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Sample records for sp strain u2

  1. Sp6<=crSscrU2 symmetry of the fermion dynamical symmetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Quan; Chen, Xuan-Gen; Feng, Da Hsuan; Wu, Cheng-Li; Ginocchio, Joseph N.; Guidry, Mike W.

    1989-12-01

    The SP6×scrSscrU2 symmetry of the fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM) was studied. Analytic expressions are given for the wave functions and matrix elements of the pair creation operators S°, D°, and E2 transition operator for the heritage u=0, 1, 2 cases. Various Pauli effects which differentiate the FDSM SU3 from IBM SU3, as well as the relationship between the wave functions and matrix elements in the FDSM, the interacting boson model, the Sp (6,R) models, and the Elliott model are discussed. Extensive discussions of the physical implications of the model are presented.

  2. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8807

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady D.; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Microcosm experiments were performed in which Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and bicarbonate concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Disappearance of soluble calcium was used as an indicator of CaCO3 formation; results from metabolically active microcosms were compared to controls with no cells or no carbonate added. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment with approximately 18.6 mg of calcium in the solid phase. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of calcium was removed in the solid phase. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. Removal of inorganic carbon by fixation into biomass was insignificant compared to the mass of inorganic carbon removed by incorporation into the growing CaCO3 solid.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. AVP053U2 Isolated from Styela clava, a Tunicate Collected in Long Island Sound

    PubMed Central

    deMayo, James A.; Maas, Kendra R.

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. AVP053U2 is a marine bacterium isolated from Styela clava, a tunicate collected in Long Island Sound. Here, we report a draft genome for this bacterium, which was found to contain a high capacity for secondary metabolite production based on analysis and identification of numerous biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:27738023

  4. Alkylated benzothiophene desulfurization by Rhodococcus sp. strain T09.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Onaka, T; Tanaka, Y; Tezuka, T; Suzuki, M; Kurane, R

    2000-03-01

    A benzothiophene desulfurizing bacterium was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain T09. Growth assays revealed that this strain assimilated, as the sole sulfur source, various organosulfur compounds that cannot be assimilated by the well-studied dibenzothiophene-desulfurizing Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8. The cellular growth rate of strain T09 for the alkylated benzothiophenes depended on the alkylated position and the length of the alkyl moiety.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sp. Strain EERV15

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Elham; Barrantes, Israel; Vandermaesen, Johanna; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Springael, Dirk; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain EERV15 isolated from sand filter. The organism most closely related to Aeromonas sp. EERV15 is Aeromonas veronii B565, with an average 83% amino acid sequence similarity of putatively encoded protein open reading frames. PMID:27540061

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sp. Strain EERV15.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Elham; Barrantes, Israel; Vandermaesen, Johanna; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Springael, Dirk; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain EERV15 isolated from sand filter. The organism most closely related to Aeromonas sp. EERV15 is Aeromonas veronii B565, with an average 83% amino acid sequence similarity of putatively encoded protein open reading frames. PMID:27540061

  7. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene by pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. )

    1993-07-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds, common intermediates or by-products in synthesis of dyes, solvents, and explosives, has resulting in their emergence as environmental contaminants. Bacterial strains able to degrade 4-nitrotoluene (4-NT) have been isolated. The present study reports the complete degradative pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT that uses 4-NT as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Expression of Heterologous Cellulases in Thermotoga sp. Strain RQ2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Han, Dongmei; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Thermotoga spp. to degrade cellulose is limited due to a lack of exoglucanases. To address this deficiency, cellulase genes Csac_1076 (celA) and Csac_1078 (celB) from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus were cloned into T. sp. strain RQ2 for heterologous overexpression. Coding regions of Csac_1076 and Csac_1078 were fused to the signal peptide of TM1840 (amyA) and TM0070 (xynB), resulting in three chimeric enzymes, namely, TM1840-Csac_1078, TM0070-Csac_1078, and TM0070-Csac_1076, which were carried by Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vectors pHX02, pHX04, and pHX07, respectively. All three recombinant enzymes were successfully expressed in E. coli DH5α and T. sp. strain RQ2, rendering the hosts with increased endo- and/or exoglucanase activities. In E. coli, the recombinant enzymes were mainly bound to the bacterial cells, whereas in T. sp. strain RQ2, about half of the enzyme activities were observed in the culture supernatants. However, the cellulase activities were lost in T. sp. strain RQ2 after three consecutive transfers. Nevertheless, this is the first time heterologous genes bigger than 1 kb (up to 5.3 kb in this study) have ever been expressed in Thermotoga, demonstrating the feasibility of using engineered Thermotoga spp. for efficient cellulose utilization. PMID:26273605

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Sphingobium sp. Strain TCM1 and Sphingomonas sp. Strain TDK1, Haloalkyl Phosphate Flame Retardant- and Plasticizer-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Katsumasa; Kasai, Daisuke; Fukuda, Masao; Takahashi, Shouji

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain TCM1 and Sphingomonas sp. strain TDK1 are haloalkyl phosphate flame retardant- and plasticizer-degrading bacteria. We report here the draft genome sequences of these strains to provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying their degradation ability. PMID:27417843

  10. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6.

    PubMed

    Oshone, Rediet; Mansour, Samira R; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-11-01

    Actinorhizal plants are able to overcome saline soils and reclaim land. Frankia sp strain CcI6 was isolated from nodules of Casuarina cunninghamiana found in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of Frankia sp. strain CcI6 revealed that the strain is closely related to Frankia sp. strain CcI3. The strain displays an elevated level of NaCl tolerance. Vesicle production and nitrogenase activity were also influenced by NaCl. PMID:24287648

  11. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black-pigment-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Saunders, Lauren P; Schisler, David A; Leathers, Timothy D; Naeem, Naveed; Cohan, Frederick M; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-08-01

    Two isolates of a Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a dark pigment on tryptic soy agar. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these strains were related most closely to Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum (99.7 % similarity) and Bacillus axarquiensis (99.7 %). In phenotypic characterization, the novel strains were found to grow between 17 and 50 °C and can tolerate up to 9 % (w/v) NaCl. Furthermore, the strains grew in media of pH 5.5-10 (optimal growth at pH 7.0-8.0). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (34.8 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (21.9 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. A draft genome of both strains was completed. The DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. A phylogenomic analysis on the core genome of these two new strains and all members of the Bacillus subtilis group revealed these two strains formed a distinct monophyletic clade with the nearest neighbour Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. DNA-DNA relatedness studies using in silico DNA-DNA hybridizations showed the two strains were conspecific (93.8 %), while values with all other species (<31.5 %) were well below the species threshold of 70 %. Based on the consensus of phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses, these strains are considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain NRRL B-41091T (=CCUG 68786T). PMID:27150918

  12. Efficient Production of Lumichrome by Microbacterium sp. Strain TPU 3598

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Lumichrome is a photodegradation product of riboflavin and is available as a photosensitizer and fluorescent dye. To develop new efficient methods of lumichrome production, we isolated bacterial strains with high lumichrome productivity from soil. The strain with highest productivity was identified as Microbacterium sp. strain TPU 3598. Since this strain inductively produced lumichrome when cultivated with riboflavin, we developed two different methods, a cultivation method and a resting cell method, for the production of large amounts of lumichrome using the strain. In the cultivation method, 2.4 g (9.9 mmol) of lumichrome was produced from 3.8 g (10.1 mmol) of riboflavin at the 500-ml scale (98% yield). The strain also produced 4.7 g (19.4 mmol) of lumichrome from 7.6 g (20.2 mmol) of riboflavin (96% yield) by addition of riboflavin during cultivation at the 500-ml scale. In the resting cell method, 20 g of cells (wet weight) in 100 ml of potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, produced 2.4 g of lumichrome from 3.8 g of riboflavin (98% yield). Since the lumichrome production by these methods was carried out in suspension, the resulting lumichrome was easily purified from the cultivation medium or reaction mixture by centrifugation and crystallization. Thus, the biochemical methods we describe here are a significant improvement in terms of simplicity and yield over the existing chemical, photolytic, and other biochemical methods of lumichrome production. PMID:26253661

  13. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, A; Land, Miriam L; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  14. Nitrogen Control of Atrazine Utilization in Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Vicente; Govantes, Fernando; Shaw, Liz J.; Burns, Richard G.; Santero, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP uses the herbicide atrazine as the sole nitrogen source. We have devised a simple atrazine degradation assay to determine the effect of other nitrogen sources on the atrazine degradation pathway. The atrazine degradation rate was greatly decreased in cells grown on nitrogen sources that support rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP compared to cells cultivated on growth-limiting nitrogen sources. The presence of atrazine in addition to the nitrogen sources did not stimulate degradation. High degradation rates obtained in the presence of ammonium plus the glutamine synthetase inhibitor MSX and also with an Nas− mutant derivative grown on nitrate suggest that nitrogen regulation operates by sensing intracellular levels of some key nitrogen-containing metabolite. Nitrate amendment in soil microcosms resulted in decreased atrazine mineralization by the wild-type strain but not by the Nas− mutant. This suggests that, although nitrogen repression of the atrazine catabolic pathway may have a strong impact on atrazine biodegradation in nitrogen-fertilized soils, the use of selected mutant variants may contribute to overcoming this limitation. PMID:14660340

  15. Biodegradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene by biochemical cooperation between Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longjiang; Wang, Xin; Jiao, Yiying; Chen, Xu; Zhou, Lingyan; Guo, Kun; Ge, Feng; Wu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Two bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge by using 4-chloronitrobenzene (4-CB) as the sole source of carbon for enrichment. One of the isolates was identified as Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and the other as Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6, mainly through morphological and physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 could transform 4-CB to 4-chloroaniline, which accumulated in the medium. Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 could transform 4-chloroaniline but not 4-CB. The co-culture of Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 could degrade 4-CB completely by the biochemical cooperation of two strains to overcome the degradative limitations of each species alone. In addition, the biochemical pathway of 4-chloroaniline transformation by Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 was proposed based on the determined related enzyme activities. The results suggested that 4-chloroaniline was completely transformed via the ortho-cleavage and modified ortho-cleavage pathways.

  16. Niche adjustment for bioaugmentation with Pseudomonas sp. strain KC

    SciTech Connect

    Dybas, M.J.; Tatara, G.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Knoll, W.H.; Mayotte, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    To be effective, novel organisms introduced into the environment must be able to survive and compete with indigenous organisms. However, to minimize the possibility of ecological disturbance, colonization should ideally be constrained. A possible solution is to create a temporary niche for the introduced organism. Alkalinity addition creates just such a niche by reducing the bioavailability of essential trace metals, such as iron, thereby favoring organisms with efficient trace metal scavenging systems. The authors evaluated alkaline pH adjustment with Pseudomonas sp. strain KC, a denitrifying aquifer organism that degrades carbon tetrachloride (CT) under denitrifying conditions. They compared the kinetic parameters of strain KC with those of its potential competitors (other denitrifiers) in groundwater from a CT-contaminated aquifer at Schoolcraft, Michigan. Under moderately alkaline conditions, strain KC had a higher maximum specific growth rate and yield. With alkaline adjustment, strain KC grew and degraded CT in columns containing aquifer solids from the Schoolcraft site and in slurries of aquifer material from Hanford, Washington. Upon reducing pH, a rapid decline in the KC population followed.

  17. Biodegradation of Ether Pollutants by Pseudonocardia sp. Strain ENV478

    PubMed Central

    Vainberg, Simon; McClay, Kevin; Masuda, Hisako; Root, Duane; Condee, Charles; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium designated Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 was isolated by enrichment culturing on tetrahydrofuran (THF) and was screened to determine its ability to degrade a range of ether pollutants. After growth on THF, strain ENV478 degraded THF (63 mg/h/g total suspended solids [TSS]), 1,4-dioxane (21 mg/h/g TSS), 1,3-dioxolane (19 mg/h/g TSS), bis-2-chloroethylether (BCEE) (12 mg/h/g TSS), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (9.1 mg/h/g TSS). Although the highest rates of 1,4-dioxane degradation occurred after growth on THF, strain ENV478 also degraded 1,4-dioxane after growth on sucrose, lactate, yeast extract, 2-propanol, and propane, indicating that there was some level of constitutive degradative activity. The BCEE degradation rates were about threefold higher after growth on propane (32 mg/h/g TSS) than after growth on THF, and MTBE degradation resulted in accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane resulted in accumulation of 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2HEAA). Despite its inability to grow on 1,4-dioxane, strain ENV478 degraded this compound for >80 days in aquifer microcosms. Our results suggest that the inability of strain ENV478 and possibly other THF-degrading bacteria to grow on 1,4-dioxane is related to their inability to efficiently metabolize the 1,4-dioxane degradation product 2HEAA but that strain ENV478 may nonetheless be useful as a biocatalyst for remediating 1,4-dioxane-contaminated aquifers. PMID:16885268

  18. Feather keratin hydrolysis by a Vibrio sp. strain kr2.

    PubMed

    Sangali, S; Brandelli, A

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize feather-degrading bacteria isolated from poultry industry waste. A Vibrio sp. strain kr2 producing a high keratinolytic activity when cultured on native feather-containing broth was isolated. The bacterium grew with an optimum at pH 6.0 and 30 degrees C, where maximum featherdegrading activity was also observed. Keratinase production was similar at both 25 and 30 degrees C, while the maximum concentration of soluble protein was reached at 30 degrees C. Reduction of disulphide bridges was also observed, increasing with cultivation time. The keratinase of strain kr2 was active on azokeratin, azocasein, benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide and Ala-Ala-p-nitroanilide as substrates. The amino acid composition of the feather hydrolysate was determined, presenting similarities with that reported for feather lysate, feather meal and raw feathers. A novel feather-degrading bacterium was isolated and characterized, showing high keratinolytic activity. Complete feather degradation was achieved during cultivation. Strain kr2 shows potential for use for biotechnological processes involving keratin hydrolysis.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sp. Strain UCD-TK1 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Koenigsaecker, Tynisha M.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Gordonia sp. strain UCD-TK1. The assembly contains 5,470,576 bp in 98 contigs. This strain was isolated from a disinfected ambulatory surgery center. PMID:27738036

  20. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  1. Induction of Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation by Fe(II) in Dechloromonas sp. Strain UWNR4 and Acidovorax sp. Strain 2AN

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the inducibility of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation (NDFO) in non-growth, chloramphenicol-amended, resting-cell suspensions of Dechloromonas sp. strain UWNR4 and Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN. Cells previously incubated with Fe(II)-EDTA oxidized ca. 6-fold more Fe(II)-EDTA than cells previously incubated with Fe(III)-EDTA. This is the first report of induction of NDFO by Fe(II). PMID:23144134

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Agrobacterium nepotum Strain 39/7T and Agrobacterium sp. Strain KFB 330.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanović, Nemanja; Puławska, Joanna; Prokić, Anđelka; Ivanović, Milan; Zlatković, Nevena; Gašić, Katarina; Obradović, Aleksa

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenic strains of Agrobacterium spp. are responsible for crown gall disease of numerous plant species. We present here draft genome sequences of nonpathogenic Agrobacterium nepotum strain 39/7(T) (CFBP 7436(T), LMG 26435(T)), isolated from crown gall tumor on Prunus cerasifera, and tumorigenic Agrobacterium sp. strain KFB 330 (CFBP 8308, LMG 28674), isolated from galls on raspberry. PMID:25908139

  3. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Electricigen Acidiphilium sp. Strain PM (DSM 24941)

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Gomez, Manuel J.; Arcas, Aida; Bargiela, Rafael; Amils, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Acidiphilium sp. strain PM (DSM 24941) was isolated from Rio Tinto's acidic, heavy metal-rich waters. Voltammetry experiments revealed that this strain is capable of electricity production even under aerobic conditions. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Acidiphilium sp. PM and a preliminary genome analysis that reveals a versatile respiratory metabolism. PMID:21914891

  5. Draft genome sequence of the electricigen Acidiphilium sp. strain PM (DSM 24941).

    PubMed

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Gomez, Manuel J; Arcas, Aida; Bargiela, Rafael; Amils, Ricardo

    2011-10-01

    Acidiphilium sp. strain PM (DSM 24941) was isolated from Rio Tinto's acidic, heavy metal-rich waters. Voltammetry experiments revealed that this strain is capable of electricity production even under aerobic conditions. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Acidiphilium sp. PM and a preliminary genome analysis that reveals a versatile respiratory metabolism.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Micromonospora sp. Strain HK10, Isolated from Kaziranga National Park, India

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Madhumita; Das, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Chiranjeeta; Deka Boruah, Hari Prasanna; Bora, Tarun Chandra

    2016-01-01

    We report the 6.92-Mbp genome sequence of Micromonospora sp. HK10, isolated from soil samples collected from Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India. The full genome of strain Micromonospora sp. strain HK10 consists of 6,911,179 bp with 73.39% GC content, 6,196 protein-coding genes, and 86 RNAs. PMID:27516496

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain Hv1, an Isolate from Medicinal Leech Mucosal Castings

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Beka, Lidia; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    The Pedobacter sp. Hv1 strain was isolated from the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, mucosal castings. These mucosal sheds have been demonstrated to play a role in horizontal symbiont transmission. Here, we report the draft 4.9 Mbp genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain Hv1. PMID:26679583

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Photobacterium sp. Strain J15, Isolated from Seawater of Southwestern Johor, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Roslan, Noordiyanah Nadhirah; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Leow, Thean Chor

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequences of Photobacterium sp. strain J15, isolated from seawater in Johor, Malaysia, with the ability to produce lipase and asparaginase. The PacBio genome sequence analysis of Photobacterium sp. strain J15 generated revealed its potential in producing enzymes with different catalytic functions. PMID:27469962

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Photobacterium sp. Strain J15, Isolated from Seawater of Southwestern Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Roslan, Noordiyanah Nadhirah; Sabri, Suriana; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Leow, Thean Chor

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequences of Photobacterium sp. strain J15, isolated from seawater in Johor, Malaysia, with the ability to produce lipase and asparaginase. The PacBio genome sequence analysis of Photobacterium sp. strain J15 generated revealed its potential in producing enzymes with different catalytic functions. PMID:27469962

  10. Molecular responses of Frankia sp. strain QA3 to naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ethan; Tang, Yang; Chu, Feixia; Tisa, Louis S

    2015-04-01

    The Frankia-actinorhizal plant symbiosis plays a significant role in plant colonization in soils contaminated with heavy metals and toxic aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular response of Frankia upon exposure to soil contaminants is not well understood. To address this issue, we subjected Frankia sp. strain QA3 to naphthalene stress and showed that it could grow on naphthalene as a sole carbon source. Bioinformatic analysis of the Frankia QA3 genome identified a potential operon for aromatic compound degradation as well as several ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. Under naphthalene stress, the expression of these genes was upregulated. Proteome analysis showed a differential protein profile for cells under naphthalene stress. Several protein spots were analyzed and used to identify proteins involved in stress response, metabolism, and energy production, including a lignostilbene dioxygenase. These results provide a model for understanding the molecular response of Frankia to common soil pollutants, which may be required for survival and proliferation of the bacterium and their hosts in polluted environments. PMID:25742598

  11. Molecular responses of Frankia sp. strain QA3 to naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ethan; Tang, Yang; Chu, Feixia; Tisa, Louis S

    2015-04-01

    The Frankia-actinorhizal plant symbiosis plays a significant role in plant colonization in soils contaminated with heavy metals and toxic aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular response of Frankia upon exposure to soil contaminants is not well understood. To address this issue, we subjected Frankia sp. strain QA3 to naphthalene stress and showed that it could grow on naphthalene as a sole carbon source. Bioinformatic analysis of the Frankia QA3 genome identified a potential operon for aromatic compound degradation as well as several ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. Under naphthalene stress, the expression of these genes was upregulated. Proteome analysis showed a differential protein profile for cells under naphthalene stress. Several protein spots were analyzed and used to identify proteins involved in stress response, metabolism, and energy production, including a lignostilbene dioxygenase. These results provide a model for understanding the molecular response of Frankia to common soil pollutants, which may be required for survival and proliferation of the bacterium and their hosts in polluted environments.

  12. Genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated from the Western Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kang, Ilnam; Vergin, Kevin L; Lee, Kiyoung; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    The genus Oceanicaulis represents dimorphic rods that were originally isolated from a marine dinoflagellate. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing from the Sargasso Sea. The genome information of strain HTCC2633 indicates a chemoorganotrophic way of life of this strain.

  13. Genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated from the Western Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kang, Ilnam; Vergin, Kevin L; Lee, Kiyoung; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    The genus Oceanicaulis represents dimorphic rods that were originally isolated from a marine dinoflagellate. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing from the Sargasso Sea. The genome information of strain HTCC2633 indicates a chemoorganotrophic way of life of this strain. PMID:21036991

  14. Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter sp. Strain SXCC-1, Isolated from Chinese Vinegar Fermentation Starter▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xin-jun; Jia, Shi-ru; Yang, Yue; Wang, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter strains are prominent bacteria during traditional vinegar fermentation. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Gluconacetobacter sp. strain SXCC-1. This strain was isolated from a fermentation starter (Daqu) used for commercial production of Shanxi vinegar, the best-known vinegar of China. PMID:21551293

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Synechococcus sp. Strain CB0101, Isolated From the Chesapeake Bay Estuary.

    PubMed

    Marsan, David; Wommack, K Eric; Ravel, Jacques; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the estuarine Synechococcus sp. strain CB0101. The genomics information of this strain will facilitate the study of the poorly understood Synechococcus subcluster 5.2 and how this strain is capable of thriving in a dynamic estuarine system, such as the Chesapeake Bay. PMID:24407633

  16. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pantoea sp. OXWO6B1

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea sp. strain OXWO6B1 inhibits the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the 5.2-Mbp genome sequence of this strain, which featured at least 3 confirmed plasmids of up to 250 kbp. The genome sequence of OXWO6B1 is different from that of all previously sequenced strains of Pantoea. PMID:27340064

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. Strain SA_1 Isolated from Iron Backwash Sludge in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Josephin; Braun, Burga; Liere, Karsten; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain SA_1 is an iron-depositing bacterium for which we report a draft genome sequence. Strain SA_1 was isolated from iron backwash sludge of a waterworks in Germany. The Illumina MiSeq technique was used to sequence the genome of the strain. PMID:27540074

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Synechococcus sp. Strain CB0101, Isolated From the Chesapeake Bay Estuary.

    PubMed

    Marsan, David; Wommack, K Eric; Ravel, Jacques; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-09

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the estuarine Synechococcus sp. strain CB0101. The genomics information of this strain will facilitate the study of the poorly understood Synechococcus subcluster 5.2 and how this strain is capable of thriving in a dynamic estuarine system, such as the Chesapeake Bay.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. Strain SA_1 Isolated from Iron Backwash Sludge in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Josephin; Liere, Karsten; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain SA_1 is an iron-depositing bacterium for which we report a draft genome sequence. Strain SA_1 was isolated from iron backwash sludge of a waterworks in Germany. The Illumina MiSeq technique was used to sequence the genome of the strain. PMID:27540074

  20. Gliding motility of Cytophaga sp. strain U67.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, I R; Berg, H C

    1982-01-01

    Video techniques were used to analyze the motion of the gliding bacterium Cytophaga sp. strain U67. Cells moved singly on glass along the long axis at a speed of about 2 micrometers/s, advancing, retreating, stopping, pivoting about a pole, or flipping over. They did not flex or roll. Cells of different lengths moved at about the same speed. Cells sometimes spun continuously about a pole at a frequency of about 2 HZ, the body moving in a plane parallel to that of the glass or on the surface of a cone having either a large or a small solid angle. Polystyrene latex spheres moved to and fro on the surfaces of cells, also at a speed of about 2 micrometers/s. They moved in the same fashion whether a cell was in suspension, gliding, or at rest on the glass. Two spheres on the same cell often moved in opposite directions, passing by one another in close proximity. Small and large spheres and aggregates of spheres all moved at about the same speed. An aggregate moved down the side of a cell with a fixed orientation, even when only one sphere was in contact with the cell. Spheres occasionally left one cell and were picked up by another. Cell pretreated with small spheres did not adhere to glass. When the cells were deprived of oxygen, they stopped gliding, and the spheres stopped moving on their surfaces. The spheres became completely immobilized; they no longer moved from cell to cell or exhibited Brownian movement. Cytophaga spp. are known to have a typical gram-negative cell envelope: an inner (cytoplasmic) membrane, a thin peptidoglycan layer, and an outer (lipopolysaccharide) membrane. Our data are consistent with a model for gliding in which sites to which glass and polystyrene strongly adsorb move within the fluid outer membrane along tracks fixed to the rigid peptidoglycan framework. Images PMID:7085564

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodovulum sp. Strain NI22, a Naphthalene-Degrading Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Bowen, Loryn L.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodovulum sp. strain NI22 is a hydrocarbon-degrading member of the genus Rhodovulum. The draft genome of Rhodovulum sp. NI22 is 3.8 Mb in size, with 3,756 coding sequences and 64.4% G+C content. The catechol and gentisate pathways for naphthalene degradation are predicted to be present in Rhodovulum sp. NI22. PMID:25614575

  2. Induction of chloramphenicol and tetracycline resistance in Flexibacter sp. strain FS-1.

    PubMed Central

    Barcak, G J; Burchard, R P

    1985-01-01

    The gliding bacterium Flexibacter sp. strain FS-1 exhibits inducible resistance to chloramphenicol (Cmr) and tetracycline (Tcr). Either chloramphenicol or tetracycline alone induced a Cmr Tcr phenotype. The resistance is apparently not plasmid encoded. PMID:3855409

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain DD3, Isolated from the Guts of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Freese, Heike M; Daniel, Rolf; Simeonova, Diliana D

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain DD3, a gammaproteobacterium from the family Enterobacteriaceae. It was isolated from homogenized guts of Daphnia magna. The genome size is 5,274 Mb.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain DD3, Isolated from the Guts of Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Freese, Heike M.; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain DD3, a gammaproteobacterium from the family Enterobacteriaceae. It was isolated from homogenized guts of Daphnia magna. The genome size is 5,274 Mb. PMID:25212623

  6. Whole-genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. strain SST3, an endophyte isolated from Jamaican sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) stalk tissue.

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; McGroty, Sean E; Chew, Teong Han; Chan, Kok Gan; Buckley, Larry J; Savka, Michael A; Hudson, André O

    2012-11-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SST3 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Saccharum spp. Here we present its annotated draft genome that may shed light on its role as a bacterial endophyte of sugarcane. To our knowledge, this is the first genome announcement of a sugarcane-associated bacterium from the genus Enterobacter.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Shellfish Bacterial Pathogen Vibrio sp. Strain B183.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Harold J; Schott, Eric J

    2014-09-18

    We report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. strain B183, a Gram-negative marine bacterium isolated from shellfish that causes mortality in larval mariculture. The availability of this genome sequence will facilitate the study of its virulence mechanisms and add to our knowledge of Vibrio sp. diversity and evolution.

  8. Genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. strain A1, a dye-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Giek Far; Gan, Han Ming; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul

    2012-10-01

    Citrobacter sp. strain A1, isolated from a sewage oxidation pond, is a facultative aerobe and mesophilic dye-degrading bacterium. This organism degrades azo dyes efficiently via azo reduction and desulfonation, followed by the successive biotransformation of dye intermediates under an aerobic environment. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. A1.

  9. Genome sequence of Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 and its potential applications from the genomic aspect.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, Chitra; Thevarajoo, Suganthi; Ee, Robson; Chan, Kok-Gan; Bennett, Joseph P; Goh, Kian Mau; Chong, Chun Shiong

    2016-08-01

    Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 is an aerobic marine bacterium isolated from seawater collected from Desaru beach, Malaysia. To date, the genus Roseivirga consists of only four species with no genome sequence reported. Here, we present the genome sequence of Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 (=KCTC 42709=DSM 101709), with a genome size of approximately 4.08Mbp and G+C content of 39.18%. Genome sequence analysis of strain D-25 revealed the presence of genes related to petroleum hydrocarbon degradation, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene detoxification, heavy metals bioremediation and production of carotenoids, which shed light on the potential application of this strain. PMID:27107724

  10. Antibiofilm Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain 3J6▿

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L.; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN3J6) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN3J6 were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN3J6 had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN3J6 also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies. PMID:20363799

  11. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain BCP1, a Biodegrader of Alkanes and Chlorinated Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, M.; Di Gennaro, P.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Landini, M.; Fedi, S.; Frascari, D.; Presentato, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 cometabolizes chlorinated compounds and mineralizes a broad range of alkanes, as it is highly tolerant to them. The high-quality draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1, consisting of 6,231,823 bp, with a G+C content of 70.4%, 5,902 protein-coding genes, and 58 RNA genes, is presented here. PMID:24158549

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Nicotine Degradation by a Newly Isolated Strain, Ochrobactrum sp. Strain SJY1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation. PMID:25344232

  13. Molecular mechanism of nicotine degradation by a newly isolated strain, Ochrobactrum sp. strain SJY1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation. PMID:25344232

  14. Molecular mechanism of nicotine degradation by a newly isolated strain, Ochrobactrum sp. strain SJY1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation.

  15. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  16. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  17. Improvement of strain Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 for tannase production by induced mutation.

    PubMed

    Zakipour-Molkabadi, E; Hamidi-Esfahani, Z; Sahari, M A; Azizi, M H

    2013-11-01

    In the search for an efficient producer of tannase, Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 was subjected to mutagenesis using heat treatment and strain EZ-ZH290 was isolated. The maximum tannase in this mutant strain was 4.32 U/mL with an incubation period of 84 h as compared to wild strain EZ-ZH190 where the incubation period was 96 h with a maximum enzyme activity of 4.33 U/mL. Also, the Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH290 tannase had a maximum activity at 40 °C and pH 5.5. Then, the spores of strain EZ-ZH290 were subjected to γ irradiation mutagenesis and strain EZ-ZH390 was isolated. Strain EZ-ZH390 exhibited higher tannase activity (7.66 U/mL) than the parent strain EZ-ZH290. It was also found that Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 tannase had an optimum activity at 35 °C and a broad pH profile with an optimum at pH 5.5. The tannase pH stability of Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 and its maximum production of tannase followed the same trend for five generations confirming the occurrence of stable mutant. This paper is shown that γ irradiation can mutate the Penicillium sp. leading to increase the tannase production.

  18. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to strains of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Gabriel D; Kaneshiro, Wendy S; Luu, Van; Berestecky, John M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    During a severe outbreak of bacterial heart rot that occurred in pineapple plantations on Oahu, Hawaii, in 2003 and years following, 43 bacterial strains were isolated from diseased plants or irrigation water and identified as Erwinia chrysanthemi (now Dickeya sp.) by phenotypic, molecular, and pathogenicity assays. Rep-PCR fingerprint patterns grouped strains from pineapple plants and irrigation water into five genotypes (A-E) that differed from representatives of other Dickeya species, Pectobacterium carotovorum and other enteric saprophytes isolated from pineapple. Monoclonal antibodies produced following immunization of mice with virulent type C Dickeya sp. showed only two specificities. MAb Pine-1 (2D11G1, IgG1 with kappa light chain) reacted to all 43 pineapple/water strains and some reference strains (D. dianthicola, D. chrysanthemi, D. paradisiaca, some D. dadantii, and uncharacterized Dickeya sp.) but did not react to reference strains of D. dieffenbachiae, D. zeae, or one of the two Malaysian pineapple strains. MAb Pine-2 (2A7F2, IgG3 with kappa light chain) reacted to all type B, C, and D strains but not to any A or E strains or any reference strains except Dickeya sp. isolated from Malaysian pineapple. Pathogenicity tests showed that type C strains were more aggressive than type A strains when inoculated during cool months. Therefore, MAb Pine-2 distinguishes the more virulent type C strains from less virulent type A pineapple strains and type E water strains. MAbs with these two specificities enable development of rapid diagnostic tests that will distinguish the systemic heart rot pathogen from opportunistic bacteria associated with rotted tissues. Use of the two MAbs in field assays also permits the monitoring of a known subpopulation and provides additional decision tools for disease containment and management practices.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Kosakonia sacchari type strain SP1T

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingyue; Zhu, Bo; Lin, Li; Yang, Litao; Li, Yangrui; An, Qianli

    2014-01-01

    Kosakonia sacchari sp. nov. is a new species within the new genus Kosakonia, which was included in the genus Enterobacter. K sacchari is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium named for its association with sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.). K sacchari bacteria are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile rods. Strain SP1T (=CGMCC1.12102T=LMG 26783T) is the type strain of the K sacchari sp. nov and is able to colonize and fix N2 in association with sugarcane plants, thus promoting plant growth. Here we summarize the features of strain SP1T and describe its complete genome sequence. The genome contains a single chromosome and no plasmids, 4,902,024 nucleotides with 53.7% GC content, 4,460 protein-coding genes and 105 RNA genes including 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes, and 1 ncRNA gene. PMID:25197499

  20. Genome Sequence of Marinobacter sp. Strain MCTG268 Isolated from the Cosmopolitan Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Marinobacter sp. strain MCTG268 was isolated from the cosmopolitan marine diatom Skeletonema costatum and can degrade oil hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,449,396 bp with 4,157 genes and an average G+C content of 57.0%. PMID:27609918

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain NIC1, an Efficient Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain NIC1, an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterium, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain NIC1, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. The genomic information will provide insights into its molecular mechanism for nicotine degradation. PMID:27417841

  2. Complete genome sequence of the chloromethane-degrading Hyphomicrobium sp. strain MC1.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Nadalig, Thierry; Ul Haque, Muhammad Farhan; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Lajus, Aurélie; Roselli, Sandro; Muller, Emilie E L; Gruffaz, Christelle; Barbe, Valérie; Médigue, Claudine; Bringel, Françoise

    2011-09-01

    Hyphomicrobium sp. strain MC1 is an aerobic methylotroph originally isolated from industrial sewage. This prosthecate bacterium was the first strain reported to grow with chloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. Its genome, consisting of a single 4.76-Mb chromosome, is the first for a chloromethane-degrading bacterium to be formally reported. PMID:21868803

  3. Reduction of Selenite to Elemental Red Selenium by Pseudomonas sp. strain CA5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Pseudomonas sp. that may be useful in bioremediation projects was isolated from soil. The strain is of potential value because it reduces selenite to elemental red selenium and is unusual in that it was resistant to high concentrations of both selenate and selenite. Cell of the strain removed 1....

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oceanobacillus sp. Strain Isolated from Soil in a Burial Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Arizaga, Ylenia; Bikandi, Joseba; Garaizar, Javier; Ganau, Giulia; Paglietti, Bianca; Deligios, Massimo; Rubino, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of an Oceanobacillus sp. strain isolated from spores found in soil samples from a burial crypt of the Cathedral of Sant'Antonio Abate in Castelsardo, Italy. The data obtained indicated the closest relation of the strain with Oceanobacillus caeni. PMID:27469952

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Acidovorax sp. Strain KKS102, a Polychlorinated-Biphenyl Degrader

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Fumito; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Acidovorax sp. strain KKS102, a polychlorinated-biphenyl-degrading strain isolated from a soil sample in Tokyo. The genome contains a single circular 5,196,935-bp chromosome and no plasmids. PMID:23209225

  6. Genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain PAMC 25724, isolated from alpine glacier cryoconite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Shin, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Gyu; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    The draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. strain PAMC 25724, which is a violacein-producing psychrotolerant bacterium, was determined. The strain was isolated from glacier cryoconite of the Alps mountain permafrost region. The sequence will allow identification and characterization of the genetic determination of its cold-adaptive properties.

  7. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  8. Functional genomic approaches for understanding the mode of action of Bacillus sp biocontrol strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequencing of several Bacillus sp. strains has shed new light on the mode of action of these antagonists of plant pathogens. The use of genomic data mining tools provided the ability to quickly determine the potential of these strains to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Our B...

  9. Genome Sequence of Marinobacter sp. Strain MCTG268 Isolated from the Cosmopolitan Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Marinobacter sp. strain MCTG268 was isolated from the cosmopolitan marine diatom Skeletonema costatum and can degrade oil hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,449,396 bp with 4,157 genes and an average G+C content of 57.0%. PMID:27609918

  10. Genome sequence and description of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov. strain NP1T

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Sankar, Senthil; Dangui, Nicole Prisca Makaya; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Michelle, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., strain NP1T, is the type strain of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Nesterenkonia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the feces of a 32-year-old French woman suffering from AIDS and living in Marseille. Nesterenkonia massiliensis is a Gram-positive aerobic coccus. Here, we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequencing and annotation. The 2,726,371 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 2,663 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including 1 rRNA operon. PMID:25197469

  11. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Murdochiella massiliensis strain SIT12 sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Vicino, E; Traore, S I; Cimmino, T; Dubourg, G; Labas, N; Andrieu, C; Di Pinto, F; Sokhna, C; Diallo, A; Raoult, D; Rolain, J M

    2016-11-01

    Murdochiella massiliensis strain SIT12 (= CSUR P1987 = DSM 29078) is the type strain of M. massiliensis sp. nov. This bacterium was isolated from the stool of a healthy 2-year-old Senegalese boy. M. massiliensis is an anaerobic, Gram-positive coccus. The genome size of M. massiliensis strain SIT12 is 1 642 295 bp with 48.9% G+C content and assembled into two scaffolds.

  12. Indigoids Biosynthesis from Indole by Two Phenol-Degrading Strains, Pseudomonas sp. PI1 and Acinetobacter sp. PI2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xuwang; Fan, Jiangli; Zhang, Zhaojing; Ma, Qiao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, two phenol-degrading bacterial strains, designated as PI1 and PI2, were isolated from activated sludge for the production of indigoids from indole. According to the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence analysis, strains PI1 and PI2 were identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp., respectively. Liquid chromatography/time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) was applied to analyze the metabolites during the biotransformation of indole by the phenol-degrading strains. The results indicated that both strains could catalyze the formation of four indigoids with the same prominent molecular ion (M-H)(-) peak at m/z 261.067 and molecular formula of C16H10N2O2, including indigo and a purple product, 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one. Isatin and 7-hydroxyindole were detected as the intermediates. Thus, the possible pathways for the production of indigoids from indole were proposed. Subsequently, the optimal conditions for the production of indigo from indole were determined using response surface methodology, and 11.82 ± 0.30 and 17.19 ± 0.49 mg/L indigo were produced by strains PI1 and PI2, respectively. The present study should provide potential candidates for microbial production of indigoids.

  13. Streptomyces avermectinius sp. nov., an avermectin-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoko; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Seino, Akio; Ueno, Junji; Iwai, Yuzuru; Omura, Satoshi

    2002-11-01

    We propose the establishment of a new species, Streptomyces avermectinius, based on characterization of strain MA-4680(T) and morphological and phylogenetic comparisons with closely related members of the genus Streptomyces. The 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from this strain and used to place it among Streptomyces species using the variable alpha region and the nearly complete 16S rDNA sequence. Four Streptomyces species were selected as related species from phenotypic data, three species from phylogenetic databases on alpha region sequences and two species from phylogenetic data using nearly complete 16S rDNA sequences. Analysis of DNA-DNA hybridization tests distinguished strain MA-4680(T) from these eight Streptomyces species. The type strain is strain MA-4680(T) (= ATCC 31267(T) = NRRL 8165(T)). PMID:12508884

  14. A Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR reductively dechlorinates both 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chang; Zhao, Siyan; He, Jianzhong

    2014-11-01

    1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) and chloroform are two notorious groundwater pollutants. Here we report the isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR that rapidly dechlorinates both compounds. In pyruvate-amended medium, strain PR reductively dechlorinates ∼ 1.0 mM TCA completely to monochloroethane within 15 days. Under the same conditions, strain PR dechlorinates ∼ 1.2 mM chloroform to predominantly dichloromethane (∼ 1.14 mM) and trace amount of monochloromethane (∼ 0.06 mM) within 10 days. Strain PR shares 96.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its closest relative - Desulfitobacterium metallireducens strain 853-15; however, it distinguishes itself from known Desulfitobacterium strains by its inability of utilizing several of their commonly shared substrates such as lactate, thiosulfate and sulfite. A reductive dehalogenase gene (ctrA) in strain PR was identified to be responsible for dechlorination of both TCA and chloroform, showing a maximum expression level of 5.95 ∼ 6.25 copies of transcripts cell(-1) . CtrA shares 94% amino acid sequence identity with CfrA in Dehalobacter sp. strain CF50 and DcrA in Dehalobacter sp. strain DCA. Interestingly, strain PR could tolerate high aqueous concentrations (up to 0.45 mM) of trichloroethene, another groundwater pollutant that often coexists with TCA/chloroform. As the first chloroform-respiring and the second TCA-respiring isolate that has been identified, Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR may prove useful in remediation of halogenated alkanes with trihalomethyl (-CX₃) groups.

  15. Endophytic colonization of balloon flower by antifungal strain Bacillus sp. CY22.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo Jeong; Lim, Woo Jin; Hong, Su Young; Park, Sang Ryeol; Yun, Han Dae

    2003-10-01

    Endophytic Bacillus sp. CY22 was previously isolated from the root interior of the balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) (Cho et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 66, 1270-1275 (2002)). Three-month-old balloon flower seedlings were inoculated with 10(7) cfu/ml of strain CY22R3, a rifampicin-resistant strain of CY22, and external and internal root colonization was assessed 2 and 4 weeks later. After inoculation, large numbers of bacteria were observed on the root surface by scanning electron microscopy. More detailed studies using optical and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that Bacillus sp. CY22 was endophytically established within intercellular spaces, cortical cells, and aerenchymas of root. Also, Bacillus sp. CY22 showed antibiotic activities against several phytopathogens by producing the antibiotic iturin A. In the pot test, root rot of balloon flower seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani was suppressed when the Bacillus sp. CY22R3 was inoculated into the soil.

  16. Biodegradation of Bis(2-Chloroethyl) Ether by Xanthobacter sp. Strain ENV481▿

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Schaefer, Charles E.; Vainberg, Simon; Steffan, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of bis(2-chloroethyl) ether (BCEE) was observed to occur in two bacterial strains. Strain ENV481, a Xanthobacter sp. strain, was isolated by enrichment culturing of samples from a Superfund site located in the northeastern United States. The strain was able to grow on BCEE or 2-chloroethylethyl ether as the sole source of carbon and energy. BCEE degradation in strain ENV481 was facilitated by sequential dehalogenation reactions resulting in the formation of 2-(2-chloroethoxy)ethanol and diethylene glycol (DEG), respectively. 2-Hydroxyethoxyacetic acid was detected as a product of DEG catabolism by the strain. Degradation of BCEE by strain ENV481 was independent of oxygen, and the strain was not able to grow on a mixture of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes, other prevalent contaminants at the site. Another bacterial isolate, Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 (S. Vainberg et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5218-5224, 2006), degraded BCEE after growth on tetrahydrofuran or propane but was not able to grow on BCEE as a sole carbon source. BCEE degradation by strain ENV478 appeared to be facilitated by a monooxygenase-mediated O-dealkylation mechanism, and it resulted in the accumulation of 2-chloroacetic acid that was not readily degraded by the strain. PMID:17873075

  17. Identification of Acetobacter strains isolated from Indonesian sources, and proposals of Acetobacter syzygii sp. nov., Acetobacter cibinongensis sp. nov., and Acetobacter orientalis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Lisdiyanti, Puspita; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Seki, Tatsuji; Yamada, Yuzo; Uchimura, Tai; Komagata, Kazuo

    2001-06-01

    Forty-six strains of acetic acid bacteria newly isolated from flowers, fruits, and fermented foods collected in Indonesia were taxonomically studied. They were Gram-negative rods, produced acetic acid from ethanol, oxidized acetate and lactate to CO(2) and H(2)O, and had Q-9 as the major ubiquinone system. On the basis of DNA-DNA similarity, all strains studied, including type strains and reference strains of the genus Acetobacter, were separated into eleven groups (Groups I to XI). Of the 46 isolates, two isolates were included in Group II and identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus, five in Group IV as A. orleanensis, 16 in Group V as A. lovaniensis, five in Group VII as A. indonesiensis, and three in Group VIII as A. tropicalis. The remaining 15 isolates constituted three new groups based on DNA-DNA similarity; four isolates were included in Group IX, two in Group X, and nine in Group XI. No isolates were identified as A. aceti (Group I), A. peroxydans (Group III), and A. estunensis (Group VI). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences of representative strains of the Groups indicated belonging to the strains of the genus Acetobacter. On the basis of DNA base composition, DNA-DNA similarity, and 16S rDNA sequences, three new species of the genus Acetobacter are proposed: Acetobacter syzygii sp. nov. for Group IX, Acetobacter cibinongensis sp. nov. for Group X, and Acetobacter orientalis sp. nov. for Group XI. The distribution of Acetobacter strains in Indonesia is discussed in light of isolation sources.

  18. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography.

    PubMed

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A; Berry, Alison M; Bickhart, Derek M; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Mullin, Beth C; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N(2)-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the "actinorhizal" symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%-98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  19. Identification and Inactivation of Three Group 2 Sigma Factor Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Khudyakov, Ivan Y.; Golden, James W.

    2001-01-01

    Three new Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 genes encoding group 2 alternative sigma factors have been cloned and characterized. Insertional inactivation of sigD, sigE, and sigF genes did not affect growth on nitrate under standard laboratory conditions but did transiently impair the abilities of sigD and sigE mutant strains to establish diazotrophic growth. A sigD sigE double mutant, though proficient in growth on nitrate and still able to differentiate into distinct proheterocysts, was unable to grow diazotrophically due to extensive fragmentation of filaments upon nitrogen deprivation. This double mutant could be complemented by wild-type copies of sigD or sigE, indicating some degree of functional redundancy that can partially mask phenotypes of single gene mutants. However, the sigE gene was required for lysogenic development of the temperate cyanophage A-4L. Several other combinations of double mutations, especially sigE sigF, caused a transient defect in establishing diazotrophic growth, manifested as a strong and prolonged bleaching response to nitrogen deprivation. We found no evidence for developmental regulation of the sigma factor genes. luxAB reporter fusions with sigD, sigE, and sigF all showed slightly reduced expression after induction of heterocyst development by nitrogen stepdown. Phylogenetic analysis of cyanobacterial group 2 sigma factor sequences revealed that they fall into several subgroups. Three morphologically and physiologically distant strains, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002, and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 each contain representatives of four subgroups. Unlike unicellular strains, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 has three additional group 2 sigma factors that cluster in subgroup 2.5b, which is perhaps specific for filamentous or heterocystous cyanobacteria. PMID:11673438

  20. Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T, a new bacterial species isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Tidjiani Alou, M.; Rathored, J.; Khelaifia, S.; Michelle, C.; Brah, S.; Diallo, B.A.; Raoult, D.; Lagier, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T is the type strain of B. rubiinfantis sp. nov., isolated from the fecal flora of a child with kwashiorkor in Niger. It is Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod belonging to the Bacillaceae family. We describe the features of this organism alongside the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4 311 083 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 4028 protein-coding gene and 121 RNA genes including nine rRNA genes. PMID:27076912

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production using waste vegetable oil by Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Hwan; Jeon, Che Ok; Choi, Mun Hwan; Yoon, Sung Chul; Park, Woojun

    2008-08-01

    To produce polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from inexpensive substrates by bacteria, vegetable-oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from a rice field using enrichment cultivation. The isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 showed clear orange or red spots of accumulated PHA granules when grown on phosphate and nitrogen limited medium containing vegetable oil as the sole carbon source and stained with Nile blue A. Up to 37.34% (w/w) of intracellular PHA was produced from corn oil, which consisted of three major 3-hydroxyalkanoates; octanoic (C8:0, 37.75% of the total 3-hydroxyalkanoate content of PHA), decanoic (C10:0, 36.74%), and dodecanoic (C12:0, 11.36%). Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated up to 23.52% (w/w) of PHAMCL from waste vegetable oil. The proportion of 3- hydroxyalkanoate of the waste vegetable-oil-derived PHA [hexanoic (5.86%), octanoic (45.67%), decanoic (34.88%), tetradecanoic (8.35%), and hexadecanoic (5.24%)] showed a composition ratio different from that of the corn-oil-derived PHA. Strain DR2 used three major fatty acids in the same ratio, and linoleic acid was the major source of PHA production. Interestingly, the production of PHA in Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 could not occur in either acetate- or butyrate-amended media. Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated a greater amount of PHA than other well-studied strains (Chromobacterium violaceum and Ralstonia eutropha H16) when grown on vegetable oil. The data showed that Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 was capable of producing PHA from waste vegetable oil.

  2. CpcM posttranslationally methylates asparagine-71/72 of phycobiliprotein beta subunits in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gaozhong; Leonard, Heidi S; Schluchter, Wendy M; Bryant, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Cyanobacteria produce phycobilisomes, which are macromolecular light-harvesting complexes mostly assembled from phycobiliproteins. Phycobiliprotein beta subunits contain a highly conserved gamma-N-methylasparagine residue, which results from the posttranslational modification of Asn71/72. Through comparative genomic analyses, we identified a gene, denoted cpcM, that (i) encodes a protein with sequence similarity to other S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, (ii) is found in all sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, and (iii) often occurs near genes encoding phycobiliproteins in cyanobacterial genomes. The cpcM genes of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 were insertionally inactivated. Mass spectrometric analyses of phycobiliproteins isolated from the mutants confirmed that the CpcB, ApcB, and ApcF were 14 Da lighter than their wild-type counterparts. Trypsin digestion and mass analyses of phycobiliproteins isolated from the mutants showed that tryptic peptides from phycocyanin that included Asn72 were also 14 Da lighter than the equivalent peptides from wild-type strains. Thus, CpcM is the methyltransferase that modifies the amide nitrogen of Asn71/72 of CpcB, ApcB, and ApcF. When cells were grown at low light intensity, the cpcM mutants were phenotypically similar to the wild-type strains. However, the mutants were sensitive to high-light stress, and the cpcM mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was unable to grow at moderately high light intensities. Fluorescence emission measurements showed that the ability to perform state transitions was impaired in the cpcM mutants and suggested that energy transfer from phycobiliproteins to the photosystems was also less efficient. The possible functions of asparagine N methylation of phycobiliproteins are discussed.

  3. Genomic Analysis Unravels Reduced Inorganic Sulfur Compound Oxidation of Heterotrophic Acidophilic Acidicaldus sp. Strain DX-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hongying; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Liu, Xueduan

    2016-01-01

    Although reduced inorganic sulfur compound (RISC) oxidation in many chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers has been investigated in recent years, there is little information about RISC oxidation in heterotrophic acidophiles. In this study, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, a heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophile, was isolated. Its genome was sequenced and then used for comparative genomics. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR was performed to identify the expression of genes involved in the RISC oxidation. Gene encoding thiosulfate: quinone oxidoreductase was present in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, while no candidate genes with significant similarity to tetrathionate hydrolase were found. Additionally, there were genes encoding heterodisulfide reductase complex, which was proposed to play a crucial role in oxidizing cytoplasmic sulfur. Like many heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1 had no genes encoding enzymes essential for the direct oxidation of sulfite. An indirect oxidation of sulfite via adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate was proposed in Acidicaldus strain DX-1. However, compared to other closely related bacteria Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum, which harbored the genes encoding Sox system, almost all of these genes were not detected in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1. This study might provide some references for the future study of RISC oxidation in heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles. PMID:27239474

  4. Genomic Analysis Unravels Reduced Inorganic Sulfur Compound Oxidation of Heterotrophic Acidophilic Acidicaldus sp. Strain DX-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hongying; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Liu, Xueduan

    2016-01-01

    Although reduced inorganic sulfur compound (RISC) oxidation in many chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers has been investigated in recent years, there is little information about RISC oxidation in heterotrophic acidophiles. In this study, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, a heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophile, was isolated. Its genome was sequenced and then used for comparative genomics. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR was performed to identify the expression of genes involved in the RISC oxidation. Gene encoding thiosulfate: quinone oxidoreductase was present in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, while no candidate genes with significant similarity to tetrathionate hydrolase were found. Additionally, there were genes encoding heterodisulfide reductase complex, which was proposed to play a crucial role in oxidizing cytoplasmic sulfur. Like many heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1 had no genes encoding enzymes essential for the direct oxidation of sulfite. An indirect oxidation of sulfite via adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate was proposed in Acidicaldus strain DX-1. However, compared to other closely related bacteria Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum, which harbored the genes encoding Sox system, almost all of these genes were not detected in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1. This study might provide some references for the future study of RISC oxidation in heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles. PMID:27239474

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium sp. Strain BHC-A, Revealing Genes for the Degradation of Hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chao; Cao, Li; Zhang, Rong; He, Jian; Li, Shunpeng; Hong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Sphingobium sp. strain BHC-A, a lin gene-based hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading strain, isolated from soil that suffered long-term HCH contamination in an insecticide factory. PMID:24699958

  6. Identification and nitrogen regulation of the cyanase gene from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed Central

    Harano, Y; Suzuki, I; Maeda, S; Kaneko, T; Tabata, S; Omata, T

    1997-01-01

    An open reading frame (slr0899) on the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 encodes a polypeptide of 149 amino acid residues, the sequence of which is 40% identical to that of cyanase from Escherichia coli. Introduction into a cyanase-deficient E. coli strain of a plasmid-borne slr0899 resulted in expression of low but significant activity of cyanase. Targeted interruption of a homolog of slr0899 from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942, encoding a protein 77% identical to that encoded by slr0899, resulted in loss of cellular cyanase activity. These results indicated that slr0899 and its homolog in the strain PCC 7942 represent the cyanobacterial cyanase gene (designated cynS). While cynS of strain PCC 6803 is tightly clustered with the four putative molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis genes located downstream, cynS of strain PCC 7942 was found to be tightly clustered with the two genes located upstream, which encode proteins similar to the subunits of the cyanobacterial nitrate-nitrite transporter. In both strains, cynS was transcribed as a part of a large transcription unit and the transcription was negatively regulated by ammonium. Cyanase activity was low in ammonium-grown cells and was induced 7- to 13-fold by inhibition of ammonium fixation or by transfer of the cells to ammonium-free media. These findings indicated that cyanase is an ammonium-repressible enzyme in cyanobacteria, the expression of which is regulated at the level of transcription. Similar to other ammonium-repressible genes in cyanobacteria, expression of cynS required NtcA, a global nitrogen regulator of cyanobacteria. PMID:9294430

  7. Identification and nitrogen regulation of the cyanase gene from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Harano, Y; Suzuki, I; Maeda, S; Kaneko, T; Tabata, S; Omata, T

    1997-09-01

    An open reading frame (slr0899) on the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 encodes a polypeptide of 149 amino acid residues, the sequence of which is 40% identical to that of cyanase from Escherichia coli. Introduction into a cyanase-deficient E. coli strain of a plasmid-borne slr0899 resulted in expression of low but significant activity of cyanase. Targeted interruption of a homolog of slr0899 from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942, encoding a protein 77% identical to that encoded by slr0899, resulted in loss of cellular cyanase activity. These results indicated that slr0899 and its homolog in the strain PCC 7942 represent the cyanobacterial cyanase gene (designated cynS). While cynS of strain PCC 6803 is tightly clustered with the four putative molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis genes located downstream, cynS of strain PCC 7942 was found to be tightly clustered with the two genes located upstream, which encode proteins similar to the subunits of the cyanobacterial nitrate-nitrite transporter. In both strains, cynS was transcribed as a part of a large transcription unit and the transcription was negatively regulated by ammonium. Cyanase activity was low in ammonium-grown cells and was induced 7- to 13-fold by inhibition of ammonium fixation or by transfer of the cells to ammonium-free media. These findings indicated that cyanase is an ammonium-repressible enzyme in cyanobacteria, the expression of which is regulated at the level of transcription. Similar to other ammonium-repressible genes in cyanobacteria, expression of cynS required NtcA, a global nitrogen regulator of cyanobacteria.

  8. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black pigment producing strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two isolates of a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a da...

  9. Draft genome sequence of Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 isolated from a Sebkha in Thamelaht, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Bezuidt, Oliver K I; Gomri, Mohamed A; Pierneef, Rian; Van Goethem, Marc W; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A; Makhalanyane, Thulani P

    2016-01-01

    The members of the genus Thermoactinomyces are known for their protein degradative capacities. Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 is a Gram-positive filamentous bacterium, isolated from moderately saline water in the Thamelaht region of Algeria. This isolate is a thermophilic aerobic bacterium with the capacity to produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes. This strain exhibits up to 99 % similarity with members of the genus Thermoactinomyces, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Here we report on the phenotypic features of Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 together with the draft genome sequence and its annotation. The genome of this strain is 2,558,690 bp in length (one chromosome, but no plasmid) with an average G + C content of 47.95 %, and contains 2550 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes together with 64 ORFs annotated as proteases. PMID:27617058

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  11. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites.

  12. Infection of Amblyomma ovale by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Andrés F; Díaz, Francisco J; Valbuena, Gustavo; Gazi, Michal; Labruna, Marcelo B; Hidalgo, Marylin; Mattar, Salim; Contreras, Verónica; Rodas, Juan D

    2014-10-01

    Our goal was to understand rickettsial spotted fevers' circulation in areas of previous outbreaks reported from 2006 to 2008 in Colombia. We herein present molecular identification and isolation of Rickettsia sp. Atlantic rainforest strain from Amblyomma ovale ticks, a strain shown to be pathogenic to humans. Infected ticks were found on dogs and a rodent in Antioquia and Córdoba Provinces. This is the first report of this rickettsia outside Brazil, which expands its known range considerably.

  13. Interaction of fructose with the glucose permease of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, E.; Schmetterer, G.

    1986-05-01

    Fructose was bactericidal for the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Each of ten independently isolated fructose-resistant mutants had an alteration of the glucose transport system, measured as uptake of glucose or of 3-0-methyl-D-glucose. In the presence of the analog, the wild-type Synechocystis strain was protected against fructose. Two mutants altered in photoautotrophy were also isolated.

  14. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites. PMID:19688378

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Kimura, Zen-Ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  16. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2016-03-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[( S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1a) and 2-[( R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds ( 2- 8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3- 6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  18. Discovery of rare and highly toxic microcystins from lichen-associated cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-10-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp(3),ADMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda(5)]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis.

  19. Isolation of Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECU0066, a New Sulfide Monooxygenase-Producing Strain for Asymmetric Sulfoxidation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Tao; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Xu, Jian-He; Lu, Wen-Ya; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A new and efficient sulfide monooxygenase-producing strain, ECU0066, was isolated and identified as a Rhodococcus sp. that could transform phenylmethyl sulfide (PMS) to (S)-sulfoxide with 99% enantiomeric excess via two steps of enantioselective oxidations. Its enzyme activity could be effectively induced by adding PMS or phenylmethyl sulfoxide (PMSO) directly to a rich medium at the early log phase (6 h) of fermentation, resulting in over 10-times-higher production of the enzyme. This bacterial strain also displayed fairly good activity and enantioselectivity toward seven other sulfides, indicating a good potential for practical application in asymmetric synthesis of chiral sulfoxides. PMID:18836022

  20. Deep Desulfurization of Extensively Hydrodesulfurized Middle Distillate Oil by Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECRD-1

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M. J.; Lee, M. K.; Prince, R. C.; Minak-Bernero, V.; George, G. N.; Pickering, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in particular substituted DBTs, are resistant to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and can persist in fuels even after aggressive HDS treatment. Treatment by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 of a middle distillate oil whose sulfur content was virtually all substituted DBTs produced extensive desulfurization and a sulfur level of 56 ppm. PMID:11282654

  1. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain ECSMB14103, Isolated from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing-Pan; Ding, De-Wen; Bao, Wei-Yang; Yang, Jin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain ECSMB14103 was isolated from marine biofilms formed on the East China Sea. The draft genome sequence comprises 4.11 Mp with a G+C content of 39.7%. The information from the draft genome will contribute to an understanding of bacteria-animal interaction. PMID:25908138

  3. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505.

    PubMed

    Tarkka, M T; Feldhahn, L; Buscot, F; Wubet, T

    2015-04-02

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation.

  4. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505

    PubMed Central

    Feldhahn, L.; Buscot, F.; Wubet, T.

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation. PMID:25838498

  5. Whole-Genome Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia spp. rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone as quorum-sensing signal molecules which coordinate their phenotype at the population level. In this work, we present the whole genome of Burkholderia sp. strain A9, which enables the discovery of its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene. PMID:25745000

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sp. Strain A1, Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the genome of Lysinibacillus sp. strain A1, which was isolated from tropical soil. Analysis of its genome sequence shows the presence of a gene encoding for a putative peptidase responsible for nitrogen compounds. PMID:25814592

  7. Characterization of Streptomyces sp. strain DRS-1 and its ampicillin transformation product.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Sharma, A; Bhowmick, G; Roy, M K; Ghosh, A C

    1997-01-01

    Incubation of ampicillin with whole cells of Streptomyces sp. DRS-1 resulted in accumulation of four compounds different from ampicillin. One of them was isolated, purified and partially characterized. On the basis of spectroscopic characteristics, RF value and antibacterial activity the compound was identified as cephalexin. It could also be obtained from ampicillin by using crude protein extract of the strain. PMID:9527516

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Cyanobium sp. NIES-981, a Marine Strain Potentially Useful for Ecotoxicological Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Haruyo; Shimura, Yohei; Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kawachi, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobium sp. NIES-981 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from tidal flat sands in Okinawa, Japan. Here, we report the complete 3.0-Mbp genome sequence of NIES-981, which is composed of a single chromosome, and its annotation. This sequence information may provide a basis for developing an ecotoxicological bioassay using this strain. PMID:27469961

  9. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments.

  10. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  11. Genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain ATCC 39116, a plant biomass-degrading actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer R; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K

    2012-05-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals. PMID:22493203

  12. Transformation of dibenzo-p-dioxin by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Sinnwell, V.; Meyer, H.; Fortnagel, P.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    Dibenzo-p-dioxin was oxidatively cleaved by the dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 to produce minor amounts of 1-hydroxydibenzo-p-dioxin and catechol, while a 2-phenoxy derivative of muconic acid was formed as the major product. Upon acidic methylation, the latter yielded the dimethylester of cis,trans-2-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-muconic acid.

  13. Cloning of Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS3 genes specifying dehalogenation of 4-chlorobenzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Savard, P.; Peloquin, L.; Sylvestre, M.

    1986-10-01

    Halogenated benzoates have been used as models for the study of the biodegradation of herbicides and PCBs. The degradation of 4-chlorobenzoate (4-CBA) by Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS3 is thought to proceed first by the dehalogenation of 4-CBA to 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA), which is then metabolized following the protocatechuate branch of the ..beta..-ketoadipate pathway. The cloning of the 4-CBA dehalogenation system was carried out by constructing a gene bank of Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS3 in Pseudomonas putida. Hybrid plasmid pPSA843 contains a 9.5-kilobase-pair fragment derived from the chromosome of Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS3. This plasmid confers on P. putida the ability to dehalogenate 4-CBA and grow on 4-CBA as the only source of carbon. However, pPSA843 did not complement mutants of P. putida unable to grow on 4-HBA (POB/sup -/), showing that the genes involved in the metabolism of 4-HBA were not cloned. Subcloning of Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS3 genes revealed that most of the insert is required for the dehalogenation of 4-CBA, suggesting that more than one gene product is involved in this dehalogenation.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Carbaryl-Degrading Soil Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain C5pp.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Vikas D; Jangir, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Phale, Prashant S

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C5pp. Genes encoding salicylate and gentisate metabolism, large amounts of oxygenase, nitrogen metabolism, and heavy metal tolerance were identified. The sequence will provide further insight into the biochemical and evolutionary aspects of carbaryl degradation. PMID:27284139

  15. Oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls by pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 and pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.T.; Cruden, D.L.; Haddock, J.D.; Zylstra, G.J.; Brand, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls that do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in the substrate specificity of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenases from both organisms.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Hemolysin-Containing Carnobacterium sp. Strain CP1 Isolated from the Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sidong; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Di; Jing, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Carnobacterium sp. strain CP1 was isolated from Antarctic sandy soil and predicted to be a novel species belonging to the genus Carnobacterium. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence, which consists of a circular 2,605,518-bp chromosome and an 8,883-bp plasmid with G+C contents of 38.13% and 31.63%, respectively. PMID:27445381

  17. Genome sequence of Shinella sp. strain DD12, isolated from homogenized guts of starved Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Freese, Heike; Daniel, Rolf; Simeonova, Diliana D

    2016-01-01

    Shinella sp. strain DD12, a novel phosphite assimilating bacterium, has been isolated from homogenized guts of 4 days starved zooplankton Daphnia magna. Here we report the draft genome of this bacterium, which comprises 7,677,812 bp and 7505 predicted protein-coding genes.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M.; Fernandez, Pablo M.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M; Fernandez, Pablo M; Ferrero, Marcela A; Martinez, M Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  20. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus sp. Strain NK55a.

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, Sergey; Liu, Zhenfeng; Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Pinel, Nicolas; Nelson, William C.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Romine, Margaret F.; Haruta, Shin; Schuster, Stephan C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-01-02

    The genome of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus sp. strain NK55a, isolated from Nakabusa hot spring, comprises a single, circular, 2.5-Mb chromosome. The genome is predicted to encode 2358 protein coding genes, including genes for all typical cyanobacterial photosynthetic and metabolic functions. No genes encoding hydrogenases or nitrogenase were identified.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Electrogenic Petroleum-Degrading Thalassospira sp. Strain HJ

    PubMed Central

    Kiseleva, Larisa; Garushyants, Sofya K.; Briliute, Justina; Simpson, David J. W.; Goryanin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of the petroleum-degrading Thalassospira sp. strain HJ, isolated from tidal marine sediment. Knowledge of this genomic information will inform studies on electrogenesis and means to degrade environmental organic contaminants, including compounds found in petroleum. PMID:25977412

  4. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain UCD-KPL2560 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brian A.; Faller, Lina L.; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the actinobacterium Curtobacterium sp. strain UCD-KPL2560, which was isolated from the running surface of an indoor track field house in Medford, MA, USA (42.409716°N, -71.115169°W). The genome assembly contains 3,480,487 bp in 156 contigs. PMID:27795241

  6. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain RTd22, an Endophyte of the Mexican Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Fernanda O.; Bacha, Larissa V.; Samborskyy, Markyian; Conti, Raphael; Pessotti, Rita C.; Clardy, Jon

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain RTd22, an endophytic actinobacterium that was isolated from the roots of the Mexican sunflower Tithonia diversifolia. The bacterium’s 11.1-Mb linear chromosome is predicted to encode a large number of unknown natural products. PMID:27445382

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Carbofuran-Mineralizing Novosphingobium sp. Strain KN65.2

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Phi Oanh; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    Complete mineralization of the N-methylcarbamate insecticide carbofuran, including mineralization of the aromatic moiety, appears to be confined to sphingomonad isolates. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of such a sphingomonad strain, i.e., Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2, isolated from carbofuran-exposed agricultural soil in Vietnam. PMID:26159535

  8. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, isolated from alpine glacial cryoconite.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Su Jin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas spp. have shown characteristics of efficiently metabolizing environmental pollutants and also producing exopolysaccharides known as biofilms. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, which was isolated from glacier cryoconite in the Alps mountain permafrost region and which may provide further insight into biodegradative and/or biofilm-producing mechanisms in a cold environment.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain DMB5, Acclimatized and Enriched for Catabolizing Anthropogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jenny; Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Parmar, Nidhi; Hinsu, Ankit; Patel, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain DMB5, isolated from polluted sediments of the Kharicut Canal, Vatva, India, having a genome size of 7.5 Mbp and 7,077 coding sequences. The genome of this dye-degrading bacterium provides valuable information on the microbe-mediated biodegradation of anthropogenic compounds. PMID:27034501

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. Strain KG01 with Full Potential for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, María S.; Lira, Felipe; Martínez, José L.; Olivares, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a free-living psychrotolerant, Pseudomonas sp. strain KG01, isolated from an Antarctic soil sample and displaying interesting antimicrobial and surfactant activities. The sequence is 6.3 Mb long and includes 5,648 predicted-coding sequences. PMID:26294625

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Carbaryl-Degrading Soil Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain C5pp

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Vikas D.; Jangir, Pramod Kumar; Phale, Prashant S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C5pp. Genes encoding salicylate and gentisate metabolism, large amounts of oxygenase, nitrogen metabolism, and heavy metal tolerance were identified. The sequence will provide further insight into the biochemical and evolutionary aspects of carbaryl degradation. PMID:27284139

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Tropical Freshwater Cyanobacterium, Limnothrix sp. Strain P13C2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boon Fei; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2016-01-01

    A nonaxenic unialgal culture of Limnothrix sp. strain P13C2 was obtained through multiple subculturing of an inoculum obtained from a tropical freshwater lake. Here, we report the genome of P13C2 of 4.6 Mbp, extracted from the metagenome of this coculture. PMID:27795269

  13. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael F; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  14. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production. PMID:26089422

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain OCN003, Isolated from Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Beurmann, Silvia; Videau, Patrick; Ushijima, Blake; Smith, Ashley M; Aeby, Greta S; Callahan, Sean M; Belcaid, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain OCN003 is a marine gammaproteobacterium that was isolated from a diseased colony of the common Hawaiian reef coral, Montipora capitata, found on a reef surrounding Moku o Lo'e in Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawaii. Here, we report the complete genome of Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain OCN003. PMID:25593253

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Labrenzia sp. Strain CP4, Isolated from a Self-Regenerating Biocathode Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Eddie, Brian J.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Hervey, W. Judson; Lin, Baochuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Labrenzia sp. strain CP4, isolated from an electricity-consuming marine biocathode biofilm. Labrenzia sp. strain CP4 consists of a circular 5.2 Mbp chromosome and an 88 Kbp plasmid. PMID:27174270

  17. Isolation and characterization of a hydrogen- and ethanol-producing Clostridium sp. strain URNW.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Umesh; Wrana, Nathan; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2011-03-01

    Identification, characterization, and end-product synthesis patterns were analyzed in a newly identified mesophilic, anaerobic Clostridium sp. strain URNW, capable of producing hydrogen (H₂) and ethanol. Metabolic profiling was used to characterize putative end-product synthesis pathways of the Clostridium sp. strain URNW, which was found to grow on cellobiose; on hexose sugars, such as glucose, sucrose, and mannose; and on sugar alcohols, like mannitol and sorbitol. When grown in batch cultures on 2 g cellobiose·L⁻¹, Clostridium sp. strain URNW showed a cell generation time of 1.5 h, and the major end-products were H2, formate, carbon dioxide (CO₂), lactate, butyrate, acetate, pyruvate, and ethanol. The total volumetric H₂ production was 14.2 mmol·(L culture)⁻¹ and the total production of ethanol was 0.4 mmol·(L culture)⁻¹. The maximum yield of H₂ was 1.3 mol·(mol glucose equivalent)⁻¹ at a carbon recovery of 94%. The specific production rates of H₂, CO₂, and ethanol were 0.45, 0.13, and 0.003 mol·h⁻¹·(g dry cell mass)-1, respectively. BLAST analyses of 16S rDNA and chaperonin 60 (cpn60) sequences from Clostridium sp. strain URNW revealed a 98% nucleotide sequence identity with the 16S rDNA and cpn60 sequences from Clostridium intestinale ATCC 49213. Phylogenetic analyses placed Clostridium sp. strain URNW within the butyrate-synthesizing clostridia.

  18. Complete genome sequence of carotenoid-producing Microbacterium sp. strain PAMC28756 isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Han, So-Ra; Kim, Ki-Hwa; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    Microbacterium sp. strain PAMC28756, of the family Microbacteriaceae, was isolated from Stereocaulon sp., an Antarctic lichen. Complete genome sequencing of Microbacterium sp. PAMC28756 revealed, for the first time in the genus Microbacterium, a series of key genes involved in C50 carotenoid biosynthesis. An analysis of the Microbacterium sp. PAMC28756 genome will lead to a better understanding of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, the sequence data will provide novel insight into UV radiation resistance in extremely cold environments. PMID:27015978

  19. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Murdochiella massiliensis strain SIT12 sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Vicino, E; Traore, S I; Cimmino, T; Dubourg, G; Labas, N; Andrieu, C; Di Pinto, F; Sokhna, C; Diallo, A; Raoult, D; Rolain, J M

    2016-11-01

    Murdochiella massiliensis strain SIT12 (= CSUR P1987 = DSM 29078) is the type strain of M. massiliensis sp. nov. This bacterium was isolated from the stool of a healthy 2-year-old Senegalese boy. M. massiliensis is an anaerobic, Gram-positive coccus. The genome size of M. massiliensis strain SIT12 is 1 642 295 bp with 48.9% G+C content and assembled into two scaffolds. PMID:27660714

  20. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC under denitrification conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Criddle, C.S.; DeWitt, J.T.; Grbic-Galic, D.; McCarty, P.L. )

    1990-11-01

    A denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. (strain KC) capable of transforming carbon tetrachloride (CT) was isolated from groundwater aquifer solids. Major products of the transformation of {sup 14}C-labeled CT by Pseudomonas strain KC under denitrification conditions were {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and an unidentified water-soluble fraction. Little or no chloroform was produced. Addition of dissolved trace metals, notably, ferrous iron and cobalt, to the growth medium appeared to enhance growth of Pseudomonas strain KC while inhibiting transformation of CT. It is hypothesized that transformation of CT by this organism is associated with the mechanism of trace-metal scavenging.

  1. Sequence of the Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 gene coding for xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Saari, G C; Kumar, A A; Kawasaki, G H; Insley, M Y; O'Hara, P J

    1987-02-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for xylose isomerase from Ampullariella sp. strain 3876, a gram-positive bacterium, has been determined. A clone of a fragment of strain 3876 DNA coding for a xylose isomerase activity was identified by its ability to complement a xylose isomerase-defective Escherichia coli strain. One such complementation positive fragment, 2,922 nucleotides in length, was sequenced in its entirety. There are two open reading frames 1,182 and 1,242 nucleotides in length, on opposite strands of this fragment, each of which could code for a protein the expected size of xylose isomerase. The 1,182-nucleotide open reading frame was identified as the coding sequence for the protein from the sequence analysis of the amino-terminal region and selected internal peptides. The gene initiates with GTG and has a high guanine and cytosine content (70%) and an exceptionally strong preference (97%) for guanine or cytosine in the third position of the codons. The gene codes for a 43,210-dalton polypeptide composed of 393 amino acids. The xylose isomerase from Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 is similar in size to other bacterial xylose isomerases and has limited amino acid sequence homology to the available sequences from E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptomyces violaceus-ruber. In all cases yet studied, the bacterial gene for xylulose kinase is downstream from the gene for xylose isomerase. We present evidence suggesting that in Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 these genes are similarly arranged. PMID:3027039

  2. Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, potent arsenic hypertolerant bacterium isolated from the industrial effluent of India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dhaval N; Flora, S J S; Kalia, Kiran

    2009-07-30

    Arsenic hypertolerant bacterial cells were isolated from the common industrial effluent treatment plant, Vapi, India. Strain DJ-1 sustaining 400 mM, As (V) out of 16 bacterial strains was identified as Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 through 16S rRNA ribotyping. The maximum arsenic accumulation of 9.8+/-0.5 mg g(-1) (dry weight) was observed during stationary phase of growth. Intracellular compartmentalization has shown 80% of arsenic accumulation in cytoplasm. The lack of arsC gene and arsenate reductase activity indicated that Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 may lack classical ars operon and detoxification may be mediated through some novel mechanism. The arsenite binding protein was purified by affinity chromatography and characterized as DNA protection during starvation (DPS) protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The induction of DPS showed the adaptation of bacteria in arsenic stress condition and/or in detoxification mechanism, relies on its ability to bind with arsenic. These results indicate the hypertolerance with higher intracellular accumulation of arsenic by Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, which could be mediated by DPS protein thus signifying this organism is a potential candidate for the removal of arsenic from industrial wastewater, which needs further study.

  3. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  4. Sequence of the Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 gene coding for xylose isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Saari, G C; Kumar, A A; Kawasaki, G H; Insley, M Y; O'Hara, P J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for xylose isomerase from Ampullariella sp. strain 3876, a gram-positive bacterium, has been determined. A clone of a fragment of strain 3876 DNA coding for a xylose isomerase activity was identified by its ability to complement a xylose isomerase-defective Escherichia coli strain. One such complementation positive fragment, 2,922 nucleotides in length, was sequenced in its entirety. There are two open reading frames 1,182 and 1,242 nucleotides in length, on opposite strands of this fragment, each of which could code for a protein the expected size of xylose isomerase. The 1,182-nucleotide open reading frame was identified as the coding sequence for the protein from the sequence analysis of the amino-terminal region and selected internal peptides. The gene initiates with GTG and has a high guanine and cytosine content (70%) and an exceptionally strong preference (97%) for guanine or cytosine in the third position of the codons. The gene codes for a 43,210-dalton polypeptide composed of 393 amino acids. The xylose isomerase from Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 is similar in size to other bacterial xylose isomerases and has limited amino acid sequence homology to the available sequences from E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptomyces violaceus-ruber. In all cases yet studied, the bacterial gene for xylulose kinase is downstream from the gene for xylose isomerase. We present evidence suggesting that in Ampullariella sp. strain 3876 these genes are similarly arranged. PMID:3027039

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Polypropylene Glycol-Degrading Strain, Microbacterium sp. No. 7

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Microbacterium (formerly Corynebacterium) sp. No. 7 was isolated from activated sludge as a polypropylene glycol (PPG)-assimilating bacterial strain. Its oxidative PPG degradation has been proposed on the basis of PPG dehydrogenase activity and the metabolic products. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. No. 7. The genome of the strain No. 7 is composed of a 4,599,046-bp circular chromosome and two linear plasmids. The whole finishing was conducted in silico with aids of the computational tools GenoFinisher and AceFileViewer. Strain No. 7 is available from the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) (Tokyo, Japan). PMID:26659673

  6. Transcriptomes of Frankia sp. strain CcI3 in growth transitions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Frankia sp. strains are actinobacteria that form N2-fixing root nodules on angiosperms. Several reference genome sequences are available enabling transcriptome studies in Frankia sp. Genomes from Frankia sp. strains differ markedly in size, a consequence proposed to be associated with a high number of indigenous transposases, more than 200 of which are found in Frankia sp. strain CcI3 used in this study. Because Frankia exhibits a high degree of cell heterogeneity as a consequence of its mycelial growth pattern, its transcriptome is likely to be quite sensitive to culture age. This study focuses on the behavior of the Frankia sp. strain CcI3 transcriptome as a function of nitrogen source and culture age. Results To study global transcription in Frankia sp. CcI3 grown under different conditions, complete transcriptomes were determined using high throughput RNA deep sequencing. Samples varied by time (five days vs. three days) and by culture conditions (NH4+ added vs. N2 fixing). Assembly of millions of reads revealed more diversity of gene expression between five-day and three-day old cultures than between three day old cultures differing in nitrogen sources. Heat map analysis organized genes into groups that were expressed or repressed under the various conditions compared to median expression values. Twenty-one SNPs common to all three transcriptome samples were detected indicating culture heterogeneity in this slow-growing organism. Significantly higher expression of transposase ORFs was found in the five-day and N2-fixing cultures, suggesting that N starvation and culture aging provide conditions for on-going genome modification. Transposases have previously been proposed to participate in the creating the large number of gene duplication or deletion in host strains. Subsequent RT-qPCR experiments confirmed predicted elevated transposase expression levels indicated by the mRNA-seq data. Conclusions The overall pattern of gene expression in aging

  7. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  8. Molecular Characterization of the Leucine Cluster in Buchnera sp. Strain PSY, a Primary Endosymbiont of the Aphid Pemphigus spyrothecae

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Gómez-Valero, Laura; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Silva, Francisco J.; Latorre, Amparo

    2002-01-01

    Buchnera strains from most aphid subfamilies studied to date have been found to carry the leucine gene cluster (leuA, -B, -C, and -D) on a plasmid, an organization unique among bacteria. Here, however, we demonstrate a classical chromosomal location of the cluster in Buchnera sp. strain PSY from the aphid Pemphigus spyrothecae (subfamily Pemphiginae). The genes that flank leuABCD in Buchnera sp. strain PSY appear to be adjacent in the genome of Buchnera sp. strain APS, a strain carrying a leucine plasmid. We propose that the presence of a leucine plasmid predates the diversification of symbiotic Buchnera and that the chromosomal location observed in Buchnera sp. strain PSY arose by a transfer of the leucine genes from a plasmid to the chromosome. PMID:11976137

  9. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature...). Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C). The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry), was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment PMID:22078466

  10. Decolorization of textile plant effluent by Citrobacter sp. strain KCTC 18061P.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moon-Sun; Jung, Byung-Gil; Sung, Nak-Chang; Lee, Young-Choon

    2007-12-01

    Citrobacter sp. strain KCTC 18061P was found to be able to decolorize textile plant effluent containing different types of reactive dyes. Effects of physico-chemical parameters, such as aeration, nitrogen source, glucose and effluent concentrations on the color removal of real dye effluent by this strain were investigated. The observed changes in the visible spectra indicated color removal by the absorption of dye to cells during incubation with the strain. This strain showed higher decolorization ability under aerobic than static culture conditions. With 1% glucose, this strain removed 70% of effluent color within 5 days. Decolorization was not significantly dependent on the nitrogen sources tested. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD) were decreased in proportion to incubation times, and their removal rates were about 35% and 50%, respectively, at 7 days of culture.

  11. Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 alleviates salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woong; Lee, Kui-Jae; Chae, Jong-Chan

    2016-05-01

    Mutual interactions between plant and rhizosphere bacteria facilitate plant growth and reduce risks of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study demonstrates alleviation of salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. perkinensis (Chinese cabbage) by Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 isolated from rhizosphere soil of Phragmites australis. The strain was capable of producing plant beneficial factors, such as auxin, siderophore, and 1-aminocylopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Treatment of strain GW103 on Chinese cabbage under salt stress increased K(+)/Na(+) ratio in roots generating balance in the ratio of ion homeostasis and consequently contributed to the increase of biomass. In addition, root colonization potential of the strain was observed by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagging approach. These results strongly suggest the beneficial impact of strain GW103 by inducing the alleviation of salt stress and development of stress tolerance in Chinese cabbage via plant-microbe interaction.

  12. Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 alleviates salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woong; Lee, Kui-Jae; Chae, Jong-Chan

    2016-05-01

    Mutual interactions between plant and rhizosphere bacteria facilitate plant growth and reduce risks of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study demonstrates alleviation of salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. perkinensis (Chinese cabbage) by Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 isolated from rhizosphere soil of Phragmites australis. The strain was capable of producing plant beneficial factors, such as auxin, siderophore, and 1-aminocylopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Treatment of strain GW103 on Chinese cabbage under salt stress increased K(+)/Na(+) ratio in roots generating balance in the ratio of ion homeostasis and consequently contributed to the increase of biomass. In addition, root colonization potential of the strain was observed by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagging approach. These results strongly suggest the beneficial impact of strain GW103 by inducing the alleviation of salt stress and development of stress tolerance in Chinese cabbage via plant-microbe interaction. PMID:26358119

  13. Genome sequence of the aerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Liu, Bo; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%.

  14. Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain FJAT-13831

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%. PMID:23144388

  15. A promising strain of Streptomyces sp. with agricultural traits for growth promotion and disease management.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mansoor; Dharni, Seema; Abdul-Khaliq; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Samad, Abdul; Gupta, Mahesh Kumar

    2012-08-01

    A bacterial strain, Streptomyces sp. CIMAP- A1 was isolated from Geranium rhizosphere and identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular characters (16S rDNA gene sequence). Phylogenetically, it was found most closely related to S. vinacendrappus, strain NRRL-2363 with 99% sequence similarity. The strain had potential antagonistic activity (in vitro) against wide range of phytopathogenic fungi like Stemphylium sp., Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Colletotrichum spp., Curvularia spp., Corynespora cassicola and Thielavia basicola. The extracellular secondary metabolites produced by the strain in the culture filtrates significantly inhibited the spore germination, growth of germ tube of the germinated spores and radial growth of Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum acutatum, Curvularia andropogonis and Fusarium moniliforme. The extraction of culture filtrate with solvents and purification by following VLC and PTLC methods always yielded a 10th fraction antifungal compound showing activity against wide range of phytopathogenic fungi. The strain was able to produce siderophores and indole-3-acetic acid. The strain was found to enhance the growth and biomass production of Geranium. It increased 11.3% fresh shoot biomass of Geranium and 21.7% essential oil yield.

  16. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  17. Molecular detection of the human pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest in Amblyomma dubitatum ticks from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Monje, Lucas D; Nava, Santiago; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Correa, Ana I; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2015-02-01

    To date, three tick-borne pathogenic Rickettsia species have been reported in different regions of Argentina, namely, R. rickettsii, R. parkeri, and R. massiliae. However, there are no reports available for the presence of tick-borne pathogens from the northeastern region of Argentina. This study evaluated the infection with Rickettsia species of Amblyomma dubitatum ticks collected from vegetation and feeding from capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) in northeastern Argentina. From a total of 374 A. dubitatum ticks collected and evaluated by PCR for the presence of rickettsial DNA, 19 were positive for the presence of Rickettsia bellii DNA, two were positive for Rickettsia sp. strain COOPERI, and one was positive for the pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the presence of the human pathogen Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest and Rickettsia sp. strain COOPERI in Argentina. Moreover, our findings posit A. dubitatum as a potential vector for this pathogenic strain of Rickettsia.

  18. Physiological characteristics of Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, E.G.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Growth of the obligately chemolithotrophic Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12, isolated from a hydrothermal vent at a depth of 2,550 m in the Galapagos Rift region, was optimal at pH 8 and required 200 mM Na/sup +/ and divalent ions (Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/). The organism was microaerophilic and tolerated 300 ..mu..M sulfide without a decrease in the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation. Growth and CO/sub 2/ incorporation occurred within the temperature range of 10 to 35/sup 0/C, with both optimal at 25/sup 0/C. At the in situ pressure of 250 atm, the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation was reduced by 25% relative to that measured at 1 atm; it was entirely suppressed at 500 atm. The results of this physiological characterization suggest that Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 can be an active autotroph in the hydrothermal environment.

  19. Metabolism of tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125.

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, J; de Bont, J A

    1993-01-01

    Corynebacterium sp. strain C125, originally isolated on o-xylene, was selected for its ability to grow on tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The catabolism of tetralin in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125 was shown to proceed via initial hydroxylation of the benzene nucleus at positions C-5 and C-6, resulting in the formation of the corresponding cis-dihydro diol. Subsequently, the dihydro diol was dehydrogenated by a NAD-dependent dehydrogenase to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,2-naphthalene diol. The aromatic ring was cleaved in the extradiol position by a catechol-2,3-dioxygenase. The ring fission product was subject to a hydrolytic attack, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid-substituted cyclohexanone. This is the first report of the catabolism of tetralin via degradation of the aromatic moiety. PMID:8434923

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kyslíková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes of Papaver somniferum can effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genus Agrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  1. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-β-Lactam-Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterium Acidovorax sp. Strain MR-S7.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takamasa; Kusada, Hiroyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi; Kimura, Nobutada

    2013-06-27

    Acidovorax sp. strain MR-S7 was isolated from activated sludge in a treatment system for wastewater containing β-lactam antibiotic pollutants. Strain MR-S7 demonstrates multidrug resistance for various types of β-lactam antibiotics at high levels of MIC. The draft genome sequence clarified that strain MR-S7 harbors unique β-lactamase genes.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain LCT-SP1 isolated from the Shenzhou X spacecraft of China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei; Zhou, Hong; Li, Jia; Huang, Bing; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Gao, Long-Cheng; Xu, Chou; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain LCT-SP1 is a glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative, chemoheterotrophic, strictly aerobic bacterium. The major feature of strain LCT-SP1, isolated from the Chinese spacecraft Shenzhou X, together with the genome draft and annotation are described in this paper. The total size of strain LCT-SP1 is 4,302,226 bp with 3,864 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes. The information gained from its sequence is potentially relevant to the elucidation of microbially mediated corrosion of various materials.

  3. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water.

  4. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  5. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    PubMed Central

    Tallur, Preeti N.; Mulla, Sikandar I.; Megadi, Veena B.; Talwar, Manjunatha P.; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  6. Beta-lactamase-free penicillin amidase from Alcaligenes sp.: isolation strategy, strain characteristics, and enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Pal, A; Samanta, T B

    1999-11-01

    Isolation and characterization of a beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6)-free, penicillin amidase (penicillin amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1. 11)-producing organism is reported. The test strain was isolated by an enrichment technique with a substrate other than penicillins. The isolated strain belongs to the genus Alcaligenes. Phenylacetic acid was found to be the inducer of penicillin amidase. The amidase has a broad substrate spectrum. It is very active against penicillin G and semisynthetic cephalosporins, whereas penicillin V and semisynthetic penicillins acted moderately as a substrate. Immobilized cells of Alcaligenes sp. were shown to act as a reversible enzyme. PMID:10489431

  7. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Crawford, R.L. )

    1993-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a carcinogenic, ozone-depleting, toxic, xenobiotic compound found in ground water, listed as a priority pollutant by the US EPA. In aqueous solution, CT is not readily hydrolyzed and has an estimated half-life of 7,000 years. Since CT resists spontaneous degradation, conditions favorable for dehalogenation must be created to effect remediation of CT contamination. This paper describes studies of CT transformation aimed at determining the potential of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC as a bioaugmentation strain and describes a search for KC-type CT transformation activity in samples from regional aquifers. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Transformation of substituted fluorenes and fluorene analogs by pseudomonas sp. strain F274

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoll, M.; Selifonov, S.A. |; Chapman, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain F274, previously shown to catabolize fluorene via fluorenone and its angular dioxygenation, 2`, 3`-dihydroxy-2-carboxybiphenyl, phthalate, and protocatechuate, was examined for its ability to transform substituted fluorenes and S- and N-heterocyclic analogs. Halogen- and methyl-substituted fluorenes were metabolized to correspondingly substituted phthalates via attack on the unsubstituted ring. In the case of 1-methylfluorene, initial oxidation of the methyl group to carboxyl prevented all other transformations but 9-monooxygenation. This strain also oxidized the S-heteroatoms and benzylic methylenic groups of fluorene analogs. No angular dioxygenation of S- and N-heterocycles was observed. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Paenibacillus ihumii sp. nov. strain AT5

    PubMed Central

    Togo, A.H.; Khelaifia, S.; Lagier, J.-C.; Caputo, A.; Robert, C.; Fournier, P.-E.; Maraninchi, M.; Valero, R.; Raoult, D.; Million, M.

    2016-01-01

    Paenibacillus ihumii sp. nov. strain AT5 (= CSUR 1981 = DSM 100664) is the type strain of P. ihumii. This bacterium was isolated from a stool sample from a morbidly obese French patient using the culturomics approach. The genome of this Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, motile and spore-forming bacillus is 5 924 686 bp long. Genomic analysis identified 253 (5%) of 3812 genes as ORFans and at least 2599 (50.03%) of 5194 orthologous proteins not shared with the closest phylogenetic species. PMID:26958346

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. HG01, a Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Accumulating Strain Isolated from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Nahat, Rafael Augusto Teodoro Pereira de Souza; Guzmán Moreno, César Wilber; Carreño Farfán, Carmen Rosa; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Taciro, Marilda Keico

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain HG01, isolated from a salt mine in Peru, is a halophilic aerobic heterotrophic bacterium accumulating poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) from different carbon sources. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this isolate, which was found to be 3,665,487 bp long, with a G+C content of 68%. PMID:26798101

  11. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Gibson, D.T.

    1996-09-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) catalyzes the first reaction in the aerobic catabolism of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp strain NCIB 9816-4. Studies suggest that the enzyme may oxidize aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene and ethylbenzene at the alkyl substituents rather than the aromatic nucleus. This paper reports on multiple pathways for the oxidation of the methyl and thyl groups of toluene and ethylbenzene by NDO. 47 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  13. Nitrite-Specific Active Transport System of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Masato; Kobayashi, Masaki; Omata, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Studies on the nitrite uptake capability of a mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 lacking the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter revealed the occurrence of a nitrite-specific active transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) of about 20 μM. Similar to the nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter, the nitrite-specific transporter was reversibly inhibited by ammonium in the medium. PMID:9852027

  14. Two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Yeager, C M; Arp, D J

    2001-11-01

    Alkane monooxygenases in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 were examined at the physiological and genetic levels. Strain CF8 can utilize alkanes ranging in chain length from C(2) to C(16). Butane degradation by butane-grown cells was strongly inhibited by allylthiourea, a copper-selective chelator, while hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells showed detectable butane degradation activity in the presence of allylthiourea. Growth on butane and hexane was strongly inhibited by 1-hexyne, while 1-hexyne did not affect growth on octane or decane. A specific 30-kDa acetylene-binding polypeptide was observed for butane-, hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells but was absent from cells grown with octane or decane in the presence of 1-hexyne. These results suggest the presence of two monooxygenases in strain CF8. Degenerate primers designed for PCR amplification of genes related to the binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas oleovorans were used to clone a related gene from strain CF8. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that this gene encoding a binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase was expressed in cells grown on alkanes above C(6). These results indicate the presence of two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8. PMID:11679317

  15. An insertion element prevents phycobilisome synthesis in N2-fixing Synechocystis sp. strain BO 8402.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, S; Ernst, A; Böger, P

    1996-01-01

    The unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain BO 8402, isolated from Lake Constance, contains a novel insertion sequence, IS8402, in the apcA gene encoding a pigmented protein of phycobilisomes. IS8402 comprises 1,322 bp, flanked by two inverted repeats of 15 bp. Upon insertion in the target DNA, direct duplications of 8 nucleotides were generated. One open reading frame, potentially coding for a protein of 399 amino acids, was found. The deduced amino acid sequence shows homology to putative transposases of the IS4 family. Precise excision of the insertion element resulted in a spontaneous revertant, Synechocystis sp. strain BO 9201, that had regained the ability to form hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes. Apart from the unique insertion of IS8402 into apcA in strain BO 8402 both strains contain at least 12 further homologous insertion elements at corresponding sites in the genomes. The unique insertion in strain BO 8402 prevents the expression of apcABC operon and hence abolishes the formation of intact phycobilisomes. This decreases the quantum efficiency of photosystem II and promotes anaerobic N2 fixation in a unicellular cyanobacterium with a highly oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase. PMID:8787395

  16. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  17. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions.

  18. Meroparamycin production by newly isolated Streptomyces sp. strain MAR01: taxonomy, fermentation, purification and structural elucidation.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Moustafa Y; El-Assar, Samy A; Abdul-Gawad, Sahar M

    2006-08-01

    Twelve actinomycete strains were isolated from Egyptian soil. The isolated actinomycete strains were then screened with regard to their potential to generate antibiotics. The most potent of the producer strains was selected and identified. The cultural and physiological characteristics of the strain identified the strain as a member of the genus Streptomyces. The nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene (1.5 kb) of the most potent strain evidenced a 99% similarity with Streptomyces spp. and S. aureofaciens 16S rRNA genes, and the isolated strain was ultimately identified as Streptomyces sp. MAR01. The extraction of the fermentation broth of this strain resulted in the isolation of one major compound, which was active in vitro against gram-positive, gram-negative representatives and Candida albicans. The chemical structure of this bioactive compound was elucidated based on the spectroscopic data obtained from the application of MS, IR, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis techniques. Via comparison to the reference data in the relevant literature and in the database search, this antibiotic, which had a molecular formula of C19H29NO2 and a molecular weight of 303.44, was determined to differ from those produced by this genus as well as the available known antibiotics. Therefore, this antibiotic was designated Meroparamycin. PMID:16953179

  19. Pathogenic and Genetic Variation in the Japanese Strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis.

    PubMed

    Namiki, F; Shiomi, T; Nishi, K; Kayamura, T; Tsuge, T

    1998-08-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic variation among 41 Japanese strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis was analyzed by pathogenicity tests with muskmelon, oriental melon, and oriental pickling melon cultivars. Based on pathogenicity to muskmelon cvs. Amus and Ohi and oriental melon cv. Ogon 9, 41 strains were divided into 3 groups that corresponded completely to Risser's races 0, 2, and 1,2y. To further characterize pathogenic variation within the forma specialis and races, strains were assayed for pathogenicity to 42 additional muskmelon, oriental melon, and oriental pickling melon cultivars. All strains of race 1,2y were pathogenic to all cultivars tested. Strains of race 0 were divided into six variants based on differences in pathogenicity to three muskmelon cultivars; strains of race 2 also were classified into six variants based on differences in pathogenicity to two muskmelon cultivars and one oriental melon cultivar. Genetic variation among strains was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting with four repetitive DNA sequences: FOLR1 to FOLR4. Thirty-six fingerprint types were detected among forty-one strains by pooling results of fingerprinting with four probes. Cluster analysis showed distinct genetic groups correlated with races: the fingerprint types detected in each of races 2 and 1,2y were grouped into a single cluster, and two distinct genetic groups were found in race 0. However, pathogenic variation detected within races 0 and 2 could not be differentiated based on the nuclear markers examined. PMID:18944886

  20. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C₅-C₈), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  1. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: (i) a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9 fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and (ii) a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N.

  2. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  3. Plant compounds that induce polychlorinated biphenyl biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, E S; Crowley, D E

    1997-01-01

    Plant compounds that induced Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B to cometabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were identified by a screening assay based on the formation of a 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl ring fission product. A chemical component of spearmint (Mentha spicata), l-carvone, induced Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B to cometabolize Aroclor 1242, resulting in significant degradation of 26 peaks in the mixture, including selected tetra- and pentachlorobiphenyls. Evidence for PCB biodegradation included peak disappearance, formation of a phenylhexdienoate ring fission product, and chlorobenzoate accumulation in the culture supernatant. Carvone was not utilized as a growth substrate and was toxic at concentrations of greater than 500 mg liter-1. Several compounds structurally related to l-carvone, including limonene, p-cymene, and isoprene, also induced cometabolism of PCBs by Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B. A structure-activity analysis showed that chemicals with an unsaturated p-menthane structural motif promoted the strongest cometabolism activity. These data suggest that certain plant-derived terpenoids may be useful for promoting enhanced rates of PCB biodegradation by soil bacteria. PMID:9143124

  4. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  5. Complete genome sequence of the lignin-degrading bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to discover anaerobic bacteria capable of lignin degradation, we isolated Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 on minimal media with alkali lignin as the sole carbon source. This organism was isolated anaerobically from tropical forest soils collected from the Bisley watershed at the Ridge site in the El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, USA, part of the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Station. At this site, the soils experience strong fluctuations in redox potential and are characterized by cycles of iron oxidation and reduction. Genome sequencing was targeted because of its ability to grow on lignin anaerobically and lignocellulolytic activity via in vitro enzyme assays. The genome of Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 is 5.80 Mbp with no detected plasmids, and includes a relatively small arsenal of genes encoding lignocellulolytic carbohydrate active enzymes. The genome revealed four putative peroxidases including glutathione and DyP-type peroxidases, and a complete protocatechuate pathway encoded in a single gene cluster. Physiological studies revealed Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 to be relatively stress tolerant to high ionic strength conditions. It grows in increasing concentrations of ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate) up to 73.44 mM and NaCl up to 1.5 M. PMID:25566348

  6. Photoacclimation of Prochlorococcus sp. (Prochlorophyta) Strains Isolated from the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hoepffner, N.; Li, WKW.; Ulloa, O.; Vaulot, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two Atlantic (SARG and NATL1) strains and one Mediterranean (MED) strain of Prochlorococcus sp., a recently discovered marine, free-living prochlorophyte, were grown over a range of "white" irradiances (lg) and under low blue light to examine their photoacclimation capacity. All three strains contained divinyl (DV) chlorophylls (Chl) a and b, both distinguishable from "normal" Chls by their red-shifted blue absorption maximum, a Chl c-like pigment at low concentration, zeaxanthin, and [alpha]-carotene. The presence of two phaeophytin b peaks in acidified extracts from both Atlantic strains grown at high lg suggests that these strains also had a normal Chl b-like pigment. In these strains, the total Chl b to DV-Chl a molar ratio decreased from about 1 at 7.5 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1 to 0.4 to 0.5 at 133 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1. In contrast, the MED strain always had a low DV-Chl b to DV-Chl a molar ratio, ranging between 0.13 at low lg and 0.08 at high lg. The discrepancies between the Atlantic and MED strains could result from differences either in the number of light-harvesting complexes (LHC) II per photosystem II or in the Chl b-binding capacity of the apoproteins constituting LHC II. Photosynthesis was saturated at approximately 5 fg C(fg Chl)-1 h-1 or 6 fg C cell-1 h-1, and growth was saturated at approximately 0.45 d-1 for both MED and SARG strains at 18[deg]C, but saturating irradiances differed between strains. Atlantic strains exhibited increased light-saturated rates and quantum yield for carbon fixation under blue light. PMID:12231684

  7. Iron Corrosion Induced by Nonhydrogenotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Prolixibacter sp. Strain MIC1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe0) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe0 oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe0 corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe0 as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe0-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe0 concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe0 foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe0 to reduce nitrate. PMID:25548048

  8. H2, N2, and O2 metabolism by isolated heterocysts from Anabaena sp. strain CA.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Kumar, D; Zhang, X K; Tabita, F R; Van Baalen, C

    1985-01-01

    Metabolically active heterocysts isolated from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain CA showed high rates of light-dependent acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution. These rates were similar to those previously reported in heterocysts isolated from the mutant Anabaena sp. strain CA-V possessing fragile vegetative cell walls. Hydrogen production was observed with isolated heterocysts. The ratio of C2H4 to H2 produced ranged from 0.9 to 1.2, and H2 production exhibited unique biphasic kinetics consisting of a 1 to 2-min burst of hydrogen evolution followed by a lower, steady-state rate of hydrogen production. This burst was found to be dependent upon the length of the dark period immediately preceding illumination and may be related to dark-to-light ATP transients. The presence of 100 nM NiCl2 in the growth medium exerted an effect on both acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution in the isolated heterocysts from strain CA. H2-stimulated acetylene reduction was increased from 2.0 to 3.2 mumol of C2H4 per mg (dry weight) per h, and net hydrogen production was abolished. A phenotypic Hup- mutant (N9AR) of Anabaena sp. strain CA was isolated which did not respond to nickel. In isolated heterocysts from N9AR, ethylene production rates were the same under both 10% C2H2-90% Ar and 10% C2H2-90% H2 with or without added nickel, and net hydrogen evolution was not affected by the presence of 100 nM Ni2+. Isolated heterocysts from strain CA were shown to have a persistent oxygen uptake of 0.7 mumol of O2 per mg (dry weight) per h, 35% of the rate of whole filaments, at air saturating O2 levels, indicating that O2 impermeability is not a requirement for active heterocysts. PMID:3921524

  9. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate.

  10. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia

    DOE PAGES

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Tiwari, Ravi; et al

    2015-10-26

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. Finally, the 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167more » contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  11. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-10-26

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. Finally, the 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167 contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov., a chitinolytic strain isolated from estuarine lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lopamudra; Mishra, Samir Ranjan; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Das, Surajit; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattanaik, Ajit Kumar; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-09-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain RC1832T was isolated from the sediment of a fish dumping yard at Balugaon near Chilika Lake. The strain is halotolerant (15 % NaCl, w/v), alkali-tolerant (pH 7-10) and hydrolyzes chitin, starch, gelatin, cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, Tween 80, tributyrin, lecithin and casein. Apart from showing typical genus-specific morphological and chemotaxonomic features, the comparision and analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence clearly revealed that the strain RC1832T represented a member of the genus Streptomyces. It exhibited the highest sequence similarities with the strains Streptomyces fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T (99.78 %), Streptomyces nanhaiensis DSM 41926T (99.07 %), Streptomyces radiopugnans R97T(98.71 %), Streptomyces atacamensis DSM 42065T (98.65 %) and Streptomyces barkulensis DSM 42082T (98.25 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain RC 1832T with the closest phylogenetic neighbours S. fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T and S. nanhaiensis DSM 41926T were 20±2 % and 21±2 %, respectively. Thus, based on a range of phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain RC1832T was suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RC1832T (=JCM 30611=KCTC 29696). PMID:27220564

  13. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  14. Whole-Genome Sequence of Enteractinococcus helveticum sp. nov. Strain UASWS1574 Isolated from Industrial Used Waters

    PubMed Central

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequences of the strain UASWS1574 of the undescribed Enteractinococcus helveticum sp. nov., isolated from used water. This is the first genome registered for the whole genus. PMID:27469945

  15. Molecular detection of Rickettsia bellii and Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi in ticks from Cordoba, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jorge; Mattar, Salim

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide molecular evidence of Rickettsia spp. in ticks collected from 2 sites of Cordoba. From May to June 2009, 1069 Amblyomma cajennense ticks were removed from 40 capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) in a rural locality of Monteria. Furthermore, 458 Amblyomma sp. larvae and 20 Amblyomma sp. nymphs were collected in a rural locality of Los Cordobas (Cordoba) by drag sampling on vegetation (n=1547). Ticks were grouped into pools and tested for rickettsial infection by real-time PCR targeting the rickettsial gene gltA. Subsequently, PCR targeting for gltA, ompA, ompB, and 16S rRNA, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses were undertaken. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 10 (4.6%) out of 214 pools of ticks by RT-PCR. Five (33%) of free-living Amblyomma sp. larval pools were positive, as well as 5 (2.6%) pools from A. cajennense. Only the gltA gene was amplified from 5 pools of free-living larvae. The nucleotide sequences were 100% identical to R. bellii by BLAST. Only one pool from A. cajennense was positive for gltA, ompA, ompB, and 16S rRNA. The partial nucleotide sequences of these genes were 100% identical to nucleotide sequences of the same genes of a new proposed species Candidatus Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi. This is the first report of R. bellii in ticks in Colombia and the second report of detection of Candidatus Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi. These Rickettsia species are still considered of unknown pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to characterize the ecological and potential pathogenic role of these 2 Rickettsia species found in Cordoba.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall’Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here. PMID:27198027

  17. Purification and characterization of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hydroquinone-1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in the degradation of alkylphenols in Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3 was purified to apparent homogeneity. The extradiol dioxygenase catalyzed the ring fission of hydroquinone to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and the degradation of chlorinated and several alkylated hydroquinones. The activity of 1 mg of the purified enzyme with unsubstituted hydroquinone was 6.1 μmol per minute, the apparent Km 2.2 μM. ICP-MS analysis revealed an iron content of 1.4 moles per mole enzyme. The enzyme lost activity upon exposure to oxygen, but could be reactivated by Fe(II) in presence of ascorbate. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme yielded two bands of an apparent size of 38 kDa and 19 kDa, respectively. Data from MALDI-TOF analyses of peptides of the respective bands matched with the deduced amino acid sequences of two neighboring open reading frames found in genomic DNA of Sphingomonas sp strain TTNP3. The deduced amino acid sequences showed 62% and 47% identity to the large and small subunit of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ACB, respectively. This heterotetrameric enzyme is the first of its kind found in a strain of the genus Sphingomonas sensu latu. PMID:21906340

  18. Genome Sequence of Carbon Dioxide-Sequestering Serratia sp. Strain ISTD04 Isolated from Marble Mining Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Gazara, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sandhya; Kumar, Madan

    2016-01-01

    The Serratia sp. strain ISTD04 has been identified as a carbon dioxide (CO2)-sequestering bacterium isolated from marble mining rocks in the Umra area, Rajasthan, India. This strain grows chemolithotrophically on media that contain sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the sole carbon source. Here, we report the genome sequence of 5.07 Mb Serratia sp. ISTD04. PMID:27795274

  19. Requirement of duplicated operons for maximal metabolism of phthalate by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Dockyu; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Eungbin

    2007-06-01

    The operons encoding the transformation of phthalate to protocatechuate are duplicated and present on two different megaplasmids [pDK2 (330 kb) and pDK3 (750 kb)] in Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17. RT-PCR experiments using gene-specific primers showed that both the pDK2- and the pDK3-encoded dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase genes are simultaneously expressed during growth on phthalate. The doubling time of the pDK2-cured mutant strain DK176 in minimal liquid medium with 5mM phthalate is 52.5% of that of the wild-type strain DK17. The data indicate that both copies of the phthalate operon are equally functional in DK17, and gene dosage is the main reason for slower growth of DK176 on phthalate. PMID:17449009

  20. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with an average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.

  1. Biotransformation of eugenol via protocatechuic acid by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain.

    PubMed

    Giedraityte, Gražina; Kalėdienė, Lilija

    2014-04-01

    The metabolic pathway of eugenol degradation by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain was analyzed based on the lack of data about eugenol degradation by thermophiles. TLC, GC-MS, and biotransformation with resting cells showed that eugenol was oxidized through coniferyl alcohol, and ferulic and vanillic acids to protocatechuic acid before the aromatic ring was cleaved. The cell-free extract of Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain grown on eugenol showed a high activity of eugenol hydroxylase, feruloyl-CoA synthetase, vanillate-O-demethylase, and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. The key enzyme, protocatechuate 3,4- dioxygenase, which plays a crucial role in the degradation of various aromatic compounds, was purified 135-fold to homogeneity with a 34% overall recovery from Geobacillus sp. AY 946034. The relative molecular mass of the native enzyme was about 450 ± 10 kDa and was composed of the non-identical subunits. The pH and temperature optima for enzyme activity were 8 and 60°C, respectively. The half-life of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase at the optimum temperature was 50 min.

  2. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less

  3. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure.

    PubMed

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M B; Liggenstoffer, Audra S; Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  4. Agroinfiltration by cytokinin-producing Agrobacterium sp. strain GV3101 primes defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Raghuram, Badmi; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Transient infiltrations in tobacco are commonly used in plant studies, but the host response to different disarmed Agrobacterium strains is not fully understood. The present study shows that pretreatment with disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 primes the defense response to subsequent infection by Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana tabacum. The presence of a trans-zeatin synthase (tzs) gene in strain GV3101 may be partly responsible for the priming response, as the tzs-deficient Agrobacterium sp. strain LBA4404 only weakly imparts such responses. Besides inducing the expression of defense-related genes like PR-1 and NHL10, GV3101 pretreatment increased the expression of tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes like MEK2, WIPK (wound-induced protein kinase), and SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase). Furthermore, the GV3101 strain showed a stronger effect than the LBA4404 strain in activating phosphorylation of the tobacco MAPK, WIPK and SIPK, which presumably prime the plant immune machinery. Lower doses of exogenously applied cytokinins increased the activation of MAPK, while higher doses decreased the activation, suggesting a balanced level of cytokinins is required to generate defense response in planta. The current study serves as a cautionary warning for plant researchers over the choice of Agrobacterium strains and their possible consequences on subsequent pathogen-related studies. PMID:25054409

  5. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G.; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M. B.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  6. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the α-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to α and β subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  7. The sll1951 Gene Encodes the Surface Layer Protein of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Sll1951 is the surface layer (S-layer) protein of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. This large, hemolysin-like protein was found in the supernatant of a strain that was deficient in S-layer attachment. An sll1951 deletion mutation was introduced into Synechocystis and was easily segregated to homozygosity under laboratory conditions. By thin-section and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy, a ∼30-nm-wide S-layer lattice covering the cell surface was readily visible in wild-type cells but was absent in the Δsll1951 strain. Instead, the Δsll1951 strain displayed a smooth lipopolysaccharide surface as its most peripheral layer. In the presence of chaotropic agents, the wild type released a large (>150-kDa) protein into the medium that was identified as Sll1951 by mass spectrometry of trypsin fragments; this protein was missing in the Δsll1951 strain. In addition, Sll1951 was prominent in crude extracts of the wild type, indicating that it is an abundant protein. The carotenoid composition of the cell wall fraction of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild type, suggesting that the S-layer does not contribute to carotenoid binding. Although the photoautotrophic growth rate of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, the viability of the Δsll1951 strain was reduced upon exposure to lysozyme treatment and hypo-osmotic stress, indicating a contribution of the S-layer to the integrity of the Synechocystis cell wall. This work identifies the S-layer protein in Synechocystis and shows that, at least under laboratory conditions, this very abundant, large protein has a supportive but not a critical role in the function of the cyanobacterium. PMID:24078613

  8. Complete genome sequence of antibiotic and anticancer agent violacein producing Massilia sp. strain NR 4-1.

    PubMed

    Myeong, Nu Ri; Seong, Hoon Je; Kim, Hye-Jin; Sul, Woo Jun

    2016-04-10

    Massilia sp. NR 4-1 was a violacein producing strain newly isolated from topsoil under nutmeg tree, Torreya nucifera in Korean national monument Bijarim Forest. Violacein is a novel class of drug exhibiting anticancer and antibiotic activities originated from l-tryptophan. Here, we present the complete genome of Massilia sp. strain NR 4-1 of 6,361,416bp and total 5285 coding sequences (CDSs) including a complete violacein biosynthesis pathway, vioABCDE. The genome sequence of Massilia sp. NR 4-1 will provide stable and efficient biotechnological applications of violacein production. PMID:26916415

  9. Cesium and strontium tolerant Arthrobacter sp. strain KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit.

    PubMed

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Joshi, Santa Ram; Acharya, Celin

    2016-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit at Domiasiat located in North-East India exhibited noteworthy tolerance for cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr). The strain displayed a high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 400 mM for CsCl and for SrCl2. Flow cytometric analysis employing membrane integrity indicators like propidium iodide (PI) and thiazole orange (TO) indicated a greater sensitivity of Arthrobacter cells to cesium than to strontium. On being challenged with 75 mM of Cs, the cells sequestered 9612 mg Cs g(-1) dry weight of cells in 12 h. On being challenged with 75 mM of Sr, the cells sequestered 9989 mg Sr g(-1) dry weight of cells in 18 h. Heat killed cells exhibited limited Cs and Sr binding as compared to live cells highlighting the importance of cell viability for optimal binding. The association of the metals with Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 was further substantiated by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) coupled with Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. This organism tolerated up to 1 kGy (60)Co-gamma rays without loss of survival. The present report highlights the superior tolerance and binding capacity of the KMSZP6 strain for cesium and strontium over other earlier reported strains and reveals its potential for bioremediation of nuclear waste. PMID:27620733

  10. Characterization of pyrene degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain Jpyr-1 isolated from active sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Xu, Li; Jia, Lingyun

    2013-07-01

    Using pyrene as a sole carbon, a new polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from the active sewage sludge. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. Jpyr-1 by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The maximum degradation rate of pyrene was 3.07 mg L(-1)h(-1) in 48 h incubation with initial pyrene concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Moreover, in binary system consisting of pyrene and another PAH, the enzyme system of Jpyr-1 showed a preference toward pyrene. Furthermore, competitive inhibition of pyrene degradation by other PAH compounds occurred in the binary system. Jpyr-1 could also rapidly degrade other PAHs, such as benzanthracene, chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene. Moreover, several metabolites were detected during pyrene degradation which indicated that Jpyr-1 degraded pyrene through the o-phthalate pathway. Taken together, these results indicated that Pseudomonas sp. Jpyr-1 was a new PAHs-degrading strain that might be useful in the bioremediation of sites contaminated with PAHs.

  11. Pseudomonas sp. strain 273, and aerobic {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkane-degrading bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wischnak, C.; Mueller, R.; Loeffler, F.E. |; Li, J.; Urbance, J.W.

    1998-09-01

    A gram-negative, aerobic bacterium was isolated from soil; this bacterium grew in 50% (vol/vol) suspensions of 1,10-dichlorodecane (1,10-DCD) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Phenotypic and small-subunit ribosomal RNA characterizations identified the organism, designated strain 273, as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. After induction with 1,10-DCD, Pseudomonas sp. strain 273 released stoichiometric amounts of chloride from C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes in the presence of oxygen. No dehalogenation occurred under anaerobic conditions. The best substrates for dehalogenation and growth were C{sub 9} to C{sub 12} chloroalkanes. The isolate also grew with nonhalogenated aliphatic compounds, and decane-grown cells dechlorinated 1,10-DCD without a lag phase. In addition, cells grown on decane dechlorinated 1,10-DCD in the presence of chloramphenicol, indicating that the 1,10-DCD-dechlorinating enzyme system was also induced by decane. Other known alkane-degrading Pseudomonas species did not grow with 1,10-DCD as a carbon source. Dechlorination of 1,10-DCD was demonstrated in cell extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 273. Cell-free activity was strictly oxygen dependent, and NADH stimulated dechlorination, whereas EDTA had an inhibitory effect.

  12. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    PubMed

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC.

  13. Biodegradation of bisphenol A by cells and cell lysate from Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Miho; Maki, Jun-ichi; Oshiman, Ko-ichi; Matsumura, Yoshinobu; Tsuchido, Tetsuaki

    2005-10-01

    The capacity and pathway of bisphenol A [BPA; 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane] degradation in Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1, which was isolated from the soil of a vegetable-growing field in Japan, were investigated. The bacterial strain was able to grow in a basal mineral salt medium containing BPA as the sole carbon source (BSMB medium), and was able to degrade 115 microg ml(-1) BPA in 6 h in L medium. Several BPA metabolites were detected in the culture supernatant by HPLC and then identified by GC-MS and LC-MS-MS. These compounds were confirmed to be the same as those reported for other BPA-degrading bacteria. BPA degradation by cells in the basal mineral salt medium was induced by BPA, and activity was detected only in the intracellular soluble fraction in the presence of coenzymes, such as NADH, NAD+, NADPH or NADP+. The addition of metyrapone, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, to BSMB medium resulted in a decrease in BPA degradation and cell growth. The BPA-degradation activity of the intracellular soluble fraction was also inhibited by the cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Carbon monoxide difference spectra indicated that cytochrome P450 was present in the cells and that the amount of cytochrome P450 corresponded to the cellular BPA-degradation activity. Our results provide evidence that the cytochrome P450 system is involved in BPA metabolism in Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1.

  14. Short Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Soil Isolate Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    In the bacteria kingdom, quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication that relies on the production of and response to specific signaling molecules. In proteobacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are the well-studied signaling molecules. The present study aimed to characterize the production of AHL of a bacterial strain A9 isolated from a Malaysian tropical soil. Strain A9 was identified as Burkholderia sp. using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence analysis. AHL production by A9 was detected with two biosensors, namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Thin layer chromatography results showed N–hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N–octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL) production. Unequivocal identification of C6-HSL and C8-HSL was achieved by high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We have demonstrated that Burkholderia sp. strain A9 produces AHLs that are known to be produced by other Burkholderia spp. with CepI/CepR homologs. PMID:24084115

  15. Plasmid dependence of Pseudomonas sp. strain NK87 enzymes that degrade 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic dimer.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, K; Negoro, S; Takada, N; Okada, H

    1989-06-01

    A bacterial strain, Pseudomonas sp. strain NK87, that can use 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic dimer as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was newly isolated from wastewater of a factory which produces nylon-6. Two responsible enzymes, 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic-dimer hydrolase (P-EI) and 6-aminohexanoate-dimer hydrolase (P-EII), were found in the NK87 strain, as is the case with Flavobacterium sp. strain KI72, another 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic-dimer-metabolizing bacterium (H. Okada, S. Negoro, H. Kimura, and S. Nakamura, Nature [London] 306:203-206, 1983). The P-EI enzyme is immunologically identical to the 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic-dimer hydrolase of KI72 (F-EI). However, antiserum against the 6-aminohexanoate-dimer hydrolase purified from KI72 (F-EII) did not react with cell extracts of NK87, indicating that the F-EII and P-EII enzymes are immunologically different. Restriction endonuclease analyses show that the NK87 strain harbors at least six plasmids ranging in size from 20 to 80 kilobase pairs (kbp). The P-EI and P-EII genes were cloned in Escherichia coli. Both the P-EI and F-EI probes strongly hybridized with a 23-kbp plasmid in Southern hybridization analyses. The P-EII probe hybridized specifically with an 80-kbp plasmid, but the F-EII probe hybridized with none of the plasmids harbored in NK87. These results indicate that the P-EI gene and P-EII gene are encoded on the 23-kbp and 80-kbp plasmids, respectively.

  16. Chemoheterotrophic Growth of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Dependent on a Functional Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Stebegg, Ronald; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mikulic, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium commonly used as a model organism for studying cyanobacterial cell differentiation and nitrogen fixation. For many decades, this cyanobacterium was considered an obligate photo-lithoautotroph. We now discovered that this strain is also capable of mixotrophic, photo-organoheterotrophic, and chemo-organoheterotrophic growth if high concentrations of fructose (at least 50 mM and up to 200 mM) are supplied. Glucose, a substrate used by some facultatively organoheterotrophic cyanobacteria, is not effective in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. The gtr gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encoding a glucose carrier was introduced into Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Surprisingly, the new strain containing the gtr gene did not grow on glucose but was very sensitive to glucose, with a 5 mM concentration being lethal, whereas the wild-type strain tolerated 200 mM glucose. The Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 strain containing gtr can grow mixotrophically and photo-organoheterotrophically, but not chemo-organoheterotrophically with fructose. Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 contains five respiratory chains ending in five different respiratory terminal oxidases. One of these enzymes is a mitochondrial-type cytochrome c oxidase. As in almost all cyanobacteria, this enzyme is encoded by three adjacent genes called coxBAC1. When this locus was disrupted, the cells lost the capability for chemo-organoheterotrophic growth. PMID:22730128

  17. Chemoheterotrophic growth of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 dependent on a functional cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Stebegg, Ronald; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mikulic, Markus; Schmetterer, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium commonly used as a model organism for studying cyanobacterial cell differentiation and nitrogen fixation. For many decades, this cyanobacterium was considered an obligate photo-lithoautotroph. We now discovered that this strain is also capable of mixotrophic, photo-organoheterotrophic, and chemo-organoheterotrophic growth if high concentrations of fructose (at least 50 mM and up to 200 mM) are supplied. Glucose, a substrate used by some facultatively organoheterotrophic cyanobacteria, is not effective in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. The gtr gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encoding a glucose carrier was introduced into Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Surprisingly, the new strain containing the gtr gene did not grow on glucose but was very sensitive to glucose, with a 5 mM concentration being lethal, whereas the wild-type strain tolerated 200 mM glucose. The Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 strain containing gtr can grow mixotrophically and photo-organoheterotrophically, but not chemo-organoheterotrophically with fructose. Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 contains five respiratory chains ending in five different respiratory terminal oxidases. One of these enzymes is a mitochondrial-type cytochrome c oxidase. As in almost all cyanobacteria, this enzyme is encoded by three adjacent genes called coxBAC1. When this locus was disrupted, the cells lost the capability for chemo-organoheterotrophic growth.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Basidiomycetous Yeast Cryptococcus sp. Strain Mo29 Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus sp. strain Mo29 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this basidiomycetous yeast strain, which has highlighted its biotechnological potential as revealed by the presence of genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites and biotechnologically important enzymes. PMID:27389259

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcanivorax sp. Strain KX64203 Isolated from Deep-Sea Sediments of Iheya North, Okinawa Trough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of Alcanivorax sp. strain KX64203, isolated from deep-sea sediment samples. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs, with a total size of 4.76 Mb. The data will improve our understanding of the strain's function in alkane degradation. PMID:27563046

  20. Genome Sequence of an Efficient Indole-Degrading Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain IDO, with Potential Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain IDO has been shown to efficiently transform indole, and the genus of Cupriavidus has been described as a promising cell factory for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis from low-cost wastes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain IDO, which may provide useful genetic information on indole metabolism and polyhydroxyalkanoate production. PMID:25767238

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Fish-Pathogenic Mycobacterium sp. Strain 012931, Isolated from Yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata).

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Nho, Seong Won; Hwang, Seong Don; Hikima, Jun-Ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises a large number of well-characterized species, several of which are human and animal pathogens. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931, a fish pathogen responsible for huge losses in aquaculture farms in Japan. The strain was isolated from a marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). PMID:23929466

  2. Draft genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, an atypical, noninfective (Nod-) ineffective (Fix-) isolate from Coriaria nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Chen, Amy; Walston Davenport, Karen; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Land, Miriam L; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina L; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Teshima, Hazuki; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, which was isolated from Coriaria nepalensis. This genome sequence is the first from the fourth lineage of Frankia, strains of which are unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. At 10 Mb, it represents the largest Frankia genome sequenced to date. PMID:23516212

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain CN3, an Atypical, Noninfective (Nod–) Ineffective (Fix–) Isolate from Coriaria nepalensis

    PubMed Central

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Chen, Amy; Walston Davenport, Karen; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Land, Miriam L.; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina L.; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Teshima, Hazuki; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, which was isolated from Coriaria nepalensis. This genome sequence is the first from the fourth lineage of Frankia, strains of which are unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. At 10 Mb, it represents the largest Frankia genome sequenced to date. PMID:23516212

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Arenibacter sp. Strain C-21, an Iodine-Accumulating Bacterium Isolated from Surface Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kohei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Yamamura, Shigeki; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Arenibacter sp. strain C-21, isolated from surface marine sediment of Japan, accumulates iodine in the presence of glucose and iodide (I-). We report here the draft genome sequence of this strain to provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying its iodine-accumulating ability. PMID:27738047

  5. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE PAGES

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  6. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain MR_MD2014, Isolated from Topsoil in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Mariita, Richard M; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Hanselmann, Kurt; Hossain, Mohammad J; Korlach, Jonas; Boitano, Matthew; Roberts, Richard J; Liles, Mark R; Moss, Anthony G; Leadbetter, Jared R; Newman, Dianne K; Dawson, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the 3,443,800-bp complete genome sequence of Curtobacterium sp. strain MR_MD2014 (phylum Actinobacteria). This strain was isolated from soil in Woods Hole, MA, as part of the 2014 Microbial Diversity Summer Program at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA. PMID:26722011

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Lewinella sp. Strain 4G2 Isolated from the Coastal Sea Surface Microlayer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shu-Kuan; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hamasaki, Koji

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Lewinella sp. strain 4G2, isolated from the sea surface microlayer (SML) of a coastal marine inlet. The genome sequence of strain 4G2 should contribute to understanding the lifestyles of bacteria living in the SML. PMID:27469943

  9. Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1, an Antibacterial Peptide-Producing Bacterium from Hot Springs in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Canbäck, Björn

    2015-07-23

    This paper reports the draft genome sequence of the firmicute Geobacillus sp. strain ZGt-1, an antibacterial peptide producer isolated from the Zara hot spring in Jordan. This study is the first report on genomic data from a thermophilic bacterial strain isolated in Jordan.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain ARG-1 Isolated from the White-Rot Fungus Armillaria gallica

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlin; Kowalski, Caitlin; Zebrowski, Jessica; Tulchinskaya, Yevgeniya; Tai, Albert K.; James-Pederson, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain ARG-1 was isolated from a cell culture of hyphal tips of the white-rot fungus Armillaria gallica. We describe here the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of its genome, confirming the presence of genes involved in methylotrophy. This is the first genome announcement of a strain of Methylobacterium associated with A. gallica. PMID:27257212

  11. Characterization of triclosan metabolism in Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sikandar I.; Wang, Han; Sun, Qian; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is one of the most widespread emerging contaminants and has adverse impact on aquatic ecosystem, yet little is known about its complete biodegradation mechanism in bacteria. Sphingomonas sp, strain YL-JM2C, isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant, was very effective on degrading TCS. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the conditions like temperature and pH. From RSM, the optimal TCS degradation conditions were found to be 30 °C and pH 7.0. Under optimal conditions, strain YL-JM2C completely mineralized TCS (5 mg L−1) within 72 h. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone and hydroquinone are three main by-products of TCS. Furthermore, stable isotope experimental results revealed that the 13C12-TCS was completely mineralized into CO2 and part of heavier carbon (13C) of labeled TCS was utilized by strain YL-JM2C to synthesize fatty acids (PLFAs). Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and degradation test results suggested that the strain could enhance degradation capacity of TCS through increasing CSH. In addition, the bacterium also completely degraded spiked TCS (5 mg L−1) in wastewater collected from the wastewater treatment plant. Hence, these results suggest that the strain has potential to remediate TCS in the environment. PMID:26912101

  12. Raoultella sp. strain L03 fixes N2 in association with micropropagated sugarcane plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Ou-Yang, Xue-Qing; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yang-Rui; Song, Xiu-Peng; Zhang, Ge-Min; Gao, Yi-Jing; Duan, Wei-Xing; An, Qianli

    2016-08-01

    N2 -fixing bacteria belonging to the genus Raoultella of the family Enterobacteriaceae are widely associated with plants. Raoultella sp. strain L03 was isolated from surface-sterilized sugarcane roots. In this study, we inoculated the strain L03 to microbe-free micropropagated plantlets of the main sugarcane cultivar ROC22 grown in Guangxi, China and determined N2 -fixation and association between strain L03 and sugarcane plants. Inoculation of strain L03 increased plant biomass, total N, N concentration and chlorophyll, and relieved N-deficiency symptoms of plants under an N-limiting condition. An (15) N isotope dilution assay revealed (15) N isotope dilution in the inoculated sugarcane plants and incorporation of the fixed (14) N from air into chlorophyll. Moreover, a gfp-tagged and antibiotic-resistant L03 strain was reisolated from surface-sterilized sugarcane plants and was detected in plant tissues by fluorescent microscopy. This study for the first time demonstrates that a Raoultella bacterium is able to fix N2 in association with the plant host.

  13. Diversity of exophillic acid derivatives in strains of an endophytic Exophiala sp.

    PubMed

    Cheikh-Ali, Zakaria; Glynou, Kyriaki; Ali, Tahir; Ploch, Sebastian; Kaiser, Marcel; Thines, Marco; Bode, Helge B; Maciá-Vicente, Jose G

    2015-10-01

    Members of the fungal genus Exophiala are common saprobes in soil and water environments, opportunistic pathogens of animals, or endophytes in plant roots. Their ecological versatility could imply a capacity to produce diverse secondary metabolites, but only a few studies have aimed at characterizing their chemical profiles. Here, we assessed the secondary metabolites produced by five Exophiala sp. strains of a particular phylotype, isolated from roots of Microthlaspi perfoliatum growing in different European localities. Exophillic acid and two previously undescribed compounds were isolated from these strains, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods using MS, 1D and 2D NMR. Bioassays revealed a weak activity of these compounds against disease-causing protozoa and mammalian cells. In addition, 18 related structures were identified by UPLC/MS based on comparisons with the isolated structures. Three Exophiala strains produced derivatives containing a β-d-glucopyranoside moiety, and their colony morphology was distinct from the other two strains, which produced derivatives lacking β-d-glucopyranoside. Whether the chemical/morphological strain types represent variants of the same genotype or independent genetic populations within Exophiala remains to be evaluated. PMID:26296744

  14. Metabolic engineering of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 for isobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Varman, Arul M; Xiao, Yi; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-02-01

    Global warming and decreasing fossil fuel reserves have prompted great interest in the synthesis of advanced biofuels from renewable resources. In an effort to address these concerns, we performed metabolic engineering of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to develop a strain that can synthesize isobutanol under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. With the expression of two heterologous genes from the Ehrlich pathway, the engineered strain can accumulate 90 mg/liter of isobutanol from 50 mM bicarbonate in a gas-tight shaking flask. The strain does not require any inducer (i.e., isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG]) or antibiotics to maintain its isobutanol production. In the presence of glucose, isobutanol synthesis is only moderately promoted (titer = 114 mg/liter). Based on isotopomer analysis, we found that, compared to the wild-type strain, the mutant significantly reduced its glucose utilization and mainly employed autotrophic metabolism for biomass growth and isobutanol production. Since isobutanol is toxic to the cells and may also be degraded photochemically by hydroxyl radicals during the cultivation process, we employed in situ removal of the isobutanol using oleyl alcohol as a solvent trap. This resulted in a final net concentration of 298 mg/liter of isobutanol under mixotrophic culture conditions.

  15. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by a Paecilomyces sp. Fungal Strain Isolated from Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A resistant and capable fungal strain in removing hexavalent chromium was isolated from an environment near of Chemical Science Faculty, located in the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The strain was identified as Paecilomyces sp., by macro- and microscopic characteristics. Strain resistance of the strain to high Cr (VI) concentrations and its ability to reduce chromium were studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose, another inexpensive commercial carbon source like unrefined and brown sugar or glycerol, in the presence of 50 mg/L of Cr (VI), the strain caused complete disappearance of Cr (VI), with the concomitant production of Cr (III) in the growth medium after 7 days of incubation, at 28°C, pH 4.0, 100 rpm, and an inoculum of 38 mg of dry weight. Decrease of Cr (VI) levels from industrial wastes was also induced by Paecilomyces biomass. These results indicate that reducing capacity of chromate resistant filamentous fungus Cr (VI) could be useful for the removal of Cr (VI) pollution. PMID:20634988

  17. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin in porous media and potential for bioaugmentation with Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1.

    PubMed

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is a toxic explosive found as a contaminant of soil and groundwater. Several microbial strains are capable of partially reducing the NG molecule to dinitro or mononitroesters. Recently, a strain capable of growing on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen (Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1) was isolated from contaminated soil. Despite the widespread presence of microbial strains capable of transforming NG in contaminated soils and sediments, the extent of NG biodegradation at contaminated sites is still unknown. In this study column experiments were conducted to investigate the extent of microbial degradation of NG in saturated porous media, specifically after bioaugmentation with JBH1. Initial experiments using sterile, low sorptivity sand, showed mineralization of NG after bioaugmentation with JBH1 in the absence of sources of carbon and nitrogen other than NG. Results could be modeled using a first order degradation rate of 0.14d(-1). Further experiments conducted using contaminated soil with high organic carbon content (highly sorptive) resulted in column effluents that did not contain NG although high dinitroester concentrations were observed. Bioaugmentation with JBH1 in sediments containing strains capable of partial transformation of NG resulted in complete mineralization of NG and faster degradation rates.

  18. Metabolism of tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125

    SciTech Connect

    Sikkema, J.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1993-02-01

    Tetralin, widely used as a solvent in the petrochemical industry and in paints and waxes, degrades slowly in mixed cultures of microorganisms or in the presence of cosubstrates. This study reports on the metabolism of tetralin in the o-xylene-isolated Corynebacterium sp. strain C125. The researchers found that this organism attacks tetralin by an initial oxidation of the aromatic nucleus at positions C-5 and C-6 and they propose a four step inducible degradation pathway for tetralin starting at that point. The presence of the pathway makes this bacteria an excellent catalyst for the specific production of special cis-dihydro diols.

  19. Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 strains lacking photosystem I and phycobilisome function.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, G; Boussiba, S; Vermaas, W F

    1993-01-01

    To design an in vivo system allowing detailed analysis of photosystem II (PSII) complexes without significant interference from other pigment complexes, part of the psaAB operon coding for the core proteins of photosystem I (PSI) and part of the apcE gene coding for the anchor protein linking the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane were deleted from the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp strain PCC 6803. Upon transformation and segregation at low light intensity (5 microE m-2 sec-1), a PSI deletion strain was obtained that is light tolerant and grows reasonably well under photoheterotrophic conditions at 5 microE m-2 sec-1 (doubling time approximately 28 hr). Subsequent inactivation of apcE by an erythromycin resistance marker led to reduction of the phycobilin-to-chlorophyll ratio and to a further decrease in light sensitivity. The resulting PSI-less/apcE- strain grew photoheterotrophically at normal light intensity (50 microE m-2 sec-1) with a doubling time of 18 hr. Deletion of apcE in the wild type resulted in slow photoautotrophic growth. The remaining phycobilins in apcE- strains were inactive in transferring light energy to PSII. Cells of both the PSI-less and PSI-less/apcE- strains had an approximately sixfold enrichment of PSII on a chlorophyll basis and were as active in oxygen evolution (on a per PSII basis) as the wild type at saturating light intensity. Both PSI-less strains described here are highly appropriate both for detailed PSII studies and as background strains to analyze site- and region-directed PSII mutants in vivo. PMID:8305875

  20. Detection of genes for alkane and naphthalene catabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain 1BN.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, V; Bernasconi, S; Colombo, M; van Beilen, J B; Cavalca, L

    2000-10-01

    Rhodococcus sp. 1BN was isolated from a contaminated site and showed various biodegradative capabilities. Besides naphthalene, strain 1BN degraded medium- (C6) and long-chain alkanes (C16-C28), benzene and toluene, alone or when the hydrocarbons were mixed in equal proportions. The nucleotide sequence of an alk polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment revealed a 59% nucleotide homology to the Pseudomonas oleovorans alkB gene. The nar fragments were highly homologous to genes coding for large and small subunits of cis-naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (narAa and narAb) and to cis-naphthalene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (narB) from other rhodococci. The oxidation of indene to cis-(1S,2R)-1,2-dihydroxyindan by toluene-induced cells allows to hypothesize that strain 1BN also carries a toluene dioxygenase-like system. PMID:11233165

  1. Oxidation of substituted phenols by Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, J.C.; Gibson, D.T.

    1988-06-01

    The biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and chlorobenzenes by Pseudomonas putida involves the initial conversion of the parent molecules to cis-dihydrodiols by dioxygenase enzyme systems. The cis-dihydrodiols are then converted to the corresponding catechols by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 uses a similar system for growth on toluene or dichlorobenzenes. We tested the wild-type organisms and a series of mutants for their ability to transform substituted phenols after induction with toluene. When grown on toluene, both wild-type organisms converted methyl-, chloro-, and nitro-substituted phenols to the corresponding catechols. Mutant strains deficient in dihydrodiol dehydrogenase or catechol oxygenase activities also transformed the phenols. Oxidation of phenols was closely correlated with the induction and activity of the toluene dioxygenase enzyme system.

  2. Cellular Response of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain A2 during Arsenite Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Koh; Huang, He; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed toxic element in the environment and microorganisms have developed resistance mechanisms in order to tolerate it. The cellular response of the chemoorganotrophic arsenite (As[III])-oxidizing α-Proteobacteria, Sinorhizobium sp. strain A2, to arsenic was examined in the present study. Several proteins associated with arsenite oxidase and As resistance were shown to be accumulated in the presence of As(III). A shift in central carbon metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid pathway to glyoxylate pathway was also observed in response to oxidative stress. Our results revealed the strategy of the As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium strain to mitigate arsenic toxicity and oxidative damage by multiple metabolic adaptations. PMID:26477790

  3. Degradation of triclocarban by a triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sikandar I; Hu, Anyi; Wang, Yuwen; Sun, Qian; Huang, Shir-Ly; Wang, Han; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial degradation plays a vital role in determining the environmental fate of micropollutants like triclocarban. The mechanism of triclocarban degradation by pure bacterium is not yet explored. The purpose of this study was to identify metabolic pathway that might be involved in bacterial degradation of triclocarban. Triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C was first found to degrade up to 35% of triclocarban (4 mg L(-1)) within 5 d. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4-chloroaniline and 4-chlorocatechol as the major metabolites of the triclocarban degradation. Furthermore, total organic carbon results confirmed that the intermediates, 3,4-dichloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) and 4-chloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) could be degraded up to 77% and 80% by strain YL-JM2C within 5 d. PMID:26364219

  4. Degradation of triclocarban by a triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sikandar I; Hu, Anyi; Wang, Yuwen; Sun, Qian; Huang, Shir-Ly; Wang, Han; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial degradation plays a vital role in determining the environmental fate of micropollutants like triclocarban. The mechanism of triclocarban degradation by pure bacterium is not yet explored. The purpose of this study was to identify metabolic pathway that might be involved in bacterial degradation of triclocarban. Triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C was first found to degrade up to 35% of triclocarban (4 mg L(-1)) within 5 d. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4-chloroaniline and 4-chlorocatechol as the major metabolites of the triclocarban degradation. Furthermore, total organic carbon results confirmed that the intermediates, 3,4-dichloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) and 4-chloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) could be degraded up to 77% and 80% by strain YL-JM2C within 5 d.

  5. Purification and properties of formate dehydrogenase from Moraxella sp. strain C-1.

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Y; Sekigawa, T; Inukai, H; Nakazawa, A

    1988-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase was screened in various bacterial strains. Facultative methanol-utilizing bacteria isolated from soil samples, acclimated to a medium containing methanol and formate at pH 9.5, were classified as members of the genus Moraxella. From a crude extract of Moraxella sp. strain C-1, formate dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity, as judged by disc gel electrophoresis. The enzyme has an isoelectric point of 3.9 and a molecular weight of approximately 98,000. The enzyme is composed of two identical subunits with molecular weights of about 48,000. The apparent Km values for sodium formate and NAD+ were calculated to be 13 mM and 0.068 mM, respectively. Images PMID:3384805

  6. Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Bernat, Gabor; Singh, Abhay K.; Mi, Hualing; Rogner, Matthias; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-09-10

    A mutant ( 5) of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 constructed by inactivating five inorganic carbon sequestration systems did not take up CO2 or HCO3– and was unable to grow in air with or without glucose. The 4 mutant in which BicA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3– uptake and grew under these conditions but more slowly than the wild-type strain. The 5 mutant required 1.7% CO2 to attain half the maximal growth rate. Electron transport activity of the mutants was strongly inhibited under high light intensities, with the 5 mutant more susceptible to high light than the 4 mutant. The results implicated the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy.

  7. Desulfurization of 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl dibenzothiophene by recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimiko; Noda, Ken-ichi; Konishi, Jin; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-09-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65 harboring dszABCD genes was used to desulfurize alkyl dibenzothiophenes (Cx-DBTs) in n-hexadecane. The specific desulfurization activity for 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl DBT (C8-DBT) by DszC enzyme was about twice that for 4,6-dipropyl DBT (C6-DBT). However, the degradation rate of 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl DBT in n-hexadecane by resting cells of strain MR65 was only about 40% of that of 4,6-dipropyl DBT. These results indicated that the desulfurization ability for Cx-DBTs by resting cells depends on carbon number substituted at positions 4 and 6 and that the rate-limiting step in the desulfurization reaction of highly alkylated Cx-DBTs is the transfer process from the oil phase into the cell.

  8. Modeling of competitive mutualistic relationships. Application to cellulose degradation by Streptomyces sp. strains.

    PubMed

    Thierie, Jacques; Penninckx, Michel J

    2007-12-01

    A "cascade" model depicts microbial degradation of a complex nutrient/substrate through a succession of intermediate compounds. Each stage is characterized by a particular species producing a typical degradation enzyme induced by its own degradation product. The final compound of the cascade consists of a single assimilable substrate used by all species. This results in a competition situation, whereas the contribution of all strains to the production of a complete set of efficient enzymes generates a mutualistic relationship. The model was shown to be appropriate to describe degradation of cellulose by a consortium of Streptomyces sp. strains. The simplicity and the model capacity for generalization are promising and could be used for various degradation processes both at laboratory and environmental scales.

  9. Global proteomic analysis of the chromate response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24.

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, K. L.; Turse, J. E.; Nicora, C. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Thompson, D. K.; Konopka, A. E.; Biosciences Division; Purdue Univ.; PNNL

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) transporter by the chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded 5 mM.

  10. Antagonistic activities of some Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from resident infant gastrointestinal microbiota on Gram-negative enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Cristea, Violeta Corina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the consolidation of the anti-infectious barrier against enteric pathogens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Bifidobacterium sp. strains, recently isolated from infant gastrointestinal microbiota on the in vitro growth and virulence features expression of enteropathogenic bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from human feces was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative pathogenic strains isolated from 30 infant patients (3 days to 5 years old) with diarrhea. Both potential probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium ruminantium) and enteropathogenic strains (EPEC, EIEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were identified by MALDI-TOF and confirmed serologically when needed. The bactericidal activity, growth curve, adherence to the cellular HEp-2 substratum and production of soluble virulence factors have been assessed in the presence of different Bifidobacterium sp. cultures and fractions (whole culture and free-cell supernatants). Among the twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains, the largest spectrum of antimicrobial activity against 9 of the 18 enteropathogenic strains was revealed for a B. breve strain recently isolated from infant intestinal feces. The whole culture and free-cell supernatant of B. breve culture decreased the multiplication rate, shortened the log phase and the total duration of the growth curve, with an earlier entrance in the decline phase and inhibited the adherence capacity to a cellular substratum and the swimming/swarming motility too. These results indicate the significant probiotic potential of the B. breve strain. PMID:26921694

  11. Construction and analysis of an intergeneric fusion from Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 and Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 for degrading acetamiprid and chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Zhu, Danfeng; Xiong, Minghua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 degrades chlorothalonil (CTN) but not acetamiprid (AAP), and Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 degrades AAP but not CTN. A functional strain, AC, was constructed through protoplast fusion of two parental strains (Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 and Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1) in order to simultaneously improve the degradation efficiency of AAP and CTN. Fusant-AC with eight transfers on plates containing two antibiotics and CTN was obtained. For the purpose of identifying and confirming the genetic relationship between fusant-AC and its parents, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) analysis were performed. In toto, RAPD fingerprint analysis produced 194 clear bands with 9 primers, which not only had bands in common with strains CTN-4 and AAP-1, but also had its own novel fusant-specific bands. The genetic similarity indices between fusant-AC and parental strains CTN-4 and AAP-1 were 0.40 and 0.69, respectively. The result of SEM indicated that the cell morphology of fusant-AC differed from both its parents. The fusant strain AC possesses a strong capability for AAP and CTN degradation. At AAP concentration (50-300 mg L(-1)), the degradation was achieved within 5 h. At the initial dose of 50 and 100 mg L(-1) CTN, the percentages reached 96 and 91 % over a 36-h incubation period. The present study indicates that the protoplast-fusion technique may have possible applications in environmental pollution control. PMID:27023810

  12. Isolation and characterization of Staphylococcus sp. strain NBRIEAG-8 from arsenic contaminated site of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shubhi; Verma, Praveen C; Singh, Ankit; Mishra, Manisha; Singh, Namrata; Sharma, Neeta; Singh, Nandita

    2012-09-01

    Arsenic contaminated rhizospheric soils of West Bengal, India were sampled for arsenic resistant bacteria that could transform different arsenic forms. Staphylococcus sp. NBRIEAG-8 was identified by16S rDNA ribotyping, which was capable of growing at 30,000 mg l(-1) arsenate [As(V)] and 1,500 mg l(-1) arsenite [As(III)]. This bacterial strain was also characterized for arsenical resistance (ars) genes which may be associated with the high-level resistance in the ecosystems of As-contaminated areas. A comparative proteome analysis was conducted with this strain treated with 1,000 mg l(-1) As(V) to identify changes in their protein expression profiles. A 2D gel analysis showed a significant difference in the proteome of arsenic treated and untreated bacterial culture. The change in pH of cultivating growth medium, bacterial growth pattern (kinetics), and uptake of arsenic were also evaluated. After 72 h of incubation, the strain was capable of removing arsenic from the culture medium amended with arsenate and arsenite [12% from As(V) and 9% from As(III)]. The rate of biovolatilization of As(V) was 23% while As(III) was 26%, which was determined indirectly by estimating the sum of arsenic content in bacterial biomass and medium. This study demonstrates that the isolated strain, Staphylococcus sp., is capable for uptake and volatilization of arsenic by expressing ars genes and 8 new upregulated proteins which may have played an important role in reducing arsenic toxicity in bacterial cells and can be used in arsenic bioremediation. PMID:22410743

  13. Chemotaxis of Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98 towards chloronitroaromatic compounds that it can metabolise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 is known for its chemotaxis towards nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that are either utilized as sole sources of carbon and energy or co-metabolized in the presence of alternative carbon sources. Here we test for the chemotaxis of this strain towards six chloro-nitroaromatic compounds (CNACs), namely 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP), 2-chloro-3-nitrophenol (2C3NP), 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP), 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoate (2C4NB), 4-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (4C2NB) and 5-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (5C2NB), and examine its relationship to the degradation of such compounds. Results Strain SJ98 could mineralize 2C4NP, 4C2NB and 5C2NB, and co-metabolically transform 2C3NP and 2C4NB in the presence of an alternative carbon source, but was unable to transform 4C2NP under these conditions. Positive chemotaxis was only observed towards the five metabolically transformed CNACs. Moreover, the chemotaxis was induced by growth in the presence of the metabolisable CNAC. It was also competitively inhibited by the presence of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that it could metabolise but not by succinate or aspartate. Conclusions Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 exhibits metabolic transformation of, and inducible chemotaxis towards CNACs. Its chemotactic responses towards these compounds are related to its previously demonstrated chemotaxis towards NACs that it can metabolise, but it is independently inducible from its chemotaxis towards succinate or aspartate. PMID:22292983

  14. The biosynthetic pathway for myxol-2' fucoside (myxoxanthophyll) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Graham, Joel E; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-05-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 produces a variety of carotenoids, which comprise predominantly dicylic beta-carotene and two dicyclic xanthophylls, zeaxanthin and synechoxanthin. However, this cyanobacterium also produces a monocyclic myxoxanthophyll, which was identified as myxol-2' fucoside. Compared to the carotenoid glycosides produced by diverse microorganisms, cyanobacterial myxoxanthophyll and closely related compounds are unusual because they are glycosylated on the 2'-OH rather than on the 1'-OH position of the psi end of the molecule. In this study, the genes encoding two enzymes that modify the psi end of myxoxanthophyll in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were identified. Mutational and biochemical studies showed that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2032, renamed cruF, encodes a 1',2'-hydroxylase [corrected] and that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2031, renamed cruG, encodes a 2'-O-glycosyltransferase. The enzymatic activity of CruF was verified by chemical characterization of the carotenoid products synthesized when cruF was expressed in a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Database searches showed that homologs of cruF and cruG occur in the genomes of all sequenced cyanobacterial strains that are known to produce myxol or the acylic xanthophyll oscillaxanthin. The genomes of many other bacteria that produce hydroxylated carotenoids but do not contain crtC homologs also contain cruF orthologs. Based upon observable intermediates, a complete biosynthetic pathway for myxoxanthophyll is proposed. This study expands the suite of enzymes available for metabolic engineering of carotenoid biosynthetic pathways for biotechnological applications.

  15. A Novel Nitrate/Nitrite Permease in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Bryant, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The nrtP and narB genes, encoding nitrate/nitrite permease and nitrate reductase, respectively, were isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and characterized. NrtP is a member of the major facilitator superfamily and is unrelated to the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate transporters that previously have been described for freshwater strains of cyanobacteria. However, NrtP is similar to the NRT2-type nitrate transporters found in diverse organisms. An nrtP mutant strain consumes nitrate at a 4.5-fold-lower rate than the wild type, and this mutant grew exponentially on a medium containing 12 mM nitrate at a rate approximately 2-fold lower than that of the wild type. The nrtP mutant cells could not consume nitrite as rapidly as the wild type at pH 10, suggesting that NrtP also functions in nitrite uptake. A narB mutant was unable to grow on a medium containing nitrate as a nitrogen source, although this mutant could grow on media containing urea or nitrite with rates similar to those of the wild type. Exogenously added nitrite enhanced the in vivo activity of nitrite reductase in the narB mutant; this suggests that nitrite acts as a positive effector of nitrite reductase. Transcripts of the nrtP and narB genes were detected in cells grown on nitrate but were not detected in cells grown on urea or ammonia. Transcription of the nrtP and narB genes is probably controlled by the NtcA transcription factor for global nitrogen control. The discovery of a nitrate/nitrite permease in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 suggests that significant differences in nutrient transporters may occur in marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. PMID:10572142

  16. Bradyrhizobium sp. Strains That Nodulate the Leguminous Tree Acacia albida Produce Fucosylated and Partially Sulfated Nod Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Myriam; Lorquin, Jean; Ba, Salif; Sanon, Kadidia; Promé, Jean-Claude; Boivin, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    We determined the structures of Nod factors produced by six different Bradyrhizobium sp. strains nodulating the legume tree Acacia albida (syn. Faidherbia albida). Compounds from all strains were found to be similar, i.e., O-carbamoylated and substituted by an often sulfated methyl fucose and different from compounds produced by Rhizobium-Mesorhizobium-Sinorhizobium strains nodulating other species of the Acaciae tribe. PMID:11055966

  17. Antibacterial activity of wild Xylaria sp. strain R005 (Ascomycetes) against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Veluchamy; Arivudainambi, U; Thalavaipandian, Annamalai; Karunakaran, Chandran; Rajendran, Ayyappan

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for new and effective antibiotic agents due to the recent emergence of life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the present study, the antimicrobial potential of mushroom was investigated against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. The mushroom was identified as Xylaria sp. strain R005 based on the morphological characteristics and confirmed by 18S ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons. The crude ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. showed significant antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains (1-10) and P. aeruginosa strains (1-8). The minimum inhibitory concentration of the ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies ranged from 225 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, and 120 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, respectively, against clinical strains of S. aurues and P. aeruginosa. The synergistic action of extracts of Xylaria sp. with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was observed against S. aureus strain 6 and P. aeruginosa strain 3, respectively. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of culture filtrate extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.18, respectively. The FICI of fruiting body extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.375, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the metabolites of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. are the potential source for production of new antimicrobial compounds.

  18. Antibacterial activity of wild Xylaria sp. strain R005 (Ascomycetes) against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Veluchamy; Arivudainambi, U; Thalavaipandian, Annamalai; Karunakaran, Chandran; Rajendran, Ayyappan

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for new and effective antibiotic agents due to the recent emergence of life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the present study, the antimicrobial potential of mushroom was investigated against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. The mushroom was identified as Xylaria sp. strain R005 based on the morphological characteristics and confirmed by 18S ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons. The crude ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. showed significant antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains (1-10) and P. aeruginosa strains (1-8). The minimum inhibitory concentration of the ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies ranged from 225 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, and 120 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, respectively, against clinical strains of S. aurues and P. aeruginosa. The synergistic action of extracts of Xylaria sp. with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was observed against S. aureus strain 6 and P. aeruginosa strain 3, respectively. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of culture filtrate extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.18, respectively. The FICI of fruiting body extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.375, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the metabolites of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. are the potential source for production of new antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22339707

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain CCGE-LA001, Isolated from Field Nodules of the Enigmatic Wild Bean Phaseolus microcarpus

    PubMed Central

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Rogel, Marco A.; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Zayas-del Moral, Alejandra; Sánchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain CCGE-LA001, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from nodules of Phaseolus microcarpus. Strain CCGE-LA001 represents the first sequenced bradyrhizobial strain obtained from a wild Phaseolus sp. Its genome revealed a large and novel symbiotic island. PMID:26988045

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain CCGE-LA001, Isolated from Field Nodules of the Enigmatic Wild Bean Phaseolus microcarpus.

    PubMed

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Rogel, Marco A; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Zayas-Del Moral, Alejandra; Sánchez, Federico; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain CCGE-LA001, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from nodules of Phaseolus microcarpus. Strain CCGE-LA001 represents the first sequenced bradyrhizobial strain obtained from a wild Phaseolus sp. Its genome revealed a large and novel symbiotic island. PMID:26988045

  1. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  2. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular rubber-degrading enzyme rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to high resolution. Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  3. Biodegradation and utilization of dimethylformamide by biofilm forming Paracoccus sp. strains MKU1 and MKU2.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Kamaldeen Nasrin; Devi, Venkatesan; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2015-01-01

    Two bacterial strains capable of degrading N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) were isolated from the effluent and sludge samples of textile and tyre industries. The 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that bacterial strains belonged to the genera Paracoccus and named as Paracoccus sp. MKU1 and Paracoccus sp. MKU2. The DMF degradation experiments conducted at a DMF concentration of 1% v/v and HPLC analysis revealed that MKU1 and MKU2 degraded 55% and 46% of DMF after 120 h of growth. Biofilm quantification by microtiter plate assay revealed that both the bacterial isolates can form efficient biofilm on during DMF utilization. The presence of secondary carbon sources influenced the DMF degradation and biofilm formation where highest biofilm formation was observed in the presence of acetate and enhanced the DMF degradation to a maximum of 86.59% with MKU1 whereas glucose and acetate enhanced DMF degradation by MKU2 to a maximum of 82.7% and 80% respectively. PMID:25728343

  4. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin-or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes. PMID:24325207

  5. Rapid aggregation of biofuel-producing algae by the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s.

  6. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T A; Crawford, R L

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was grown on a medium with a low content of transition metals in order to examine the conditions for carbon tetrachloride (CT) transformation. Several carbon sources, including acetate, glucose, glycerol, and glutamate, were able to support CT transformation. The chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthroline stimulated CT transformation in a rich medium that otherwise did not support this activity. Low (< 10 microM) additions of dissolved iron(II), iron(III), and cobalt(II), as well as an insoluble iron(III) compound, ferric oxyhydroxide, inhibited CT transformation. The addition of 50 microM iron to actively growing cultures resulted in delayed inhibition of CT transformation. CT transformation was seen in aerobic cultures of KC, but with reduced efficiency compared with denitrifying cultures. Inhibition of CT transformation by iron was also seen in aerobically grown cultures. Optimal conditions were used in searching for effective CT transformation activity among denitrifying enrichments grown from samples of aquifer material. No activity comparable to that of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was found among 16 samples tested. PMID:8517754

  7. Host range susceptibility of Enterococcus sp. strains isolated from diseased turbot: possible routes of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Romalde, J L; Magariños, B; Nuñez, S; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of Enterococcus sp. strains isolated from diseased turbot for several fish species (turbot, salmon, trout, and seabream), as well as for mice. The intraperitoneal injection assays indicated that the tested strains showed host specificity for turbot, with a high degree of virulence (50% lethal dose of 10(4) cells per g of fish). The Spanish Enterococcus sp. isolates were nonpathogenic for the other fish species studied and for mice. The possible routes of infection were determined by bath exposure (with and without prior abrasion of the skin) and by intragastric inoculations with food and feces contaminated with the pathogen. The bath challenges indicated that the Enterococcus isolates were able to overcome the defense mechanisms present on the surface of the turbot only if the skin was abraded prior to the exposure. The antibacterial activities of components of a glycoprotein nature present in the turbot skin mucus are probably responsible in part for the resistance in noninjured fish to infection. On the other hand, we demonstrated the capacity of this pathogen to overcome adverse conditions in the stomachs of fish when associated with food or fecal material, since it is able to establish an infective state and to produce mortalities after 16 to 20 days postingestion. From all of these findings, we can conclude that horizontal transmissions through water and the fecal-oral route are the main avenues of infection of turbot streptococcosis. PMID:8593061

  8. Biodegradation and utilization of dimethylformamide by biofilm forming Paracoccus sp. strains MKU1 and MKU2.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Kamaldeen Nasrin; Devi, Venkatesan; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2015-01-01

    Two bacterial strains capable of degrading N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) were isolated from the effluent and sludge samples of textile and tyre industries. The 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that bacterial strains belonged to the genera Paracoccus and named as Paracoccus sp. MKU1 and Paracoccus sp. MKU2. The DMF degradation experiments conducted at a DMF concentration of 1% v/v and HPLC analysis revealed that MKU1 and MKU2 degraded 55% and 46% of DMF after 120 h of growth. Biofilm quantification by microtiter plate assay revealed that both the bacterial isolates can form efficient biofilm on during DMF utilization. The presence of secondary carbon sources influenced the DMF degradation and biofilm formation where highest biofilm formation was observed in the presence of acetate and enhanced the DMF degradation to a maximum of 86.59% with MKU1 whereas glucose and acetate enhanced DMF degradation by MKU2 to a maximum of 82.7% and 80% respectively.

  9. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin- or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes.

  10. Characterization of the desulfurization genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Denome, S A; Oldfield, C; Nash, L J; Young, K D

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 possesses an enzymatic pathway that can remove covalently bound sulfur from dibenzothiophene (DBT) without breaking carbon-carbon bonds. The DNA sequence of a 4.0-kb BstBI-BsiWI fragment that carries the genes for this pathway was determined. Frameshift and deletion mutations established that three open reading frames were required for DBT desulfurization, and the genes were designated soxABC (for sulfur oxidation). Each sox gene was subcloned independently and expressed in Escherichia coli MZ1 under control of the inducible lambda pL promoter with a lambda cII ribosomal binding site. SoxC is an approximately 45-kDa protein that oxidizes DBT to DBT-5,5'-dioxide. SoxA is an approximately 50-kDa protein responsible for metabolizing DBT-5,5'-dioxide to an unidentified intermediate. SoxB is an approximately 40-kDa protein that, together with the SoxA protein, completes the desulfurization of DBT-5,5'-dioxide to 2-hydroxybiphenyl. Protein sequence comparisons revealed that the predicted SoxC protein is similar to members of the acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase family but that the SoxA and SoxB proteins have no significant identities to other known proteins. The sox genes are plasmidborne and appear to be expressed as an operon in Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 and in E. coli. Images PMID:7961424

  11. Characterization of the Gene Cluster Involved in Isoprene Metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    PubMed Central

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Leemhuis, Hans; Spelberg, Jeffrey H. Lutje; Janssen, Dick B.

    2000-01-01

    The genes involved in isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 10 genes of which 2 encoded enzymes which were previously found to be involved in isoprene degradation: a glutathione S-transferase with activity towards 1,2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoI) and a 1-hydroxy-2-glutathionyl-2-methyl-3-butene dehydrogenase (isoH). Furthermore, a gene encoding a second glutathione S-transferase was identified (isoJ). The isoJ gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and was found to have activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 3,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene but not with 1,2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene. Downstream of isoJ, six genes (isoABCDEF) were found; these genes encoded a putative alkene monooxygenase that showed high similarity to components of the alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter sp. strain Py2 and other multicomponent monooxygenases. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by an additional gene (isoG) showed significant similarity with that of α-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase. The results are in agreement with a catabolic route for isoprene involving epoxidation by a monooxygenase, conjugation to glutathione, and oxidation of the hydroxyl group to a carboxylate. Metabolism may proceed by fatty acid oxidation after removal of glutathione by a still-unknown mechanism. PMID:10715003

  12. Composition of the carbohydrate granules of the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that temporally separates O2-sensitive N2 fixation from oxygenic photosynthesis. The energy and reducing power needed for N2 fixation appears to be generated by an active respiratory apparatus that utilizes the contents of large interthylakoidal carbohydrate granules. We report here on the carbohydrate and protein composition of the granules of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. The carbohydrate component is a glucose homopolymer with branches every nine residues and is chemically identical to glycogen. Granule-associated protein fractions showed temporal changes in the number of proteins and their abundance during the metabolic oscillations observed under diazotrophic conditions. There also were temporal changes in the protein pattern of the granule-depleted supernatant fractions from diazotrophic cultures. None of the granule-associated proteins crossreacted with antisera directed against several glycogen-metabolizing enzymes or nitrogenase, although these proteins were tentatively identified in supernatant fractions. It is suggested that the granule-associated proteins are structural proteins required to maintain a complex granule architecture.

  13. Functional characterization of a soybean growth stimulator Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 showing acylhomoserine lactone production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amanat; Ayesha; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Iqbal, Mazhar; Iqbal, Javed; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2016-09-01

    A soybean nodule endophytic bacterium Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 was characterized for production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing molecules. Mass spectrometry analysis of AHLs revealed the presence of C6-HSL, 3OH-C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3oxoC10-HSL, 3oxo-C12-HSL and 3OH-C12-HSL which are significantly different from those reported earlier in soybean symbionts. Purified AHL extracts significantly improved wheat and soybean seedling growth and root hair development along with increased soybean nodulation under axenic conditions. A positive correlation was observed among in vivo nitrogenase and catalase enzyme activities of the strain SR-6. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed the cytochemical localization of catalase activity within the bacteroids, specifically attached to the peribacteroidal membrane. Root and nodule colonization proved rhizosphere competence of SR-6. The inoculation of SR-6 resulted in increased shoot length (13%), plant dry matter (50%), grain weight (16%), seed yield (20%) and N-uptake (14%) as compared to non-inoculated soybean plants. The symbiotic bacterium SR-6 has potential to improve soybean growth and yield in sub-humid climate of Azad Jammu and Kashmir region of Pakistan. The production and mass spectrometric profiling of AHLs as well as in vivo cytochemical localization of catalase enzyme activity in soybean Bradyrhizobium sp. have never been reported earlier elsewhere before our these investigations.

  14. Metabolism of dibenzo-p-dioxin by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1

    SciTech Connect

    Wittich, R.M.; Wilkes, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Francke, W.; Fortnagel, P. )

    1992-03-01

    In the course of screening for dibenzo-p-dioxin-utilizing bacteria, a Sphingomonas sp. strain was isolated from enrichment cultures inoculated with water samples from the river Elbe. The isolate grew with both the biaryl ethers dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (DF) as the sole sources of carbon and energy, showing doubling times of about 8 and 5 h, respectively. Biodegradation of the two aromatic compounds initially proceeded after an oxygenolytic attack at the angular position adjacent to the ether bridge, producing 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether or 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl from the initially formed dihydrodiols, which represent extremely unstable hemiacetals. Results obtained from determinations of enzyme activities and oxygen consumption suggest meta cleavage of the trihydroxy compounds. During dibenzofuran degradation, hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-hexa-2,4-dienoate yielded salicylate, which was branched into the catechol meta cleavage pathway and the gentisate pathway. Catechol obtained from the product of meta ring fission of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether was both ortho and meta cleaved by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 when this organism was grown with dibenzo-p-dioxin.

  15. Biosurfactant production by a CO2 sequestering Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Smita; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2, produced biosurfactant when enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as carbon source was evaluated for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and biosurfactant production. CO2 sequestration efficiency of the bacterium was determined by enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Biosurfactant production ability at 100 mM NHCO3 and 5% CO2 was screened by surface and interfacial tension measurement, emulsification stability test, hydrophobicity test, contact angle measurement, bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon and purified by silica gel column (60-120 mesh). Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the crude biosurfactant of ISTS2 were composed of lipopeptides and free fatty acids (FA) and its hydrophobic fraction contained five kinds of fatty acids (FA) with chain lengths of C14-C19. Thus Bacillus sp. strain IST2 can be used as a cleaner bioprocess for the utilization of industrial CO2 as alternate substrate.

  16. Karyotype rearrangements and telomere analysis in Myzuspersicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) strains collected on Lavandula sp. plants.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Zanasi, Federica; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype analysis of nine strains of the peach-potato aphid Myzuspersicae (Sulzer, 1776), collected on Lavandula sp. plants, evidenced showed that five of them had a standard 2n = 12 karyotype, one possessed a fragmentation of the X chromosome occurring at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one and three strains had a chromosome number 2n = 11 due to a non-reciprocal translocation of an autosome A3 onto an A1 chromosome. Interestingly, the terminal portion of the autosome A1 involved in the translocation was the same in all the three strains, as evidenced by FISH with the histone cluster as a probe. The study of telomeres in the Myzuspersicae strain with the X fission evidenced that telomerase synthesised de novo telomeres at the breakpoints resulting in the stabilization of the chromosomal fragments. Lastly, despite the presence of a conserved telomerase, aphid genome is devoid of genes coding for shelterin, a complex of proteins involved in telomere functioning frequently reported as conserved in eukaryotes. The absence of this complex, also confirmed in the genome of other arthropods, suggests that the shift in the sequence of the telomeric repeats has been accompanied by other changes in the telomere components in arthropods in respect to other metazoans. PMID:25610541

  17. Biodegradation of the neonicotinoid insecticide Acetamiprid by bacterium Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Yue, Wenlong; Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng; Xiong, Minhua; Zhang, Hui

    2013-06-01

    The Acetamiprid-degrading bacterium AAP-1 was isolated from contaminated soil, and identified as Pigmentiphaga sp. combined traditionary categorization method with modern molecule method. The strain could utilize Acetamiprid as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source for growth and metabolized 100 mgL(-1) Acetamiprid within 2.5h. During the degradation of Acetamiprid, one N-deacetylation metabolite, was characterized by FT-IR, GC-MS and NMR analysis. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for Acetamiprid was proposed on the basis of the metabolite. Compared with uninoculated soils, the addition of the AAP-1 strain into soils treated with Acetamiprid gained a higher degradation rate, and the bacteria community analysis by T-RFLP in contaminated soil recovered after inoculation of the AAP-1 strain. On the basis of these results, strain AAP-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of Acetamiprid-contaminated environments. This is the first report of Acetamiprid-degrading isolate from the genus of Pigmentiphaga. PMID:23624055

  18. Karyotype rearrangements and telomere analysis in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) strains collected on Lavandula sp. plants

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Zanasi, Federica; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis of nine strains of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer, 1776), collected on Lavandula sp. plants, evidenced showed that five of them had a standard 2n = 12 karyotype, one possessed a fragmentation of the X chromosome occurring at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one and three strains had a chromosome number 2n = 11 due to a non-reciprocal translocation of an autosome A3 onto an A1 chromosome. Interestingly, the terminal portion of the autosome A1 involved in the translocation was the same in all the three strains, as evidenced by FISH with the histone cluster as a probe. The study of telomeres in the Myzus persicae strain with the X fission evidenced that telomerase synthesised de novo telomeres at the breakpoints resulting in the stabilization of the chromosomal fragments. Lastly, despite the presence of a conserved telomerase, aphid genome is devoid of genes coding for shelterin, a complex of proteins involved in telomere functioning frequently reported as conserved in eukaryotes. The absence of this complex, also confirmed in the genome of other arthropods, suggests that the shift in the sequence of the telomeric repeats has been accompanied by other changes in the telomere components in arthropods in respect to other metazoans. PMID:25610541

  19. [Bioremediation of chlorothalonil-contaminated soil by utilizing Pseudomonas sp. strain CTN-3].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Chen, Hong-Hong; Bi, Meng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-01

    Chlorothalonil is the priority organic pollutant listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To utilize the function of microbial degradation in the bioremediation of chlorothalonil-contaminated soil is of practical significance. In this study, a chlorothalonil-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain CTN-3 isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil was used to examine the chlorothalonil-degrading capacity of the strain and related affecting factors in a microcosm. In sterilized soil, the effect of CTN-3 on chlorothalonil degradation was better than that in unsterilized soil. Various factors, including soil pH, temperature, initial chlorothalonil concentration, and inoculum size, affected the degradation of chlorothalonil by the strain. With the inoculum size of 10(6) CFU x g(-1) soil, the CTN-3 at 15-30 degrees C and pH 5.8-8.3 could effectively degrade 10-200 mg x kg(-1) of chlorothalonil, suggesting that the strain CTN-3 had great potential in the bioremediation of chlorothalonil-contaminated soil.

  20. Metabolism of dibenzofuran by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 and the mixed culture HH27

    SciTech Connect

    Fortnagel, P.; Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Krohn, S.; Meyer, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Wilkes, H.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, HH69, and a mixed culture, designated HH27, were isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples. The pure strain and the mixed culture grew aerobically on dibenzofuran as the sole source of carbon and energy. Degradation proceeded via salicylic acid which was branched into the gentisic acid and the catechol pathway. Both salicylic acid and gentisic acid accumulated in the culture medium of strain HH69. The acids were slowly metabolized after growth ceased. The enzymes responsible for their metabolism showed relatively low activities. Besides the above-mentioned acids, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, benzopyran-4-one (chrome), several 2-substituted chroman-4-ones, and traces of the four isomeric monohydroxydibenzofurans were identified in the culture medium. 2,2{prime},3-Trihydroxybiphenyl was isolated from the medium of a dibenzofuran-converting mutant derived from parent strain HH69, which can no longer grow on dibenzofuran. This gives evidence for a novel type of dioxygenases responsible for the attack on the biarylether structure of the dibenzofuran molecule. A meta-fission mechanism for cleavage of the dihydroxylated aromatic nucleus of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl is suggested as the next enzymatic step in the degradative pathway.

  1. Response of Nitrosospira sp. Strain AF-Like Ammonia Oxidizers to Changes in Temperature, Soil Moisture Content, and Fertilizer Concentration▿

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Sharon; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the ecology of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, a unique group of ammonia oxidizers within the Betaproteobacteria. We studied the response of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like ammonia oxidizers to changing environmental conditions by applying molecular methods and physiological measurements to Californian grassland soil manipulated in the laboratory. This soil is naturally high in Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria relative to the much-better-studied Nitrosospira multiformis-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Increases in temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer interacted to reduce the relative abundance of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, although they remained numerically dominant. The overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria increased with increasing soil moisture and decreased with increasing temperature. Potential nitrification activity was altered by interactions among temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer, with activity tending to be higher when soil moisture and temperature were increased. The increase in potential nitrification activity with increased temperature was surprising, given that the overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria decreased significantly under these conditions. This observation suggests that (i) Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria may respond to increased temperature with an increase in activity, despite a decrease in abundance, or (ii) that potential nitrification activity in these soils may be due to organisms other than bacteria (e.g., archaeal ammonia oxidizers), at least under conditions of increased temperature. PMID:17158615

  2. Response of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like ammonia oxidizers to changes in temperature, soil moisture content, and fertilizer concentration.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Sharon; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2007-02-01

    Very little is known regarding the ecology of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, a unique group of ammonia oxidizers within the Betaproteobacteria. We studied the response of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like ammonia oxidizers to changing environmental conditions by applying molecular methods and physiological measurements to Californian grassland soil manipulated in the laboratory. This soil is naturally high in Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria relative to the much-better-studied Nitrosospira multiformis-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Increases in temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer interacted to reduce the relative abundance of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, although they remained numerically dominant. The overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria increased with increasing soil moisture and decreased with increasing temperature. Potential nitrification activity was altered by interactions among temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer, with activity tending to be higher when soil moisture and temperature were increased. The increase in potential nitrification activity with increased temperature was surprising, given that the overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria decreased significantly under these conditions. This observation suggests that (i) Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria may respond to increased temperature with an increase in activity, despite a decrease in abundance, or (ii) that potential nitrification activity in these soils may be due to organisms other than bacteria (e.g., archaeal ammonia oxidizers), at least under conditions of increased temperature.

  3. Molecular structure and enzymatic function of lycopene cyclase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp strain PCC7942.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, F X; Sun, Z; Chamovitz, D; Hirschberg, J; Gantt, E

    1994-01-01

    A gene encoding the enzyme lycopene cyclase in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp strain PCC7942 was mapped by genetic complementation, cloned, and sequenced. This gene, which we have named crtL, was expressed in strains of Escherichia coli that were genetically engineered to accumulate the carotenoid precursors lycopene, neurosporene, and zeta-carotene. The crtL gene product converts the acyclic hydrocarbon lycopene into the bicyclic beta-carotene, an essential component of the photosynthetic apparatus in oxygen-evolving organisms and a source of vitamin A in human and animal nutrition. The enzyme also converts neurosporene to the monocyclic beta-zeacarotene but does not cyclize zeta-carotene, indicating that desaturation of the 7-8 or 7'-8' carbon-carbon bond is required for cyclization. The bleaching herbicide 2-(4-methylphenoxy)triethylamine hydrochloride (MPTA) effectively inhibits both cyclization reactions. A mutation that confers resistance to MPTA in Synechococcus sp PCC7942 was identified as a point mutation in the promoter region of crtL. The deduced amino acid sequence of lycopene cyclase specifies a polypeptide of 411 amino acids with a molecular weight of 46,125 and a pI of 6.0. An amino acid sequence motif indicative of FAD utilization is located at the N terminus of the polypeptide. DNA gel blot hybridization analysis indicated a single copy of crtL in Synechococcus sp PCC7942. Other than the FAD binding motif, the predicted amino acid sequence of the cyanobacterial lycopene cyclase bears little resemblance to the two known lycopene cyclase enzymes from nonphotosynthetic bacteria. Preliminary results from DNA gel blot hybridization experiments suggest that, like two earlier genes in the pathway, the Synechococcus gene encoding lycopene cyclase is homologous to plant and algal genes encoding this enzyme. PMID:7919981

  4. High-Level Chromate Resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 Requires Previously Uncharacterized Accessory Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-09-24

    The annotated genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 revealed a chromate resistance determinant (CRD): a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their regulatory roles. Collectively, our findings indicate that chromate resistance in strain FB24 is primarily achieved by plasmid-mediated chromate efflux with the contribution of previously unrecognized accessory genes.

  5. Efficient production of lignocellulolytic enzymes xylanase, β-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and β-glucosidase by the mutant strain Aspergillus awamori 2B.361 U2/1

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Leda Maria Fortes; de Sousa Paredes, Raquel; Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant’Ana; da Silva Bon, Elba Pinto

    2013-01-01

    The production of xylanase, β-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and β-glucosidase by Aspergillus awamori 2B.361 U2/1, a hyper producer of glucoamylase and pectinase, was evaluated using selected conditions regarding nitrogen nutrition. Submerged cultivations were carried out at 30 °C and 200 rpm in growth media containing 30 g wheat bran/L as main carbon source and either yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate or urea, as nitrogen sources; in all cases it was used a fixed molar carbon to molar nitrogen concentration of 10.3. The use of poor nitrogen sources favored the accumulation of xylanase, β-xylosidase and ferulic acid esterase to a peak concentrations of 44,880; 640 and 118 U/L, respectively, for sodium nitrate and of 34,580, 685 and 170 U/L, respectively, for urea. However, the highest β-glucosidase accumulation of 10,470 U/L was observed when the rich organic nitrogen source yeast extract was used. The maxima accumulation of filter paper activity, xylanase, β-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and β-glucosidase by A. awamori 2B.361 U2/1 was compared to that produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. The level of β-glucosidase was over 17-fold higher for the Aspergillus strain, whereas the levels of xylanase and β-xylosidase were over 2-fold higher. This strain also produced ferulic acid esterase (170 U/L), which was not detected in the T. reesei culture. PMID:24294256

  6. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment.

  7. [Extracellular hydrolases of strain Bacillus sp. 739 and their involvement in the lysis of micromycete cell walls].

    PubMed

    Aktuganov, G E; Galimzianova, N F; Melent'ev, A I; Kuz'mina, L Iu

    2007-01-01

    The mycolytic bacterial strain Bacillus sp. 739 produces extracellular enzymes which degrade in vitro the cell walls of a number of phytopathogenic and saprophytic fungi. When Bacillus sp. 739 was cultivated with Bipolaris sorokiniana, a cereal root-rot pathogen, the fungus degradation process correlated with the levels of the beta-1,3-glucanase and protease activity. The comparative characteristic of Bacillus sp. 739 enzymatic preparations showed that efficient hydrolysis of the fungus cell walls was the result of the action of the complex of enzymes produced by the strain when grown on chitin-containing media. Among the enzymes of this complex, chitinases and beta-1,3-glucanases hydrolyzed most actively the disintegrated cell walls of B. sorokiniana. However, only beta-1,3-glucanases were able to degrade the cell walls of native fungal mycelium in the absence of other hydrolases, which is indicative of their key role in the mycolytic activity of Bacillus sp. 739.

  8. Regulation of the Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP Cyanuric Acid Degradation Operon

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Vicente; Govantes, Fernando; Porrúa, Odil; Santero, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP is the model strain for studying bacterial degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. In this work, we focused on the expression of the atzDEF operon, involved in mineralization of the central intermediate of the pathway, cyanuric acid. Expression analysis of atzD-lacZ fusions in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP and Pseudomonas putida showed that atzDEF is subjected to dual regulation in response to nitrogen limitation and cyanuric acid. The gene adjacent to atzD, orf99 (renamed here atzR), encoding a LysR-like regulator, was found to be required for both responses. Expression of atzR-lacZ was induced by nitrogen limitation and repressed by AtzR. Nitrogen regulation of atzD-lacZ and atzR-lacZ expression was dependent on the alternative σ factor σN and NtrC, suggesting that the cyanuric acid degradation operon may be subject to general nitrogen control. However, while atzR is transcribed from a σN-dependent promoter, atzDEF transcription appears to be driven from a σ70-type promoter. Expression of atzR from a heterologous promoter revealed that although NtrC regulation of atzD-lacZ requires the AtzR protein, it is not the indirect result of NtrC-activated AtzR synthesis. We propose that expression of the cyanuric acid degradation operon atzDEF is controlled by means of a complex regulatory circuit in which AtzR is the main activator. AtzR activity is in turn modulated by the presence of cyanuric acid and by a nitrogen limitation signal transduced by the Ntr system. PMID:15601699

  9. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Brent Peyton; Viamajala, Sridhar; Robin Gerlach; William Apel; Rajesh Sani; Alice Dohnalkova; Thomas Borch

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed U precipitates containing nearly equal fractions of U(IV) and U(VI), whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI). Mass balance calculations for U and P corroborate these observations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR42TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids. The U(VI)-phosphate precipitates, confirmed by EDS as containing U and P in equimolar concentrations, had nanometer sized lath structure. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, U reduction became the dominant removal mechanism, in contrast to primarily phosphate-mediated precipitation observed in the absence of AQDS. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, t 52 he presence of multiple U

  10. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Leucobacter sp. Strain G161, a Distinct and Effective Chromium Reducer

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Shimei; Ai, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence for Leucobacter sp. strain G161 due to its distinct and effective hexavalent chromium reduction under aerobic growth conditions, followed by facultative anaerobic incubation. The draft genome sequence of Leucobacter sp. G161 comprises 3,554,188 bp, with an average G+C content of 65.3%, exhibiting 3,341 protein-coding genes and 55 predicted RNA genes. PMID:26893433

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Marine Actinomycete Streptomyces sp. Strain NTK 937, Producer of the Benzoxazole Antibiotic Caboxamycin

    PubMed Central

    Olano, Carlos; Cano-Prieto, Carolina; Losada, Armando A.; Bull, Alan T.; Goodfellow, Michael; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Méndez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain NTK 937 is the producer of the benzoxazole antibiotic caboxamycin, which has been shown to exert inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria, cytotoxic activity against several human tumor cell lines, and inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. In this genome announcement, we present a draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. NTK 937 in which we identified at least 35 putative secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:24994793

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Marine Actinomycete Streptomyces sp. Strain NTK 937, Producer of the Benzoxazole Antibiotic Caboxamycin.

    PubMed

    Olano, Carlos; Cano-Prieto, Carolina; Losada, Armando A; Bull, Alan T; Goodfellow, Michael; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A

    2014-07-03

    Streptomyces sp. strain NTK 937 is the producer of the benzoxazole antibiotic caboxamycin, which has been shown to exert inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria, cytotoxic activity against several human tumor cell lines, and inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. In this genome announcement, we present a draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. NTK 937 in which we identified at least 35 putative secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters.

  13. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides.

  14. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides. PMID:20721665

  15. Molecular cloning of a malyl coenzyme A lyase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1, a facultative methylotroph

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, G.L.; Nunn, D.N.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1984-11-01

    A genomic library containing HindIII partial digest of Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 DNA was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pVK100. PCT57, a Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 methanol mutant deficient in malyl coenzyme A lyase activity, was complemented to a methanol-positive phenotype by mobilization of pVK100 library into PCT57 recipients with the ColE1/RK2 mobilizing plasmid pRK2013. Six different complemented isolates all contained a recombinant plasmid carrying the same 19.6-kilobase-pair Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 DNA insert. Subcloning and complementation analysis demonstrated that the gene deficient in PCT57 (mcl-1) was located in a 1.6-kilobase-pair region within a 7.4-kilobase-pair EcoRI-HindIII fragment. 33 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Molecular cloning of a malyl coenzyme A lyase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1, a facultative methylotroph.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, G L; Nunn, D N; Lidstrom, M E

    1984-01-01

    A genomic library containing HindIII partial digests of Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 DNA was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pVK100. PCT57, a Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 methanol mutant deficient in malyl coenzyme A lyase activity, was complemented to a methanol-positive phenotype by mobilization of the pVK100 library into PCT57 recipients with the ColE1/RK2 mobilizing plasmid pRK2013. Six different complemented isolates all contained a recombinant plasmid carrying the same 19.6-kilobase-pair Pseudomonas sp. strain AM1 DNA insert. Subcloning and complementation analysis demonstrated that the gene deficient in PCT57 (mcl-1) was located in a 1.6-kilobase-pair region within a 7.4-kilobase-pair EcoRI-HindIII fragment. PMID:6094488

  17. ChoG is the main inducible extracellular cholesterol oxidase of Rhodococcus sp. strain CECT3014.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Las Heras, Laura; Mascaraque, Victoria; García Fernández, Esther; Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Perera, Julián; Drzyzga, Oliver

    2011-07-20

    Cholesterol catabolism has been reported in different bacteria and particularly in several Rhodococcus species, but the genetic of this complex pathway is not yet very well defined. In this work we report the isolation and sequencing of a 9.8 kb DNA fragment of Rhodococcus sp. strain CECT3014, a bacterial strain that we here identify as a Rhodococcus erythropolis strain. In this DNA fragment we found several ORF that are probably involved in steroid catabolism, and choG, a gene encoding a putative cholesterol oxidase whose functional characterization we here report. ChoG protein is a class II cholesterol oxidase with all the structural features of the enzymes of this group. The disruption of the choG gene does not alter the ability of strain CECT3014 cells to grow on cholesterol, but it abolishes the production of extracellular cholesterol oxidase. This later effect is reverted when the mutant cells are transformed with a plasmid expressing choG. We conclude that choG is the gene responsible for the inducible extracellular cholesterol oxidase activity of strain CECT3014. This activity distributes between the cellular membrane and the culture supernatant in a way that suggests it is produced by the same ChoG protein that occurs in two different locations. RT-PCR transcript analysis showed a dual scheme of choG expression: a low constitutive independent transcription, plus a cholesterol induced transcription of choG into a polycistronic kstD-hsd4B-choG mRNA. PMID:20630728

  18. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  19. Hydrolytic potential of Trichoderma sp. strains evaluated by microplate-based screening followed by switchgrass saccharification.

    PubMed

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Galletti, Stefania; Burzi, Pier Luigi; Cerato, Claudio

    2012-05-10

    Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel requires a hydrolysis step to obtain fermentable sugars, generally accomplished by fungal enzymes. Large-scale screening of different microbial strains would provide optimal enzyme cocktails for any target feedstock. The aim of this study was to screen a large collection of Trichoderma sp. strains for the hydrolytic potential towards switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). Strains were cultivated in a small-scale system and assayed in micro-plates for xylanase and cellulase activities. The population distributions of these traits are reported after growth on switchgrass in comparison with cellulose. The distribution profiles suggest that the growth on switchgrass strongly promotes xylanase production. The IK4 strain displayed the highest xylanase activity after growth on switchgrass (133U/mL). Enzymes (10FPU/g substrate) from IK4 were compared with those from 2 cellulolytic Trichoderma strains and a commercial enzyme in saccharification time-course experiments on untreated and pretreated switchgrass and on an artificial substrate. Samples were analysed by DNS assay and by an oxygraphic method for sugar equivalent or glucose concentration. On the untreated substrate, IK4 enzymes even outperformed a 5-fold load of commercial enzyme, suggesting that xylanase or accessory enzymes are a limiting factor on this type of recalcitrant substrate. On the other substrates, IK4 preparations showed intermediate behaviour if compared with the commercial enzyme at 10FPU/g substrate and at 5-fold load. IK4 also nearly halved the time to release 50% of the hydrolysable sugar equivalents (T(50%)), with respect to the other preparations at the same enzymatic load. DNS assay and oxygraphic method gave highly correlated results for the 3 saccharified substrates. The study suggests that accessory enzymes like xylanase play a key role in improving the performance of cellulase preparations on herbaceous lignocellulosic feedstocks like switchgrass.

  20. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes. PMID:26203342

  1. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agriculturalmore » relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.« less

  2. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Ismail, Rokiah; Kwan, Zhenli; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle. PMID:27280438

  3. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.

  4. High Production of Squalene Using a Newly Isolated Yeast-like Strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Yanzhen; Feng, Yingang; Li, Wenli; Cui, Qiu

    2015-09-30

    A yeast-like fungus, termed strain SD301, with the ability to produce a high concentration of squalene, was isolated from Shuidong Bay, China. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SD301 indicated the strain belonged to Pseudozyma species. The highest biomass and squalene production of SD301 were obtained when glucose and yeast extracts were used as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, with a C/N ratio of 3. The optimal pH and temperature were 6 and 25 °C, with 15 g L(-1) of supplemented sea salt. The maximum squalene productivity reached 0.039 g L(-1) h(-1) in batch fermentation, while the maximum squalene yield of 2.445 g L(-1) was obtained in fed-batch fermentation. According to our knowledge, this is the highest squalene yield produced thus far using fermentation technology, and the newly isolated strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301 is a promising candidate for commercial squalene production.

  5. Construction of the astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway in a methanotrophic bacterium Methylomonas sp. strain 16a.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rick W; Yao, Henry; Stead, Kristen; Wang, Tao; Tao, Luan; Cheng, Qiong; Sharpe, Pamela L; Suh, Wonchul; Nagel, Eva; Arcilla, Dennis; Dragotta, Dominic; Miller, Edward S

    2007-04-01

    Methylomonas sp. strain 16a is an obligate methanotrophic bacterium that uses methane or methanol as the sole carbon source. An effort was made to engineer this organism for astaxanthin production. Upon expressing the canthaxanthin gene cluster under the control of the native hps promoter in the chromosome, canthaxanthin was produced as the main carotenoid. Further conversion to astaxanthin was carried out by expressing different combinations of crtW and crtZ genes encoding the beta-carotenoid ketolase and hydroxylase. The carotenoid intermediate profile was influenced by the copy number of these two genes under the control of the hps promoter. Expression of two copies of crtZ and one copy of crtW led to the accumulation of a large amount of the mono-ketolated product adonixanthin. On the other hand, expression of two copies of crtW and one copy of crtZ resulted in the presence of non-hydroxylated carotenoid canthaxanthin and the mono-hydroxylated adonirubin. Production of astaxanthin as the predominant carotenoid was obtained in a strain containing two complete sets of carotenoid biosynthetic genes. This strain had an astaxanthin titer ranging from 1 to 2.4 mg g(-1) of dry cell biomass depending on the growth conditions. More than 90% of the total carotenoid was astaxanthin, of which the majority was in the form of E-isomer. This result indicates that it is possible to produce astaxanthin with desirable properties in methanotrophs through genetic engineering.

  6. High Production of Squalene Using a Newly Isolated Yeast-like Strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Yanzhen; Feng, Yingang; Li, Wenli; Cui, Qiu

    2015-09-30

    A yeast-like fungus, termed strain SD301, with the ability to produce a high concentration of squalene, was isolated from Shuidong Bay, China. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SD301 indicated the strain belonged to Pseudozyma species. The highest biomass and squalene production of SD301 were obtained when glucose and yeast extracts were used as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, with a C/N ratio of 3. The optimal pH and temperature were 6 and 25 °C, with 15 g L(-1) of supplemented sea salt. The maximum squalene productivity reached 0.039 g L(-1) h(-1) in batch fermentation, while the maximum squalene yield of 2.445 g L(-1) was obtained in fed-batch fermentation. According to our knowledge, this is the highest squalene yield produced thus far using fermentation technology, and the newly isolated strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301 is a promising candidate for commercial squalene production. PMID:26350291

  7. Biosynthesis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Oleaginous Marine Diatom Fistulifera sp. Strain JPCC DA0580

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yue; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Muto, Masaki; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Studies of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in microalgae are of great importance for many reasons, including the production of biofuel and variable omega 3-long chain PUFAs. The elucidation of the PUFA biosynthesis pathway is necessary for bioengineering to increase or decrease PUFA content in certain microalgae. In this study, we identified the PUFA synthesis pathway in the oleaginous marine diatom, Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580, a promising candidate for biodiesel production. The data revealed not only the presence of the desaturases and elongases involved in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) synthesis, but also the unexpected localization of ω3-desaturase expression in the chloroplast. This suggests that this microalga might perform the final step of EPA synthesis in the chloroplast and not in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) like other diatoms. The detailed fatty acid profile suggests that the EPA was synthesized only through the ω6-pathway in this strain, which was also different from other diatoms. Finally, the transcriptome analysis demonstrated an overall down-regulation of desaturases and elongases over incubation time. These genetic features might explain the decrease of PUFA percentage over incubation time in this strain. The important insights into metabolite synthesis acquired here will be useful for future metabolic engineering to control PUFA content in this diatom. PMID:24335525

  8. Cloning and characterization of Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT genes for 2,4-dinitrotoluene degradation.

    PubMed

    Suen, W C; Spain, J C

    1993-03-01

    The degradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) by Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT is initiated by a dioxygenase attack to yield 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) and nitrite. Subsequent oxidation of MNC by a monooxygenase results in the removal of the second molecule of nitrite, and further enzymatic reactions lead to ring fission. Initial studies on the molecular basis of DNT degradation in this strain revealed the presence of three plasmids. Mitomycin-derived mutants deficient in either DNT dioxygenase only or DNT dioxygenase and MNC monooxygenase were isolated. Plasmid profiles of mutant strains suggested that the mutations resulted from deletions in the largest plasmid. Total plasmid DNA partially digested by EcoRI was cloned into a broad-host-range cosmid vector, pCP13. Recombinant clones containing genes encoding DNT dioxygenase, MNC monooxygenase, and 2,4,5-trihydroxytoluene oxygenase were characterized by identification of reaction products and the ability to complement mutants. Subcloning analysis suggests that the DNT dioxygenase is a multicomponent enzyme system and that the genes for the DNT pathway are organized in at least three different operons. PMID:8449889

  9. Biodegradation of buprofezin by Rhodococcus sp. strain YL-1 isolated from rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Cao, Li; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-14

    A buprofezin-degrading bacterium, YL-1, was isolated from rice field soil. YL-1 was identified as Rhodococcus sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain could use buprofezin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth and was able to degrade 92.4% of 50 mg L(-1) buprofezin within 48 h in liquid culture. During the degradation of buprofezin, four possible metabolites, 2-tert-butylimino-3-isopropyl-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, N-tert-butyl-thioformimidic acid formylaminomethyl ester, 2-isothiocyanato-2-methyl-propane, and 2-isothiocyanato-propane, were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was strongly induced during the degradation of buprofezin. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for buprofezin was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. The inoculation of soils treated with buprofezin with strain YL-1 resulted in a higher degradation rate than that observed in noninoculated soils, indicating that strain YL-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments.

  10. Combined bioremediation of atrazine-contaminated soil by Pennisetum and Arthrobacter sp. strain DNS10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ge, Shijie; Jiang, Mingyue; Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Zhigang; Ma, Bingbing

    2014-05-01

    Strain DNS10 was isolated from the black soil collected from the northeast of China which had been cultivated with atrazine as the sole nitrogen source. Pennisetum is a common plant in Heilongjiang Province of China. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the efficiency of plant-microbe joint interactions (Arthrobacter sp. DNS10 + Pennisetum) in atrazine degradation compared with single-strain and single-plant effects. Plant-microbe joint interactions degraded 98.10 % of the atrazine, while single strain and single plant only degraded 87.38 and 66.71 % after a 30-day experimental period, respectively. The results indicated that plant-microbe joint interactions had a better degradation effect. Meanwhile, we found that plant-microbe joint interactions showed a higher microbial diversity. The results of microbial diversity illustrated that the positive effects of cropping could improve soil microbial growth and activity. In addition, we planted atrazine-sensitive plants (soybean) in the soil after repair. The results showed that soybean growth in soil previously treated with the plant-microbe joint interactions treatment was better compared with other treatments after 20 days of growth. This was further proved that the soil is more conducive for crop cultivation. Hence, plant-microbe joint interactions are considered to be a potential tool in the remediation of atrazine-contaminated soil.

  11. Modification of Norfloxacin by a Microbacterium sp. Strain Isolated from a Wastewater Treatment Plant▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Wi; Heinze, Thomas M.; Kim, Bong-Soo; Schnackenberg, Laura K.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Sutherland, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial residues found in municipal wastewater may increase selective pressure on microorganisms for development of resistance, but studies with mixed microbial cultures derived from wastewater have suggested that some bacteria are able to inactivate fluoroquinolones. Medium containing N-phenylpiperazine and inoculated with wastewater was used to enrich fluoroquinolone-modifying bacteria. One bacterial strain isolated from an enrichment culture was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as a Microbacterium sp. similar to a plant growth-promoting bacterium, Microbacterium azadirachtae (99.70%), and a nematode pathogen, “M. nematophilum” (99.02%). During growth in medium with norfloxacin, this strain produced four metabolites, which were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses as 8-hydroxynorfloxacin, 6-defluoro-6-hydroxynorfloxacin, desethylene norfloxacin, and N-acetylnorfloxacin. The production of the first three metabolites was enhanced by ascorbic acid and nitrate, but it was inhibited by phosphate, amino acids, mannitol, formate, and thiourea. In contrast, N-acetylnorfloxacin was most abundant in cultures supplemented with amino acids. This is the first report of defluorination and hydroxylation of a fluoroquinolone by an isolated bacterial strain. The results suggest that some bacteria may degrade fluoroquinolones in wastewater to metabolites with less antibacterial activity that could be subject to further degradation by other microorganisms. PMID:21724893

  12. Modification of norfloxacin by a Microbacterium sp. strain isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Wi; Heinze, Thomas M; Kim, Bong-Soo; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Woodling, Kellie A; Sutherland, John B

    2011-09-01

    Antimicrobial residues found in municipal wastewater may increase selective pressure on microorganisms for development of resistance, but studies with mixed microbial cultures derived from wastewater have suggested that some bacteria are able to inactivate fluoroquinolones. Medium containing N-phenylpiperazine and inoculated with wastewater was used to enrich fluoroquinolone-modifying bacteria. One bacterial strain isolated from an enrichment culture was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as a Microbacterium sp. similar to a plant growth-promoting bacterium, Microbacterium azadirachtae (99.70%), and a nematode pathogen, "M. nematophilum" (99.02%). During growth in medium with norfloxacin, this strain produced four metabolites, which were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses as 8-hydroxynorfloxacin, 6-defluoro-6-hydroxynorfloxacin, desethylene norfloxacin, and N-acetylnorfloxacin. The production of the first three metabolites was enhanced by ascorbic acid and nitrate, but it was inhibited by phosphate, amino acids, mannitol, formate, and thiourea. In contrast, N-acetylnorfloxacin was most abundant in cultures supplemented with amino acids. This is the first report of defluorination and hydroxylation of a fluoroquinolone by an isolated bacterial strain. The results suggest that some bacteria may degrade fluoroquinolones in wastewater to metabolites with less antibacterial activity that could be subject to further degradation by other microorganisms.

  13. Sulfate as a pivotal factor in regulation of Serratia sp. strain S2B pigment biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastegari, Banafsheh; Karbalaei-Heidari, Hamid Reza

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we investigated the prodiginine family as secondary metabolite members. Bacterial strain S2B, with the ability to produce red pigment, was isolated from the Sarcheshmeh copper mine in Iran. 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed that the strain was placed in the Serratia genus. Pigment production was optimized using low-cost culture medium and the effects of various physicochemical factors were studied via statistical approaches. Purification of the produced pigment by silica gel column chromatography showed a strong red pigment fraction and a weaker orange band. Mass spectrometry, FT-IR spectroscopy and (1)H NMR analysis revealed that the red pigment was prodigiosin and the orange band was a prodigiosin-like analog, with molecular weights of 323 and 317 Da, respectively. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity studies confirmed their membership in the prodiginine family. Analysis of the production pattern of the pigments in the presence of different concentrations of ammonium salts revealed the role of sulfate as an important factor in regulation of the pigment biosynthesis pathway. Overall, the data showed that regulation of the pigment biosynthesis pathway in Serratia sp. strain S2B was affected by inorganic micronutrients, particularly the sulfate ions.

  14. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the amidase domain of allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Balotra, Sahil; Newman, Janet; French, Nigel G.; Briggs, Lyndall J.; Peat, Thomas S.; Scott, Colin

    2014-02-19

    The amidase domain of the allophanate hydrolase AtzF from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP has been crystallized and preliminary X-ray diffraction data have been collected. The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was expressed and purified, and a tryptic digest fragment was subsequently identified, expressed and purified. This 50 kDa construct retained amidase activity and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and adopted space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.4, b = 179.2, c = 112.6 Å, β = 106.6°.

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-04-11

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. We find the 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  17. Copper tolerance in Frankia sp. strain EuI1c involves surface binding and copper transport.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Medhat; Furnholm, Teal; Finethy, Ryan H; Chu, Feixia; El-Fadly, Gomaah; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-09-01

    Several Frankia strains have been shown to be copper-tolerant. The mechanism of their copper tolerance was investigated for Frankia sp. strain EuI1c. Copper binding was shown by binding studies. Unusual globular structures were observed on the surface of the bacterium. These globular structures were composed of aggregates containing many relatively smaller "leaf-like" structures. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDAX) analysis of these structures indicated elevated copper and phosphate levels compared to the control cells. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated an increase in extracellular phosphate on the cell surface of copper-stressed cells. Bioinformatics' analysis of the Frankia sp. strain EuI1c genome revealed five potential cop genes: copA, copZ, copC, copCD, and copD. Experiments with Frankia sp. strain EuI1c using qRT-PCR indicated an increase in messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of the five cop genes upon Cu(2+) stress. After 5 days of Cu(2+) stress, the copA, copZ, copC, copCD, and copD mRNA levels increased 25-, 8-, 18-, 18-, and 25-fold, respectively. The protein profile of Cu(2+)-stressed Frankia sp. strain EuI1c cells revealed the upregulation of a 36.7 kDa protein that was identified as FraEuI1c_1092 (sulfate-binding periplasmic transport protein). Homologues of this gene were only present in the genomes of the Cu(2+)-resistant Frankia strains (EuI1c, DC12, and CN3). These data indicate that copper tolerance by Frankia sp. strain EuI1c involved the binding of copper to the cell surface and transport proteins. PMID:24903815

  18. Genomics of the Proteorhodopsin-Containing Marine Flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. Strain MED134▿†

    PubMed Central

    González, José M.; Pinhassi, Jarone; Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz; Coll-Lladó, Montserrat; González-Velázquez, Mónica; Puigbò, Pere; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antoni; Goesmann, Alexander; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin phototrophy is expected to have considerable impact on the ecology and biogeochemical roles of marine bacteria. However, the genetic features contributing to the success of proteorhodopsin-containing bacteria remain largely unknown. We investigated the genome of Dokdonia sp. strain MED134 (Bacteroidetes) for features potentially explaining its ability to grow better in light than darkness. MED134 has a relatively high number of peptidases, suggesting that amino acids are the main carbon and nitrogen sources. In addition, MED134 shares with other environmental genomes a reduction in gene copies at the expense of important ones, like membrane transporters, which might be compensated by the presence of the proteorhodopsin gene. The genome analyses suggest Dokdonia sp. MED134 is able to respond to light at least partly due to the presence of a strong flavobacterial consensus promoter sequence for the proteorhodopsin gene. Moreover, Dokdonia sp. MED134 has a complete set of anaplerotic enzymes likely to play a role in the adaptation of the carbon anabolism to the different sources of energy it can use, including light or various organic matter compounds. In addition to promoting growth, proteorhodopsin phototrophy could provide energy for the degradation of complex or recalcitrant organic matter, survival during periods of low nutrients, or uptake of amino acids and peptides at low concentrations. Our analysis suggests that the ability to harness light potentially makes MED134 less dependent on the amount and quality of organic matter or other nutrients. The genomic features reported here may well be among the keys to a successful photoheterotrophic lifestyle. PMID:22003006

  19. Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. isolated from alpine glaciers and reclassification of Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-12 as the type strain of Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Frasson, David; Udovičić, Matije; Frey, Beat; Lapanje, Aleš; Zhang, De-Chao; Margesin, Rosa; Sievers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Psychrophilic bacterial strains were isolated from alpine glaciers in Switzerland and characterized taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, three of those strains, strain 79 ( = CCOS 247), strain 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and strain 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) clustered together with strain Cr9-12T and separately from the type strains Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-30T and Glaciimonas singularis LMG 27070T. Strain Cr9-12T has been previously described as a strain of G. immobilis. The three newly isolated strains were compared phenotypically with strain Cr9-12T and with the type strains of the species G. immobilis and G. singularis. Cr9-12T and the three novel strains from an alpine glacier in Switzerland were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped and psychrophilic and showed good growth throughout a temperature range of 1-20 °C and characteristically oxidized d-mannitol, l-fucose and bromosuccinic acid. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain Cr9-12T and the three novel strains were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The respiratory quinone of these strains was ubiquinone 8 (UQ-8). The genomic DNA G+C content of Cr9-12T was 49.2 mol%. The combined data from phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness studies strongly support the reclassification of strain Cr9-12T as representing a novel species. This strain and the isolates 79 ( = CCOS 247), 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) are representatives of a novel species of the genus Glaciimonas, for which the name Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Glaciimonas alpina is Cr9-12T ( = CCOS 761T = DSM 22814T).

  20. Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Synthesis Genes in Azotobacter sp. Strain FA8

    PubMed Central

    Pettinari, M. Julia; Vázquez, Gustavo J.; Silberschmidt, Daniel; Rehm, Bernd; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Méndez, Beatriz S.

    2001-01-01

    Genes responsible for the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in Azotobacter sp. FA8 were cloned and analyzed. A PHB polymerase gene (phbC) was found downstream from genes coding for β-ketothiolase (phbA) and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (phbB). A PHB synthase mutant was obtained by gene inactivation and used for genetic studies. The phbC gene from this strain was introduced into Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4 (phbC-negative mutant), and the recombinant accumulated PHB when either glucose or octanoate was used as a source of carbon, indicating that this PHB synthase cannot incorporate medium-chain-length hydroxyalkanoates into PHB. PMID:11679365

  1. Application of response surface methodology for optimising caffeine-degrading parameters by Leifsonia sp. strain SIU.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Salihu; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Abdul Khalil, Khalilah; Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Syed, Mohd Arif; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2015-09-01

    Caffeine is an important naturally occurring compound which can be degraded by bacteria. Previously, Leifsonia sp. strain SIU capable of degrading caffeine was isolated from agricultural soil. Plackett-Burman design was used to screen significant parameters that affect the rate of caffeine degradation. After the design was applied, response surface methodology (RSM) through Central Composite Design (CCD) was used to study significant parameters further, in order to get the most superior degradation conditions. The optimum concentrations of carbon source (sucrose), nitrogen source (NH4Cl), pH and initial caffeine concentration was found to be 5.0 gl(-1), 0.4 gl(-1), 6.0 and 375 ppm respectively. Second order polynomial regression model accurately showed interpretation of experimental data with an R2 value of 0.9989, Adjusted (Adj) R2, Predicted (Pred) R2 and F values of 0.9939, 0.9225 and 88.77 respectively.

  2. Oxidation of biphenyl by a multicomponent enzyme system from pseudomonas sp. strain LB400

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, J.D.; Nadim, L.M.; Gibson, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl to cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrobiphenyl. Incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the substrate was shown with (18)O2. The nonlinear relationship between enzyme activity and protein concentration suggested that the enzyme is composed of multiple protein components. Ion-exchange chromatography of the cell extract gave three protein fractions that were required together to restore enzymatic activity. Similarities with other multicomponent aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenases indicated that biphenyl dioxygenase may consist of a flavoprotein and iron-sulfur proteins that constitute a short electron transport chain involved in catalyzing the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the aromatic ring.

  3. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rivas, J.; Losada, M.

    1984-04-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive

  4. Methyl viologen responsive proteome dynamics of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Rajaram, Hema; Kumar Apte, Shree

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach was employed to elucidate the response of an agriculturally important microbe, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, to methyl viologen (MV). Exposure to 2 μM MV caused 50% lethality (LD50 ) within 6 h and modified the cellular levels of several proteins. About 31 proteins increased in abundance and 24 proteins decreased in abundance, while 55 proteins showed only a minor change in abundance. Of these, 103 proteins were identified by MS. Levels of proteins involved in ROS detoxification and chaperoning activities were enhanced but that of crucial proteins involved in light and dark reactions of photosynthesis declined or constitutive. The abundance of proteins involved in carbon and energy biogenesis were altered. The study elaborated the oxidative stress defense mechanism deployed by Anabaena, identified carbon metabolism and energy biogenesis as possible major targets of MV sensitivity, and suggested potential biotechnological interventions for improved stress tolerance in Anabaena 7120.

  5. Degradation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl and 2,2 prime -dihydroxybiphenyl by Pseudomonas sp. strain HBP1

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, H.P.E.; Kohler-Staub, D.; Focht, D.D. )

    1988-11-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain HBP1 was found to grow on 2-hydroxy- and 2,2{prime}-dihydroxy-biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy sources. The first step in the degradation of these compounds was catalyzed by an NADH-dependent monooxygenase. The enzyme inserted a hydroxyl group adjacent to the already existing hydroxyl group to form 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl when acting on 2-hydroxybiphenyl and to form 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl when acting on 2,2{prime}-dihydroxybiphenyl. To be substrates of the monooxygenase, compounds required a 2-hydroxyphenyl-R structure, with R being a hydrophobic group (e.g., methyl, ethyl, propyl, sec-butyl, phenyl, or 2-hydroxyphenyl). Several chlorinated hydroxybiphenyls served as pseudosubstrates by effecting consumption of NADH and oxygen without being hydroxylated. Further degradation of 2,3-dihydroxy- and 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl involved meta cleavage, with subsequent formation of benzoate and salicylate, respectively.

  6. Antifungal activity of violacein purified from a novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522).

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Anju; Sasidharan, Nishanth Kumar; Amma, Dileepkumar Bhaskaran Nair Saraswathy; Vasu, Radhakrishnan Kokkuvayil; Nataraja, Anupama Vijaya; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2015-10-01

    A novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522) producing high level of purple blue bioactive compound violacein was isolated from clay mine acidic sediment. During 24 h aerobic incubation in modified Luria Bertani medium, around 0.6 g crude violacein was produced per gram of dry weight biomass. An inexpensive method for preparing crystalline, pure violacein from crude pigment was developed (12.8 mg violacein/L) and the pure compound was characterized by different spectrometric methods. The violacein prepared was found effective against a number of plant and human pathogenic fungi and yeast species such as Cryptococcus gastricus, Trichophyton rubrum, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum, and Candida albicans. The best activity was recorded against Trichophyton rubrum (2 -g/ml), a human pathogen responsible for causing athlete-s foot infection. This is the first report of antifungal activity of purified violacein against pathogenic fungi and yeast. PMID:26428920

  7. Saccharification of corn fiber using enzymes from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1

    SciTech Connect

    Leathers, T.D.; Gupta, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Crude enzyme preparations from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1 were characterized and tested for the capacity to saccharify corn fiber. Cultures grown on xylan, corn fiber, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated corn fiber produced specific levels of endoxylanase, amylase, protease, cellulose, and other activities. Using equal units of endoxylanase activity, crude enzymes from AHP-pretreated corn fiber cultures were most effective in saccharification. Multiple enzyme activities were implicated in this process. Pretreatment of corn fiber with AHP nearly doubled the susceptibility of hemicellulose to enzymatic digestion. Up to 138 mg xylose, 125 mg arabinose, and 490 mg glucose were obtained per g pretreated corn fiber under conditions tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk; Fan, Qing; Zhou, Ruanbao; Huang, Guocun; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kuritz, Tanya; Wojciuch, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  9. Enhancing atrazine biodegradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP adsorption to Layered Double Hydroxide bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, Tatiana; Prevot, Vanessa; Sancelme, Martine; Forano, Claude; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale

    2011-07-15

    To mimic the role of hydroxide minerals and their humic complex derivatives on the biodegradability of pesticides in soils, synthetic Mg(R)Al Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) and Mg(R)Al modified by Humic substances (LDH-HA) were prepared for various R values (2, 3 and 4) and fully characterized. Adsorption properties of LDH and LDH-HA toward Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP were evaluated. The adsorption kinetics were very fast (<5 min to reach equilibrium). The adsorption capacities were greater than previously reported (13.5×10(11), 41×10(11) and 45.5×10(11) cells/gLDH for Mg(2)Al, Mg(3)Al and Mg(4)Al, respectively) and varied with both surface charge and textural properties. Surface modification by HA reduced the adsorption capacities of cells by 2-6-fold. Biodegradation kinetics of atrazine by Pseudomonas sp. adsorbed on both LDHs and LDH-HA complexes were measured for various solid/liquid ratios and adsorbed cell amounts. Biodegradation activity of bacterial cells was strongly boosted after adsorption on LDHs, the effect depending on the quantity and properties of the LDH matrix. The maximum biodegradation rate was obtained in the case of a 100 mg/mL Mg(2)Al LDH suspension (26 times higher than that obtained with cells alone). PMID:21596476

  10. Compositional and toxicological evaluation of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Arieli, B.; McKeehen, J. D.; Stephens, S. D.; Nielsen, S. S.; Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Compositional analyses of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 showed high protein (50-60%) and low fat (0.4-1%) content, and the ability to synthesize vitamin B12. The amino acid profile indicated that Cyanothece sp. was a balanced protein source. Fatty acids of the 18:3n-3 type were also present. Mineral analyses indicated that the cellular biomass may be a good source of Fe, Zn and Na. Caloric content was 4.5 to 5.1 kcal g dry weight-1 and the carbon content was approximately 40% on a dry weight basis. Nitrogen content was 8 to 9% on a dry weight basis and total nucleic acids were 1.3% on a dry weight basis. Short-term feeding studies in rats followed by histopathology found no toxicity or dietary incompatibility problems. The level of uric acid and allantoin in urine and tissues was low, suggesting no excess of nucleic acids, as sometimes reported in the past for a cyanobacteria-containing diet. The current work discusses the potential implications of these results for human nutrition applications.

  11. Photoheterotrophic Fluxome in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 and Its Implications for Cyanobacterial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; He, Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated metabolic responses in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to photosynthetic impairment. We used 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU; a photosystem II inhibitor) to block O2 evolution and ATP/NADPH generation by linear electron flow. Based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) and RNA sequencing, we have found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 employs a unique photoheterotrophic metabolism. First, glucose catabolism forms a cyclic route that includes the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway and the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) reaction. Glucose-6-phosphate is extensively degraded by the OPP pathway for NADPH production and is replenished by the reversed PGI reaction. Second, the Calvin cycle is not fully functional, but RubisCO continues to fix CO2 and synthesize 3-phosphoglycerate. Third, the relative flux through the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and succinate dehydrogenase is small under heterotrophic conditions, indicating that the newly discovered cyanobacterial TCA cycle (via the γ-aminobutyric acid pathway or α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) plays a minimal role in energy metabolism. Fourth, NAD(P)H oxidation and the cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I are the two main ATP sources, and the CEF accounts for at least 40% of total ATP generation from photoheterotrophic metabolism (without considering maintenance loss). This study not only demonstrates a new topology for carbohydrate oxidation but also provides quantitative insights into metabolic bioenergetics in cyanobacteria. PMID:25535269

  12. Biodegradation of cefdinir by a novel yeast strain, Ustilago sp. SMN03 isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Selvi, A; Salam, Jaseetha Abdul; Das, Nilanjana

    2014-11-01

    Cefdinir, a semi-synthetic third generation cephalosporin antibiotic being considered as an emerging pollutant, demands removal from aquatic ecosystems. A yeast strain isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater which was identified as Ustilago sp. SMN03 by molecular techniques and was found to be capable of utilizing cefdinir as a sole carbon source. The isolate was found to degrade 81 % of cefdinir within 6 days under optimized conditions viz. pH 6.0, temperature 30 °C, a shaking speed of 120 rpm, an inoculum dosage of 4 % (w/v) and an initial cefdinir concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Kinetic studies revealed that cefdinir degradation followed the pseudo-first order model, a rate constant of 0.222 per day and a half-life period of 3.26 days. Using LC-MS analysis, six novel intermediates formed during the cefdinir degradation were identified and characterized. FT-IR analysis showed that the functional groups ranging from 1,766 to 1,519 cm(-1), characteristic for lactam ring were completely removed during the cefdinir degradation. The opening of the β-lactam ring was one of the major steps in the cefdinir degradation process. Based on the results from the present study, a possible pathway of cefdinir degradation by Ustilago sp. SMN03 was proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on microbial degradation of cefdinir by yeast. PMID:25086584

  13. Degradation of Phenanthrene and Anthracene by Cell Suspensions of Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Joanna D.; Freeman, James P.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were dosed with anthracene or phenanthrene and after 14 days of incubation had degraded 92 and 90% of the added anthracene and phenanthrene, respectively. The metabolites were extracted and identified by UV-visible light absorption, high-pressure liquid chromatography retention times, mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and comparison to authentic compounds and literature data. Neutral-pH ethyl acetate extracts from anthracene-incubated cells showed four metabolites, identified as cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydroanthracene, 6,7-benzocoumarin, 1-methoxy-2-hydroxyanthracene, and 9,10-anthraquinone. A novel anthracene ring fission product was isolated from acidified culture media and was identified as 3-(2-carboxyvinyl)naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid. 6,7-Benzocoumarin was also found in that extract. When Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was grown in the presence of phenanthrene, three neutral metabolites were identified as cis- and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and cis-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophenanthrene. Phenanthrene ring fission products, isolated from acid extracts, were identified as 2,2′-diphenic acid, 1-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and phthalic acid. The data point to the existence, next to already known routes for both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, of alternative pathways that might be due to the presence of different dioxygenases or to a relaxed specificity of the same dioxygenase for initial attack on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:11282593

  14. DL-7-azatryptophan and citrulline metabolism in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 1F

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Van Baalen, C.; Tabita, F.R.

    1987-03-01

    An alternative route for the primary assimilation of ammonia proceeds via glutamine synthetase-carbamyl phosphate synthetase and its inherent glutaminase activity in Anabaena sp. strain 1F, a marine filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium. Evidence for the presence of this possible alternative route to glutamate was provided by the use of amino acid analogs as specific enzyme inhibitors, enzymological studies, and radioistopic labeling experiments. The amino acid pool patterns of continuous cultures of Anabaena sp. strain 1F were markedly influenced by the nitrogen source. A relatively high concentration of glutamate was maintained in the amino acid pools of all cultures irrespective of the nitrogen source, reflecting the central role of glutamate in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of 1.0 microM azaserine increased the intracellular pools of glutamate and glutamine. All attempts to detect any enzymatic activity for glutamate synthase by measuring the formation of L-(/sup 14/C)glutamate from 2-keto-(1-/sup 14/C)glutarate and glutamine failed. The addition of 10 microM DL-7-azatryptophan caused a transient accumulation of intracellular citrulline and alanine which was not affected by the presence of chloramphenicol. The in vitro activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase and glutaminase increased severalfold in the presence of azatryptophan. Results from radioisotopic labeling experiments with (/sup 14/C)bicarbonate and L-(1-/sup 14/C)ornithine also indicated that citrulline was formed via carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase. In addition to its effects on nitrogen metabolism, azatryptophan also affected carbon metabolism by inhibiting photosynthetic carbon assimilation and photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  15. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  16. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present

  17. The thin pili of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 mediate adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gohl, Olivia; Friedrich, Alexandra; Hoppert, Michael; Averhoff, Beate

    2006-02-01

    Two structurally different appendages, thin and thick pili, are found in members of the genus Acinetobacter. The presence of pilus structures correlates with different phenotypes, such as adherence to surfaces, a trait not only observed in pathogenic Acinetobacter species, as well as motility. However, their distinct individual roles were unknown. To characterize the role of different pili in the physiology of Acinetobacter, we isolated the thin pili from the cell surface of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 (recently recognized as representative of Acinetobacter baylyi), a soil bacterium that rapidly takes up naked DNA from its environment. Electron microscopy revealed that the pilus has an external diameter of 2 to 3 nm for single filaments. The filaments are packed into right-handed bundles. The major protein constituting the pilus was purified, and the encoding gene, acuA, was cloned. AcuA was found to be weakly related to the structural subunit of F17 pili of Escherichia coli. Analyses of the acuA flanking DNA region led to the identification of three closely associated genes, acuD, acuC, and acuG, whose deduced proteins are similar to chaperone, usher, and adhesin of F17-related pili, respectively. Transcriptional analyses revealed that acuA expression is maximal in the late-stationary-growth phase. Mutation of acuA led to a loss of thin pili and concomitantly loss of adhesion to polystyrene and erythrocytes but not loss of competence. Therefore, thin pili of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 are suggested to be assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway and are involved in adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces.

  18. Repression of the antifungal activity of Pseudomonas sp. strain DF41 by the stringent response.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Jerrylynn; Berry, Chrystal; Selin, Carrie; Fernando, W G Dilantha; de Kievit, Teresa R

    2011-08-15

    The stringent response (SR) enables bacteria to adapt to nutrient limitation through production of the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, collectively known as (p)ppGpp. Two enzymes are responsible for the intracellular pools of (p)ppGpp: RelA acts as a synthetase, while SpoT can function as either a synthetase or a hydrolase. We investigated how the SR affects the ability of the biological control agent Pseudomonas sp. strain DF41 to inhibit the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. Strain DF41 relA and relA spoT mutants were generated and found to exhibit increased antifungal activity. Strain DF41 produces a lipopeptide (LP) molecule that is essential for Sclerotinia biocontrol. LP production and protease activity were both elevated in the relA and relA spoT mutants. Addition of relA but not spoT in trans restored the mutant phenotype to that of the parent. Next, we investigated whether an association exists between the SR and known regulators of biocontrol, including the Gac system and RpoS. A gacS mutant of strain DF41 produced less (p)ppGpp and exhibited a 1.7-fold decrease in relA expression compared to the wild type, suggesting that relA forms part of the Gac regulon. We discovered that rpoS transcription was reduced significantly in the SR mutants. Furthermore, rpoS provided in trans restored protease activity to wild-type levels but did not attenuate antifungal activity. Finally, relA expression was decreased in the mutants, indicating that the SR is required for maximum expression of relA.

  19. Metabolism of hydroxydibenzofurans, methoxydibenzofurans, acetoxydibenzofurans, and nitrodibenzofurans by Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H. |; Wittich, R.M.; Fortnagel, P.

    1995-07-01

    The metabolism of 11 substituted dibenzofurans by the dibenzofuran-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69 was investigated. Strain HH69 utilizes 2-, 3-, and 4-acetoxydibenzofuran as well as 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxydibenzofuran as sole sources of carbon and energy. The degradation of acetoxydibenzofurans is initiated by hydrolysis of the ester bonds, yielding the corresponding hydroxydibenzofurans and acetate. Strain HH69 grew on 2-methoxydibenzofuran only after it was adapted to the utilization of 5-methoxysalicylic acid, whereas 3- and 4-methoxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran were only cooxidized. During the breakdown of all eight hydroxy-, methoxy-, and nitrodibenzofurans studied here, the corresponding substituted salicylic acids accumulated in the culture broth. In the cases of 2- and 3-hydroxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran, salicylic acid was also formed. Those four dibenzofurans which did not serve as carbon sources for strain HH69 were converted to a nonutilizable salicylic acid derivative. From turnover experiments with the mutant HH69/II, which is deficient in meta-cleavage, 2,2{prime}, 3,4{prime}-tetrahydroxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-methoxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-nitrobiphenyl, and 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-4{prime}-nitrobiphenyl were isolated as the main products formed from 3-hydroxydibenzofuran, 2-methoxydibenzofuran, and 2- and 3-nitrodibenzo-furan, respectively. These results indicate significant regioselectivity for the dioxygenolytic cleavage of the ether bond of these monosubstituted dibenzofurans, with a preference for the nonsubstituted aromatic nucleus. Substituted trihydroxybiphenyls are converted further by meta-cleavage followed by the removal of the side chain of the resulting product. A stepwise degradation of this side chain was found to be involved in the metabolism of 2-hydroxydibenzofuran. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Degradation of p-chlorotoluene by a mutant of Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. )

    1989-02-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 grows on chlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, or toluene as a sole source of carbon and energy. It does not grow on p-chlorotoluene (p-CT). Growth on glucose in the presence of p-CT resulted in the accumulation of 4-chloro-2,3- dihydroxy-1-methyl benzene (3-chloro-6- methylcatechol), 4-chloro- 2,3-dihydroxy-1-methyl cyclohexa- 4,6-diene (p-CT dihydrodoil), and 2-methyl-4-carboxy methylenebut-2-en-4-olide (2-methyl dienelactone). Strain JS21, a spontaneous mutant capable of growth on p-CT, was isolated from cultures of strain JS6 after extended exposure to p-CT. In addition to growing on p-CT, JS21 grew on all of the substrates that supported growth of the parent strain, including p-dichlorobenzene, chlorobenzene, benzene, toluene, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenol, and ethylbenzene. The pathway for degradation of p-CT by JS21 was investigated by respirometry, isolation of intermediates, and assay of enzymes in cell extracts. p-CT was converted to 3-chloro-6-methylcatechol by dioxygenase and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. 3-Chloro-6-methylcatechol underwent ortho ring cleavage catalyzed by a catechol 1,2-dioxygenase to form 2-chloro-5-methyl-cis,cis-muconate, which was converted to 2-methyl dienelactone. A dienelactone hydrolase converted 2-methyl dienelactone to 2-methylmaleylacetic acid. Preliminary results indicate that a change in wild-type induction patterns allows JS21 to grow on p-CT.

  1. Regio- and stereospecific oxidation of fluorene, dibenzofuran, and dibenzothiophene by naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, S.M.; Gibson, D.T.

    1996-11-01

    Fluorene, dibenzofuran, dibenzothiophene, and carbazole are structural analogs differing only in the type of atom bridging the two aromatic rings. These compounds are constituents of fossil fuels. The authors have examined the oxidation of fluorene, dibenzofuran, and dibenzothiophene by mutant and recombinant strains which express NDO from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 and reports the yields, region chemistry, absolute stereochemistry, and enantiomeric purity of the isolated initial metabolites. 71 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Crystal Structure of a Complex of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and Haemophilus influenzae Lipopolysaccharide Reveals Shielding of Core Structures in SP-D-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Howard W.; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Deadman, Mary E.; Hood, Derek W.; Madsen, Jens; Moxon, E. Richard; Townsend, J. Paul; Reid, Kenneth B. M.; Ahmed, Abdul; Shaw, Amy J.; Greenhough, Trevor J.

    2016-01-01

    The carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of lung collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognize sugar patterns on the surface of lung pathogens and promote phagocytosis. Using Haemophilus influenzae Eagan strains expressing well-characterized lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface structures of various levels of complexity, we show that bacterial recognition and binding by SP-D is inversely related to LPS chain extent and complexity. The crystal structure of a biologically active recombinant trimeric SP-D CRD complexed with a delipidated Eagan 4A LPS suggests that efficient LPS recognition by SP-D requires multiple binding interactions utilizing the three major ligand-binding determinants in the SP-D binding pocket, with Ca-dependent binding of inner-core heptose accompanied by interaction of anhydro-Kdo (4,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) with Arg343 and Asp325. Combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) binding analyses, our results show that extended LPS structures previously thought to be targets for collectins are important in shielding the more vulnerable sites in the LPS core, revealing a mechanism by which pathogens with complex LPS extensions efficiently evade a first-line mucosal innate immune defense. The structure also reveals for the first time the dominant form of anhydro-Kdo. PMID:26953329

  3. Crystal Structure of a Complex of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and Haemophilus influenzae Lipopolysaccharide Reveals Shielding of Core Structures in SP-D-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Clark, Howard W; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Deadman, Mary E; Hood, Derek W; Madsen, Jens; Moxon, E Richard; Townsend, J Paul; Reid, Kenneth B M; Ahmed, Abdul; Shaw, Amy J; Greenhough, Trevor J; Shrive, Annette K

    2016-05-01

    The carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of lung collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognize sugar patterns on the surface of lung pathogens and promote phagocytosis. Using Haemophilus influenzae Eagan strains expressing well-characterized lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface structures of various levels of complexity, we show that bacterial recognition and binding by SP-D is inversely related to LPS chain extent and complexity. The crystal structure of a biologically active recombinant trimeric SP-D CRD complexed with a delipidated Eagan 4A LPS suggests that efficient LPS recognition by SP-D requires multiple binding interactions utilizing the three major ligand-binding determinants in the SP-D binding pocket, with Ca-dependent binding of inner-core heptose accompanied by interaction of anhydro-Kdo (4,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) with Arg343 and Asp325. Combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) binding analyses, our results show that extended LPS structures previously thought to be targets for collectins are important in shielding the more vulnerable sites in the LPS core, revealing a mechanism by which pathogens with complex LPS extensions efficiently evade a first-line mucosal innate immune defense. The structure also reveals for the first time the dominant form of anhydro-Kdo.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. Strain GHG001, a High Producer of Endo-1,4-Xylanase Isolated from an Insect Pest of Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Borges, Thuanny A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. strain GHG001. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is the closest relative of Pseudozyma vetiver. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is capable of growing on xylose or xylan as a sole carbon source and has great biotechnological potential. PMID:24356824

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. Strain GHG001, a High Producer of Endo-1,4-Xylanase Isolated from an Insect Pest of Sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; Dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Borges, Thuanny A; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. strain GHG001. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is the closest relative of Pseudozyma vetiver. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is capable of growing on xylose or xylan as a sole carbon source and has great biotechnological potential.

  6. Anilofos Tolerance and Its Mineralization by the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PUPCCC 64

    PubMed Central

    Singh, D. P.; Khattar, J. I. S.; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Gurdeep; Gupta, Meenu; Singh, Yadvinder

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the common rice field cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64. The organism tolerated anilofos up to 25 mg L−1. The herbicide caused inhibitory effects on photosynthetic pigments of the test organism in a dose-dependent manner. The organism exhibited 60, 89, 96, 85 and 79% decrease in chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, respectively, in 20 mg L−1 anilofos on day six. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase increased by 1.04 to 1.80 times over control cultures in presence of 20 mg L−1 anilofos. Glutathione content decreased by 26% while proline content was unaffected by 20 mg L−1 anilofos. The test organism showed intracellular uptake and metabolized the herbicide. Uptake of herbicide by test organism was fast during initial six hours followed by slow uptake until 120 hours. The organism exhibited maximum anilofos removal at 100 mg protein L−1, pH 8.0 and 30°C. Its growth in phosphate deficient basal medium in the presence of anilofos (2.5 mg L−1) indicated that herbicide was used by the strain PUPCCC 64 as a source of phosphate. PMID:23382844

  7. Differential Degradation of Bicyclics with Aromatic and Alicyclic Rings by Rhodococcus sp. Strain DK17 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Choi, Ki Young; Kang, Beom Sik; Kim, Tai Kyoung; Hong, Soon Gyu; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Kim, Eungbin

    2011-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 is able to grow on tetralin and indan but cannot use their respective desaturated counterparts, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene and indene, as sole carbon and energy sources. Metabolite analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry clearly show that (i) the meta-cleavage dioxygenase mutant strain DK180 accumulates 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,2-naphthalene diol, 1,2-indene diol, and 3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-1,2-diol from tetralin, indene, and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, respectively, and (ii) when expressed in Escherichia coli, the DK17 o-xylene dioxygenase transforms tetralin, indene, and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene into tetralin cis-dihydrodiol, indan-1,2-diol, and cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, respectively. Tetralin, which is activated by aromatic hydroxylation, is degraded successfully via the ring cleavage pathway to support growth of DK17. Indene and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene do not serve as growth substrates because DK17 hydroxylates them on the alicyclic ring and further metabolism results in a dead-end metabolite. This study reveals that aromatic hydroxylation is a prerequisite for proper degradation of bicyclics with aromatic and alicyclic rings by DK17 and confirms the unique ability of the DK17 o-xylene dioxygenase to perform distinct regioselective hydroxylations. PMID:21965391

  8. Enhancement of the potential to utilize octopine in the nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, S.S.; Boivin, R.; Dion, P. )

    1991-08-01

    The nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92 requires the presence of a supplementary carbon source for growth on octopine, whereas the spontaneous mutant RB100 has acquired the capacity to utilize this opine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Insertional mutagenesis of RB100 with transposon Tn5 generated mutants which were unable to grow on octopine and others which grew slowly on this substrate. Both types of mutants yielded revertants that had regained the ability to utilize octopine. Some of the revertants had lost the transposon, whereas in others the transposon was retained but with rearrangements of the insertion site. Genes of octopine catabolism from strain 92 were cloned on a cosmid vector to generate pK3. The clone pK3 conferred the ability to utilize octopine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source on the host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Although they conferred an equivalent growth phenotype, the mutant genes carried by RB100 and the cloned genes on pK3 differed in their regulation. Utilization of ({sup 14}C)octopine was inducible by octopine in RB100 and was constitutive in KT2440(pK3).

  9. Algicidal metabolites produced by Bacillus sp. strain B1 against Phaeocystis globosa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Chen, Lina; Yin, Pinghe

    2014-03-01

    The bloom of Phaeocystis globosa has broken out frequently in the coastal areas of China in recent years, which has led to substantial economic losses. This study shows that Bacillus sp. strain B1, which was previously identified by our group, is effective in regulating P. globosa by excreting active metabolites. Heat stability, pH stability and molecular weight range of the algicidal compounds from strain B1 were measured and the results demonstrated that the algicidal activities of these compounds were not affected by pH or temperature variation. The algicidal compounds extracted with methanol were isolated and purified by ODS-A column chromatography and HPLC. The algicidal compounds corresponding to peaks 2-5 eluted from HPLC were further analysed by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS). PeakView™ Software determined the compounds corresponding to peaks 2-5 to be L-histidine, o-tyrosine, N-acetylhistamine and urocanic acid on the basis of the accurate mass information, the isotopic pattern and MS-MS spectra. Furthermore, these compounds were also able to eliminate Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum donghaiense and Heterosigma akashiwo. This is the first report of bacteria-derived algicidal compounds being identified only by Q-TOF-MS and PeakView™ Software, and these compounds may be used as the constituents of algicides in the future. PMID:24370882

  10. Characterization of two novel plasmids from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains.

    PubMed

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Butaitė, Elena; Citavičius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cryptic low molecular weight plasmids, pGTD7 (3279bp) and pGTG5 (1540bp), isolated from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains, respectively. Homology analysis of the replication protein (Rep) sequences and detection of ssDNA indicate that both of them replicate via rolling circle mechanism. As revealed by sequence similarities of dso region and Rep protein, plasmid pGTD7 belongs to pC194/pUB110 plasmid family. The replicon of pGTD7 was proved to be functional in another Geobacillus host. For this purpose, a construct pUCK7, containing a replicon of the analyzed plasmid, was created and transferred to G. stearothermophilus NUB3621R strain by electroporation. Plasmid pGTG5, based on Rep protein sequence similarity, was found to be related mostly to some poorly characterized bacterial plasmids. Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids contain conservative motifs that are most similar to those of Microviridae phages. This feature suggests that pGTG5, together with other plasmids containing the same motifs, could constitute a new family of bacterial plasmids. To date, pGTG5 is the smallest plasmid identified in bacteria belonging to the genus Geobacillus. The two plasmids described in this study can be used for the construction of new vectors suitable for biotechnologically important bacteria of the genus Geobacillus.

  11. Ageing of atrazine in manure amended soils assessed by bioavailability to Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP.

    PubMed

    Glæsner, Nadia; Bælum, Jacob; Strobel, Bjarne W; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2014-04-01

    Animal manure is applied to agricultural land in areas of high livestock production. In the present study, we evaluated ageing of atrazine in two topsoils with and without addition of manure and in one subsoil. Ageing was assessed as the bioavailability of atrazine to the atrazine mineralizing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Throughout an ageing period of 90 days bioavailability was investigated at days 1, 10, 32, 60 and 90, where ~10(8) cells g(-1) of the ADP strain was inoculated to the (14)C-atrazine exposed soil and (14)CO2 was collected over 7 days as a measure of mineralized atrazine. Even though the bioavailable residue decreased in all of the three soils as time proceeded, we found that ageing occurred faster in the topsoils rich in organic carbon than in subsoil. For one topsoil rich in organic carbon content, Simmelkær, we observed a higher degree of ageing when treated with manure. Contrarily, sorption experiments showed less sorption to Simmelkær treated with manure than the untreated soil indicating that sorption processes are not the only mechanisms of ageing. The other topsoil low in organic carbon content, Ringe, showed no significant difference in ageing between the manure-treated and untreated soil. The present study illustrates that not simply the organic carbon content influences adsorption and ageing of atrazine in soil but the origin and composition of organic matter plays an important role.

  12. Premethylation of Foreign DNA Improves Integrative Transformation Efficiency in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Yu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Restriction digestion of foreign DNA is one of the key biological barriers against genetic transformation in microorganisms. To establish a high-efficiency transformation protocol in the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803), we investigated the effects of premethylation of foreign DNA on the integrative transformation of this strain. In this study, two type II methyltransferase-encoding genes, i.e., sll0729 (gene M) and slr0214 (gene C), were cloned from the chromosome of Synechocystis 6803 and expressed in Escherichia coli harboring an integration plasmid. After premethylation treatment in E. coli, the integration plasmid was extracted and used for transformation of Synechocystis 6803. The results showed that although expression of methyltransferase M had little impact on the transformation of Synechocystis 6803, expression of methyltransferase C resulted in 11- to 161-fold-higher efficiency in the subsequent integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. Effective expression of methyltransferase C, which could be achieved by optimizing the 5′ untranslated region, was critical to efficient premethylation of the donor DNA and thus high transformation efficiency in Synechocystis 6803. Since premethylating foreign DNA prior to transforming Synechocystis avoids changing the host genetic background, the study thus provides an improved method for high-efficiency integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. PMID:26452551

  13. Genome Sequence of the Arsenic-Resistant Haladaptatus sp. Strain R4 Isolated from Ramnagar, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Sen, Urmimala; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Bose, Sucharita; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Haladaptatus sp. strain R4, a halophilic archaea that produces an orange-pink pigment and is capable of growing in a wide salinity range. The genome assembly shows genes for arsenic resistance, siderophore production, trehalose and glycine betaine biosynthesis, uptake and transporters of sodium, potassium, and chloride ions. PMID:27660791

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Burguener, Germán F.; Maldonado, Marcos J.; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Exiguobacterium sp. Strain S17, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Omar F; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Kurth, Daniel; Gorriti, Marta F; Revale, Santiago; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P; Farías, María E; Turjanski, Adrian G

    2013-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain S17 is a moderately halotolerant, arsenic-resistant bacterium that was isolated from Laguna Socompa stromatolites in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high levels of UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:23887911

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcanivorax sp. Strain KX64203 Isolated from Deep-Sea Sediments of Iheya North, Okinawa Trough

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of Alcanivorax sp. strain KX64203, isolated from deep-sea sediment samples. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs, with a total size of 4.76 Mb. The data will improve our understanding of the strain’s function in alkane degradation. PMID:27563046

  17. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata.

    PubMed

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción; Costa, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis.

  18. Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain UMTAT18 Isolated from the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii Found in the Straits of Malacca

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Gan Han; Mohd Noor, Mohd Ezhar; Sung, Yeong Yik; Usup, Gires

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain UMTAT18 was isolated from the harmful dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii. Its genome consists of 5,479,367 bp with 5,546 open reading frames, 102 tRNAs, and 29 rRNAs. Gene clusters for biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides, bacteriocin, and lantipeptide were identified. It also contains siderophore and genes related to stress tolerance. PMID:27795265

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence of Mesorhizobium hungaricum sp. nov. Strain UASWS1009, a Potential Resource for Agricultural and Environmental Uses

    PubMed Central

    Crovadore, Julien; Cochard, Bastien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Schulz, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequences of the strain UASWS1009 of the species Mesorhizobium hungaricum sp. nov., which are different from any other known Mesorhizobium species. This is the first genome registered for this new species, which could be considered as a potential resource for agriculture and environmental uses. PMID:27738050

  20. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata.

    PubMed

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción; Costa, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis. PMID:27540075

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  3. Draft Genome Sequence and Description of Janthinobacterium sp. Strain CG3, a Psychrotolerant Antarctic Supraglacial Stream Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Franklin, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Daligault, Hajnalka; Erkkila, Tracy; Goodwin, Lynne; Gu, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chain, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain CG3, a psychrotolerant non-violacein-producing bacterium that was isolated from the Cotton Glacier supraglacial stream. The genome sequence of this organism will provide insight as to the mechanisms necessary for bacteria to survive in UV-stressed icy environments. PMID:24265494

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain Ant20, Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Soil on Ross Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Sandra; Frossard, Aline; Guerrero, Leandro D.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Aislabie, Jackie M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Sphingomonas sp. strain Ant20, isolated from oil-polluted soil near Scott Base, Ross Island, Antarctica. The genome of this aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium provides valuable information on the microbially mediated biodegradation of aromatic compounds in cold-climate systems. PMID:25573925

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BMG5.12, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Tunisian Soils.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N; Chen, Amy; Detter, J Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-01-01

    Members of the actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BMG5.12, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from Tunisian soils with the ability to infect Elaeagnus angustifolia and Myrica gale. PMID:23846272

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain DC12, an Atypical, Noninfective, Ineffective Isolate from Datisca cannabina.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Louis S; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Gtari, Maher; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nouioui, Imen; Oshone, Rediet; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Shapiro, Nicole; Szeto, Ernest; Wall, Luis; Wishart, Jessie; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain DC12, isolated from root nodules of Datisca cannabina, is a member of the fourth lineage of Frankia, which is unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. Here, we report its 6.88-Mbp high-quality draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 71.92% and 5,858 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26251504

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BCU110501, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Nodules of Discaria trinevis.

    PubMed

    Wall, Luis G; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N; Chaia, Eugenia; Chen, Amy; Detter, J Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P; Nouioui, Imen; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-01-01

    Frankia forms a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BCU110501, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from nodules of Discaria trinevis grown in the Patagonia region of Argentina. PMID:23846281

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BMG5.12, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Tunisian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Nouioui, Imen; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Chen, Amy; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Members of the actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BMG5.12, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from Tunisian soils with the ability to infect Elaeagnus angustifolia and Myrica gale. PMID:23846272

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BCU110501, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Nodules of Discaria trinevis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Luis G.; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Chaia, Eugenia; Chen, Amy; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Nouioui, Imen; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Frankia forms a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BCU110501, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from nodules of Discaria trinevis grown in the Patagonia region of Argentina. PMID:23846281

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain DC12, an Atypical, Noninfective, Ineffective Isolate from Datisca cannabina

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Gtari, Maher; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nouioui, Imen; Oshone, Rediet; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Shapiro, Nicole; Szeto, Ernest; Wall, Luis; Wishart, Jessie; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain DC12, isolated from root nodules of Datisca cannabina, is a member of the fourth lineage of Frankia, which is unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. Here, we report its 6.88-Mbp high-quality draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 71.92% and 5,858 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26251504

  11. Draft genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singapore wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets

    DOE PAGES

    Dichosa, Armand E. K.; Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Kunde, Yuliya; McMurry, Kim; Lo, Chien -Chi; Reitenga, Krista G.; et al

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Sphingobium sp. Strain Ant17, Isolated from Antarctic Soil

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Leandro D.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Aislabie, Jackie M.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Sphingobium sp. strain Ant17, an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium that was isolated from Antarctic oil-contaminated soil. An analysis of this genome can lead to insights into the mechanisms of xenobiotic degradation processes at low temperatures and potentially aid in bioremediation applications. PMID:24723703

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of MCPA-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain ERG5, Isolated from a Groundwater Aquifer in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function in bioaugmented sand filters. Genes associated with MCPA degradation are situated on a putative conjugative plasmid. PMID:25676756

  14. Pandoraea sp. Strain E26: Discovery of Its Quorum-Sensing Properties via Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pandoraea sp. strain E26 isolated from a former landfill site, sequenced by the Illumina MiSeq platform. This genome sequence will be useful to further understand the quorum-sensing system of this isolate. PMID:26021935

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain CCM_MD2014, Isolated from Topsoil in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Mariita, Richard M; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Hanselmann, Kurt; Hossain, Mohammad J; Korlach, Jonas; Boitano, Matthew; Roberts, Richard J; Liles, Mark R; Moss, Anthony G; Leadbetter, Jared R; Newman, Dianne K; Dawson, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CCM_MD2014 (phylum Actinobacteria), isolated from surface soil in Woods Hole, MA. Its single linear chromosome of 8,274,043 bp in length has a 72.13% G+C content and contains 6,948 coding sequences. PMID:26722012

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-06-16

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Arsenic-Resistant Haladaptatus sp. Strain R4 Isolated from Ramnagar, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Urmimala; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Bose, Sucharita; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Haladaptatus sp. strain R4, a halophilic archaea that produces an orange-pink pigment and is capable of growing in a wide salinity range. The genome assembly shows genes for arsenic resistance, siderophore production, trehalose and glycine betaine biosynthesis, uptake and transporters of sodium, potassium, and chloride ions. PMID:27660791

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna.

    PubMed

    Burguener, Germán F; Maldonado, Marcos J; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2014-02-06

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella sp. Strain Y9602, a Gammaproteobacterium Isolate from Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff S.; Held, Brittany; Land, Miriam L.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from contaminated subsurface soils that is capable of promoting uranium phosphate mineralization as a result of constitutive phosphatase activity. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of an isolate belonging to the genus Rahnella. PMID:22461551

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Exiguobacterium sp. Strain S17, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez, Omar F.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Kurth, Daniel; Gorriti, Marta F.; Revale, Santiago; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P.; Farías, María E.

    2013-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain S17 is a moderately halotolerant, arsenic-resistant bacterium that was isolated from Laguna Socompa stromatolites in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high levels of UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:23887911

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Exiguobacterium sp. Strain BMC-KP, an Environmental Isolate from Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Hyson, Peter; Shapiro, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain BMC-KP was isolated as part of a student environmental sampling project at Bryn Mawr College, PA. Sequencing of bacterial DNA assembled a 3.32-Mb draft genome. Analysis suggests the presence of genes for tolerance to cold and toxic metals, broad carbohydrate metabolism, and genes derived from phage. PMID:26450734

  3. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, a natural rubber degrading actinomycete isolated from Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nanthini, Jayaram; Chia, Kim-Hou; Thottathil, Gincy P; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Najimudin, Nazalan; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddharth; Sudesh, Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, which naturally degrades rubber, was isolated from a rubber plantation. Whole genome sequencing and assembly resulted in 2 contigs with total genome size of 8.248 Mb. Two latex clearing protein (lcp) genes which are responsible for rubber degrading activities were identified. PMID:26376470

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Microvirga sp. Strain BSC39, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis C; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Raymond, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Microvirga sp. BSC39 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and exopolysaccharide synthesis for biofilm adhesion. The BSC39 genome contains iron siderophore uptake and hydrolysis enzymes; however, it lacks siderophore synthesis pathways, suggesting the uptake of siderophores produced by neighboring microbes. PMID:25395650

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain BSC154, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis C; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Raymond, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus sp. BSC154 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and biofilm production. The BSC154 genome contains iron siderophore production, nitrate reduction, mixed acid-butanediol fermentation, and assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfate metabolism pathways. PMID:25395651

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Massilia sp. Strain BSC265, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis C; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Raymond, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Massilia sp. BSC265 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and exopolysaccharide synthesis for biofilm adhesion. The BSC265 genome contains a complete dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway as well as a TCA cycle, making it a facultative anaerobe. PMID:25395652

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Thauera sp. Strain SWB20, Isolated from a Singapore Wastewater Treatment Facility Using Gel Microdroplets

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Kunde, Yuliya; McMurry, Kim; Lo, Chien-Chi; Reitenga, Krista G.; Daughton, Ashlynn R.; Shen, Xiaohong; Frietze, Seth; Wang, Dongping; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Schuster, Stephan; Chain, Patrick S.; Han, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species. PMID:25792053

  8. Degradation of Chlorobenzenes at Nanomolar Concentrations by Burkholderia sp. Strain PS14 in Liquid Cultures and in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Peter; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    1999-01-01

    The utilization of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, the three isomeric dichlorobenzenes and fructose as the sole carbon and energy sources at nanomolar concentrations was studied in batch experiments with Burkholderia sp. strain PS14. In liquid culture, all chlorobenzenes were metabolized within 1 h from their initial concentration of 500 nM to below their detection limits of 0.5 nM for 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and 7.5 nM for the three dichlorobenzene isomers, with 63% mineralization of the tetra- and trichloroisomers. Fructose at the same initial concentration was, in contrast, metabolized over a 4-h incubation period down to a residual concentration of approximately 125 nM with 38% mineralization during this time. In soil microcosms, Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 metabolized tetrachlorobenzene present at 64.8 ppb and trichlorobenzene present at 54.4 ppb over a 72-h incubation period to below the detection limits of 0.108 and 0.09 ppb, respectively, with approximately 80% mineralization. A high sorptive capacity of Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 for 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene was found at very low cell density. The results demonstrate that Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 exhibits a very high affinity for chlorobenzenes at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:10347041

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M.; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:26701084

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella sp Strain Y9602, a Gammaproteobacterium Isolate from Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Held, Brittany; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobeckya, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from contaminated subsurface soils that is capable of promoting uranium phosphate mineralization as a result of constitutive phosphatase activity. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of an isolate belonging to the genus Rahnella.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Turicibacter sp. Strain H121, Isolated from the Feces of a Contaminated Germ-Free Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, T. A.; Holder, M. E.; Gesell, J. R.; Ajami, N. J.; Duarte, R. T. D.; Itoh, K.; Caspi, R. R.; Petrosino, J. F.; Horai, R.

    2016-01-01

    Turicibacter bacteria are commonly detected in the gastrointestinal tracts and feces of humans and animals, but their phylogeny, ecological role, and pathogenic potential remain unclear. We present here the first complete genome sequence of Turicibacter sp. strain H121, which was isolated from the feces of a mouse line contaminated following germ-free derivation. PMID:27013036

  13. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain BSC154, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis C.; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus sp. BSC154 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and biofilm production. The BSC154 genome contains iron siderophore production, nitrate reduction, mixed acid-butanediol fermentation, and assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfate metabolism pathways. PMID:25395651

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Massilia sp. Strain BSC265, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis C.; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Massilia sp. BSC265 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and exopolysaccharide synthesis for biofilm adhesion. The BSC265 genome contains a complete dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway as well as a TCA cycle, making it a facultative anaerobe. PMID:25395652

  16. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 on nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C; Hughes, Joseph B

    2010-03-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy.

  17. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata

    PubMed Central

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata. This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis. PMID:27540075

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. F8, a Biofilm-Forming Strain Which Produces Large Amounts of Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain F8 is a biofilm-forming gammaproteobacterium that has been found to produce large amounts of filamentous extracellular DNA. Here, we announce the de novo assembly of its genome. It is estimated to be 4,464,511 bp in length, with 3,970 protein-coding sequences and 92 RNA-coding sequences. PMID:26966195

  19. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, a natural rubber degrading actinomycete isolated from Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nanthini, Jayaram; Chia, Kim-Hou; Thottathil, Gincy P; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Najimudin, Nazalan; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddharth; Sudesh, Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, which naturally degrades rubber, was isolated from a rubber plantation. Whole genome sequencing and assembly resulted in 2 contigs with total genome size of 8.248 Mb. Two latex clearing protein (lcp) genes which are responsible for rubber degrading activities were identified.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the requirement... of seeds, cuttings, transplants, and plants of agricultural crops in accordance with...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the requirement... of seeds, cuttings, transplants, and plants of agricultural crops in accordance with...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the requirement... of seeds, cuttings, transplants, and plants of agricultural crops in accordance with...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the requirement... of seeds, cuttings, transplants, and plants of agricultural crops in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the requirement... of seeds, cuttings, transplants, and plants of agricultural crops in accordance with...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Thalassotalea sp. Strain ND16A Isolated from Eastern Mediterranean Sea Water Collected from a Depth of 1,055 Meters

    PubMed Central

    Stelling, Savannah C.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Alshibli, Noor K.; Brown, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A belongs to the family Colwelliaceae and was isolated from eastern Mediterranean Sea water at a depth of 1,055 m. Members of Colwelliaceae are ubiquitous marine heterotrophs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A, a member of the newly described genus Thalassotalea. PMID:25428976

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium sp. Strain ML3W, Isolated from Wings of Myotis lucifugus Infected with White Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen A.; Krasucki, Stephen P.; McDowell, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobacterium sp. strain ML3W was isolated from the wing of a bat infected with white nose syndrome. We report the complete 5.33-Mb genome sequence of Sphingobacterium sp. strain ML3W, obtained using Pacific Biosciences technology. Being the second complete Sphingobacterium sequence, this will increase knowledge of the genus. PMID:25614576

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Thalassotalea sp. Strain ND16A Isolated from Eastern Mediterranean Sea Water Collected from a Depth of 1,055 Meters

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, Savannah C.; Techtmann, Stephen M.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Alshibli, Noor K.; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2014-11-26

    Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A belongs to the family Colwelliaceae and was isolated from eastern Mediterranean Sea water at a depth of 1,055 m. Members of Colwelliaceae are ubiquitous marine heterotrophs. Lastly, here we report the draft genome sequence of Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A, a member of the newly described genus Thalassotalea.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea sp. Strain A4, a Rafflesia-Associated Bacterium That Produces N-Acylhomoserine Lactones as Quorum-Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar-Wai; Gan, Han Ming; Low, Siew-Moon; Lee, Patrick Kok Yuen; Chong, Yee-Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2012-01-01

    Pantoea sp. strain A4 is a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the Rafflesia flower. We present here, for the first time, the genome sequence of Rafflesia-associated Pantoea sp. strain A4, which exhibited quorum-sensing activity. PMID:23144374

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium sp. Strain ML3W, Isolated from Wings of Myotis lucifugus Infected with White Nose Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A; Krasucki, Stephen P; McDowell, John V; Balke, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobacterium sp. strain ML3W was isolated from the wing of a bat infected with white nose syndrome. We report the complete 5.33-Mb genome sequence of Sphingobacterium sp. strain ML3W, obtained using Pacific Biosciences technology. Being the second complete Sphingobacterium sequence, this will increase knowledge of the genus. PMID:25614576

  10. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Peyton, Brent M.; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William; Sani, Rajesh K.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-24

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO3-4 . In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium

  11. Multiple mechanisms of uranium immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I; Peyton, Brent M; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William A; Sani, Rajesh K; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO₄³⁻. In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium

  12. [Probiotic features of carotene producing strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113].

    PubMed

    Avdeeva, L V; Nechypurenko, O O; Kharhota, M A

    2015-01-01

    Researched probiotic properties of carotinproducing strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113. It was established that Bacillus sp. 1.1 characterized by high and middle antagonistic activity against museums and actual test cultures and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 shown middle and low activity. They grew up and formed a pigment at pH 6.0 in the presence of 0.4% bile. Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 were avirulent, had low antagonistic activity and characterized by susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, excluding colistin. The results suggested the possibility to create based on Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 probiotic preparation. PMID:26036029

  13. Characterization and purification of bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus sp. strain 100-100

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, S.G.; Savage, D.C. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have characterized and purified the bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus sp. strain 100-100. Bile salt hydrolase from cells of the strain was purified with column and high-performance liquid chromatography. The activity was assayed in whole cells and cell-free extracts with either a radiochemical assay involving ({sup 14}C)taurocholic acid or a nonradioactive assay involving trinitrobenzene sulfonate. The activity was detectable only in stationary-phase cells. Within 20 min after conjugated bile acids were added to stationary-phase cultures of strain 100-100, the activity in whole cells increased to levels three- to fivefold higher than in cells from cultures grown in medium free of bile salts. In cell-free extracts, however, the activity was about equal whether or not the cells have been grown with bile salts present. When supernatant solutions from cultures grown in medium containing taurocholic acid were used to suspend cells grown in medium free of the bile salt, the bile salt hydrolase activity detected in whole cells increased two- to threefold. Two forms of the hydrolase were purified from the cells and designated hydrolases A and B. They eluted from anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography in two sets of fractions, A at 0.15 M NaCl and B at 0.18 M NaCl. Their apparent molecular weights in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 115,000 and 105,000, respectively. However, discrepancies existed in the apparent molecular weights and number of peptides detected in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the two forms. Whether the enzyme exists in two forms in the cells remains to be determined.

  14. Defluorination of organofluorine sulfur compounds by Pseudomonas sp. strain D2

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B.D.; Criddle, C.S.; Howell, R.D.

    1998-08-01

    Little is known of the potential for biodegradation of fluorinated sulfonates. Because of the apparent stability of fluorinated organics, their bioactivity, and their potential for accumulation in the environment, it is important to understand their environmental fate and the mechanisms by which they might be degraded. To evaluate this potential, the following model compounds were selected: difluoromethane sulfonate (DFMS), trifluoromethane sulfonate (TFMS), 2,2,2-trifluoroethane sulfonate (TES), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctane sulfonate (H-PFOS). A laboratory isolate designated Pseudomonas sp. strain D2 completely defluorinated DFMS under aerobic sulfur-limiting conditions in a defined mineral medium. Strain D2 utilized DFMS as the sole source of sulfur, but not as a source of carbon or energy. DFMS utilization was inhibited by other forms of sulfur, and noncompetitive inhibition kinetics were observed, with K{sub i}-values of 3--4 {micro}M for sulfate, sulfite, methane sulfonate, and cystine. Strain D2 was subsequently used to evaluate degradation of other fluorinated sulfonates. Growth and defluorination were only observed for those compounds containing hydrogen (TES and H-PFOS). TFMS and PFOS were not degraded. TES was completely defluorinated, and H-PFOS was partially defluorinated. No volatile transformation products were detected for TES or DFMS, but six volatile products were detected for H-PFOS. All of the volatile products contained oxygen and fluorine, but not sulfur. This is the first report of defluorination of fluorinated sulfonates, a linkage between sulfur assimilation and defluorination, and generation of volatile fluorinated biotransformation products.

  15. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd2+ MIC, >250 mg liter−1) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. PMID:26729719

  16. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production by new Bacillus sp. strains isolated from brazilian soil

    PubMed Central

    Menocci, Vivian; Goulart, Antonio José; Adalberto, Paulo Roberto; Tavano, Olga Luisa; Marques, Daniela Parreira; Contiero, Jonas; Monti, Rubens

    2008-01-01

    Three strains of Bacillus sp. (BACRP, BACNC-1 and BACAR) were isolated from soil adhered to cassava husk. CGTase specific activity for the three isolated strains was higher when cultivated at 40°C. Potato starch, cassava starch, maltodextrin and glucose were used as carbon source and growth temperatures varied from 25 to 55°C. The three isolates presented higher CGTase specific activity when cultivated with potato starch at 40°C. Isolated BACRP and BACAR presented specific activity of 4.0×10–3 and 2.2×10–3 U/mg prot at pH 7.0, respectively, when cultivated in mediums added with NaCl 2%; at pH 10,0 their activities were of 3.4×10–3 and 3.0×10–3 U/mg prot, respectively, in the same concentration of NaCl. On the other hand, the isolated BACNC-1 presented activity specific of 2.4×10–3 U/mg prot when cultivated at pH 7.0 added of NaCl 1%, and at pH 10.0 the specific activity was of 3.4×10–3 U/mg prot without NaCl addition. This work also showed the presence of cyclodextrins formed during fermentation process and that precipitation with acetone or lyophilization followed by dialysis was efficient at removing CDs (cyclodextrins), thus, eliminating interference in the activity assays. The enzyme produced by the BACAR strain was partially purified and β-CD was liberated as a reaction product. PMID:24031289

  17. Lauric Acid Production in a Glycogen-Less Strain of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Work, Victoria H.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Davies, Fiona K.; Kucek, Leo A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Pasteur culture collection 7002 was genetically engineered to synthesize biofuel-compatible medium-chain fatty acids (FAs) during photoautotrophic growth. Expression of a heterologous lauroyl-acyl carrier protein (C12:0-ACP) thioesterase with concurrent deletion of the endogenous putative acyl-ACP synthetase led to secretion of transesterifiable C12:0 FA in CO2-supplemented batch cultures. When grown at steady state over a range of light intensities in a light-emitting diode turbidostat photobioreactor, the C12-secreting mutant exhibited a modest reduction in growth rate and increased O2 evolution relative to the wild-type (WT). Inhibition of (i) glycogen synthesis by deletion of the glgC-encoded ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and (ii) protein synthesis by nitrogen deprivation were investigated as potential mechanisms for metabolite redistribution to increase FA synthesis. Deletion of AGPase led to a 10-fold decrease in reducing carbohydrates and secretion of organic acids during nitrogen deprivation consistent with an energy spilling phenotype. When the carbohydrate-deficient background (ΔglgC) was modified for C12 secretion, no increase in C12 was achieved during nutrient replete growth, and no C12 was recovered from any strain upon nitrogen deprivation under the conditions used. At steady state, the growth rate of the ΔglgC strain saturated at a lower light intensity than the WT, but O2 evolution was not compromised and became increasingly decoupled from growth rate with rising irradiance. Photophysiological properties of the ΔglgC strain suggest energy dissipation from photosystem II and reconfiguration of electron flow at the level of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:25964950

  18. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  19. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrailov, Simeon; Ivanova, Viara

    2016-03-01

    The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein) leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4) 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4) 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  20. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; et al

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs,more » contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).« less

  1. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs, contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).

  2. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  3. Two Master Switch Regulators Trigger A40926 Biosynthesis in Nonomuraea sp. Strain ATCC 39727

    PubMed Central

    Lo Grasso, Letizia; Maffioli, Sonia; Sosio, Margherita; Bibb, Mervyn; Puglia, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 produces the glycopeptide A40926, the precursor of dalbavancin. Biosynthesis of A40926 is encoded by the dbv gene cluster, which contains 37 protein-coding sequences that participate in antibiotic biosynthesis, regulation, immunity, and export. In addition to the positive regulatory protein Dbv4, the A40926-biosynthetic gene cluster encodes two additional putative regulators, Dbv3 and Dbv6. Independent mutations in these genes, combined with bioassays and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses, demonstrated that Dbv3 and Dbv4 are both required for antibiotic production, while inactivation of dbv6 had no effect. In addition, overexpression of dbv3 led to higher levels of A40926 production. Transcriptional and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses showed that Dbv4 is essential for the transcription of two operons, dbv14-dbv8 and dbv30-dbv35, while Dbv3 positively controls the expression of four monocistronic transcription units (dbv4, dbv29, dbv36, and dbv37) and of six operons (dbv2-dbv1, dbv14-dbv8, dbv17-dbv15, dbv21-dbv20, dbv24-dbv28, and dbv30-dbv35). We propose a complex and coordinated model of regulation in which Dbv3 directly or indirectly activates transcription of dbv4 and controls biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyphenylglycine and the heptapeptide backbone, A40926 export, and some tailoring reactions (mannosylation and hexose oxidation), while Dbv4 directly regulates biosynthesis of 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine and other tailoring reactions, including the four cross-links, halogenation, glycosylation, and acylation. IMPORTANCE This report expands knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms used to control the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926 in the actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727. A40926 is the precursor of dalbavancin, approved for treatment of skin infections by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, understanding the regulation of its biosynthesis

  4. Biochemical Characterization of 3-Methyl-4-nitrophenol Degradation in Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun; Lu, Yang; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Several strains have been reported to grow on 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (3M4NP), the primary breakdown product of the excessively used insecticide fenitrothion. However, the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels remains unknown. Here, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MBQ) and methylhydroquinone (MHQ), rather than catechol proposed previously, were identified as the intermediates before ring cleavage during 3M4NP degradation by Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnpABA1CDEF cluster involved in para-nitrophenol (PNP) and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) catabolism was also likely responsible for 3M4NP degradation in this strain. Purified PNP 4-monooxygenase (PnpA) is able to catalyze the monooxygenation of 3M4NP to MBQ and exhibited an apparent K m value of 20.3 ± 2.54 μM for 3M4NP, and pnpA is absolutely necessary for the catabolism of 3M4NP by gene knock-out and complementation. PnpB, a 1,4-benzoquinone reductase catalyzes the reduction of MBQ to MHQ, and also found to enhance PnpA activity in vitro in the conversion of 3M4NP to MBQ. By sequential catalysis assays, PnpCD, PnpE, and PnpF were likely involved in the lower pathway of 3M4NP catabolism. Although NpcCD, NpcE, and NpcF are able to catalyze the sequential conversion of MHQ in vitro, these enzymes are unlikely involved in 3M4NP catabolism because their coding genes were not upregulated by 3M4NP induction in vivo. These results revealed that the enzymes involved in PNP and 2C4NP catabolism were also responsible for 3M4NP degradation in strain SJ98. This fills a gap in our understanding of the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels and also provides another example to illustrate the adaptive flexibility in microbial catabolism for structurally similar compounds. PMID:27252697

  5. Biochemical Characterization of 3-Methyl-4-nitrophenol Degradation in Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jun; Lu, Yang; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Several strains have been reported to grow on 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (3M4NP), the primary breakdown product of the excessively used insecticide fenitrothion. However, the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels remains unknown. Here, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MBQ) and methylhydroquinone (MHQ), rather than catechol proposed previously, were identified as the intermediates before ring cleavage during 3M4NP degradation by Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnpABA1CDEF cluster involved in para-nitrophenol (PNP) and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) catabolism was also likely responsible for 3M4NP degradation in this strain. Purified PNP 4-monooxygenase (PnpA) is able to catalyze the monooxygenation of 3M4NP to MBQ and exhibited an apparent Km value of 20.3 ± 2.54 μM for 3M4NP, and pnpA is absolutely necessary for the catabolism of 3M4NP by gene knock-out and complementation. PnpB, a 1,4-benzoquinone reductase catalyzes the reduction of MBQ to MHQ, and also found to enhance PnpA activity in vitro in the conversion of 3M4NP to MBQ. By sequential catalysis assays, PnpCD, PnpE, and PnpF were likely involved in the lower pathway of 3M4NP catabolism. Although NpcCD, NpcE, and NpcF are able to catalyze the sequential conversion of MHQ in vitro, these enzymes are unlikely involved in 3M4NP catabolism because their coding genes were not upregulated by 3M4NP induction in vivo. These results revealed that the enzymes involved in PNP and 2C4NP catabolism were also responsible for 3M4NP degradation in strain SJ98. This fills a gap in our understanding of the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels and also provides another example to illustrate the adaptive flexibility in microbial catabolism for structurally similar compounds. PMID:27252697

  6. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was <30%, indicating that they were likely to be new species. DNA relatedness between these 2 strains was only 65%, suggesting that they also belonged to different species. The α-amino group content of 6-month-old fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P < 0.05). Histamine was not produced during fermentations with both strains. Fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P < 0.05). The major volatile compound detected in fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce. PMID:26256665

  7. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was <30%, indicating that they were likely to be new species. DNA relatedness between these 2 strains was only 65%, suggesting that they also belonged to different species. The α-amino group content of 6-month-old fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P < 0.05). Histamine was not produced during fermentations with both strains. Fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P < 0.05). The major volatile compound detected in fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce.

  8. Metabolomic Analysis of Cold Acclimation of Arctic Mesorhizobium sp. Strain N33

    PubMed Central

    Ghobakhlou, Abdollah; Laberge, Serge; Antoun, Hani; Wishart, David S.; Xia, Jianguo; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Mandal, Rupasri

    2013-01-01

    Arctic Mesorhizobium sp. N33 isolated from nodules of Oxytropis arctobia in Canada’s eastern Arctic has a growth temperature range from 0°C to 30°C and is a well-known cold-adapted rhizobia. The key molecular mechanisms underlying cold adaptation in Arctic rhizobia remains totally unknown. Since the concentration and contents of metabolites are closely related to stress adaptation, we applied GC-MS and NMR to identify and quantify fatty acids and water soluble compounds possibly related to low temperature acclimation in strain N33. Bacterial cells were grown at three different growing temperatures (4°C, 10°C and 21°C). Cells from 21°C were also cold-exposed to 4°C for different times (2, 4, 8, 60 and 240 minutes). We identified that poly-unsaturated linoleic acids 18∶2 (9, 12) & 18∶2 (6, 9) were more abundant in cells growing at 4 or 10°C, than in cells cultivated at 21°C. The mono-unsaturated phospho/neutral fatty acids myristoleic acid 14∶1(11) were the most significantly overexpressed (45-fold) after 1hour of exposure to 4°C. As reported in the literature, these fatty acids play important roles in cold adaptability by supplying cell membrane fluidity, and by providing energy to cells. Analysis of water-soluble compounds revealed that isobutyrate, sarcosine, threonine and valine were more accumulated during exposure to 4°C. These metabolites might play a role in conferring cold acclimation to strain N33 at 4°C, probably by acting as cryoprotectants. Isobutyrate was highly upregulated (19.4-fold) during growth at 4°C, thus suggesting that this compound is a precursor for the cold-regulated fatty acids modification to low temperature adaptation. PMID:24386418

  9. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. AmpA is a homodimer with an isoelectric point of 5.4. AmpA displays maximum enzymatic activity at 40°C and a pH of between 7.5 and 8.0, and it is very stable at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 10.0 and at temperatures up to 50°C. AmpA efficiently hydrolyzes a variety of secondary amine compounds such as propanil, 4-acetaminophenol, propham, chlorpropham, dimethoate, and omethoate. The most suitable substrate is propanil, with Km and kcat values of 29.5 μM and 49.2 s−1, respectively. The benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron and hexaflumuron) are also hydrolyzed but at low efficiencies. No cofactor is needed for the hydrolysis activity. AmpA shares low identities with reported arylamidases (less than 23%), forms a distinct lineage from closely related arylamidases in the phylogenetic tree, and has different biochemical characteristics and catalytic kinetics with related arylamidases. The results in the present study suggest that AmpA is a good candidate for the study of the mechanism for amide pesticide hydrolysis, genetic engineering of amide herbicide-resistant crops, and bioremediation of amide pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:22544249

  10. Reinvestigation of Brevibacterium sp. Strain KY-4313 as a Source of Canthaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, H. J.; De Leenheer, A. P.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrocarbon-utilizing Brevibacterium sp. strain KY-4313 was reevaluated for its potential to produce canthaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment of strong commercial interest. Three approaches were used to optimize the canthaxanthin yield from this organism, i.e., the preparation of mutants, the addition of supposedly carotenogenic chemicals to the growth medium, and growth promotion. Following treatment of the parent strain with N-nitrosomethylurea, a presumed mutant was isolated which showed a 32% increase in cellular canthaxanthin content. No effective carotenogenic chemicals were found in connection with hydrocarbon fermentations, in which mainly growth promotion through periodic medium renewal proved conducive to enhanced pigment production. Carotenogenesis could be stimulated in brain heart infusion broth by adding alcohols or retinol. Improved growth in this medium was generally not associated with higher canthaxanthin yields. Both superior growth and pigment levels were obtained in a newly designed medium based on fumaric acid-molasses. The maximum yields of canthaxanthin in shake flasks were (in milligrams per liter) 4.2 (brain heart infusion broth plus propanol-zinc sulfate), 3.6 (hydrocarbon medium), and 9.3 (fumaric acid-molasses), which represent a significant improvement over the originally reported optimal result (1 mg/liter). The corresponding yields of echinenone, the direct precursor of canthaxanthin, were 1.2, 1.6, and 2.3 mg/liter, respectively. Two-liter hydrocarbon batch fermentations involving medium renewal maximally produced 7.2 mg of canthaxanthin and 3.7 mg of echinenone per liter. PMID:16348027

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Xylan Utilization Systems in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha; Crooks, Casey; St. John, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Xylans, including methylglucuronoxylans (MeGXn) and methylglucuronoarabinoxylans (MeGAXn), are the predominant polysaccharides in hemicellulose fractions of dicots and monocots available for conversion to biofuels and chemicals. Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Pjdr2) efficiently depolymerizes MeGXn and MeGAXn and assimilates the generated oligosaccharides, resulting in efficient saccharification and subsequent metabolism of these polysaccharides. A xylan utilization regulon encoding a cell-associated GH10 (glycoside hydrolase family 10) endoxylanase, transcriptional regulators, ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, an intracellular GH67 α-glucuronidase, and other glycoside hydrolases contributes to complete metabolism. This GH10/GH67 system has been proposed to account for preferential utilization of xylans compared to free oligo- and monosaccharides. To identify additional genes contributing to MeGXn and MeGAXn utilization, the transcriptome of Pjdr2 has been sequenced following growth on each of these substrates as well as xylose and arabinose. Increased expression of genes with different substrates identified pathways common or unique to the utilization of MeGXn or MeGAXn. Coordinate upregulation of genes comprising the GH10/GH67 xylan utilization regulon is accompanied with upregulation of genes encoding a GH11 endoxylanase and a GH115 α-glucuronidase, providing evidence for a novel complementary pathway for processing xylans. Elevated expression of genes encoding a GH43 arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase and an arabinose ABC transporter on MeGAXn but not on MeGXn supports a process in which arabinose may be removed extracellularly followed by its rapid assimilation. Further development of Pjdr2 for direct conversion of xylans to targeted products or introduction of these systems into fermentative strains of related bacteria may lead to biocatalysts for consolidated bioprocessing of hemicelluloses released from lignocellulose. PMID:25527555

  12. Metabolism of cyclohexaneacetic acid and cyclohexanebutyric acid by Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Trudgill, P W

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Arthrobacter was isolated by enrichment culture with cyclohexaneacetate as the sole source of carbon and grew with a doubling time of 4.2 h. In addition to growing with cyclohexaneacetate, the organism also grew with cyclohexanebutyrate at concentrations not above 0.05%, and with a variety of alicyclic ketones and alcohols. Oxidation of cyclohexaneacetate proceeded through formation of the coenzyme A (CoA) ester followed by initiation of a beta-oxidation cycle. beta-Oxidation was blocked before the second dehydrogenation step due to the formation of a tertiary alcohol, and the side chain was eliminated as acetyl-CoA by the action of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase. The cyclohexanone thus formed was degraded by a well-described route that involves ring-oxygen insertion by a biological Baeyer-Villiger oxygenase. All enzymes of the proposed metabolic sequence were demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1 synthesized constitutive beta-oxidative enzymes, but further induction of enzymes active toward cyclohexaneacetate and its metabolites could occur during growth with the alicyclic acid. Other enzymes of the sequence, (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase and enzymes of cyclohexanone oxidation, were present at negligible levels in succinate-grown cells but induced by growth with cyclohexaneacetate. The oxidation of cyclohexanebutyrate was integrated into the pathway for cyclohexaneacetate oxidation by a single beta-oxidation cycle. Oxidation of the compound could be divided into two phases. Initial oxidation to (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate could be catalyzed by constitutive enzymes, whereas the further degradation of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate was dependent on induced enzyme synthesis which could be inhibited by chloramphenicol with the consequent accumulation of cyclohexaneacetate and (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate. PMID:7076617

  13. Type 2 NADH dehydrogenases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are involved in regulation rather than respiration.

    PubMed

    Howitt, C A; Udall, P K; Vermaas, W F

    1999-07-01

    Analysis of the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 reveals three open reading frames (slr0851, slr1743, and sll1484) that may code for type 2 NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (NDH-2). The sequence similarity between the translated open reading frames and NDH-2s from other organisms is low, generally not exceeding 30% identity. However, NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding motifs are conserved in all three putative NDH-2s in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. The three open reading frames were cloned, and deletion constructs were made for each. An expression construct containing one of the three open reading frames, slr1743, was able to functionally complement an Escherichia coli mutant lacking both NDH-1s and NDH-2s. Therefore, slr0851, slr1743, and sll1484 have been designated ndbA, ndbB, and ndbC, respectively. Strains that lacked one or more of the ndb genes were created in wild-type and photosystem (PS) I-less backgrounds. Deletion of ndb genes led to small changes in photoautotrophic growth rates and respiratory activities. Electron transfer rates into the plastoquinone pool in thylakoids in darkness were consistent with the presence of a small amount of NDH-2 activity in thylakoids. No difference was observed between wild-type and the Ndb-less strains in the banding patterns seen on native gels when stained for either NADH or NADPH dehydrogenase activity, indicating that the Ndb proteins do not accumulate to high levels. A striking phenotype of the PS I-less background strains lacking one or more of the NDH-2s is that they were able to grow at high light intensities that were lethal to the control strain but they retained normal PS II activity. We suggest that the Ndb proteins in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are redox sensors and that they play a regulatory role responding to the redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

  14. The Glutathione/Glutaredoxin System Is Essential for Arsenate Reduction in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803▿ †

    PubMed Central

    López-Maury, Luis; Sánchez-Riego, Ana María; Reyes, José Carlos; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic resistance in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is mediated by an operon of three genes in which arsC codes for an arsenate reductase with unique characteristics. Here we describe the identification of two additional and nearly identical genes coding for arsenate reductases in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, which we have designed arsI1 and arsI2, and the biochemical characterization of both ArsC (arsenate reductase) and ArsI. Functional analysis of single, double, and triple mutants shows that both ArsI enzymes are active arsenate reductases but that their roles in arsenate resistance are essential only in the absence of ArsC. Based on its biochemical properties, ArsC belongs to a family that, though related to thioredoxin-dependent arsenate reductases, uses the glutathione/glutaredoxin system for reduction, whereas ArsI belongs to the previously known glutaredoxin-dependent family. We have also analyzed the role in arsenate resistance of the three glutaredoxins present in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 both in vitro and in vivo. Only the dithiolic glutaredoxins, GrxA (glutaredoxin A) and GrxB (glutaredoxin B), are able to donate electrons to both types of reductases in vitro, while GrxC (glutaredoxin C), a monothiolic glutaredoxin, is unable to donate electrons to either type. Analysis of glutaredoxin mutant strains revealed that only those lacking the grxA gene have impaired arsenic resistance. PMID:19304854

  15. Characterization and Genomic Analysis of a Highly Efficient Dibutyl Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium Gordonia sp. Strain QH-12.

    PubMed

    Jin, Decai; Kong, Xiao; Liu, Huijun; Wang, Xinxin; Deng, Ye; Jia, Minghong; Yu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain QH-12 isolated from activated sludge was identified as Gordonia sp. based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and was found to be capable of utilizing dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and other common phthalate esters (PAEs) as the sole carbon and energy source. The degradation kinetics of DBP under different concentrations by the strain QH-12 fit well with the modified Gompertz model (R² > 0.98). However, strain QH-12 could not utilize the major intermediate product phthalate (phthalic acid; PA) as the sole carbon and energy source, and only a little amount of PA was detected. The QH-12 genome analysis revealed the presence of putative hydrolase/esterase genes involved in PAEs-degradation but no phthalic acid catabolic gene cluster was found, suggesting that a novel degradation pathway of PAEs was present in Gordonia sp. QH-12. This information will be valuable for obtaining a more holistic understanding on diverse genetic mechanisms of PAEs-degrading Gordonia sp. strains. PMID:27347943

  16. Characterization and Genomic Analysis of a Highly Efficient Dibutyl Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium Gordonia sp. Strain QH-12

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Kong, Xiao; Liu, Huijun; Wang, Xinxin; Deng, Ye; Jia, Minghong; Yu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain QH-12 isolated from activated sludge was identified as Gordonia sp. based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and was found to be capable of utilizing dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and other common phthalate esters (PAEs) as the sole carbon and energy source. The degradation kinetics of DBP under different concentrations by the strain QH-12 fit well with the modified Gompertz model (R2 > 0.98). However, strain QH-12 could not utilize the major intermediate product phthalate (phthalic acid; PA) as the sole carbon and energy source, and only a little amount of PA was detected. The QH-12 genome analysis revealed the presence of putative hydrolase/esterase genes involved in PAEs-degradation but no phthalic acid catabolic gene cluster was found, suggesting that a novel degradation pathway of PAEs was present in Gordonia sp. QH-12. This information will be valuable for obtaining a more holistic understanding on diverse genetic mechanisms of PAEs-degrading Gordonia sp. strains. PMID:27347943

  17. Vought XO4U-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Vought XO4U-2: A biplane scout, the Vought XO4U-2 was 'flown' in the NACA's 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in early spring 1933. Part of these tests were to study the cooling of the Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp radial engine. Other tests involved the relation of the slipstream to stability and control.

  18. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  19. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus.

  20. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  1. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  2. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27672405

  3. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y.I.; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  4. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y.I.; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27672405

  5. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15-20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase, and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  6. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Five Marine Cyanophages Propagated on Synechococcus sp. Strain WH7803

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William H.; Joint, Ian R.; Carr, Noel G.; Mann, Nicholas H.

    1993-01-01

    Five marine cyanophages propagated on Synechococcus sp. strain WH7803 were isolated from three different oceanographic provinces during the months of August and September 1992: coastal water from the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda; Woods Hole harbor, Woods Hole, Mass.; and coastal water from the English Channel, off Plymouth Sound, United Kingdom. The five cyanophage isolates were found to belong to two families, Myoviridae and Styloviridae, on the basis of their morphology observed in the transmission electron microscope. DNA purified from each of the cyanophage isolates was restricted with a selection of restriction endonucleases, and three distinguishably different patterns were observed. DNA isolated from Myoviridae isolates from Bermuda and the English Channel had highly related restriction patterns, as did DNA isolated from Styloviridae isolates from Bermuda and the English Channel. DNA isolated from the Myoviridae isolate from Woods Hole had a unique restriction pattern. The genome size for each of the Myoviridae isolates was ca. 80 to 85 kb, and it was ca. 90 to 100 kb for each of the Styloviridae isolates. Southern blotting analysis revealed that there was a limited degree of homology among all cyanophage DNAs probed, but clear differences were observed between cyanophage DNA from the Myoviridae and that from the Styloviridae isolates. Polypeptide analysis revealed a clear difference between Myoviridae and Styloviridae polypeptide profiles, although the major, presumably structural, protein in each case was ca. 53 to 54 kDa. Images PMID:16349088

  7. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. )

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  8. Cytochrome P450 Initiates Degradation of cis-Dichloroethene by Polaromonas sp. Strain JS666

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Shirley F.; Shin, Kwanghee A.; Gossett, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Polaromonas sp. strain JS666 grows on cis-1,2-dichoroethene (cDCE) as the sole carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions, but the degradation mechanism and the enzymes involved are unknown. In this study, we established the complete pathway for cDCE degradation through heterologous gene expression, inhibition studies, enzyme assays, and analysis of intermediates. Several lines of evidence indicate that a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzes the initial step of cDCE degradation. Both the transient accumulation of dichloroacetaldehyde in cDCE-degrading cultures and dichloroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of JS666 support a pathway for degradation of cDCE through dichloroacetaldehyde. The mechanism minimizes the formation of cDCE epoxide. The molecular phylogeny of the cytochrome P450 gene and the organization of neighboring genes suggest that the cDCE degradation pathway recently evolved in a progenitor capable of degrading 1,2-dichloroethane either by the recruitment of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene from an alkane catabolic pathway or by selection for variants of the P450 in a preexisting 1,2-dichloroethane catabolic pathway. The results presented here add yet another role to the broad array of productive reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes. PMID:23354711

  9. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4-Dinitroanisole by Nocardioides sp. strain JS1661.

    PubMed

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Palamuru, Shannu; Pandey, Gunjan; Spain, Jim C

    2014-12-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munition ingredient used in explosive formulations as a replacement for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Little is known about the environmental behavior of DNAN. There are reports of microbial transformation to dead-end products, but no bacteria with complete biodegradation capability have been reported. Nocardioides sp. strain JS1661 was isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to grow on DNAN as the sole source of carbon and energy. Enzyme assays indicated that the first reaction involves hydrolytic release of methanol to form 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP). Growth yield and enzyme assays indicated that 2,4-DNP underwent subsequent degradation by a previously established pathway involving formation of a hydride-Meisenheimer complex and release of nitrite. Identification of the genes encoding the key enzymes suggested recent evolution of the pathway by recruitment of a novel hydrolase to extend the well-characterized 2,4-DNP pathway.

  11. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:18259065

  12. A thermostable humic acid peroxidase from Streptomyces sp. strain AH4: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Fodil, Djamila; Jaouadi, Bassem; Badis, Abdelmalek; Nadia, Zaraî Jaouadi; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Bejar, Samir; Boutoumi, Houcine

    2012-05-01

    An extracellular thermostable humic acid peroxidase (HaP3) was isolated from a Streptomyces sp. strain AH4. MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 60,215.18Da. The 26N-terminal residues of HaP3 displayed high homology with Streptomyces peroxidases. Optimal peroxidase activity was obtained at pH 5 and 80°C. HaP3 was stable at pH and temperature ranges of 4-8 and 60-90°C for 72 and 4h, respectively. HaP3 catalyzed the oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol, commercial humic acid, guiacol, and 2,6-dichlorophenol (50mM); L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (40 mM); 4-chlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (30 mM) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Sodium azide and potassium cyanide inhibited HaP3, which indicated the presence of heme components. These properties make HaP3 a potential strong candidate for future application in the elimination of natural humic acids in drinking water. PMID:22342039

  13. Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Possesses a Remarkable Number of Secretion Systems▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Christel; Liesegang, Heiko; Krysciak, Dagmar; Bakkou, Nadia; Le Quéré, Antoine; Wollherr, Antje; Heinemeyer, Isabelle; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Flores, Margarita; Palacios, Rafael; Brenner, Sydney; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Broughton, William J.; Perret, Xavier; Strittmatter, Axel W.; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a unique alphaproteobacterium (order Rhizobiales) that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other microsymbiont. We report here that the 3.93-Mbp chromosome (cNGR234) encodes most functions required for cellular growth. Few essential functions are encoded on the 2.43-Mbp megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and none are present on the second 0.54-Mbp symbiotic plasmid (pNGR234a). Among many striking features, the 6.9-Mbp genome encodes more different secretion systems than any other known rhizobia and probably most known bacteria. Altogether, 132 genes and proteins are linked to secretory processes. Secretion systems identified include general and export pathways, a twin arginine translocase secretion system, six type I transporter genes, one functional and one putative type III system, three type IV attachment systems, and two putative type IV conjugation pili. Type V and VI transporters were not identified, however. NGR234 also carries genes and regulatory networks linked to the metabolism of a wide range of aromatic and nonaromatic compounds. In this way, NGR234 can quickly adapt to changing environmental stimuli in soils, rhizospheres, and plants. Finally, NGR234 carries at least six loci linked to the quenching of quorum-sensing signals, as well as one gene (ngrI) that possibly encodes a novel type of autoinducer I molecule. PMID:19376903

  14. Factors influencing substitutive transformation of carbon tetrachloride by pseudomonas sp. strain KC

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Crawford, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC can transform carbon tetrachloride (CT) to carbon dioxide by an as yet unknown mechanism. In addition to CO{sub 2}, a large portion of the CT carbon atoms are found as unidentified non-volatile products. In order to assess the potential usefulness of this process as a remediation technology and to assure that other toxic compounds are not produced, experiments to investigate the transformation process were undertaken. Using L-cysteine or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (DMED), the corresponding phosgene and thiophosgene condensation products from CT-transforming cultures of KC were observed, indicating that a radical substitution pathway was operating. Using radioisotopic tracer, it was found that the addition of DMED caused a substantial decrease in CO{sub 2} production. Other experiments were undertaken to account for the fraction of CT transformation accounted for by the sulfur and oxygen substitutive pathways. Data support a radical substitution pathway for the transformation of CT to CO{sub 2} and nonvolatile products. Furthermore, data suggest that the products of CT transformation would be fully dechlorinated due to the lability of the carbon-chlorine bonds in phosgene and thiophosgene.

  15. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions. PMID:26029182

  16. Aerobic biotransformation of 3-methylindole to ring cleavage products by Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kimiko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    3-Methylindole, also referred to as skatole, is a pollutant of environmental concern due to its persistence, mobility and potential health impacts. Petroleum refining, intensive livestock production and application of biosolids to agricultural lands result in releases of 3-methylindole to the environment. Even so, little is known about the aerobic biodegradation of 3-methylindole and comprehensive biotransformation pathways have not been established. Using glycerol as feedstock, the soil bacterium Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10 biodegraded 100 mg/L of 3-methylindole in 24 h. Cometabolic 3-methylindole biodegradation was confirmed by the identification of biotransformation products through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses. In all, 14 3-methylindole biotransformation products were identified which revealed that biotransformation occurred through different pathways that included carbocyclic aromatic ring-fission of 3-methylindole to single-ring pyrrole carboxylic acids. This work provides first comprehensive evidence for the aerobic biotransformation mechanisms of 3-methylindole by a soil bacterium and expands our understanding of the biodegradative capabilities of members of the genus Cupriavidus towards heteroaromatic pollutants. PMID:26126873

  17. A thermostable humic acid peroxidase from Streptomyces sp. strain AH4: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Fodil, Djamila; Jaouadi, Bassem; Badis, Abdelmalek; Nadia, Zaraî Jaouadi; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Bejar, Samir; Boutoumi, Houcine

    2012-05-01

    An extracellular thermostable humic acid peroxidase (HaP3) was isolated from a Streptomyces sp. strain AH4. MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 60,215.18Da. The 26N-terminal residues of HaP3 displayed high homology with Streptomyces peroxidases. Optimal peroxidase activity was obtained at pH 5 and 80°C. HaP3 was stable at pH and temperature ranges of 4-8 and 60-90°C for 72 and 4h, respectively. HaP3 catalyzed the oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol, commercial humic acid, guiacol, and 2,6-dichlorophenol (50mM); L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (40 mM); 4-chlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (30 mM) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Sodium azide and potassium cyanide inhibited HaP3, which indicated the presence of heme components. These properties make HaP3 a potential strong candidate for future application in the elimination of natural humic acids in drinking water.

  18. Biogenic Production of Photosensitive Arsenic-Sulfide Nanotubes by Shwanella sp. strain HN-41

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Yoo, Bongyoung; Myung, Nosang V.; Maeng, Jongsun; Lee, Takhe; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2007-12-07

    This paper describes the novel production of extensive filamentous, arsenic-sulfide (As-S) nanotubes (20 - 100 nm dia. X ~30 μm length) resulting from the dissimilatoryreduction of thiosulfate and arsenate by the bacterium Shewanella sp. HN-41. While there have been several reports of bacterial-produced nanowires composed entirely of biological macromolecules, here we report for the first time the biogenic formation ofphotosensitive and electroconductive nanotubes comprised of crystalline As-S and bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of the synthesis of such a material either by chemical or biological means. The biogenic As-S nanotubes reported here represent a significant advancement as building blocks for the production of nanodevices because of their high aspect ratios and unique size dependent properties. We characterized the structural evolution of the bacterial As-S nanotubes formed by strain HN-41 using XAFS spectra as well as XRD analyses, as a function of time and extent of bacterial reduction. In addition, we characterized the electrical and photoconductive properties of the As-S nanotubes. Upon aging, the As-S nanotubes behaved as metals and semiconductors in terms of their electrical and photoconductive properties, respectively. These results indicate that the dissimilatory bacterium Shewanella may be an excellent biological tool to bioengineer As-S nanotubes, which may provide useful materials for novel nano- and optoelectronic devices.

  19. Characterization of the Highly Active Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase of Chromobacterium sp. Strain USM2▿

    PubMed Central

    Bhubalan, Kesaven; Chuah, Jo-Ann; Shozui, Fumi; Brigham, Christopher J.; Taguchi, Seiichi; Sinskey, Anthony J.; Rha, ChoKyun; Sudesh, Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) is very much dependent on the expression and activity of a key enzyme, PHA synthase (PhaC). Many efforts are being pursued to enhance the activity and broaden the substrate specificity of PhaC. Here, we report the identification of a highly active wild-type PhaC belonging to the recently isolated Chromobacterium sp. USM2 (PhaCCs). PhaCCs showed the ability to utilize 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), and 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx) monomers in PHA biosynthesis. An in vitro assay of recombinant PhaCCs expressed in Escherichia coli showed that its polymerization of 3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A activity was nearly 8-fold higher (2,462 ± 80 U/g) than that of the synthase from the model strain C. necator (307 ± 24 U/g). Specific activity using a Strep2-tagged, purified PhaCCs was 238 ± 98 U/mg, almost 5-fold higher than findings of previous studies using purified PhaC from C. necator. Efficient poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] accumulation in Escherichia coli expressing PhaCCs of up to 76 ± 2 weight percent was observed within 24 h of cultivation. To date, this is the highest activity reported for a purified PHA synthase. PhaCCs is a naturally occurring, highly active PHA synthase with superior polymerizing ability. PMID:21398494

  20. Molecular and biochemical analysis of phthalate and terephthalate degradation by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Dockyu; Sul, Woo Jun; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Eungbin

    2005-11-15

    Alkylbenzene-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 is able to utilize phthalate and terephthalate as growth substrates. The genes encoding the transformation of phthalate and terephthalate to protocatechuate are organized as two separate operons, located 6.7kb away from each other. Interestingly, both the phthalate and terephthalate operons are induced in response to terephthalate while expression of the terephthalate genes is undetectable in phthalate-grown cells. In addition to two known plasmids (380-kb pDK1 and 330-kb pDK2), a third megaplasmid (750-kb pDK3) was newly identified in DK17. The phthalate and terephthalate operons are duplicated and are present on both pDK2 and pDK3. RT-PCR experiments, coupled with sequence analysis, suggest that phthalate and terephthalate degradation in DK17 proceeds through oxygenation at carbons 3 and 4 and at carbons 1 and 2 to form 3,4-dihydro-3,4-dihydroxyphthalate and 1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxyterephthalate, respectively. The 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate pathway was further corroborated through colorometric tests. Apparently, the two dihydrodiol metabolites are subsequently dehydrogenated and decarboxylated to form protocatechuate, which is further degraded by a protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase as confirmed by a ring-cleavage enzyme assay. PMID:16181748

  1. Elucidation of the metabolic pathway for dibenzothiophene desulphurization by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 (ATCC 53968).

    PubMed

    Oldfield, C; Pogrebinsky, O; Simmonds, J; Olson, E S; Kulpa, C F

    1997-09-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 (ATCC 53968) is able to utilize dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sole source of sulphur. The carbon skeleton of DBT is not metabolized and is conserved as 2-hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), which accumulates in the medium. This phenotype is due to the expression of the plasmid-encoded DBT-desulphurization (dsz) operon, which encodes three proteins, DszA, B and C. In this paper it is shown, using [35S]DBT radiolabelling studies, that sulphur is released in the form of inorganic sulphite. The pathway of DBT desulphurization is described in detail. In summary, DszC catalyses the stepwise S-oxidation of DBT, first to dibenzothiophene 5-oxide (DBTO) and then to dibenzothiophene 5,5-dioxide (DBTO2); DszA catalyses the conversion of DBTO2 to 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzene sulphinate (HBPSi-) and DszB catalyses the desulphination of HBPSi- to give HBP and sulphite. Studies with cell-free extracts show that DszA and DszC, but not DszB, require NADH for activity. 18O2-labelling studies show that each incorporated oxygen atom is derived directly from molecular oxygen. These results are consistent with the role of DszC as a mono-oxygenase, of DszA as an apparently unique enzyme which catalyses the reductive hydroxylation of DBTO2 leading to cleavage of the thiophene ring, and of DszB as an aromatic sulphinic acid hydrolase.

  2. Multiple fission in Allogromia sp., strain NF (Foraminiferida): release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of offspring.

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-05-01

    The release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of juveniles arising through multiple fission in the benthic foraminiferan Allogromia sp., strain NF (Lee & Pierce, 1963) has been examined by light and electron microscopy. An extensive reticulopodial network participates in the dispersal of fully differentiated young as they emerge from the fragmented parental test. During the earliest stages of release, offspring are of two classes--aroused and unaroused. Unaroused juveniles, which have not extended pseudopods, attach externally to the network and are transported bidirectionally along its surface. Aroused juveniles, which have extended pseudopods and are in protoplasmic continuity with the network, move quickly to the periphery of the network. Within 24 h, juveniles establish a communal "feeding reticulum" in which dispersed individuals are in protoplasmic continuity with neighbors via a common reticulopodial network. At the ultrastructural level, the cell body cytoplasm of unaroused juveniles contains numerous patches of a paracrystalline material, which disappears as their pseudopodia are extended to join the communal feeding reticulum. This paracrystalline material therefore appears to be a temporary reservoir of precursors required for pseudopod construction.

  3. Quinoline biodegradation and its nitrogen transformation pathway by a Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Sun, Qinghua; Zhao, Cui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2010-06-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, which can utilize quinoline as its sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source, was isolated from activated sludge in a coking wastewater treatment plant. Quinoline can be degraded via the 8-hydroxycoumarin pathway. We quantified the first two organic intermediates of the biodegradation, 2-hydroxyquinoline and 2,8-dihydroxyquinoline. We tracked the transformation of the nitrogen in quinoline in two media containing different C/N ratios. At least 40.4% of the nitrogen was finally transformed into ammonium when quinoline was the sole C and N source. But addition of an external carbon source like glucose promoted the transformation of N from NH3 into NO3(-), NO2(-), and then to N2. The product analysis and gene characteristics indicated that the isolate accomplished heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification simultaneously. The study also demonstrated that quinoline and its metabolic products can be eliminated if the C/N ratio is properly controlled in the treatment of quinoline-containing wastewater.

  4. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. R.; Bakar, N. A.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Johari, W. L. W.; Ahmad, S. A.; Jirangon, H.; Syed, M. A.; Shukor, M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  5. Aerobic Biodegradation of 2,4-Dinitroanisole by Nocardioides sp. Strain JS1661

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Palamuru, Shannu; Pandey, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munition ingredient used in explosive formulations as a replacement for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Little is known about the environmental behavior of DNAN. There are reports of microbial transformation to dead-end products, but no bacteria with complete biodegradation capability have been reported. Nocardioides sp. strain JS1661 was isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to grow on DNAN as the sole source of carbon and energy. Enzyme assays indicated that the first reaction involves hydrolytic release of methanol to form 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP). Growth yield and enzyme assays indicated that 2,4-DNP underwent subsequent degradation by a previously established pathway involving formation of a hydride-Meisenheimer complex and release of nitrite. Identification of the genes encoding the key enzymes suggested recent evolution of the pathway by recruitment of a novel hydrolase to extend the well-characterized 2,4-DNP pathway. PMID:25281383

  6. A further insight into the mechanism of Ag + biosorption by Lactobacillus sp. strain A09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhongyu; Zhou, Chaohui; Wu, Jianming; Zhou, Jianzhang; Wang, Lin

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of Ag + biosorption by resting cell of Lactobacillus sp. strain A09 has been further investigated at the molecular level using spectroscopic techniques. The values of estimated equilibrium constants, rate constants, half-life periods and apparent enthalpies of the binding reaction were calculated via the determination of Ag + adsorbed by the biomass using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The reductive ratio of the Ag + to Ag 0 by the A09 biomass was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis for sulfur and nitrogen atomic contents in dry powder of the biomass with EA-1110 elemental analysis (EA) showed that amino acid residues retaining the reductive property of Ag + to Ag 0 are very small quantity, whereas glucose content in the hydrolysates of the biomass analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis) indicated that the amount of reducing sugars in the biomass is much larger than 2.71%. The fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry on blank and silver-loaded biomass demonstrated that the chemical functional group such as the free aldehyde group of the hemiacetalic hydroxyl group from reducing sugars, i.e. the hydrolysates of the polysaccharides from the cell wall plays a leading role in serving as the electron donor for reducing the Ag + to Ag 0. This result was further supported by characterizations on the interaction of the Ag + with glucose using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. Desulfurization characteristics of thermophilic Paenibacillus sp. strain A11-2 against asymmetrically alkylated dibenzothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Onaka, T; Konishi, J; Ishii, Y; Maruhashi, K

    2001-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Paenibacillus sp. A11-2, which can utilize dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the sole sulfur source at high temperature (45-55 degrees C), was investigated for its ability to cleave carbon-sulfur bonds in the dibenzothiophene (DBT) ring with asymmetrical alkyl substitution, such as methyl, dimethyl, trimethyl, ethyl and propyl DBTs. The biodesulfurization products of each of these alkylated DBTs (Cx-DBTs) were identified and quantitatively determined. The results suggested that each of the Cx-DBTs was desulfurized at a low rate, then converted to alkylated hydroxybiphenyls containing the isomers, and molar ratios of these metabolic isomers were altered in terms of not only the positions but also the numbers and lengths of the alkyl substituents. Moreover, these ratios were compared with those obtained using the mesophilic desulfurizing bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1. Consequently, biodesulfurization reactions of these microbes could be characterized using asymmetrically Cx-DBTs and their molecular shape parameters (length and length-to-breadth ratio), indicating differences in the selectivity of the microbial enzymic systems between the two bacterial strains.

  8. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Osipiuk, J.; Pinkau, T. )

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70{degrees}C culture at the lethal temperature of 92{degrees}C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88{degrees}C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  9. Highly Thermostable Xylanase Production from A Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain WSUCF1 Utilizing Lignocellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M.; Sani, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylooligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail) when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70°C, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12 days at 60 and 70°C, respectively. At 70°C, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, Cellic-HTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ≤70°C). High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes. PMID:26137456

  10. Purification, biochemical characterization, and genetic cloning of the phytase produced by Burkholderia sp. strain a13.

    PubMed

    Graminho, Eduardo Rezende; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A phytase-producing bacterium, Burkholderia sp. a13 (JCM 30421), was isolated from Lake Kasumigaura by enrichment cultivation using minimum medium containing phytic acid as the sole phosphorus source. The phytase production by strain a13 was induced by the presence of phytic acid and repressed by the addition of glucose. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of 44 kDa and a phytase activity of 174 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity, but the highest activity was observed with phytic acid. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and iodoacetic acid, indicating the requirement of a thiol group for the activity. Genetic cloning reveals that the mature portion of this enzyme consists of 428 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 46 kDa. The amino acid sequence showed the highest similarity to the phytase produced by Hafnia alvei with 48% identity; it also contained histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) motifs (RHGXRXP and HD), indicating the classification of this enzyme in the HAP phytase family. We have successfully expressed the cloned gene in Escherichia coli from its putative initiation codon, showing that the gene actually encodes the phytase. PMID:25833676

  11. Aerobic biotransformation of 3-methylindole to ring cleavage products by Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kimiko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    3-Methylindole, also referred to as skatole, is a pollutant of environmental concern due to its persistence, mobility and potential health impacts. Petroleum refining, intensive livestock production and application of biosolids to agricultural lands result in releases of 3-methylindole to the environment. Even so, little is known about the aerobic biodegradation of 3-methylindole and comprehensive biotransformation pathways have not been established. Using glycerol as feedstock, the soil bacterium Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10 biodegraded 100 mg/L of 3-methylindole in 24 h. Cometabolic 3-methylindole biodegradation was confirmed by the identification of biotransformation products through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses. In all, 14 3-methylindole biotransformation products were identified which revealed that biotransformation occurred through different pathways that included carbocyclic aromatic ring-fission of 3-methylindole to single-ring pyrrole carboxylic acids. This work provides first comprehensive evidence for the aerobic biotransformation mechanisms of 3-methylindole by a soil bacterium and expands our understanding of the biodegradative capabilities of members of the genus Cupriavidus towards heteroaromatic pollutants.

  12. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results (R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  13. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan Janardhana; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results ( R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  14. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS. PMID:24555340

  15. Cloning and characterization of two xyloglucanases from Paenibacillus sp. strain KM21.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakai, Tomonori; Kameda, Yoshiro; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Yasushi

    2005-12-01

    Two xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanases (xyloglucanases [XEGs]), XEG5 and XEG74, with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 105 kDa, respectively, were isolated from the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus sp. strain KM21, which degrades tamarind seed xyloglucan. The genes encoding these XEGs were cloned and sequenced. Based on their amino acid sequences, the catalytic domains of XEG5 and XEG74 were classified in the glycoside hydrolase families 5 and 74, respectively. XEG5 is the first xyloglucanase belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5. XEG5 lacks a carbohydrate-binding module, while XEG74 has an X2 module and a family 3 type carbohydrate-binding module at its C terminus. The two XEGs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant forms of the enzymes were purified and characterized. Both XEGs had endoglucanase active only toward xyloglucan and not toward Avicel, carboxymethylcellulose, barley beta-1,3/1,4-glucan, or xylan. XEG5 is a typical endo-type enzyme that randomly cleaves the xyloglucan main chain, while XEG74 has dual endo- and exo-mode activities or processive endo-mode activity. XEG5 digested the xyloglucan oligosaccharide XXXGXXXG to produce XXXG, whereas XEG74 digestion of XXXGXXXG resulted in XXX, XXXG, and GXXXG, suggesting that this enzyme cleaves the glycosidic bond of unbranched Glc residues. Analyses using various oligosaccharide structures revealed that unique structures of xyloglucan oligosaccharides can be prepared with XEG74. PMID:16332739

  16. Cloning and Characterization of Two Xyloglucanases from Paenibacillus sp. Strain KM21

    PubMed Central

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakai, Tomonori; Kameda, Yoshiro; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Yasushi

    2005-01-01

    Two xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanases (xyloglucanases [XEGs]), XEG5 and XEG74, with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 105 kDa, respectively, were isolated from the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus sp. strain KM21, which degrades tamarind seed xyloglucan. The genes encoding these XEGs were cloned and sequenced. Based on their amino acid sequences, the catalytic domains of XEG5 and XEG74 were classified in the glycoside hydrolase families 5 and 74, respectively. XEG5 is the first xyloglucanase belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5. XEG5 lacks a carbohydrate-binding module, while XEG74 has an X2 module and a family 3 type carbohydrate-binding module at its C terminus. The two XEGs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant forms of the enzymes were purified and characterized. Both XEGs had endoglucanase active only toward xyloglucan and not toward Avicel, carboxymethylcellulose, barley β-1,3/1,4-glucan, or xylan. XEG5 is a typical endo-type enzyme that randomly cleaves the xyloglucan main chain, while XEG74 has dual endo- and exo-mode activities or processive endo-mode activity. XEG5 digested the xyloglucan oligosaccharide XXXGXXXG to produce XXXG, whereas XEG74 digestion of XXXGXXXG resulted in XXX, XXXG, and GXXXG, suggesting that this enzyme cleaves the glycosidic bond of unbranched Glc residues. Analyses using various oligosaccharide structures revealed that unique structures of xyloglucan oligosaccharides can be prepared with XEG74. PMID:16332739

  17. Trimethylamine oxide respiration in Proteus sp. strain NTHC153: electron transfer-dependent phosphorylation and L-serine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, E; Styrvold, O B; Strøm, A R

    1982-01-01

    Cells of Proteus sp. strains NTHC153 grown anaerobically with glucose and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) were converted to spheroplasts by the penicillin method. The spheroplasts were lysed by osmotic shock, and the membrane vesicles were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Vesicles energized electron transfer from formate to TMAO displayed active anaerobic transport of serine. An anaerobic cell-free extract of Proteus sp. disrupted in a French pressure cell reduced TMAO with formate and NADH with the concomitant formation of organic phosphate. The net P/2e- ratios determined were 0.1 and 0.3, respectively. The NADH- and TMAO-dependent phosphorylation was sensitive to uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (protonophores), and the formate- and TMAO-dependent serine transport was sensitive to ionophores and protonophores. We conclude that TMAO reduction in Proteus sp. fulfills the essential features of anaerobic respiration. PMID:6798018

  18. A role for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142, in nitrogen cycling for CELSS applications.

    PubMed

    Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, L A

    1996-01-01

    Simple calculations show that fixed nitrogen regeneration in a CELSS may not be as efficient as stowage and resupply of fixed nitrogen compounds. However, fixed nitrogen regeneration may be important for the sustainability and safety of a deployed CELSS. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142, a unicellular, aerobic, diazotrophic cyanobacterium, with high growth rates and a robust metabolism, is a reasonable candidate organism for a biological, fixed nitrogen regeneration system. In addition, Cyanothece sp. cultures may be used to balance gas exchange ratio imparities between plants and humans. The regeneration of fixed nitrogen compounds by cyanobacterial cultures was examined in the context of a broad computer model/simulation (called CELSS-3D). When cyanothece sp. cultures were used to balance gas exchange imparities, the biomass harvested could supply as much as half of the total fixed nitrogen needed for plant biomass production.

  19. Rickettsia sp. Strain Atlantic Rainforest Infection in a Patient from a Spotted Fever-Endemic Area in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, Felipe S; Muñoz-Leal, Sebastián; Guztzazky, Ana Carolina; Oliveira, Stefan V; Santos, Fabiana C P; Angerami, Rodrigo N; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; de Souza, Julio C; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2016-09-01

    Santa Catarina State in southern Brazil is the state with the second highest number of laboratory-confirmed cases of spotted fever illness in Brazil. However, all these cases were confirmed solely by serological analysis (seroconversion to spotted fever group rickettsiae), which has not allowed identification of the rickettsial agent. Here, a clinical case of spotted fever illness from Santa Catarina is shown by seroconversion and molecular analysis to be caused by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. This is the third confirmed clinical case due to this emerging rickettsial agent in Brazil. Like the previous two cases, the patient presented an inoculation eschar at the tick bite site. Our molecular diagnosis was performed on DNA extracted from the crust removed from the eschar. These results are supported by previous epidemiological studies in Santa Catarina, which showed that nearly 10% of the most common human-biting ticks were infected by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. PMID:27325804

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H; Boissinot, Maurice; Omar, Rabeea F

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium. The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfide-Oxidizing, Autotrophic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium, Chloroflexus sp. Strain MS-G (Chloroflexi)

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G (Chloroflexi), isolated from Mushroom Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 4,784,183 bp in 251 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 4,059 protein coding genes, 49 tRNA encoding genes, and 3 rRNA operons. PMID:25189583

  3. A Pair of New Polyketide Enantiomers from Three Endolichenic Fungal Strains Nigrospora sphaerica, Alternaria alternata, and Phialophora sp.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Wei; Wang, Chuan-Xi; Yang, Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Hu, Dan; Guo, Liang-Dong; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Gao, Hao

    2016-06-01

    A pair of new enantiomeric polyketides, (-)- and (+)-nigrosporaol A (1a and 1b), along with one related known compound, (+)-alternarienoic acid (2), were isolated from three endolichenic fungal strains, Nigrospora sphaerica (No.83-1-1-2), Alternaria alternata (No.58-8-4-1), and Phialophora sp.(No.96-1-8-1). Their structures, including the absolute configurations, were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the modified Mosher's method.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil

    PubMed Central

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation. PMID:27563050

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacter sp. Strain OR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Japanese Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. strain OR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from Japanese paddy soil. It contained two distinct arsenic islands, one including genes for a respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr) as well as for arsenic resistance (arsD-arsA-acr3-arsR-arrA-arrB) and the second containing only genes for arsenic resistance. PMID:25635012

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacter sp. Strain OR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Japanese Paddy Soil.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. strain OR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from Japanese paddy soil. It contained two distinct arsenic islands, one including genes for a respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr) as well as for arsenic resistance (arsD-arsA-acr3-arsR-arrA-arrB) and the second containing only genes for arsenic resistance. PMID:25635012

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo; Campos, Eleonora

    2016-08-25

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation.

  8. Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain 3J1, a Highly Desiccation-Tolerant Bacterium That Promotes Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    García-Fontana, Cristina; Vílchez, Juan Ignacio; Narváez-Reinaldo, Juan Jesús; González-López, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence for Microbacterium sp. strain 3J1, a desiccation-tolerant organism isolated from the Nerium oleander rhizosphere, is reported here. The genome is estimated to be approximately 3.5 Mb in size, with an average G+C content of 67.7% and a predicted number of protein-coding sequences of 3,310. PMID:26316631

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Dominova, I. N.; Sorokin, D. Y.; Kublanov, I. V.; Patrushev, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1T, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon, 45 tRNAs, and 3,013 protein-coding gene sequences. PMID:23868130

  10. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    PubMed

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo; Campos, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation. PMID:27563050

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Magnetospirillum sp. Strain XM-1, Isolated from the Xi’an City Moat, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinzhao; Zhang, Tongwei; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Bingfang; Cai, Yao; Yang, Caiyun; Li, Jinhua; Xu, Huangtao

    2016-01-01

    The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. strain XM-1 was recently isolated from the Xi’an City moat, China. It belongs to the Rhodospirillaceae family in the Alphaproteobacteria class. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of XM-1. The genome contains a single circular chromosome of 4,825,187 bp and a plasmid of 167,290 bp. PMID:27795283

  13. A Pair of New Polyketide Enantiomers from Three Endolichenic Fungal Strains Nigrospora sphaerica, Alternaria alternata, and Phialophora sp.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Wei; Wang, Chuan-Xi; Yang, Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Hu, Dan; Guo, Liang-Dong; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Gao, Hao

    2016-06-01

    A pair of new enantiomeric polyketides, (-)- and (+)-nigrosporaol A (1a and 1b), along with one related known compound, (+)-alternarienoic acid (2), were isolated from three endolichenic fungal strains, Nigrospora sphaerica (No.83-1-1-2), Alternaria alternata (No.58-8-4-1), and Phialophora sp.(No.96-1-8-1). Their structures, including the absolute configurations, were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the modified Mosher's method. PMID:27534128

  14. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  15. Influence of carbon sources and electron shuttles on ferric iron reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robin; Field, Erin K; Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A; Cunningham, Al B

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  16. Cloning and expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Burkholderia sp. strain DNT for enhancement of 2,4-dinitrotoluene degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.M.; Stark, B.C.; Hwang, K.W.; Dikshit, K.L.; Webster, D.A.

    2000-02-01

    The gene (vgb) encoding the hemoglobin (VHb) of Vitreoscilla sp. was cloned into a broad host range vector and stably transformed into Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) sp. strain DNT, which is able to degrade and metabolize 1,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). Vgb was stably maintained and expressed in functional form in this recombinant strain (YV1). When growth of YV1, in both tryptic soy broth and minimal salts broth containing DNT and yeast extract, was compared with that of the untransformed strain, YV1 grew significantly better on a cell mass basis (A{sub 600}) and reached slightly higher maximum viable cell numbers. YV1 also had roughly twice the respiration as strain DNT on a cell mass basis, and in DNT-containing medium, YV1 degraded DNT faster than the untransformed strain. YV1 cells pregrown in medium containing DNT plus succinate showed the fastest degradation: 100% of the initial 200 ppm DNT was removed from the medium within 3 days.

  17. Efficient biodegradation of phenanthrene by a novel strain Massilia sp. WF1 isolated from a PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhen; Lou, Jun; Gu, Haiping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Yang, Li; Wu, Laosheng; Liu, Yong; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2016-07-01

    A novel phenanthrene (PHE)-degrading strain Massilia sp. WF1, isolated from PAH-contaminated soil, was capable of degrading PHE by using it as the sole carbon source and energy in a range of pH (5.0-8.0), temperatures (20-35 °C), and PHE concentrations (25-400 mg L(-1)). Massilia sp. WF1 exhibited highly effective PHE-degrading ability that completely degraded 100 mg L(-1) of PHE over 2 days at optimal conditions (pH 6.0, 28 °C). The kinetics of PHE biodegradation by Massilia sp. WF1 was well represented by the Gompertz model. Results indicated that PHE biodegradation was inhibited by the supplied lactic acid but was promoted by the supplied carbon sources of glucose, citric acid, and succinic acid. Salicylic acid (SALA) and phthalic acid (PHTA) were not utilized by Massilia sp. WF1 and had no obvious effect on PHE biodegradation. Only two metabolites, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1H2N) and PHTA, were identified in PHE biodegradation process. Quantitatively, nearly 27.7 % of PHE was converted to 1H2N and 30.3 % of 1H2N was further metabolized to PHTA. However, the PHTA pathway was broken and the SALA pathway was ruled out in PHE biodegradation process by Massilia sp. WF1. PMID:27026540

  18. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  19. Characterisation and molecular dynamic simulations of J15 asparaginase from Photobacterium sp. strain J15.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Mohd Adilin; Hasan, Wan Atiqah Najiah Wan; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran; Leow, Thean Chor

    2014-01-01

    Genome mining revealed a 1011 nucleotide-long fragment encoding a type I L-asparaginase (J15 asparaginase) from the halo-tolerant Photobacterium sp. strain J15. The gene was overexpressed in pET-32b (+) vector in E. coli strain Rosetta-gami B (DE3) pLysS and purified using two-step chromatographic methods: Ni(2+)-Sepharose affinity chromatography and Q-Sepharose anion exchange chromatography. The final specific activity and yield of the enzyme achieved from these steps were 20 U/mg and 49.2%, respectively. The functional dimeric form of J15-asparaginase was characterised with a molecular weight of ~70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 25°C and pH 7.0, respectively. This protein was stable in the presence of 1 mM Ni(2+) and Mg(2+), but it was inhibited by Mn(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) at the same concentration. J15 asparaginase actively hydrolysed its native substrate, l-asparagine, but had low activity towards l-glutamine. The melting temperature of J15 asparaginase was ~51°C, which was determined using denatured protein analysis of CD spectra. The Km, Kcat, Kcat/Km of J15 asparaginase were 0.76 mM, 3.2 s(-1), and 4.21 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively. Conformational changes of the J15 asparaginase 3D structure at different temperatures (25°C, 45°C, and 65°C) were analysed using Molecular Dynamic simulations. From the analysis, residues Tyr₂₄ , His₂₂, Gly₂₃, Val₂₅ and Pro₂₆ may be directly involved in the 'open' and 'closed' lid-loop conformation, facilitating the conversion of substrates during enzymatic reactions. The properties of J15 asparaginase, which can work at physiological pH and has low glutaminase activity, suggest that this could be a good candidate for reducing toxic effects during cancer treatment. PMID:25337608

  20. Localization and Characterization of the Carbon Tetrachloride Transformation Activity of Pseudomonas sp. Strain KC

    PubMed Central

    Dybas, M. J.; Tatara, G. M.; Criddle, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Previous research has established that Pseudomonas sp. strain KC rapidly transforms carbon tetrachloride (CT) to carbon dioxide (45 to 55%), a nonvolatile fraction (45 to 55%), and a cell-associated fraction ((equiv)5%) under denitrifying, iron-limited conditions. The present study provides additional characterization of the nonvolatile fraction, demonstrates that electron transfer plays a role in the transformation, and establishes the importance of both extracellular and intracellular factors. Experiments with (sup14)C-labeled CT indicate that more than one nonvolatile product is produced during CT transformation by strain KC. One of these products, accounting for about 20% of the [(sup14)C]CT transformed, was identified as formate on the basis of its elution time from an ion-exchange column, its boiling point, and its conversion to (sup14)CO(inf2) when incubated with formate dehydrogenase. Production of formate requires transfer of two electrons to the CT molecule. The role of electron transfer was also supported by experiments demonstrating that stationary-phase cells that do not transform CT can be stimulated to transform CT when supplemented with acetate (electron donor), nitrate (electron acceptor), or a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). The location of transformation activity was also evaluated. By themselves, washed cells did not transform CT to a significant degree. Occasionally, CT transformation was observed by cell-free culture supernatant, but this activity was not reliable. Rapid and reliable CT transformation was only obtained when washed whole cells were reconstituted with culture supernatant, indicating that both extracellular and intracellular factors are normally required for CT transformation. Fractionation of culture supernatant by ultrafiltration established that the extracellular factor or factors are small, with an apparent molecular mass of less than 500 Da. The extracellular factor or factors were stable after