technological advancements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing require additional sources of water - about 2.8 million gallons of per well (Goodwin et al.). The statewide water use for hydraulic fracturing is estimated to be less than 0.1%; however, on a local scale, when water is transferred from agricultural and municipal uses to industrial use, there are economic, environmental and social tradeoffs. Unfortunately, the pathway of a particular water transfer and its associated tradeoffs can be difficult to predict and quantify, further complicating the ability of local and state stakeholders to make sound and informative decisions about energy development. Energy companies are implementing new strategies to ensure reliable water supplies for their operations. These include tapping into non-tributary aquifers to help reduce competition for fully appropriated surface and tributary groundwater sources and recycling and reusing wastewater that results from the drilling and extraction practices. Many conflicting perspectives shape the water-energy discussion in the DJB so non-biased scientific data plays an important role in addressing the questions surrounding water use for energy development. This

  13. Outbreak of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Associated with Attencdance at a Large Livestock Exhibition - Denver, Colorado, January-February 2009

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with attendance at a large livestock exhibition – Denver, Colorado, January-February 2009 Nicole Comstock1, Hugh Maguire1, Abby Bronken2, Carol McDonald3, Donna Hite-Bynum4, Mary Kate Cichon1, Lisa Durso5 1 Colorado Department of Public Health and En...

  14. Summary and Evaluation of the Quality of Stormwater in Denver, Colorado, October 2001 to October 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossong, Clifford R.; Fleming, Andrea C.

    2008-01-01

    amount of urban land cover was identified using data available from the U.S. Geological Survey National Land Cover data. Results from 22 discrete samples collected during two storms and used to obtain composited results with various weighting methods indicate that correlation coefficients between time-weighted and volume-weighted concentrations were generally at least 0.65, indicating a strong direct correlation between the two weighting methods for the stations involved in this study. In addition, the central tendency for relative percent differences between the time- and volume-weighting methods typically has an absolute value of about 10 or less, indicating good agreement for these weighting methods for data collected as part of this study. Comparison of stormwater results to numeric standards for streams developed by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on the basis of use classifications indicates that, for water-quality properties and constituents other than bacteriological indicators, there were very few exceptions to numeric standards. Bacteriological indicators, however, such as Escherichia coli and fecal coliform consistently exceeded numeric standards in all bacteriological samples. An evaluation of laboratory results from composite samples on the basis of annual means indicates the presence of some simple upward and downward temporal trends in concentrations. In general, for annual means of results for all stations, hardness, ammonia plus organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, most dissolved metals (lead, manganese, and zinc), and all total metals (copper, lead, manganese, and zinc) all indicate annual means that decrease each year, or downward trends. Some trends were indicated only at individual stations in the network rather than at all stations. Ammonia as nitrogen at Union, Denver, and Henderson, orthophosphate at Sand Creek, and nitrite plus nitrate at Denver and Henderson all indicate decreasing annual means, or downward tr

  15. Hydrologic data for urban storm runoff in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, Johnnie W.; Doefer, John T.

    1982-01-01

    Urban storm-runoff data collected from April through September 1981 from nine Denver Nationwide Urban Runoff Program sites, urban storm-runoff data collected from April 1980 through September 1981 from ten South Platte River Study sites, and rainfall-runoff simulation data from two sites for June 1980 and May 1981 are presented in this report. The Denver Nationwide Urban Runoff Program sites were two single-family residential areas, two multifamily residential areas, one commercial area (shopping center), one mixed commercial and multifamily residential area, one natural area (open space), and two detention ponds. The South Platte River Study sites were six tributaries of the South Platte River and four instream sites on the South Platte River. The tributary sites were Bear Creek at mouth, at Sheridan; Harvard Gulch at Harvard Park, at Denver; Sanderson Gulch at mouth, at Denver; Weir Gulch at mouth, at Denver; Lakewood Gulch at mouth, at Denver; and Cherry Creek at Denver. The instream sites were South Platte River at Littleton; South Platte River at Florida Avenue, at Denver; South Platte River at Denver; and South Platte River at 50th Avenue, at Denver. The rainfall-runoff simulation sites were North Avenue at Denver Federal Center, at Lakewood and Rooney Gulch at Rooney Ranch, near Morrison. Precipitation, rainfall-runoff, water-quality data, and basin characteristics were collected at the urban storm-runoff sites. The urban storm-runoff data may be used to characterize runoff loading for various land-use types in Denver and other semiarid regions. (USGS)

  16. Summary and evaluation of the quality of stormwater in Denver, Colorado, 2006-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Slaughter, Cecil B.

    2012-01-01

    , samples collected at Toll Gate Creek above 6th Avenue at Aurora station, Sand Creek at mouth near Commerce City station, and the South Platte River at Henderson station, each had about 30 to 50 percent exceedances of both acute and chronic dissolved manganese standards. Of the samples collected at Sand Creek at mouth near Commerce City, 1 sample exceeded the acute standard and 4 samples exceeded the chronic standard for dissolved zinc, but no samples collected from the other sites exceeded either standard for zinc. Almost all samples of stormwater analyzed for Escherichia coli exceeded Colorado numeric standards. A numerical standard for fecal coliform is no longer applicable as of 2004. Results from the 2002-2005 study indicated that the general quality of stormwater had improved during 2002-2005 compared to 1998-2001, having fewer exceedances of Colorado standards, and showing downward trends for many water-quality values and concentrations. These trends coincided with general downward or relatively similar mean streamflows for the 2002-2005 compared to 1998-2001, which indicates that dilution may be a smaller influence on values and concentrations than other factors. For this report, downward trends were indicated for many constituents at each station during 2006-2010 compared to 2002-2005. The trends for mean streamflow for 2006-2010 compared to 2002-2005 are upward at all sites except for the South Platte River at Henderson, indicating that dilution by larger flows could be a factor in the downward concentration trends. At the South Platte River below Union Avenue station, downward trends were indicated for hardness, dissolved ammonia, dissolved orthophosphate, and dissolved copper. Upward trends at South Platte River below Union Avenue were indicated for pH. At the South Platte River at Denver station, downward trends were indicated for total ammonia plus organic nitrogen, dissolved ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, dissolved orthophosphate, total phosphorus

  17. Reducing cardiovascular disease risk using patient navigators, Denver, Colorado, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Shlay, Judith C; Barber, Beverly; Mickiewicz, Theresa; Maravi, Moises; Drisko, Jodi; Estacio, Raymond; Gutierrez, Gregory; Urbina, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    Early identification of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is important to reach people in need of treatment. At-risk patients benefit from behavioral counseling in addition to medical therapy. The objective of this study was to determine whether enhanced counseling, using patient navigators trained to counsel patients on CVD risk-reduction strategies and facilitate patient access to community-based lifestyle-change services, reduced CVD risk among at-risk patients in a low-income population. We compared clinical characteristics at baseline and 12-month follow-up among 340 intervention and 340 comparison patients from community health centers in Denver, Colorado, between March 2007 and June 2009; all patients had a Framingham risk score (FRS) greater or equal to 10% at baseline. The intervention consisted of patient-centered counseling by bilingual patient navigators. At baseline and at 6-month and 12-month follow-up, we assessed health behaviors of intervention participants. We used an intent-to-treat approach for all analyses and measured significant differences by χ(2) and t tests. We found significant differences in several clinical outcomes. At follow-up, the mean FRS was lower for the intervention group (mean FRS, 15%) than for the comparison group (mean FRS, 16%); total cholesterol was lower for the intervention group (mean total cholesterol, 183 mg/dL) than for the comparison group (mean total cholesterol, 197 mg/dL). Intervention participants reported significant improvements in some health behaviors at 12-month follow-up, especially nutrition-related behaviors. Behaviors related to tobacco use and cessation attempts did not improve. Patient navigators may provide some benefit in reducing risk of CVD in a similar population.

  18. Understanding the Charter School Special Education Gap: Evidence from Denver, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.

    2014-01-01

    Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) commissioned Dr. Marcus Winters to analyze the factors driving the special education gap between Denver's charter and traditional public elementary and middle schools. Using student-level data, Winters shows that Denver's special education enrollment gap starts at roughly 2 percentage points in…

  19. Eldorado Springs member of the Skull Creek Shale in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    The Eldorado Springs Sandstone crops out at the west edge of the Denver Basin and is mapped in the subsurface as an elongate linear sand body that extends at least 70 mi east-southeast of the outcrop. Along its axis, the sand body thickness ranges from 63 ft at the type section to about 25 ft on the east side of the study area. North of the axis, the sandstone thins as the base interfingers with the Lower Cretaceous Skull Creek Shale. To the south of the main axis, the sand interfingers with silty facies. The Eldorado Springs displays a cleaning upward signature, and is thought to have been deposited in an offshore bar sub-parallel to shoreline. The eastward thinning of the sand body suggests an orientation oblique to the Skull Creek shoreline, the thinner end being farther from shore. The overlying Skull Creek Shale thins over this sand body. This subtle paleotopographic effect persisted through the close of Muddy (J) time. The Eldorado Springs consists of very fine- to fine-grained siliceous sandstone with low porosity and permeability. Pore-lining clays that locally bridge pore throats and variable amounts of silica and ankerite cement reduce reservoir quality. this unit is not considered a good stand-alone target for hydrocarbon exploration but instead as a potential secondary pay in wells with primary pay in the D or Muddy (J). Production has been established from this unit in a well located in Sec. 20, T4S, R63W. A large part of this thick and laterally continuous sandstone body falls within the window of the basin center hydrocarbon trap. The Eldorado Springs Member offers a potentially large hydrocarbon resource that is virtually untapped.

  20. Characteristics of urban-ecosystem atmosphere fluxes of CO2, CH4, N2O, and et over Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.E.; Alvarez, C.; Thienelt, T.

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of urban ecosystems fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and evapotranspiration (ET) over Denver, Colorado were discussed. These atmospheric fluxes were measured using a methodology that included a combination of eddy covariance sensors at two levels on a tall tower and chamber measurements at 33 locations on the soil surface. There was both strong temporal and spatial heterogeneity of fluxes owing to characteristics of natural and anthropogenic ecosystem components. Although the urban ecosystem was a net carbon dioxide source, tower-based eddy covariance measurements showed it to be a net vegetative sink during the majority of mid-say summer hours.

  1. Gas, water, and oil production from Wattenberg field in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Santus, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from selected wells in two tight gas reservoirs-the Codell-Niobrara interval, comprised of the Codell Sandstone Member of the Carlile Shale and the Niobrara Formation; and the Dakota J interval, comprised mostly of the Muddy (J) Sandstone of the Dakota Group; both intervals are of Cretaceous age-in the Wattenberg field in the Denver Basin of Colorado. Production from each well is represented by two samples spaced five years apart, the first sample typically taken two years after production commenced, which generally was in the 1990s. For each producing interval, summary diagrams and tables of oil-versus-gas production and water-versus-gas production are shown with fluid-production rates, the change in production over five years, the water-gas and oil-gas ratios, and the fluid type. These diagrams and tables permit well-to-well and field-to-field comparisons. Fields producing water at low rates (water dissolved in gas in the reservoir) can be distinguished from fields producing water at moderate or high rates, and the water-gas ratios are quantified. The Dakota J interval produces gas on a per-well basis at roughly three times the rate of the Codell-Niobrara interval. After five years of production, gas data from the second samples show that both intervals produce gas, on average, at about one-half the rate as the first sample. Oil-gas ratios in the Codell-Niobrara interval are characteristic of a retrograde gas and are considerably higher than oil-gas ratios in the Dakota J interval, which are characteristic of a wet gas. Water production from both intervals is low, and records in many wells are discontinuous, particularly in the Codell-Niobrara interval. Water-gas ratios are broadly variable, with some of the variability possibly due to the difficulty of measuring small production rates. Most wells for which water is reported have water-gas ratios exceeding the amount that could exist dissolved in gas at reservoir

  2. Shallow ground-water quality beneath a major urban center: Denver, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, B.W.; McMahon, P.B.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of the chemical quality of ground water in the unconsolidated alluvial aquifer beneath a major urban center (Denver, Colorado, USA) was performed in 1993 with the objective of characterizing the quality of shallow ground-water in the urban area and relating water quality to land use. Thirty randomly selected alluvial wells were each sampled once for a broad range of dissolved constituents. The urban land use at each well site was sub- classified into one of three land-use settings: residential, commercial, and industrial. Shallow ground-water quality was highly variable in the urban area and the variability could be related to these land-use setting classifications. Sulfate (SO4) was the predominant anion in most samples from the residential and commercial land-use settings, whereas bicarbonate (HCO3) was the predominant anion in samples from the industrial land-use setting, indicating a possible shift in redox conditions associated with land use. Only three of 30 samples had nitrate concentrations that exceeded the US national drinking-water standard of 10 mg l-1 as nitrogen, indicating that nitrate contamination of shallow ground water may not be a serious problem in this urban area. However, the highest median nitrate concentration (4.2 mg l-1) was in samples from the residential setting, where fertilizer application is assumed to be most intense. Twenty-seven of 30 samples had detectable pesticides and nine of 82 analyzed pesticide compounds were detected at low concentrations, indicating that pesticides are widely distributed in shallow ground water in this urban area. Although the highest median total pesticide concentration (0.17 ??g l-1) was in the commercial setting, the herbicides prometon and atrazine were found in each land-use setting. Similarly, 25 of 29 samples analyzed had detectable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indicating these compounds are also widely distributed in this urban area. The total VOC concentrations in sampled wells

  3. A preliminary report on a zone containing thick lignite beds, Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soister, Paul E.

    1973-01-01

    A zone of lignite beds of Paleocene age in the Denver Formation (Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene) lies about 800-1,500 feet above the well-known and extensively mined coal beds of the Laramie Formation (Upper Cretaceous). The zone is a few hundred to as much as 500 feet thick. Where lignite beds lie within 1,000 feet of the surface, this zone underlies an area about 30 miles wide by about 75 miles long, stretching from just northeast of Denver to several miles south of Calhan. Fifteen mines were operated at various periods between 1874 and 1940 and probably produced a total of less than 100,000 tons of lignite, mostly for local use. From 1874 to 1974, several geologists have reported on this lignite zone or the enclosing beds, but no detailed reports have been written except for one by this writer. Drill holes are the main source of geologic data, owing to poor exposure. There are generally about 3 to 6 lignite beds, and they are mostly about 15 or 20 to a few tens of feet apart. Most or all beds typically contain numerous non-coal partings from a fraction of an inch to several inches thick, so that thickness of lignite beds should be stated as gross thickness and as net lignite thickness; net lignite thickness is generally from 70 to 90 percent of gross thickness. Many partings are composed of kaolin, but others are composed of other clay minerals, siltstone, and sandstone. The lignite beds range generally from 1 or 2 to several feet thick, and some are as much as 10-25 feet thick; the thickest known bed has a maximum thickness of 54.5 feet, with a net lignite thickness of 40 feet. Most lignite beds seem to have fair lateral continuity, and at least some beds are several miles in extent. The thickest known lignite bed was traced for at least 18 miles, from northwest to southeast of Watkins. The lignite is brownish-black to black, weathers, checks, and disintegrates rapidly, and even in drill cores from a few hundred feet in depth the lignite is easily broken by

  4. Alluvial and bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin; eastern Colorado's dual ground-water resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1989-01-01

    Large volumes of ground water are contained in alluvial and bedrock aquifers in the semiarid Denver basin of eastern Colorado. The bedrock aquifer, for example, contains 1.2 times as much water as Lake Erie of the Great Lakes, yet it supplies only about 9 percent of the ground water used in the basin. Although this seems to indicate underutilization of this valuable water supply, this is not necessarily the case, for many factors other than the volume of water in the aquifer affect the use of the aquifer. Such factors as climatic conditions, precipitation runoff, geology and water-yielding character of the aquifers, water-level conditions, volume of recharge and discharge, legal and economic constraints, and water-quality conditions can ultimately affect the decision to use ground water. Knowledge of the function and interaction of the various parts of this hydrologic system is important to the proper management and use of the ground-water resources of the region. The semiarid climatic conditions on the Colorado plains produce flash floods of short duration and large peak-flow rates. However, snowmelt runoff from the Rocky Mountains produces the largest volumes of water and is typically of longer duration with smaller peak-flow rates. The alluvial aquifer is recharged easily from both types of runoff and readily stores and transmits the water because it consists of relatively thin deposits of gravel, sand, and clay located in the valleys of principal streams. The bedrock aquifer is recharged less easily because of its greater thickness (as much as 3,000 feet) and prevalent layers of shale which retard the downward movement of water in the formations. Although the bedrock aquifer contains more than 50 times as much water in storage as the alluvial aquifer, it does not store and transmit water as readily as the alluvial aquifer. For example, about 91 percent of the water pumped from wells is obtained from the alluvial aquifer, yet water-level declines generally have

  5. Improving park space access for the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities partnership in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Jennifer Wieczorek

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Denver Public Health at Denver Health was awarded a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC) grant that supported policy, system, and environmental changes to expand healthy food access through gardens and large-chain grocery stores and expand environments that are safe for all children to play, walk, and bike. Systems-thinking approaches enhanced the Denver partnership's work to identify and address the multiple and complex factors affecting the environment changes implemented to increase active living and healthy eating. Continued application of the systems-thinking approach in Denver will sustain outcomes for obesity prevention efforts beyond the grant project cycle, specifically in park space redevelopment. Key members of the Denver HKHC coalition were invited to participate in a half-day group model-building workshop to create behavior-over-time graphs and a causal loop diagram. These activities were intended to build on the Denver HKHC partnership's work by identifying factors that affect or are affected by policy, system, and environmental changes that influence active living, healthy eating or childhood obesity. Environments (ie, park space, farms, gardens) developed or renovated should consider identifying and addressing a range of factors that may influence access and utilization of active living and healthy eating. Denver's partnership found the experience highly valuable for identifying the policy, system, and environment change pathways that lead to increases in active living and healthy food access. In addition, it highlighted the need to identify and address the multiple and complex change pathways to ensure the outcomes of environment change, especially with park space, implemented in Denver achieve increased access to active living and healthy eating.

  6. Reduction of subcutaneous mass, but not lean mass, in normal fetuses in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Galan, H L; Rigano, S; Radaelli, T; Cetin, I; Bozzo, M; Chyu, J; Hobbins, J C; Ferrazzi, E

    2001-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that reduced birth weight in normal fetuses born at moderately high altitude (Denver), compared with the birth weight in normal fetuses born at sea level (Milan), is caused by a reduction in both lean mass and subcutaneous fat mass. Ninety-four normal singleton pregnancies (46 in Denver, 48 in Milan) had serial ultrasonographic axial images obtained to assess subcutaneous tissues of fetuses as a measure of body fat. The abdominal wall thickness and mid upper arm and mid thigh were examined. The equation was: Subcutaneous tissue equals total cross-sectional area minus bone and muscle area. Lean mass included the area of muscle and bone, head circumference, and femur length. Gestational age at delivery was similar between groups. Birth weight was less at Denver's altitude (2991 +/- 79 g versus 3247 +/- 96 g; P =.04). Abdominal wall thickness, mid upper arm, and mid thigh subcutaneous tissues measurements were significantly reduced at Denver's altitude and increased further in significance with advancing gestational age. Lean mass measurements were similar between groups. The reduced birth weight of the newborns in Denver was the result of a reduction in fetal subcutaneous fat tissue and not lean mass. Ultrasonography can be used to follow subcutaneous measurements longitudinally and to detect differences, and potentially disease processes, in study populations.

  7. Shallow ground-water quality beneath a major urban center: Denver, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Breton W.; McMahon, Peter B.

    1996-11-01

    A survey of the chemical quality of ground water in the unconsolidated alluvial aquifer beneath a major urban center (Denver, Colorado, USA) was performed in 1993 with the objective of characterizing the quality of shallow ground-water in the urban area and relating water quality to land use. Thirty randomly selected alluvial wells were each sampled once for a broad range of dissolved constituents. The urban land use at each well site was sub-classified into one of three land-use settings: residential, commercial, and industrial. Shallow ground-water quality was highly variable in the urban area and the variability could be related to these land-use setting classifications. Sulfate (SO 4) was the predominant anion in most samples from the residential and commercial land-use settings, whereas bicarbonate (HCO 3) was the predominant anion in samples from the industrial land-use setting, indicating a possible shift in redox conditions associated with land use. Only three of 30 samples had nitrate concentrations that exceeded the US national drinking-water standard of 10 mg l -1 as nitrogen, indicating that nitrate contamination of shallow ground water may not be a serious problem in this urban area. However, the highest median nitrate concentration (4.2 mg l -1) was in samples from the residential setting, where fertilizer application is assumed to be most intense. Twenty-seven of 30 samples had detectable pesticides and nine of 82 analyzed pesticide compounds were detected at low concentrations, indicating that pesticides are widely distributed in shallow ground water in this urban area. Although the highest median total pesticide concentration (0.17 μg l -) was in the commercial setting, the herbicides prometon and atrazine were found in each land-use setting. Similarly, 25 of 29 samples analyzed had detectable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indicating these compounds are also widely distributed in this urban area. The total VOC concentrations in sampled wells

  8. Bedrock aquifers and population growth in the Denver Basin, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.E.; Raynolds, R.G.; Dechesne, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Denver Basin bedrock aquifer system consists of Tertiary and Cretaceous age sedimentary rocks known as the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers. The number of bedrock wells has increased from 12,000 in 1985 to over 33,700 in 2001 and the withdrawal of groundwater has caused water level declines in excess of 75 meters. Water level declines now range from 3 to 12 meters per year in the critical Arapahoe Aquifer. The groundwater supplies were once thought to be sufficient for 100 years but there is concern that they may be depleted in 10 to 15 years in areas on the west side of the basin. Groundwater is being mined from the aquifer system because the withdrawal through wells exceeds the rate of recharge. Increased groundwater withdrawal will cause further water level declines, increased costs to pump groundwater, and reduced yield from existing wells. In the Denver Basin, hydrologists have some capability to monitor declines in water levels for the Arapaho Aquifer, but generally have a limited ability to monitor water use. More complete and accurate water use data are needed to predict groundwater longevity for the Arapahoe Aquifer. The life of the Arapahoe Aquifer can be extended with artificial recharge using imported surface water, water reuse, restrictions on lawn watering, well permit restrictions and other conservation measures. Availability of groundwater may limit growth in the Denver Basin over the next 20 years unless residents are willing to pay for additional new sources of supply.

  9. Available Thermal Energy in the Denver Basin Dakota Group: Colorado and Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, A. M.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    The University of North Dakota, in conjunction with the United States Geological Survey, has begun a geothermal assessment of energy in place for the Denver Basin. We focused on the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstones which are a series of petroleum producing formations in the Denver Basin. The "D" and "J" sands, in particular, are primary sources of petroleum and therefore of interest to the co-produced geothermal energy community. Analysis of bottom-hole temperature data from over 33,000 wells within the Lower Cretaceous Dakota group in the Denver Basin show that the potential available thermal energy in place is 5.23 x 1021 Joules (J). We estimated the following variables: the average thickness of 485 meters (m), the predominant rock is sandstone with a density of 2.3 x 1012 kg/km3 and a heat capacity of 920.48 J/kg °C, an average temperature of 109.4 °C. The interpolation of the bottom-hole temperatures for this group yielded an area of 73,449.20 km2, and a volume of 35,622,862 km3. Sorey et al. (1983) determined a recovery rate of 0.1% to be appropriate for a basin the size of the Denver Basin. Bottom-hole temperature interpolation of the Lower Cretaceous formations.

  10. REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION, SCHOOL DISTRICT NUMBER ONE, DENVER, COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VOORHEES, JAMES D.

    THE COMMITTEE WAS CHARGED WITH STUDYING AND REPORTING ON THE PRESENT STATUS OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY IN THE DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS, AND GIVING ATTENTION TO RACIAL AND ETHNIC FACTORS IN THE AREAS OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, GUIDANCE, PUPILS, PERSONNEL, BUILDINGS, EQUIPMENT, LIBRARIES, ADMINISTRATION, ORGANIZATION, AND SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS.…

  11. Understanding Long-term Greenness, Water Use, and Redevelopment in Denver, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neel, A.; Hogue, T. S.; Read, L.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015 the U.S. Census Bureau's found Denver to have the fastest growth rate among large cities in America. With the population of Metro Denver expected to increase from 2.9 to 3.3 million it is critical to consider the impacts of expected redevelopment and increased housing density on the City's ecosystem and future water supply. While prior studies have shown outdoor water use to account for as much as 40-60% of single-family residential water use in western cities, currently no published research examines patterns in urban vegetation, greenness, temperature and water use for cities in the Rocky Mountain West. Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat imagery was examined to assess how redevelopment in Denver's urban center impacts regional greenness patterns, land surface temperatures and water budgets. Over the last twenty-seven years Denver has shown an overall 4.4% decrease in greenness, with a more rapid decline starting in 2006. While NDVI and cumulative precipitation have a significant relationship over the study period, decreasing NDVI trends across all seasons suggests other factors, such as redevelopment, may be influencing the city's greenness. Comparing water use, NDVI, and precipitation reveals that not only do climate and redevelopment affect NDVI patterns, but mandated water restrictions may also be having a significant impact on NDVI values. NDVI and precipitation patterns are being assessed against regional surface temperatures over time. Surface temperatures, taken from Landsat data, reveal that Urban Heat Island effect may become more pronounced with decreasing NDVI values. As Denver continues to grow, managers can utilize results to better inform decisions about landscape patterns relative to outdoor water use, the effectiveness of restrictions on consumption, and future planning for green infrastructure.

  12. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center - Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a "Power of Zero Energy Center" linked to its model home in the Stapleton community. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. This case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  13. Hydrologic data for urban storm runoff from nine sites in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, Johnnie W.

    1981-01-01

    Urban storm-runoff data were collected April through September 1980, from nine urbanrunoff sites in the Denver metropolitan area, and are presented in this report. The sites consist of two single-family residential areas, two multi-family residential areas, one commercial area (shopping center), one mixed commercial and multi-family residential area, one native area (open space), and two detention ponds. Precipitation, rainfall-runoff, water-quality (common constituents, nutrients, coliform bacteria, solids, and trace elements) and basin-area data are necessary to use the U.S. Geological Survey 's Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model, Version II. The urban storm-runoff data may be used to characterize runoff pollution loading for various land-use types in Denver and other semi-arid regions. (USGS)

  14. Hydrologic data for urban storm runoff from three localities in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Sherman R.

    1978-01-01

    Urban storm-runoff data, collected from 1975 to 1977, on three catchment areas in the Denver, Colo., metropolitan area are presented. The catchment are predominantly a single-family residential catchment area in Littleton, a multifamily residential and commercial catchment area in Lakewood, and a high-density residential and commercial catchment area in Denver. Precipitation, rainfall-runoff, snowmelt-runoff, water-quality (common constituents, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, coliform bacteria, and solids, trace elements, and pesticides), and catchment-area data are necessary to use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's Storm Water Management Model II. The urban storm-runoff data may be used by planning, water-management, and environmental-protection agencies to assess the impact of urban storm runoff on the hydrologic system. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Colorado High Court Rules U. of Denver Is Not Liable for Student's Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl M.

    1987-01-01

    A Colorado Supreme Court ruling rejecting a student's liability claim for an injury sustained in a fraternity house is the second this year in which a court found no special university responsibility to protect student safety in private activities. (MSE)

  16. European Service Module Structural Test Article Load onto Guppy for Transport to Denver Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-23

    At Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility in Florida, workers move the Orion service module structural test article for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), built by the European Space Agency, inside NASA's Super Guppy aircraft. The module is secured inside the aircraft and shipped to Lockheed Martin's Denver facility to undergo testing. The Orion spacecraft will launch atop the agency's Space Launch System rocket on EM-1 in 2019

  17. Geologic Map of the Denver West 30' x 60' Quadrangle, North-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Karl S.; Shroba, Ralph R.; Bryant, Bruce; Premo, Wayne R.

    2008-01-01

    The Denver West quadrangle extends east-west across the entire axis of the Front Range, one of numerous uplifts in the Rocky Mountain region in which Precambrian rocks are exposed. The history of the basement rocks in the Denver West quadrangle is as old as 1,790 Ma. Along the east side of the range, a sequence of sedimentary rocks as old as Pennsylvanian, but dominated by Cretaceous-age rocks, overlies these ancient basement rocks and was upturned and locally faulted during Laramide (Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary) uplift of the range. The increasingly coarser grained sediments up section in rocks of latest Cretaceous to early Tertiary age record in remarkable detail this Laramide period of mountain building. On the west side of the range, a major Laramide fault (Williams Range thrust) places Precambrian rocks over Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The geologic history of the quadrangle, therefore, can be divided into four major periods: (1) Proterozoic history, (2) Pennsylvanian to pre-Laramide, Late Cretaceous history, (3) Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary Laramide mountain building, and (4) post-Laramide history. In particular, the Quaternary history of the Denver West quadrangle is described in detail, based largely on extensive new mapping.

  18. Initial linkage and subsequent retention in HIV care for a newly diagnosed HIV-infected cohort in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Edward M; Daniloff, Elaine; Thrun, Mark W; Reirden, Daniel H; Davidson, Arthur J; Johnson, Steven C; Wilmoth, Ralph; Connick, Elizabeth; Burman, William J

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective cohort study of 352 newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Denver, from 2005 to 2007. Utilizing data from 3 health care systems, 2 clinical trials units, and statewide Colorado HIV laboratory reporting databases, we tracked initial linkage to HIV care, retention in care, loss to follow-up, and transitions between HIV care providers. After more than 2.6 years of follow-up, 256 (73%) individuals linked to HIV care within 180 days. Of the 301 individuals who eventually linked to care, 168 (56%) had at least one 180-day gap in care, while 49 (16%) had a 360-day gap. Transitions in care were common, with 131 (37%) individuals accessing care from 2 different providers and 15% having evidence of living outside of Colorado. In this newly diagnosed HIV-infected cohort, linkage to care was slow and long-term retention in care was poor. Transitions between HIV care providers were common and may impair engagement in care over time. Out-of-state migration was frequent and may cause an underestimation of engagement in care.

  19. Reaching homeless youths for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae screening in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, J M; Rietmeijer, C A; LeRoux, T; White, R; Petersen, J

    2002-10-01

    The availability of urine based testing for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) provides a unique opportunity to screen for these pathogens outside traditional clinical settings. The researchers investigated the feasibility of street based CT/GC screening in the context of an outreach programme among street/homeless adolescents in Denver. To describe the integration of urine based CT/GC screening into an existing outreach programme among street/homeless youths and the yield of CT/GC testing in this setting. The Denver Department of Public Health (DPH) collaborated with outreach staff from Urban Peak (a community based organisation serving street/homeless youths in Denver) to offer urine based CT/GC testing to males and females in street settings. Tests were conducted on the street in areas where street/homeless youths congregate. Urban Peak outreach staff were trained by DPH staff to conduct CT testing, process urine specimens, and provide test results to participating youths. DPH remained responsible for treatment of people with CT or GC infection as well as CT/GC case reporting. CT testing started in January 2000; GC testing was added in July 2000. Throughout April 2002 a total of 414 CT and 302 GC tests were conducted, respectively 11.6% and 2.7% of which were positive. Among first testers, 13.0% were positive for CT and 3.7% for GC. CT/GC urine testing can be incorporated into existing outreach programmes without considerable extra effort. Overall CT rates were high and suggest the need for ongoing screening in this manner. To understand the role of CT/GC screening in the context of services provided to street/homeless youths in outreach settings.

  20. Groundwater levels in the Denver Basin bedrock aquifers of Douglas County, Colorado, 2011-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, Rhett

    2014-01-01

    Manual and automated (time-series) water-level data collection from these sites between 2011 and 2013 showed water level declines in 36 wells. Over the 2-year monitoring period, average declines of approximately 0.4 foot per year were observed in the upper Dawson aquifer, declines of over 2.6 feet per year were observed in the lower Dawson aquifer, declines of about 3.2 feet per year were observed in the Denver aquifer, declines of about 1.9 feet per year were observed in the Arapahoe aquifer, and declines of about 9.9 feet per year were observed in the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer.

  1. Proposed Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Federal Volatility Control Program in the Denver-Boulder-Greeley-Ft. Collins-Loveland, Colorado, 1997 8-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal Register and fact sheet for EPA's proposed rule which would extend the federal summertime low volatility requirements to those portions of the Denver-Boulder-Greeley-Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado, 1997 8-hour Ozone Nonattainment area are here.

  2. Effects of the May 5-6, 1973, storm in the Greater Denver area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1973-01-01

    Rain began falling on the Greater Denver area the evening of Saturday, May 5, 1973, and continued through most of Sunday, May 6. Below about 7,000 feet altitude, the precipitation was mostly rain; above that altitude, it was mostly snow. Although the rate of fall was moderate, at least 4 inches of rain or as much as 4 feet of snow accumulated in some places. Sustained precipitation falling at a moderate rate thoroughly saturated the ground and by midday Sunday sent most of the smaller streams into flood stage. The South Platte River and its major tributaries began to flood by late Sunday evening and early Monday morning. Geologic and hydrologic processes activated by the May 5-6 storm caused extensive damage to lands and to manmade structures in the Greater Denver area. Damage was generally most intense in areas where man had modified the landscape--by channel constrictions, paving, stripping of vegetation and topsoil, and oversteepening of hillslopes. Roads, bridges, culverts, dams, canals, and the like were damaged or destroyed by erosion and sedimentation. Streambanks and structures along them were scoured. Thousands of acres of croplands, pasture, and developed urban lands were coated with mud and sand. Flooding was intensified by inadequate storm sewers, blocked drains, and obstructed drainage courses. Saturation of hillslopes along the Front Range caused rockfalls, landslides, and mudflows as far west as Berthoud Pass. Greater attention to geologic conditions in land-use planning, design, and construction would minimize storm damage in the future.

  3. Structural and stratigraphic compartmentalization of the Terry Sandstone and effects on reservoir fluid distributions: Latham Bar Trend, Denver Basin: Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Raisi, M.H.; Slatt, R.M.; Decker, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Latham Bar Trend, located in the Denver Basin of Colorado, is an elongate sandstone which extends in a northwest direction for more than 6 mi and is up to 1-2 mi wide. It is now under infill drilling on 40-acre spacing, with more than 65 wells producing from the Upper Cretaceous Terry Sandstone. Detailed analysis of four cores and 210 wells suggests that the Terry Sandstone within the Lantham Bar Trend was deposited in an open marine environment. Reservoir quality, particularly permeability, is primarily facies controlled, and secondarily controlled by diagenetic products. Estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) values in wells are related to thickness of this facies. Structural analysis indicates the Trend is dissected by a series of northeast-trending, northwest-dipping faults with vertical displacements of 30-100 ft. (9-30 m). The faults are interpreted to be sealing, separating the Terry Sandstone into isolated fault blocks, on the basis of the following criteria: (1) normalized GOR values exhibit a non-systematic areal distribution across the trend, but show systematic up-structure increases in GOR within individual fault blocks; (2) initial API gravity values from different wells also are non-systematically distributed areally across the Trend, but show similar groupings within fault blocks; (3) EUR values within each fault block exhibit a positive correlation with thickness of cross-bedded sandstone facies; (4) individual wells with specific normalized GOR values occur at lower structural elevations than wells in adjacent fault blocks with lower GORs, giving rise to structural reversal of fluid distributions. Recognition of the facies control on reservoir quality, reservoir facies thickness, sealing capacity of normal faults, and resultant compartmentalization can help explain complex stratigraphic and areas distribution patterns of gas and oil in these and other strata in the Denver Basin and to maximize reservoir producibility and exploration success.

  4. Geologic sources and concentrations of selenium in the West-Central Denver Basin, including the Toll Gate Creek watershed, Aurora, Colorado, 2003-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Beck, Jennifer A.; Webbers, Ank; Dupree, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Toll Gate Creek, in the west-central part of the Denver Basin, is a perennial stream in which concentrations of dissolved selenium have consistently exceeded the Colorado aquatic-life standard of 4.6 micrograms per liter. Recent studies of selenium in Toll Gate Creek identified the Denver lignite zone of the non-marine Cretaceous to Tertiary-aged (Paleocene) Denver Formation underlying the watershed as the geologic source of dissolved selenium to shallow ground-water and surface water. Previous work led to this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Aurora Utilities Department, which investigated geologic sources of selenium and selenium concentrations in the watershed. This report documents the occurrence of selenium-bearing rocks and groundwater within the Cretaceous- to Tertiary-aged Denver Formation in the west-central part of the Denver Basin, including the Toll Gate Creek watershed. The report presents background information on geochemical processes controlling selenium concentrations in the aquatic environment and possible geologic sources of selenium; the hydrogeologic setting of the watershed; selenium results from groundwater-sampling programs; and chemical analyses of solids samples as evidence that weathering of the Denver Formation is a geologic source of selenium to groundwater and surface water in the west-central part of the Denver Basin, including Toll Gate Creek. Analyses of water samples collected from 61 water-table wells in 2003 and from 19 water-table wells in 2007 indicate dissolved selenium concentrations in groundwater in the west-central Denver Basin frequently exceeded the Colorado aquatic-life standard and in some locations exceeded the primary drinking-water standard of 50 micrograms per liter. The greatest selenium concentrations were associated with oxidized groundwater samples from wells completed in bedrock materials. Selenium analysis of geologic core samples indicates that total selenium

  5. Integrating viral hepatitis prevention services into an urban STD clinic: Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Subiadur, Julie; Harris, Jennie L; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2007-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends integrating viral hepatitis prevention services with services for adults evaluated for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The Denver Public Health STD clinic began hepatitis B vaccination in 1999, hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody (anti-HCV) testing in 2000, and hepatitis A vaccination in 2002. Rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing began in late 2004. Hepatitis B vaccinations peaked in 2003 (31/100 client visits) when a full-time nurse was hired to vaccinate and eligibility was expanded. The proportion of clients documented to have received their anti-HCV test results declined from an average of 71% in 2000-2003 to 22% in 2004-2005, coinciding with the introduction of rapid HIV testing. Viral hepatitis prevention services can be incorporated into a busy STD clinic if staff and resources are available. Rapid HIV testing may be associated with lower receipt of anti-HCV test results.

  6. Student opinions of condom distribution at a Denver, Colorado, high school.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, J T; Kaplan, D W; Naylor, K E

    1995-05-01

    Over the past two decades, the reported number of women and men who have had intercourse by age 18 has increased by approximately 20%. Concomitant increases occurred in the incidence of teen-age pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. Increasing condom availability within schools has been proposed as one means of preventing the serious potential consequences of unprotected sexual intercourse. Although published surveys report 68% to 75% of adults have supported distributing condoms in schools, little is known about what students think about making condoms available at school. In this survey, high school students in Denver initiated and helped conduct a school-wide survey to assess student opinions about condom distribution in their school. Of 931 high school students responding to the survey, 85% replied that condoms should be distributed in their school, and 76% believed making condoms more accessible would not change the frequency of sexual activity among teens.

  7. Collective efficacy in Denver, Colorado: Strengthening neighborhoods and health through community gardens.

    PubMed

    Teig, Ellen; Amulya, Joy; Bardwell, Lisa; Buchenau, Michael; Marshall, Julie A; Litt, Jill S

    2009-12-01

    Community gardens are viewed as a potentially useful environmental change strategy to promote active and healthy lifestyles but the scientific evidence base for gardens is limited. As a step towards understanding whether gardens are a viable health promotion strategy for local communities, we set out to examine the social processes that might explain the connection between gardens, garden participation and health. We analyzed data from semi-structured interviews with community gardeners in Denver. The analysis examined social processes described by community gardeners and how those social processes were cultivated by or supportive of activities in community gardens. After presenting results describing these social processes and the activities supporting them, we discuss the potential for the place-based social processes found in community gardens to support collective efficacy, a powerful mechanism for enhancing the role of gardens in promoting health.

  8. Vulnerability of the uppermost ground water to contamination in the greater Denver area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearne, G.A.; Wireman, Michael; Campbell, A.S.; Turner, Sandy; Ingersoll, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Information about vulnerability of ground water to contamination is needed to facilitate ground-water management. Vulnerability of ground water refers to the intrinsic characteristics that determine the sensitivity of the water to being adversely affected by an imposed contaminant load. Within the greater Denver area, vulnerability of the uppermost ground water to contamination from the surface was assessed by considering the intrinsic characteristics included in a method developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Water Well Association, the DRASTIC method. The seven geohydrologic characteristics considered are: (1) Aquifer media, (2) hydraulic conductivity, (3) unsaturated media, (4) depth to water, (5) recharge, (6) soil media, and (7) land-surface slope. Recharge from precipitation generally is less than 2 inches per year; no effort was made to quantify the variation of recharge throughout the study area. Data for geology, depth to water, soils, and elevation were obtained and processed to produce maps of the other six characteristics. Spatial and attribute data for these maps were stored and processed by geographic-information-system software to produce a map showing vulnerability of the uppermost ground water to contamination from the surface. This report describes the assessment of each geohydrologic characteristic and the 157 vulnerability response units that were delineated within the greater Denver area. These response units are unique with respect to the geohydrologic characteristics considered. The uppermost ground water within each of the vulnerability response units are described in a series of tables, which include qualitative and selected quantitative data and the vulnerability rating assigned for each of the seven geohydrologic characteristics.

  9. Symposium on Animal Retroviruses: Abstracts. Held in Denver, Colorado on 10 December 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-10

    ADENOMATOSIS OF SHEEP : ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS. J. C. DeMartini and R. H. Rosadio, Department of Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO...Pulmonary adenomatosis of sheep (PAjaagsiekte, sheep pulmonary carcinoma) occurs naturally as a contagious bronchioloalveolar car- cinoma in sheep ...where PA causes an annual loss of about 2% of adult sheep . In both countries, PA has been shown to coexist with ovine lentivirus (OvLV) infection in the

  10. 76 FR 9606 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  11. 76 FR 9604 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  12. 76 FR 9598 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  13. 76 FR 9597 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  14. 76 FR 9603 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  15. Modeling and Management of Increased Urban Stormwater Runoff Using InfoSWMM Sustain in the Berkeley Neighborhood of Denver, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panos, C.; Hogue, T. S.; McCray, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Few urban studies have evaluated the hydrologic impacts of redevelopment - for example, a rapid conversion from single to multi-family homes - known as infill, or re-urbanization. Redevelopment provides unique stormwater challenges as private property owners in many cities are not mandated to undertake stormwater retrofits leading to an overall increase in stormwater quantity and decrease in quality. This research utilizes a version of the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM), InfoSWMM Sustain, to model and analyze the impacts of impervious cover change due to redevelopment on stormwater quantity and quality in Denver, Colorado, with a focus on the Berkeley Neighborhood, where the percent imperviousness is expected to increase significantly from a current value of 53% by 2025. We utilize flow data from multiple pressure transducers installed directly within the storm sewer network as well as water quality data from storm and low flow sampling to initially calibrate InfoSWMM Sustain using September 2015 through September 2016 storm data. Model scenarios include current land cover conditions as well as future imperviousness predictions from redevelopment. The Urban Drainage and Flood Control District's Colorado Urban Hydrograph Procedure (CUHP) model is also implemented and used for calibration and comparison to the InfoSWMM stormwater model. Model simulations predicting an average annual stormwater runoff for the basin will be used to inform stormwater capture for the Berkeley Neighborhood on the downstream Willis Case Golf Course, where treatment trains are being designed to provide irrigation water (a 250 ac-ft per year demand) and improved water quality for discharge to the nearby receiving waters of Clear Creek. Ultimately, study results will better inform regional stormwater capture requirements when transitioning from single to multi-family units by providing a quantitative basis for treatment and regulation priorities.

  16. Science for watershed decisions on abandoned mine lands; review of preliminary results, Denver, Colorado, February 4-5, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, David A.; Von Guerard, Paul

    1998-01-01

    From the Preface: There are thousands of abandoned or inactive mines on or adjacent to public lands administered by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and National Park Service. Mine wastes from many of these abandoned mines adversely affect resources on public lands. In 1995, an interdepartmental work group within the Federal government developed a strategy to address remediation of the many abandoned mines on public lands. This strategy is based on using a watershed approach to address the abandoned mine lands (AML) problem. The USGS, working closely with the Federal land-management agencies (FLMAs), is key for the success of this watershed approach. In support of this watershed approach, the USGS developed an AML Initiative with pilot studies in the Boulder River in Montana and the Animas River in Colorado. The goal of these studies is to design and implement a reliable strategy that will supply the scientific information to the FLMAs so that land managers can develop efficient and cost-effective remediation of AML. The symposium 'Science for Watershed Decisions on Abandoned Mine Lands: Review of Preliminary Results' held in Denver, Colorado, on February 4-5, 1998, provided the FLMAs a first look at the techniques, data, and interpretations being generated by the USGS pilot studies. This multidisciplined effort already is proving very valuable to land managers in making science-based AML cleanup decisions and will continue to be of increasing value as additional and more complete information is obtained. Ongoing interaction between scientists and land managers is essential to insure the efficient continuation and success of AML cleanup efforts.

  17. Quality of groundwater in the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado, 2003-5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne; Bauch, Nancy J.; Mashburn, Shana L.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality data were synthesized to evaluate factors that affect spatial and depth variability in water quality and to assess aquifer vulnerability to contaminants from geologic materials and those of human origin. The quality of shallow groundwater in the alluvial aquifer and shallow bedrock aquifer system has been adversely affected by development of agricultural and urban areas. Land use has altered the pattern and composition of recharge. Increased recharge from irrigation water has mobilized dissolved constituents and increased concentrations in the shallow groundwater. Concentrations of most constituents associated with poor or degraded water quality in shallow groundwater decreased with depth; many of these constituents are not geochemically conservative and are affected by geochemical reactions such as oxidation-reduction reactions. Groundwater age tracers provide additional insight into aquifer vulnerability and help determine if young groundwater of potentially poor quality has migrated to deeper parts of the bedrock aquifers used for drinking-water supply. Age-tracer results were used to group samples into categories of young, mixed, and old groundwater. Groundwater ages transitioned from mostly young in the water-table wells to mostly mixed in the shallowest bedrock aquifer, the Dawson aquifer, to mostly old in the deeper bedrock aquifers. Although the bedrock aquifers are mostly old groundwater of good water quality, several lines of evidence indicate that young, contaminant-bearing recharge has reached shallow to moderate depths in some areas of the bedrock aquifers. The Dawson aquifer is the most vulnerable of the bedrock aquifers to contamination, but results indicate that the older (deeper) bedrock aquifers are also vulnerable to groundwater contamination and that mixing with young recharge has occurred in some areas. Heavy pumping has caused water-level declines in the bedrock aquifers in some parts of the Denver Basin, which has the potential

  18. Comparison of conceptually based and regression rainfall-runoff models, Denver Metropolitan area, Colorado, and potential applications in urban areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindner-Lunsford, J. B.; Ellis, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    Multievent, conceptually based models and a single-event, multiple linear-regression model for estimating storm-runoff quantity and quality from urban areas were calibrated and verified for four small (57 to 167 acres) basins in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado. The basins represented different land-use types - light commercial, single-family housing, and multi-family housing. Both types of models were calibrated using the same data set for each basin. A comparison was made between the storm-runoff volume, peak flow, and storm-runoff loads of seven water quality constituents simulated by each of the models by use of identical verification data sets. The models studied were the U.S. Geological Survey 's Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model-Version II (DR3M-II) (a runoff-quantity model designed for urban areas), and a multievent urban runoff quality model (DR3M-QUAL). Water quality constituents modeled were chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total lead, total manganese, and total zinc. (USGS)

  19. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home and the Challenge of Hot Water on Demand, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2016-02-01

    "This report outlines the steps a developer can use when looking to create and implement higher performance standards such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) standards in a community. The report also describes the specific examples of how this process was followed by a developer, Forest City, in the Stapleton community in Denver, Colorado. IBACOS described the steps used to begin to bring the DOE ZERH standard to the Forest City Stapleton community based on 15 years of community-scale development work done by IBACOS. As a result of this prior IBACOS work, the team gained an understanding of the various components that a master developer needs to consider and created strategies for incorporating those components in the initial phases of development to achieve higher performance buildings in the community. An automated scoring system can be used to perform an internal audit that provides a detailed and consistent evaluation of how several homes under construction or builders' floor plans compare with the requirements of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. This audit can be performed multiple times at specific milestones during construction to allow the builder to make changes as needed throughout construction for the project to meet Zero Energy Ready Home standards. This scoring system also can be used to analyze a builder's current construction practices and design.

  20. Proceedings of a U.S. Geological Survey pressure-sensor Workshop, Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilbourn, Sammy L.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a Pressure Sensor Workshop, oriented toward the measurement of stage in surface waters, in Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992. Twenty attendees from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gave presentations concerning their experiences with the use of pressure sensors in hydrologic investigations. This report is a compilation of the abstracts of the presentations made at the workshop. Workshop participants concluded that each of the sensors evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey has strengths and weaknesses. Personnel contemplating the use of pressure sensors discussed at this workshop should contact workshop attendees and consult with them about their experiences with those sensors. The attendees preferred to use stilling wells with float-operated water-level sensors as the primary means for monitoring water levels. However, pressure sensor systems were favored as replacements for mercury manometers and as alternatives to stilling wells at sites where stilling wells are not practical or cost effective.

  1. Quantity and quality of urban runoff from three localities in the Denver Metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Sherman R.; Alley, William M.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable variation in constituent concentrations was shown in urban runoff data for 1975-77 from three metropolitan Denver drainage basins. Constituent concentrations, greatest during initial rainfall runoff, generally peaked midday of snowmelt runoff, corresponding with maximum melting and runoff. Instantaneous loads of constituents were largely a function of discharge. Days since last street sweeping or antecedent precipitation had no apparent effect; snowmelt-runoff loads apparently increased with number of days snow had been on the ground. Urban storm runoff may significantly contribute total ammonia nitrogen, total nonfiltrable residue, total copper, total iron, total lead, and total zinc; and snowmelt runoff may significantly contribute sodium and chloride, to local receiving waters. Data from two basins were used for calibration and verification of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's Storm Water Management Model II for rainfall-runoff modeling of flow and total nitrogen. The model assumption that land-surface loads of total nitrogen are directly proportional to number of days prior to storm during which accumulated rainfall was less than 1.0 inch was not substantiated. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Street Level Hydrology: An Urban Application of the WRF-Hydro Framework in Denver, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, L.; Hogue, T. S.; Salas, F. R.; Gochis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urban flood modeling at the watershed scale carries unique challenges in routing complexity, data resolution, social and political issues, and land surface - infrastructure interactions. The ability to accurately trace and predict the flow of water through the urban landscape enables better emergency response management, floodplain mapping, and data for future urban infrastructure planning and development. These services are of growing importance as urban population is expected to continue increasing by 1.84% per year for the next 25 years, increasing the vulnerability of urban regions to damages and loss of life from floods. Although a range of watershed-scale models have been applied in specific urban areas to examine these issues, there is a trend towards national scale hydrologic modeling enabled by supercomputing resources to understand larger system-wide hydrologic impacts and feedbacks. As such it is important to address how urban landscapes can be represented in large scale modeling processes. The current project investigates how coupling terrain and infrastructure routing can improve flow prediction and flooding events over the urban landscape. We utilize the WRF-Hydro modeling framework and a high-resolution terrain routing grid with the goal of compiling standard data needs necessary for fine scale urban modeling and dynamic flood forecasting in the urban setting. The city of Denver is selected as a case study, as it has experienced several large flooding events in the last five years and has an urban annual population growth rate of 1.5%, one of the highest in the U.S. Our work highlights the hydro-informatic challenges associated with linking channel networks and drainage infrastructure in an urban area using the WRF-Hydro modeling framework and high resolution urban models for short-term flood prediction.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Wastewater Injection in the Denver Basin combined disposal zone in northeast Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R. M.; Ge, S.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have correlated seismicity with high rate injection at Underground Injection Control Class II wastewater disposal wells. In this study, we examine the impact of injection in the Denver Basin combined disposal zone that is used by numerous Class II wells. The disposal zone includes the Lyons Formation, a sandstone unit, and the Fountain Formation, an arkose unit just above the basement. Within a 30-km radius of the deep Class II injection well (NGL C4A) closest to the June 1, 2014 M3.2 Greeley earthquake, there are fifteen deep wastewater disposal wells injecting into the disposal zone and two shallow wastewater disposal wells injecting into the Lyons Formation only. One of the shallow wells is located at the same disposal facility as NGL-C4A and started injection in October 2004; the earliest deep injection in this region, at well NGL-C6, began in November 2007. The major episode of seismicity in the area started in November 2013. The timing of injection operation and seismicity occurrence raises several questions. Why did seismicity not begin in the area until nearly 10 years after the start of injection? Nine of the deep wastewater disposal wells began injection after the M3.2 earthquake on June 1, 2014; how does the large increase in the number of injection wells in the area change the pore-pressure in the disposal zone? How does the injection from the various wells interact? Does this increase the chances of induced seismicity? We conduct numerical modeling of 18 injection wells from 2004 to 2016 to explore these questions by better understanding the pore-pressure changes through time, pore-pressure changes in areas of induced earthquakes, and the interactions between injection wells. We include the asymmetry of the basin geometry in the model. We also use this case study to refine how well spacing and injection rate influences the occurrence of induced earthquakes.

  4. Proceedings of the 4th New World Luminescence Dating and Dosimetry Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 31 June 2, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wise, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is one of a class of measurements known as stimulated phenomena. Such phenomena may be stimulated thermally or optically and the reader is referred to works by Aitken (1998) and Botter-Jensen and others (2003) for more detail. In recent years OSL has become a popular procedure for the determination of environmental radiation doses absorbed by archeological and geological materials in an attempt to date these materials. The first OSL measurements on quartz and feldspar were made using an argon ion-laser (Huntley et al., 1985). However, the development of cheaper stimulation systems based first on filtered lamps and then on light- emitting diodes (LEDs) (Spooner, et al., 1990; Botter-Jensen, and others, 1999) has led to a massive expansion in OSL dating applications. The abstracts in this volume represent presentations from a workshop held in May-June 2006, at the Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado, in which OSL methodologies and applications were summarized and integrated to provide a current synthesis of the OSL science being applied throughout North America. The workshop, sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Imaging and Characterization Team and North Dakota State University, was open to all scientists interested in OSL dating techniques and radiation dosimetry. Participants included thirty-six research scientists and students in geology, archaeology, and physics from the U.S. Geological Survey, Los Alamos National Labs, Kentucky Geological Survey, eight universities in the United States, one university in Canada, one university in India, and Riso National Labs of Denmark. The workshop included two keynote speakers: Dr. Ashok Singhvi (Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India) spoke on 'Some Unexplored Methodological Aspects and Some New Applications of Luminescence Dating,' while Dr. Jim Feathers (University of Seattle, WA) spoke on OSL Dating of Sediments From Paleoindian Sites in Brazil

  5. Delineating producing trends within plays by the use of computer-generated drill intensity maps, Denver basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, D.K.; Mast, R.F.; Gautier, D.L.

    1986-08-01

    Computer-generated exploration intensity maps were constructed for the Lower Cretaceous J and D sandstones of the Dakota Group in the Denver basin as part of the US Geological Survey's Federal Lands Assessment Program (FLAP). These maps illustrate producing and non-producing areas, distribution of hydrocarbon shows, and explored areas. They were compared with existing or generated maps of depositional environment, structure, thermal maturity, core porosity and permeability, and production data to delineate trends and to assess oil and gas resources for the Denver basin. Data from more than 36,000 drill holes in the Denver basin were entered into drill intensity programs, developed by the US Geological Survey, which tabulate show and production data for drill holes within 0.5 mi/sup 2/ grid cells. Primary production in the Denver basin is from stratigraphic traps of the J and D sandstones of the Dakota Group. Production and shows within the Dakota group are present in northeast-southwest-trending zones on the eastern flank of the basin in Colorado. Based on the incorporation of maps of depositional environment, porosity, and permeability, the trends may represent distributary-channel systems in this portion of the basin. Thermal maturation studies of J and D sandstone hydrocarbon source rocks indicate that much of the oil and gas present in the Dakota Group was generated deeper in the Denver basin. Hydrocarbon migration pathways from deep in the basin may also be indicated by these northeastern trends. Using drill intensity maps to illustrate zones of production is useful for delineating large-scale trends within plays and, therefore, for helping assess petroleum resources within the Denver basin. It may also be used to outline potential exploration targets by extending and analyzing the trends.

  6. Identifying ozone production from oil and gas versus urban emissions sources in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.; Abeleira, A.; Flocke, F. M.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    During summertime, ozone concentrations in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado often exceed the 8-hour average EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 ppbv. Ambient measurements of ozone, ozone precursors - volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) - and other secondary pollutants such as peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) were collected during spring (15 Mar-18 May) and summer (6 Jul-9 Sept) 2015 at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado. These measurements were made in conjunction with airborne measurements from the Shale Oil and Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in spring 2015, which focused on studying the air quality impacts of emissions from oil and gas production in the western U.S. Using the in-situ ground-based measurements collected at the BAO field site, we attempt to identify and compare regional ozone production originating from oil and gas emissions (e.g., the Denver-Julesburg oil basin northeast of BAO) with that from urban and mobile sources (e.g., the Denver/Boulder metropolitan area south and west of BAO). We use ozone production efficiency (i.e., the number of molecules of ozone produced per molecule of NOx oxidized) and emissions ratios of selected VOCs as a metric for comparing ozone production associated with these different sources of emissions as well as seasonal differences between observations collected in spring versus summer.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-354-1955, Lakewood Radiator Shop, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, B.J.; Hammel, R.

    1989-03-01

    In response to a request from the owners of three radiator repair shops located in Lakewood, Arvada, and Aurora, Colorado, an investigation was made of lead exposures and worker blood-lead levels. All types of radiators were repaired and cleaned, most being from automobiles. Lead exposure occurred when an oxygen acetylene torch was used to melt the lead-based solder used to attach the top and bottom to the core. Other contact with lead resulted from brushing, producing skin contact with the oxidized lead. Environmental samples for inorganic lead indicated concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.29 mg/m{sup 3} with the average for all ten samples being 0.16 mg/m{sup 3}. Of the eight breathing zone samples taken, six exceeded the recommended criterion of 0.05 mg/m{sup 3}. Of ten workers tested for blood lead levels, three had levels exceeding 40 micrograms/deciliter and four had elevated zinc-protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels. No significant statistical association was noted between breathing zone levels of lead and blood levels of lead. A health hazard existed from overexposure to lead during cleaning and repair of radiators. Specific control measures are recommended.

  8. Map showing flood-prone areas, greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCain, J.F.; Hotchkiss, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    The rapid growth of population in the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado is causing intense competition for available land resources. One form of competition posing serious problems in indiscriminate development on flood plains along creeks and rivers. Flood plains are natural features of the landscape developed by streams in carry water in excess of channel capacity. Although not used as often by the stream, flood plains are as much a part of the stream system as is the channel. Whenever man competes with this natural function of the flood plain he must inevitably pay the price through property damage and varying degrees of human suffering Flood damages in the United States have been estimated to average about \\$1 billion annually (American Public Works Association, 1966.) This tremendous waste of national resources is borne not only by those citizens in direct contact with floods but also to a lesser degree by all citizens through increased cost of public services. Thus, floods are of concern to the entire community, and solutions to existing or potential problems should be a community effort.

  9. Geologic map of the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Donald E.; Machette, Michael N.

    1979-01-01

    This digital map shows the areal extent of surficial deposits and rock stratigraphic units (formations) as compiled by Trimble and Machette from 1973 to 1977 and published in 1979 under the Front Range Urban Corridor Geology Program. Trimble and Machette compiled their geologic map from published geologic maps and unpublished geologic mapping having varied map unit schemes. A convenient feature of the compiled map is its uniform classification of geologic units that mostly matches those of companion maps to the north (USGS I-855-G) and to the south (USGS I-857-F). Published as a color paper map, the Trimble and Machette map was intended for land-use planning in the Front Range Urban Corridor. This map recently (1997-1999) was digitized under the USGS Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In general, the mountainous areas in the western part of the map exhibit various igneous and metamorphic bedrock units of Precambrian age, major faults, and fault brecciation zones at the east margin (5-20 km wide) of the Front Range. The eastern and central parts of the map (Colorado Piedmont) depict a mantle of unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age and interspersed outcroppings of Cretaceous or Tertiary-Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock. The Quaternary mantle comprises eolian deposits (quartz sand and silt), alluvium (gravel, sand, and silt of variable composition), colluvium, and a few landslides. At the mountain front, north-trending, dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic sandstone, shale, and limestone bedrock formations form hogbacks and intervening valleys.

  10. Water-quality assessment for Arvada Reservoir, Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britton, L.J.; Gaggiani, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data were collected from Arvada Reservoir, Colorado, and from its major inflows, Ralston Creek and Croke Canal, to assess the water quality of the reservoir, to evaluate the effect of water from various sources on the reservoir, and to estimate the trophic state of the reservoir. Data were collected at five sites in Arvada Reservoir, one site in Ralston Creek, and two sites in Croke Canal. The study began in June 1983 (just before filling in May 1984) and continued through September 1985. The reservoir was thermally stratified on most sampling dates from April through September. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from 0 to 12.0 milligrams per liter, and the reservoir was anaerobic below the 10-meter depth during most of the summer. Secchi-disk-depth measurements ranged from 0.9 to 5.5 meters and generally increased during the study period, possibly because of decreases in nonalgal turbidity after the reservoir was filled. Water from the reservoir generally is of suitable quality for a raw-water-supply source and for maintenance of aquatic life. Total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus concentrations were small, and both were growth-limiting factors in the reservoir. The phytoplankton community was diverse, and the most dominant taxa were diatoms. Phytoplankton densities ranged from 1,400 to 29,000 cells per millimeter, and chlorophyll alpha concentrations ranged from 0.0 to 20.4 micrograms per liter. (USGS)

  11. Denver VA Hospital MS4 NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit CO-R042008, the Veterans Administration (Medical Center, Denver Campus) is authorized to discharge from all municipal separate storm sewer system outfalls to the receiving waters specified in the permit in the City of Denver, Colorado.

  12. Notes from the field: hospital outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase--Denver, Colorado, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-02-15

    On August 16, 2012, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment was notified of two patients at an acute-care hospital in Denver with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP), isolated from respiratory specimens during July-August. Both isolates produced New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM). A review of microbiology records identified a third patient with NDM-producing CRKP isolated from a respiratory specimen, admitted in May. Active surveillance cultures in September identified an additional five patients colonized with NDM-producing CRKP. An investigation was launched by the hospital and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to guide infection control measures and limit transmission.

  13. Third U.S. Geological Survey Wildland Fire-Science Workshop : Denver, Colorado, November 12-15, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livingston, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The historically significant wildland fire events that occurred in the United States during 2000 and 2002, together with the associated recognition of the need for a different national policy of forest management, has led to an increased awareness of the need for cooperative effort among all Federal agencies in planning for and managing the risks and consequences of wildland fire. The expertise and capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are significant resources in this regard, and the agency is becoming increasingly involved in fire-science activities in support of the various land-management agencies that are dealing directly with this issue. The First USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1997 and helped to establish the direction of USGS in sharing its expertise with the fire-management agencies. The Second USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 2000 and brought together all the agencies involved in the management of wildland fires in order to determine their needs, to demonstrate USGS capabilities to meet those needs, and to establish methods for the USGS to distribute data and tools useful in fire management. It enhanced the relationships developed during the 1997 workshop and helped to define USGS' role in the fire-management community. The Third USGS Wildland Fire-Science Workshop, held in Denver, Colorado, November 12?15, 2002, was an opportunity for exchange of information on recent progress in the area of fire science and to determine the gaps in fire-science research that could be addressed by the USGS. In addition to more than 90 USGS scientists engaged in fire-related research and managers of organizational units involved in some aspect of wildland fire activities, the workshop was attended by about 30 representatives of 11 other Federal agencies. There also were a number of attendees affiliated with several universities, private companies, and State and local

  14. Uranium in Surface Waters and Sediments Affected by Historical Mining in the Denver West 1:100,000 Quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, Robert A.; Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Wirt, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical sampling of 82 stream waters and 87 stream sediments within mountainous areas immediately west of Denver, Colorado, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1994. The primary purpose was to evaluate regionally the effects of geology and past mining on the concentration and distribution of uranium. The study area contains uranium- and thorium-rich bedrock, numerous noneconomic occurrences of uranium minerals, and several uranium deposits of variable size and production history. During the sampling period, local streams had low discharge and were more susceptible to uranium-bearing acid drainage originating from historical mines of base- and precious-metal sulfides. Results indicated that the spatial distribution of Precambrian granites and metamorphic rocks strongly influences the concentration of uranium in stream sediments. Within-stream transport increases the dispersion of uranium- and thorium rich mineral grains derived primarily from granitic source rocks. Dissolved uranium occurs predominantly as uranyl carbonate complexes, and concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 65 micrograms per liter. Most values were less than 5 micrograms per liter, which is less than the current drinking water standard of 30 micrograms per liter and much less than locally applied aquatic-life toxicity standards of several hundred micrograms per liter. In local streams that are affected by uranium-bearing acid mine drainage, dissolved uranium is moderated by dilution and sorptive uptake by stream sediments. Sorbents include mineral alteration products and chemical precipitates of iron- and aluminum-oxyhydroxides, which form where acid drainage enters streams and is neutralized. Suspended uranium is relatively abundant in some stream segments affected by nearby acid drainage, which likely represents mobilization of these chemical precipitates. The 234U/238U activity ratio of acid drainage (0.95-1.0) is distinct from that of local surface waters (more than 1

  15. Third U.S. Geological Survey Wildland Fire-Science Workshop : Denver, Colorado, November 12-15, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livingston, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The historically significant wildland fire events that occurred in the United States during 2000 and 2002, together with the associated recognition of the need for a different national policy of forest management, has led to an increased awareness of the need for cooperative effort among all Federal agencies in planning for and managing the risks and consequences of wildland fire. The expertise and capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are significant resources in this regard, and the agency is becoming increasingly involved in fire-science activities in support of the various land-management agencies that are dealing directly with this issue. The First USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1997 and helped to establish the direction of USGS in sharing its expertise with the fire-management agencies. The Second USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 2000 and brought together all the agencies involved in the management of wildland fires in order to determine their needs, to demonstrate USGS capabilities to meet those needs, and to establish methods for the USGS to distribute data and tools useful in fire management. It enhanced the relationships developed during the 1997 workshop and helped to define USGS' role in the fire-management community. The Third USGS Wildland Fire-Science Workshop, held in Denver, Colorado, November 12?15, 2002, was an opportunity for exchange of information on recent progress in the area of fire science and to determine the gaps in fire-science research that could be addressed by the USGS. In addition to more than 90 USGS scientists engaged in fire-related research and managers of organizational units involved in some aspect of wildland fire activities, the workshop was attended by about 30 representatives of 11 other Federal agencies. There also were a number of attendees affiliated with several universities, private companies, and State and local

  16. Quantifying Urban-Ecosystem Atmosphere Fluxes of N2O, CO2, CH4 over Denver, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. E.; Tindall, J.; Thienelt, T.

    2004-12-01

    Urban ecosystems are complex, rapidly expanding, and the location of strong emissions of greenhouse gases. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and water vapor were measured over a ~30 km2 portion of Denver, Colorado. Equipment used in these measurements included eddy covariance sensors at two levels on a tall 120m tower for CO2 flux and evapotranspiration (ET), soil surface chambers for the measurement of CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes at 33 locations, and direct flux measurements of CO2 and N2O from the water treatment system. Measurement of CO2 flux and ET has been continuous for more than two years (2002-2004). Chamber measurements were conducted on selected dates during two growing seasons. Direct flux measurements from the water treatment system were conducted on a monthly basis in the 2004 summer. Measurements indicate both strong temporal and spatial heterogeneity of fluxes owing to characteristics of natural and anthropogenic ecosystem components. Tower-based eddy covariance measurements indicated that the urban ecosystem was a net CO2 source when measurements were averaged over a day or longer. However, during the majority of mid-day summer hours it was a weak sink, sequestering atmospheric CO2. In this case, the weak sink may indicate that the vegetative sink for CO2 was stronger than anthropogenic emissions of CO2 from heavy traffic on nearby highways in the flux footprint. Chamber-based measurements of CH4 flux over most dry land surfaces with vegetation varied from -0.3 to 2.6mmol/m2/d while the range in N2O flux was ~0 to 0.2\\mu mol/m2/d. For both fluxes, the higher values were observed over wet soils (>20%, volumetric). In contrast, at certain locations over a landfill (closed more than 30years ago) and converted to other uses (light industry, city park and golf course), CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes were a few orders of magnitude higher than that found anywhere else in the city. However, for the majority

  17. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality and aerosol formation in the Colorado Front Range during FRAPPÉ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Kennedy T.; Dingle, Justin H.; Bahreini, Roya; Reddy, Patrick J.; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott C.; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Pusede, Sally E.; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Sachse, Glen W.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Walega, James; Weibring, Peter; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Pfister, Gabriele; Flocke, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We present airborne measurements made during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ) project to investigate the impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality in the greater Denver area. Data on trace gases, non-refractory submicron aerosol chemical constituents, and aerosol optical extinction (βext) at λ = 632 nm were evaluated in the presence and absence of the surface mesoscale circulation in three distinct study regions of the Front Range: In-Flow, Northern Front Range, and the Denver metropolitan area. Pronounced increases in mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in the Northern Front Range and the Denver metropolitan area were observed during the cyclone episodes (27-28 July) compared to the non-cyclonic days (26 July, 2-3 August). Organic aerosols dominated the mass concentrations on all evaluated days, with a 45 % increase in organics on cyclone days across all three regions, while the increase during the cyclone episode was up to ˜ 80 % over the Denver metropolitan area. In the most aged air masses (NOx / NOy < 0.5), background organic aerosols over the Denver metropolitan area increased by a factor of ˜ 2.5 due to transport from Northern Front Range. Furthermore, enhanced partitioning of nitric acid to the aerosol phase was observed during the cyclone episodes, mainly due to increased abundance of gas phase ammonia. During the non-cyclone events, βext displayed strong correlations (r = 0.71) with organic and nitrate in the Northern Front Range and only with organics (r = 0.70) in the Denver metropolitan area, while correlation of βext during the cyclone was strongest (r = 0.86) with nitrate over Denver. Mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values in the Denver metropolitan area were similar on cyclone and non-cyclone days despite the dominant influence of different aerosol species on βext. Our analysis showed that the meteorological patterns associated with the Denver Cyclone increased aerosol

  18. Multiple cluster analysis for the identification of high-risk census tracts for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Nassel, Ariann F; Root, Elisabeth D; Haukoos, Jason S; McVaney, Kevin; Colwell, Christopher; Robinson, James; Eigel, Brian; Magid, David J; Sasson, Comilla

    2014-12-01

    Prior research has shown that high-risk census tracts for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) can be identified. High-risk neighborhoods are defined as having a high incidence of OHCA and a low prevalence of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, there is no consensus regarding the process for identifying high-risk neighborhoods. We propose a novel summary approach to identify high-risk neighborhoods through three separate spatial analysis methods: Empirical Bayes (EB), Local Moran's I (LISA), and Getis Ord Gi* (Gi*) in Denver, Colorado. We conducted a secondary analysis of prospectively collected Emergency Medical Services data of OHCA from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2011 from the City and County of Denver, Colorado. OHCA incidents were restricted to those of cardiac etiology in adults ≥18 years. The OHCA incident locations were geocoded using Centrus. EB smoothed incidence rates were calculated for OHCA using Geoda and LISA and Gi* calculated using ArcGIS 10. A total of 1102 arrests in 142 census tracts occurred during the study period, with 887 arrests included in the final sample. Maps of clusters of high OHCA incidence were overlaid with maps identifying census tracts in the below the Denver County mean for bystander CPR prevalence. Five census tracts identified were designated as Tier 1 high-risk tracts, while an additional 7 census tracts where designated as Tier 2 high-risk tracts. This is the first study to use these three spatial cluster analysis methods for the detection of high-risk census tracts. These census tracts are possible sites for targeted community-based interventions to improve both cardiovascular health education and CPR training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ground-water quality near a sewage-sludge recycling site and a landfill near Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1977-01-01

    The Metropolitan Denver Sewage Disposal District and the city and county of Denver operate a sewage-sludge recycling site and a landfill in an area about 15 miles (24 kilometers) east of Denver. The assessment of the effects of these facilities on the ground-water system indicated that five wells perforated in alluvium were found to have markedly degradedd water quality. One well is located in the landfill and water that was analyzed was obtained from near the base of the buried refuse, two others are located downgradient and near sewage-sludge burial areas, and the remaining two are located near stagnant surface ponds. Concentrations of nitrate in wells downgradient from fields where sludge is plowed into the soil were higher than background concentrations due to the effects of the sludge disposal. No evidence of water-quality degradation was detected in deeper wells perforated in the bedrock formations. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. The Role of Vocational Rehabilitation in the 1980's: Serving Those with Invisible Handicaps Such as Cancer, Cardiac Illness, Epilepsy. A Report of the Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (3rd, Denver, Colorado, June 5-7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.

    This publication includes six action papers presented at the Denver, Colorado, seminar on June 5-7, 1978. Three disability categories highlighted in the seminar are the topics of the papers: cancer, cardiac illness, and epilepsy. There are two papers devoted to each category of disability, one focusing on action for eliminating barriers to…

  1. Vocational Rehabilitation and End Stage Renal Disease. Proceedings of the Workshop (Denver, Colorado, December 11-13, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC. Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.

    This document contains 12 papers presented to medical and vocational rehabilitation professionals on the topic of vocational rehabilitation and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) at a Denver conference in 1979. The following papers are contained in this report: "Rehabilitation and ESRD: Services with a New Thrust" by Kathleen E. Lloyd;…

  2. Analysis of urban storm-runoff data and the effects on the South Platte River, Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, S.R.; Doerfer, J.T.; Mustard, M.H.; Blakely, S.R.; Gibbs, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Denver was selected for inclusion in the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Denver Regional council of governments, contains a synopsis of previous urban runoff studies in the Denver metropolitan area. The report includes a description of the monitored basins, a summary of storm runoff-to-rainfall ratios and estimates of impervious retention, and constituent loads and concentrations from seven small basins. The data from six small and five tributary basins to the South Platte River are analyzed using regression analysis, resulting in two sets of regression equations to predict storm runoff volume and selected constituent loads. The regression equations may be used to estimate storm-runoff volume and constituent loads from unmonitored basins from 15 to 16,000 acres with effective impervious areas of 15 to 90 percent. The effects of urban runoff on the South Platte River in the Denver area are described in three ways. The three methods indicated that storm runoff was a significant contributor of total suspended solids, total organic carbon, total lead, and total zinc to the South Platte River. (USGS)

  3. 75 FR 5283 - Foreign-Trade Zone 123 - Denver, Colorado, Application for Subzone, Vestas Nacelles America, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs, Blades and Towers), Brighton, Denver, Pueblo, and...) located at 100 Tower Drive, Pueblo; and, Site 4 - warehouse wind turbine components (119,983 sq.ft./5.6... would include manufacturing, testing, packaging and warehousing of wind turbines and related parts...

  4. 78 FR 52758 - Foreign-Trade Zone 123-Denver, Colorado; Application for Subzone, Pillow Kingdom, Inc., Aurora...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Kingdom, Inc., Aurora, Colorado An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board... Pillow Kingdom, Inc. (Pillow Kingdom), located in Aurora, Colorado. The application was submitted... subzone would consist of the following site: Site 1 (34.66 acres) 24000 E. 19th Avenue, Aurora....

  5. Knowledge of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Al-Tayyib, Alia A; Thrun, Mark W; Haukoos, Jason S; Walls, N Eugene

    2014-04-01

    As part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Denver, Colorado, we assessed knowledge of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); willingness to use PrEP; and potential changes in risk behaviors among HIV-negative participants reporting sexual activity with a male partner in the preceding 12 months. We examined knowledge of PrEP before (2008) and after (2011) results of the iPrEx trial were available. Of the 425 participants in the 2008 sample, 91 (21 %) were aware of PrEP compared to 131 (28 %) of the 461 participants in the 2011 sample (adjusted prevalence ratio: 1.43, 95 % confidence interval: 1.18, 1.72). Despite the increase in 2011, few MSM in Denver were aware of PrEP. Educating high-risk MSM about the potential utility of PrEP as an adjunct to other effective prevention methods is needed when considering the addition of PrEP to the HIV prevention arsenal.

  6. Evaluation of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System among men who have sex with men in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Kathryn H; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Thrun, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Denver Public Health implements the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS), a cyclical survey of populations at increased risk for HIV. We evaluated the implementation of NHBS among Denver men who have sex with men (MSM), considering the system's simplicity, data quality, representativeness, and sensitivity to trends. We found that the time required for implementation and the complexity of data management and analysis are barriers to disseminating local findings. Data quality has improved in each cycle of the study but must be protected by continually checking for errors and training field staff to be attentive to detail. Compared with the US census and other convenience samples of Denver MSM, the overall demographic representativeness of NHBS has improved over time. However, there is concern that the underlying population included in the study may be changing. NHBS survey data show evidence of two suspected trends in the local MSM population at risk for HIV: increasing sexual risk-taking and the transition away from bars as a dominant partner-finding location. It is unclear whether the increasing reports of sexual risk-taking reflect a real trend or simply a change in the population sampled, since most NHBS participants are recruited at gay bars and other venues. To ensure that the sample continues to represent the underlying population at risk and accurately identify trends, it is necessary to closely monitor MSM sample characteristics during implementation and incorporate weighted data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention into analyses.

  7. A report from the World Conference on Lung Cancer (September 6-9, 2015 - Denver, Colorado, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-09-01

    The mile-high city of Denver was the site of this year's World Conference on Lung Cancer, which reached its 16th event. The conference scheduled 3 days of intensive scientific research presentations and discussions arranged in oral, mini-oral and poster sessions, plus an array of additional educational sessions. Being the largest international gathering of lung cancer and thoracic malignancy clinicians and researchers, important new research on prevention, screening and treatment of lung cancer and other malignancies of the thorax, with special emphasis on thymoma and mesothelioma, was presented during the conference.

  8. Median-porosity contour maps of the J Sandstone, Dakota Group, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Gautier, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Porosity data compiled in this study were determined from J sandstone cores from 134 widely spaced boreholes. Porosity in areas of poor core coverage was determined from neutron density logs from an additional 20 boreholes ( corrected to core average grain density). Median, rather than average, porosity was used in order to minimize the statistical effect of anomalously high and low porosity values. Thirty-five oil companies and independent operators supplied core porosity data. Core porosities were determined by means of helium porosimetry, primarily by Core Laboratories of Denver, Colo.

  9. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Seventh Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 12-16, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helterbrand, Wm. Steve; Sieverling, Jennifer B.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Seventh Biennial Geographic Information Science (GIS) Workshop (USGS-GIS 2008) on May 12 through 16, 2008, at the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado, is unique in that it brings together GIS professionals from all of the USGS disciplines across all regions, and focuses primarily on the needs and accomplishments of the USGS. The theme for the 2008 workshop, ?GIS for Tomorrow?s Challenges,? provides an opportunity for USGS GIS professionals to demonstrate how they have responded to the challenges set forth in the USGS Science Strategy. During this workshop, attendees will have an opportunity to present or demonstrate their work; develop their knowledge by attending hands-on workshops and presentations given by professionals from the USGS and other Federal agencies, GIS-related companies, and academia; and to network with other professionals to develop collaborative opportunities. In addition to participation in numerous workshops and presentations, attendees will have opportunities to listen to top-level managers from the USGS present updates and goals concerning the future of several USGS programs. Monday evening?s Star Guest presentation by Thomas Wagner, NSF Office of Polar Programs, and Paul Morin, Antarctic Geospatial Information Center, entitled ?Mapping all that is White: Antarctic Science and Operations Viewed Though Geospatial Data,? will be one of many valuable presentations. This Proceedings volume will serve as an activity reference for workshop attendees, as well as an archive of technical abstracts presented at the workshop. Author, co-author, and presenter names, affiliations, and contact information are listed with presentation titles with the abstracts. Some hands-on sessions are offered twice; in these instances, abstracts submitted for publication are presented in the proceedings on both days on which they are offered. All acronyms used in these proceedings are explained in the text of each abstract.

  10. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Fourth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop: Denver, Colorado, April 23-27, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Char, Stephen J.; San Juan, Carma A.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fourth Biennial Geographic Information Science (GIS) Workshop (USGS-GIS 2001) was held April 23-27, 2001, at the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado. The workshop provided an environment for participants to improve their knowledge about GIS and GIS-related applications that are used within the USGS. Two major topics of USGS-GIS 2001 were the application of GIS technology to interdisciplinary science and the distribution and sharing of USGS GIS products. Additionally, several presentations included GIS technology and tools, project applications of GIS, and GIS data management. USGS-GIS 2001 included user and vendor presentations, demonstrations, and hands-on technical workshops. Presentation abstracts that were submitted for publication are included in these proceedings. The keynote speaker was Karen Siderelis, the USGS Associate Director for Information (Geographic Information Officer). In addition to the USGS, other Federal agencies, GIS-related companies, and university researchers presented lectures or demonstrations or conducted hands-on sessions. USGS employees and contractors from every discipline and region attended the workshop. To facilitate the interaction between the Federal agencies, each of the presenting Federal agencies was invited to send a representative to the workshop. One of the most beneficial activities of USGS-GIS 2001, as identified by an informal poll of attendees, was the Monday evening poster session in which more than 75 poster presentations gave attendees a chance to learn of work being performed throughout the USGS. A feature new to USGS-GIS 2001 was internet participation of USGS personnel through cyber seminars of the morning plenary sessions.

  11. Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An early-season snowfall accents the Rocky Mountains through western and central Colorado. This true-color image made from data collected by MODIS on October 26, 2001, highlights the contrast between various irrigated areas and the otherwise dry environment at the foothills of the Rockies. One such example is the city of Denver and its outlying suburbs, which can be seen best in the high-resolution image. In areas that would normally harbor drought-tolerant grasses, shrubs and trees, humans are living, watering their lawns, and farming; those watered, green areas differ substantially from the surrounding hues of brown. Numerous National Parks and Monuments dot the Southwestern U.S. The Great Sand Dunes National Monument is one such park. Running along the western base the Sangre de Cristo Range(just below the image's center), a subsection of the Rockies, the monument possesses some of the highest inland sand dunes in the U.S., with crests reaching over 700 feet.

  12. Occurrence of Selected Organic Compounds in Groundwater Used for Public Supply in the Plio-Pleistocene Deposits in East-Central Nebraska and the Dawson and Denver Aquifers near Denver, Colorado, 2002-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bails, Jeffrey B.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Landon, Matthew K.; Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has an ongoing Source Water-Quality Assessment program designed to characterize the quality of water in aquifers used as a source of drinking-water supply for some of the largest metropolitan areas in the Nation. In addition to the sampling of the source waters, sampling of finished or treated waters was done in the second year of local studies to evaluate if the organic compounds detected in the source waters also were present in the water supplied to the public. An evaluation of source-water quality used in selected groundwater-supplied public water systems in east-central Nebraska and in the south Denver metropolitan area of Colorado was completed during 2002 through 2004. Fifteen wells in the Plio-Pleistocene alluvial and glacial deposits in east-central Nebraska (the High Plains study) and 12 wells in the Dawson and Denver aquifers, south of Denver (the South Platte study), were sampled during the first year to obtain information on the occurrence and distribution of selected organic chemicals in the source waters. During the second year of the study, two wells in east-central Nebraska were resampled, along with the associated finished water derived from these wells, to determine if organic compounds detected in the source water also were present in the finished water. Selection of the second-phase sampling sites was based on detections of the most-frequently occurring organic compounds from the first-year Source Water-Quality Assessment study results. The second-year sampling also required that finished waters had undergone water-quality treatment processes before being distributed to the public. Sample results from the first year of sampling groundwater wells in east-central Nebraska show that the most-frequently detected organic compounds were the pesticide atrazine and its degradate, deethylatrazine (DEA, otherwise known as 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine or CIAT

  13. Sexual Abuse: Therapeutic & Systems Considerations for the Child and Family. [Report of] Colorado State Department of Social Services Conference (Denver, Colorado, July 7-8, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Claudia A., Ed.; Gottlieb, Bruce, Ed.

    This publication presents papers from a 1982 child sexual abuse conference sponsored by the Colorado State Department of Social Services, designed to identify major issues and trends and to stimulate the exchange of perspectives and practices among persons concerned about preventing and treating child sexual abuse. The first section of the…

  14. Sexual Abuse: Therapeutic & Systems Considerations for the Child and Family. [Report of] Colorado State Department of Social Services Conference (Denver, Colorado, July 7-8, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Claudia A., Ed.; Gottlieb, Bruce, Ed.

    This publication presents papers from a 1982 child sexual abuse conference sponsored by the Colorado State Department of Social Services, designed to identify major issues and trends and to stimulate the exchange of perspectives and practices among persons concerned about preventing and treating child sexual abuse. The first section of the…

  15. A Colorado Response to the Information Society: The Changing Academic Library. Proceedings of a Conference (Denver, Colorado, October 6-7, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breivik, Patricia Senn, Ed.

    As suggested by a Colorado Academic Library Master Plan developed in 1982, a statewide conference that brought together academicians and librarians was held to explore the role of academic libraries in the information society. People came in teams of three from institutions and included library directors, academic vice presidents, and faculty…

  16. Petroleum system and production characteristics of the Muddy (J) Sandstone (Lower Cretaceous) Wattenberg continuous gas field, Denver basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Cox, D.O.; Weimer, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Wattenberg field is a continuous-type gas accumulation. Estimated ultimate recovery from current wells is 1.27 tcf of gas from the Lower Cretaceous Muddy (J) Sandstone. Mean gas resources that have the potential to be added to these reserves in the next 30 yr are 1.09 tcf; this will be primarily through infill drilling to recover a greater percentage of gas in place and to drain areas that are isolated because of geologic compartmentalization. Greatest gas production from the Muddy (J) Sandstone in Wattenberg field occurs (1) from within the most permeable and thickest intervals of Fort Collins Member delta-front and nearshore-marine sandstones, (2) to a lesser extent from the Horsetooth Member valley-fill channel sandstones, (3) in association with a large thermal anomaly that is delineated by measured temperatures in wells and by vitrinite reflectance contours of 0.9% and greater, (4) in proximity to the bounding Mowry, Graneros, and Skull Creek shales that are the hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoir seals, and (5) between the Lafayette and Longmont right-lateral wrench fault zones (WFZs) with secondary faults that act as conduits in areas of the field. The axis of greatest gas production is north 25 to 35?? northeast, which parallels the basin axis. Recurrent movement along five right-lateral WFZs that crosscut Wattenberg field shifted the Denver basin axis to the northeast and influenced depositional and erosional patterns of the reservoir and seal intervals. Levels of thermal maturity within the Wattenberg field are anomalously high compared to other areas of the Denver basin. The Wattenberg field thermal anomaly may be due to upward movement of fluids along faults associated with probable igneous intrusions. Areas of anomalous high heat flow within the field correlate with an increased and variable gas-oil ratio.

  17. 75 FR 20394 - American Racing Equipment, LLC, Denver, CO; Notice of Negative Determination on Remand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... workers and former workers of American Racing Equipment, LLC, Denver, Colorado (the subject firm). (AR 49... remand investigation revealed that the worker group at the Denver, Colorado facility did not support the... wholesaled by the Denver, Colorado worker group was imported from China and a small portion entered...

  18. Land-Cover and Imperviousness Data for Regional Areas near Denver, Colorado; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin - 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcone, James A.; Pearson, Daniel K.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the processing and results of land-cover and impervious surface derivation for parts of three metropolitan areas being studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems (EUSE). The data were derived primarily from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery from the period 1999-2002, and are provided as 30-meter resolution raster datasets. Data were produced to a standard consistent with data being produced as part of the USGS National Land Cover Database 2001 (NLCD01) Program, and were derived in cooperation with, and assistance from, NLCD01 personnel. The data were intended as surrogates for NLCD01 data because of the EUSE Program's time-critical need for updated land-cover for parts of the United States that would not be available in time from the NLCD01 Program. Six datasets are described in this report: separate land-cover (15-class categorical data) and imperviousness (0-100 percent continuous data) raster datasets for parts of the general Denver, Colorado area (South Platte River Basin), Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas area (Trinity River Basin), and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin area (Western Lake Michigan Drainages).

  19. Unconformities and valley-fill sequences-Key to understanding reservoirs at Lonetree and Poncho Fields, Denver Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, F.; Dolson, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Previous interpretations suggested that the Lower Cretaceous ''J'' sandstone in the Denver basin is divisible into three genetic units: a lower delta front (J-3), a middle delta plain (J-2), and an upper destructional marine bar (J-1). The presence of root casts and siderite cement along the upper contact of the J-3 sandstone, however, suggests that J-2 deposits are separated from the J-3 sandstone by a regional unconformity. This contact may mark the same unconformity that separates the Horsetooth and Fort Collins Members in outcrop along the western margin of the basin. J-2 deposits comprise point bar, crevasse splay, and floodplain sequences of a broad alluvial plain. Fluvial deposits at Lonetree and Poncho probably formed in a tributary to a larger order tributary that flowed southwest through the Peoria field area. These tributaries eventually drained into a major trunk stream represented by valley-fill deposits of the Kassler sandstone. Delta-front deposits (J-3) that underlie the unconformity are tightly cemented by siderite and do not produce in either field. J-2 sandstones are productive from north- and west-trending point-bar deposits in both fields and from laterally equivalent crevasse-splay deposits at Lonetree field. Secondary porosity has created a common reservoir in point-bar and crevasse-splay deposits at Lonetree. Laterally equivalent deposits of major trunk streams, such as the Kassler sandstone, generally produce only over structural noses in the southern D-J basin. Overlying J-1 sandstones form northeast-trending marine bars in both field areas. Two echelon bars are present at Poncho but only the western one is productive. The eastern bar at Poncho and the single marine bar at Lonetree are wet.

  20. Geologic control of severe expansive clay damage to a subdivision in the Pierre Shale, southwest Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, J.D.; West, M.W.; Noe, D.C.; Olsen, H.W.; McCarty, D.K.

    1996-01-01

    Shortly after construction of a subdivision in the southwest Denver metropolitan area in 1986, a portion of the subdivision built directly on steeply-dipping strata of the Pierre Shale began experiencing damaging differential movements, causing house foundations to fail and pavements to warp and crack. This formation is a Late Cretaceous marine clay-shale composed predominantly of fluvial mixed-layer illite/smectite and quartz. During deposition of the shale, periodic and explosive volcanism generated thin beds of bentonite, consisting initially of volcanic ash and subsequently altered to nearly pure smectite. Some of these bentonite beds were exposed in a trench adjacent to the subdivision and perpendicular to the strike of the steeply-dipping strata. The thickest bentonite beds correlated well with linear heave features that these beds parallel the bedrock strike throughout the subdivision were mapped via severely deformed pavements. Mineralogical data show the bentonite bed that correlates with the worst damage within the subdivision consists of about 62% smectite by weight with mixed-layer illite/smectite expandability of 92%. By comparison, a sample of the typical silty claystone, which is fluvial mixed-layer illite/smectite mixed with detrital quartz from the adjacent strata, had about 23% smectite by weight with 70% to 90% illite/smectite expandability. Geotechnical tests for swell potential show that samples of 2 bentonite beds swelled 39% to 43% compared to 2% to 8% for samples of the typical silty claystone. It is proposed that differential swell resulting from stratigraphically-controlled differences in clay mineralogy and grain-size is the primary factor controlling extreme damage for this geologic setting.

  1. Railroad cars on the siding of the Denver, South Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Railroad cars on the siding of the Denver, South Park & Pacific/Colorado & Southern Railway Co., above and just south of the town of Saint Elmo (historical), Chaffee County, Colorado - Paramount Mine, Saint Elmo (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  2. Analysis of the Denver Developmental Screening Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, James N.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to validate the Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST), the scores were compared with selected demographic, health history, and physical examination variables of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' preschool children in Colorado. (NQ)

  3. Occurrence and Origin of Methane in Relation to Major Ion Concentrations in Groundwater Wells of the Denver-Julesburg and Piceance Basins of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Sherwood, O.; Lackey, G.; Burke, T. L.; Osborn, S. G.; Ryan, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America has generated intense public concerns about potential impacts to groundwater quality. To address these concerns, we examined geochemical data from a publicly available Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database. The data consist of over 17,000 samples from 4,756 unique surface and groundwater locations collected since 1990, representing one of the most extensive databases of groundwater quality in relation to oil and gas development anywhere. Following rigorous data QA/QC, we classified groundwater samples with respect to major ion composition and compared the assigned water "types" along with other geochemical parameters to methane concentrations and carbon isotopes in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) and Piceance Basins in Colorado. 88% of samples with elevated methane (defined as > 1 mg L-1) were classified as Na-HCO3 type in the DJ basin and 78% were classified as either Na-HCO3 or Na-Cl type in the Piceance basin. Of the elevated methane samples, 96% and 69% in the DJ and Piceance basins respectively had microbial gas signatures, as determined by d13C values < - 60 ‰. Samples with elevated methane concentrations had higher pH, higher concentrations of chloride and sodium and lower concentrations of calcium in both the DJ and Piceance Basin. Elevated methane concentrations were predominately microbial in origin and correlated to indicators of increased water-rock interactions and anaerobic groundwater conditions, indicating that methane observed in these groundwater samples are largely a result of natural processes. Rare occurrences of stray thermogenic gas (d13C > 55 ‰, gas wetness > 5 % C2+ hydrocarbons) were most frequently associated with the Na-HCO3 water type in the DJ basin (67% of occurrences) and were randomly distributed across water types in the Piceance Basin. Investigation of natural and anthropogenic causes for the presence of methane is ongoing, using

  4. Major- and Trace-Element Concentrations in Soils from Two Geochemical Surveys (1972 and 2005) of the Denver, Colorado, Metropolitan Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilburn, James E.; Smith, David B.; Closs, L. Graham; Smith, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report contains major- and trace-element concentration data for soil samples collected in 1972 and 2005 from the Denver, Colorado, metropolitan area. A total of 405 sites were sampled in the 1972 study from an area approximately bounded by the suburbs of Golden, Thornton, Aurora, and Littleton to the west, north, east, and south, respectively. This data set included 34 duplicate samples collected in the immediate vicinity of the primary sample. In 2005, a total of 464 sites together with 34 duplicates were sampled from the same approximate localities sampled in 1972 as well as additional sites in east Aurora and the area surrounding the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Sample density for both surveys was on the order of 1 site per square mile. At each site, sample material was collected from a depth of 0-5 inches. Each sample collected was analyzed for near-total major- and trace-element composition by the following methods: (1) inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gallium, indium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, niobium, phosphorus, potassium, rubidium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfur, tellurium, thallium, thorium, tin, titanium, tungsten, uranium, vanadium, yttrium, and zinc; and (2) hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry for selenium. The samples collected in 2005 were also analyzed by a cold vapor-atomic absorption method for mercury. This report makes available the analytical results of these studies.

  5. Groundwater methane in relation to oil and gas development and shallow coal seams in the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Rogers, Jessica D.; Lackey, Greg; Burke, Troy L.; Osborn, Stephen G.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional oil and gas development has generated intense public concerns about potential impacts to groundwater quality. Specific pathways of contamination have been identified; however, overall rates of contamination remain ambiguous. We used an archive of geochemical data collected from 1988 to 2014 to determine the sources and occurrence of groundwater methane in the Denver-Julesburg Basin of northeastern Colorado. This 60,000-km2 region has a 60-y-long history of hydraulic fracturing, with horizontal drilling and high-volume hydraulic fracturing beginning in 2010. Of 924 sampled water wells in the basin, dissolved methane was detected in 593 wells at depths of 20–190 m. Based on carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes and gas molecular ratios, most of this methane was microbially generated, likely within shallow coal seams. A total of 42 water wells contained thermogenic stray gas originating from underlying oil and gas producing formations. Inadequate surface casing and leaks in production casing and wellhead seals in older, vertical oil and gas wells were identified as stray gas migration pathways. The rate of oil and gas wellbore failure was estimated as 0.06% of the 54,000 oil and gas wells in the basin (lower estimate) to 0.15% of the 20,700 wells in the area where stray gas contamination occurred (upper estimate) and has remained steady at about two cases per year since 2001. These results show that wellbore barrier failure, not high-volume hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells, is the main cause of thermogenic stray gas migration in this oil- and gas-producing basin. PMID:27402747

  6. A new look at methane and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from oil and natural gas operations in the Colorado Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétron, Gabrielle; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Benjamin R.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Frost, Gregory J.; Trainer, Michael; Tans, Pieter; Andrews, Arlyn; Kofler, Jonathan; Helmig, Detlev; Guenther, Douglas; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lang, Patricia; Newberger, Tim; Wolter, Sonja; Hall, Bradley; Novelli, Paul; Brewer, Alan; Conley, Stephen; Hardesty, Mike; Banta, Robert; White, Allen; Noone, David; Wolfe, Dan; Schnell, Russ

    2014-06-01

    Emissions of methane (CH4) from oil and natural gas (O&G) operations in the most densely drilled area of the Denver-Julesburg Basin in Weld County located in northeastern Colorado are estimated for 2 days in May 2012 using aircraft-based CH4 observations and planetary boundary layer height and ground-based wind profile measurements. Total top-down CH4 emission estimates are 25.8 ± 8.4 and 26.2 ± 10.7 t CH4/h for the 29 and 31 May flights, respectively. Using inventory data, we estimate the total emissions of CH4 from non-O&G gas-related sources at 7.1 ± 1.7 and 6.3 ± 1.0 t CH4/h for these 2 days. The difference in emissions is attributed to O&G sources in the study region, and their total emission is on average 19.3 ± 6.9 t/h, close to 3 times higher than an hourly emission estimate based on Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program data for 2012. We derive top-down emissions estimates for propane, n-butane, i-pentane, n-pentane, and benzene from our total top-down CH4 emission estimate and the relative hydrocarbon abundances in aircraft-based discrete air samples. Emissions for these five nonmethane hydrocarbons alone total 25.4 ± 8.2 t/h. Assuming that these emissions are solely originating from O&G-related activities in the study region, our results show that the state inventory for total volatile organic compounds emitted by O&G activities is at least a factor of 2 too low for May 2012. Our top-down emission estimate of benzene emissions from O&G operations is 173 ± 64 kg/h, or 7 times larger than in the state inventory.

  7. Vertically resolved chemical characteristics and sources of submicron aerosols measured on a Tall Tower in a suburban area near Denver, Colorado in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, F.; Bahreini, R.; Wagner, N. L.; Dubé, W. P.; Young, C. J.; Brown, S. S.; Brock, C. A.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cooper, O. R.; Middlebrook, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower study was conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Colorado during February-March 2011. A compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was installed in a moving carriage on the tower, obtaining vertical profiles of submicron nonrefractory aerosol mass concentrations (PM1nr) from 0-265 m above ground level. The average PM1nr was 4.6 ± 5.7 µg/m3, with average contributions of nitrate, organics, sulfate, ammonium, and chloride of 35%, 26%, 20%, 17%, and 1%, respectively. Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of the organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra indicated that average contributions of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA)-I, OOA-II, and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (surrogates for aged and fresh secondary OA and primary OA, respectively) to OA mass were 52%, 32%, and 16%, respectively. There was considerable variability in the vertical profiles of aerosol mass loading and composition, especially at the lowest heights. Below 40 m, the highest PM1nr concentrations were composed of mostly nitrate (30-46%) and were associated with winds from the northeast where there are large agricultural facilities. When winds were southerly, PM1nr mass distributions near the surface had small, fresh OA, indicating the influence of nearby Denver urban emissions at the site. The largest contribution to OA mass at these heights was OOA-II (~43%). Between 40 and 120 m, trajectory cluster analysis indicated that during high-altitude long-range transport events, daytime aerosol composition was dominated by sulfate, whereas during low-altitude transport events, the contributions of sulfate, nitrate, and OA were comparable. OOA-I contributed the most (53-68%) to OA mass at these tower heights.

  8. Groundwater methane in relation to oil and gas development and shallow coal seams in the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Owen A; Rogers, Jessica D; Lackey, Greg; Burke, Troy L; Osborn, Stephen G; Ryan, Joseph N

    2016-07-26

    Unconventional oil and gas development has generated intense public concerns about potential impacts to groundwater quality. Specific pathways of contamination have been identified; however, overall rates of contamination remain ambiguous. We used an archive of geochemical data collected from 1988 to 2014 to determine the sources and occurrence of groundwater methane in the Denver-Julesburg Basin of northeastern Colorado. This 60,000-km(2) region has a 60-y-long history of hydraulic fracturing, with horizontal drilling and high-volume hydraulic fracturing beginning in 2010. Of 924 sampled water wells in the basin, dissolved methane was detected in 593 wells at depths of 20-190 m. Based on carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes and gas molecular ratios, most of this methane was microbially generated, likely within shallow coal seams. A total of 42 water wells contained thermogenic stray gas originating from underlying oil and gas producing formations. Inadequate surface casing and leaks in production casing and wellhead seals in older, vertical oil and gas wells were identified as stray gas migration pathways. The rate of oil and gas wellbore failure was estimated as 0.06% of the 54,000 oil and gas wells in the basin (lower estimate) to 0.15% of the 20,700 wells in the area where stray gas contamination occurred (upper estimate) and has remained steady at about two cases per year since 2001. These results show that wellbore barrier failure, not high-volume hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells, is the main cause of thermogenic stray gas migration in this oil- and gas-producing basin.

  9. A spatial database of bedding attitudes to accompany Geologic map of the greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Donald E.; Machette, Michael N.; Brandt, Theodore R.; Moore, David W.; Murray, Kyle E.

    2003-01-01

    This digital map shows bedding attitude symbols display over the geographic extent of surficial deposits and rock stratigraphic units (formations) as compiled by Trimble and Machette 1973-1977 and published in 1979 (U.S. Geological Survey Map I-856-H) under the Front Range Urban Corridor Geology Program. Trimble and Machette compiled their geologic map from published geologic maps and unpublished geologic mapping having varied map unit schemes. A convenient feature of the compiled map is its uniform classification of geologic units that mostly matches those of companion maps to the north (USGS I-855-G) and to the south (USGS I-857-F). Published as a color paper map, the Trimble and Machette map was intended for land-use planning in the Front Range Urban Corridor. This map recently (1997-1999), was digitized under the USGS Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project (see cross-reference). In general, the mountainous areas in the west part of the map exhibit various igneous and metamorphic bedrock units of Precambrian age, major faults, and fault brecciation zones at the east margin (5-20 km wide) of the Front Range. The eastern and central parts of the map (Colorado Piedmont) depict a mantle of unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age and interspersed outcroppings of Cretaceous or Tertiary-Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock. The Quaternary mantle is comprised of eolian deposits (quartz sand and silt), alluvium (gravel, sand, and silt of variable composition), colluvium, and few landslides. At the mountain front, north-trending, dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic sandstone, shale, and limestone bedrock formations form hogbacks and intervening valleys.

  10. Slope stability of proposed ski facilities at the southeast side of Snodgrass Mountain, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex L.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the proposed expansion of ski facilities at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, Gunnison County, Colorado, is in an area underlain by landslide deposits that are on the southeast side of Snodgrass Mountain. Except for localized movement, the landslides do not appear to be moving at present or to have moved in the past several decades. Shallow sliding and debris flows have occurred in similar materials nearby and are likely to occur in the landslide deposits during the 50-100 year life of the proposed facilities. Hazards related to debris flow, shallow slumping, and expansive soils in the deposits can be reduced by appropriate engineering and remedial measures but maintenance for the proposed facility may become costly. Snow making is likely to aggravate the hazards of shallow slumping, deep-seated sliding, and debris flow. Reactivation and deep-seated movement of a 1.6-million-m3 slide at the east side of the deposits would damage or destroy a proposed gondola, ski lift N-3, and related facilities. Moving the gondola and lift off the slide and prohibiting snow making on the slide will protect the gondola and lift and reduce the chances of debris-flow damage to a proposed development near the toe of the slide. Insufficient data are available to assess the current or future stability of the landslides or to evaluate possible mitigation strategies; detailed stability analyses are needed before developing any facilities on the landslide deposits.

  11. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Eighth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop and first The National Map Users Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 10-13, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Dietterle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is sponsoring the first The National Map Users Conference in conjunction with the eighth biennial Geographic Information Science (GIS) Workshop on May 10-13, 2011, in Lakewood, Colorado. The GIS Workshop will be held at the USGS National Training Center, located on the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, Colorado, May 10-11. The National Map Users Conference will be held directly after the GIS Workshop at the Denver Marriott West, a convention hotel in the Lakewood, Colorado area, May 12-13. The National Map is designed to serve the Nation by providing geographic data and knowledge for government, industry, and public uses. The goal of The National Map Users Conference is to enhance communications and collaboration among the communities of users of and contributors to The National Map, including USGS, Department of the Interior, and other government GIS specialists and scientists, as well as the broader geospatial community. The USGS National Geospatial Program intends the conference to serve as a forum to engage users and more fully discover and meet their needs for the products and services of The National Map. The goal of the GIS Workshop is to promote advancement of GIS and related technologies and concepts as well as the sharing of GIS knowledge within the USGS GIS community. This collaborative opportunity for multi-disciplinary GIS and associated professionals will allow attendees to present and discuss a wide variety of geospatial-related topics. The Users Conference and Workshop collaboration will bring together scientists, managers, and data users who, through presentations, posters, seminars, workshops, and informal gatherings, will share accomplishments and progress on a variety of geospatial topics. During this joint event, attendees will have the opportunity to present or demonstrate their work; to develop their knowledge by attending hands-on workshops, seminars, and presentations given by professionals from USGS and

  12. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  13. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Sixth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop, Denver, Colorado, April 24-28, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakebill, John W.; Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Sixth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop April 24 - 28, 2006, at the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado, provides a unique opportunity for multi-disciplinary Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and associated scientific professionals to share, learn, present, and discuss a wide variety of geospatial-related topics. Information is exchanged through a series of plenary sessions, hands-on technical workshops, user and commercial vendor demonstrations, lecture and poster sessions, and specialty meetings. Workshop attendance is limited to Department of Interior (DOI) and USGS employees and contractors; however, plenary, hands-on, and lecture sessions have presenters from other Federal agencies, numerous commercial vendors, universities, and several consortia. Over 175 participants are expected to attend the Workshop. Several prominent speakers are featured at this Workshop. Monday evening Star Guest Speaker and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Astronaut Captain Dominic Gorie will talk about his experiences as a veteran of three space flights and over 32 days in space, including the NASA Space Shuttle Radar Topography Mission that mapped more than 47 million miles of the Earth's land surface. Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in December 1994, Captain Gorie is currently Chief of the Astronaut Shuttle Branch. Monday evening also features a town hall meeting with Geographic Information Office (GIO) leaders Karen Siderelis, Kevin Gallagher, Bob Pierce, Steve Guptill, Mark DeMulder, John Mahoney, and Mark Negri, who will discuss changes and activities within the GIO in an open discussion format. Tuesday plenary sessions feature keynote speaker Dr. P. Patrick Leahy, Acting USGS Director. Dr. Leahy holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in geology (1968) and geophysics (1970) from Boston College. In 1979, he received his doctorate in geology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he

  14. A field test of tracer transport and organic contaminant elution in a stratified aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorbjarnarson, Kathryn W.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    1997-01-01

    A tracer-elution experiment was conducted in a 9-m-thick alluvial sand aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado, within an extensive 1,1,1-trichloroethene and trichloroethene plume. The forced-gradient flow field was controlled by an injection well and an extraction well separated by 8.4 m and aligned in the direction of the natural-gradient flow. Upon extraction, the contaminant-laden water was treated by air stripping and reinjected into the injection well. Iodide tracer was added to the injection flow during the initial 27.5 h of the experiment. Tracer transport and organic contaminant elution were monitored by four 0.15-m-screened drive points and a fully penetrating monitoring well. Relative permeabilities, dispersivities and retardation factors were estimated from tracer breakthrough and contaminant elution curves by the moment method and by curve-fitting with an advection-dispersion model. Tracer transport through the four strata sampled by the drive points indicated a permeability variation of three orders of magnitude. Contaminant elution was not observed in the lowest-permeability stratum monitored during the experiment. In all monitored strata, contaminant elution was controlled primarily by permeability effects on water flow and exhibited minimal retardation or desorption effects. The fully penetrating monitoring well exhibited a tracer response primarily from the more permeable strata with the addition of tracer from the less permeable strata producing an increased breakthrough spreading. This increased spreading or dispersion was reflected in a higher longitudinal dispersivity estimate (1.2 m assuming a homogeneous aquifer) than dispersivity estimates from the drive-point sampler tracer curves (ranging from 5 to 21 cm). Contaminant elution curves from the fully penetrating monitoring well exhibited an initial response primarily from the more permeable strata (rapid elution of contaminants) and provided no insight into the elution

  15. Colorado

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... the Medicine Bow, Front, Gore and the Sawatch. The Colorado River originates in the Rocky Mountains National Park near Lake Granby - a dark ... between the Turquoise and Twin Lakes. The Colorado River traverses the length of the image, running roughly east and south to the ...

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Middle Rio Grande Basin Study; proceedings of the first annual workshop, Denver, Colorado, November 12-14, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    many USGS scientists working in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, yearly technical meetings are planned for the anticipated 5-year study. These meetings provide an opportunity to present research results and plan new field efforts. This report documents the results of research presented at the first technical workshop held in Denver, Colorado, in November 1996. The report is organized into this introduction, five chapters that focus on USGS investigations in progress in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and three appendixes with supplemental information. The first chapter provides an overview of the USGS program in the basin. The second chapter describes geographic data and analysis efforts in the basin. The third chapter details work being done on the hydrogeologic framework of the basin. The fourth chapter describes studies on ground-water availability in the basin and is divided into three areas of research: ground-water/surface-water interaction, ground-water flow and aquifer properties, and recharge. The fifth chapter is devoted to an overview of New Mexico District Cooperative Program studies in the basin. Finally, the appendixes list publications and presentations made during the first year of the study and 1996 workshop attendees. The report concludes with a list of selected references relevant to the study. The information in this report presents preliminary results of an evolving study. As the study progresses and individual projects publish their results in more detail, the USGS hopes to expand the scientific basis needed for management decisions regarding the Middle Rio Grande Basin.

  17. Quantity and quality of ground-water discharge to the South Platte River, Denver to Fort Lupton, Colorado, August 1992 through July 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Lull, K.J.; Dennehy, K.F.; Collins, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Water-quality studies conducted by the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District have indicated that during low flow in segments of the South Platte River between Denver and Fort Lupton, concentrations of dissolved oxygen are less than minimum concen- trations set by the State of Colorado. Low dissolved-oxygen concentrations are observed in two reaches of the river-they are about 3.3 to 6.4 miles and 17 to 25 miles downstream from the Metro Waste- water Reclamation District effluent outfalls. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen recover between these two reaches. Studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey have indicated that ground-water discharge to the river may contribute to these low dissolved-oxygen concentrations. As a result, an assessment was made of the quantity and quality of ground-water discharge to the South Platte River from Denver to Fort Lupton. Measurements of surface- water and ground-water discharge and collections of surface water and ground water for water-quality analyses were made from August 1992 through January 1993 and in May and July 1993. The quantity of ground-water discharge to the South Platte River was determined indirectly by mass balance of surface-water inflows and outflows and directly by instantaneous measurements of ground-water discharge across the sediment/water interface in the river channel. The quality of surface water and ground water was determined by sampling and analysis of water from the river and monitoring wells screened in the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the river and by sampling and analysis of water from piezometers screened in sediments underlying the river channel. The ground-water flow system was subdivided into a large-area and a small-area flow system. The precise boundaries of the two flow systems are not known. However, the large-area flow system is considered to incorporate all alluvial sediments in hydrologic connection with the South Platte River. The small- area flow system is considered to incorporate

  18. Education for a Productive Society. Remarks to the National Commission on Excellence in Education. (Public Hearing, Denver, Colorado, September 16, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Donald

    The link between education and work and the situation at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs are discussed by the university chancellor in testimony to the National Commission on Excellence in Education. Characteristics of this urban, commuter university and its students are described, along with historical changes in the role of the…

  19. Testing Astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar Timescales for the K/Pg Boundary Interval Using High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphy and U-Pb Geochronology in the Denver Basin of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyde, W.; Bowring, S. A.; Johnson, K. R.; Ramezani, J.; Jones, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and precise calibration of the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale (GPTS) in absolute time is critical for resolving rates of geological and biological processes which in turn help constrain the underlying causes of those processes. Numerical calibration of the GPTS was traditionally carried out by interpolation between a limited number of 40Ar/39Ar dated volcanic ash deposits from superpositional sequences with well-defined magnetostratigraphies. More recently, the Neogene part of the GPTS has been calibrated using high-resolution astrochronological methods, however the application of these approaches to pre-Neogene parts of the timescale is controversial given the uncertainties in relevant orbital parameters this far back in time and differing interpretations of local cyclostratigraphic records. The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary interval is a good example, where various astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar calibrations have been proposed with varying degrees of agreement. The Denver Basin (Colorado, USA) contains one of the most complete stratigraphic sequences across the K/Pg boundary in the world, preserving evidence of bolide impact as well as biotic extinction and recovery in a thick stratigraphic package that is accessible by both core and outcrop. We present a series of high-precision U-Pb age determinations from interbedded volcanic ash deposits within a tightly constrained magnetobiostratigraphic framework across the K/Pg boundary in the Denver Basin. This new timeline provides a precise absolute age for the K/Pg boundary, constrains the ages of magnetic polarity Chrons C28 to C30, and provides a direct and independent test of early Paleogene astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar based timescales. Temporal calibration of fossil pollen evidence of the "fern spike" in the Denver Basin shows that plant extinctions peaked within ~50-500 years of the bolide impact and primary productivity recovered ~500-5000 years after the impact.

  20. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Denver Basin, Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska: Chapter G in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake II, Ronald M.; Brennan, Sean T.; Covault, Jacob A.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, P.A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2014-01-01

    This is a report about the geologic characteristics of five storage assessment units (SAUs) within the Denver Basin of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska. These SAUs are Cretaceous in age and include (1) the Plainview and Lytle Formations, (2) the Muddy Sandstone, (3) the Greenhorn Limestone, (4) the Niobrara Formation and Codell Sandstone, and (5) the Terry and Hygiene Sandstone Members. The described characteristics, as specified in the methodology, affect the potential carbon dioxide storage resource in the SAUs. The specific geologic and petrophysical properties of interest include depth to the top of the storage formation, average thickness, net-porous thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and the area of structural reservoir traps. Descriptions of the SAU boundaries and the overlying sealing units are also included. Assessment results are not contained in this report; however, the geologic information included here will be used to calculate a statistical Monte Carlo-based distribution of potential storage volume in the SAUs.

  1. The Denver Serum Bank.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Theodore C; Graves, Patricia S

    2015-10-01

    At the University of Colorado, Dr. Gordon Meiklejohn pursed the study of influenza and other respiratory pathogens for an unbroken period of 40 years, under the auspices of the Commission on Influenza of the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board through a series of contracts with the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command. Sera, throat washings, and other specimens for diagnosis were sent to Dr. Meiklejohn's laboratory. After serologic and virologic studies were carried out, aliquots of sera and virus samples were logged in and frozen. Sera were stored at -20°C and virus specimens at -70°C. These specimens became known as the Denver Serum Bank. The Bank supported military research programs and other researchers nationally and internationally until the 1990s when lacking of funding and considerations of administration, space, and cost resulted in the destruction of all specimens. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Denver Energy Challenge (DEC) Small Grant, Big Impact

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page is about Denver, Colorado's EPA Climate Showcase Community grant. EPA’s Climate Showcase Communities Program helps local governments & tribal nations pilot innovative, cost-effective & replicable community-based greenhouse gas reduction projects.

  3. In Pursuit of Excellence: The Community College of Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E.; Ely, Eileen E.; Roueche, Suanne D.

    This book reports on how the Community College of Denver (CCD) (Colorado) improved the success of its students under difficult conditions. CCD is an urban community college with inadequate resources that serves diverse and at-risk students. Demographic factors are discussed, such as the fact that Denver's population decreased 5% between 1980 and…

  4. In Pursuit of Excellence: The Community College of Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E.; Ely, Eileen E.; Roueche, Suanne D.

    This book reports on how the Community College of Denver (CCD) (Colorado) improved the success of its students under difficult conditions. CCD is an urban community college with inadequate resources that serves diverse and at-risk students. Demographic factors are discussed, such as the fact that Denver's population decreased 5% between 1980 and…

  5. Demonstration optimization analyses of pumping from selected Arapahoe aquifer municipal wells in the west-central Denver Basin, Colorado, 2010–2109

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.; Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2012-01-01

    Declining water levels caused by withdrawals of water from wells in the west-central part of the Denver Basin bedrock-aquifer system have raised concerns with respect to the ability of the aquifer system to sustain production. The Arapahoe aquifer in particular is heavily used in this area. Two optimization analyses were conducted to demonstrate approaches that could be used to evaluate possible future pumping scenarios intended to prolong the productivity of the aquifer and to delay excessive loss of saturated thickness. These analyses were designed as demonstrations only, and were not intended as a comprehensive optimization study. Optimization analyses were based on a groundwater-flow model of the Denver Basin developed as part of a recently published U.S. Geological Survey groundwater-availability study. For each analysis an optimization problem was set up to maximize total withdrawal rate, subject to withdrawal-rate and hydraulic-head constraints, for 119 selected municipal water-supply wells located in 96 model cells. The optimization analyses were based on 50- and 100-year simulations of groundwater withdrawals. The optimized total withdrawal rate for all selected wells for a 50-year simulation time was about 58.8 cubic feet per second. For an analysis in which the simulation time and head-constraint time were extended to 100 years, the optimized total withdrawal rate for all selected wells was about 53.0 cubic feet per second, demonstrating that a reduction in withdrawal rate of about 10 percent may extend the time before the hydraulic-head constraints are violated by 50 years, provided that pumping rates are optimally distributed. Analysis of simulation results showed that initially, the pumping produces water primarily by release of water from storage in the Arapahoe aquifer. However, because confining layers between the Denver and Arapahoe aquifers are thin, in less than 5 years, most of the water removed by managed-flows pumping likely would be supplied

  6. Cleaning up the Streets of Denver

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, R.L.; Wood, T.R.; Hackett, J.R.; Sogue, A.

    2006-07-01

    Between 1913 and 1924, several Denver area facilities extracted radium from carnotite ore mined from the Paradox basin region of Colorado. Tailings or abandoned ores from these facilities were apparently incorporated into asphalt used to pave approximately 7.2 kilometers (4.5 miles) of streets in Denver. A majority of the streets are located in residential areas. The radionuclides are bound within the asphalt matrix and pose minimal risk unless they are disturbed. The City and County of Denver (CCoD) is responsible for controlling repairs and maintenance on these impacted streets. Since 2002, the CCoD has embarked on a significant capital improvement project to remove the impacted asphalt for secure disposal followed by street reconstruction. To date, Parsons has removed approximately 55 percent of the impacted asphalt. This paper discusses the history of the Denver Radium Streets and summarizes on-going project efforts. (authors)

  7. OCCUPATIONS IN COLORADO. PART I, OUTLOOK BY INDUSTRIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1966

    CURRENT AND PROJECTED EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS ARE GIVEN FOR THE STATE AND FOR THE DENVER STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA WHICH INCLUDES ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, BOULDER, DENVER, AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT, DENVER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, U.S. CENSUS, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, MOUNTAIN STATES…

  8. OCCUPATIONS IN COLORADO. PART I, OUTLOOK BY INDUSTRIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1966

    CURRENT AND PROJECTED EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS ARE GIVEN FOR THE STATE AND FOR THE DENVER STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA WHICH INCLUDES ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, BOULDER, DENVER, AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT, DENVER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, U.S. CENSUS, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, MOUNTAIN STATES…

  9. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on Regional Air Quality and Aerosol Formation in the Colorado Front Range during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, K. K. T.; Dingle, J. H.; Bahreini, R.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Montzka, D. D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Colorado Front Range continues to face challenges related to air quality, specifically ozone, and has been classified as a marginal non-attainment area by the U.S EPA. The highly complex topography and meteorology in the Colorado Front Range provide flow patterns that are driven by mountain-valley circulation, resulting in formation of the Denver Cyclone, strongly influencing concentrations of ozone and aerosol particles. However, the impact of the Denver Cyclone on aerosol formation has not been previously explored. In this study, airborne measurements were made during July 16 - August 18, 2014 aboard the NSF C-130 aircraft during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) project. We carried out fast time resolved measurements of ambient aerosol chemical constituents (organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) of non-refractory sub-micrometer particles using an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (mAMS). Pronounced increased mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in two distinct regions in the Front Range were observed during the cyclone episodes, in contrast to the non-cyclonic days. Organics dominated the mass concentrations on all days evaluated. The average mass concentration of organics during a cyclone event was 5.79 ± 1.48 μg·m-3 and were lower during the two non-cyclonic measurement days, 3.09 ± 1.18 μg·m-3. Average sulfate mass concentrations were 1.25 ± 0.41 μg·m-3 vs. 0.58 ± 0.20 μg·m-3 followed by nitrate with an average of 1.66 ± 0.92 μg·m-3 vs. 0.32 ± 0.41 μg·m-3 on cyclone vs. non-cyclonic days, respectively. Correlations between trace gas markers (carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, ammonia, and ethane), meteorological variables (relative humidity, temperature), and the extent of aerosol aging are evaluated and used to assess the Front Range aerosol formation and air quality impacts in the region during these events.

  10. Comparison of secular trends in pneumococcal serotypes causing invasive disease in Denver, Colorado (1971-2004) and serotype coverage by marketed pneumococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Akduman, D; Ehret, J M; Judson, F N

    2006-11-01

    Invasive pneumococcal isolates from three hospitals in Denver, CO, USA were serotyped between 1971 and 2004. Serotype 14 was most common (13.2%), and other prevalent serotypes (3, 4, 6, 9 and 19) together accounted for 44.1% of the isolates. All prevalent serotypes and 91.3% of the total isolates were covered by pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, while 79.1% of prevalent serotypes and 56.7% of total isolates were covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Serotypes 6, 9 and 14 were more common in the final decade than in the first decade studied (37.3% vs. 20.2%), whereas serotypes 3 and 23 were more common in the first decade (18.5% vs. 11.0%).

  11. Barriers to Calling 911 and Learning and Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Residents of Primarily Latino, High-Risk Neighborhoods in Denver, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S.; Ben-Youssef, Leila; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Bull, Sheana; Eigel, Brian; Magid, David J.; Padilla, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Study objective Individuals in neighborhoods composed of minority and lower socioeconomic status populations are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest event, less likely to have bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed, and less likely to survive. Latino cardiac arrest victims are 30% less likely than whites to have bystander CPR performed. The goal of this study is to identify barriers and facilitators to calling 911, and learning and performing CPR in 5 low-income, Latino neighborhoods in Denver, CO. Methods Six focus groups and 9 key informant interviews were conducted in Denver during the summer of 2012. Purposeful and snowball sampling, conducted by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Two reviewers analyzed the data to identify recurrent and unifying themes. A qualitative content analysis was used with a 5-stage iterative process to analyze each transcript. Results Six key barriers to calling 911 were identified: fear of becoming involved because of distrust of law enforcement, financial, immigration status, lack of recognition of cardiac arrest event, language, and violence. Seven cultural barriers were identified that may preclude performance of bystander CPR: age, sex, immigration status, language, racism, strangers, and fear of touching someone. Participants suggested that increasing availability of tailored education in Spanish, increasing the number of bilingual 911 dispatchers, and policy-level changes, including CPR as a requirement for graduation and strengthening Good Samaritan laws, may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. Conclusion Distrust of law enforcement, language concerns, lack of recognition of cardiac arrest, and financial issues must be addressed when community-based CPR educational programs for Latinos are implemented. PMID:25481112

  12. Barriers to calling 911 and learning and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for residents of primarily Latino, high-risk neighborhoods in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S; Ben-Youssef, Leila; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Bull, Sheana; Eigel, Brian; Magid, David J; Padilla, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Individuals in neighborhoods composed of minority and lower socioeconomic status populations are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest event, less likely to have bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed, and less likely to survive. Latino cardiac arrest victims are 30% less likely than whites to have bystander CPR performed. The goal of this study is to identify barriers and facilitators to calling 911, and learning and performing CPR in 5 low-income, Latino neighborhoods in Denver, CO. Six focus groups and 9 key informant interviews were conducted in Denver during the summer of 2012. Purposeful and snowball sampling, conducted by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Two reviewers analyzed the data to identify recurrent and unifying themes. A qualitative content analysis was used with a 5-stage iterative process to analyze each transcript. Six key barriers to calling 911 were identified: fear of becoming involved because of distrust of law enforcement, financial, immigration status, lack of recognition of cardiac arrest event, language, and violence. Seven cultural barriers were identified that may preclude performance of bystander CPR: age, sex, immigration status, language, racism, strangers, and fear of touching someone. Participants suggested that increasing availability of tailored education in Spanish, increasing the number of bilingual 911 dispatchers, and policy-level changes, including CPR as a requirement for graduation and strengthening Good Samaritan laws, may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. Distrust of law enforcement, language concerns, lack of recognition of cardiac arrest, and financial issues must be addressed when community-based CPR educational programs for Latinos are implemented. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 223. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 July 1971 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    223. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 July 1971 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). MUSTARD AGENT INCINERATOR. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. 207. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 22 March 1954 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    207. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 22 March 1954 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). MUSTARD GAS ASSEMBLY LINE, WHERE ARSENAL EMPLOYEES FILL 105mm ARTILLERY SHELL CASINGS WITH DEADLY GAS. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. 202. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 2 August 1951 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    202. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 2 August 1951 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). NAPALM BOMB ASSEMBLY LINE. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 222. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 July 1971 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    222. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 July 1971 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). EMPTY MUSTARD TON CONTAINER PRIOR TO PUNCHING AND INSERTION INTO FURNACE. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. 205. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    205. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). THE 'GOOP' BOMB PRODUCTION LINE. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  18. 208. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 2 August 1957 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    208. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 2 August 1957 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). NAPALM BOMB PRODUCTION LINE. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. 203. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). PLACING BOMBS IN CLUSTERS OF 38. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. 221. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 March 1970 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    221. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 March 1970 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). RABBIT USED TO TEST FOR NERVE GAS AT RMA. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  1. 76 FR 34711 - Notice of Hearing; Reconsideration of Disapproval of Colorado State Plan Amendments (SPA) 10-034

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... held on August 4, 2011, at the CMS Denver Regional Office, Colorado State Bank Building, 1600 Broadway..., 1600 Broadway, Suite 700, Denver, Colorado 80202- 4367, in order to reconsider the decision to...

  2. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: Petroleum Systems and Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas in the Denver Basin Province, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming - USGS Province 39

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Denver Basin Province (USGS Province 39), Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. Petroleum is produced in the province from sandstone, shale, and limestone reservoirs that range from Pennsylvanian to Upper Cretaceous in age. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define seven total petroleum systems and twelve assessment units. Nine of these assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources. Gas was not assessed for two coal bed methane assessment units due to lack of information and limited potential; oil resources were not assessed for the Fractured Pierre Shale Assessment Unit due to its mature development status.

  3. The Relative Roles of RONO2 and HNO3 as Sinks of NOX in the Denver Metropolitan Region and Colorado's Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T.; Ebben, C. J.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of HNO3, total RONO2, NOX, and other relevant species, acquired during the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns in the Northern Front Range of Colorado during July-August 2014, are used to assess our understanding of the relative roles of RONO2 and HNO3 formation as sinks of NOX. Although HNO3 production was dominant in the region, RONO2 production was often of order 1/3 of the NOX sink. As NOX emissions decrease, our results indicate RONO2­ chemistry will be increasingly important to descriptions of the chemistry in the region.

  4. Calibration and verification of a rainfall-runoff model and a runoff-quality model for several urban basins in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindner-Lunsford, J. B.; Ellis, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey 's Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model--Version II was calibrated and verified for five urban basins in the Denver metropolitan area. Land-use types in the basins were light commerical, multifamily housing, single-family housing, and a shopping center. The overall accuracy of model predictions of peak flows and runoff volumes was about 15 percent for storms with rainfall intensities of less than 1 inch per hour and runoff volume of greater than 0.01 inch. Predictions generally were unsatisfactory for storm having a rainfall intensity of more than 1 inch per hour, or runoff of 0.01 inch or less. The Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model-Quality, a multievent runoff-quality model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, was calibrated and verified on four basins. The model was found to be most useful in the prediction of seasonal loads of constituents in the runoff resulting from rainfall. The model was not very accurate in the prediction of runoff loads of individual constituents. (USGS)

  5. Confirmation and Characterization of a Previously Unmapped Northeast Extension of the Cheraw Fault, Southeast Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellman, M.; Ostenaa, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent geologic field mapping, shallow geophysical surveys, and boreholes, combined with interpretation of reprocessed industry 2D seismic reflection profiles, provide new constraints for the structural characterization of the Cheraw Fault in southeastern Colorado. A previously unmapped topographic scarp extending northeast from of the mapped fault trace exhibits northeast-oriented fractures in Cretaceous Niobrara shale and an apparent ~3m down-to-the-northwest offset across a bedrock/alluvium contact observed in exposures of the scarp near of Haswell, CO. Shallow seismic surveys and a transect of 4 shallow borings across the scarp confirm the vertical displacement estimates. Two industry 2D seismic refraction profiles that cross this scarp were licensed, reprocessed, and depth-migrated. Preliminary analyses of the seismic profiles show ~ 100m or less of down-to-the-northwest displacement across a primary fault that is coincident with the topographic scarp and extends through Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata into Precambrian basement. Fault dip constraints and are pending further seismic data interpretation and analysis. These data show that 1) the Cheraw fault extends an additional 15 km from its currently mapped northern termination, for a minimum total fault length of ~60 km, 2) offset of an early (?) Quaternary pediment along the northeast extension near the town of Haswell of ~3 m, is similar in magnitude to the offset in a late Pleistocene channel reported by Crone et al. (1997) along the main trace of the fault, and 3) seismic reflection data show that the fault extends into crystalline basement rock, supporting a tectonic feature rather than dissolution collapse.

  6. Runoff characteristics and washoff loads from rainfall-simulation experiments on a street surface and a native pasture in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mustard, Martha H.; Ellis, Sherman R.; Gibbs, Johnnie W.

    1987-01-01

    Rainfall simulation studies were conducted in conjunction with the Denver Regional Urban Runoff Program to: (1) Compare runoff quantity and quality from two different intensities of rainfall on impervious plots having identical antecedent conditions, (2) document a first flush of constituent loads in runoff from l,000-square-foot street-surface plots, (3) compare runoff characteristics from a street surface subjected to simulated rainfall with those from a 69-acre urban basin of mixed land use subjected to natural rainfall, (4) perform statistical analysis of constituent loads in the runoff with several independent variables, and (5) compare the quantity and quality of runoff from 400-square-foot plots of native grasses used for pasture and subjected to simulated rainfall with that from a 405-acre basin covered with native grasses used for pasture and subjected to natural rainfall. The rainfall simulations conducted on the street surface showed that higher intensity simulated rainfall produced a higher percentage of runoff than lower intensity rainfall. A first flush of constituent loads occurred for most constituents in the runoff from most rainfall simulations on the street surface; however, a first flush did not occur in the runoff from simulated rainfall on the pasture. The event mean concentrations of constituents in the runoff from simulated storms on the street surface were generally much smaller than the event mean concentrations of constituents in the runoff from an adjacent urban basin. Analysis of the data from the rainfall simulations on a street surface indicates that intensity of rainfall and total rainfall are important variables determining constituent loads. The design of the experiment was such that intensity of rainfall and total rainfall were highly correlated, thus precluding the development of useful regression equations to predict washoff loads. The quality of runoff from the simulated rainfall on the pasture was influenced by the disturbed

  7. Keyes et al. v. School District No. 1, Denver, Colorado, et al. Supreme Court of the United States: Syllabus; Slip Opinion. Argued October 12, 1972--Decided June 21, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supreme Court of the U. S., Washington, DC.

    Petitioners sought desegregation of the Park Hill area schools in Denver, and, upon securing an order of the District Court directing that relief, expanded their suit to secure desegregation of the remaining schools of the Denver school district, particularly those in the core city area. The District Court denied the further relief, holding that…

  8. Historic Denver for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    Although the directory to Denver's historic sites has been compiled particularly for the use of teachers and their classes, it will be useful to all individuals and groups of any age who are interested in exploring the history of the Denver area. Seventy historic sites are listed alphabetically. Information for each provides address, phone, price…

  9. Keyes v Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Jose A.

    In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court remanded Keyes v Denver to the district court for further proceedings. In past hearings, the court had concluded that minority populations in Denver were receiving an inferior instructional program in violation of constitutional and legal rights. After remand from the Supreme Court, the court requested assistance in…

  10. Historic Denver for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    Although the directory to Denver's historic sites has been compiled particularly for the use of teachers and their classes, it will be useful to all individuals and groups of any age who are interested in exploring the history of the Denver area. Seventy historic sites are listed alphabetically. Information for each provides address, phone, price…

  11. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial area...

  12. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial area...

  13. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial area...

  14. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial area...

  15. 206. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 March 1954 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    206. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 20 March 1954 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). WORKERS USE AIRTIGHT SUITS, GLOVES AND MASKS TO WORK WITH DEADLY GB NERVE GAS. WORKERS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO STAY IN THE BLENDING CHAMBER FOR MORE THAN 20 MINUTES AT A TIME, EVEN WITH THESE PRECAUTIONS. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 204. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    204. Photocopy of photograph, Denver Post photographer, 19 September 1952 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). THE LAST STEP IN BOMB PRODUCTION-PACKING BOMB CLUSTERS. THE FINISHED PRODUCT WEIGHS 500 POUNDS AND WHEN DETONATED, THROWS BURNING JELLIED GASOLINE OVER A WIDE AREA. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. Interim report on the scientific investigations in the Animas River watershed, Colorado to facilitate remediation decisions by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service, March 29, 2000 meeting, Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The joint U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of Agriculture Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative (AMLI) was developed as a collaborative effort between the Federal land management agencies (FLMA, that is the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1996. The stated goal of the AML Initiative was to develop a strategy for gathering and communicating the scientific information needed to develop effective and cost-efficient remediation of abandoned mines within the framework of a watershed. Four primary objectives of the AMLI are to: 1. Provide the scientific information needed (in the short-term) by the FLMAs to make decisions related to the design and implementation of cleanup actions, 2. Develop a multi-disciplined, multi-division approach that integrates geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and ecological information into a knowledge base for sound decision making, 3. Transfer technologies developed within the scientific programs of the USGS to the field and demonstrate their suitability to solve real, practical problems, and 4. Establish working relationships among involved members of land management and regulatory agencies within the framework of a watershed approach to the cleanup of abandoned mines. Long-term process-based research, including development of analytical tools, is recognized as being critical to the long-term success in remediating watersheds impacted by historical mining activities (AML 5-year plan, http://amli.usgs.gov/amli). In a meeting of Federal agencies (U.S. Bureau of Land Management [BLM], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [BOR], U.S. National Park Service [NPS], U.S. Forest Service [USFS], the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [F&WS]), and State agencies (Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment, Colorado Division of Mines and Geology), several watersheds were examined within the state whose water quality was

  18. 78 FR 757 - Notice of the Joint Colorado Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of the Joint Colorado Resource Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: Bureau... Range Colorado RACs have scheduled a joint meeting for February 13, 14 and 15, 2013. On February 13, the...: The Joint Colorado RAC meeting will be held at the Denver Marriott West Hotel, 1717 Denver...

  19. Survey of Needs: Single Homeless Men. Denver Metro Area, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Adult Learning Source Homeless Program of the Colorado Department of Education conducted an educational needs assessment of single homeless men in the Denver metropolitan area. A questionnaire was developed with the input of social services workers and administered to 74 homeless men in the summer of 1993. Forty-one percent were White, 24…

  20. Review of Higher Education Issues in the Denver Metropolitan Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, Denver.

    This report presents an analysis of characteristics of public higher education in the Denver (Colorado) metropolitan area. Items examined include current educational offerings and participation, current and projected regional demographics, and the physical capacity available for higher education. Emphasis is on trends at the Auraria campus which…

  1. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado State Governor Bill Ritter delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. 75 FR 58426 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ..., should contact Chris Melcher, General Counsel, The Colorado College c/o Jan Bernstein, President, Bernstein & Associates - NAGPRA Consultants, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, CO 80218, telephone (303) 894- 0648...

  3. Congestive Heart Failure home monitoring pilot study in urban Denver.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Saba; Li, Xin; Semenov, Nikolay; Apodaca-Madrid, Jesús; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Newman, Kimberly E; Long, Carlin S; Neuman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    With a growing number of low-income patients developing Congestive Heart Failure in urban Denver, accessible and affordable solutions are needed to provide home management options. A multidisciplinary team evaluated currently available options for telemonitoring and developed a solution for an initial pilot study. This system is currently used in the Denver Metro area (Colorado) for 44 CHF patients. Preliminary results show this approach is effective and has reduced the patients' average length of stay at the hospital compared to historical data and control patients who do not use a remote monitoring system.

  4. The University of Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branscombe, Art

    1981-01-01

    In 1978 when Ross Pritchard became president of the University of Denver, he halted the budgeting process and turned a deficit into a surplus. Now that the "crisis management" phase of the school turnaround is over, future plans for the university call for improving academic quality, finances, and national stature. (MLW)

  5. 75 FR 9893 - Adequacy Determination for the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range 8-Hour Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Plan's Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes; State of Colorado AGENCY... Attainment Plan (hereafter ``Denver/NFR Ozone Attainment Plan'') are adequate for transportation conformity... budgets for future transportation conformity determinations once this finding becomes effective....

  6. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) CEO Elaine Thorndike, seated left, and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, seated right, sign an agreement at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, that created a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. Looking on from left, Executive Director, Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade Don Marostica, Colorado State Representative Su Ryden, Colorado State Senate President Brandon Schaffer, Representative from U.S. Senator Udall's office Jimmy Haugue, NIST/MEP Director Roger Kilmer and Colorado State Governor Bill Ritter. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to signing an agreement that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Steam on the frontier: District heating in Denver, 1880--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.E.; Pierce, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    In late 1879 a group of Denver businessmen led by pioneer John W. Smith incorporated the Denver City Steam Heating Company to supply heat and power to their frontier own. The following summer they installed a Holly district steam system, including a boiler plant and several thousand feet of underground steam pipe laid under unpaved streets. On November 5, 1880, the company began supplying steam to downtown Denver. Henry M. Porter, Smith`s son-in-law, became president of the company in 1888 and replaced the distribution system with larger pipes in anticipation of asphalt paving. Although rarely meeting the financial expectations of its owners, the system grew over the years and in 1909 was acquired by a predecessor to the Public Service Company of Colorado. The Denver steam system is the oldest commercial district heating company in the world and continues to supply steam for heating and cooling to a large portion of downtown Denver from its original plant location.

  9. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (10/29/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  10. Map showing availability of hydrologic data published by the U.S. Environmental Data Service and by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperative agencies, greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    What is the rainfall of this region? What areas are prone to periodic flooding? What is the water supply? What is the chemical quality of the ground water and water in the streams? How deep is the water table? Which streams are gaged, and where? These and similar questions are being asked regularly by land and resource developers, urban planners, industrial consultants, and governmental resource managers. This map provides the first step toward answering these questions. It shows by symbols and color the hydrologic data published as of January 1974 for the Greater Denver area by the U.S. Environmental Data Service and by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies, and the points or areas where these data have been collected. The sources of the data are given in both the following discussion and the references.

  11. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) CEO Elaine Thorndike delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Colorado State Capitol Geothermal project

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Lance

    2016-04-29

    Colorado State Capitol Geothermal Project - Final report is redacted due to space constraints. This project was an innovative large-scale ground-source heat pump (GSHP) project at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver, Colorado. The project employed two large wells on the property. One for pulling water from the aquifer, and another for returning the water to the aquifer, after performing the heat exchange. The two wells can work in either direction. Heat extracted/added to the water via a heat exchanger is used to perform space conditioning in the building.

  13. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    NIST MEP Director Roger Kilmer delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement between the Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) and NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. 75 FR 5627 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human... this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Denver Museum of Nature...

  15. 75 FR 23807 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human... this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Denver Museum of Nature...

  16. Preventing Childhood Bullying: Findings and Lessons from the Denver Public Schools Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jeffrey M.; Dieterich, William A.; Brisson, Daniel; Bender, Kimberly A.; Powell, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Twelve-month follow-up outcomes from a group-randomized trial (GRT) of a classroom curriculum aimed at preventing bullying and victimization among elementary students in the Denver, Colorado, public school system are presented. Twenty-eight elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive selected modules of "Youth Matters" (YM), a…

  17. Preventing Childhood Bullying: Findings and Lessons from the Denver Public Schools Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jeffrey M.; Dieterich, William A.; Brisson, Daniel; Bender, Kimberly A.; Powell, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Twelve-month follow-up outcomes from a group-randomized trial (GRT) of a classroom curriculum aimed at preventing bullying and victimization among elementary students in the Denver, Colorado, public school system are presented. Twenty-eight elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive selected modules of "Youth Matters" (YM), a…

  18. Denver School of Science and Technology: A High School that Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2006

    2006-01-01

    When one sees the new Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST), the first thing one will likely to notice is the building's impressive design. The school looks more like a Silicon Valley biotech firm than a typical new Colorado high school. Indeed, the innovative structure, modeled on a similar facility in San Diego, has already garnered…

  19. A Downtown Denver Law Firm Leverages Tenant Improvement Funds to Cut Operating Expenses

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    Bryan Cave HRO (formerly Holme Roberts & Owen LLP, headquartered in Denver, Colorado), an international law firm, partnered with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus pre-retrofit energy use as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  20. Planning Quality Education: A Proposal for Integrating the Denver Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Public Schools, CO.

    This document contains a comprehensive plan for achieving quality integrated education in the Denver, Colorado, public schools. A system of Elementary and Secondary Model-School Complexes is proposed as a vehicle for maximizing social and racial integration while providing innovative instructional programs for all students in the school system. A…

  1. Denver TMA assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Sanford, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the assessment of the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) conducted at the Denver Center and TRACON, January 11-February 5, 1993. The assessment addressed the effectiveness of TMA for supporting various traffic management activities. At the Center, traffic management coordinators (TMC's) shadowed traffic operations, using TMA to make metering time and internal release decisions. At the TRACON, TMC's accessed TMA in an advisory mode for different planning activities such as staffing, distributing the traffic load, and changing the airport acceptance rate. These different opportunities for assessing TMA provide insight into TMA as a potential communication aid and planning tool. Findings from this assessment indicate that TMA can be used to support traffic management planning and decisions. TMC's at the center were able to use information provided by TMA to determine metering times as well as internal release times. At the TRACON, TMA supported decisions on airport configuration, airport acceptance rate, load distribution, proactive coordination with the center, and staffing. While findings of TMA use are generally positive, it must be kept in mind that this assessment is a snapshot in time. Not all TMA capabilities were assessed, nor were TMC's fully trained and knowledgeable on all features. Feature use will continue to evolve and strategies emerge as the TMC's gain experience with TMA over a variety of traffic situations and their understanding of TMA capabilities broadens with continued training.

  2. 2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below Parker Dam; View southeast from TV Hill above Whitsett Pump Plant. - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  3. Source apportionment of speciated PM2.5 and non-parametric regressions of PM2.5 and PM(coarse) mass concentrations from Denver and Greeley, Colorado, and construction and evaluation of dichotomous filter samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, Ricardo A.

    The Denver Aerosol Sources and Health study (DASH) was a long-term study of the relationship between the variability in fine particulate mass and chemical constituents (PM2.5, particulate matter less than 2.5mum) and adverse health effects such as cardio-respiratory illnesses and mortality. Daily filter samples were chemically analyzed for multiple species. We present findings based on 2.8 years of DASH data, from 2003 to 2005. Multilinear Engine 2 (ME-2), a receptor-based source apportionment model was applied to the data to estimate source contributions to PM2.5 mass concentrations. This study relied on two different ME-2 models: (1) a 2-way model that closely reflects PMF-2; and (2) an enhanced model with meteorological data that used additional temporal and meteorological factors. The Coarse Rural Urban Sources and Health study (CRUSH) is a long-term study of the relationship between the variability in coarse particulate mass (PMcoarse, particulate matter between 2.5 and 10mum) and adverse health effects such as cardio-respiratory illnesses, pre-term births, and mortality. Hourly mass concentrations of PMcoarse and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are measured using tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOMs) with Filter Dynamics Measurement Systems (FDMS), at two rural and two urban sites. We present findings based on nine months of mass concentration data, including temporal trends, and non-parametric regressions (NPR) results, which were used to characterize the wind speed and wind direction relationships that might point to sources. As part of CRUSH, 1-year coarse and fine mode particulate matter filter sampling network, will allow us to characterize the chemical composition of the particulate matter collected and perform spatial comparisons. This work describes the construction and validation testing of four dichotomous filter samplers for this purpose. The use of dichotomous splitters with an approximate 2.5mum cut point, coupled with a 10mum cut

  4. Extensive Green Roof Research Program at Colorado State University

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the high elevation, semi-arid climate of Colorado, green roofs have not been scientifically tested. This research examined alternative plant species, media blends, and plant interactions on an existing modular extensive green roof in Denver, Colorado. Six plant species were ev...

  5. Extensive Green Roof Research Program at Colorado State University

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the high elevation, semi-arid climate of Colorado, green roofs have not been scientifically tested. This research examined alternative plant species, media blends, and plant interactions on an existing modular extensive green roof in Denver, Colorado. Six plant species were ev...

  6. Onychomycosis in the Denver pediatrics population, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Young, Lindsay S; Arbuckle, Harvey A; Morelli, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis (OM) is a common nail disorder in adults but has been rare in children. Recent international studies have demonstrated a rise in the prevalence of OM in children and adolescents, with Trichophyton rubrum being the most common pathogen. This 5-year retrospective chart review of children (aged <18) found that 66 of 141 patients (46.8%) presenting to Children's Hospital Colorado or Denver Health Medical Center Dermatology clinics with nail complaints had OM, with the highest prevalence in those aged 6 to 10 and a slight male predominance. Toenails were more commonly affected, and Trichophyton rubrum was the most common pathogen.

  7. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Representative from U.S. Senator Udall's office Jimmy Haugue reads remarks from U.S. Senator Udall at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Geochronology Database for Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Evans, K.V.; deWitt, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and some unpublished isotopic and fission track age determinations in central Colorado. The compiled area extends from the southern Wyoming border to the northern New Mexico border and from approximately the longitude of Denver on the east to Gunnison on the west. Data for the tephrochronology of Pleistocene volcanic ash, carbon-14, Pb-alpha, common-lead, and U-Pb determinations on uranium ore minerals have been excluded.

  9. Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest - Denver International Airport Site, Between Fifty-sixth & 128th Avenues, Buckley Road & Box Elder Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  10. 76 FR 43709 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... may contact the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Repatriation of the human remains and associated...

  11. 77 FR 23504 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... may contact the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Repatriation of the human remains and associated...

  12. Denver Makes a Fairer Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teske, Paul; Yettick, Holly; Ely, Todd; Klute, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Denver Public Schools traditional and charter schools combined to create a single system that allowed all students to indicate their school choice preferences, replacing a system of more than 60 different selection processes. The new system also gave families a wealth of information regarding school quality. A study of the new system found it was…

  13. Reduced liquid movement subject of Denver Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reduction of subsurface movement of liquids was the subject of a 1-day symposium sponsored by Committee D-18 on Soil and Rock of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and cosponsored by the U.S. Committee on Large Dams (USCOLD) of the International Commission on Large Dams. The Symposium on Impermeable Barriers for Soil and Rock, the first specialized symposium of its kind, was held in Denver, Colorado, on June 25, 1984. The program emphasized the interaction of the environmental system of soil and rock containment, impermeable barriers, and enclosed liquids. The theory, testing, and design considerations of such interactive systems was explored in relation to slurry walls and clay and earth additive linings as applied to geotechnical engineering projects such as tailings and waste containment ponds, landfills, solar and biomass ponds, ditches, canals, and reservoirs. A number of papers presented research results on the interaction of various chemical and hazardous wastes with the soil and rock materials and lining or slurry materials.

  14. Environmental Assessment of the Reduce Bird Air Strike Hazards (BASH) Along East Tollgate Creek, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-22

    Arapahoe County, Colorado – Soil Survey. USDA, in cooperation with the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station. Final EA Reduce BASH Along East Tollgate...Environment Water Quality Control Division 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South Denver, CO 80246-1530 Ms. Eliza Moore Wildlife Manager Colorado Division

  15. Multi-perspective observations of NO2 over the Denver area during DISCOVER-AQ: Insights for future monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    The final deployment in the DISCOVER-AQ1 series of air quality field campaigns focused on the Northern Front Range of Colorado including the Denver Metropolitan Area in July-August 2014. The overarching goal of these campaigns was to improve the interpretation of satellite observ...

  16. The Denver-Boulder Hmong: A Geographical Perspective on the Acculturation and Satisfaction of an Indochinese Refugee Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzel, Kristen L.

    This study examines the Lao Hmong, an Indochinese refugee group that has resettled in the Denver-Boulder, Colorado, area. Characteristics examined are the following: (1) migration; (2) location; (3) housing; (4) acculturation; and (5) life satisfaction. An extensive literature review discusses the history, ethnography, and culture of the Hmong in…

  17. The Denver-Boulder Hmong: A Geographical Perspective on the Acculturation and Satisfaction of an Indochinese Refugee Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzel, Kristen L.

    This study examines the Lao Hmong, an Indochinese refugee group that has resettled in the Denver-Boulder, Colorado, area. Characteristics examined are the following: (1) migration; (2) location; (3) housing; (4) acculturation; and (5) life satisfaction. An extensive literature review discusses the history, ethnography, and culture of the Hmong in…

  18. Summertime Relationships Between NOx, NOy, and O3 in the Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, E. E.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, W. P.; Wolfe, D. E.; Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Brophy, P.; Kirkland, J. R.; Link, M. F.; Abeleira, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Tevlin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) took place July-August 2014 with an emphasis on measuring emissions relevant to air quality throughout the Northern Front Range Metropolitan region of Colorado. Extensive focus on this region has been due in part to its large and variable emission sources, such as the Denver-metro area and nearby oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin. The Denver urban area is frequently out of compliance with the national air quality standards for ozone during summer. Photochemical ozone precursors, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) are prevalent in urban emissions. Oil and natural gas production is also known to contribute to VOC emissions in the Denver urban area, and may affect ozone levels in the region. The focus of this presentation will be on NOx-NOy-O3 measurements conducted from a tall tower at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO), approximately 33km north of Denver, Colorado. The tower is unique in that it is tall (300m) and located between the Denver metro area to the south and the D-J basin to the north (Fig. 1). During this campaign a suite of instruments were mounted in a carriage, external to the BAO tower, to collect in-situ measurements with vertical resolution or at fixed heights above ground level. A cavity ring-down instrument was used to measure NOx, ozone, and total reactive nitrogen (NOy). Additional instruments mounted in the carriage and at the BAO ground site (Picarro, HR-TOF-CIMS, and GC) provided VOC data and other tracers of air mass origin. This presentation will discuss methods for determining contributions of different emission sources to Front Range ozone, with an emphasis on high ozone days during FRAPPE.

  19. Symposium on Spina Bifida (Denver, Colorado, November, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Denver. Medical Center.

    The objectives of the symposium were to define the problems of the child with spina bifida and to present practical means of management, using a multi-disciplinary team approach. Eight papers defining the problem cover the epidemiology of spina bifida, pathophysiology, musculoskeletal defects, incontinence of bladder and bowel, problems of…

  20. Windshear Case Study: Denver, Colorado, July 11, 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    04/03/88 JR) GTF 1850 120 SC.T 250 -OVC: 45 032/83/40/n7/973/TC -.W 04COAS NE-E AND SW-NW GTF 1750 200 -SCT 250 -OVC 45 041/81/48/1306/?76/ ACCAS NE...2104/96) P: WND ; 000 /WSHFT 04 ACCAS S+W RS 1848 ----------------- ENROLITE TERMINAL FORECASTS:----------------- OMA FT11 111717 80 SCT 250 -BKN...N I C3~/ 01)z 0 F 𔄁 LUJ I / 1/ 4111 /A A I o . o 0 71, /) p1 ) A O~ od 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C ) * * * aLf~ -O ) r .ij~ m - O ~ r’- u~ C

  1. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human...

  2. 76 FR 14061 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Museum of Nature & Science at the address below by April 14, 2011. ADDRESSES: Dr. Chip Colwell...

  3. 75 FR 55823 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO... Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed... Museum of Nature & Science collections. In the Federal Register of July 22, 2010, paragraph number 4...

  4. Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment in the 1990s. Keeping Old Promises, Meeting New Demands. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session (Denver, CO, September 15, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Testimony on the topic of child abuse prevention and treatment is presented in this document. After an opening statement by Representative Patricia Schroeder of Colorado, testimony and supplemental materials by these persons are included: (1) Marilyn Van Derbur, motivational lecturer, Denver, Colorado; (2) Barry Bennett, program manager,…

  5. Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branscombe, Art

    1977-01-01

    Notes that Denverites are proud that they have accomplished school desegregation with little or no violence. School enrollment statistics, however, indicate that one effect of desegregation has been a movement to the suburbs or to private schools. (Author/AM)

  6. 30 CFR 906.20 - Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Broadway, Suite 3320, Denver, Colorado 80202-5733. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  7. 30 CFR 906.20 - Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Broadway, Suite 3320, Denver, Colorado 80202-5733. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  8. 30 CFR 906.20 - Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Broadway, Suite 3320, Denver, Colorado 80202-5733. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  9. 30 CFR 906.20 - Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Broadway, Suite 3320, Denver, Colorado 80202-5733. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 906.20 - Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Broadway, Suite 3320, Denver, Colorado 80202-5733. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Colorado abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  11. Denver Public Schools: Resegregation, Latino Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chungmei

    2006-01-01

    The Denver Public Schools (DPS) provide a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of school segregation within the context of rapid demographic changes and key policy changes. This paper, the first of two reports, focuses on the dynamics of segregation, demographic changes, and implications for graduation rates in the Denver Public Schools. It…

  12. Fraser, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-25

    This sequence of three images in northern Colorado, taken by NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar AIRSAR in 2002, shows Fraser, Colorado, before snowfall, the morning after snow, and after the snow melted.

  13. Sanitary Sewerage System Repairs, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    System. Denver Board of Water Commissioners Colorado State Department of Health Colorado State Department of Natural Resources U. S. Environmental...Department of Health Division of Water Pollution Control. There are no permit requirements although trench dewatering water and any sanitary sewer...system. This has been verified by Shell personnel. 5. Page V-5, paragraph 1, line 7: Public Health Service standar’s for aldrin and dieldrin are one

  14. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-18

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03499

  15. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  16. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-10-30

    STS058-89-013 (18 Oct-1 Nov 1993) --- An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  17. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  18. Environmental Predictors of Human West Nile Virus Infections, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Juliusson, Lara; Vogt, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether environmental surveillance of West Nile virus–positive dead birds, mosquito pools, equines, and sentinel chickens helped predict human cases in metropolitan Denver, Colorado, during 2003, we analyzed human surveillance data and environmental data. Birds successfully predicted the highest proportion of human cases, followed by mosquito pools, and equines. PMID:18217573

  19. Telehealth: Families Finding Ways to Connect in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    JFK Partners, at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, is currently implementing a study on the use of telehealth (receiving treatment or services using videoconferencing technology, such as Skype) and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and anxiety. The study is an exploratory grant from Health Resources and Services…

  20. Telehealth: Families Finding Ways to Connect in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    JFK Partners, at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, is currently implementing a study on the use of telehealth (receiving treatment or services using videoconferencing technology, such as Skype) and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and anxiety. The study is an exploratory grant from Health Resources and Services…

  1. Denver's Pioneer Astronomer: Herbert Alonso Howe (1858-1926)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, H. J.; Stencel, R. E.; Fisher, S.

    1999-05-01

    Herbert A. Howe arrived at Denver University (DU) to teach autumn 1880 classes, in math, astronomy and surveying. Howe established himself with clever solutions to the Kepler problem for orbit determinations in thesis work at Cincinnati Observatory. Riding the economic expansion of Colorado gold and silver mining in 1888, the University accepted a proposed gift of a major observatory, offered by Denver real estate baron, Humphrey Chamberlin. The result features a 20 inch aperture Alvan Clark refractor, which still ranks among the largest telescopes of the era. With the observatory building ready, the Silver Panic of 1893 -- when the US Congress dropped silver reserves from the currency basis -- burst the Denver economic bubble. Chamberlin was unable to complete payments on the balances due. Clark and G.N.Saegmuller (Fauth and Co.) at personal expense, delivered on the optics and telescope assemblies in 1894, but would wait for repayment. Sadly, this fiscal crisis affected DU for over a decade. Professor Howe, while observatory director, found himself consumed as Dean and Acting Chancellor for a young, struggling university, at the expense of the astronomy future that had looked so bright in 1892. Absent the Silver Panic, Howe would have probably been given an endowed chair in astronomy, as promised by Chamberlin. The complexion of American astronomy at the time of the birth of the American Astronomical Society in 1899 might have been different, in terms of US observing sites, etc. We are fortunate to have extensive Prof.Howe's daily diaries now in the University archives. These describe Howe's view of progress on the observatory, meetings with astronomy notables, plus vignettes of the life and times of Denver and the nation. Grandson, Herbert Julian Howe rediscovered their existence and is summarizing them in the form of a biography entitled: The Pioneer Astronomer. DU archival records contain numerous original letters from late 19th century astronomy luminaries

  2. The Denver Prescreening Developmental Questionnaire (PDQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenburg, William K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    To facilitate periodic developmental screening of all children, a Prescreening Developmental Questionnaire was created to identify those children under 3 years of age who require a more thorough screening with the Denver Developmental Screening Test. (Author)

  3. The peak of construction. After years of stagnant hospital growth, Colorado sees boom in healthcare construction as enterprising companies pan for gold.

    PubMed

    Romano, Michael

    2003-12-15

    As Denver experienced a population boom during the '90s, hospital construction was at a standstill. Now providers are racing to catch up with demand, reflecting a national trend. Four Denver-area facilities, including Sky Ridge Medical Center, left, are open or under construction. "Right now, there's nothing like this going on anywhere," says Dennis Brimhall, of the University of Colorado Hospital.

  4. Archives of Environmental Health, Volume 18 Number 4. Ninth AMA Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, July 22-24, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Frank

    Papers read before the Ninth American Medical Association (AMA) Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, Colorado, July 22-24, 1968, are presented in this document. Topics deal with the relationship and effects of atmospheric pollution to respiratory diseases, epidemiology, human physiological reactions, urban morbidity, health of school…

  5. Archives of Environmental Health, Volume 18 Number 4. Ninth AMA Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, July 22-24, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Frank

    Papers read before the Ninth American Medical Association (AMA) Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, Colorado, July 22-24, 1968, are presented in this document. Topics deal with the relationship and effects of atmospheric pollution to respiratory diseases, epidemiology, human physiological reactions, urban morbidity, health of school…

  6. Distinguishing a Western Women's College: A History of the Curriculum at Colorado Women's College, 1909-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jennifer Ann

    2010-01-01

    Colorado Women's College (CWC), a private, Baptist college for women in Denver, Colorado, first welcomed students to its campus in 1909, making it one of only a handful of women's colleges in the American West, where coeducation predominated. This dissertation describes and interprets the curriculum offered at CWC in the period from 1909 to 1967.…

  7. Distinguishing a Western Women's College: A History of the Curriculum at Colorado Women's College, 1909-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jennifer Ann

    2010-01-01

    Colorado Women's College (CWC), a private, Baptist college for women in Denver, Colorado, first welcomed students to its campus in 1909, making it one of only a handful of women's colleges in the American West, where coeducation predominated. This dissertation describes and interprets the curriculum offered at CWC in the period from 1909 to 1967.…

  8. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human...

  9. 75 FR 70027 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance with the Native... remains were removed from Brown County, IL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service...

  10. Detail, drivethrough under hoppers, view to southeast. Hungry Horse ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, drive-through under hoppers, view to southeast. - Hungry Horse Village, Timber Sand Bunker, Approximately 1 mile south of Highway 2 East & 1/4 mile east of Colorado Boulevard, Hungry Horse, Flathead County, MT

  11. 6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AND FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARD SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AND FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARD SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 5. SOUTHEAST FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHEAST FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 7. COUNTERFORT, NORTHWEST SIDE OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COUNTERFORT, NORTHWEST SIDE OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Agronomic factors affecting dryland grain sorghum maturity and production in northeast Colorado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is an important dryland crop in southeast Colorado, but expansion into northeast Colorado is thought to be limited due to the shorter growing season. The study examined whether sorghum production could be expanded into northeast Colorado. A 2-year study ...

  16. Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodman, Joan I.

    The development of 10 preschool children who attended the Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center was compared with the development of 10 preschool children who did not attend a child care center to ascertain the value of the center's program. Both groups were tested with the Denver Developmental Screening Test at the beginning and…

  17. DESCHUTES PROJECT, OREGON, WICKIUP DAM AND RESERVOIR. LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES PROJECT, OREGON, WICKIUP DAM AND RESERVOIR. LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG FACE OF DAM FROM OLD FALL RIVER ROAD RAMP. WICKIUP BUTTE TO THE LEFT. Photocopy of historic photographs (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). R.A. Baker, Photographer, April 25, 1950 - Wickiup Dam, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  18. Photocopy of Dec, 12, 1940 photograph showing construction southeast of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of Dec, 12, 1940 photograph showing construction southeast of the water towers. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. 76 FR 28071 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... signs of weathering consistent with prolonged surface exposure. In 1903, human remains representing a..., and two individuals show signs of weathering consistent with prolonged surface exposure. Officials of...

  20. 78 FR 19296 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... levels of benzene in the soil. The Adams County Coroner initially believed this was a forensic case and removed the remains with the assistance of a Metro State College forensic anthropologist. The burial... Native American ancestry found in a secondary burial and of no forensic interest. The remains were then...

  1. 78 FR 50095 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ..., Durango, Cory, and Whitewater. Subsequently, the Mesa County Coroner ruled out a forensic interest in the... forensic interest in the human remains. Osteological analysis by Dr. Catherine Gaither indicates the...

  2. Hydrogeologic Data of the Denver Basin, Colorado. Colorado Water Conservation Board Basic Data Report Number 15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-01-01

    ac0 $$c 030 M0 001 . . coco coo -0coc0a00 0000 0’ 000080 000 0000ý0 060 0 060 0 000 0.0 -0 U. -0 a -, U- 06’ A S 0 U U 14 0 som 06- - - -6 im l 0 v6...Shale, chocolate . . . 13 1.380 Sh•e, gray . . .. 8 1.448 COal. ........... ... 5 1.38 Shal*e, brown, and S-68-Aabchi. Alt. 6.285 ft. shl.e, gray...shale. chocolate . . . 15 1,450 flowed at surface). 1 1,457 Sand and gravel. . . . 37 37 Coal ..... ......... S 1.455 Shale, hard, gray- Dawson

  3. Groundwater mining of bedrock aquifers in the Denver Basin - Past, present, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.E.; Raynolds, R.G.; Barkmann, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Denver Basin bedrock aquifer system is an important source of water for municipal and agricultural uses in the Denver and Colorado Springs metropolitan areas. The Denver area is one of the fastest growing areas in the United States with a population of 1.2 million in 1960 that has increased to over 2.4 million by 2000. This rapid population growth has produced a corresponding increase in demand for potable water. Historically, the Denver area has relied on surface water, however, in the past 10 years new housing and recreation developments have begun to rely on groundwater from the bedrock aquifers as the surface water is fully appropriated and in short supply. The Denver Basin bedrock aquifer system consists of Tertiary and Cretaceous age sedimentary rocks known as the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills Aquifers. The number of bedrock wells has increased from 12,000 in 1985 to 33,700 in 2001 and the withdrawal of groundwater has caused water level declines of 76 m. Water level declines for the past 10 years have ranged from 3 to 12 m per year. The groundwater supplies were once thought to last 100 years but there is concern that the groundwater supplies may be essentially depleted in 10 to 15 years in areas on the west side of the basin. Extensive development of the aquifer system has occurred in the last 25 years especially near the center of the basin in Douglas and El Paso Counties where rapid urban growth continues and surface water is lacking. Groundwater is being mined from the aquifer system because the discharge by wells exceeds the rate of recharge. Concern is mounting that increased groundwater withdrawal will cause water level declines, increased costs to withdraw groundwater, reduced well yield, and reduced groundwater storage. As the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource is in doubt, water managers believe that the life of the Denver Basin aquifers can be extended with artificial recharge, water reuse, restrictions on

  4. 1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW DOWNSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  5. 2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW UPSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  6. The Busy Hands of Denver's Handicapped

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Vincent; White, Theodore R.

    1970-01-01

    Early history and present status of a work-study program, which includes classroom instruction and work experience at Goodwill Industries, for all handicapped students in Special Education classes. The program is coordinated by the public school system, the Goodwill Industries of Denver, and three state agencies. (SB)

  7. Denver American Indian Mental Health Needs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 374 Denver American Indians, mostly unemployed and low-income, examined substance abuse, psychological problems, and personal trauma for self and household; Native community mental health problems (including youth problems); counselor preferences; opinions about school testing of American Indian children; and Native community needs for…

  8. Teachers Lead the Way in Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazareno, Lori

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teacher-led school "Mathematics and Science Leadership Academy" (MSLA) that is part of the Denver Public Schools. At MSLA, teachers collaborate to make authentic and substantive decisions about how the school operates and seek to meet each student's needs. At teacher-led schools, teachers hire their own…

  9. Teachers Lead the Way in Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazareno, Lori

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teacher-led school "Mathematics and Science Leadership Academy" (MSLA) that is part of the Denver Public Schools. At MSLA, teachers collaborate to make authentic and substantive decisions about how the school operates and seek to meet each student's needs. At teacher-led schools, teachers hire their own…

  10. A Comparison of Web-Based Library Catalogs and Museum Exhibits and Their Impacts on Actual Visits: A Focus Group Evaluation for the Colorado Digitization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Thomas K.; Lance, Keith Curry; Cox, Marti A.; Moe, Tammi

    The Colorado Digitization Project (CDP) commissioned the Library Research Service (LRS) of the Colorado State Library and the University of Denver Library and Information Science Program to evaluate user perceptions of the relative merits of the catalog (or database) and the exhibit approaches to providing access to digital information, especially…

  11. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, that meets the definition of an object of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science... & Science, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribe, has determined that a cultural item meets the...

  12. 1979 summary of coal resources in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Colorado, with 8 coal-bearing regions and 20 coal fields, contains at least 11 percent of the total remaining coal resources of the United States to a depth of 6000 feet. Colorado coals range from early Late Cretaceous to Eocene in age. The higher rank bituminous coals and the largest reserves generally are found in the Upper Cretaceous Dakota and Mesa Verde Groups/Formations in western Colorado. The younger coals, generally of lower rank (subbituminous a to lignite), are found in latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks in the Green River, North and South Park, Raton Mesa, and Denver coal regions. Marginal and premium grades of coking coal are found in the Carbondale, Crested Butte, and Somerset fields, Uinta coal region; in the Trinidad field, Raton Mesa region; and in the Durango field, San Juan River region. Colorado coals range in rank from lignite to anthracite; over 70 percent of the resource is bituminous, approximately 23 percent is subbituminous, 5 percent lignite, and less than one percent anthracite. Moisture, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents of Colorado coals vary considerably with rank from region to region. According to the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Colorado ranks seventh in the total U.S. demonstrated reserve base of coal (16.3 billion short tons) and fourth in the reserve base of bituminous coal. Furthermore, Colorado ranks first in the reserve base of underground-minable low sulphur bituminous coal. The Green River region produced over 9 million tons of the total 1978 state-wide coal production of 14.3 million tons. Projections for Colorado coal production through 1985 is in the order of 32.2 million tons per year.

  13. Geophysical constraints on the flexural subsidence of the Denver Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, Ayrat

    The Denver Basin is an asymmetric Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) foreland basin covering portions of eastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, southwestern Nebraska, and southeastern Wyoming, USA. It is bordered on the west by the Rocky Mountain Front Range Uplift, a basement cored Laramide anticline bounded by thrust faults, and on the east by the Great Plains and stable North American craton. A ˜400 mGal negative Bouguer gravity anomaly exists over the Denver Basin and Front Range Uplift, with its minimum located over the highest topography in the central part of the uplift, approximately 100 km west of the Denver Basin. This study examines three hypotheses concerning the isostatic state of the basin and adjacent Front Range Uplift. These hypotheses are that the modern shape of the basin is due to: 1) flexure of the lithosphere under the surface load of the current topography, or 2) flexure under a subsurface load beneath the Rocky Mountains, or 3) a combination of both surface and subsurface loads. To test these hypotheses, spectral analysis and forward gravity modeling was conducted along three profiles located in the northern, central, and southern parts of the basin. Bouguer gravity power spectra along the profiles reveal 5 major density interfaces interpreted to represent the base of the lithosphere (at depths of 132 to 153 km), base of the crust (45-55 km), a mid-crustal boundary (about 20 km), the top of Precambrian basement (1-2 km), and a boundary between the Pierre Shale and Niobrara Formations within the pre-Laramide sedimentary section (-1-0 km). Flexural modeling shows that the shape of the basin can be fit with an elastic plate model having a line load of magnitude 2-5 × 1012 N/m and an elastic thickness of the lithosphere of 58-80 km. The location of the load is 90-115 km west of the Bouguer gravity minimum on each profile. The gravity anomaly associated with flexural subsidence of the basin, assuming the layered density structure derived

  14. Smoke from Colorado Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman fire, situated about 65 kilometers southwest of Denver, Colorado, is the largest fire ever recorded in that state. The amount and distribution of smoke from the Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The images were captured on June 9, 2002, on the second day of the Hayman fire, when only about 13 percent of the total 137,000 acres eventually consumed had been scorched.

    The image at top-left was acquired by MISR's most oblique (70-degree) forward-viewing camera, and the view at bottom-left was captured by MISR's 26-degree forward-viewing camera. Both left-hand panels are 'false color' views, utilizing near-infrared, red, and blue spectral bands displayed as red, green and blue respectively. With this spectral combination, highly vegetated areas appear red. At top right is a map of aerosol optical depth. This map utilizes the capability of the oblique view angles to measure the abundance of particles in the atmosphere. Haze distributed across the eastern part of the state is indicated by a large number of green pixels, and areas where no retrieval occurred are shown in dark grey. The more oblique perspective utilized within the top panels enhances the appearance of smoke and reveals the haze. In the lower left-hand panel the view is closer to nadir (downward-looking). Here the smoke plumes appear more compact and the haze across eastern Colorado is not detected. The lower right-hand panel is a stereoscopically derived height field that echoes the compact shape of the smoke plumes in the near-nadir image. Results indicate that the smoke plumes reached altitudes of a few kilometers above the surface terrain, or about the same height as the small clouds that appear orange along the bottom edge to the left of center.

    Data used in these visualizations were generated as part of operational processing at the Atmospheric

  15. Data base for the Colorado profiling network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Colorado profiling system developed by the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) includes five (soon to be six) Doppler radar wind Profilers; four operate at 49 MHz (6 m) and are located at Platteville, Fleming, Lay Creek, and Cahone, and one operates at 915 MHz (33 cm) and is located at Denver. The sixth radar, now under construction, will operate at 405 MHz (UHF) and will be located at Boulder. Microwave radiometers and surface meteorological stations are at some of the radar sites. The data base for the wind Profilers is discussed.

  16. Capabilities and limitations of existing MST radars: Colorado wind profilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory is developing a ground-based remote sensing system called PROFILER to measure troposphere parameters currently measured in operational meteorology by radiosondes. The prototype PROFILER uses two radars for wind sounding: a 6-m radar located at Platteville, Colorado, and a 33-cm radar located at Denver's Stapleton International Airport. In addition, a network of three 6-m wind-profiling radars is being installed in Colorado, and a fourth site is planned. The location of the five radars, their characteristics, and their limitations are described.

  17. Capabilities and limitations of existing MST radars: Colorado wind profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1983-12-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory is developing a ground-based remote sensing system called PROFILER to measure troposphere parameters currently measured in operational meteorology by radiosondes. The prototype PROFILER uses two radars for wind sounding: a 6-m radar located at Platteville, Colorado, and a 33-cm radar located at Denver's Stapleton International Airport. In addition, a network of three 6-m wind-profiling radars is being installed in Colorado, and a fourth site is planned. The location of the five radars, their characteristics, and their limitations are described.

  18. Taking a Measure of Impact: 2 Colorado Districts Calibrate the Effects of High Quality Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Snapshots of two Colorado districts in the Redesign PD Community of Practice: Denver Public Schools' professional learning partners help subject-matter experts and others provide educators with a high-quality learning experience. In Jefferson County, Learning Forward's Standards for Professional Learning guide educators to make teacher…

  19. Equity in Excellence for Colorado's Future: "A Policy Audit and Analysis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelau, Demarée K.

    2014-01-01

    Equity in Excellence is a two-year project launched in 2013 to support the implementation of Colorado's higher education reform agenda. With a focus on the metropolitan Denver area, the project intends to align the state's higher education policies with concrete, equity-focused actions at its public community colleges and four-year institutions.…

  20. Taking a Measure of Impact: 2 Colorado Districts Calibrate the Effects of High Quality Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Snapshots of two Colorado districts in the Redesign PD Community of Practice: Denver Public Schools' professional learning partners help subject-matter experts and others provide educators with a high-quality learning experience. In Jefferson County, Learning Forward's Standards for Professional Learning guide educators to make teacher…

  1. Extensive Green Roof Species and Soilless Media Evaluations in Semi-arid Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the high elevation, semi-arid climate of Colorado, green roofs have not been scientifically tested. This research examined alternative plant species, soilless media blends and plant interactions on an existing, modular-extensive (shallow, 10 cm deep) green roof in Denver, Colo...

  2. Lasting Legacy for Achievement: Colorado Coaches Boost Teacher Effectiveness with a Rubric for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the Weld County School District Re-8 in Fort Lupton, Colorado, was eager to find a way to increase teacher effectiveness and, as a result, improve student achievement. This small, semirural district about 35 miles northeast of Denver grappled with high teacher turnover (34% in 2005) and low scores on state assessments (three out of four…

  3. Extensive Green Roof Species and Soilless Media Evaluations in Semi-arid Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the high elevation, semi-arid climate of Colorado, green roofs have not been scientifically tested. This research examined alternative plant species, soilless media blends and plant interactions on an existing, modular-extensive (shallow, 10 cm deep) green roof in Denver, Colo...

  4. Colorado Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle ... x 565 kilometers. They use data from blocks 58 to 61 within World Reference System-2 path 32. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's ...

  5. Colorado composting

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, K.

    1994-08-01

    Composting operations come in all shapes and sizes, and there are many variables in operating a successful composting operation. The author looked at two markedly different composting operations in Colorado--the recycling/composting program at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, and the biosolids composting operation at the Upper Eagle Valley Sanitation District, Colorado Springs--to report on how each operation was developed and how both are working today. At the Air Force Academy, a three-acre base for the composting facility was prepared in the fall of 1991. As word of the facility started getting out, people began offering to bring in their clean, green yard trimmings. A Wildcat Compost Turner made it possible for the academy to add a variety of organic matter to the typical yard clippings it was collecting. Material currently being composted at the academy includes a mixture of approximately 15% grass, 25% sod, 10% pine needles, and 50% stable bedding. Four years ago, Colorado's Upper Eagle Valley Consolidated Sanitation District looked to composting as a way to handle its biosolids. A small, two-acre parcel, three miles from the nearest community, was chosen as the composting site. After meeting all of the associated regulations, trucks began hauling biosolids to the site. The sludge was mixed with sawdust and recycled sludge, and then windrowed. The district already has 14,000 cubic yards of compost stored up and ready to go.

  6. Case Studies of Water Vapor and Surface Liquid Water from AVIRIS Data Measured Over Denver, CO and Death Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, B.-C.; Kierein-Young, K. S.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, E. R.; Stankov, B. B.; Birkenheuer, D.

    1991-01-01

    High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts and equivalent liquid water thicknesses of surface targets are retrieved from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The retrievals are made using a nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique. Two case studies from AVIRIS data acquired over Denver-Platteville area, Colorado and over Death Valley, California are presented. The column water vapor values derived from AVIRIS data over the Denver-Platteville area are compared with those obtained from radiosondes, ground level upward-looking microwave radiometers, and geostationary satellite measurements. The column water vapor image shows spatial variation patterns related to the passage of a weather front system. The column water vapor amounts derived from AVIRIS data over Death Valley decrease with increasing surface elevation. The derived liquid water image clearly shows surface drainage patterns.

  7. NREL PV AR D 11th review meeting, May 13--15, 1992, Denver Marriott City Center, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This is a collection of abstracts from papers presented at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) research and development review meeting held May 1992. Subject areas covered include solar cell and solar module manufacturing and development, materials, polycrystalline thin films, applications, amorphous silicon, solar cell performance and testing, crystalline silicon and other photovoltaic and safety perspectives. (GHH)

  8. A Pilot Demonstration of Electrochromic and Thermochromic Windows in the Denver Federal Center, Building 41, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eleanor S.; Fernandes, Luis L.; Goudey, Chad Howdy; Jonsson, Carl Jacob; Curcija, D. Charlie; Pang, Xiufeng; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Hoffmann, Sabine

    2013-07-01

    Chromogenic glazing materials are emerging technologies that tint reversibly from a clear to dark tinted state either passively in response to environmental conditions or actively in response to a command from a switch or building automation system. Switchable coatings on glass manage solar radiation and visible light while enabling unobstructed views to the outdoors. Building energy simulations estimate that actively controlled, near-term chromogenic glazings can reduce perimeter zone heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) and lighting energy use by 10-20% and reduce peak electricity demand by 20-30%, achieving energy use levels that are lower than an opaque, insulated wall. This project demonstrates the use of two types of chromogenic windows: thermochromic and electrochromic windows. By 2013, these windows will begin production in the U.S. by multiple vendors at high-volume manufacturing plants, enabling lower cost and larger area window products to be specified. Both technologies are in the late R&D stage of development, where cost reductions and performance improvements are underway. Electrochromic windows have been installed in numerous buildings over the past four years, but monitored energy-efficiency performance has been independently evaluated in very limited applications. Thermochromic windows have been installed in one other building with an independent evaluation, but results have not yet been made public.

  9. 76 FR 80401 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO. The human remains and... transferred to Fallis F. Rees, who donated them to the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

  10. Looking southeast at building 150 on the left, building 149 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southeast at building 150 on the left, building 149 (both partially obstructed), and north and west sides of building 144. Behind it is building 143 and in the distance at the right edge of the photograph is building 500. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Beyond Averages: School Quality in Denver Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, academic outcomes for students in Denver Public Schools (DPS) have slowly improved. The primary mechanism for increasing academic performance lies within the district's schools, and on an aggregate level Denver has seen a substantial rise in both the number of quality schools and the percentage of students they serve. Every child…

  12. Teacher Performance Management in Denver Public Schools. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Teacher Project, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the 2008-2009 school year, The New Teacher Project (TNTP) partnered with Denver Public Schools (DPS) and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) to assess the effectiveness of current teacher performance management policies and practices. DPS and the DCTA have been national leaders in their willingness to examine the difficult issues…

  13. The New Service: Michelle Jeske--Denver Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    It bothers Michelle Jeske that many people still don't know all that their public libraries can do for them, even in Denver, where 80 percent of the population has a library card. Fortunately, as manager of web information services at the Denver Public Library (DPL), she can reach out to people who never come through the library doors. Jeske and…

  14. 75 FR 3461 - Denver City Energy Associates; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Denver City Energy Associates; Notice of Filing January 13, 2010. Take notice that on January 11, 2010, Denver City Energy Associates filed a supplemental filing to...

  15. Prevalence of Giardia lamblia and risk factors for infection among children attending day-care facilities in Denver.

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, T E; Hopkins, R S; Shillam, P; Janoff, E N

    1990-01-01

    A sample of children in the toddler age group was surveyed in Denver, CO, to determine the prevalence of Giardia lamblia and to identify risk factors for the intestinal disease. The sample consisted of 236 children attending day-care centers (DCC) and 79 who were not attending. Thirty-eight children (16 percent) attending DCCs and 7 (9 percent) who had not were positive for G. lamblia in stool samples. Risk factors for those attending DCC facilities included increasing duration of attendance, time per week attending DCCs, low family income, and large family size. The only risk factor for those not attending DCC facilities was travel to Colorado mountains. Multivariate analysis showed that risk factors for all children in the sample included travel to Colorado mountains, large family size, and attending DCC facilities. Infection was not associated with symptoms. PMID:2106707

  16. The predicted impact of VOCs from Marijuana cultivation operations on ozone concentrations in great Denver, CO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ashworth, K.

    2016-12-01

    Colorado is the first the marijuana legal states in the United States since 2014. As a result, thousands of legal Marijuana cultivation operations are at great Denver area now. Those Marijuana cultivation operations could be the potential to release a lot of biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpene(C10H16), alpha-pinene, and D-limonene. Those alkene species could rapidly increase the peroxy radicals and chemical reactions in the atmosphere, especially in the urban area which belong to VOC-limited ozone regime. These emissions will increase the ozone in Denver city, where is ozone non-attainment area. Some previous research explained the marijuana smoke and indoor air quality (Martyny, Serrano, Schaeffer, & Van Dyke, 2013) and the smell of marijuana chemical compounds(Rice & Koziel, 2015). However, there have been no studies discuss on identifying and assessing emission rate from marijuana and how those species impact on atmospheric chemistry and ozone concentration, and the marijuana emissions have been not considered in the national emission inventory, either. This research will use air quality model to identify the possibility of ozone impact by marijuana cultivation emission. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions, CAMx, are applied for this research to identify the impact of ozone concentration. This model is government regulatory model based on the Three-State Air Quality Modeling Study (3SAQS), which developed by UNC-Chapel Hill and ENVIRON in 2012. This model is used for evaluation and regulate the ozone impact in ozone non-attainment area, Denver city. The details of the 3SAQS model setup and protocol can be found in the 3SAQS report(UNC-IE, 2013). For the marijuana emission study scenarios, we assumed the monoterpene (C10H16) is the only emission species in air quality model and identify the ozone change in the model by the different quantity of emission rate from marijuana cultivation operations.

  17. Multi-perspective observations of NO2 over the Denver area ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The final deployment in the DISCOVER-AQ1 series of air quality field campaigns focused on the Northern Front Range of Colorado including the Denver Metropolitan Area in July-August 2014. The overarching goal of these campaigns was to improve the interpretation of satellite observations to diagnose near-surface air quality conditions. This called for observations to be combined from multiple perspectives that included ground-based as well as airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements. These observations were collected to demonstrate how future geostationary satellites could provide information of direct benefit to agencies responsible for monitoring and regulating air quality. This article focuses specifically on measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), which are critical to understanding the photochemical production of ozone (O3). Published in the August issue of EM: AIR AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATIONS MAGAZINE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGERS

  18. Anticoagulant rodenticide exposure and toxicosis in coyotes (Canis latrans) in the Denver Metropolitan Area.

    PubMed

    Poessel, Sharon A; Breck, Stewart W; Fox, Karen A; Gese, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used in urban areas to control rodent pests and are responsible for secondary poisoning in many nontarget wildlife species. We tested the livers of five coyotes (Canis latrans) in the Denver Metropolitan Area, Colorado, US, for anticoagulant rodenticides. All five livers were positive for brodifacoum, with values ranging from 95 ppb to 320 ppb, and one liver was positive for bromadiolone, with a value of 885 ppb. Both of these rodenticides are second-generation anticoagulants, which are more potent and more likely to cause secondary poisoning than first-generation anticoagulants due to their accumulation and persistence in the liver. We concluded that exposure to these rodenticides may have caused the death of at least two of the five coyotes, and urban coyotes in our study area are commonly exposed to rodenticides.

  19. Beyond Colorado's Front Range - A new look at Laramide basin subsidence, sedimentation, and deformation in north-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H.; Cashman, Patricia H.; Miller, Ian M.; Shroba, Ralph R.; Cosca, Michael A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.

    2010-01-01

    This field trip highlights recent research into the Laramide uplift, erosion, and sedimentation on the western side of the northern Colorado Front Range. The Laramide history of the North Park?Middle Park basin (designated the Colorado Headwaters Basin in this paper) is distinctly different from that of the Denver basin on the eastern flank of the range. The Denver basin stratigraphy records the transition from Late Cretaceous marine shale to recessional shoreline sandstones to continental, fluvial, marsh, and coal mires environments, followed by orogenic sediments that span the K-T boundary. Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene strata in the Denver basin consist of two mega-fan complexes that are separated by a 9 million-year interval of erosion/non-deposition between about 63 and 54 Ma. In contrast, the marine shale unit on the western flank of the Front Range was deeply eroded over most of the area of the Colorado Headwaters Basin (approximately one km removed) prior to any orogenic sediment accumulation. New 40Ar-39Ar ages indicate the oldest sediments on the western flank of the Front Range were as young as about 61 Ma. They comprise the Windy Gap Volcanic Member of the Middle Park Formation, which consists of coarse, immature volcanic conglomerates derived from nearby alkalic-mafic volcanic edifices that were forming at about 65?61 Ma. Clasts of Proterozoic granite, pegmatite, and gneiss (eroded from the uplifted core of the Front Range) seem to arrive in the Colorado Headwaters Basin at different times in different places, but they become dominant in arkosic sandstones and conglomerates about one km above the base of the Colorado Headwaters Basin section. Paleocurrent trends suggest the southern end of the Colorado Headwaters Basin was structurally closed because all fluvial deposits show a northward component of transport. Lacustrine depositional environments are indicated by various sedimentological features in several sections within the >3 km of sediment

  20. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  1. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  2. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  3. EPA provides $200K to advance the cleanup and revitalization of mine-impacted properties in Creede, Colorado

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Denver, Colo. - May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today awarded the Lower Willow Creek Restoration Company $200K in Brownfields grant funding to clean up mine-impacted sites along Lower Willow Creek in Creede, Colorado. To

  4. The influence of wildfire extent and severity on streamwater chemistry, sediment and temperature following the Hayman Fire, Colorado

    Treesearch

    Charles C. Rhoades; Deborah Entwistle; Dana Butler

    2011-01-01

    The 2002 Hayman Fire was the largest fire in recent Colorado history (558 km2). The extent of high severity combustion and possible effects on Denver's water supply focussed public attention on the effects of wildfire on water quality.Wemonitored stream chemistry, temperature and sediment before the fire and at monthly intervals for 5 years after the fire. The...

  5. Noble Energy Inc. agrees to make system upgrades and fund projects to reduce air pollution in Colorado

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Denver, Colo.-- April 22, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Justice and the State of Colorado today announced a settlement with Houston-based Noble Energy, Inc. resolving alleged Clean Air Act violations stemming from the compa

  6. The greater Denver Latino Cancer Prevention/Control Network. Prevention and research through a community-based approach.

    PubMed

    Flores, Estevan; Espinoza, Paula; Jacobellis, Jillian; Bakemeier, Richard; Press, Norma

    2006-10-15

    The Latino/a Research & Policy Center (LRPC), at the University of Colorado (UC) at Denver and Health Sciences Center built the Greater Denver Latino Cancer Prevention Network, a successful cancer prevention network, in 6 Denver metro area counties. The Network consisted of 23 Latino community-based organizations, health clinics, social service agencies, faith-based groups, and employee-based organizations; 2 migrant health clinics; and 14 scientific partners including the UC Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the American Cancer Society. The Network focused on 5 significant cancers: breast, cervical, lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. The Steering Committee initiated a review process for junior researchers that resulted in 5 NCI-funded pilot projects. Pilot projects were conducted with various Latino populations. The Network developed community education and health promotion projects including the bilingual outreach play The Cancer Monologues. The Network's partnership also started and held 2 annual health fairs, Dia de la Mujer Latina/Day of the Latina Woman, and annual health prevention summits. The Special Population Network (SPN) adapted and revised a clinical trials education outreach module that reached Network community partners. SPN partners recruited Latino/a students to cancer research through a6-week NCI training program held yearly at the UCHSC campus. The Network methodology of bringing together the Latino community with the scientific community increased the level of awareness of cancer in the Latino community and increased cancer research and the level of engagement of the scientific partners with the Latino community. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  7. Southeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Home to beautiful jungles, booming industry, and age-old temples, Southeast Asia has become a confluence of ancient and modern life. This true-color image of mainland Southeast Asia was acquired on November 30, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The body of water in the upper righthand corner of the image is the Gulf of Tonkin. East and southeast of the gulf are the dark green jungles of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. The light brown Mekong River winds its way through the center of the Cambodian jungle and into southern Vietnam. The dark blue patch to the left of the river at the bottom of the image is the Tonle Sap. Literally translated to mean 'Great Lake,' the Tonle Sap is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia. During the rainy season from May to October, the lake will more than double in size growing from its wintertime extent of 3,000 square kilometers to over 7,500 square kilometers. North of the lake, approximately in the center of the image, is a saucer-shaped patch of reddish brown land known as the Khorat Plateau. Situated 90 to 200 meters above sea level in eastern Thailand, the dry plateau is mostly covered with farmland and savanna-type grasses and shrubs. Moving south again, the large body of light blue water at the bottom central portion of the image is the Gulf of Thailand. By switching to the full resolution image (250 meters per pixel) and following the Gulf of Thailand to its northernmost extent, one can see a pinkish beige patch of terrain covered by a faint latticework of fine lines. These are likely to be the network of roads that crisscross Bangkok and its surrounding suburbs and fertile farmland. The narrow strip of land to the east of the Gulf of Thailand is the Malay Peninsula. The body of water to the left of the peninsula is the Gulf of Martaban, which borders Myanmar (Burma). At the far upper lefthand corner of the image, the water has turned light brown from

  8. Southeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Home to beautiful jungles, booming industry, and age-old temples, Southeast Asia has become a confluence of ancient and modern life. This true-color image of mainland Southeast Asia was acquired on November 30, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The body of water in the upper righthand corner of the image is the Gulf of Tonkin. East and southeast of the gulf are the dark green jungles of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. The light brown Mekong River winds its way through the center of the Cambodian jungle and into southern Vietnam. The dark blue patch to the left of the river at the bottom of the image is the Tonle Sap. Literally translated to mean 'Great Lake,' the Tonle Sap is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia. During the rainy season from May to October, the lake will more than double in size growing from its wintertime extent of 3,000 square kilometers to over 7,500 square kilometers. North of the lake, approximately in the center of the image, is a saucer-shaped patch of reddish brown land known as the Khorat Plateau. Situated 90 to 200 meters above sea level in eastern Thailand, the dry plateau is mostly covered with farmland and savanna-type grasses and shrubs. Moving south again, the large body of light blue water at the bottom central portion of the image is the Gulf of Thailand. By switching to the full resolution image (250 meters per pixel) and following the Gulf of Thailand to its northernmost extent, one can see a pinkish beige patch of terrain covered by a faint latticework of fine lines. These are likely to be the network of roads that crisscross Bangkok and its surrounding suburbs and fertile farmland. The narrow strip of land to the east of the Gulf of Thailand is the Malay Peninsula. The body of water to the left of the peninsula is the Gulf of Martaban, which borders Myanmar (Burma). At the far upper lefthand corner of the image, the water has turned light brown from

  9. Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

  10. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue.

    This image was acquired on June 16, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  11. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue.

    This image was acquired on June 16, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  12. A laundry's reincarnation. Hospital Cooperative Laundry, Denver, CO.

    PubMed

    1993-12-15

    It started out as an off-site hospital laundry, then was leased to a commercial operator, now it is a cooperative plant that serves several accounts in the Denver area. See what makes Hospital Cooperative Laundry tick.

  13. Palliation of malignant ascites by the Denver peritoneovenous shunt.

    PubMed Central

    Downing, R.; Black, J.; Windsor, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    Five out of 8 Denver peritoneovenous shunts placed in 7 patients provided excellent palliation of malignant ascites. Subclinical consumptive coagulopathy was detected after placement of 6 shunts, but no patient developed overt bleeding. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6207757

  14. Denver Federal Center Building 52A NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit CO-0034860, the GSA is authorized to discharge wastewater from construction dewatering activities at Denver Federal Center Building 52A in Lakewood, Colo., to to the storm drain system entering McIntyre Gulch.

  15. Interdepartmental Classical Humanities at the University of Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellani, Victor

    1982-01-01

    Describes special program at the University of Denver funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities to design and offer intensive interdisciplinary courses on cultures separated from our own by time and/or space. (Author/BK)

  16. RadNet Air Data From Denver, CO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Denver, CO from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  17. Floods of June 1965 in South Platte River basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthai, Howard Frederick

    1969-01-01

    Heavy, intense rains in three areas on three different days caused outstanding floods on many streams in the South Platte River basin from Plum Creek, just south of Denver, downstream to the Colorado-Nebraska State line. The flood-producing storms followed a relatively wet period, and rainfall of as much as 14 inches in a few hours was reported. The storms occurred over the Greeley-Sterling area on June 14-15, over the Plum Creek and Cherry Creek basins on June 16, and over the headwaters of Kiowa and Bijou Creeks on June 17 after heavy rains on June 15. The flood crest did not pass Julesburg, in the northeast corner of Colorado, until June 20. Previous record high discharges on many tributaries with drainage areas on the plains were exceeded, sometimes severalfold. The six principal tributaries carrying snowmelt runoff were contributing, but not significant, factors in the floods. The attenuation of the peak flow by channel storage as the flood passed through Denver was considerable; yet the peak discharge of 40,300 cfs (cubic feet per second) of the South Platte River at Denver was 1.8 times the previously recorded high of 22,000 cfs in a period of record starting in 1889. The 1965 peak would have been still higher except that all flow from Cherry Creek was stored in Cherry Creek Reservoir. Six persons were drowned, and two other deaths were attributed to the storms. The total damage amounted to $508.2 million, and about 75 percent of this occurred in the Denver metropolitan area. Descriptions of the storms and floods, detailed streamflow records, and information on damages, flood profiles, inundated areas, and flood frequency are included in this report. Several comparisons of the magnitude of the flood are made, and all indicate that an outstanding hydrologic event occurred.

  18. 2. Exterior view of instrumentation and gauge panels on southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Exterior view of instrumentation and gauge panels on southeast wall of Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). The piping and tubing visibile in the photograph extends from the structure to the Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28) and other structures in the complex. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Signal Transfer Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Colorado amethyst.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michalski, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Of the 20 or so amethyst localities reported in Colorado, four are described in some detail and comments are given on their geology. The Crystal Hill mine, near La Garita, Saguache County, contains rock crystal (long slender prisms with small rhombohedral terminations) and pale lavender amethyst (generally <3 in. in length). The deposit was worked as early as the 1800's as a gold mine and also contains abundant manganese oxides. Amethyst, associated with argentiferous galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite, occurs in the Amethyst mine, in the Creede district, on West Willow Creek, Mineral County. The specimens here consist of small pale pinkish-purple crystals interlayered with milky quartz, some as banded forms ("sowbelly agate') and as geode-like vugs. Amethyst also occurs in Unaweep Canyon south of Grand Junction in Mesa County. Pale to very dark amethyst occurs as crystals dominated by large rhombohedra and small prisms (approx 1 in. across). At Red Feather Lakes, Larimer County, amethyst crystals are medium to dark purple and have prism and rhombohedral faces nearly equally developed; some are doubly terminated. -R.S.M.

  20. Denver-area cleanup and revitalization projects receive $1 million in EPA Brownfields funding (Denver, Northglenn, Adams County)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Denver, Colo. - May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today awarded $1 million in Brownfields assessment funds to three grant recipients to expand local efforts to assess, clean up and redevelop properties throughout the Denve

  1. Cloud-to-ground lightning downwind of the 2002 Hayman forest fire in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Rutledge, Steven A.

    2006-02-01

    The Hayman forest fire occurred near Denver, burning ~138,000 acres during 8 June-2 July 2002. It produced aerosol that filled the troposphere over Colorado, allowing an investigation of the effects of increased aerosol concentration on cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning polarity. Compared to climatological values over eastern Colorado, the 2002 fire period showed enhancements in satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD; up to 0.4 units greater), and the percentage of +CG lightning more than doubled in the domain average. However, spatial patterns were different in the fire's vicinity, with increases in AOD but not in +CGs. Denver soundings during the fire were compared to climatology, and showed environmental differences that are associated with increased +CG percentage, in particular higher cloud base and reduced warm-cloud depth. Thus, our findings provide only mixed support for the idea that smoke aerosols impact CG polarity, and suggest a possible link between drought conditions and increased +CG percentage.

  2. Influence of Emissions from Oil and Gas Development on Elevated Ozone in the Northern Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. M.; Helmig, D.; Thompson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Colorado Front Range (NCFR) region has been in exceedance of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) since 2004. Rapidly growing oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations in the Denver-Julesberg Basin, NNE of the Denver metropolitan area, continue to be one of the largest volatile organic compound emitting sources in the region. Trend analysis of the last 13 years of Denver/NCFR ozone monitoring from five sites does not show any statistically significant decrease in annual regulated ozone maxima despite state efforts to mitigate ozone precursor emissions. In this work, we investigate the contribution of O&NG emissions to continued exceedances of the ozone NAAQS. We use surface ozone and wind data from two sites near Boulder, Colorado, to investigate the climatology of ozone in the NCFR region. Transport analyses show a preponderance of elevated ozone events associated with transport from the O&NG operations area in the N-ESE sector, rather than from the more densely populated Denver metro area to the SE-S. On average, between the two sites, air transport from areas associated with dense O&NG operations accounts for 65% of 1-hr averaged elevated ozone (>75 ppbv), while transport from the densely populated Denver metropolitan area accounts for only 9%.

  3. Colorado court involvement in chemical spill clean-up activities.

    PubMed

    Rice, D

    1981-09-01

    Judicial involvement was utilized to force the owners of a pesticide formulation plant to decontaminate property that had been covered with toxic pesticides having the potential to contaminate both surface and groundwater supplies in the East Denver metropolitan area. This case represented the first use of the Colorado state court system in dealing with a hazardous waste "spill." In this case, judicial intervention was unsatisfactory because of the delays involved. Other courses of action will be considered in future cases of a similar nature.

  4. Colorado court involvement in chemical spill clean-up activities.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D

    1981-01-01

    Judicial involvement was utilized to force the owners of a pesticide formulation plant to decontaminate property that had been covered with toxic pesticides having the potential to contaminate both surface and groundwater supplies in the East Denver metropolitan area. This case represented the first use of the Colorado state court system in dealing with a hazardous waste "spill." In this case, judicial intervention was unsatisfactory because of the delays involved. Other courses of action will be considered in future cases of a similar nature. PMID:7270771

  5. Ozone Precursor Trends in Colorado and Their Relevance to Oil and Gas Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, G. E.; Frazier, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Oil and gas development has occurred in Colorado for over 150 years. With the increasing use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, development of shale oil resources has increased significantly during the past ten years. One of the areas is the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin in northeast Colorado, where there are now over 20,000 active wells. The North Front Range area of Colorado, including Denver, is a non-attainment area for ozone, where emissions from oil and gas development in the D-J Basin are a major concern. If a lower ozone standard is promulgated by EPA, other areas of Colorado will likely be designated as non-attainment as well. Colorado has instituted a number of regulations on the oil and gas industry over the past decade to help reduce emissions. The Denver metropolitan area has also grown significantly over the past decades to a population of over 2.6 million, which adds an urban component to the mix of ozone precursor emissions. Ambient monitoring of ozone precursors, including non-methane organic compounds and carbonyls, has been performed at a number of locations in the North Front Range area of Colorado over the past 12 years. Two of these sites have been in continuous operation since 2012; one site is located in the core of the city of Denver, while the other is located in the center of the oil and gas development area and has recorded high levels of ethane. Additionally, air monitoring sites operating on the western slope of Colorado that includes the Piceance Basin have data as far back as 2004. We present trends from the ozone precursor monitoring conducted in Colorado, and discuss how these precursors may contribute to ozone formation, particularly those related to oil and gas development. These data are valuable for emissions inventory work and model validation related to upcoming State Implementation Plans for ozone. The data will also be used in association with the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment

  6. Results and assessment of uranium series dating of vertebrate fossils from Quaternary alluvium in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    An average uranium-series age of 102,000 ± 14,000 yr for bones from Louviers Alluvium, near Denver, Colorado, is compatible with the inferred geologic age of from 120,000 to 150,000 yr. A uranium-series date of about 190,000 yr for a bone from Slocum Alluvium, near Canon City, Colorado, is consistent with the inferred geologic age of from 150,000 to 260,000 yr. Age determinations for the Broadway Alluvium are inconsistent but its geologic age is considered to be 15,000 to 30,000 yr BP.

  7. Resident perspectives on a dermatology Quality Improvement curriculum: the University of Colorado experience.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sammie J; Huff, Laura S; Lott, Jason P; Dellavalle, Robert P; Dunnick, Cory A

    2016-04-18

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have prioritized the objective of optimizing quality healthcare though quality improvement initiatives, yet research on dermatology-specific QI programs and their perceptions among dermatology residents remains limited. We explore residents' opinions of a dermatology-specific QI scholarly project curriculum implemented at University of Colorado Denver (UCD) in 2010 and also evaluate residents' attitudes regarding the value of this curriculum in aiding them to meet ACGME core competencies.

  8. The Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study: Overview and early findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedal, S.; Hannigan, M. P.; Dutton, S. J.; Miller, S. L.; Milford, J. B.; Rabinovitch, N.; Kim, S.-Y.; Sheppard, L.

    Improved understanding of the sources of air pollution that are most harmful could aid in developing more effective measures for protecting human health. The Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study was designed to identify the sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) that are most responsible for the adverse health effects of short-term exposure to PM 2.5. Daily 24-h PM 2.5 sampling began in July 2002 at a residential monitoring site in Denver, Colorado, using both Teflon and quartz filter samplers. Sampling is planned to continue through 2008. Chemical speciation is being carried out for mass, inorganic ionic compounds (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), and carbonaceous components, including elemental carbon, organic carbon, temperature-resolved organic carbon fractions and a large array of organic compounds. In addition, water-soluble metals were measured daily for 12 months in 2003. A receptor-based source apportionment approach utilizing positive matrix factorization (PMF) will be used to identify PM 2.5 source contributions for each 24-h period. Based on a preliminary assessment using synthetic data, the proposed source apportionment should be able to identify many important sources on a daily basis, including secondary ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, diesel vehicle exhaust, road dust, wood combustion and vegetative debris. Meat cooking, gasoline vehicle exhaust and natural gas combustion were more challenging for PMF to accurately identify due to high detection limits for certain organic molecular marker compounds. Measurements of these compounds are being improved and supplemented with additional organic molecular marker compounds. The health study will investigate associations between daily source contributions and an array of health endpoints, including daily mortality and hospitalizations and measures of asthma control in asthmatic children. Findings from the DASH study, in addition to being of interest to policymakers, by

  9. Denver Radium Site -- Operable Unit I closeout report for the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Denver Radium Site consists of properties in the Denver, Colorado, area having radioactive contamination left from radium processing in the early 1900s. The properties are divided into 11 gaps or operable units to facilitate remedial action of the Site. Operable Unit I is an 8-acre block bounded by Quivas Street to the east, Shoshone Street to the west, West 12th Avenue to the south, and West 13th Avenue to the north. The primary focus of interest concerning investigations of radiological contamination was a radium, vanadium, and uranium processing facility at 1201 Quivas Street owned by the Pittsburgh Radium Company (PRC) from 1925 until 1926. The Radium Ores Company, which was associated with PRC, operated the facility until 1927. A Remedial investigation (RI) of Operable Unit I was prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group and CH[sub 2]M Hill on behalf of EPA in April 1986. The draft Feasibility Study (FS), prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group and CH[sub 2]M Hill, was issued in July 1987 (the final FS is the Community Relations Responsiveness Summary with an errata to the draft, issued September 1987). The RI focused on radium uranium processing residues discarded in the early 1900s. These residues contained uranium, radium, and thorium. EPA s Community Relations Plan involved the community in the decision-making process relating to the remedy to be implemented at Operable Unit X, and promoted communications among interested parties throughout the course of the project. The remedial action alternative preferred by EPA for Operable Unit I was Off-Site Permanent Disposal. Because a permanent disposal facility was not available at the time the Record of Decision was issued in September 1987, EPA selected the On-Site Temporary Containment (capping) with the Off-Site Permanent Disposal alternative.

  10. The Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) Study: Overview and Early Findings.

    PubMed

    Vedal, S; Hannigan, M P; Dutton, S J; Miller, S L; Milford, J B; Rabinovitch, N; Kim, S-Y; Sheppard, L

    2009-03-01

    Improved understanding of the sources of air pollution that are most harmful could aid in developing more effective measures for protecting human health. The Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study was designed to identify the sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) that are most responsible for the adverse health effects of short-term exposure to PM (2.5). Daily 24-hour PM(2.5) sampling began in July 2002 at a residential monitoring site in Denver, Colorado, using both Teflon and quartz filter samplers. Sampling is planned to continue through 2008. Chemical speciation is being carried out for mass, inorganic ionic compounds (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), and carbonaceous components, including elemental carbon, organic carbon, temperature-resolved organic carbon fractions and a large array of organic compounds. In addition, water soluble metals were measured daily for 12 months in 2003. A receptor-based source apportionment approach utilizing positive matrix factorization (PMF) will be used to identify PM (2.5) source contributions for each 24-hour period. Based on a preliminary assessment using synthetic data, the proposed source apportionment should be able to identify many important sources on a daily basis, including secondary ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, diesel vehicle exhaust, road dust, wood combustion and vegetative debris. Meat cooking, gasoline vehicle exhaust and natural gas combustion were more challenging for PMF to accurately identify due to high detection limits for certain organic molecular marker compounds. Measurements of these compounds are being improved and supplemented with additional organic molecular marker compounds. The health study will investigate associations between daily source contributions and an array of health endpoints, including daily mortality and hospitalizations and measures of asthma control in asthmatic children. Findings from the DASH study, in addition to being of interest to policymakers

  11. Episodic incision of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, C.D.; Hanks, T.C.; Finkel, R.C.; Heimsath, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Incision rates of the Colorado River are integral to understanding the development of the Colorado Plateau. Here we calculate episodic incision rates of the Colorado River based on absolute ages of two levels of Quaternary deposits adjacent to Glen Canyon, Utah, along the north flank of Navajo Mountain. Minimum surface ages are determined by a combination of cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure ages, uranium series and soil-development formation times. Bedrock incision rates of the Colorado River between c. 500 ka and c. 250 ka, and c. 250 ka to present are c. 0??4 m ka-1 and c. 0??7 m ka-1, respectively. These rates are more than double the rates reported in the Grand Canyon, suggesting that the Colorado River above Lees Ferry is out of equilibrium with the lower section of the river. We also determine incision rates of two tributaries to the Colorado River. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek flow off Navajo Mountain into Glen Canyon from the southeast. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek both have incision rates of c. 0??6 m ka-1 over the past c. 100 ka at points about 9 km away from the main stem of the Colorado River. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 78 FR 73886 - Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Amended Certification... Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The Department's notice of determination was published in the Federal... workers at Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado were engaged in activities related to production...

  13. Ambient Air Quality Assessment 43-21-0170-81 Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AD-A285 551 AG . .iorm ApprovedIIIIh PAGE 0MB Nl. 0704-07 88r to averaqe I hour per response. including the time for review ng instructions...Washington. DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) (2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 106/00/81 1 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) THE AIR QUALITY

  14. Program and Proceedings: NCPV Program Review Meeting 2000, 16-19 April 2000, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2000-04-01

    In entering the 21st century, we in industry and government who have labored to develop PV and bring it into the marketplace can be proud. World demand for PV is increasing faster than supply. The NCPV Program Review Meeting will a provide a forum for exploring how to implement strategies and recommendations for achieving critical goals and foster creative thinking on combining laboratory and industry talents to achieve the goals. The oral sessions focus on both strategic and tactical issues relating to the overall advance of the PV industry and the poster sessions provide an opportunity for more detailed discussions relating to particular tasks.

  15. Pedologic and climatic controls on Rn-222 concentrations in soil gas, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Asher-Bolinder, S.; Owen, D.E.; Schumann, R.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Soil-gas radon concentrations are controlled seasonally by factors of climate and pedology. In a swelling soil of the semiarid Western United States, soil-gas radon concentrations at 100 cm depth increase in winter and spring due to increased emanation with higher soil moisture and the capping effect of surface water or ice. Increased soil moisture results from a combination of higher winter and spring precipitation and decreased insolation in fall and winter, lowering soil temperatures so that water infiltrates deeper and evaporates more slowly. Radon concentrations in soil drop markedly through the summer and fall. The increased insolation of spring and summer warms and dries the soil, limiting the amount of water that reaches 100 cm. As the soil dries, radon emanation decreases, and deep soil cracks develop. These cracks aid convective transport of soil gas, increase radon's flux into the atmosphere, and lower its concentration in soil gas. Probable controls on the distribution of uranium within the soil column include its downward leaching, its precipitation or adsorption onto B-horizon clays, concretions, or cement, and the uranium content and mineralogy of the soil's granitic and gneissic precursors.

  16. South Platte Watershed from the Headwaters to the Denver Metropolitan Area (Colorado)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    South Platte River of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  17. The Dynamics of Academic Productivity. A Seminar (Denver, Colorado, March 2, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massy, William F.; Zemsky, Robert

    This report is an edited version of the transcript of a seminar held to explore the problem of increasing costs and defining productivity in higher education. The main paper, by William Massey, presents a conceptual model explaining the forces driving up costs in academic departments of institutions of higher education. Under the model there have…

  18. North Boundry Containment/Treatment System Performance Report. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Treatment Facility, numerous pump tests, pumping and irrigating in sections 23 and 24, and operation and testing of the Pilot Containment System. Since the...depression has developed behind the Pilot bar- rier, caused by the pumping of wells associated with the system operations. Ground water at this time had...results of higher pumping rates along the eastern and central portion of the control system. The effect of this pumping was to change the water table

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    All homes in the Stapleton community must be ENERGY STAR certified; New Town Builders has announced that it will build 250–300 new homes over the next 7–10 years, all of which will be Challenge Homes. New Town received a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the production builder category.

  20. Dynamics Days US 2013 Conference Held in Denver, Colorado on 3-6 January 2013. Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-17

    inherent complexity. More significantly, perhaps, the trajectory analysis approach provides little explanation for ’why’ things behave the way they do...reaction-diffusion system. His mechanism has been tested extensively but remains controversial and not fully demonstrated for cellular systems. Now...that these observations are due specifically to the Turing mechanism itself. Further we demonstrate a nonlinear phenomena in the same system that was

  1. Gamma-emitting radionuclide measurements at the US geological survey national water quality laboratory, Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    In, Che Yang; Ambats, E.

    1982-01-01

    Like sediment samples from Scofield Resevior in Utah were analyzed for 210Pb by the gamma-ray spectrometric method. The top 10 cm of surface sediment yielded excess 210Pb activity (excluding in situ 226Ra supported 210Pb) of 1.05 pCi/g dry weight and decreased to 0.25 pCi/g at a depth of 25 cm. Based on these data, sedimentation rate was approximately 0.49 cm/y for a total of 30 cm of lake sediment and a lake history of approximately 60 y. An alternative method of 210Pb measurements using wet chemical procedures followed by beta counting gave equivalent results. ?? 1982.

  2. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CIPP LINERS USED FOR REHABILITATION IN COLUMBUS, OHIO AND DENVER, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) has been used for the rehabilitation of deteriorating wastewater pipes for nearly 30 years in the US with much success. However, little quantitative data is available regarding the performance of these liners, which can confirm their estimated design. ...

  3. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CIPP LINERS USED FOR REHABILITATION IN COLUMBUS, OHIO AND DENVER, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) has been successfully used for the rehabilitation of deteriorating wastewater pipes for nearly 30 years in the U.S. However, little quantitative data is available regarding the performance of these liners that can confirm their estimated design life. Wi...

  4. 75 FR 5109 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... black-on-white ceramic plate, is present. Cranial morphology is consistent with physical features common....45, O.935.1) are a black-on-white ceramic mug, two black-on-white ceramic bowls, a black- on-white... from Little Dog Ruin (site 5MT13403), Montezuma County, CO. The human remains (O.2233.1, O.2234.1,...

  5. Evidence Use and Advocacy Coalitions: Intermediary Organizations and Philanthropies in Denver, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Janelle; Jabbar, Huriya; LaLonde, Priya; DeBray, Elizabeth; Lubienski, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The increasing involvement of philanthropists in education policy has contributed to the emergence of a dynamic sector of intermediary organizations (IOs), entities that serve a number of functions in school reform, including advocacy, consultation, policy design, alternative teacher and leadership preparation, and research. In recent years, many…

  6. Geotechnical Containment Alternatives for Industrial Waste Basin F, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado. A quantitative Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    investiga- tions into the cause of this damage prompted the construction of Basin F, which was lined and sealed by laying a catalytic air- blown asphalt membrane...give cause for revising conclusions reported in our September 23, -970 letter. It is indicated that the catalytically blown asphalt membrane ]li has...been continued for an ad- ditional 58 days without leakage through any of the liner specimens. Information was given on testing of a catalytically blown

  7. PEPNet 2000 Innovation in Education. Conference Proceedings (Denver, Colorado, April 5-8, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jursik, Kay B., Ed.

    This proceedings focuses on the best practices and most effective strategies for meeting the needs of postsecondary students who are deaf and hard of hearing. Presentations address professional development, access to programs and services, teaching methods, using technology, student preparation for college, program development, working with…

  8. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CIPP LINERS USED FOR REHABILITATION IN COLUMBUS, OHIO AND DENVER, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) has been used for the rehabilitation of deteriorating wastewater pipes for nearly 30 years in the US with much success. However, little quantitative data is available regarding the performance of these liners, which can confirm their estimated design. ...

  9. Digital Model Study of Groundwater Contamination by Diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP), Rocky Mountain Arsenal Near Denver, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    bar- rier at the north arsenal boundary. Contaminated water pumped from immedi- ately above the barrier to prevent waterlogging would not be returned...north arsenal boundary that effectively prevents further off- arsenal movement of contaminated ground water. Two shortcomings of the plan involve the lack... prevent the further contamination of the aquifer from the recent source near Reservoir F. Model results indicate that a physical barrier to ground-water

  10. Invitational Conference on College Prepayment and Savings Plans (Denver, Colorado, June 7-8, 1987). Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    Summaries of conference presentations on college savings and prepayment plans and related tax, policy, and social issues are provided. The conference objective was to communicate the issues to constituents with the most at stake: parents, students, and relatives; state and federal legislators and staff; and developers of plans for higher education…

  11. Vegetation map of the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marr, J.W.; Boyd, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    Vegetation is one of our most valuable renewable resources; it is the primary producer of organic matter on which all nongreen organisms are dependent for energy, construction materials, aesthetic enjoyment, and other necessities of life. In order to secure the greatest possible returns from the utilization of the different types of vegetation, people need to know what species are present, the ecological processes in which they are involved, and the ways in which they are arranged in the landscape. This vegetation map is designed to help persons in a wide variety of activities to secure that information.

  12. CAIRSENSE Study: Real-world evaluation of low cost sensors in Denver, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-cost air pollution sensors are a rapidly developing field in air monitoring. In recent years, numerous sensors have been developed that can provide real-time concentration data for different air pollutants at costs accessible to individuals and non-regulatory groups. Addition...

  13. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CIPP LINERS USED FOR REHABILITATION IN COLUMBUS, OHIO AND DENVER, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) has been successfully used for the rehabilitation of deteriorating wastewater pipes for nearly 30 years in the U.S. However, little quantitative data is available regarding the performance of these liners that can confirm their estimated design life. Wi...

  14. Industrial odor sources and air pollutant concentrations in Globeville, a Denver, Colorado neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Blayne; Hansgen, Rachel; Hawthorne, Wendy; Miller, Shelly L

    2015-09-01

    An odor of unknown origin described as a "tar" or "asphalt" smell has become unbearable for many of Globeville, CO, residents over the past few years. Residents report during odor events burning eyes and throat, headaches, skin irritation, and problems sleeping. This study was undertaken to identify the potential sources of the odor and the concentrations of air pollutants making up the odor by conducting meteorological correlations and sampling for a panel of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur gases, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the neighborhood and near suspected sources. Wind speed and direction data collected every 1 min in the neighborhood indicate that when the odor is noticed, the community is directly downwind of a wood preservation facility and an asphalt roofing facility. Air samples collected during high-intensity odor events have shown concentrations of methylene chloride, hexane, toluene, naphthalene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, each at least two times higher than background concentrations. Naphthalene and the other PAHs are known pollutants emitted from wood treatment processes, and are known to have a coal tar odor. Naphthalene was present in a sample collected directly adjacent to the Koppers facility and was not present in any background samples. Single-compound odor and health thresholds, however, were never surpassed. Given the technical and regulatory challenges of sampling odors and controlling emissions, it is recommended that Globeville residents and neighboring industry pursue a "good neighbor policy" to solve the odor issue. Specific offending industrial processes could be identified for which there exist cost-effective control technologies that would reduce exposure to odors and air toxics in Globeville. Meteorological correlations and samples of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur gases, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Globeville, CO, neighborhood and near suspected sources during odor events indicate potential industrial sources of a transient and noxious odor. Legislative approaches have proven unfruitful and no health or odor thresholds were typically violated. New approaches are warranted to address odor mixture effects in neighborhoods near industrial facilities.

  15. Preliminary map of landslide deposits, Denver 1° by 2° Quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colton, Roger B.; Holligan, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, Larry W.

    1975-01-01

    Areas inferred to be underlain by landslide deposits resulting from landsliding, avalanching, block gliding, debris sliding or flowing, earthflows, mudflows, rocksliding, rockfalls, rotational slides, slab or flake sliding, slumping, talus accumulation, and translational sliding. Rock glacier deposits, colluvium, and solifluction deposits are included in some areas. Some till is mapped with landslide deposits because distinguishing these two deposits from one another is difficult: Furthermore, in some areas till has failed by landsliding and other types of mass movements. Movement within the deposits varies from none to rapid; rates of movement may also be variable in any given landslide within the same year. Ages of deposits' range from early Pleistocene to Holocene.

  16. CAIRSENSE Study: Real-world evaluation of low cost sensors in Denver, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-cost air pollution sensors are a rapidly developing field in air monitoring. In recent years, numerous sensors have been developed that can provide real-time concentration data for different air pollutants at costs accessible to individuals and non-regulatory groups. Addition...

  17. Omicron Tau Theta Professional Studies and Research Seminar Proceedings (Denver, Colorado, November 30-December 5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D., Ed.

    This proceedings contains five papers. "Learning in the Workplace: A Qualitative Study of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Apprenticeship Programs" (Cheryl E. P. Evanciew) discusses research on youth apprenticeship programs as opportunities for contextual, meaningful, and relevant use of knowledge gained in school. "Effects…

  18. Porosity trends of the Lower Cretaceous J Sandstone, Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Higley, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The petrographic factors that most affect J sandstone porosity variability at a given level of thermal maturity are carbonate cementation and clay content. Carbonate cement, where present, reduces porosity. If previously more widespread, carbonate cement could also introduce porosity heterogeneity by temporarily preserving the pore network relative to uncemented intervals. Abundant detrital and authigenic clay reduces porosity by occupying pores. Low clay content indirectly reduces porosity because the inhibiting effects of clay upon quartz cementation and pressure solution are largely absent. -from Authors

  19. Pedologic and climatic controls on Rn-222 concentrations in soil gas, Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asher-Bolinder, S.; Owen, D.E.; Schumann, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Soil-gas radon concentrations are controlled seasonally by factors of climate and pedology. In a swelling soil of the semiarid Western United States, soil-gas radon concentrations at 100 cm depth increase in winter and spring due to increased emanation with higher soil moisture and the capping effect of surface water or ice. Radon concentrations in soil drop markedly through the summer and fall. The increased insolation of spring and summer warms and dries the soil, limiting the amount of water that reaches 100 cm. Probable controls on the distribution of uranium within the soil column include its downward leaching, its precipitation or adsorption onto B-horizon clays, concretions, or cement, and the uranium content and mineralogy of the soil's granitic and gneissic precursors. -from Authors

  20. Invitational Conference on College Prepayment and Savings Plans (Denver, Colorado, June 7-8, 1987). Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    Summaries of conference presentations on college savings and prepayment plans and related tax, policy, and social issues are provided. The conference objective was to communicate the issues to constituents with the most at stake: parents, students, and relatives; state and federal legislators and staff; and developers of plans for higher education…

  1. Mobile Phone and Social Media Use of Homeless Youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Harpin, Scott; Davis, Jillian; Low, Hana; Gilroy, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate homeless youth mobile phone and social media use, to plan health promotion efforts. Nearly half (46.7%) of runaway/homeless youth in this sample (n = 181) owned a mobile phone and a majority of those devices were smart phones. Ownership did not vary significantly by shelter location, though regular use of Facebook was more prevalent among those in housing programs or camping, than those living on the streets. Over 90% of youth in the sample reported using Facebook. Such media use might facilitate parent, family, and health provider communications with homeless youth.

  2. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Haines area, Juneau and Skagway quadrangles, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 212 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Chilkat, Klehini, Tsirku, and Takhin river drainages, as well as smaller drainages flowing into Chilkat and Chilkoot Inlets near Haines, Skagway Quadrangle, Southeast Alaska. Additionally some samples were also chosen from the Juneau gold belt, Juneau Quadrangle, Southeast Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical

  3. Pediatric resident and faculty knowledge of the Denver II.

    PubMed

    Barratt, M S; Moyer, V A

    2000-04-01

    To assess knowledge of the Denver II, the revised developmental screening tool recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, in residents and faculty, and to evaluate a teaching intervention for incoming postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) trainees. A cross-sectional test of knowledge for all subjects and pretesting and posttesting of the incoming PGY- 1 trainees. University of Texas-Houston Medical School Department of Pediatrics. Faculty (n = 9) and residents (n = 78), including an intervention group (n = 45), of incoming PGY-1 trainees over 2 years. Postgraduate year 1 trainees in both 1994 through 1995 and 1995 through 1996 viewed the Denver II training videotape on entry into a continuity clinic. Trainees were encouraged to perform Denver II evaluations on at least 1 appropriate patient at each pediatric clinic session and had access to Denver II support materials. Scores on the Denver II Proficiency Written Test, self-reported measures of comfort, and number of Denver II evaluations performed. The mean (SD) test scores for incoming, preintervention PGY-1 trainees (n = 45) (41.3 [9.6]) did not differ from scores for outgoing PGY-1 trainees (n = 13) (38.5 [10.4]) who had not received the intervention. Postintervention PGY-1 test results were significantly improved (59.4 [10.6]) (P<.001). Test scores for upper-level residents who had participated in the developmental pediatrics rotation (n = 14) were better (55.3 [9.31), but all scored below passing. Residents who had not yet participated in the developmental pediatrics rotation (n = 19) and members of the general pediatric faculty (n = 9) had scores similar to those of PGY-1 trainees (40.9 [13.4] and 39.0 [15.1], respectively). Residents had a greater knowledge of the Denver II after completing a developmental pediatrics rotation. Our intervention produced significant improvement in PGY-1 trainees' knowledge, raising it to levels similar to those of upper-level residents exposed to developmental pediatrics

  4. EPA provides $192K job training grant to Denver Indian Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Denver, Colo. - May 26, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded the Denver Indian Center, Inc. a $192,000 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) grant to deliver targeted environmental workforce instruc

  5. University of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Gary D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The management information system used at the University of Colorado is described, outlining its history, administrative organization, administrative systems, hardware, budgets, software, and future plans. (MSE)

  6. City and County of Denver: Technical comparison between hythane, CNG and gasoline fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The City and County of Denver, in cooperation with the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force of Public Technology, Inc. has completed a unique two-year research and development project designed to test and compare the technical merits of three transportation fuels. Comparisons of the tailpipe emissions from Hythane - a new, blended, alternative motor fuel comprised of 85% compressed natural gas (CNG) and 15% hydrogen measured by volume - to the emissions from gasoline and 100% CNG were conducted. This project has been one of the first pioneering studies of a hydrogen blended fuel and, through its success, has prompted eight additional Hythane research projects to date. Phase I of the project provided results from the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) testing of a light duty pick-up truck operating on Hythane. The purpose of this testing was to quantify any decrease in tailpipe emissions and to determine whether Hythane could meet the California Ultra Low Emission Vehicle standard (ULEV) for light duty trucks. During Phase I, FTP analyses were conducted in both Colorado (high altitude testing) and California (sea level testing) on a converted Chevrolet S-10, pick-up truck by Hydrogen Consultants (HCl), the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) and the California Air Resource Board (CARB). Currently, the only other non-electric vehicle which is capable of meeting the ULEV standard is Chrysler`s natural gas vehicle. There was additional interest in the role Hythane could play as a transitional fuel in the introduction of hydrogen. Hydrogen, a renewable energy carrier, may soon be categorized as a ZEV fuel by the South Coast Air Quality Management District. This factor may encourage the use of Hythane as a transportation fuel that not only meets the ULEV standard, but may provide the bridge necessary to the eventual widespread use of hydrogen.

  7. 15. CONCRETE CHECK DAM NORTHWEST OF SOUTHEAST LAKE LADORA (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CONCRETE CHECK DAM NORTHWEST OF SOUTHEAST LAKE LADORA (SECTION 2) WITH THE FORMER EGLI FARM IN THE DISTANCE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. Animation of Panorama of Phoenix Landing Area Looking Southeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This is an animation of panoramic images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 15 (June 9, 2008), the 15th Martian day after landing. The panorama looks to the southeast and shows rocks casting shadows, polygons on the surface and as the image looks to the horizon, Phoenix's backshell gleams in the distance.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. 76 FR 63537 - Mandatory Electronic Filing for Agencies and Attorneys at Washington Regional Office and Denver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Electronic Filing for Agencies and Attorneys at Washington Regional Office and Denver Field Office AGENCY... program under which the Washington Regional Office (WRO) and Denver Field Office (DEFO) will require all... Sensitive Security Information filed with the Washington Regional Office (WRO) and the Denver Field...

  10. The history of aggregate development in the denver, Co area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century Denver's population was 203,795. Most streets were unpaved. Buildings were constructed of wood frame or masonry. Transport was by horse-drawn-wagon or rail. Statewide, aggregate consumption was less than 0.25 metric tons per person per year. One hundred years later Denver had a population of 2,365,345. Today Denver is a major metropolitan area at the crossroads of two interstates, home to a new international airport, and in the process of expanding its light rail transit system. The skyline is punctuated with skyscrapers. The urban center is surrounded with edge cities. These changes required huge amounts of aggregate. Statewide, aggregate consumption increased 50 fold to over 13 metric tons per person per year. Denver has a large potential supply of aggregate, but sand and gravel quality decreases downstream from the mountain front and potential sources of crushed stone occur in areas prized for their scenic beauty. These issues, along with urban encroachment and citizen opposition, have complicated aggregate development and have paved a new path for future aggregate development including sustainable resource management and reclamation techniques.

  11. ROD MILL ROOM, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING DENVER SPIRAL CLASSIFIER, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ROD MILL ROOM, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING DENVER SPIRAL CLASSIFIER, WITH DOMINION ROD MILL IN LEFT BACKGROUND. WATER WAS ADDED TO ORE IN ROD MILL TO MAKE A SLURRY CALLED SLIME. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  12. 55. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection) C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM; GENERAL VIEW OF GATES, DIRT FILL UPSTREAM AND THE DISMANTLING OF CRANES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 73. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. SILT FILTERING 'THROUGH NORTH DAM; NORTH DAM FROM DOWNSTREAM SHOWING DIRT FILL FILTERING THROUGH DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 38. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. NORTH DAM AT MILNER DAM; NORTH VIEW, UPPER SLOPE OF MAIN CHANNEL DAM, DIRT FILL CONTINUING. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. An Education Plan for the Denver Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Jose A.

    The development and submission, for the Court's consideration, of an education plan for Hispano and Black children in Denver Public Schools was requested by plaintiffs in this case. The Court ordered the development of a school program based on the characteristics of these children. The proposed plan provides the rationale and activities necessary…

  16. Community College of Denver: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The Community College of Denver provides educational facilities and faculty for greater development of skilled manpower to meet the demands of an expanding industrial and business environment. The computing facilities and hardware, administrative data processing, and educational computing are discussed. (MLW)

  17. Electronic Book Usage: A Survey at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Clark, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the University of Denver's Penrose Library conducted a survey of its users to determine their degree of awareness of electronic books, how and why they use them, and their level of satisfaction with the format. It is clear from vendor-supplied usage statistics that electronic books are used, but it is not clear how or why…

  18. Sharing the Load Denver Public Schools' Differentiated Roles Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2014

    2014-01-01

    To assist system administrators as they pursue their own teacher leadership initiatives, this profile from Leading Educators and the Aspen Institute details the steps Denver Public Schools (DPS) took to design and implement its Differentiated Roles pilot. Specifically, it examines the initiative's opportunities and challenges within the context of…

  19. 50. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM TUNNELS. CHANNEL APPROACHING TUNNELS; SNAKE RIVER PASSING THROUGH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. Prehistoric Journey: Denver Museum of Natural History Educators' Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rebecca L.; Leigh, Vicki; Crew, Diana Lee

    This sourcebook prepares students for a visit to the "Prehistoric Journey" exhibit at the Denver Museum of Natural History. The exhibit opened October 23, 1995, and offered a dramatic exploration of 3.5 billion years of life on Earth. Dioramas and "enviroramas" depict seven critical points in life's history. In addition to the chronological…

  1. 72. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. CONTRACTOR'S DAM BELOW MILNER DAM USED TO RAISE WATER TO POWER DITCH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. Lessons from Denver: The Pay for Performance Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratz, Donald G.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers in Denver recently approved a historic revision to the teachers' contract, in which compensation is linked, in part, to student success in the classroom. If voters fund the proposed contract in fall 2005, it could mark a new era in which teachers and communities formally accept a range of indicators that can be used to determine the…

  3. "Rocky Mountain Talent Search" at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    The "Rocky Mountain Talent Search" (RMTS) at the University of Denver was developed based on the talent search model developed by Dr Julian Stanley of Johns Hopkins University. This article summarizes the establishment of RMTS and outlines its contemporary programs. Guided by the philosophy that gifted students have unique needs, require academic…

  4. Electronic Book Usage: A Survey at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Clark, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the University of Denver's Penrose Library conducted a survey of its users to determine their degree of awareness of electronic books, how and why they use them, and their level of satisfaction with the format. It is clear from vendor-supplied usage statistics that electronic books are used, but it is not clear how or why…

  5. 85. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    85. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; EAST VIEW OF SIPHON PIPE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 82. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. DRY CREEK HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; CHECK GATES ACROSS THE MAIN CANAL BELOW DRY CREEK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. 83. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. DRY CREEK GATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; GATES FROM THE LOWER SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  8. 84. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF SIPHON PIPE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 87. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; UPPER END OF THE SIPHON. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. 86. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; MEN WORKING ON THE EAST END OF THE SIPHON. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. Start with the Facts: Strengthening Denver Public Schools' Education Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating student achievement in Denver Public Schools (DPS) starts with taking a hard look at where performance stands. In this report, the researchers examine key transition points across the education pipeline, from preschool through college. They gauge student progress--or lack of progress. And they identify challenges. That way, they can…

  12. 81. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. DRY CREEK DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; DRIVING SHEET PILING TO SHUT OFF SEEPAGE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. Denver airport pumping systems achieve optimal [Delta] T's

    SciTech Connect

    Mannion, G.F.; Krist, G.D. )

    1994-07-01

    This article describes how the pumping and generating systems at the new Denver Airport operate efficiently with the user loops in the buildings producing design temperature rise at all load levels. Fifteen miles east of Denver's Stapleton International Airport lies the newly completed Denver International Airport (DIA)--the world's largest and most high-tech airport. Besides being one of the largest construction projects in the works, it has many of the latest technical innovations available. Of particular interest to the HVAC industry is the design of the heating and cooling water systems. These systems provide environmental cooling and heating water to the three concourses, the airport office building, and the main terminal. The mechanical engineers for the project were all from the Denver area. The central plant design was the work of Behrent Engineering Co.; the three concourses were designed by Swanson-Rink Associates; and the main terminal and administrative office building were designed by Abeyta Engineering Consultants. The overall system concept was developed during the initial design phase by engineers from these firms, members of the DIA staff, and application engineers from several manufacturers.

  14. 64. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM. WATER FLOODING OVER SPILLWAY FOR FIRST TIME. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 76. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. DISASSEMBLING CRANE TOWER FROM SOUTH ISLAND SPILLWAY. REMOVING CABLE TOWER. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 51. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM, INSPECTION OF GATES PRIOR TO CLOSURE; DISASSEMBLING CRANE TOWER AT LEFT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 43. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. NORTH SIDE CANAL GATES, PART OF ORIGINAL PROJECT. CLOSE-UP OF NORTH CANAL GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 47. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM; RIP-RAPPED UPPER SLOPE OF CENTER DAM; CROWD ALONG CHANNEL TO TUNNELS. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 53. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM TUNNEL CHANNEL AND APPROACH TO TUNNEL GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 75. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. SNAKE RIVER GOING DRY AT MILNER. POWER DITCH AT RIGHT; RIVER IN POOLS FOLLOWING GATE CLOSURE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 41. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. NORTH DAM OF MILNER DAM; DOWNSTREAM AFTER TUNNEL CLOSURE; SILT BERM COMING THROUGH DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. 80. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. WASTE GATES ON MAIN CANAL. F.H. BUHL OVERLOOKS THE NEWLY OPENED CANAL AT GATES ONE MILE BELOW DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. 48. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER DAM; WEST VIEW ACROSS DAM FROM MIDDLE DAM; SNAKE RIVER EXITING FROM TUNNELS. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. 70. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. SNAKE RIVER SHALLOWS AFTER TUNNEL CLOSURE; DOWNSTREAM FROM MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  5. 45. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March 1905. SNAKE RIVER BEHIND MILNER DAM; MILNER RESERVOIR RISING. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 59. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection) C.R. Savage, Photographer, date unknown. MILNER DAM; TUNNEL OUTLETS WITH SNAKE RIVER PASSING THROUGH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. Leading Technology by the Nose: Denver Public's Booktech 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Bonnie

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Booktech 2000 project that was developed at the Denver Public Library as a new work concept to improve acquisitions procedures and customer service. The short-term goal of expanding collections for new branch libraries is discussed, and new relationships with vendors are explained. (LRW)

  8. 52. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of Photograph (original located in Univ. of Denver collection). C.R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. MILNER TUNNEL CLOSURE GATES AND GROUP. GROUP ON GATE PLATFORM JUST BEFORE LOWERING GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. Experience in Collaboration: McDenver at McDonald's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Clarice Sue

    2002-01-01

    The McDenver at McDonald's project provided a nontraditional, community-based teaching and learning environment for faculty and students in a health, physical education, and recreation (HPER) department and a school of nursing. Children and parents come to McDonald's, children received developmental screenings, and parents completed conferences…

  10. Summertime Acyl peroxy nitrates (PANs) in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Farmer, D.; Flocke, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range (CFR) currently violates the 8-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone (O3). The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) was an extensive aircraft and ground-based campaign aimed at characterizing the regional chemical environment in the CFR. Campaign goals were to constrain the emissions of O3 precursors and the subsequent O3 formation rates. A large suite of trace gases and aerosols were measured during FRAPPÉ at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO), including O3, NOx, NOy, CH4, CO, CO2, and several PAN homologues. The BAO, located 35 km north of Denver and on the southwestern side of the Denver-Julesburg Basin, affords the opportunity to sample a wide variety of air masses, including those impacted by emissions from oil and gas development, agriculture, and the urban Denver plume. Here we present an analysis of PAN measurements during FRAPPÉ. The PPN/PAN ratio observed (~20%) at BAO during FRAPPÉ is indicative of chemistry dominated by anthropogenic VOCs. We used the relationships between PAN, PPN, and MPAN to estimate the contribution of isoprene chemistry to local O3 production. We found that the estimated contribution of isoprene chemistry to O3 is less than 5 ppbv. We also investigated the meteorological conditions leading to the most extreme PAN abundances. We found that Denver Cyclones, mesoscale conditions that allow for potential recirculation of pollutants, were present on three out of the four days with PAN mixing ratios much greater than 1 ppbv. We plan to continue exploring specific days characterized by measurements of elevated PAN and O3 with a photochemical box model to attempt to understand the mix of VOC chemistry responsible for the extremely consistent observed PPN/PAN ratio.

  11. A Hazard Analysis of Risk Factors of Mortality in Individuals Who Inject Drugs in Denver CO

    PubMed Central

    Suleta, Katie; Corsi, Karen F.; Booth, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite multiple risk factors for mortality among People Who Inject Drugs (PWID), more research is warranted that examines sub-populations within PWID. Mortality data from PWID participating in longitudinal HIV prevention research in Denver were obtained from The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Risk factors for both all-cause and acute-toxicity related mortality were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Two-thousand seven individuals were interviewed at baseline. Eighty-six individuals died during the time frame of the study, 58 of which were due to acutetoxicity. Disabled (HR = 3.3, p < 0.001), gay/lesbian-identified (HR = 2.6, p = 0.03), white race/ethnicity (HR = 2.4, p = 0.003), and use of a shared cooker (HR = 2.1, p = 0.01) were important adjusted risk factors. These suggest that drug and HIV interventions should utilize techniques that can address the needs of marginalized populations in addition to HIV drug risk behaviors. PMID:28063072

  12. Colorado Children's Budget 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Colorado Children's Budget 2011" tallies up Colorado's public investments during FY 2007-08 through FY 2011-12 for programs and services that enhance the well-being of children across four domains--Early Childhood, K-12 Education, Health, and Other Supports. It is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are…

  13. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  14. Colorado Children's Budget 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Children's Budget is a comprehensive report on funding for children's services in Colorado. This report provides a six- year funding history for more than 50 programs funded with state, local, and federal dollars. The Colorado Children's Budget analyzes reductions in programs and services during the economic downturn. The data in the…

  15. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  16. Colorado Library Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Colorado school librarians are in the midst of a crisis. According to a 2009-2010 survey of public schools in Colorado, just 23% of elementary schools have an endorsed librarian, while 37% of middle schools and 32% of high schools report having an endorsed librarian. This report also shows how these percentages have dropped in just a two-year…

  17. Colorado Children's Budget 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Cuciti, Peggy L.; Baker, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget 2012" examines the state's commitment to investing in the well-being of children. It tallies up Colorado's actual and planned investment during the past five years (Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2009 through FY 2012-2013) on programs and services in four areas: Early Childhood Learning and Development, K-12…

  18. Isostasy and Flexural Subsidence of the Denver Basin and Rocky Mountain Front Range Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, A. K.; Harry, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Denver Basin is an asymmetric Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) foreland basin covering portions of eastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, southwestern Nebraska, and southeastern Wyoming, USA. It is bordered on the west by the Rocky Mountain Front Range Uplift, a basement cored Laramide anticline bounded by thrust faults, and on the east by the Great Plains and stable North American craton. A ~400 mGal negative Bouguer gravity anomaly exists over the Denver Basin and Front Range Uplift, with its minimum located over the highest topography of the uplift, approximately 100 km west of the Denver Basin. This study examines three hypotheses concerning the isostatic state of the basin and adjacent Front Range Uplift. These hypotheses are that the modern shape of the basin is due to 1) flexure of the lithosphere under the surface load of the current Rocky Mountain topography; 2) flexure under a subsurface load beneath the Rocky Mountains; or 3) a combination of both surface and subsurface loads. To test these hypotheses, spectral analysis and forward gravity modeling was conducted along three profiles located in the northern, central, and southern parts of the basin. Bouguer gravity power spectra along the profiles reveal 5 major density interfaces interpreted to represent the base of the lithosphere (at depths of 132 to 153 km), base of the crust (45-55 km), a mid-crustal boundary (about 20 km), the top of Precambrian basement (1-2 km), and a boundary between the Pierre Shale and Niobrara Formations within the pre-Laramide sedimentary section (-1- 0 km). Flexural modeling shows that the shape of the basin can be fit with an elastic plate model having a line load of magnitude 2-5 x 1012 N/m and a flexural rigidity of 1.73-4.55 x 1024 Nm. The location of the load is 90-115 km west of the Bouguer gravity minimum on each profile. The gravity anomaly associated with flexural subsidence of the basin, assuming the layered density structure derived from the spectral

  19. Colorado`s Pollution-Prevention Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.

    1994-12-31

    The Colorado Pollution Prevention Partnership is a nonprofit, voluntary alliance of government, business, and public interest groups organized in 1990 to develop and promote pollution prevention and waste minimization in Colorado industries. The partnership started with discussions between two individuals concerning a difficulty in a public-private working relationship. The discussions soon expanded to several individuals meeting on a regular basis, then to informal breakfast meetings with representatives from industry, EPA, and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Eventually, organizations representing the public interest joined the discussions. The goals of the partnership are clear: strengthen the working relationship between the private and public sectors; improve capabilities for anticipating and avoiding environmental problems; pool resources and focus attention on the mutual goal of pollution prevention; and exchange information and expertise, and help transfer these to medium and small companies and the general public.

  20. Multiple cluster analysis for the identification of high-risk census tracts for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Denver, Colorado✩

    PubMed Central

    Nassel, Ariann F.; Root, Elisabeth D.; Haukoos, Jason S.; McVaney, Kevin; Colwell, Christopher; Robinson, James; Eigel, Brian; Magid, David J.; Sasson, Comilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior research has shown that high-risk census tracts for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) can be identified. High-risk neighborhoods are defined as having a high incidence of OHCA and a low prevalence of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, there is no consensus regarding the process for identifying high-risk neighborhoods. Objective We propose a novel summary approach to identify high-risk neighborhoods through three separate spatial analysis methods: Empirical Bayes (EB), Local Moran’s I (LISA), and Getis Ord Gi* (Gi*) in Denver, Colorado. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of prospectively collected Emergency Medical Services data of OHCA from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2011 from the City and County of Denver, Colorado. OHCA incidents were restricted to those of cardiac etiology in adults ≥18 years. The OHCA incident locations were geocoded using Centrus. EB smoothed incidence rates were calculated for OHCA using Geoda and LISA and Gi* calculated using ArcGIS 10. Results A total of 1102 arrests in 142 census tracts occurred during the study period, with 887 arrests included in the final sample. Maps of clusters of high OHCA incidence were overlaid with maps identifying census tracts in the below the Denver County mean for bystander CPR prevalence. Five census tracts identified were designated as Tier 1 high-risk tracts, while an additional 7 census tracts where designated as Tier 2 high-risk tracts. Conclusion This is the first study to use these three spatial cluster analysis methods for the detection of high-risk census tracts. These census tracts are possible sites for targeted community-based interventions to improve both cardiovascular health education and CPR training. PMID:25263511

  1. Planning for the conservation and development of infrastructure resources in urban areas; Colorado Front Range urban corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arbogast, Belinda F.; Arnold, L. Rick; Fishman, Neil S.; Langer, William H.; Mladinich, Carol S.; Roelle, James E.; Wilburn, David R.; Knepper, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    This Circular provides a basic understanding of the characteristics, location, distribution, and quality of infrastructure resources (natural aggregate, energy, and water) in the Colorado Front Range urban corridor between Denver and Ft. Collins. With this understanding, the reader explores the many factors that affect the current and future availability of those resources, including the socioeconomic aspects of the resources and the complexly interwoven individual and collective interests that policymakers, decisionmakers, and the public must address.

  2. The Colorado River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image shows the passage of the Colorado River through several southwestern states. The river begins, in this image, in Utah at the far upper right, where Lake Powell is visible as dark pixels surrounded by the salmon-colored rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado flows southwest through Glen Canyon, to the Glen Canyon Dam, on the Utah-Arizona border. From there it flows south into Arizona, and then turns sharply west where the Grand Canyon of the Colorado cuts through the mountains. The Colorado flows west to the Arizona-Nevada (upper left) border, where it is dammed again, this time by the Hoover Dam. The dark-colored pixels surrounding the bend in the river are Lake Mead. The river flows south along the border of first Nevada and Arizona and then California and Arizona. The Colorado River, which begins in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, empties into the Gulf of California, seen at the bottom center of this image.

  3. The Colorado River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image shows the passage of the Colorado River through several southwestern states. The river begins, in this image, in Utah at the far upper right, where Lake Powell is visible as dark pixels surrounded by the salmon-colored rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado flows southwest through Glen Canyon, to the Glen Canyon Dam, on the Utah-Arizona border. From there it flows south into Arizona, and then turns sharply west where the Grand Canyon of the Colorado cuts through the mountains. The Colorado flows west to the Arizona-Nevada (upper left) border, where it is dammed again, this time by the Hoover Dam. The dark-colored pixels surrounding the bend in the river are Lake Mead. The river flows south along the border of first Nevada and Arizona and then California and Arizona. The Colorado River, which begins in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, empties into the Gulf of California, seen at the bottom center of this image.

  4. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas; Hannigan, Michael P.; Miller, Shelly L.; Peel, Jennifer L.; Milford, Jana B.

    2016-06-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), from 2009 to early 2012 in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 µg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5 / PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley. The mass

  5. Clutter modeling of the Denver Airport and surrounding areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, Steven D.; Delmore, Victor E.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    To accurately simulate and evaluate an airborne Doppler radar as a wind shear detection and avoidance sensor, the ground clutter surrounding a typical airport must be quantified. To do this, an imaging airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was employed to investigate and map the normalized radar cross sections (NRCS) of the ground terrain surrounding the Denver Stapleton Airport during November of 1988. Images of the Stapleton ground clutter scene were obtained at a variety of aspect and elevation angles (extending to near-grazing) at both HH and VV polarizations. Presented here, in viewgraph form with commentary, are the method of data collection, the specific observations obtained of the Denver area, a summary of the quantitative analysis performed on the SAR images to date, and the statistical modeling of several of the more interesting stationary targets in the SAR database. Additionally, the accompanying moving target database, containing NRCS and velocity information, is described.

  6. Expanded bicycling route system for Denver. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Maltempo, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    This final report describes the results of a study of the potential energy savings associated with increased utilitarian bicycle transportation in the Denver metropolitan area. The project has included computer modeling of the carrying capacity of the present bicycle route system, future route systems, as well as outreach activities to convey the results to public officials and the general public. A key feature of the project has been a consideration of the benefits associated with an expanded bikeway system which includes ''bike boulevards''. Data from the west coast cities and other sources, have been used to generate quantitative estimates of the benefits associated with a Denver bikeway system which includes bike boulevards. The development of a network of bike boulevards in Denver should result in energy savings of about 20.2 million gallons of gasoline per year, as well as a 3.4% reduction in vehicular carbon monoxide emissions. These benefits are in addition to those accruing from current levels of bicycling.

  7. Game Animals of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game animals typical of Colorado. Discussions in both English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game animals, individual game species, and introduced species of game animals. (RE)

  8. Low-BTU gas in the Rocky Mountain region - Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Tremain, C.M. ); Broadhead, R.E. ); Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Doelger, M. ); Morgan, C.D. )

    1993-08-01

    There are over 100 reservoirs in Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah that produce or could produce low-BTU (heating value less than 900 BTU/ft[sup 3]) gas. Reservoirs range in age from Devonian to Cretaceous; reservoir lithologies include both carbonates and sandstones. Frequently, the low-BTU gas (CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], and He) is a byproduct of normal hydrocarbon production. CO[sub 2]-rich gas occurs in southwest to east-central Utah, in the southeastern Paradox basin (Utah and Colorado), in the North Park basin (Colorado), in southeast Colorado and northeast New Mexico, and in the Green River and Wind River basins (Wyoming). Five fields produce nearly pure (98%) CO[sub 2]. The 1990 annual CO[sub 2] production from these fields was North and South McCallum (Colorado), 1.7 bcf; McElmo (Colorado), 205 bcf; Sheep Mountain (Colorado), 70.7 bcf; and Bravo Dome (New Mexico), 119.7 bcf. Big Piney-LaBarge (Wyoming) produced 120 bcf of CO[sub 2] (at a concentration of 65%) in 1990. Most of the CO[sub 2] is used in enhanced oil recovery. Nitrogen-rich gas is found in the southern Green River basin (Utah and Wyoming), east flank of the San Rafael uplift (Utah), northern Paradox basin (Utah), Uncompahgre uplift (Utah and Colorado), Douglas Creek arch (Colorado), Hugoton embayment (Colorado), Las Animas arch (Colorado), Permian basin (New Mexico), and Four Corners platform (New Mexico). Helium is sometimes associated with the nitrogen and in concentrations of up to 8% in New Mexico and Colorado, 2.8% in Utah, and 1% in Wyoming.

  9. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Xcel Energy Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado XcelEnergy NonXcel Transmission Network Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains transmission network of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4540689.017558 m Left: 160606.141934 m Right: 758715.946645 m Bottom: 4098910.893397m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shapefile

  11. 9. Interior, room in southeast corner of depot looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior, room in southeast corner of depot looking southeast - Missouri Pacific Railway Depot, Natches Street (State Highway 15) & Pine Street intersection, northeast corner, Wisner, Franklin Parish, LA

  12. NREL PV AR&D 11th review meeting, May 13--15, 1992, Denver Marriott City Center, Denver, Colorado. Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This is a collection of abstracts from papers presented at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) research and development review meeting held May 1992. Subject areas covered include solar cell and solar module manufacturing and development, materials, polycrystalline thin films, applications, amorphous silicon, solar cell performance and testing, crystalline silicon and other photovoltaic and safety perspectives. (GHH)

  13. Aggregate supply and demand modeling using GIS methods for the front range urban corridor, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ahmet; Turner, Keith

    2004-07-01

    The combined use of allocation modeling and geographical information system (GIS) technologies for providing quantitative assessments of aggregate supply and demand is evaluated using representative data for the Front Range Urban Corridor (FRUC) in Colorado. The FRUC extends from the Colorado-Wyoming border to south of Colorado Springs, and includes Denver and the major urban growth regions of Colorado. In this area, aggregate demand is high and is increasing in response to population growth. Neighborhood opposition to the establishment of new pits and quarries and the depletion of many deposits are limiting aggregate supplies. Many sources are already covered by urban development or eliminated from production by zoning. Transport of aggregate by rail from distant resources may be required in the future. Two allocation-modeling procedures are tested in this study. Network analysis procedures provided within the ARC/INFO software, are unsatisfactory. Further aggregate allocation modeling used a model specifically designed for this task; a modified version of an existing Colorado School of Mines allocation model allows for more realistic market analyses. This study evaluated four scenarios. The entire region was evaluated with a scenario reflecting the current market and by a second scenario in which some existing suppliers were closed down and new potential suppliers were activated. The conditions within the Denver metropolitan area were studied before and after the introduction of three possible rail-to-truck aggregate distribution centers. GIS techniques are helpful in developing the required database to describe the Front Range Urban Corridor aggregate market conditions. GIS methods allow the digital representation of the regional road network, and the development of a distance matrix relating all suppliers and purchasers.

  14. 3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room, and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Downscaling the IPCC: The 2008 and 2014 Colorado Climate Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyt, K.; Lukas, J.; Gordon, E.

    2014-12-01

    The last two years have seen the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and the third US National Climate Assessment (NCA). In addition to these high profile climate assessments, many regional, state, and municipal entities are leveraging the emerging climate science and scaling the process and the data to develop climate assessments relevant to decision making at sub-national scales. One such example is the assessment Climate Change in Colorado: A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation. The report (released in August 2014) expands and updates an earlier Climate Change in Colorado assessment that was published in October 2008. The 2008 Colorado assessment took a hybrid approach to assessment, marrying the IPCC Working Group I focus on physical science, with the adaptation components raditionally embedded within Working Group II. The Colorado assessment approach included the transparency and open review that underpin the credibility of the IPCC and NCA processes. A modest amount of original research was undertaken, which is a slight deviation from the IPCC and NCA processes. The state-based process also used a co-production model that engages users directly at the outset of the process. The 2008 and 2014 reports used the same process, but the newer assesment is vastly expanded in scope. The efficacy of the process is demonstrated by the use of the Colorado assessments by decision makers. The science in the 2008 report supported the Colorado State Drought Plan, Climate Adaptation Plans for several Colorado Counties, and the State Water Supply Initiative. Components of the 2014 assessment have been used as the science basis for Denver's Climate Adaptation Plan. Decisions that involve climate adaptation tend to happen at sub-regional scales. Consequently, IPCC and NCA documents are not as informative for adaptation planning at regional and state scales as localized assessments. This does not

  17. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  18. Hydraulic and geochemical performance of a permeable reactive barrier containing zero-valent iron, Denver Federal Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Dennehy, K.F.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The hydraulic and geochemical performance of a 366 m long permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the Denver Federal Center; Denver, Colorado, was evaluated. The funnel and gate system, which was installed in 1996 to intercept and remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), contained four 12.2 m wide gates filled with zero-valent iron. Ground water mounding on the upgradient side of the PRB resulted in a tenfold increase in the hydraulic gradient and ground water velocity through the gates compared to areas of the aquifer unaffected by the PRB. Water balance calculations for April 1997 indicate that about 75% of the ground water moving toward the PRB from upgradient areas moved through the gates. The rest of the water either accumulated on the upgradient side of the PRB or bypassed the PRB. Chemical data from monitoring wells screened down-gradient, beneath, and at the ends of the PRB indicate that contaminants had not bypassed the PRB, except in a few isolated areas. Greater than 99% of the CAH mass entering the gates was retained by the iron. Fifty-one percent of the CAH carbon entering one gate was accounted for in dissolved C1 and C2 hydrocarbons, primarily ethane and ethene, which indicates that CAHs may adsorb to the iron prior to being dehalogenated. Treated water exiting the gates displaced contaminated ground water at a distance of at least 3 m downgradient from the PRB by the end of 1997. Measurements of dissolved inorganic ions in one gate indicate that calcite and siderite precipitation in the gate could reduce gate porosity by about 0.35% per year. Results from this study indicate that funnel and gate systems containing zero-valent iron can effectively treat ground water contaminated with CAHs. However, the hydrologic impacts of the PRB on the flow system need to be fully understood to prevent contaminants from bypassing the PRB.

  19. Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene = 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene = 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene = 0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  20. Derivation and Validation of the Denver Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Risk Score for Targeted HIV Screening

    PubMed Central

    Haukoos, Jason S.; Lyons, Michael S.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hopkins, Emily; Bender, Brooke; Rothman, Richard E.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; MacLaren, Lynsay A.; Thrun, Mark W.; Sasson, Comilla; Byyny, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted screening remains an important approach to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing. The authors aimed to derive and validate an instrument to accurately identify patients at risk for HIV infection, using patient data from a metropolitan sexually transmitted disease clinic in Denver, Colorado (1996–2008). With multivariable logistic regression, they developed a risk score from 48 candidate variables using newly identified HIV infection as the outcome. Validation was performed using an independent population from an urban emergency department in Cincinnati, Ohio. The derivation sample included 92,635 patients; 504 (0.54%) were diagnosed with HIV infection. The validation sample included 22,983 patients; 168 (0.73%) were diagnosed with HIV infection. The final score included age, gender, race/ethnicity, sex with a male, vaginal intercourse, receptive anal intercourse, injection drug use, and past HIV testing, and values ranged from −14 to +81. For persons with scores of <20, 20–29, 30–39, 40–49, and ≥50, HIV prevalences were 0.31% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20, 0.45) (n = 27/8,782), 0.41% (95% CI: 0.29, 0.57) (n = 36/8,677), 0.99% (95% CI: 0.63, 1.47) (n = 24/2,431), 1.59% (95% CI: 1.02, 2.36) (n = 24/1,505), and 3.59% (95% CI: 2.73, 4.63) (n = 57/1,588), respectively. The risk score accurately categorizes patients into groups with increasing probabilities of HIV infection. PMID:22431561

  1. Organic geochemistry and petroleum potential of Pennsylvanian black shales, Powder River and Denver basins

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, J.L.; Lubeck, C.M.; King, J.D.; Daws, T.A.

    1987-05-01

    Thin, Middle Pennsylvanian organic-rich black shales (cumulative thickness generally less than 7 m) underlie much of the northern Denver basin and the southeastern Powder River basin. In the Powder River basin, these shales are part of the middle member of the Minnelusa Formation. During Desmoinesian time, the present-day area of the southeastern Powder River basin and the Nebraska panhandle was a shallow, at times highly saline restricted sea. In contrast, the black shales were deposited in a marine environment with normal salinity in the present-day area of northeastern Colorado, which was probably continuous with the Mid-Continent Pennsylvanian sea. Total organic carbon content of all the black shales is high (up to 20 wt. %) except along the margins of the ancient seaway and along the boundary between the open sea and the restricted basin (TOC < 2 wt. %). Extractable organic matter in the black shales is predominantly of marine origin. Evidence for marine organic material includes a predominance of low-molecular-weight alkanes (< C20) and absence of long-chain alkanes (> C25), very low saturated/aromatic hydrocarbon ratios (avg. 0.5), and relatively low pristane/phytane ratios (0.7-1.3). Although the black shales were apparently deposited in uniformly low-oxygen marine conditions, the restricted basin and open marine environments can be differentiated by organic geochemical analysis. Chloroform extracts from black shales from the restricted basin environment contain abundant red pigments, most likely derived from bacteria or algae requiring high salinity for growth. In contrast, extracts from the open marine shales, although equally organic rich, are devoid of pigments, suggesting depositional under conditions of normal seawater salinity. In bulk, organic matter in black shales from both environments is type II and has good potential for generation of liquid hydrocarbons during catagenesis.

  2. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Passive Wake Acoustics Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Frank Y.; Wassaf, Hadi; Dougherty, Robert P.; Clark, Kevin; Gulsrud, Andrew; Fenichel, Neil; Bryant, Wayne H.

    2004-01-01

    From August to September 2003, NASA conducted an extensive measurement campaign to characterize the acoustic signal of wake vortices. A large, both spatially as well as in number of elements, phased microphone array was deployed at Denver International Airport for this effort. This paper will briefly describe the program background, the microphone array, as well as the supporting ground-truth and meteorological sensor suite. Sample results to date are then presented and discussed. It is seen that, in the frequency range processed so far, wake noise is generated predominantly from a very confined area around the cores.

  4. State summaries: Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, J.; Carroll, C.; Widmann, B.

    2006-01-01

    According to the Colorado Geological Survey (CGS), Colorado's mining industry enjoyed a record-breaking year in 2005. For the whole year, the total value of nonfuel minerals, coal and uranium produced in the state in 2005 amounted to $2.4 billion. The production value of $1.52 billion in the nonfuel sector broke the previous record of $1.3 billion set in 1980, and is 60% higher than the revised 2004 CGS estimate of $950.5 million. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) ranked Colorado ninth among the states in nonfuel mineral value, up from 17th in 2004. About $1 billion of the nonfuel total is from metal mining. New record-high productions were achieved not only for molybdenum but also for coal and goal.

  5. Possible young faulting in the Piedmont of North-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, D.R.; Steven, T.A.; Knepper, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We interpret several linear topographic scarps in both alluvium and bedrock in the piedmont of north-central Colorado between Denver and Wyoming to be fault scarps. The scarps, ranging from tens of feet to about 150 ft in height, bound trough-like (graben and half-graben) forms. These features coincide in part with the floodplains of the South Platte River and Lone Tree, St. Vrain, and Boulder Creeks. Details of their topographic forms as well as relations of the Holocene and Pleistocene gravels underlying the floodplains suggest to us that the forms resulted from Quaternary tectonism.

  6. STS-30 Magellan spacecraft arrives at KSC after six-day journey from Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) (semi-truck and trailer), which transported the Magellan spacecraft on its six-day journey from Martin Marietta in Denver, Colorado, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC), arrives safely at the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) planetary checkout facility. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, is to be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1082.

  7. STS-30 Magellan spacecraft arrives at KSC after six-day journey from Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) (semi-truck and trailer), which transported the Magellan spacecraft on its six-day journey from Martin Marietta in Denver, Colorado, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC), arrives safely at the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) planetary checkout facility. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, is to be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1082.

  8. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in Northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, N.; Hannigan, M. P.; Miller, S. L.; Peel, J. L.; Milford, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), for three years in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 μg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5/PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley.

  9. Colorado Better Buildings Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Strife, Susie; Yancey, Lea

    2013-12-30

    The Colorado Better Buildings project intended to bring new and existing energy efficiency model programs to market with regional collaboration and funding partnerships. The goals for Boulder County and its program partners were to advance energy efficiency investments, stimulate economic growth in Colorado and advance the state’s energy independence. Collectively, three counties set out to complete 9,025 energy efficiency upgrades in 2.5 years and they succeeded in doing so. Energy efficiency upgrades have been completed in more than 11,000 homes and businesses in these communities. Boulder County and its partners received a $25 million BetterBuildings grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the summer of 2010. This was also known as the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants program. With this funding, Boulder County, the City and County of Denver, and Garfield County set out to design programs for the residential and commercial sectors to overcome key barriers in the energy upgrade process. Since January 2011, these communities have paired homeowners and business owners with an Energy Advisor – an expert to help move from assessment to upgrade with minimal hassle. Pairing this step-by-step assistance with financing incentives has effectively addressed many key barriers, resulting in energy efficiency improvements and happy customers. An expert energy advisor guides the building owner through every step of the process, coordinating the energy assessment, interpreting results for a customized action plan, providing a list of contractors, and finding and applying for all available rebates and low-interest loans. In addition to the expert advising and financial incentives, the programs also included elements of social marketing, technical assistance, workforce development and contractor trainings, project monitoring and verification, and a cloud-based customer data system to coordinate among field

  10. Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Renovation Raises Its Energy Performance to New Heights, Commercial Building Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet); Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Alliance for Sustainable Colorado (The Alliance) is a nonprofit organization aiming to transform sustainability from vision to reality. Part of its mission is to change the operating paradigms of commercial building design to make them more sustainable. Toward that end The Alliance uses its headquarters, The Alliance Center at 1536 Wynkoop Street in Denver, as a living laboratory, conductingpilot studies of innovative commercial-building-design solutions for using and generating energy.

  11. Denver Papillae Protocol for Objective Analysis of Fungiform Papillae.

    PubMed

    Nuessle, Tiffany M; Garneau, Nicole L; Sloan, Meghan M; Santorico, Stephanie A

    2015-06-08

    The goal of the Denver Papillae Protocol is to use a dichotomous key to define and prioritize the characteristics of fungiform papillae (FP) to ensure consistent scoring between scorers. This protocol builds off of a need that has arisen from the last two decades of taste research using FP as a proxy for taste pore density. FP density has historically been analyzed using Miller & Reedy's 1990 characterizations of their morphology: round, stained lighter, large, and elevated. In this work, the authors forewarned that stricter definitions of FP morphology needed to be outlined. Despite this call to action, follow up literature has been scarce, with most studies continuing to cite Miller & Reedy's original work. Consequently, FP density reports have been highly variable and, combined with small sample sizes, may contribute to the discrepant conclusions on the role of FP in taste sensitivity. The Genetics of Taste Lab explored this apparent inconsistency in counting and found that scorers were individually prioritizing the importance of these characteristics differently and had no guidance for when a papilla had some, but not all, of the reported qualities of FP. The result of this subjectivity is highly variable FP counts of the same tongue image. The Denver Papillae Protocol has been developed to remedy this consequence through use of a dichotomous key that further defines and prioritizes the importance of the characteristics put forth by Miller & Reedy. The proposed method could help create a standard way to quantify FP for researchers in the field of taste and nutritional studies.

  12. [Models for intervention in autism spectrum disorders: Denver and SCERTS].

    PubMed

    Forment-Dasca, C

    2017-02-24

    Introduccion. Dado el aumento de prevalencia respecto a los diagnosticos de autismo en los ultimos años, la creciente investigacion sobre modelos para trabajar con las personas con trastornos del espectro autista (TEA) hace que se encuentren diversas tecnicas y metodos para obtener mayores resultados y poder asi ayudar a mejorar muchos de los sintomas que impiden llevar una vida plena a personas con dicho diagnostico y a sus familias. Objetivo. Revisar dos modelos de intervencion diseñados especificamente para trabajar con personas con TEA. Desarrollo. Se revisa el modelo de intervencion temprana Early Start Denver Model, que presenta un checklist para niños con TEA de 12 a 48 meses, a partir de la evolucion de estos. Se revisa tambien el modelo SCERTS. A diferencia del Denver, este modelo presenta objetivos a trabajar a lo largo de toda la vida de las personas con TEA. Conclusiones. A falta de mayores resultados de la practica basada en la evidencia cientifica respecto a los dos modelos revisados, se concluye que no existe un modelo unico estandarizado y que se necesita una derivacion precoz en niños con dificultades en atencion conjunta e imitacion y el trabajo junto con las familias. Asi pues, para realizar una correcta intervencion debe tenerse en cuenta tanto la practica basada en la evidencia como un conocimiento, respeto y comprension profunda de los niños con TEA y de sus familias por parte del terapeuta.

  13. Sources and loads of nutrients in the South Platte River, Colorado and Nebraska, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litke, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The South Platte River Basin was one of 20 river basins selected in 1991 for investigation as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Nationwide, nutrients have been identified as one of the primary nationwide water-quality concerns and are of particular interest in the South Platte River Basin where nutrient concentrations are large compared to concentrations in other NAWQA river basins. This report presents estimates of the magnitude of nutrient-source inputs to the South Platte River Basin, describes nutrient concen- trations and loads in the South Platte River during different seasons, and presents comparisons of nutrient inputs to instream nutrient loads. Annual nutrient inputs to the basin were estimated to be 306,000 tons of nitrogen and 41,000 tons of phosphorus. The principal nutrient sources were wastewater-treatment plants, fertilizer and manure applications, and atmospheric deposition. To characterize nutrient concentrations and loads in the South Platte River during different seasons, five nutrient synoptic samplings were conducted during 1994 and 1995. Upstream from Denver, Colorado, during April 1994 and January 1995, total nitrogen concentrations were less than 2 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and total phosphorus concentrations were less than 0.2 mg/L. The water in the river at this point was derived mostly from forested land in the mountains west of Denver. Total nutrient concentrations increased through the Denver metropolitan area, and concentration peaks occurred just downstream from each of Denver's largest wastewater-treatment plants with maximum concentrations of 13.6 mg/L total nitrogen and 2.4 mg/L total phosphorus. Nutrient concen- concentrations generally decreased downstream from Denver. Upstream from Denver during April 1994 and January 1995, total nitrogen loads were less than 1,000 pounds per day (lb/d), and total phosphorus loads were less than 125 lb/d. Total nutrient loads increased

  14. Phytomass in southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Bert R. Mead

    1998-01-01

    Phytomass tables are presented for the southeast Alaska archipelago. Average phytomass for each sampled species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in 10 forest and 4 nonforest vegetation types is shown.

  15. Preschool Developmental Screening with Denver II Test in Semi-Urban Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eratay, Emine; Bayoglu, Birgül; Anlar, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and reliability of screening semi-urban preschool children with Denver II, developmental and neurological status was examined in relation with one-year outcome. Methodology: Denver II developmental screening test was applied to 583 children who visited family physicians or other health centers in a province of…

  16. Teacher Vote on Merit Pay down to Wire: Denver Poll Shows Issue in Hands of "Undecideds"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the city of Denver's poll on a new teacher-compensation plan. The poll showed those who had made up their minds to be about evenly divided, leaving more than 20 percent undecided. Proponents have been making the rounds at schools in recent weeks to try winning teachers over to their side. If members of the Denver Classroom…

  17. The End of "Keyes": Resegregation Trends and Achievement in Denver Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Catherine L.; Kurlaender, Michal

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the academic achievement trends of students in Denver's elementary schools from 1994 to 2000. It begins with a brief introduction to the original 1973 Keyes decision and the path to its conclusion in 1995. It then presents a chronology of the standardized measures of academic achievement used by the Denver Public Schools and…

  18. Great Expectations, Mixed Results: Standards and Performance in Denver's New Public Schools, 2007-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In conjunction with the Denver Plan instituted in 2005, Denver Public Schools (DPS) has embarked upon a consistent strategy of opening new schools in an effort to improve overall academic performance. DPS has pursued this strategy under several different paths: an annual request for proposals from charter school applicants; allowing current…

  19. Into the void: Regulating pesticide use in Colorado's commercial cannabis markets.

    PubMed

    Subritzky, Todd; Pettigrew, Simone; Lenton, Simon

    2017-04-01

    In 2014, Colorado implemented the world's first seed-to-sale recreational cannabis market under a commercial model. This paper aims to provide a thick descriptive account that gives insight into the issues and complexities of Colorado's pioneering and evolving attempt to regulate the use of pesticides on commercial cannabis plantations. The paper examines multiple data sets including: (i) Colorado State Government documents; (ii) recreational cannabis regulations; (iii) mass and niche media publications (n=175); (iv) face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders, including seniors, regulators and industry executives (n=8); and (v) field notes from relevant conferences and cultivation facility tours in Denver in October, 2016. Two key issues are identified. First, a public safety threat has arisen relating to application of pesticides on cannabis with intensified toxicity in concentrated products of particular concern. Second, as a pioneering jurisdiction, Colorado faces a considerable knowledge gap. To expand collective learning on this issue, for which no regulatory template and little research exists, state regulators tapped industry and other stakeholder expertise while attempting to ensure public safety goals were achieved and regulatory capture by industry was limited. Four years since the recreational cannabis market in Colorado was legalised, the State continues to grapple with the pesticide issue as testing regulations and cultivation standards are yet to be finalised. While more work is needed, Colorado has made significant progress in developing regulations relating to this complex matter. As governments of countries such as Canada and US states, including California, contemplate changes to recreational cannabis laws, Colorado's experience can assist regulators in other jurisdictions considering policy change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating Oil and Gas Speciation Profiles with Factor Analysis of Ambient Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S.; Paranjothi, G.; Pierce, G. E.; Milford, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Increased oil and gas (O&G) development, particularly through the use of hydraulic fracturing, in the Denver-Julesburg Basin (DJB) in Colorado over the last decade has been identified as a source of emissions of air pollutants, which are now included in chemical transport modeling. As one effort to evaluate its impact, ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that serve as precursors to ozone formation were measured in an Ozone Precursor Study conducted by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment during 2013 and 2014. The study included 6 - 9 a.m. measurements of an extensive suite of ozone-precursor VOCs from a site in an area of intensive O&G development in Platteville, CO, and another site in downtown Denver, CO. To evaluate the influences of urban activity or O&G development on these ambient concentrations, we used the U.S. EPA's Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) tool. A five-factor PMF solution was selected as providing the best fit to the dataset comprised of VOC measurements for both years and both sites. One PMF factor matches the VOC emissions speciation profile for the flashing gas composition for condensate tanks in the DJB that was developed by the Western Regional Air Partnership for use in chemical transport modeling in the region. The contribution of this factor to individual and total VOC concentrations and ozone production reactivity is evaluated for Platteville and Denver.