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Sample records for space administration usa

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) Deputy Space Shuttle Program Manager of Operations Loren Shriver, USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro examine a tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) in KSC's TPS Facility. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) Deputy Space Shuttle Program Manager of Operations Loren Shriver, USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro examine a tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) in KSC's TPS Facility. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, United Space Alliance (USA) Director of Orbiter Operations Patty Stratton, and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons view the underside of Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, United Space Alliance (USA) Director of Orbiter Operations Patty Stratton, and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons view the underside of Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician briefs NASA Deputy Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Program Michael Wetmore, USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik on the use of cold plates in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician briefs NASA Deputy Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Program Michael Wetmore, USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik on the use of cold plates in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program managers attend a briefing, part of activities during a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC. Starting third from left are NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons, and USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program managers attend a briefing, part of activities during a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC. Starting third from left are NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons, and USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Program Michael Wetmore, United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and a USA technician examine cold plates in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Program Michael Wetmore, United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and a USA technician examine cold plates in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (top) discusses the inner workings of Shuttle Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (bottom). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (top) discusses the inner workings of Shuttle Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (bottom). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility Martin Wilson (right) briefs NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) on the properties of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's TPS. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility Martin Wilson (right) briefs NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) on the properties of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's TPS. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) is given a tour of a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship by United Space Alliance (USA) employee Joe Chaput (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) is given a tour of a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship by United Space Alliance (USA) employee Joe Chaput (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) discusses some of the working parts inside the nose of Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (back to camera). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) discusses some of the working parts inside the nose of Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (back to camera). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right) discusses a speed brake on Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (left). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right) discusses a speed brake on Shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 with a United Space Alliance (USA) technician (left). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A United Space Alliance (USA) technician (center) discusses aspects of Shuttle processing performed in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility (ARF) with NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A United Space Alliance (USA) technician (center) discusses aspects of Shuttle processing performed in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility (ARF) with NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Associate Program Manager of Florida Operations Bill Pickavance (left front) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right front) tour a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Associate Program Manager of Florida Operations Bill Pickavance (left front) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right front) tour a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) are briefed on the use of a cold plate in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2 by a USA technician (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) are briefed on the use of a cold plate in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2 by a USA technician (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (third from left) watch as a USA technician (right) creates a tile for use in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (third from left) watch as a USA technician (right) creates a tile for use in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (right) are briefed by a USA technician (center) on Shuttle processing in the payload bay of orbiter Atlantis. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (right) are briefed by a USA technician (center) on Shuttle processing in the payload bay of orbiter Atlantis. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians demonstrate the construction of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's thermal protection system for USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (second from left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians demonstrate the construction of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's thermal protection system for USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (second from left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician discusses aspects of Shuttle processing performed in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility (ARF) with USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician discusses aspects of Shuttle processing performed in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility (ARF) with USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro are briefed on the properties of the tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) by USA Manager of the TPS Facility Martin Wilson (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro are briefed on the properties of the tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) by USA Manager of the TPS Facility Martin Wilson (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From front row left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons are trained on the proper use of the Emergency Life Support Apparatus (ELSA). NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From front row left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons are trained on the proper use of the Emergency Life Support Apparatus (ELSA). NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons each don an Emergency Life Support Apparatus (ELSA) during training on the proper use of the escape devices. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and NASA Space Shuttle Program Manager William Parsons each don an Emergency Life Support Apparatus (ELSA) during training on the proper use of the escape devices. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) tours a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) tours a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  2. Pharmaceutical production in space? The case of the USA.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, J N; Beasley, L J; Goodrich, G E

    1989-07-01

    Globally, over $100 billion are spent annually on space goods and services. These include space shuttles, space stations ('factories'), transportation into space and materials processing in space (MPS). Many countries are involved, such as the USA, USSR, Japan and China. A current, fascinating area of space commerce--albeit in its infancy--is the production in space of vital pharmaceuticals such as urokinase, interferon and Factor VIII. This article discusses space-based pharmaceutical production, marketing-related obstacles and other concerns in the USA.

  3. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National Aeronautics and Space...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XVII Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration Federal Acquisition Regulation; Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE/GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION/ NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (FAR) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL...

  4. The Essence and Structure of Masters' of Public Administration Core Competencies in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevchenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with revealing the essence and structure of Masters' of Public Administration professional training in the USA. It has been concluded that Public Administration studies the realization of government policies and trains future public administrators for professional activity; is guided by political science and administrative law;…

  5. The Essence and Structure of Masters' of Public Administration Core Competencies in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevchenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with revealing the essence and structure of Masters' of Public Administration professional training in the USA. It has been concluded that Public Administration studies the realization of government policies and trains future public administrators for professional activity; is guided by political science and administrative law;…

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters as he outlined a new focus and vision for the space agency. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) ; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, USA; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office; and Cheryl Cox, External Affairs. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters as he outlined a new focus and vision for the space agency. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) ; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, USA; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office; and Cheryl Cox, External Affairs. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters as he outlined a new focus and vision for the space agency. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) ; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, USA; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; and Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters as he outlined a new focus and vision for the space agency. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) ; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, USA; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; and Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters, outlining a new focus and vision for the space agency. Fourth from left is Mike Leinbach, Shuttle launch director; at right, front row, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) and Howard DeCastro, USA vice president and Space Shuttle program manager. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters, outlining a new focus and vision for the space agency. Fourth from left is Mike Leinbach, Shuttle launch director; at right, front row, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) and Howard DeCastro, USA vice president and Space Shuttle program manager. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

  9. 3 CFR - Designation of Officers of the National Aeronautics And Space Administration To Act as Administrator

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of Officers of the National Aeronautics... Memorandum of January 16, 2009 Designation of Officers of the National Aeronautics And Space Administration To Act as Administrator Memorandum for the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and...

  10. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Pictured from the left, in the Saturn I mockup, are: William Brooksbank, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Dr. Wernher von Braun, MSFC director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, executive officer of the Office of the Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, newly appointed deputy associate administrator for Manned Space Flight, technical. The party examined an ordinary man's shoe (held by Paine) outfitted for use in the Saturn I Workshop. The shoe had a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desired. Dr. Paine and his party indulged in a two-day tour at the Marshall Space Flight Center getting acquainted with Marshall personnel and programs. It was Paine's first visit to the center since assuming the NASA post on February 1, 1968.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration technology application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Contracts are reported between the RTI TATeam and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other governmental, educational, and industrial organizations participating in NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

  12. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans for space communication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A program plan is presented for a space communications application utilizing the 30/20 GHz frequency bands (30 GHz uplink and 20 GHz downlink). Results of market demand studies and spacecraft systems studies which significantly affect the supporting research and technology program are also presented, along with the scheduled activities of the program plan.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scientific and Technical Information Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven articles discuss informational and educational programs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Some of the areas discussed include scientific and technical information management, the new Space and Earth Science Information Systems, transfer of technology to other industries, intellectual property issues, and the…

  15. 77 FR 7183 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of...

  16. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    Sierra Nevada Space Systems chairman Mark Sirangello talks to NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, in Louisville, Colo. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver speaks at Sierra Nevada Space Systems, on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, in Louisville, Colo. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Guidance for Improving Customer Satisfaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Logistics Management Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Guidance for Improving Customer Satisfaction NS302RD1 Lawrence... Management Institute (LMI) has been engaged to provide a common approach for planning, conducting, and analyzing customer satisfaction surveys. LMI...groups and formal surveys) (2) Process definition provides the understanding for addressing customer concerns (3) Management and employee

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  2. NCERA-101 Station Report from Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    This is our annual report to the North Central Extension Research Activity, which is affiliated with the USDA and Land Grant University Agricultural Experiment Stations. I have been a member of this committee for 25 years. The presentation will be given by Dr. Gioia Massa, Kennedy Space Center

  3. Identities, Intentionality and Institutional Fit: Perceptions of Senior Women Administrators at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Upper Midwestern Usa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enke, Kathryn A. E.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study engaged women senior administrators at liberal arts colleges in the Upper Midwestern USA to better understand how their intersecting identities mediate their enacted leadership. Data were collected from eight participants via a questionnaire, document review, one-on-one interviews and observations. Positionality theory…

  4. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems' Dre

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is seen as NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talks during a press conference on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Advances in space power research and technology at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.P.; Randolph, L.P.; Hudson, W.R.; Ambrus, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Research and Technology Program is to provide a technology base that will adequately support, enhance, or enable current and future activities in the exploration and exploitation of space. This paper summarizes the current status, accomplishments, and goals in the power-system-component areas of photovoltaics, electrochemistry, thermal-to-electric conversion technology, and power management.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Science and Engineering Apprentice Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Science and Engineering Apprentice Program for high school students is one of NASA's many efforts toward a goal of scientific literacy. It embraces science, mathematics, and technology as keys to purposeful and sustained progress and security for our nation and its people. It serves as a model for helping reform education by striving to address mechanisms to influence the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of our students. It focuses on what to do today to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  7. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems' Dre

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talks during a press conference with Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft in the background on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this Report.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this Report.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Fiscal Year 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events. The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this report.

  11. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. 401.3 Section 401.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. The Office is headed by an...

  12. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. 401.3 Section 401.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. The Office is headed by an...

  13. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. 401.3 Section 401.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. The Office is headed by an...

  14. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. 401.3 Section 401.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. The Office is headed by an...

  15. The administration of the NASA space tracking system and the NASA space tracking system in Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollander, N.

    1973-01-01

    The international activities of the NASA space program were studied with emphasis on the development and maintenance of tracking stations in Australia. The history and administration of the tracking organization and the manning policies for the stations are discussed, and factors affecting station operation are appraised. A field study of the Australian tracking network is included.

  16. 78 FR 13383 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory (SCI) AGENCY: Office of Procurement, National Aeronautics and...

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 1999 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Accountability Report consolidates reports required by various statutes and summarizes NASA's program accomplishments and its stewardship over budget and financial resources. It is a culmination of NASA's management process, which begins with mission definition and program planning, continues with the formulation and justification of budgets for the President and Congress, and ends with the resulting scientific and engineering program accomplishments. The report covers activities from October 1, 1998, through September 30, 1999, with a discussion of some subsequent events. Program accomplishments included the deployment and operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the delivery of supplies and equipment needed to live and operate on the International Space Station, and the development of the first global 3-D map of Mars. Achievements are highlighted in the Statement of the Administrator and summarized in the performance section of this report.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) education 1993--2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivie, Christine M.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993 -- 2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that time period. Constant changes in education leadership at NASA resulted in changes in direction in the education program and the documents produced by each administration reflected both small and some significant changes in program direction. The result of the analysis of documents and interview data was the identification of several trends in the NASA education program. This study identified three significant trends in NASA education. First, the approach that NASA took in both its EPO efforts and in the efforts directed by the Office of Education is disjointed and seems to reflect individual preferences in education approaches designed to reach populations that are of interest to the individuals in decision-making positions rather than reflect a systematic approach designed to meet identified goals and outcomes. Second, this disjointed and person-driven approach led to a lack of consistent evaluation data available for review and planning purposes. Third, there was an ongoing assumption made by the education community that NASA education efforts were tied to larger education reports, concerns, needs, initiatives and evidence collected and presented in Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education-related studies over the past twenty years. In fact, there is no evidence that the programs and projects initiated were a response to these identified needs or initiatives. That does not mean that NASA's efforts did not contribute to STEM education initiatives in the United States. This study, however, indicates that contributions to those initiatives occurred as a byproduct of the effort and not because of specific

  19. [Prospect of the Advanced Life Support Program Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in USA].

    PubMed

    Guo, S S; Ai, W D

    2001-04-01

    The Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in NASA of USA was focused on the development of the bioregenerative life support components, crop plants for water, air, and food production and bioreactors for recycling of wastes. The keystone of the Breadboard Project was the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), which was supported by 15 environmentally controlled chambers and several laboratory facilities holding a total area of 2150 m2. In supporting the Advanced Life Support Program (ALS Program), the Project utilizes these facilities for large-scale testing of components and development of required technologies for human-rated test-beds at Johnson Space Center in NASA, in order to enable a Lunar and a Mars mission finally.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation Synthetic Aperture Radar Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Dubayah, R.; Hager, B. H.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation are planning a synthetic aperture radar (currently named NISAR) mission for launch in 2020. The mission is a dual L- and S-band polarimetric SAR satellite with a 12-day interferometric orbit and 240 km wide ground swath. The 3-year mission will have a circular sun synchronous orbit (6 am and 6 pm) with a 98° inclination and 747 km altitude that will provide systematic global coverage. Its primary science objectives are to: measure solid Earth surface deformation (earthquakes, volcanic unrest, land subsidence/uplift, landslides); track and understand cryosphere dynamics (glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, and permafrost); characterize and track changes in vegetation structure and wetlands for understanding ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle; and support global disaster response. We will describe the current mission concept: the satellite design/capabilities, spacecraft, launch vehicle, and data flow.

  1. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator to exercise the Secretary's authority to license or permit and otherwise regulate commercial space transportation and to discharge the Secretary's responsibility to encourage, facilitate, and promote commercial...

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC management and other employees gather in the Center’s television studio to watch the address by President George W. Bush from NASA Headquarters stating his goals for NASA’s new mission. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Dr. Whitlow; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, United Space Alliance; and Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, USA. The President’s goals are completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC management and other employees gather in the Center’s television studio to watch the address by President George W. Bush from NASA Headquarters stating his goals for NASA’s new mission. Seated in the front row, left to right, are Ken Aguilar, chief, Equal Opportunity office; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs; Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Woodrow Whitlow, KSC deputy director; Dr. Whitlow; Shannon Roberts, with External Affairs; Howard DeCastro, vice president and Space Shuttle program manager, United Space Alliance; and Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, USA. The President’s goals are completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

  3. Enhancing Lyme Disease Surveillance by Using Administrative Claims Data, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen G.; Dunn, John R.; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is underreported in the United States. We used insurance administrative claims data to determine the value of such data in enhancing case ascertainment in Tennessee during January 2011–June 2013. Although we identified ≈20% more cases of Lyme disease (5/year), the method was resource intensive and not sustainable in this low-incidence state. PMID:26291336

  4. Enhancing Lyme Disease Surveillance by Using Administrative Claims Data, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Joshua L; Jones, Stephen G; Dunn, John R; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F

    2015-09-01

    Lyme disease is underreported in the United States. We used insurance administrative claims data to determine the value of such data in enhancing case ascertainment in Tennessee during January 2011-June 2013. Although we identified ≈20% more cases of Lyme disease (5/year), the method was resource intensive and not sustainable in this low-incidence state.

  5. Administrator Bolden on the SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    While rocket launches from the Cape are considered a common occurrence to some, the historic significance of today’s achievement by SpaceX should not be lost. This is the first in a new generat...

  6. Space Climate Manifestation in Earth Prices from Medieval England up to Modern U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, L. A.; Din, G. Yom

    2004-10-01

    In this study we continue to search for possible manifestations of space weather influence on prices of agricultural products and consumables. We note that the connection between solar activity and prices is based on the causal chain that includes several nonlinear transition elements. These nonlinear elements are characterized by threshold sensitivity to external parameters and lead to very inhomogeneous local sensitivity of the price to space weather conditions. It is noted that “soft type” models are the most adequate for description of this class of connections. Two main observational effects suitable for testing causal connections of this type of sensitivity are considered: burst-like price reactions on changes in solar activity and price asymmetry for selected phases of the sunspot cycle. The connection, discovered earlier for wheat prices of Medieval England, is examined in this work on the basis of another 700-year data set of consumable prices in England. Using the same technique as in the previous part of our work (Pustilnik and Yom Din, 2004) we show that statistical parameters of the interval distributions for price bursts of consumable basket and for sunspot minimum states are similar to one another, as was reported earlier for wheat price bursts. Possible sources of these consistencies between three different multiyear samples are discussed. For a search of possible manifestations of the ‘space weather -wheat market’ connection in modern time, we analyze dynamics of wheat prices in the U.S.A. in the twentieth century. We show that the wheat prices revealed a maximum/minimum price asymmetry consistent with the phases of the sunspot cycle. We discuss possible explanations of this observed asymmetry, unexpected under conditions of globalization of the modern wheat market.

  7. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems' Dre

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    Sierra Nevada Space Systems chairman Mark Sirangello talks during a press conference with Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft in the background on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exploration Systems Interim Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate within NASA. Enabling the Vision for Space Exploration. The Role of the Directorate. 2. Strategic Context and Approach. Corporate Focus. Focused, Prioritized Requirements. Spiral Transformation. Management Rigor. 3. Achieving Directorate Objectives. Strategy to Task Process. Capability Development. Research and Technology Development. 4. Beyond the Horizon. Appendices.

  9. 27. INTERIOR, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR, SOUTHEAST CORNER SPACE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. INTERIOR, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR, SOUTHEAST CORNER SPACE, LOOKING UP AT CIRCULAR MOTIF AND BANDS IN THE CEILING ABOVE THE ACOUSTICAL TILES - Ford Motor Company Plant, 700 South Union Street, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  10. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Sierra Nevada Space Systems' Dre

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-05

    Director of Advanced Programs, Sierra Nevada Corporation, Jim Voss talks during a press conference with Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft in the background on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft is under development with support from NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program to provide crew transportation to and from low Earth orbit. NASA is helping private companies develop innovative technologies to ensure that the U.S. remains competitive in future space endeavors. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Tropospheric Wind Monitoring During Day-of-Launch Operations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Leach, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environments Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) monitors the winds aloft at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the countdown for all Space Shuttle launches. Assessment of tropospheric winds is used to support the ascent phase of launch. Three systems at KSC are used to generate independent tropospheric wind profiles prior to launch; 1) high resolution Jimsphere balloon system, 2) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) and 3) low resolution radiosonde system. Data generated by the systems are used to assess spatial and temporal wind variability during launch countdown to ensure wind change observed does not violate wind change criteria constraints.

  12. Tropospheric Wind Monitoring During Day-of-Launch Operations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Leach, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environments Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) monitors the winds aloft at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the countdown for all Space Shuttle launches. Assessment of tropospheric winds is used to support the ascent phase of launch. Three systems at KSC are used to generate independent tropospheric wind profiles prior to launch; 1) high resolution Jimsphere balloon system, 2) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) and 3) low resolution radiosonde system. Data generated by the systems are used to assess spatial and temporal wind variability during launch countdown to ensure wind change observed does not violate wind change criteria constraints.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2003 Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Imagine knowing that we are not alone, but that life is abundant in our solar system and throughout the universe. Imagine a world where we can safely travel anywhere, anytime, on our home planet, and in space. Imagine a world in which long-term weather forecasts are reliable, and natural disasters are predictable and perhaps even preventable. NASA is changing our understanding of the world, exploring the unknown, and creating new awareness about who we are and what our place is in the cosmos. For the first time in history, we have the tools, the insight and ability to seek answers to some of humanity's most profound questions: 1) How did we get here? 2) Where are we going? 3) Are we alone? In addition to pursuing these compelling questions, NASA helps the Nation to meet its challenges and address its urgent national needs. Among these are the requirements to improve the security and safety of our air transportation system and counter the looming shortage of U.S. scientists and engineers in our next generation of Americans.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2003 Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Imagine knowing that we are not alone, but that life is abundant in our solar system and throughout the universe. Imagine a world where we can safely travel anywhere, anytime, on our home planet, and in space. Imagine a world in which long-term weather forecasts are reliable, and natural disasters are predictable and perhaps even preventable. NASA is changing our understanding of the world, exploring the unknown, and creating new awareness about who we are and what our place is in the cosmos. For the first time in history, we have the tools, the insight and ability to seek answers to some of humanity's most profound questions: 1) How did we get here? 2) Where are we going? 3) Are we alone? In addition to pursuing these compelling questions, NASA helps the Nation to meet its challenges and address its urgent national needs. Among these are the requirements to improve the security and safety of our air transportation system and counter the looming shortage of U.S. scientists and engineers in our next generation of Americans.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA), (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, NASA’s Richard Parker (below left) and Peggy Ritchie, with USA, (at right) watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA), (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, NASA’s Richard Parker (below left) and Peggy Ritchie, with USA, (at right) watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA) (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, Peggy Ritchie, USA, (behind the stand) and NASA’s Richard Parker (seated) watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA) (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, Peggy Ritchie, USA, (behind the stand) and NASA’s Richard Parker (seated) watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA), (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, Peggy Ritchie, with USA, (behind the stand) and NASA’s Richard Parker watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, while Greg Harlow, with United Space Alliance (USA), (above) threads a camera under the tiles of the orbiter Endeavour, Peggy Ritchie, with USA, (behind the stand) and NASA’s Richard Parker watch the images on a monitor to inspect for corrosion.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Training Grant Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The following section summarizes the impact of the Ohio Space Grant Consortium (OSGC) in Ohio and to NASA over the last four-year period (February 1, 2001 to April 30, 2005) and highlights the important accomplishments of the consortium. The strength of the OSGC network of universities, community colleges, government agencies, industry, and outreach affiliates is well-established and is growing. The OSGC Consortium Management Structure was designed and remains committed to using the talents and diversity of everyone within this collaborative network, and operational policies and procedures are such that all consortium members are active contributors resulting in quality OSGC programs in research, education and service, while receiving a relatively small amount of NASA funds. The number of quality activities, both on- and off-campus, and collaborations/partnerships that OSGC has established with NASA and government agencies, state and local government, educational institutions, and private industry, has been impressive. Further desired university affiliate expansion requires additional funds. Diversity is shown in the OSGC 12-member Executive Committee by the presence of three campus representatives from Central State University, Wilberforce University, and The Ohio State University (two underrepresented minority, one female). One additional female campus representative (Cleveland State University) is currently on sabbatical leave and a valuable alternate member attends. Other additional female and underrepresented minority members are on the larger OSGC Advisory committee. All committee members participate fully in all consortium management and policy decisions. The OSGC Executive Committee strives to achieve and communicate a culture of trust, respect, teamwork, open communication, creativity, and empowerment. These programs have shown results and impact by their visibility and importance to Ohio and to NASA, resulting in strategic alliances created throughout

  19. The Effect of the Commercial Space Launch Act on Department of Defense Contract Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Furce Base, Ohio50 12 19 005 AFIT/GCM/LSP/90S-3 THE EFFECT OF THE COMMERCIAL SPACE LAUNCH ACT ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION THESIS...A i ., .u; AFIT/GCM/LSP/90S-3 THE EFFECT OF THE COMMERCIAL SPACE LAUNCH ACT ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION THESIS Presented to the...unlimited Preface The purpose of this study was to examine the Commercial Space Launch Act and the effect of the Act on the Department of Defense

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials brief the media at KSC about the agency’s human space flight program. At left is moderator Allard Beutel, with NASA Headquarters. Others on the panel (left to right) are NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory, Associate Administrator for Space Flight Bill Readdy and Associate Administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance Bryan O’Connor.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials brief the media at KSC about the agency’s human space flight program. At left is moderator Allard Beutel, with NASA Headquarters. Others on the panel (left to right) are NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory, Associate Administrator for Space Flight Bill Readdy and Associate Administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance Bryan O’Connor.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials brief the media at KSC about the agency’s human space flight program. On the panel (left to right) are NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory, Associate Administrator for Space Flight Bill Readdy and Associate Administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance Bryan O’Connor.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials brief the media at KSC about the agency’s human space flight program. On the panel (left to right) are NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory, Associate Administrator for Space Flight Bill Readdy and Associate Administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance Bryan O’Connor.

  2. Public opinion and interest group positions on open-space issues in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Implications for resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannery, Thomas Allan

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to elicit and compare the open-space preferences of citizens and openspace experts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. A randomly selected sample of 492 citizens and 35 open-space experts participated in a telephone survey during May 5 18, 1986. The following hypothesis was tested and used as a guideline for the study: HO1: There is no significant difference between respondents' status and preference for open space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis was rejected. Findings confirmed respondents' status affected preference for open space. Of the eight issues on which the citizen and expert groups were compared, five recorded significant differences in response profiles. The open-space expert group was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate offroad vehicle facilities, wildlife preserves, a citywide recreational trail, and a trail system along the arroyos and city ditches. The citizen sample was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate overnight camping facilities. Both groups equally supported using open space to accommodate an outdoor amphitheater, outdoor education facilities, and rafting, kayaking, and canoeing facilities. The finding indicated that expert preferences did not represent an aggregate of citizen preferences for managing open-space resources. Understanding both expert and citizen positions will facilitate decision-making processes and help resolve environmental disputes.

  3. NASA Facts. An Educational Publication of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The versatility of space shuttle, its heat shieldings, principal components, and facilities for various operations are described as well as the accomodations for the spacecrew and experiments. The capabilities of an improved space suit and a personal rescue enclosure containing life support and communication systems are highlighted. A typical mission is described.

  4. From Global Jobs to Safe Spaces: The Diverse Discourses That Sell Multilingual Schooling in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    While much research has demonstrated that English-only rhetoric negatively affects bilingual education for the children of US immigrants, few studies have examined the local negotiations and discourses that shape the development of multilingual programming for English-speaking students. Across the USA, educational leaders and policy-makers today…

  5. From Global Jobs to Safe Spaces: The Diverse Discourses That Sell Multilingual Schooling in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    While much research has demonstrated that English-only rhetoric negatively affects bilingual education for the children of US immigrants, few studies have examined the local negotiations and discourses that shape the development of multilingual programming for English-speaking students. Across the USA, educational leaders and policy-makers today…

  6. NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Rothenberg addresses guests at ribbon cutting for the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Joseph Rothenberg addresses attendees at a ribbon cutting for the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) at the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility (HMF). The CLCS was declared operational in a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing.

  7. NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Rothenberg addresses guests at ribbon cutting for the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Joseph Rothenberg addresses attendees at a ribbon cutting for the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) at the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility (HMF). The CLCS was declared operational in a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing.

  8. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration interdisciplinary studies in space technology at the University of Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    A broad range of research projects contained in a cooperative space technology program at the University of Kansas are reported as they relate to the following three areas of interdisciplinary interest: (1) remote sensing of earth resources; (2) stability and control of light and general aviation aircraft; and (3) the vibrational response characteristics of aeronautical and space vehicles. Details of specific research efforts are given under their appropriate departments, among which are aerospace engineering, chemical and petroleum engineering, environmental health, water resources, the remote sensing laboratory, and geoscience applications studies.

  9. Quality improvement prototype: Johnson Space Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Johnson Space Flight Center was recognized by the Office of Management and Budget as a model for its high standards of quality. Included are an executive summary of the center's activities, an organizational overview, techniques for improving quality, the status of the quality effort and a listing of key personnel.

  10. 77 FR 63897 - Notice of License Terminations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Plum Brook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Notice of License Terminations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Plum Brook Reactor and Plum Brook Mock-Up Reactor The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is noticing the termination of the National...

  11. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  12. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  13. Space Research Data Management in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Space related scientific research has passed through a natural evolutionary process. The task of extracting the meaningful information from the raw data is highly involved and will require data processing capabilities that do not exist today. The results are presented of a three year examination of this subject, using an earlier report as a starting point. The general conclusion is that there are areas in which NASA's data management practices can be improved and recommends specific actions. These actions will enhance NASA's ability to extract more of the potential data and to capitalize on future opportunities.

  14. Project Mercury: Man-In-Space Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [Report of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences United States Senate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The purpose of this staff study, made at the request of the chairman, is to serve members of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences as a source of basic information on Project Mercury, the man-in-space program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The study is largely derived from unclassified information released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and testimony concerning Project Mercury given during hearings before this committee. The program descriptions are based upon current program planning. Since this is a highly advanced research and development program, the project is obviously subject to changes that may result from future developments and accomplishments characteristic of such research activities. Certain information with respect to revised schedules, obtained on a classified basis by the committee during inspection trips, is necessarily omitted. The appendixes to the study include information that may prove helpful on various aspects of space flight and exploration. Included are unofficial comments and observations relating to Russia's manned space flight activities and also a complete chronology of all satellites, lunar probes, and space probes up to the present.

  15. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  16. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  17. The NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, J.C.; Butler, P.L.; Glassell, R.L.; Herndon, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Materials processing in space - An overview of studies in the U.S.A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews the evolution of the U.S. Materials Processing In Space Program, current materials processing in space program, and future programs. The discussion covers a summary of significant findings from previous flight experiments, a current assessment of the attractive areas for future experimentation, and a synopsis of the experiments accepted for future Space Processing Application Rocket (SPAR) and Spacelab flights. The ultimate goal is to develop a viable commercial interest in using space (1) to perform research for improving industrial technology or developing new products; (2) to prepare research quantities of material to serve as paradigms for comparing current earth-based technologies; (3) to manufacture limited quantities of a unique product to test market potential, or to fulfill a limited but compelling need; and (4) to produce materials in space of adequate quantity and value to be economically self-sufficient.

  19. Advances in space power research and technology at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. P.; Randolph, L. P.; Hudson, W. R.; Ambrus, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Progress and plans in various areas of the NASA Space Power Program are discussed. Solar cell research is narrowed to GaAs, multibandgap, and thin Si cells for arrays in planar and concentrator configurations, with further work to increase cell efficiency, radiation hardness, develop flexible encapsulants, and reduce cost. Electrochemical research is concentrating on increasing energy and power density, cycle and wet stand life, reliability and cost reduction of batteries. Further development of the Ni-H2 battery and O2-H2 fuel cell to multihundred kW with a 5 year life and 30,000 cycles is noted. Basic research is ongoing for alkali metal anodes for high energy density secondary cells. Nuclear thermoelectric propulsion is being developed for outer planets exploration propulsion systems, using Si-Ge generators, and studies with rare earth chalcogenides and sulfides are mentioned. Power Systems Management seeks to harmonize increasing power supply levels with inner and outer spacecraft environments, circuits, demands, and automatic monitoring. Concomitant development of bipolar transistors, an infrared rectenna, spacecraft charging measurement, and larger heat pipe transport capacity are noted.

  20. A Tribute to National Aeronautics and Space Administration Minority Astronauts: Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been selecting astronauts since 1959. The first group was called the "Mercury Seven." These seven men were chosen because of their performance as military officers and test pilots, their character, their intelligence, and their guts. Six of these seven flew in the Mercury capsule. Several additional groups were chosen between 1959 and 1978. It was an exciting period in the American space program. Many of these astronauts participated in the Gemini and Apollo programs, traveled and walked on the Moon, docked with the Russians during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, and occupied America's first space station, the Skylab. With the onset of the Space Shuttle, a new era began. The astronauts selected in 19 78 broke the traditional mold. For the first time, minorities and women became part of America's astronaut corps. Since then, eight additional groups have been selected, with an increasing mix of African American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American men and women. These astronauts will continue the American space program into the new millennium by continuing flights on the Space Shuttle and participating in the construction and occupancy of the International Space Station. These astronauts, and those who will be chosen in the future, will lead America and its partners to future voyages beyond the influence of Earth's gravity.

  1. Profile of software engineering within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Craig C.; Jeletic, Kellyann F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents findings of baselining activities being performed to characterize software practices within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It describes how such baseline findings might be used to focus software process improvement activities. Finally, based on the findings to date, it presents specific recommendations in focusing future NASA software process improvement efforts. The findings presented in this paper are based on data gathered and analyzed to date. As such, the quantitative data presented in this paper are preliminary in nature.

  2. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  3. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nondestructive Evaluation Program for Safe and Reliable Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program is presented. As a result of the loss of seven astronauts and the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003, NASA has undergone many changes in its organization. NDE is one of the key areas that are recognized by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) that needed to be strengthened by warranting NDE as a discipline with Independent Technical Authority (iTA). The current NASA NDE system and activities are presented including the latest developments in inspection technologies being applied to the Space Transportation System (STS). The unfolding trends and directions in NDE for the future are discussed as they apply to assuring safe and reliable operations.

  4. First intramuscular administration in the U.S. space program. [of motion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagian, James P.

    1991-01-01

    In the past, the only kind of medicines used for symptomatic treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) in space had been oral, transdermal, or suppositories. This paper describes the effect of the first intramuscular (IM) administration of Phenergan (50-mg in single dose) on SMS in one subject who exhibited grade-3 symptoms and signs which persisted unabated throughout the first and the second flight days aboard the Space Shuttle. Thirty minutes after the injection, the subject had completely recovered. His symptoms were gone, his appetite was back, and he had no recurrences for the remainder of the flight. Since that experiment, intramuscular injections have been given nine more times on subsequent flights, with similar results.

  5. First intramuscular administration in the U.S. space program. [of motion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagian, James P.

    1991-01-01

    In the past, the only kind of medicines used for symptomatic treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) in space had been oral, transdermal, or suppositories. This paper describes the effect of the first intramuscular (IM) administration of Phenergan (50-mg in single dose) on SMS in one subject who exhibited grade-3 symptoms and signs which persisted unabated throughout the first and the second flight days aboard the Space Shuttle. Thirty minutes after the injection, the subject had completely recovered. His symptoms were gone, his appetite was back, and he had no recurrences for the remainder of the flight. Since that experiment, intramuscular injections have been given nine more times on subsequent flights, with similar results.

  6. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Twenty-Fifth Anniversary, 1958-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This year marks a major milestone for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration: its silver anniversary. It seems appropriate, on this occasion, to sum up how NASA has responded to the legislative charter that established the agency. Among the responsibilities the Congress assigned NASA in the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 were these: preservation of U.S. leadership in aerospace science and technology; cooperation with other nations in the peaceful application of technology; expansion of human knowledge of phenomena in the atmosphere and in space; pursuit of the practical benefits to be gained from aeronautical and space activities. There can be no doubt that NASA's quarter century of effort has preserved the nation's leadership role and strengthened its posture in aerospace science and technology. As for international cooperation. NASA has - since its inception - fostered the concept that the fruits of civil space research are to be shared with all mankind. The agency has provided technical assistance to scores of nations and has actively promoted cooperative ventures; indeed, virtually every major NASA space project today boasts some degree of foreign participation. In the last 25 years, man has teamed more about his planet, the near-Earth environment, and the universe than in all the prior years of history. NASA's space science program has spearheaded this great expansion of human knowledge. And, from the beginning, NASA has vigorously pursued the practical benefits that aerospace research offers. The agency pioneered in weather, communications and Earth resources survey satellites, the prime examples of space technology applied for Earth benefit, and it has built a broad base for expanding into new applications, some of which promise direct benefits of exceptional order. In aeronautical research, NASA has contributed in substantial degree to safer, better performing, more efficient, more environmentally acceptable aircraft.

  8. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from space shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy space center, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

    1990-07-01

    Observations of damage to vegetation, acute reductions in surface water pH, and kills of small fish prompted the Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the John F. Kennedy Space Center to initiate intensive environmental evaluations of possible acute and long-term chronic impacts that may be produced by repeated launches of the space shuttle. An important step in this evaluation was the identification of deposition patterns and the quantification of ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents from the solid rocket motors (SRMs) in the area of the launch pad. These constituents are primarily aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). During three launches of the space transportation system (STS-11, 13, and 14) up to 100 bulk deposition collectors, 83 mm in diameter containing 100 ml of deionized water, were deployed in a grid pattern covering 12.6 ha north of launch pad 39-A. Estimates of HCl and particulate deposition levels were made based on laboratory measurements of items entrained in the collectors. Captured particulates consisted of a variety of items including Al2O3, sand grains, sea shell fragments, paint chips, and other debris ablated from the launch pad surface by the initial thrust of the SRMs. Estimated ranges of HCl and particulate deposition in the study area were 0-127 g/m2 and 0-246 g/m2, respectively. Deposition patterns were highly influenced by wind speed and direction. These measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, up to 7.1 × 103 kg of particulates and 3.4 × 103 kg of HCl can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence.

  9. Advanced space design program to the Universities Space Research Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Fall 1987 class of EGM 4000 was the investigation of engineering aspects contributing to the development of NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The areas investigated were the geometry of plant growth chambers, automated seeding of plants, remote sensing of plant health, and processing of grain into edible forms. The group investigating variable spacing of individual soybean plants designed growth trays consisting of three dimensional trapezoids arranged in a compact circular configuration. The automated seed manipulation and planting group investigated the electrical and mechanical properties of wheat seeds and developed three seeding concepts based upon these properties. The plant health and disease sensing group developed a list of reliable plant health indicators and investigated potential detection technologies.

  10. Space technology: A study of the significance of recognition for innovators of spinoff technologies. Commercial Space Expo-USA, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the data collected at the Commercial Space Expo. The Expo was held 13-14 April 1993, in conjunction with the National Space Symposium. There were two modes of data gathering: surveys of expo registrants and exhibit feedback. In addition, exhibitors were interviewed to get their perspectives on the format of the expo and exhibits. Expo registrants were given a paper-pencil survey instrument at the beginning of the day and were asked to turn in the survey when they left for the day. Of the approximately 100 registrants, 22 surveys were returned. In the exhibit hall were five computers set up to collect people's reactions to specific exhibits. It was envisioned that people would react to each (or several) exhibits they visited. In fact, few people did this: almost everyone who visited a computer responded to one exhibit and did not stop by another computer. Therefore, we did not get a large number of responses for any particular exhibit. Nevertheless, there are some interesting data.

  11. Impact of the 1985 Space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (Consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  12. Ecosystem services and urban heat riskscape moderation: water, green spaces, and social inequality in Phoenix, USA.

    PubMed

    Jenerette, G Darrel; Harlan, Sharon L; Stefanov, William L; Martin, Chris A

    2011-10-01

    Urban ecosystems are subjected to high temperatures--extreme heat events, chronically hot weather, or both-through interactions between local and global climate processes. Urban vegetation may provide a cooling ecosystem service, although many knowledge gaps exist in the biophysical and social dynamics of using this service to reduce climate extremes. To better understand patterns of urban vegetated cooling, the potential water requirements to supply these services, and differential access to these services between residential neighborhoods, we evaluated three decades (1970-2000) of land surface characteristics and residential segregation by income in the Phoenix, Arizona, USA metropolitan region. We developed an ecosystem service trade-offs approach to assess the urban heat riskscape, defined as the spatial variation in risk exposure and potential human vulnerability to extreme heat. In this region, vegetation provided nearly a 25 degrees C surface cooling compared to bare soil on low-humidity summer days; the magnitude of this service was strongly coupled to air temperature and vapor pressure deficits. To estimate the water loss associated with land-surface cooling, we applied a surface energy balance model. Our initial estimates suggest 2.7 mm/d of water may be used in supplying cooling ecosystem services in the Phoenix region on a summer day. The availability and corresponding resource use requirements of these ecosystem services had a strongly positive relationship with neighborhood income in the year 2000. However, economic stratification in access to services is a recent development: no vegetation-income relationship was observed in 1970, and a clear trend of increasing correlation was evident through 2000. To alleviate neighborhood inequality in risks from extreme heat through increased vegetation and evaporative cooling, large increases in regional water use would be required. Together, these results suggest the need for a systems evaluation of the

  13. Intellectual Property Rights at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Vernon E.

    1994-01-01

    At a fundamental level, intellectual property is the core work product of a technical organization. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), produces a variety of intellectual property including: patents, trademarks, data rights, copyright and rights associated with National Security. For a scientific organization to properly manage its work product it has to manage its intellectual property. This paper endeavors to describe how the intellectual property rights are generated and allocated at NASA. The author then goes on to discuss how the intellectual property might be managed to meet the objectives of program implementation, technology transfer and security.

  14. The Role of Human Intelligence in the USAs 1960s Efforts to Understand Soviet Space Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesavento, P.

    Recent declassification of material from the Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP) and the archives of the US State Department provide several new insights into US intelligence's knowledge of Soviet Space Activities and sources of that knowledge. It is apparent that there was a significant human intelligence source providing information on subjects such as the USSR's Voskhod 3 mission and manned lunar program activities. This new understanding shows that US intelligence was employing the complete panoply of intelligence tools and that human intelligence appears to have provided many key understandings

  15. Leaders, Faculty, and Administrative Staff Perceptions of the Role of Shared Governance at Public Sector Universities in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, Shamaila A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain how the leaders, faculty and administrative staff perceive the role of shared governance in their respective institutions of higher education. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) Committee T developed an instrument to measure the state of shared governance at universities. The…

  16. Neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome: cross-country comparison using hospital administrative data in England, the USA, Western Australia and Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hilary; Gilbert, Ruth; Johnson, Kathryn; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin; O'Donnell, Melissa; Guttmann, Astrid; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    We determined trends over time in the prevalence of neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome (NWS) in England compared with that reported in the USA, Western (W) Australia and Ontario, Canada. We also examined variation in prevalence of NWS according to maternal age, birth weight and across the English NHS by hospital trusts. Retrospective study using national hospital administrative data (Hospital Episode Statistics) for the NHS in England between 1997 and 2011. NWS was identified using international classification of disease codes in hospital admission records. We searched the research literature and contacted researchers to identify studies reporting trends in the prevalence of NWS. Prevalence of NWS by calendar year per 1000 live births for each country/state. For births in England, prevalence by maternal age group and birth weight group. Prevalence by NHS trust and region at birth, and funnel plot to show outlying English NHS hospital trusts (>3 SD of mean prevalence). Mean prevalence rates of recorded NWS increased in all four countries. Rates stabilised in England and W. Australia from the early 2000s and rose steeply in the USA and Ontario during the late 2000s. The most recent prevalence rates were 2.7/1000 live births in England (2011; 1544 cases); 2.7/1000 in W. Australia (2009); 3.6/1000 in the USA (2009) and 5.1/1000 in Ontario (2011). The highest prevalence in England was among babies born to mothers aged 25-34 years at delivery and among babies born with low birth weight (1500-2500 g). In England in 2011, 8.6% of hospital trusts had a recorded prevalence outside 3 SD of the overall average (7% above, 1% below). The North East region of England had the highest recorded prevalence of NWS. Although recorded NWS is stable in England and W. Australia, rising rates in the USA and Ontario may reflect better recognition and/or increased use of prescribed opiate analgesics and highlight the need for surveillance. The extent to which different prevalence rates by

  17. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  18. Reassessing Magmatic Space-Time-Composition Patterns in the Colorado Mineral Belt, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailley, T. L.; Farmer, G. L.; Jones, C.

    2007-05-01

    The Colorado Mineral Belt (COMB) is a northeast trending zone of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary (~75-50Ma) magmatism that accompanied the development of basement cored uplifts of the Laramide orogeny in Colorado. The origin of COMB magmatism remains enigmatic despite decades of study, largely because the magmatism coincided temporally with subduction at the western margin of North America but occurred some 1000 km inboard of the active trench. Many workers have attributed COMB magmatism to progressive shallowing of the oceanic lithosphere of the Farallon plate subducting beneath this region and have suggested that COMB magmatism was generally related to lower crustal melting (Simmons and Hedge, 1978, Stein and Crock, 1990). Others have attributed the COMB magmatism to upwelling of passive hot spots resulting from lithospheric deformation (Mutschler et al., 1987, 1998). Radiogenic isotopic data available for basaltic COMB volcanic clasts found in the Late Cretaceous Windy Gap member of the Middle Park Formation in northern Colorado (Farmer and Larson, unpublished data) support a mantle rather than crustal origin for COMB parental magmas. Further insights into the origin of the COMB clearly require a better understanding of the factors controlling the space-time-composition patterns in the magmatism. However, data compiled in the North American Volcanic and Igneous Rock Database (NAVDAT) illustrate the difficulty in assessing age patterns within the COMB. Little high quality age information is currently available for the COMB igneous rocks, and taken as a whole, little obvious space-time patterns can be discerned (Karlstrom and Humphreys, 1998). But when only the highest quality age determinations are used (including unpublished Ar-Ar ages from graduate theses), there is support for a progressive younging in igneous activity from the central COMB (~65 Ma) to northern COMB (~55 Ma; Cunningham et al., 1994). Cessation of COMB magmatism coincides with the onset of

  19. Temporal, Spatial, and Diurnal Patterns in Avian Activity at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.

    1997-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns in bird abundance within the five-mile airspace at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) on John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, USA were investigated for purposes of quantifying Bird Aircraft Strike Hazards (BASH). The airspace is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) which provides habitat for approximately 331 resident and migratory bird species. Potential bird strike hazards were greatest around sunrise and sunset for most avian taxonomic groups, including wading birds, most raptors, pelicans, gulls/terns, shorebirds, and passerines. Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures were identified as a primary threat to aircraft operations and were represented in 33% of the samples. Diurnal vulture activity varied seasonally with the development of air thermals in the airspace surrounding the SLF. Variation in the presence and abundance of migratory species was shown for American Robins, swallows, and several species of shorebirds. Analyses of bird activities provides for planning of avionics operations during periods of low-dsk and allows for risk minimization measures during periods of high-risk.

  20. Patterns of space and habitat use by northern bobwhites in South Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, A.; Hines, T.C.; Hostetler, J.A.; Percival, H.F.; Oli, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    The manner by which animals use space and select resources can have important management consequences. We studied patterns of habitat selection by northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) on Babcock-Webb Wildlife Management Area, Charlotte County, Florida and evaluated factors influencing the sizes of their home ranges. A total of 1,245 radio-tagged bobwhites were monitored for 19,467 radio days during 2002-2007. The mean (?? 1 SE) annual home range size, estimated using the Kernel density method, was 88. 43 (?? 6. 16) ha and did not differ between genders. Winter home ranges of bobwhites (69. 27 ?? 4. 92 ha) were generally larger than summer home ranges (53. 90 ?? 4. 93 ha). Annual and winter home ranges were smaller for bobwhites whose ranges contained food plots compared to those that did not; however, the presence of food plots did not influence summer home ranges. We used distance-based methods to investigate habitat selection by bobwhites at two scales: selection of home ranges within the study site (second-order selection) and selection of habitats within home ranges (third-order selection). Across both scales, bobwhites generally preferred food plots and dry prairie habitat and avoided wet prairies and roads. This pattern was generally consistent between genders and across years. Our data indicate that management practices aimed at increasing and maintaining a matrix of food plots and dry prairie habitat would provide the most favorable environment for bobwhites. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

    2008-10-09

    Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

  2. Climate Change Adaptation Activities at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Fl., USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. R.; Phillips, L. V.; Foster, T.; Stolen, E.; Duncan, B.; Hunt, D.; Schaub, R.

    2016-12-01

    In 2010, the Office of Strategic Infrastructure and Earth Sciences established the Climate Adaptation Science Investigators (CASI) program to integrate climate change forecasts and knowledge into sustainable management of infrastructure and operations needed for the NASA mission. NASA operates 10 field centers valued at $32 billion dollars, occupies 191,000 acres and employs 58,000 people. CASI climate change and sea-level rise forecasts focus on the 2050 and 2080 time periods. At the 140,000 acre Kennedy Space Center (KSC) data are used to simulate impacts on infrastructure, operations, and unique natural resources. KSC launch and processing facilities represent a valued national asset located in an area with high biodiversity including 33 species of special management concern. Numerical and advanced Bayesian and Monte Carlo statistical modeling is being conducted using LiDAR digital elevation models coupled with relevant GIS layers to assess potential future conditions. Results are provided to the Environmental Management Branch, Master Planning, Construction of Facilities, Engineering Construction Innovation Committee and our regional partners to support Spaceport development, management, and adaptation planning and design. Potential impacts to natural resources include conversion of 50% of the Center to open water, elevation of the surficial aquifer, alterations of rainfall and evapotranspiration patterns, conversion of salt marsh to mangrove forest, reductions in distribution and extent of upland habitats, overwash of the barrier island dune system, increases in heat stress days, and releases of chemicals from legacy contamination sites. CASI has proven successful in bringing climate change planning to KSC including recognition of the need to increase resiliency and development of a green managed shoreline retreat approach to maintain coastal ecosystem services while maximizing life expectancy of Center launch and payload processing resources.

  3. Climate Change Adaptation Activities at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL., USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Carlton; Phillips, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the Office of Strategic Infrastructure and Earth Sciences established the Climate Adaptation Science Investigators (CASI) program to integrate climate change forecasts and knowledge into sustainable management of infrastructure and operations needed for the NASA mission. NASA operates 10 field centers valued at $32 billion dollars, occupies 191,000 acres and employs 58,000 people. CASI climate change and sea-level rise forecasts focus on the 2050 and 2080 time periods. At the 140,000 acre Kennedy Space Center (KSC) data are used to simulate impacts on infrastructure, operations, and unique natural resources. KSC launch and processing facilities represent a valued national asset located in an area with high biodiversity including 33 species of special management concern. Numerical and advanced Bayesian and Monte Carlo statistical modeling is being conducted using LiDAR digital elevation models coupled with relevant GIS layers to assess potential future conditions. Results are provided to the Environmental Management Branch, Master Planning, Construction of Facilities, Engineering Construction Innovation Committee and our regional partners to support Spaceport development, management, and adaptation planning and design. Potential impacts to natural resources include conversion of 50% of the Center to open water, elevation of the surficial aquifer, alterations of rainfall and evapotranspiration patterns, conversion of salt marsh to mangrove forest, reductions in distribution and extent of upland habitats, overwash of the barrier island dune system, increases in heat stress days, and releases of chemicals from legacy contamination sites. CASI has proven successful in bringing climate change planning to KSC including recognition of the need to increase resiliency and development of a green managed shoreline retreat approach to maintain coastal ecosystem services while maximizing life expectancy of Center launch and payload processing resources.

  4. Movements and use of space by Mangrove Cuckoos (Coccyzus minor) in Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    I used radio-telemetry to track the movements of Mangrove Cuckoos (Coccyzus minor) captured in southwest Florida. Relatively little is known about the natural history of Mangrove Cuckoos, and my goal was to provide an initial description of how individuals use space, with a focus on the size and placement of home ranges. I captured and affixed VHF radio-transmitters to 32 individuals between 2012 and 2015, and obtained a sufficient number of relocations from 16 of them to estimate home-range boundaries and describe patterns of movement. Home-range area varied widely among individuals, but in general was roughly four times larger than expected based on the body size of Mangrove Cuckoos. The median core area (50% isopleth) of a home range was 42 ha (range: 9–91 ha), and the median overall home range (90% isopleth) was 128 ha (range: 28–319 ha). The median distance between estimated locations recorded on subsequent days was 298 m (95% CI [187 m–409 m]), but variation within and among individuals was substantial, and it was not uncommon to relocate individuals >1 km from their location on the previous day. Site fidelity by individual birds was low; although Mangrove Cuckoos were present year-round within the study area, I did not observe any individuals that remained on a single home range throughout the year. Although individual birds showed no evidence of avoiding anthropogenic edges, they did not incorporate developed areas into their daily movements and home ranges consisted almost entirely of mangrove forest. The persistence of the species in the study area depended on a network of conserved lands–mostly public, but some privately conserved land as well–because large patches of mangrove forest did not occur on tracts left unprotected from development. PMID:28674670

  5. Remarks of Ruth Bates Harris, Deputy Assistant Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration at summer institute closing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of experience and knowledge gained from aeronautical and space research and exploration are discussed briefly. Spinoffs are presented which improve the quality of life by contributing to advances in health, transportation, foods, communications, energy, safety, and manufacturing.

  6. Update of Ulysses FSAR results using updated NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-18

    The mission risk results reported in the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) issued on March 14, 1990, were based on initiating accident probabilities the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) on July 13, 1988. These probabilities were provided in terms of ranges; the geometric mean of these ranges were used in the development and presentation of the results in the FSAR for source terms, radiological consequences and risks. Subsequent to the issuance of the FSAR, DOE received a revised set of probabilities from NASA. These probabilities were presented in terms of distributions for each initiating accident and characterized by a mean and cumulative percentile values. NASA recommended that DOE use the updated probabilities to update the Ulysses FSAR results. Accordingly, at the request of DOE, this letter report has been prepared to evaluate the changes in the Ulysses FSAR results when the updated mean probabilities are used.

  7. Rapid transport within cerebral perivascular spaces underlies widespread tracer distribution in the brain after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Pizzo, Michelle E; Thorne, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    The intranasal administration route is increasingly being used as a noninvasive method to bypass the blood-brain barrier because evidence suggests small fractions of nasally applied macromolecules may reach the brain directly via olfactory and trigeminal nerve components present in the nasal mucosa. Upon reaching the olfactory bulb (olfactory pathway) or brainstem (trigeminal pathway), intranasally delivered macromolecules appear to rapidly distribute within the brains of rodents and primates. The mechanisms responsible for this distribution have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we have used ex vivo fluorescence imaging to show that bulk flow within the perivascular space (PVS) of cerebral blood vessels contributes to the rapid central distribution of fluorescently labeled 3 and 10 kDa dextran tracers after intranasal administration in anesthetized adult rats. Comparison of tracer plasma levels and fluorescent signal distribution associated with the PVS of surface arteries and internal cerebral vessels showed that the intranasal route results in unique central access to the PVS not observed after matched intravascular dosing in separate animals. Intranasal targeting to the PVS was tracer size dependent and could be regulated by modifying nasal epithelial permeability. These results suggest cerebral perivascular convection likely has a key role in intranasal drug delivery to the brain.

  8. Nicotine dependence and mental disorders among adults in the USA: evaluating the role of the mode of administration.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R D; Zvolensky, M J; Keyes, K M

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the association between nicotine dependence (ND), by cigarette smoking and use of smokeless tobacco (UST), and mental disorders. Face-to-face surveys (n=43 093) were conducted in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Nicotine use, ND, and mental disorders were assessed using DSM-IV criteria. UST-ND was associated with a significantly increased likelihood of any anxiety disorder, specific phobia, alcohol abuse and dependence. Consistent with previous findings, cigarette smoking-ND was associated with an increased likelihood of all mental disorders examined. Among those without ND, cigarette smoking was specifically associated with panic attacks and panic disorder; non-dependent UST was not associated with mental disorders. Our findings suggest that the association between ND and mental disorders is relatively specific to the mode of nicotine administration. Among those who are nicotine dependent, cigarette use is associated with most major psychiatric disorders, whereas UST is associated with dysthymia and specific phobia. Among those who use tobacco but are not nicotine dependent, cigarette use is associated with dysthymia and panic disorder; UST is not associated with any major mood or anxiety disorders. The link between mental disorders and nicotine is complex, and is associated primarily with dependence, and not with non-dependent use.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson (right) learns about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) from Louise Kleba (left), with United Space Alliance at KSC, and Jennifer Goldsmith (center), with USA at Johnson Space Center. Crew members are at KSC becoming familiar with Shuttle and mission equipment. The mission is Logistics Flight 1, which is scheduled to deliver supplies and equipment plus the external stowage platform to the International Space Station.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson (right) learns about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) from Louise Kleba (left), with United Space Alliance at KSC, and Jennifer Goldsmith (center), with USA at Johnson Space Center. Crew members are at KSC becoming familiar with Shuttle and mission equipment. The mission is Logistics Flight 1, which is scheduled to deliver supplies and equipment plus the external stowage platform to the International Space Station.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson (left) learns about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) from Jennifer Goldsmith (center), with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, and Louise Kleba (right), with USA at KSC. Crew members are at KSC to become familiar with Shuttle and mission equipment. The mission is Logistics Flight 1, which is scheduled to deliver supplies and equipment plus the external stowage platform to the International Space Station.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson (left) learns about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) from Jennifer Goldsmith (center), with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, and Louise Kleba (right), with USA at KSC. Crew members are at KSC to become familiar with Shuttle and mission equipment. The mission is Logistics Flight 1, which is scheduled to deliver supplies and equipment plus the external stowage platform to the International Space Station.

  11. Leadership in Space: Selected Speeches of NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, May 2005 - October 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Speech topics include: Leadership in Space; Space Exploration: Real and Acceptable Reasons; Why Explore Space?; Space Exploration: Filling up the Canvas; Continuing the Voyage: The Spirit of Endeavour; Incorporating Space into Our Economic Sphere of Influence; The Role of Space Exploration in the Global Economy; Partnership in Space Activities; International Space Cooperation; National Strategy and the Civil Space Program; What the Hubble Space Telescope Teaches Us about Ourselves; The Rocket Team; NASA's Direction; Science and NASA; Science Priorities and Program Management; NASA and the Commercial Space Industry; NASA and the Business of Space; American Competitiveness: NASA's Role & Everyone's Responsibility; Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration; The Next Generation of Engineers; System Engineering and the "Two Cultures" of Engineering; Generalship of Engineering; NASA and Engineering Integrity; The Constellation Architecture; Then and Now: Fifty Years in Space; The Reality of Tomorrow; and Human Space Exploration: The Next 50 Years.

  12. Economic burden of diagnosed pertussis among individuals with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA: an analysis of administrative claims.

    PubMed

    Buck, P O; Meyers, J L; Gordon, L-D; Parikh, R; Kurosky, S K; Davis, K L

    2017-07-01

    Individuals with chronic respiratory conditions may be at increased risk for pertussis. We conducted a retrospective administrative claims analysis to examine the incidence and economic burden of diagnosed pertussis among adolescents and adults in the USA with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. Patients aged ⩾11 years with diagnosed pertussis and pre-existing COPD (n = 343) or asthma (n = 1041) were matched 1:1 to patients with diagnosed pertussis but without COPD or asthma. Differences in all-cause costs ('excess' costs) during the 45-day and 3-month and 6-month periods before and after the pertussis index date were calculated; adjusted excess costs were estimated via multivariate regressions. The incidence of diagnosed pertussis was higher among patients with COPD or asthma than among matched patients. Compared with matched patients, patients with pertussis and pre-existing COPD or asthma accrued greater all-cause adjusted costs across study periods ($3694 and $1193 more, respectively, in the 45-day period; $4173 and $1301 more in the 3-month period; and $6154 and $1639 more in the 6-month period; all P < 0·0001). Patients with pre-existing COPD or asthma experience an increased economic burden after diagnosed pertussis and may especially benefit from targeted tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccination strategies.

  13. Code of conduct for the International Space Station Crew. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-12-21

    NASA is issuing new regulations entitled "International Space Station Crew," to implement certain provisions of the International Space Station (ISS) Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) regarding ISS crewmembers' observance of an ISS Code of Conduct.

  14. Report of Apollo 204 Review Board to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration . Appendix F ; Schedule of Physical Evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Immediately following the Apollo 204 accident of January 27, 1961. all associated equipment and material were impounded. Release of this equipment and material for normal use was under the close control of the Apollo 204 Review Board. Apollo Review Board Administrative Procedure No. 11, February 11, 1961, established the Apollo 204 Review Board Material Release Record (MRR). This MRR was the official form used to release material from full impoundment and was valid only after being approved by the Board and signed by a Member. The form was used as the authority to place any impounded item into one of the three Categories defined in Administrative Procedure No. 11. This appendix contains all of the authorized MRR's. Each item submitted on an MRR was given a control number; a description, including the part number and serial number; the relevance and location to the accident; any constraints before release; and the control category. The categories placed on the equipment were as follows: Category A - Items which may have a significant influence or bearing on the results or findings of the Apollo 204 Review Board; Category B - All material other than Category A which is considered relevant to the Apollo 204 Review Board investigation; Category C - Material released from Board jurisdiction. Several classes of equipment were released by special Board action prior to the establishment of the MRR system. The operating procedure for release of these classes is Enclosure F-l to this appendix.

  15. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  16. Design by Prototype: Examples from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Gundo, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes and provides exa.mples of a technique called Design-by-Prototype used in the development of research hardware at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ames Research Center. This is not a new idea. Artisans and great masters have used prototyping as a design technique for centuries. They created prototypes to try out their ideas before making the primary artifact they were planning. This abstract is itself a prototype for others to use in determining the value of the paper it describes. At the Ames Research Center Design-by-Prototype is used for developing unique, one-of-a-kind hardware for small, high-risk projects. The need tor this new/old process is the proliferation of computer "design tools" that can result in both excessive time expended in design, and a lack of imbedded reality in the final product. Despite creating beautiful three-dimensional models and detailed computer drawings that can consume hundreds of engineering hours, the resulting designs can be extremely difficult to make, requiring many changes that add to the cost and schedule. Much design time can be saved and expensive rework eliminated using Design-by-Prototype.

  17. Suspended in Liminal Space: Special Education Administrators and the Decade of Educational Reform within the NYC School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly politicized educational reforms in New York City have seen special education become marginalized as a casualty of the accountability movement. There is a liminal space between "old" and "new" ways where special education administrators find themselves as they consider their roles and responsibilities in continuing to…

  18. Suspended in Liminal Space: Special Education Administrators and the Decade of Educational Reform within the NYC School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly politicized educational reforms in New York City have seen special education become marginalized as a casualty of the accountability movement. There is a liminal space between "old" and "new" ways where special education administrators find themselves as they consider their roles and responsibilities in continuing to…

  19. Incidence Rate of Cardiovascular Disease End Points in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Astronaut Corps.

    PubMed

    Ade, Carl J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Charvat, Jacqueline M; Barstow, Thomas J

    2017-08-07

    It is unknown whether the astronaut occupation or exposure to microgravity influences the risk of long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study explored the effects of being a career National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) astronaut on the risk for clinical CVD end points. During the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health, data were collected on 310 NASA astronauts and 981 nonastronaut NASA employees. The nonastronauts were matched to the astronauts on age, sex, and body mass index, to evaluate acute and chronic morbidity and mortality. The primary outcomes were composites of clinical CVD end points (myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and coronary artery bypass surgery) or coronary artery disease (CAD) end points (myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass surgery). Of the astronauts, 5.2% had a clinical CVD end point and 2.9% had a CAD end point compared with the nonastronaut comparisons with 4.7% and 3.1% having CVD and CAD end points, respectively. In the multivariate models adjusted for traditional risk factors, astronauts had a similar risk of CVD compared with nonastronauts (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.60-1.93; P=0.80). Risk of a CAD end point was similar between groups (hazard ratio, 0.97; CI, 0.45-2.08; P=0.93). In astronauts with early spaceflight experience, the risk of CVD (hazard ratio, 0.80; CI, 0.25-2.56; P=0.71) and CAD (hazard ratio, 1.23; CI: 0.27-5.61; P=0.79) compared with astronauts with no experience were not different. These findings suggest that being an astronaut is not associated with increased long-term risk of CVD development. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  1. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model summarizing the wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 kin. Launches of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle from Kennedy Space Center utilize CCAFS RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the CCAFS RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, a validation study on the 2006 version was conducted as well as a comparison analysis of the 2006 version to the existing CCAFS RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  2. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model summarizing the wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 kin. Launches of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle from Kennedy Space Center utilize CCAFS RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the CCAFS RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, a validation study on the 2006 version was conducted as well as a comparison analysis of the 2006 version to the existing CCAFS RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  3. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters are essential in assessing the flight performance of aerospace vehicles. The effects of the Earth's atmosphere on aerospace vehicles influence various aspects of the vehicle during ascent ranging from its flight trajectory to the structural dynamics and aerodynamic heatmg on the vehicle. Atmospheric databases charactenzing the wind and thermodynamic environments, known as Range Reference Atmospheres (RRA), have been developed at space launch ranges by a governmental interagency working group for use by aerospace vehicle programs. The National Aeronantics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle Program (SSP), which launches from Kennedy Space Center, utilizes atmosphenc statistics derived from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere (CCAFS RRA) database to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehlcle during ascent.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Overview, FY2007 Budget in Brief, and Key Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-23

    4,057 — International Space Station — 1,753 1,811 1,778 CRS-3 Space and Flight Support — 339 367 — Subtotal 6,578 6,870 6,234 6,194 Inspector General...its commitments to its partners in building the International Space Station (ISS): Russia, Japan, Canada, and 10 European countries. The President...of returning the space shuttle to flight status, completing the International Space Station , and overruns in a number of science programs. The House

  5. The Spatial Practices of School Administrative Clerks: Making Space for Contributive Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the work practices of the much neglected phenomenon of the work of school administrative clerks in schools. Popular accounts of school administrative clerks portray them as subjectified--assigned roles with limited power and discretion--as subordinate and expected to be compliant, passive and deferent to the principal and…

  6. 77 FR 6587 - Startek USA, Inc. Alexandria, LA; Startek USA, Inc., Collinsville, VA; Amended Certification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Startek USA, Inc. Alexandria, LA; Startek USA, Inc., Collinsville, VA..., applicable to workers of StarTek USA, Inc., Alexandria, Louisiana. The workers are engaged in the supply of..., Virginia location of StarTek USA, Inc. supplied call center services such as sales and technical...

  7. Re-Living Dangerous Memories: Online Journaling to Interrogate Spaces of "Otherness" in an Educational Administration Program at a Midwestern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Jennifer; Caruthers, Loyce; McCarther, Shirley Marie

    2009-01-01

    This theoretical paper explores the use of online journaling in an educational administration program to interrogate spaces of "otherness"--the geographical spaces of cities where poor children and children of color live--and the dangerous memories prospective administrators may have about diversity. The cultures of most educational administration…

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  9. Evaluation of the Transfer of International Traffic in Arms Regulations-Controlled Missile Defense Technology to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    Administration ( NASA ) J U LY 1 3 , 2 0 1 5 Report No. DODIG-2015-146 Mission Our mission is to provide independent, relevant, and timely oversight of...Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ) Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective In response to House Report 113-446, “Howard P. ‘Buck’ McKeon...Regulations (ITAR)-controlled missile defense technology from the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA

  10. Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Office of Safety and Mission Assurance sponsors an Agency-wide NDE Program that supports Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology, Human Exploration and Development of Space, Earth Science, and Space Science Enterprises. For each of these Enterprises, safety is the number one priority. Development of the next generation aero-space launch and transportation vehicles, satellites, and deep space probes have highlighted the enabling role that NDE plays in these advanced technology systems. Specific areas of advanced component development, component integrity, and structural heath management are critically supported by NDE technologies. The simultaneous goals of assuring safety, maintaining overall operational efficiency, and developing and utilizing revolutionary technologies to expand human activity and space-based commerce in the frontiers of air and space places increasing demands on the Agencies NDE infrastructure and resources. In this presentation, an overview of NASA's NDE Program will be presented, that includes a background and status of current Enterprise NDE issues, and the NDE investment areas being developed to meet Enterprise safety and mission assurance needs through the year 2009 and beyond.

  11. Case Report: Fractured Needle in the Pterygomandibular Space Following Administration of an Inferior Dental Nerve Block.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Edmund; Rao, Jeethendra; Saksena, Alka

    2015-04-01

    Fortunately, needle fracture is a rare complication following the administration of dental local anaesthetic. We present a case of needle fracture following administration of an inferior dental nerve block. The fractured needle was retrieved successfully under general anaesthetic. We also provide some suggestions on how to prevent needle fracture, and advice on how to manage the situation should it arise. Clinical Relevance: Dental practitioners are the largest user group of local anaesthesia in the UK. It is important that practitioners are aware of the risks to the patient of needle fracture, how to minimize the risk of this occurring and be aware of how to manage the situation should it arise.

  12. An Analysis of Acquisition Logistics within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    The search for information concerning an acquisition logistics model included discussions with AFIT faculty members, a search of the card catalogs and...current plans. We proposed an acquisition logistics model with which we compare the two programs. We had a great deal of help with this research. First, we...logistics models . Logistics managers from the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom programs were interviewed, surveyed, and observed to provide evidence

  13. Address by James C. Fletcher, Administrator National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the National Academy of Engineering, Washington, D.C., 10 November 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Future plans and programs of the space agency are discussed. Topics discussed include solar energy, space stations, planetary exploration, interstellar exploration, the space shuttles, and satellites.

  14. Shifting Spaces and Emerging Voices: Participation, Support, and Conflict in One School Administrative Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Manila S.; Harkins, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Collaborative work and supportive relationships are highly valued by teachers and school administrators. Collaboration, however, necessitates constructive conflict resolution (P. M. Senge, 1990); yet conflict is often experienced as interpersonally threatening and undermining supportive working conditions. This contradiction is…

  15. 76 FR 6827 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration FY 2010 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Administration (NASA) is publishing this notice to advise the public of the availability of its FY 2010 Service... November 5, 2010, by the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP). NASA has posted its inventory and a summary of the inventory on the NASA Office of Procurement...

  16. Shifting Spaces and Emerging Voices: Participation, Support, and Conflict in One School Administrative Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Manila S.; Harkins, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Collaborative work and supportive relationships are highly valued by teachers and school administrators. Collaboration, however, necessitates constructive conflict resolution (P. M. Senge, 1990); yet conflict is often experienced as interpersonally threatening and undermining supportive working conditions. This contradiction is…

  17. Safety And Promotion in the Federal Aviation Administration- Enabling Safe and Successful Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repcheck, Randall J.

    2010-09-01

    The United States Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation(AST) authorizes the launch and reentry of expendable and reusable launch vehicles and the operation of launch and reentry sites by United States citizens or within the United States. It authorizes these activities consistent with public health and safety, the safety of property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States. In addition to its safety role, AST has the role to encourage, facilitate, and promote commercial space launches and reentries by the private sector. AST’s promotional role includes, among other things, the development of information of interest to industry, the sharing of information of interest through a variety of methods, and serving as an advocate for Commercial Space Transportation within the United States government. This dual safety and promotion role is viewed by some as conflicting. AST views these two roles as complementary, and important for the current state of commercial space transportation. This paper discusses how maintaining a sound safety decision-making process, maintaining a strong safety culture, and taking steps to avoid complacency can together enable safe and successful commercial space transportation.

  18. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  19. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. IMPACTS OF MULTIPLE STRSSORS ON COMMON LOONS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE, USA: A DEMONSTRATION STUDY FOR STRESSOR EFFECTS ACROSS SPACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors that significantly impact wildlife population dynamics, such as resource availability and exposure to stressors, frequently vary over space and thereby contribute to the heterogeneous spatial distributions of organisms. The spatial co-occurrence of organisms, environmenta...

  1. IMPACTS OF MULTIPLE STRSSORS ON COMMON LOONS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE, USA: A DEMONSTRATION STUDY FOR STRESSOR EFFECTS ACROSS SPACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors that significantly impact wildlife population dynamics, such as resource availability and exposure to stressors, frequently vary over space and thereby contribute to the heterogeneous spatial distributions of organisms. The spatial co-occurrence of organisms, environmenta...

  2. Wildland Arson as Clandestine Resource Management: A Space-Time Permutation Analysis and Classification of Informal Fire Management Regimes in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Forest managers are increasingly recognizing the value of disturbance-based land management techniques such as prescribed burning. Unauthorized, "arson" fires are common in the southeastern United States where a legacy of agrarian cultural heritage persists amidst an increasingly forest-dominated landscape. This paper reexamines unauthorized fire-setting in the state of Georgia, USA from a historical ecology perspective that aims to contribute to historically informed, disturbance-based land management. A space-time permutation analysis is employed to discriminate systematic, management-oriented unauthorized fires from more arbitrary or socially deviant fire-setting behaviors. This paper argues that statistically significant space-time clusters of unauthorized fire occurrence represent informal management regimes linked to the legacy of traditional land management practices. Recent scholarship has pointed out that traditional management has actively promoted sustainable resource use and, in some cases, enhanced biodiversity often through the use of fire. Despite broad-scale displacement of traditional management during the 20th century, informal management practices may locally circumvent more formal and regionally dominant management regimes. Space-time permutation analysis identified 29 statistically significant fire regimes for the state of Georgia. The identified regimes are classified by region and land cover type and their implications for historically informed disturbance-based resource management are discussed.

  3. Wildland Arson as Clandestine Resource Management: A Space-Time Permutation Analysis and Classification of Informal Fire Management Regimes in Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Michael R.

    2016-05-01

    Forest managers are increasingly recognizing the value of disturbance-based land management techniques such as prescribed burning. Unauthorized, "arson" fires are common in the southeastern United States where a legacy of agrarian cultural heritage persists amidst an increasingly forest-dominated landscape. This paper reexamines unauthorized fire-setting in the state of Georgia, USA from a historical ecology perspective that aims to contribute to historically informed, disturbance-based land management. A space-time permutation analysis is employed to discriminate systematic, management-oriented unauthorized fires from more arbitrary or socially deviant fire-setting behaviors. This paper argues that statistically significant space-time clusters of unauthorized fire occurrence represent informal management regimes linked to the legacy of traditional land management practices. Recent scholarship has pointed out that traditional management has actively promoted sustainable resource use and, in some cases, enhanced biodiversity often through the use of fire. Despite broad-scale displacement of traditional management during the 20th century, informal management practices may locally circumvent more formal and regionally dominant management regimes. Space-time permutation analysis identified 29 statistically significant fire regimes for the state of Georgia. The identified regimes are classified by region and land cover type and their implications for historically informed disturbance-based resource management are discussed.

  4. Aeronautical concerns and National Aeronautics and Space Administration atmospheric electricity projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenology of lightning and lightning measurement techniques are briefly examined with a particular reference to aeronautics. Developments made in airborne and satellite detection methods are reported. NASA research efforts are outlined which cover topics including in-situ measurements, design factors and protection, remote optical and radio frequency measurements, and space vehicle design.

  5. Aeronautical concerns and National Aeronautics and Space Administration atmospheric electricity projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenology of lightning and lightning measurement techniques are briefly examined with a particular reference to aeronautics. Developments made in airborne and satellite detection methods are reported. NASA research efforts are outlined which cover topics including in-situ measurements, design factors and protection, remote optical and radio frequency measurements, and space vehicle design.

  6. Third National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and climate program science review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Research results of developing experimental and prototype operational systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring, and understanding the atmosphere are reported. Major aspects include: (1) detection, monitoring, and prediction of severe storms; (2) improvement of global forecasting; and (3) monitoring and prediction of climate change.

  7. Implementation of the Enhanced Flight Termination System at National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology, requirements, tests, and results of the implementation of the current operating capability for the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The implementation involves the development of the EFTS at NASA DFRC starting from the requirements to system safety review to full end to end system testing, and concluding with the acceptance of the system as an operational system. The paper discusses the first operational usage and subsequent flight utilizing EFTS successfully.

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  15. The Characteristics of Project Managers: An Exploration of Complex Projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.

    2000-01-01

    Study of characteristics and relationships of project managers of complex projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Study is based on Research Design, Data Collection, Interviews, Case Studies, and Data Analysis across varying disciplines such as biological research, space research, advanced aeronautical test facilities, aeronautic flight demonstrations, and projects at different NASA centers to ensure that findings were not endemic to one type of project management, or to one Center's management philosophies. Each project is treated as a separate case with the primary data collected during semi-structured interviews with the project manager responsible for the overall project. Results of the various efforts show some definite similarities of characteristics and relationships among the project managers in the study. A model for how the project managers formulated and managed their projects is included.

  16. Assessment of Intelligent Processing Equipment in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here is an assessment of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) within NASA. An attempt is made to determine the state of IPE development and research in specific areas where NASA might contribute to the national capability. Mechanisms to transfer NASA technology to the U.S. private sector in this critical area are discussed. It was concluded that intelligent processing equipment is finding extensive use in the manufacture of space hardware, especially in the propulsion components of the shuttle. The major benefits are found in improved process consistency, which lowers cost as it reduces rework. Advanced feedback controls are under development and being implemented gradually into shuttle manufacturing. Implementation is much more extensive in new programs, such as in the advanced solid rocket motor and the Space Station Freedom.

  17. Assessment of intelligent processing equipment in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. S.

    1992-04-01

    Summarized here is an assessment of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) within NASA. An attempt is made to determine the state of IPE development and research in specific areas where NASA might contribute to the national capability. Mechanisms to transfer NASA technology to the U.S. private sector in this critical area are discussed. It was concluded that intelligent processing equipment is finding extensive use in the manufacture of space hardware, especially in the propulsion components of the shuttle. The major benefits are found in improved process consistency, which lowers cost as it reduces rework. Advanced feedback controls are under development and being implemented gradually into shuttle manufacturing. Implementation is much more extensive in new programs, such as in the advanced solid rocket motor and the Space Station Freedom.

  18. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  19. Swamp Works: A New Approach to Develop Space Mining and Resource Extraction Technologies at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; Sibille, L.; Leucht, K.; Smith, J. D.; Townsend, I. I.; Nick, A. J.; Schuler, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The first steps for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on target bodies such as the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), and even comets, involve the same sequence of steps as in the terrestrial mining of resources. First exploration including prospecting must occur, and then the resource must be acquired through excavation methods if it is of value. Subsequently a load, haul and dump sequence of events occurs, followed by processing of the resource in an ISRU plant, to produce useful commodities. While these technologies and related supporting operations are mature in terrestrial applications, they will be different in space since the environment and indigenous materials are different than on Earth. In addition, the equipment must be highly automated, since for the majority of the production cycle time, there will be no humans present to assist or intervene. This space mining equipment must withstand a harsh environment which includes vacuum, radical temperature swing cycles, highly abrasive lofted dust, electrostatic effects, van der Waals forces effects, galactic cosmic radiation, solar particle events, high thermal gradients when spanning sunlight terminators, steep slopes into craters / lava tubes and cryogenic temperatures as low as 40 K in permanently shadowed regions. In addition the equipment must be tele-operated from Earth or a local base where the crew is sheltered. If the tele-operation occurs from Earth then significant communications latency effects mandate the use of autonomous control systems in the mining equipment. While this is an extremely challenging engineering design scenario, it is also an opportunity, since the technologies developed in this endeavor could be used in the next generations of terrestrial mining equipment, in order to mine deeper, safer, more economical and with a higher degree of flexibility. New space technologies could precipitate new mining solutions here on Earth. The NASA KSC Swamp Works is an innovation

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center data base requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the types of data that the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) should automate in order to make available essential management and technical information to support MSC's various functions and missions. In addition, the software and hardware capabilities to best handle the storage and retrieval of this data were analyzed. Based on the results of this study, recommendations are presented for a unified data base that provides a cost effective solution to MSC's data automation requirements. The recommendations are projected through a time frame that includes the earth orbit space station.

  1. Fourth National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and Climate Program Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Weather and Climate Program has two major thrusts. The first involves the development of experimental and prototype operational satellite systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring and understanding the atmosphere. The second thrust involves basic scientific investigation aimed at studying the physical and chemical processes which control weather and climate. This fourth science review concentrated on the scientific research rather than the hardware development aspect of the program. These proceedings contain 65 papers covering the three general areas: severe storms and local weather research, global weather, and climate.

  2. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from Space Shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from studies designed to identify deposition patterns and quantify the ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents (which are primarily Al2O3 and HCl) from the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors in the area of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad. Results of measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, as much as 7.1 x 10 exp 3 kg of particulates and 3.4 x 10 exp 3 kg HCL can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence during one STS launch.

  3. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from Space Shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from studies designed to identify deposition patterns and quantify the ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents (which are primarily Al2O3 and HCl) from the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors in the area of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad. Results of measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, as much as 7.1 x 10 exp 3 kg of particulates and 3.4 x 10 exp 3 kg HCL can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence during one STS launch.

  4. The applicability and availability of Former Soviet Union (FSU) space-related capabilities and facilities to energy-related space activities of Department of Energy, Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellechi, M.

    1993-01-01

    A senior-level Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team visited the former Soviet Union (FSU) from 16-28 Oct. 1992. The purpose of the visit was to investigate the applicability and availability of FSU space-related capabilities and facilities to the energy-related space activities of the three agencies. This included renewable energy, nuclear power and propulsion, radiation effects, remote sensing, optics, and lasers. The U.S. delegation was successful in identifying some capabilities that would be useful to the three organizations. Efforts to utilize some of the FSU capabilities viewed are being initiated. Concurrently, there will be a technical assessment performed on the information gained from this and other recent visits to the FSU relative to space research.

  5. Natural Atmospheric Environment Model Development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank; Overbey, Glenn; Batts, Glen W.; Parker, Nelson (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently began development of a new reusable launch vehicle. The program office is located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and is called the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV). The purpose of the program is to improve upon the safety and reliability of the first generation reusable launch vehicle, the Space Shuttle. Specifically, the goals are to reduce the risk of crew loss to less than 1-in-10,000 missions and decreased costs by a factor of 10 to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched to low Earth orbit. The program is currently in the very early stages of development and many two-stage vehicle concepts will be evaluated. Risk reduction activities are also taking place. These activities include developing new technologies and advancing current technologies to be used by the vehicle. The Environments Group at MSFC is tasked by the 2GRLV Program to develop and maintain an extensive series of analytical tools and environmental databases which enable it to provide detailed atmospheric studies in support of structural, guidance, navigation and control, and operation of the 2GRLV.

  6. The past, present, and future of National Aeronautics and Space Administration spaceflight diet in support of microgravity rodent experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gwo-Shing; Tou, Janet C; Yu, Diane; Girten, Beverly E; Cohen, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Rodents have been the most frequently flown animal model used to study physiological responses to the space environment. In support of future of space exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) envisions an animal research program focused on rodents. Therefore, the development of a rodent diet that is suitable for the spaceflight environment including long duration spaceflight is a high priority. Recognizing the importance of nutrition in affecting spaceflight physiological responses and ensuring reliable biomedical and biological science return, NASA developed the nutrient-upgraded rodent food bar (NuRFB) as a standard diet for rodent spaceflight. Depending on future animal habitat hardware and planned spaceflight experiments, modification of the NuRFB or development of a new diet formulation may be needed, particularly for long term spaceflights. Research in this area consists primarily of internal technical reports that are not readily accessible. Therefore, the aims of this contribution are to provide a brief history of the development of rodent spaceflight diets, to review the present diet used in rodent spaceflight studies, and to discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions for diets to be used in future long-term rodent spaceflight studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  9. Prospective, randomized and controlled trial on magnesium sulfate administration during laparoscopic gastrectomy: effects on surgical space conditions and recovery profiles.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Koo, B W; Kim, B G; Oh, A Y; Kim, H H; Park, D J; Lee, C M; Kim, S T; Do, S H

    2016-11-01

    The degree of neuromuscular blockade is one of the important factors that determine the condition of surgical space during laparoscopic surgery. Magnesium sulfate potentiates the actions of neuromuscular blocking agent, and we hypothesized that intraoperative magnesium sulfate infusion may improve surgical space condition during laparoscopic surgery. Eighty-four patients undergoing elective laparoscopic gastrectomy were randomized to receive isotonic saline (group C) or magnesium sulfate (group M, loading dose with 50 mg/kg over 10 min and then 15 mg/kg/h by continuous infusion) to maintain the moderate neuromuscular blockade using rocuronium. Two experienced surgeons scored the quality of surgical space condition using a 5-point surgical rating scale (SRS). The secondary outcomes included recovery profiles, postoperative pain and adverse events. The SRS in group M was higher than that of group C. The proportion of patients with a SRS of 5 (optimal) was 2.7 % in the group C and 40.5 % in the group M (P < 0.0001) although a lower amount of rocuronium was required in group M than group C [24.2 (6.5) mg/h for group M vs. 27.5 (6) mg/h for group C; P = 0.017]. Pain after operation site was less severe in group M than in group C at postoperative 24 h (P = 0.009). Recovery profiles and adverse events were similar between the two groups. Intraoperative administration of magnesium sulfate improved the quality of surgical space conditions and decreased neuromuscular blocking agent requirement and postoperative pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy.

  10. Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Approaches Used in Development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Max Launch Abort System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Schuster, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineering and Safety Center was chartered to develop an alternate launch abort system (LAS) as risk mitigation for the Orion Project. Its successful flight test provided data for the design of future LAS vehicles. Design of the flight test vehicle (FTV) and pad abort trajectory relied heavily on modeling and simulation including computational fluid dynamics for vehicle aero modeling, 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics models for flight trajectory modeling, and 3-degree-of-freedom kinematics models for parachute force modeling. This paper highlights the simulation techniques and the interaction between the aerodynamics, flight mechanics, and aerodynamic decelerator disciplines during development of the Max Launch Abort System FTV.

  11. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Science Applications Program: Exploring Partnerships to Enhance Decision Making in Public Health Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Timi S.; Venezia, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Earth Science Enterprise is engaged in applications of NASA Earth science and remote sensing technologies for public health. Efforts are focused on establishing partnerships with those agencies and organizations that have responsibility for protecting the Nation's Health. The program's goal is the integration of NASA's advanced data and technology for enhanced decision support in the areas of disease surveillance and environmental health. A focused applications program, based on understanding partner issues and requirements, has the potential to significantly contribute to more informed decision making in public health practice. This paper intends to provide background information on NASA's investment in public health and is a call for partnership with the larger practice community.

  12. Mercury concentrations in blood and feathers of prebreeding Forster's terns in relation to space use of San Francisco Bay, California, USA, habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Bluso, J.D.; Adelsbach, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    We examined mercury concentrations and space use of prebreeding Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA, to assess factors influencing mercury levels in piscivorous birds. In 2005 and 2006, we collected blood and feathers from 122 Forster's terns and radio-marked and tracked 72 terns to determine locations of dietary mercury uptake. Capture site and capture date were the most important factors explaining variation in blood mercury concentrations (geometric mean ?? standard error: 1.09 ?? 0.89 ??g/g wet wt), followed by sex and year. Accordingly, radiotelemetry data revealed that Forster's terns generally remained near their site of capture and foraged in nearby salt ponds, managed and tidal marshes, and tidal flats. In contrast, capture site and capture date were not important factors explaining variation in feather mercury concentrations, probably because feathers were grown on their wintering grounds several months prior to our sampling. Instead, sex and year were the most important factors explaining mercury concentrations in breast feathers (9.57 ?? 8.23 ??g/g fresh wt), and sex was the most important factor for head feathers (6.94 ?? 7.04 ??g/g fresh wt). Overall, 13 and 22% of prebreeding Forster's terns were estimated to be at high risk for deleterious effects due to mercury concentrations in blood (>3.0 ??g/g wet wt) and feathers (>20.0 ??g/g fresh wt), respectively. Breeding terns are likely to be even more at risk because blood mercury concentrations more than tripled during the 45-d prebreeding time period. These data illustrate the importance of space use and tissue type in interpreting mercury concentrations in birds. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  13. Mercury concentrations in blood and feathers of prebreeding Forster's terns in relation to space use of San Francisco Bay, California, USA, habitats.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Takekawa, John Y; Bluso, Jill D; Adelsbach, Terrence L

    2008-04-01

    We examined mercury concentrations and space use of prebreeding Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA, to assess factors influencing mercury levels in piscivorous birds. In 2005 and 2006, we collected blood and feathers from 122 Forster's terns and radio-marked and tracked 72 terns to determine locations of dietary mercury uptake. Capture site and capture date were the most important factors explaining variation in blood mercury concentrations (geometric mean +/- standard error: 1.09+/-0.89 microg/g wet wt), followed by sex and year. Accordingly, radiotelemetry data revealed that Forster's terns generally remained near their site of capture and foraged in nearby salt ponds, managed and tidal marshes, and tidal flats. In contrast, capture site and capture date were not important factors explaining variation in feather mercury concentrations, probably because feathers were grown on their wintering grounds several months prior to our sampling. Instead, sex and year were the most important factors explaining mercury concentrations in breast feathers (9.57+/-8.23 microg/g fresh wt), and sex was the most important factor for head feathers (6.94+/-7.04 microg/g fresh wt). Overall, 13 and 22% of prebreeding Forster's terns were estimated to be at high risk for deleterious effects due to mercury concentrations in blood (>3.0 microg/g wet wt) and feathers (>20.0 microg/g fresh wt), respectively. Breeding terns are likely to be even more at risk because blood mercury concentrations more than tripled during the 45-d prebreeding time period. These data illustrate the importance of space use and tissue type in interpreting mercury concentrations in birds.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  15. Aquifer-System Characterization by Integrating Data from the Subsurface and from Space, San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive groundwater pumping from the aquifer system in the San Joaquin Valley, California, between 1926 and 1970 caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence that locally exceeded 8 m. The importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased pumping, recovery of water levels, and a reduced rate of subsidence in some areas. Recently, land-use changes and reductions in surface-water availability have caused pumping to increase, water levels to decline, and subsidence to recur. Reduced freeboard and flow capacity of several Federal, State, and local canals have resulted from this subsidence. Vertical land-surface changes during 2005-14 in the San Joaquin Valley were determined by using space-based [Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS)] and subsurface (extensometer) data; groundwater-level and lithologic data were used to understand and estimate properties that partly control the stress/strain response of the aquifer system. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that two areas covering about 7,200 km2 subsided 20-540 mm during 2008-10; GPS data indicate that these rates continued through 2014. Groundwater levels (stress) and vertical land-surface changes (strain) were used to estimate preconsolidation head and aquifer system storage coefficients. Integrating lithology into the analysis indicates that in some parts of the valley, the compaction occurred primarily within quickly-equilibrating fine-grained deposits in deeper parts of the aquifer system. In other parts of the valley, anomalously fine-grained alluvial-fan deposits underlie one of the most rapidly subsiding areas, indicating the shallow sediments may also contribute to total subsidence. This information helps improve hydrologic and aquifer-system compaction models, which in turn can be used to consider land subsidence as a constraint in evaluating water-resource management options.

  16. APPLICATION OF A BIP CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION MODEL COMBINED WITH NASA's ATLAS MODEL TO OPTIMIZE THE SOCIETAL BENEFITS OF THE USA's INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION AND UTILIZATION INITIATIVE OF 1/14/04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Glover, Fred W.; Woodcock, Gordon R.; Laguna, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The 1/14/04 USA Space Exploratiofltilization Initiative invites all Space-faring Nations, all Space User Groups in Science, Space Entrepreneuring, Advocates of Robotic and Human Space Exploration, Space Tourism and Colonization Promoters, etc., to join an International Space Partnership. With more Space-faring Nations and Space User Groups each year, such a Partnership would require Multi-year (35 yr.-45 yr.) Space Mission Planning. With each Nation and Space User Group demanding priority for its missions, one needs a methodology for obiectively selecting the best mission sequences to be added annually to this 45 yr. Moving Space Mission Plan. How can this be done? Planners have suggested building a Reusable, Sustainable, Space Transportation Infrastructure (RSSn) to increase Mission synergism, reduce cost, and increase scientific and societal returns from this Space Initiative. Morgenthaler and Woodcock presented a Paper at the 55th IAC, Vancouver B.C., Canada, entitled Constrained Optimization Models For Optimizing Multi - Year Space Programs. This Paper showed that a Binary Integer Programming (BIP) Constrained Optimization Model combined with the NASA ATLAS Cost and Space System Operational Parameter Estimating Model has the theoretical capability to solve such problems. IAA Commission III, Space Technology and Space System Development, in its ACADEMY DAY meeting at Vancouver, requested that the Authors and NASA experts find several Space Exploration Architectures (SEAS), apply the combined BIP/ATLAS Models, and report the results at the 56th Fukuoka IAC. While the mathematical Model is in Ref.[2] this Paper presents the Application saga of that effort.

  17. [Managed care--an example for future structural developments in health care. Reflections on a informational visit on direction and administration of medical centers in east USA].

    PubMed

    Kraus, T; Weber, W; Funk, H; Klar, E; Herfarth, C

    1998-04-01

    While the different national health systems merge structurally, cost expansion in health care is a global challenge. Structural reforms have been developed during recent years in the USA which can be summarized as "managed care". They are characterized by the evolution of an economically orientated system, in which units of medical therapy are generally handled like conventional economically goods. In managed-care models, patients are deliberately directed to the most economic forms of therapy. The spectrum of medical interventions as well as diagnostic or therapeutic patterns are predefined by a system of contracted guidelines, which lead to a standardization of processes. Financing and medical executive responsibilities fuse. The autonomy of medical decisions is clearly reduced to enforce and integrated and economically oriented steering of the health system. Leadership is no longer primarily confined to doctors or scientists. It is progressively shifting to financing institutions, managing directors or insurance companies. Structural changes currently are expanding rapidly in the U.S. and have meanwhile led to marked regional reductions of medical costs. Nevertheless, the US model is still far more expensive compared to the German system. Historical development, current concepts of US-managed care, its potential influence and general applicability to the German situation are discussed in an overview.

  18. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    A NASA staff member shows attendees of the USA Science and Engineering Festival what happens to the human body in space without a space suit using a marshmallow bunny. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) listens to Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, with United Space Alliance, about corrosion work being done on the external tank door of orbiter Endeavour. On either side of Laufenberg are Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, also with USA, and Joy Huff, with KSC Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) listens to Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, with United Space Alliance, about corrosion work being done on the external tank door of orbiter Endeavour. On either side of Laufenberg are Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, also with USA, and Joy Huff, with KSC Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

  20. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration Telemedicine Project: Program Activities and Participant Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottke, T. E.; Little Finger, L.; Trapp, M. A.; Panser, L. A.; Novotny, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. DESIGN: We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. RESULTS: Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  1. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project: program activities and participant reactions.

    PubMed

    Kottke, T E; Little Finger, L; Trapp, M A; Panser, L A; Novotny, P J

    1996-04-01

    To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  2. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration Telemedicine Project: Program Activities and Participant Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottke, T. E.; Little Finger, L.; Trapp, M. A.; Panser, L. A.; Novotny, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. DESIGN: We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. RESULTS: Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  3. Understanding the Tobacco Control Act: efforts by the US Food and Drug Administration to make tobacco-related morbidity and mortality part of the USA's past, not its future.

    PubMed

    Husten, Corinne G; Deyton, Lawrence R

    2013-05-04

    The USA has a rich history of public health efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality from tobacco use. Comprehensive tobacco-prevention programmes, when robustly implemented, reduce the prevalence of youth and adult smoking, decrease cigarette consumption, accelerate declines in tobacco-related deaths, and diminish health-care costs from tobacco-related diseases. Effective public health interventions include raising the price of tobacco products, smoke-free policies, counter-marketing campaigns, advertising restrictions, augmenting access to treatment for tobacco use through insurance coverage and telephone help lines, and comprehensive approaches to prevent children and adolescents from accessing tobacco products. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has six major areas of regulatory authority: regulation of tobacco products; regulation of the advertising, marketing, and promotion of tobacco products; regulation of the distribution and sales of tobacco products; enforcement of the provisions of the Tobacco Control Act and tobacco regulations; regulatory science to support FDA authorities and activities; and public education about the harms of tobacco products and to support FDA regulatory actions. With passing of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) in June, 2009, important new regulatory approaches were added to the tobacco prevention and control arsenal.

  4. Building Common Ground through Safe Spaces of Dialog: Transforming Perceptions on Intercultural Competence among Future Primary and Secondary School Leaders in Chicago, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Gabriel Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights critical pedagogical methods used in a community relations class that introduces intercultural education concepts to current K-12 educators who are enrolled in a Masters of Education program at Northeastern Illinois University, which is located in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. The purpose of the class is to teach future…

  5. Building Common Ground through Safe Spaces of Dialog: Transforming Perceptions on Intercultural Competence among Future Primary and Secondary School Leaders in Chicago, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Gabriel Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights critical pedagogical methods used in a community relations class that introduces intercultural education concepts to current K-12 educators who are enrolled in a Masters of Education program at Northeastern Illinois University, which is located in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. The purpose of the class is to teach future…

  6. 78 FR 71614 - Submission for OMB Review; MyUSA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Submission for OMB Review; MyUSA AGENCY: Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies... and Budget (OMB) a request to approve a new information collection requirement concerning MyUSA. DATES... Collection 3090- 00XX; MyUSA by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  7. 78 FR 49270 - Information Collection; MyUSA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Information Collection; MyUSA AGENCY: Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies... request to review and approve a new information collection requirement regarding MyUSA. DATES: Submit... 3090- 00XX; MyUSA by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy (left), NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), prepares to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Helping out, at right, is Dan Phillips, also with USA. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy (left), NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), prepares to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Helping out, at right, is Dan Phillips, also with USA. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  9. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-23

    Young visitors to the inaugural USA Science and Engineering Festival at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., learn about the life cycle of a star at an exhibit sponsored by the John C. Stennis Space Center Education Office. Stennis personnel participated in the final weekend of the Oct. 10-24 festival with education activities and to present information on its new Spaced Out Sports Design Challenge.

  10. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan; Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle utilizes atmospheric thermodynamic properties to evaluate structural dynamics and vehicle flight performance impacts by the atmosphere during ascent. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric thermodynamic properties at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) used in Space. Shuttle Vehicle assessments are contained in the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) Database. Database contains tabulations for monthly and annual means (mu), standard deviations (sigma) and skewness of wind and thermodynamic variables. Wind, Thermodynamic, Humidity and Hydrostatic parameters 1 km resolution interval from 0-30 km 2 km resolution interval 30-70 km Multiple revisions of the CCAFS RRA database have been developed since initial RRA published in 1963. 1971, 1983, 2006 Space Shuttle program utilized 1983 version for use in deriving "hot" and "cold" atmospheres, atmospheric density dispersions for use in vehicle certification analyses and selection of atmospheric thermodynamic profiles for use in vehicle ascent design and certification analyses. During STS-114 launch preparations in July 2005 atmospheric density observations between 50-80 kft exceeded density limits used for aerodynamic ascent heating constraints in vehicle certification analyses. Mission specific analyses were conducted and concluded that the density bias resulted in small changes to heating rates and integrated heat loading on the vehicle. In 2001, the Air Force Combat Climatology Center began developing an updated RRA for CCAFS.

  11. Fostering Safe and Inclusive Spaces for LGBTQ Students: Phenomenographic Exploration of High School Administrators' Perceptions about GSAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steck, Andy K.; Perry, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. secondary school environment often is hostile and exclusionary toward LGBTQ students. Queer theoretical perspectives have served as the conceptual foundation for a phenomenographic study exploring seven high school administrators' perceptions of their experiences with Gay-Straight Alliances. The study results support prior research that…

  12. Fostering Safe and Inclusive Spaces for LGBTQ Students: Phenomenographic Exploration of High School Administrators' Perceptions about GSAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steck, Andy K.; Perry, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. secondary school environment often is hostile and exclusionary toward LGBTQ students. Queer theoretical perspectives have served as the conceptual foundation for a phenomenographic study exploring seven high school administrators' perceptions of their experiences with Gay-Straight Alliances. The study results support prior research that…

  13. Florida, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-01-27

    51C-44-026 (24-27 January 1985) --- This oblique view of the Florida peninsula was photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Discovery during the DOD-devoted mission. Many popular features of the state can be delineated in the scene. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), from which this and all Space Shuttle missions are launched, is on the jutting Cape Canaveral, visible on the east Atlantic Coast. The spacecraft was flying at an altitude of 190 nautical miles. A handheld Hasselblad camera, with 70mm Kodak natural color Ektachrome ASA 64 film, was used to expose the frame. Crew members for the flight were astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, Loren J. Shriver, Ellison S. Onizuka, James F. Buchli, and Gary E. Payton of the United States Air Force.

  14. Florida, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-06-14

    STS040-613-049 (5-14 June 1991) --- This oblique scene from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia shows southern Florida, several of the Bahama Islands and parts of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. The nine-day STS-40/Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) mission started with launch from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), visible in lower left. Cuba can be seen at top center. The picture was photographed with a handheld Rolleiflex camera, aimed through Columbia's aft flight deck windows.

  15. Intravenous Fluid Bolus Prior to Neonatal and Infant Lumbar Puncture: A Sonographic Assessment of the Subarachnoid Space After Intravenous Fluid Administration.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jessica; Wang, Vincent J; Goodarzian, Fariba; Lai, Hollie A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal and infant lumbar puncture is a commonly performed procedure in emergency departments, yet traumatic and unsuccessful lumbar punctures occur 30% to 50% of the time. Dehydration may be a risk factor for unsuccessful lumbar punctures, but to our knowledge, no studies have investigated the use of intravenous (IV) fluid bolus prior to lumbar puncture. To investigate the association of IV fluid bolus administration with the sonographic measure of the neonatal and infant lumbar subarachnoid space. We hypothesized that IV fluids would increase subarachnoid space size. Prospective observational study conducted from August 2012 to April 2015.The study took place at the emergency department of the Children's Hospital Los Angeles, an urban pediatric emergency department with an annual census of 76,000 visits.A convenience sample of patients aged 0 to 3 months were enrolled if they had a clinical presentation consistent with pyloric stenosis. This population was used as a proxy because they are similar in age to patients undergoing lumbar puncture for evaluation of neonatal fever and are routinely given IV fluids for dehydration. Patients with a sonographic diagnosis of pyloric stenosis underwent additional ultrasonography evaluation to determine the size of the subarachnoid space before and after IV fluids. Primary outcomes included the difference in the size of the subarachnoid space in millimeters squared before and 1 hour after administration of an IV fluid bolus in the emergency department. Interobserver consistency for the subarachnoid space measurement between attending radiologists was measured using intraclass correlation coefficient. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to examine changes in subarachnoid space measurements (millimeters squared). The study sample consisted of 40 patients with a mean (SD) age of 37 (11.3) days (range, 15-71 days). The mean (SD) size of the subarachnoid space before and 1 hour after IV fluid bolus was 37.8 (11.1) mm(2) and 36

  16. Government Information Quarterly. Volume 7, no. 2: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scientific and Technical Information Programs. Special issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernon, Peter (Editor); Mcclure, Charles R. (Editor); Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    NASA scientific and technical information (STI) programs are discussed. Topics include management of information in a research and development agency, the new space and Earth science information systems at NASA's archive, scientific and technical information management, and technology transfer of NASA aerospace technology to other industries.

  17. Paine Appointed Administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

  18. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  19. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-10-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  20. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration operations: Remote sensing experiments in the New York Bight, 7-17 April 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of remote sensing experiments conducted in the New York Bight between April 7-17, 1975, to evaluate the role of remote sensing technology to aid in monitoring ocean dumping. Remote sensors were flown on the C-54, U-2, and C-130 aircraft while the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration obtained concurrent in situ sea truth data using helicopters and surface platforms. The test site, aircraft platforms, experiments, and supporting sensors are described. The operation of each aircraft are discussed and aircraft flight lines, flight parameters, and data identification parameters are presented in figures and tables.

  2. The Alpha-Helix Concept: Innovative utilization of the Space Station Program. A report to the National Aeronautical and Space Administration requesting establishment of a Sensory Physiology Laboratory on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Singh, N.

    1983-01-01

    A major laboratory dedicated to biological-medical research is proposed for the Space Platform. The laboratory would focus on sensor physiology and biochemistry since sensory physiology represents the first impact of the new space environment on living organisms. Microgravity and the high radiation environment of space would be used to help solve the problems of prolonged sojourns in space but, more importantly, to help solve terrestrial problems of human health and agricultural productivity. The emphasis would be on experimental use of microorganisms and small plants and small animals to minimize the space and time required to use the Space Platform for maximum human betterment. The Alpha Helix Concept, that is, the use of the Space Platform to bring experimental biomedicine to a new and extreme frontier is introduced so as to better understand the worldly environment. Staffing and instrumenting the Space Platform biomedical laboratory in a manner patterned after successful terrestrial sensory physiology laboratories is also proposed.

  3. The Alpha-Helix Concept: Innovative utilization of the Space Station Program. A report to the National Aeronautical and Space Administration requesting establishment of a Sensory Physiology Laboratory on the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Singh, N.

    1983-10-01

    A major laboratory dedicated to biological-medical research is proposed for the Space Platform. The laboratory would focus on sensor physiology and biochemistry since sensory physiology represents the first impact of the new space environment on living organisms. Microgravity and the high radiation environment of space would be used to help solve the problems of prolonged sojourns in space but, more importantly, to help solve terrestrial problems of human health and agricultural productivity. The emphasis would be on experimental use of microorganisms and small plants and small animals to minimize the space and time required to use the Space Platform for maximum human betterment. The Alpha Helix Concept, that is, the use of the Space Platform to bring experimental biomedicine to a new and extreme frontier is introduced so as to better understand the worldly environment. Staffing and instrumenting the Space Platform biomedical laboratory in a manner patterned after successful terrestrial sensory physiology laboratories is also proposed.

  4. Vibro-Acoustic Forecast for Space Shuttle Launches at Vandenberg AFB: The Payload Changeout Room and the Administration Building,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7 RD-0156 944 VIBRO-RCOUS’IC FORECAST FOR SPACE SHUTTLE LAUNCHES AT / VANDENBERG AFB: THE..( U ) WESTON OB ERVATORY MR F A CROWLEY ET AL. 31 OCT 84...altitude of 300 meters. At thi v t ir the enuivatent acoustic source is 100 meters below the Shuttle WI. Thie ,’ASP1E ma xir: is 1R4.5 Wb (151 b for . S ...is constrained to use only the first 1𔃺 meters of Shuttle traject ory. As the Shuttle moves south, backscatter OtI the PPR south wall .haould nearly

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  6. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. A ground demonstration of the entire system and software was successfully tested. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development, by the MSFC, of a new generation of video based rendezvous sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation with a new target designed as a direct replacement for existing ISS hemispherical reflectors.

  7. 78 FR 5500 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA... 19, 2012, Siegfried (USA), 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application...

  8. 78 FR 46613 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC... 10, 2013, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070,...

  9. 75 FR 11937 - Ternium USA, Inc.; Shreveport, LA; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Ternium USA, Inc.; Shreveport, LA; Notice of Termination of..., USA, Inc., Shreveport, Louisiana. The petitioner has requested that the petition be...

  10. 78 FR 32458 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC... April 18, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070,...

  11. 77 FR 70825 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC... November 5, 2012, Siegfried (USA) LLC, 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070,...

  12. Detroit, Michigan, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Detroit, Michigan, USA Sensor: L7 ETM+ Acquisition Date: December 11, 2001 Path/Row: 20/30 Lat/Long: 42.330/-83.046 Detroit, Michigan, is commonly referred to as Motor City because of the many automobile manufacturing plants located in the city. It is the largest city in Michigan, with a population approaching one million. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Landsat NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the NASA/ASEE program were: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent 10 weeks at Johnson Space Center engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation is presented of the final reports on the research projects done by the fellows during the summer of 1987. This is volume 1 of a 2 volume report.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/american Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1991 are presented. Some of the topics covered include: collision avoidance for rover vehicles, bioinstrumentation, neural nets, total quality management of flexible space structures, project scheduling, nondestructive tests, orthostatic intolerance to bedrest, hypersonic reentry simulation, measuring human energy expenditure, tribological models, trace element movement in Anarctic ice, gastrointestinal function, and computer assisted instruction.

  16. Color/magnitude calibration for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) standard Fixed-Head Star Trackers (FHST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, J.; Leid, Terry; Garber, A.; Lee, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper characterizes and analyzes the spectral response of Ball Aerospace fixed-head star trackers, (FHST's) currently in use on some three-axis stabilized spacecraft. The FHST output is a function of the frequency and intensity of the incident light and the position of the star image in the field of view. The FHST's on board the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) have had occasional problems identifying stars with a high B-V value. These problems are characterized by inaccurate intensity counts observed by the tracker. The inaccuracies are due to errors in the observed star magnitude values. These errors are unique to each individual FHST. For this reason, data were also collected and analyzed from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). As a consequence of this work, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) hopes to improve the attitude accuracy on these missions and to adopt better star selection procedures for catalogs.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Capability Roadmap Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts. Although detailed requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, near-term technology investment decisions need to be guided by the anticipated capabilities needed to enable or enhance the mission concepts. This paper describes a roadmap that NASA has formulated to guide the development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing, flight-proven state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed. When SOA capabilities fell short of meeting the needs, those "gaps" were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The resulting list of enabling and enhancing capability gaps can be used to guide future ECLSS development. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies needed to enable and enhance exploration may be developed in a manner that synergistically benefits the ISS operational capability, supports Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) development, and sustains long-term technology investments for longer duration missions. This paper summarizes NASA s ECLSS capability roadmap

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) looks at an external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. At right, Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist with United Space Alliance, is describing the work. At right is Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager,also with USA. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) looks at an external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. At right, Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist with United Space Alliance, is describing the work. At right is Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager,also with USA. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Les Hanks (foreground) and Mike Young (behind him), with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. Behind Young is Lance Emery, with USA, works on tile under the windows. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Les Hanks (foreground) and Mike Young (behind him), with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. Behind Young is Lance Emery, with USA, works on tile under the windows. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

  20. Soybean seed protein oil fatty acids sugars and minerals as affected by seeding rates and row spacing in the Midsouth USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research on the effects of seeding rates (SDR) and row spacing (RS) on soybean seed composition is almost non-existent. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of SDR and RS on soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals using two soybean cultivars, P 93M90 (ear...

  1. A modelling study of hyporheic exchange pattern and the sequence, size, and spacing of stream bedforms in mountain stream networks, Oregon, USA.

    Treesearch

    Michael N. Gooseff; Justin K. Anderson; Steven M. Wondzell; Justin LaNier; Roy. Haggerty

    2005-01-01

    Studies of hyporheic exchange flows have identified physical features of channels that control exchange flow at the channel unit scale, namely slope breaks in the longitudinal profile of streams that generate subsurface head distributions. We recently completed a field study that suggested channel unit spacing in stream longitudinal profiles can be used to predict the...

  2. 77 FR 27082 - StarTek USA, Inc., 244 Dundee Avenue, Greeley, CO; StarTek USA, Inc., 1250 H Street, Greeley, CO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration StarTek USA, Inc., 244 Dundee Avenue, Greeley, CO; StarTek USA, Inc... December 28, 2010, applicable to workers and former workers of StarTek USA, Inc., Greeley, Colorado. The... reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm. New information shows that there are two...

  3. Technology transfer in digital mammography. Report of the Joint National Cancer Institute-National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop of May 19-20, 1993.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D; Silbiger, M; Brown, G S; Clarke, L; Dwyer, S; Yaffe, M; Shtern, F

    1994-04-01

    Digital mammography is one of the most promising novel technologies for further improvement of early detection of breast cancer, offering important potential advantages: 1) improved image quality; 2) digital image processing for improved lesion contrast; 3) computer-aided diagnosis for enhanced radiologic interpretation; and 4) teleradiology for facilitated radiologic consultation. The Diagnostic Imaging Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently funded an international, multidisciplinary, multi-institutional Digital Mammography Development Group for collaborations between NCI, the academic community, and industry to facilitate the integrated development and implementation of digital mammographic systems. Currently, however, digital mammography faces a number of fundamental technological roadblocks: 1) cost-effective digital detectors and displays for imaging systems; 2) the need for novel algorithms for image processing and computer-aided diagnosis; and 3) high performance, low cost digital networks to provide an "information superhighway" for teleradiology. To solve some of these technological problems, the Diagnostic Imaging Research Branch of NCI joined efforts with the Technology Transfer Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to pursue a federal technology transfer program in digital mammography. The authors discuss the findings and recommendations of the workshop entitled "Technology Transfer in Digital Mammography," which was organized and held jointly by the NCI and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in May, 1993. Numerous innovative technologies of varying degree of promise for digital mammography were presented at the conference. In this article, specific technologies presented at the workshop by the federal and federally-supported laboratories are described, and critiques of these technologies by the leaders of the medical imaging community are presented.

  4. 75 FR 22411 - Fonterra (USA) Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Fonterra (USA) Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that Fonterra (USA) Inc. has filed a petition proposing that the food additive regulations be...

  5. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  6. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  7. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  8. Kids Voting USA: Bringing Out the Vote.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golston, Sydele E.

    1997-01-01

    Kids Voting USA is a grass roots, community-driven voter education program. A Kids Voting community must mobilize corporate sponsors, election officials, media representatives, and administrative staff to print curricula, train teachers, prepare students, welcome them to polling precincts, and count and report their votes. Children become…

  9. Future Expansion of the Lightning Surveillance System at the Kennedy Space Center and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, C. T.; Wilson, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and a volumetric mapping array, the lightning detection and ranging II (LDAR II) system: These systems are used to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations and hardware. These systems are not perfect and both have documented missed lightning events when compared to the existing lightning surveillance system at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B). Because of this finding it is NASA's plan to install a lightning surveillance system around each of the active launch pads sharing site locations and triggering capabilities when possible. This paper shows how the existing lightning surveillance system at LC39B has performed in 2011 as well as the plan for the expansion around all active pads.

  10. A review of falconry as a bird control technique with recommendations for use at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.; Yosef, Reuven

    1994-01-01

    Falconry has been proposed as a method of reducing the bird/aircraftstrike hazard, in addition to current bird control techniques, at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, U.S. Bird control programs using falconry have been employed at a number of military and commercial airfields in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Most falconry programs have been discontinued. In most situations, falconry did not prove cost effective when compared to alternative bird control techniques. Available literature and documents, as well as several raptor specialists and military personnel, suggest that falconry may be useful only against certain problem species and when other bird control methods have been proven inadequate. Because many of the most commonly used falcons are protected species, acquisition of falcons will complicate their use in bird control programs. Many avian species found at the SLF are federally and state protected or of conservation concern, therefore, environmental impacts may also result from the use of falcons.

  11. Pattern of community compliance with spaced, single-dose, mass administrations of diethylcarbamazine or ivermectin, for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis from rural areas of southern India.

    PubMed

    Vanamail, P; Ramaiah, K D; Subramanian, S; Pani, S P; Yuvaraj, J; Das, P K

    2005-04-01

    Current programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF) are largely based on annual mass administrations of single doses of antifilarial drugs. The level and pattern of compliance by the target population are important determinants of the success of such mass drug administrations (MDA). Community compliance was therefore investigated during a study in southern India of the effects, on Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemia and transmission, of spaced MDA based on diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM). During six rounds of MDA, the frequency of compliance in the target populations, in the five study villages given DEC and the five given IVM, ranged from 55%-77%. Analysis of the relevant cohort data indicated that about 30% of the villagers had complied with treatment during all six rounds, but 3.5% of those in the DEC arm and 4.0% of those in the IVM arm had never complied with treatment. Most of the villagers (>90%) had received treatment at least once, however, and >60% had each received treatment in at least four of the six rounds. Overall, there was a significant negative correlation (r=-0.78; P=0.008) between the size of the village, in terms of the number of villagers, and the mean frequency of compliance over the six rounds of MDA. The pattern of community compliance was found to be 'semi-systematic', laying between random and systematic. In terms of the elimination of LF, a semi-systematic pattern of compliance is worse than random compliance but better than systematic. The relevance of the levels and patterns of compliance to LF control or elimination is discussed.

  12. 78 FR 30333 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (Usa), Llc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (Usa), Llc... 70825, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by... determined that the registration of Siegfried (USA), LLC., to manufacture the listed basic classes...

  13. 78 FR 64020 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried USA, LLC..., Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by letter to... Siegfried USA, LLC., to manufacture the listed basic class of controlled substance is consistent with...

  14. 78 FR 24206 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; USA Spending

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; USA Spending AGENCY: Interagency... requirement regarding USA Spending. DATES: Submit comments on or before June 24, 2013. ADDRESSES: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 3090- 00xx, USA Spending, by any of the following...

  15. 77 FR 30027 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (USA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (USA) By..., Siegfried (USA), 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by renewal to the... (USA), to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the...

  16. 78 FR 64015 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried (USA), LLC By..., Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by letter to... that the registration of Siegfried USA, LLC., to import the basic classes of controlled substances...

  17. 78 FR 64020 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried USA, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried USA, LLC..., page 18338, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, applied for... August 6, 2013, Siegfried (USA), LLC., subsequently withdrew this request for drug code Opium, raw...

  18. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  19. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Soil Trace Gas (CH4, N2O and NO) Fluxes in a Scrub Oak Ecosystem at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, A. E.; Bracho, R. G.; Stover, D.

    2008-05-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase the plant demand for soil nutrients, which in turn can impose a nitrogen limitation on unmanaged ecosystems. The microbial responses to CO2 enrichment are complex and difficult to predict. Some studies suggest that CO2 enrichment increases microbial mineralization of nitrogen, making nitrogen more available through a carbon priming effect. Alternatively, microbes may contribute to nitrogen limitation through accelerated soil nitrogen losses. In this study, we examined the effects of CO2 enrichment on trace gases that are released or taken up during soil microbial reactions: nitrification, denitrification and methane consumption. Ambient and approximately twice-ambient CO2 treatments were applied to a coastal scrub oak community at Kennedy Space Center, FL, via open-top chambers since May 1996. The CO2 treatments ended in July 2007 before an aboveground harvest took place inside the chambers. Nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and methane (CH4) fluxes were measured in the field from 2006-2008. Soil N2O losses from the study site were low (< 1 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1) with no CO2 treatment effect. Soil NO losses were similarly low (< 1 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1), but fluxes were consistently lower in elevated CO2 than in ambient CO2. NO production was higher for 3 months post-harvest in ambient CO2. Methane consumption was lower in elevated vs. ambient CO2 in 2006, although this trend was not significant. Over a decade of CO2 enrichment has reduced soil nitrogen availability, which could explain the low overall rates of nitrogen trace gas emission. Reduced soil carbon stores in elevated CO2 measured at this site could also explain the lower nitrification rates, measured as NO efflux. Trace gas emissions in this sandy, nutrient-poor scrub oak forest are comparable to published rates in desert ecosystems.

  20. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mission-X Child Health Promotion Program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Min, Jungwon; Tan, Zhengqi; Abadie, Laurie; Townsend, Scott; Xue, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effects of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mission-X: Train Like an Astronaut program (MX) on children's health-related knowledge and behaviors of a sample of US participants. A nonexperimental pilot intervention study in 5 cities with a pre-post comparison of children's health-related knowledge and behaviors in the United States in 2014 and 2015. Children (n = 409) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 10.1 (1.7) years. Children answered pre- and postintervention questionnaires. We measured the differences in children's health knowledge on nutrition and physical fitness and behaviors on diet and physical activity as scores. A 6-week web- and school-based intervention for a healthier lifestyle by introducing physical fitness and science activities based on actual astronaut training under a teacher's supervision. Nonparametric analysis and logistic regression models. Participants significantly improved both of their health behaviors on physical activity ( P < .001) and diet ( P = .06) and their health knowledge regarding nutrition ( P < .001) and physical fitness ( P < .001) after the intervention. The improvement in children's behaviors ( P < .001), knowledge ( P < .001), and the total score ( P < .001) after intervention did not significantly vary by sex or age, after adjusting for year of participation and state of residency. The MX seems effective in improving health behaviors and health knowledge of participating children, which may serve as a model for sustainable global child health promotion program. Further research is needed to test its long-term effects on child health.

  1. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  2. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-04

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  3. 14 CFR § 1201.103 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administration. § 1201.103 Section § 1201.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.103 Administration. (a) NASA is headed by an Administrator, who...

  4. 14 CFR 1201.103 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administration. 1201.103 Section 1201.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.103 Administration. (a) NASA is headed by an Administrator, who is...

  5. 14 CFR 1201.103 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administration. 1201.103 Section 1201.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.103 Administration. (a) NASA is headed by an Administrator, who is...

  6. 14 CFR 1201.103 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Administration. 1201.103 Section 1201.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.103 Administration. (a) NASA is headed by an Administrator, who is...

  7. 14 CFR 1201.103 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration. 1201.103 Section 1201.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.103 Administration. (a) NASA is headed by an Administrator, who is...

  8. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  9. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  10. Measurement of forest disturbance and regrowth with Landsat and forest inventory and analysis data: anticipated benefits from forest and inventory analysis' collaboration with the national aeronautics and space administration and university partners

    Treesearch

    Sean Healey; Gretchen Moisen; Jeff Masek; Warren Cohen; Sam Goward; < i> et al< /i>

    2007-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program has partnered with researchers from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the University of Maryland, and other U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service units to identify disturbance patterns across the United States using FIA plot data and time series of Landsat satellite images. Spatially explicit...

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Readdy, KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges, and NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Readdy, KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges, and NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges receives the applause of NASA officials and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy, and KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges receives the applause of NASA officials and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy, and KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy share a light moment on the stage in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy share a light moment on the stage in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  14. STS-128 Administrator Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-03

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, seated left, smiles as Deputy Administrator Lori Garver greets STS-128 astronauts Patrick Forrester, Jose Hernandez and Christer Fugelsang, of the European Space Agency, during a meeting at NASA Headquarters, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. Validation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index as a tool to evaluate-the learning curve for endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Rachid; Raman, Maitreyi; Anderson, John; McLaughlin, Kevin; Rostom, Alaa; Coderre, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although workplace workload assessments exist in different fields, an endoscopy-specific workload assessment tool is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To validate such a workload tool and use it to map the progression of novice trainees in gastroenterology in performing their first endoscopies. METHODS: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) workload assessment tool was completed by eight novice trainees in gastroenterology and 10 practicing gastroenterologists/surgeons. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to construct a streamlined endoscopy-specific task load index, which was subsequently validated. The ‘Endoscopy Task Load Index’ was used to monitor progression of trainee exertion and self-assessed performance over their first 40 procedures. RESULTS: From the factor analysis of the NASA-TLX, two principal components emerged: a measure of exertion and a measure of self-efficacy. These items became the components of the newly validated Endoscopy Task Load Index. There was a steady decline in self-perceived exertion over the training period, which was more rapid for gastroscopy than colonoscopy. The self-efficacy scores for gastroscopy rapidly increased over the first few procedures, reaching a plateau after this period of time. For colonoscopy, there was a progressive increase in reported self-efficacy over the first three quartiles of procedures, followed by a drop in self-efficacy scores over the final quartile. DISCUSSION: The present study validated an Endoscopy Task Load Index that can be completed in <1 min. Practical implications of such a tool in endoscopy education include identifying periods of higher perceived exertion among novice endoscopists, facilitating appropriate levels of guidance from trainers. PMID:24619638

  16. Validation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index as a tool to evaluate the learning curve for endoscopy training.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Rachid; Raman, Maitreyi; Anderson, John; McLaughlin, Kevin; Rostom, Alaa; Coderre, Sylvain

    2014-03-01

    Although workplace workload assessments exist in different fields, an endoscopy-specific workload assessment tool is lacking. To validate such a workload tool and use it to map the progression of novice trainees in gastroenterology in performing their first endoscopies. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) workload assessment tool was completed by eight novice trainees in gastroenterology and 10 practicing gastroenterologists⁄surgeons. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to construct a streamlined endoscopy-specific task load index, which was subsequently validated. The 'Endoscopy Task Load Index' was used to monitor progression of trainee exertion and self-assessed performance over their first 40 procedures. From the factor analysis of the NASA-TLX, two principal components emerged: a measure of exertion and a measure of self-efficacy. These items became the components of the newly validated Endoscopy Task Load Index. There was a steady decline in self-perceived exertion over the training period, which was more rapid for gastroscopy than colonoscopy. The self-efficacy scores for gastroscopy rapidly increased over the first few procedures, reaching a plateau after this period of time. For colonoscopy, there was a progressive increase in reported self-efficacy over the first three quartiles of procedures, followed by a drop in self-efficacy scores over the final quartile. The present study validated an Endoscopy Task Load Index that can be completed in <1 min. Practical implications of such a tool in endoscopy education include identifying periods of higher perceived exertion among novice endoscopists, facilitating appropriate levels of guidance from trainers.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration "threat and error" model applied to pediatric cardiac surgery: error cycles precede ∼85% of patient deaths.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Edward J; Nosikova, Yaroslavna; Pham-Hung, Eric; Gritti, Michael; Schwartz, Steven; Caldarone, Christopher A; Redington, Andrew; Van Arsdell, Glen S

    2015-02-01

    We hypothesized that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration "threat and error" model (which is derived from analyzing >30,000 commercial flights, and explains >90% of crashes) is directly applicable to pediatric cardiac surgery. We implemented a unit-wide performance initiative, whereby every surgical admission constitutes a "flight" and is tracked in real time, with the aim of identifying errors. The first 500 consecutive patients (524 flights) were analyzed, with an emphasis on the relationship between error cycles and permanent harmful outcomes. Among 524 patient flights (risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery category: 1-6; median: 2) 68 (13%) involved residual hemodynamic lesions, 13 (2.5%) permanent end-organ injuries, and 7 deaths (1.3%). Preoperatively, 763 threats were identified in 379 (72%) flights. Only 51% of patient flights (267) were error free. In the remaining 257 flights, 430 errors occurred, most commonly related to proficiency (280; 65%) or judgment (69, 16%). In most flights with errors (173 of 257; 67%), an unintended clinical state resulted, ie, the error was consequential. In 60% of consequential errors (n = 110; 21% of total), subsequent cycles of additional error/unintended states occurred. Cycles, particularly those containing multiple errors, were very significantly associated with permanent harmful end-states, including residual hemodynamic lesions (P < .0001), end-organ injury (P < .0001), and death (P < .0001). Deaths were almost always preceded by cycles (6 of 7; P < .0001). Human error, if not mitigated, often leads to cycles of error and unintended patient states, which are dangerous and precede the majority of harmful outcomes. Efforts to manage threats and error cycles (through crew resource management techniques) are likely to yield large increases in patient safety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, JiEun; Min, Jungwon; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Childhood obesity has become a global epidemic. Development of effective and sustainable programs to promote healthy behaviors from a young age is important. This study developed and tested an intervention program designed to promote healthy eating and physical activity among young children in South Korea by adaptation of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X (MX) Program. SUBJECTS/METHODS The intervention program consisted of 4 weeks of fitness and 2 weeks of nutrition education. A sample of 104 subjects completed pre- and post-surveys on the Children's Nutrition Acknowledgement Test (NAT). Parents were asked for their children's characteristics and two 24-hour dietary records, the Nutrition Quotient (NQ) at baseline and a 6-week follow-up. Child weight status was assessed using Korean body mass index (BMI) percentiles. RESULTS At baseline, 16.4% (boy: 15.4%; girl: 19.2%) of subjects were overweight or obese (based on BMI≥85%tile). Fat consumption significantly decreased in normal BMI children (48.6 ± 16.8 g at baseline to 41.9 ± 18.1 g after intervention, P < 0.05); total NQ score significantly increased from 66.4 to 67.9 (P < 0.05); total NAT score significantly improved in normal BMI children (74.3 at baseline to 81.9 after the program), children being underweight (from 71.0 to 77.0), and overweight children (77.1 at baseline vs. 88.2 after intervention, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The 6-week South Korean NASA MX project is feasible and shows favorable changes in eating behaviors and nutritional knowledge among young children. PMID:27698964

  19. Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, JiEun; Wang, Youfa; Min, Jungwon; Carvajal, Nubia A; Lloyd, Charles W

    2016-10-01

    Childhood obesity has become a global epidemic. Development of effective and sustainable programs to promote healthy behaviors from a young age is important. This study developed and tested an intervention program designed to promote healthy eating and physical activity among young children in South Korea by adaptation of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X (MX) Program. The intervention program consisted of 4 weeks of fitness and 2 weeks of nutrition education. A sample of 104 subjects completed pre- and post-surveys on the Children's Nutrition Acknowledgement Test (NAT). Parents were asked for their children's characteristics and two 24-hour dietary records, the Nutrition Quotient (NQ) at baseline and a 6-week follow-up. Child weight status was assessed using Korean body mass index (BMI) percentiles. At baseline, 16.4% (boy: 15.4%; girl: 19.2%) of subjects were overweight or obese (based on BMI≥85%tile). Fat consumption significantly decreased in normal BMI children (48.6 ± 16.8 g at baseline to 41.9 ± 18.1 g after intervention, P < 0.05); total NQ score significantly increased from 66.4 to 67.9 (P < 0.05); total NAT score significantly improved in normal BMI children (74.3 at baseline to 81.9 after the program), children being underweight (from 71.0 to 77.0), and overweight children (77.1 at baseline vs. 88.2 after intervention, P < 0.001). The 6-week South Korean NASA MX project is feasible and shows favorable changes in eating behaviors and nutritional knowledge among young children.

  20. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Two boys attending the USA Science and Engineering Festival pose with Robonaut 2 at the NASA Stage. Robonaut 2 is NASA's first dexterous humanoid robot that has been working on the International Space Station for the last three years. R2 recently received 1.2 meter long legs to allow mobility. This will enable R2 to assist more with regular and repetitive tasks inside and outside the station. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival is measured by a laser at the NASA Stage. A NASA Staff member describes the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission, which operated from 2003-2009, and pioneered the use of laser altimeters in space to study the elevation of the Earth's surface and its changes. ICESat-2 is a follow-on mission to continue the ICESat observations and is scheduled to launch in 2017. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Attendees of the USA Science and Engineering Festival observe their infrared images as a NASA Staff member describes the James Webb Space Telescope. It will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5 meter primary mirror and will study every phase in the history of our Universe ranging from the Big Bang to the formation of our Solar System. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival observes the infrared image of himself as a NASA staff member describes the James Webb Space Telescope. It will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5 meter primary mirror and will study every phase in the history of our Universe ranging from the Big Bang to the formation of our Solar System. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival observes Robonaut 2 at the NASA Stage. Robonaut 2 is NASA's first dexterous humanoid robot that has been working on the International Space Station for the last three years. R2 recently received 1.2 meter long legs to allow mobility. This will enable R2 to assist more with regular and repetitive tasks inside and outside the station. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival observes the infrared image of himself as a NASA Staff member describes the James Webb Space Telescope. It will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5 meter primary mirror and will study every phase in the history of our Universe ranging from the Big Bang to the formation of our Solar System. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival examines how glass blocks some heat, altering the infrared image of himself. The James Webb Space Telescope will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5 meter primary mirror and will study every phase in the history of our Universe ranging from the Big Bang to the formation of our Solar System. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  8. 14 CFR 1260.147 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1260.147 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of... of all purchases. Recipients shall evaluate contractor performance and document, as...

  9. 14 CFR 1260.147 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1260.147 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of... of all purchases. Recipients shall evaluate contractor performance and document, as...

  10. 75 FR 10505 - FCI USA, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Inc., Mount Union, PA; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration FCI USA, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Inc... January 22, 2010, applicable to workers of FCI USA, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Manpower... issued as follows: All workers of FCI USA, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Inc...

  11. 75 FR 10822 - FCI USA, LLC Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Inc.; Mount Union, PA; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration FCI USA, LLC Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Inc... January 22, 2010, applicable to workers of FCI USA, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Manpower... issued as follows: All workers of FCI USA, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Inc...

  12. 75 FR 49525 - World Color (USA), LLC Formerly Known as Quebecor World World Color Covington Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration World Color (USA), LLC Formerly Known as Quebecor World World Color... to workers of World Color (USA), LLC, formerly known as Quebecor World, World Color Covington... IH Services were employed on-site at the Covington, Tennessee, location of World Color (USA), LLC...

  13. 14 CFR 1274.508 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contract administration. 1274.508 Section 1274.508 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Procurement Standards § 1274.508 Contract administration. A system for...

  14. Human Resources Policies Compared: What Can the EU and the USA Learn from Each Other?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare in a fruitful way the human resources (HR) policies that exist in the European Union (EU) and in the United States of America (USA). Nowadays, the world is evolving to a situation in which big economic spaces like Brazil, Russia, India, China, Japan, the EU and the USA are becoming dominant. Those spaces can learn from one…

  15. Human Resources Policies Compared: What Can the EU and the USA Learn from Each Other?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare in a fruitful way the human resources (HR) policies that exist in the European Union (EU) and in the United States of America (USA). Nowadays, the world is evolving to a situation in which big economic spaces like Brazil, Russia, India, China, Japan, the EU and the USA are becoming dominant. Those spaces can learn from one…

  16. Budgeting Academic Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Watson

    2011-01-01

    There are many articles about space management, including those that discuss space calculations, metrics, and categories. Fewer articles discuss the space budgeting processes used by administrators to allocate space. The author attempts to fill this void by discussing her administrative experiences with Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU)…

  17. Budgeting Academic Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Watson

    2011-01-01

    There are many articles about space management, including those that discuss space calculations, metrics, and categories. Fewer articles discuss the space budgeting processes used by administrators to allocate space. The author attempts to fill this void by discussing her administrative experiences with Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU)…

  18. Health care reform in the USA: Recommendations from USA and non-USA radiologists.

    PubMed

    Burke, Lauren Mb; Martin, Diego R; Bader, Till; Semelka, Richard C

    2012-02-28

    To compare the opinions and recommendations of imaging specialists from United States (USA) and non-USA developed nations for USA health care reform. A survey was emailed out to 18 imaging specialists from 17 non-USA developed nation countries and 14 radiologists within the USA regarding health care reform. The questionnaire contained the following questions: what are the strengths of your health care system, what problems are present in your nation's health care system, and what recommendations do you have for health care reform in the USA. USA and non-USA radiologists received the same questionnaire. Strengths of the USA health care system include high quality care, autonomy, and access to timely care. Twelve of 14 (86%) USA radiologists identified medicolegal action as a major problem in their health care system and felt that medicolegal reform was a critical aspect of health care reform. None of the non-USA radiologists identified medicolegal aspects as a problem in their own country nor identified it as a subject for USA health care reform. Eleven of 14 (79%) USA radiologists and 16/18 (89%) non-USA radiologists identified universal health care coverage as an important recommendation for reform. Without full universal coverage, meaningful health care reform will likely require medicolegal reform as an early and important aspect of improved and efficient health care.

  19. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  20. The USA PATRIOT Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minow, Mary; Coyle, Karen; Kaufman, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Explains the USA PATRIOT (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism) Act, passed after the September 11 terrorist attacks, and its implications for libraries and patron records. Considers past dealings with the FBI; court orders; search warrants; wiretaps; and subpoenas. Includes:…

  1. The USA PATRIOT Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minow, Mary; Coyle, Karen; Kaufman, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Explains the USA PATRIOT (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism) Act, passed after the September 11 terrorist attacks, and its implications for libraries and patron records. Considers past dealings with the FBI; court orders; search warrants; wiretaps; and subpoenas. Includes:…

  2. Modernizing Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Vincent L.; Hildebrand, Verna

    1981-01-01

    Suggests assignment of research duties and rotation of teaching and management roles for college administrators, to increase their effectiveness and diminish the negative effects of declining enrollments. (JD)

  3. Homeopathy in the USA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2001-04-01

    Homeopathy was introduced into the USA by Hans Burch Gram in 1825. It developed largely through immigration of German homeopaths. The first homeopathic medical college was established in Allentown, PA in 1835. The American institute of Homeopathy (AIH) was founded in 1844. The American Medical Association was founded in 1847 and pursued policies hostile to homeopathy from the outset. Eclectic medicine was widespread in nineteenth century medicine, one of the greatest homeopaths, JT Kent had originally been an eclectic. The International Hahnemannian Association split from the AIH in 1880. The Flexner Report of 1910 resulted in many homeopathic medical colleges being closed down. Homeopathy in the USA was in steep decline from the 1920s to the 1960s but has had a strong recovery since the 1970s.

  4. 75 FR 67775 - Compass Group USA, Inc., Canteen, Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Compass Group USA, Inc., Canteen, Webster City, Iowa; Notice of... workers and former workers of Compass Group USA, Inc., Canteen, Webster City, Iowa. Signed at...

  5. 75 FR 66796 - Multina, USA, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Plattsburgh, NY; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... working on-site at the ] Plattsburgh, New York location of Multina, USA. The amended notice applicable to... Employment and Training Administration Multina, USA, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Plattsburgh, NY; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance...

  6. 78 FR 49546 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC This is notice that on June 10, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New...

  7. Chicago, Illinois, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In this late winter scene of Chicago, Illinois, USA (42.0N, 87.5W) the light dusting of snow has actually enhanced the determination of the cities street pattern, parks and other cultural features. Sited at the south end of Lake Michigan, Chicago has long served as an industrial, transportation and communications center for the midwest. The obvious snowline on the ground enables meteorologists to trace the regional groundtracks of winter storms.

  8. Chicago, Illinois, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In this late winter scene of Chicago, Illinois, USA (41.5N, 87.0W) the light dusting of snow has actually enhanced the determination of the cities street pattern, parks and other cultural features. Sited at the south end of Lake Michigan, Chicago has long served as an industrial, transportation and communications center for the midwest. The obvious snowline on the ground enables meteorologists to trace the regional groundtracks of winter storms.

  9. Chicago, Illinois, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-04

    In this late winter scene of Chicago, Illinois, USA (41.5N, 87.0W) the light dusting of snow has actually enhanced the determination of the cities street pattern, parks and other cultural features. Sited at the south end of Lake Michigan, Chicago has long served as an industrial, transportation and communications center for the midwest. The obvious snowline on the ground enables meteorologists to trace the regional groundtracks of winter storms.

  10. Theatre Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Patti P., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this special journal issue is theatre administration. The journal is divided into four parts: a short introduction and three major sections on the role of the theatre chair, theatre administration in the 1980's, and evaluating creative work. Among others, topics covered in the issue's 13 articles include (1) the changing nature of the…

  11. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  12. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  13. NASA/NBS (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Bureau of Standards) standard reference model for telerobot control system architecture (NASREM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.; Mccain, Harry G.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The document describes the NASA Standard Reference Model (NASREM) Architecture for the Space Station Telerobot Control System. It defines the functional requirements and high level specifications of the control system for the NASA space Station document for the functional specification, and a guideline for the development of the control system architecture, of the 10C Flight Telerobot Servicer. The NASREM telerobot control system architecture defines a set of standard modules and interfaces which facilitates software design, development, validation, and test, and make possible the integration of telerobotics software from a wide variety of sources. Standard interfaces also provide the software hooks necessary to incrementally upgrade future Flight Telerobot Systems as new capabilities develop in computer science, robotics, and autonomous system control.

  14. Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Part 2: Space shuttle program. Section 1: Observations and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The NASA and contractor management systems, including policies, practices, and procedures for the development of critical systems, subsystems and integration of the program elements, were investigated. The technical development status of critical systems, subsystems, and interfaces is presented. Space shuttle elements were qualified as to potential risks and hazards. The elements included the orbiter, external tanks, main engine, solid rocket boosters, and the ground support facilities.

  15. Report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the Space Shuttle Program. Part 1: Observations and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Each system was chosen on the basis of its importance with respect to crew safety and mission success. An overview of the systems management is presented. The space shuttle main engine, orbiter thermal protection system, avionics, external tanks and solid rocket boosters were examined. The ground test and ground support equipment programs were studied. Program management was found to have an adequate understanding of the significant ground and flight risks involved.

  16. Challenges for space medicine.

    PubMed

    Sri Kantha, S

    1994-03-01

    Since April 1961, when Yuri Gagarin first orbited the earth about 270 astronauts (predominantly males) have lived in space. More than 90 percent of these astronauts were natives of the USA and the ex-USSR. In this commentary, the challenges confronting the discipline of space medicine are reviewed. These include, (1) space sickness, (2) wasting of the musculoskeletal system and (3) developing a longterm life support system.

  17. 75 FR 60139 - Compass Group USA, Inc. Canteen: Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Compass Group USA, Inc. Canteen: Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated July 9, 2010,...

  18. Field investigations of historic covered timber bridges in the USA

    Treesearch

    James Wacker; Travis Hosteng; Brent. Phares

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Highway Administration is sponsoring a comprehensive research program on Historic Covered Timber Bridges in the USA. This national program's main purpose is to develop improved methods to preserve, rehabililate, and restore the timber bridge trusses that were developed during the early 1800s, and in many cases are still in service today. The overall...

  19. Sexual Orientation Topics in Educational Leadership Programmes across the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Todd

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examines the inclusion of sexual orientation topics within the formal curriculum of 55 public college and university educational administration/leadership programmes across the USA. The findings indicate that programmes place a low priority upon sexual orientation compared to other diversity topics and that 59.5% of programmes…

  20. Sexual Orientation Topics in Educational Leadership Programmes across the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Todd

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examines the inclusion of sexual orientation topics within the formal curriculum of 55 public college and university educational administration/leadership programmes across the USA. The findings indicate that programmes place a low priority upon sexual orientation compared to other diversity topics and that 59.5% of programmes…

  1. Statement of Aaron Cohen, Director, Research and Engineering, Johnson Space Center and Chairman, Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The activities of NASA's Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee is discussed. Advanced Technology Advisory Committee (ATAC) activities over the last year are reviewed in preparation of the report to Congress on the potential for advancing automation and robotics technology for the space station and for the U.S. economy.

  2. Research and Advanced Development. Volume I - Supporting Research and Technology for the Office of Space Sciences and Applications, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Semiannual Review, 1 Jan. - 30 Jun. 1968.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This volume contains a review of all supporting research and technology in progress at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during the period January 1 to June 30, 1965, under direction of the Office of Research and Advanced Development for the Office of Space Sciences and Applications. The work units are arranged in numerical sequence by NASA code in each subject section.

  3. Statement of Chester M. Lee, Director, Space Transportation Systems Operations, NASA, and Phillip E. Culbertson, Assistant Administrator of Planning and Program Integration, NASA. [concerning NASA and non-NASA payloads for the space shuttle program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Payloads for the Space Transportation System 560 flights, particularly the NASA payloads, are discussed. NASA payloads will make up approximately 50% of total payloads in these flights. Proposed Spacelab experiments are listed and discussed; plans for accommodating commercial user payloads are then outlined, including price schedules.

  4. Restricting maternal space during parturition in the pig. Effects on oxytocin, vasopressin and cortisol secretion following vagino-cervical stimulation and administration of naloxone.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C L; Boulton, M I; Forsling, M L; Goode, J A; McGrath, T J

    1997-04-01

    This experiment studied the effects on endocrine and birth parameters of parturient pigs produced by restricting maternal freedom of movement without otherwise altering environment. Six primiparous pigs (gilts) were each given a jugular catheter under anaesthesia 7 days before parturition and commenced birth in a strawed pen, 2.0 m x 1.5 m in size. Continuous automated blood sampling (3 ml min-1) from unrestrained gilts began following the birth of the first piglet (stage 1) and continued for 2 h. After at least 30 min of blood collection, maternal space was reduced to 2.0 m x 0.55 m by placing rails across the pen (stage 2). The scope for movement in stage 2 was similar to that offered by a farrowing crate. After at least 25 min each gilt was given the opioid antagonist naloxone (1 mg kg-1 i.v.: stage 3). At each stage, vagino-cervical stimulation (VCS) was applied to mimic foetal ejection. Non-cervically stimulated oxytocin (OT) secretion between stages 1 and 2 was unchanged (P > 0.05) but increased significantly relative to both stages 1 and 2 following naloxone treatment for 15-20 min (P < 0.05, paired t-tests on log10 data). Following VCS in all stages plasma OT rose (P < 0.05) for 1-2 min in a similar way to that seen previously following foetal ejection, the increases being proportionally similar irrespective of stage or baseline secretion. Cortisol secretion did not increase as a consequence of space restriction (mean +/- SEM concentrations were 28.6 +/- 8.51 pmol l-1 and 32.3 +/- 11.8 pmol l-1 in stages 1 and 2, respectively). In addition, VCS did not significantly affect cortisol output. Lysine vasopressin concentrations were not affected as a consequence of either stage or VCS. Parturition was not interrupted following space restriction of gilts. These data suggest that reducing maternal space allowance during parturition is not stressful when the process does not involve the movement of animals to novel surroundings.

  5. 14 CFR 1274.508 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract administration. 1274.508 Section 1274.508 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS... evaluate contractor performance and document, as appropriate, whether contractors have met the...

  6. Reagan Administration Prepares Budget Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Describes tentative federal budget cuts affecting science education in the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, and the specific areas these budget cuts will affect. (DS)

  7. Global update: USA.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2011-11-01

    The NIH, which has an annual budget of over US$31 billion, is the world's largest biomedical research agency and is a major strength for science in the USA. Despite the political nature of stem cell research, this area of science has flourished across the country. In 2010, the NIH funded approximately US$1.3 billion in stem cell research. According to the ISI Web of Science, more than 4000 US-authored stem cell publications were produced in 2010 - approximately 40% of the world total. The average citation rate was 4.12 per article, with six articles amassing 100 citations in less than 18 months after release.

  8. Increases in vocalization and motor reflex thresholds are influenced by the site of morphine microinjection: comparisons following administration into the periaqueductal gray, ventral medulla, and spinal subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Borszcz, G S

    1995-06-01

    The relative influence of morphine microinjected into the periaqueductal gray, ventral medulla (nucleus raphé magnus or nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis), or spinal subarachnoid space on the thresholds of responses organized at spinal (spinal motor reflexes, SMRs), medullary (vocalizations elicited during shock, VDSs), and rhinencephalic-diencephalic (vocalization after discharges, VADs) levels of the neuraxis was assessed. Dose-dependent increases in response thresholds differed with the site of morphine injection. These results indicate that the mu-opiate-receptor-linked systems in the mesencephalon, medulla, and spinal cord exert differential antinociceptive effects on pain behaviors organized at different levels of the neuraxis. A hypothesis is offered regarding the mechanisms through which morphine inhibits nociceptive transmission through various levels of the CNS. VADs are promoted as a model system for analyzing the affective-motivational dimension of the pain experience.

  9. Summary Report for National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and Centro Para Prevencao da Poluicao (C3P) 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The C3P &. NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on November 15-18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. The theme of the workshop was "Global Collaboration in Environmental and Alternative Energy Strategies". The workshop was held at ESTEC's conference center. More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop. For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session. Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students. In addition to the students, thirty eight U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics: (1) Hazardous materials management and substitution in support of space operations (2) Emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies (3) Sustainable development and redevelopment (4) Remediation technologies and strategies The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of the challenges of operating installations across borders. Throughout the workshop, attendees heard about the scope of environmental and energy challenges that industry and governments face. They heard about technologies for increasing energy efficiency and increasing use of renewable energy. They learned about ways companies and government agencies are using materials, processes, goods and services in a manner more respectful with the environment and in compliance with health and safety rules. The concept of partnerships and their inherent benefits was evidenced throughout the workshop. Partnering is a key aspect of sustainability because sustainable development is complicated. Through formal presentations and side discussions, attendees

  10. The Use of a Satellite Communications System for Command and Control of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Surrogate Unmanned Aerial System Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Charles T.; Jones, Frank; Hutchinson, Brian; Joyce, Claude; Nelson, Skip; Melum, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has transformed a Cirrus Design SR22 general aviation (GA) aircraft into an Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Surrogate research aircraft which has served for several years as a platform for unmanned systems research and development. The aircraft is manned with a Safety Pilot and a Research Systems Operator (RSO) that allows for flight operations almost any-where in the national airspace system (NAS) without the need for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA). The UAS Surrogate can be remotely controlled from a modular, transportable ground control station (GCS) like a true UAS. Ground control of the aircraft is accomplished by the use of data links that allow the two-way passage of the required data to control the aircraft and provide the GCS with situational awareness. The original UAS Surrogate data-link system was composed of redundant very high frequency (VHF) data radio modems with a maximum range of approximately 40 nautical miles. A new requirement was developed to extend this range beyond visual range (BVR). This new requirement led to the development of a satellite communications system that provided the means to command and control the UAS Surrogate at ranges beyond the limits of the VHF data links. The system makes use of the Globalstar low earth orbit (LEO) satellite communications system. This paper will provide details of the development, implementation, and flight testing of the satellite data communications system on the UAS Surrogate research aircraft.

  11. Robert M. Lightfoot Jr., NASA Acting Administrator, Official Portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-23

    Portrait, Robert M. Lightfoot Jr., Acting Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Monday, Jan. 23, 2017 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. FAA Administrator Babbitt Speaks at Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-09

    Randy Babbitt, Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration gives opening remarks at the 14th Annual FAA Commercial Space Transportation Conference at the Washington Convention Center on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2001. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Social Justice and Educational Administration: Mutually Exclusive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpinski, Carol F.; Lugg, Catherine A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore some of the current tensions within educational administration in the USA and conclude with a few cautions for educators who engage in social justice projects. Design/methodology/approach: Using a selective case, this historical essay examines the issues of social justice and equity as they have…

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy, NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), watches a monitor off-screen to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy, NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), watches a monitor off-screen to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  15. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    A NASA staff member describes the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission. The GPM Core Observatory satellite was launched into space on February 27, 2014 and will measure rain and snow worldwide every three hours. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. A Full-Scale Fire Program to Evaluate New Furnishings and Textile Materials Developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillenbrand, L. J.; Wray, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The plans for the present series of full-scale experimental fires were initiated at the suggestion of NASA following the presentation of a film and discussion illustrating Battelle-Columbus' recent work in fire research. That film showed bedroom-type fires carried out as a part of a program to determine the influence of the cyclic characteristics of real fires under limited ventilation on the burning and pyrolysis properties of the room furnishings. A new series of fires was suggested by NASA designed to show the performance of new fire resistant and fire retardant materials by providing comparative fire and smoldering environmental conditions. More recently, the goal for the new series of fires was written in a meeting with NASA personnel and others at Battelle on May 3 and 4, 1972. The goal was as follows: To establish the need for special materials of improved fire safety in domiciliary settings of public concern, and to assess, in a professionally acceptable manner, the potential of materials arising from the new space-age technology for this purpose. It was anticipated that some new materials arising from the space-age technology and not yet available through conventional commercial channels might provide significant improvements in fire safety if the best of the commercially available materials showed important shortcomings in this area. It was the intent of this program to assess the benefits that could accrue from the use of these new materials. Fire safety is a matter requiring the evaluation of a number of factors. For example, fire resistance and fire spread, visibility during the fire, toxicity of evolved gases, and the fire-fighting problem that is created must be evaluated before the relative hazard can be assessed. The plan of the program provided for sampling and instrumentation to evaluate these factors, consistent with the goal of technological utilization that has been specified. Arrangements were made with the Columbus Fire Department to use an

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy (left) and incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow talk about One NASA during the rollout of the Agency initiative at KSC. They were joined at the IMAX Theater® by other NASA leaders James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson to explain how their respective centers contribute to One NASA. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy (left) and incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow talk about One NASA during the rollout of the Agency initiative at KSC. They were joined at the IMAX Theater® by other NASA leaders James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson to explain how their respective centers contribute to One NASA. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science, speaks to employees and guests during the rollout at KSC of the Agency initiative One NASA . The event was held at the IMAX Theater®. Explaining how their respective centers contribute to One NASA, along with Weiler, were KSC Director Jim Kennedy; James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science, speaks to employees and guests during the rollout at KSC of the Agency initiative One NASA . The event was held at the IMAX Theater®. Explaining how their respective centers contribute to One NASA, along with Weiler, were KSC Director Jim Kennedy; James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA leaders discuss the Agency’s One NASA initiative with selected employees at the KSC Visitor Complex IMAX Theater®. From left are KSC Director Jim Kennedy; James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA leaders discuss the Agency’s One NASA initiative with selected employees at the KSC Visitor Complex IMAX Theater®. From left are KSC Director Jim Kennedy; James Jennings, NASA’s associate deputy administrator for institutions and asset management; Ed Weiler, associate administrator for Space Science; Kevin Peterson, Dryden Flight Research Center director; incoming KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow; and implementation team lead Johnny Stevenson. Glenn Research Center Director Dr. Julian Earls gave a motivational speech during the luncheon held at the Visitor Complex Debus Conference Center.

  20. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  1. Administrative IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

  2. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  3. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  4. Administrative IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

  5. Trading Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, Cliff

    2006-01-01

    Education administrators face the dual dilemma of crowded, aging facilities and tightening capital budgets. The challenge is to build the necessary classroom, laboratory and activity space while minimizing the length and expense of the construction process. One solution that offers an affordable alternative is modular construction, a method that…

  6. Trading Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, Cliff

    2006-01-01

    Education administrators face the dual dilemma of crowded, aging facilities and tightening capital budgets. The challenge is to build the necessary classroom, laboratory and activity space while minimizing the length and expense of the construction process. One solution that offers an affordable alternative is modular construction, a method that…

  7. Appealing Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittoe, William; Porter, Nat

    2007-01-01

    For more than a decade, educators and designers have been moving tentatively into uncharted waters. This article reports that administrators, faculty, and planners now recognize that learning spaces should be developed for reasons beyond utilization numbers. With declining retention and graduation rates, education institutions are acknowledging…

  8. Found Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Ted; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    When education providers confront obstacles such as shrinking budgets and swelling enrollments, a multi-million-dollar new facility or major additions probably are not feasible. Converting vacant and underused buildings into school facilities enables administrators to acquire additional space quickly and cheaply. In this article, the authors…

  9. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  10. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  11. Former Administration Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-27

    This archival image was released as part of a gallery comparing JPL's past and present, commemorating the 80th anniversary of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Oct. 31, 2016. Building 11, one of the oldest buildings on lab, was once JPL's central administration building. It is now the Space Sciences Laboratory. This picture dates back to May 1943. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21201

  12. Military Space Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-30

    Engineering Center 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, California 94025 U.S.A. D (415) 326-6200 * Cable: SRI INTL MPK TWX: 910-373-2046 UNCLASSIFIED...Automation and Robotics Study," p. 2-6, Final Report, Operator-Systems Interface, Boeing Aerospace Company and Boeing Computer Services Company (November 1984...Clara, California 95052 G.E. Co. Space Division Bldg. 11 Space Station Amy L. Buhrig King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406 Boeing Aerospace Company, M/S

  13. How to Manage Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, R. B.

    Major institutions and organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for organized and structured action on space administration. In large organizations the successful administration of space matters requires a committee that includes an architect; an engineer; and ranking persons from personnel, planning, and finance departments. Procedures…

  14. Space Cooperation Working Group

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, welcome Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency Anatoly Perminov, right, for the third Space Cooperation Working Group meeting of the U.S. – Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission on Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. How to Manage Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, R. B.

    Major institutions and organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for organized and structured action on space administration. In large organizations the successful administration of space matters requires a committee that includes an architect; an engineer; and ranking persons from personnel, planning, and finance departments. Procedures…

  16. 77 FR 47671 - TA-W-81,520, T-Mobile USA, Inc., Call Center, Allentown, PA; TA-W-81,520G, T-Mobile USA, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration TA-W-81,520, T-Mobile USA, Inc., Call Center, Allentown, PA; TA- W-81,520G, T-Mobile USA, Inc., Headquarters Office, Bellevue, WA; Amended Certification Regarding... to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on July 11, 2012, applicable to workers of T-Mobile...

  17. 75 FR 17437 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  18. 75 FR 39974 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  19. 76 FR 20717 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  20. 75 FR 53349 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  1. 75 FR 16197 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  2. 75 FR 11200 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  3. 78 FR 42111 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  4. 76 FR 17712 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  5. 76 FR 3674 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  6. 77 FR 67028 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  7. 77 FR 52067 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This Committee reports to the NAC... Agreements --Ames Research Center's Commercial Space Activities and Plans --Dryden Flight Research...

  8. 75 FR 39973 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  9. 76 FR 3673 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  10. 75 FR 5630 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  11. 77 FR 20852 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  12. 78 FR 10213 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) inspect some of the debris. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from left), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) inspect some of the debris. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from left), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at tiles recovered. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (center), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at tiles recovered. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (center), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) receives the applause of KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) receives the applause of KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) also spoke. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) also spoke. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) visits the Columbia Debris Hangar . Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (third from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from right), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) visits the Columbia Debris Hangar . Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (third from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from right), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  19. 14 CFR 1245.115 - Action by the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action by the Administrator. 1245.115 Section 1245.115 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PATENTS AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS Patent Waiver Regulations § 1245.115 Action by the Administrator. (a)...

  20. 14 CFR 1245.115 - Action by the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Action by the Administrator. 1245.115 Section 1245.115 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PATENTS AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS Patent Waiver Regulations § 1245.115 Action by the Administrator. (a)...

  1. 14 CFR § 1264.143 - Right to administrative offset.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Right to administrative offset. § 1264.143 Section § 1264.143 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.143 Right to administrative offset. The amount...

  2. 14 CFR 1264.143 - Right to administrative offset.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Right to administrative offset. 1264.143 Section 1264.143 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.143 Right to administrative offset. The amount of...

  3. 14 CFR 1212.701 - Assistant Deputy Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assistant Deputy Administrator. 1212.701 Section 1212.701 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.701 Assistant Deputy Administrator. The Assistant...

  4. 14 CFR 1251.108 - Administrative requirements for small recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Administrative requirements for small recipients. 1251.108 Section 1251.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON BASIS OF HANDICAP General Provisions § 1251.108 Administrative requirements for...

  5. Dengue in Florida (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  6. 77 FR 54862 - GNT USA, Inc.; Filing of Color Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 GNT USA, Inc.; Filing of Color Additive Petition AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of petition. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug.... Keefe, Director, Office of Food Additive Safety, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. BILLING...

  7. 76 FR 73684 - Tiger Drylac USA, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks and Beyond Employment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Tiger Drylac USA, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks... Adjustment Assistance on October 19, 2011, applicable to workers of Tiger Drylac USA, Inc., Reading.../Robert Half International were employed on- site at the Reading, Pennsylvania location of Tiger Drylac...

  8. 77 FR 56698 - Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC, on Behalf of Daimler AG, Receipt of Petition for Decision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Administration [Docket No. NHTSA-2012-0115; Notice 1] Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC, on Behalf of Daimler AG, Receipt of... and its parent company Daimler AG (DAG) \\2\\, has determined that certain model year 2012 Mercedes-Benz...\\ Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC, is a U.S. company that manufacturers and imports motor vehicles. \\2\\ Daimler AG, is...

  9. 75 FR 76039 - LF USA, Inc., a Subsidiary of Li & Fung Limited, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration LF USA, Inc., a Subsidiary of Li & Fung Limited, Including Workers... subsidiary of Li & Fung Limited, including on-site leased workers from Winston Staffing, New York, New York... applicable to TA-W-74,185 is hereby issued as follows: All workers of LF USA, Inc., a subsidiary of Li &...

  10. 78 FR 12827 - Fuji Heavy Industries U.S.A., Inc., Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fuji Heavy Industries U.S.A., Inc., Receipt of Petition for.... ACTION: Receipt of Petition. SUMMARY: Fuji Heavy Industries U.S.A., Inc., on behalf of Subaru of America... report dated January 29, 2013, pursuant to 49 CFR Part 573, Defect and Noncompliance Responsibility and...

  11. 78 FR 39772 - Huntingdon County Site, FCI USA, LLC, Americas Division, a Subsidiary of FCI SA, Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ..., 2012, applicable to workers of Huntingdon County Site, FCI USA, LLC, Americas Division, a subsidiary of... Employment and Training Administration Huntingdon County Site, FCI USA, LLC, Americas Division, a Subsidiary of FCI SA, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Inc. and Geodis Wilson Inc., Mount...

  12. 76 FR 65752 - International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of renewal and... Relations, (202) 358-0550, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC 20546-0001....

  13. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Sierra Nevada Corporation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Vice President, Space Exploration Systems (SES) at Sierra Nevada Corporation Steve Lindsey, left, speaks with acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot, center, and acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe, left, about the Dream Chaser Space System simulator, Thursday, April 6, 2017 during a visit to Sierra Nevada Corporation in Louisville, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  14. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    The Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly is being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this photo, one of many segments of the mirror assembly is being set up inside the 24-ft vacuum chamber where it will undergo x-ray calibration tests. MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  15. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    This photo (rear view) is of one of many segments of the Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  16. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    The Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly is being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this photo, an MSFC employee is inspecting one of many segments of the mirror assembly for flaws. MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  17. FrogwatchUSA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    full text: Frogs and toads are perhaps the most approachable and available of all our wildlife. In many, if not most places, they are abundant. In wetter parts of the East, almost anyone outside on a warm rainy night in spring will hear their dream-like calls, bellows, trills and snores. Even in the deserts of the Southwest, a nocturnal trip after a summer monsoon will yield toads moving across the roads toward a cacophonous orgy of mating and calling in the roadside ditches and desert pools. Birds share with frogs and toads this same sense of presence in our daily lives. But the difference is that birds are like the attractive neighbor who just never gives you the time of day, while frogs are more like the troglodyte who appears regularly to chat, philosophize, and have a beer. Uninvited, frogs appear in our water gardens, toads are on our stoops in the morning, we catch them when we are kids, raise their babies in the aquarium, and feel sorry when we find we have run them over with the lawnmower. When concerns about declining populations of amphibians reached the mass media, the Secretaries' office became involved. In addition to using traditional research mechanisms to investigate the problem, the Secretary also wanted to involve the public directly. The combination of high public appeal and the relative ease with which frog calls can be learned made a large-scale monitoring program for frogs and toads possible. What emerged was a program called Frogwatch USA, modeled after a successful Canadian program with a similar name. A web site was created (www.frogwatch.org) that presented potential frogwatchers with directions and a way to register their site online as well as enter their data. Observers chose where to count frogs depending on what they felt was important. For some it was their backyard, others chose vulnerable wetlands in their neighborhoods, or spots on local refuges and parks. Initially funded at $8,000 a year and then after two years increased to

  18. USA300 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Perencevich, Eli N.; David, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with the USA300 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type causes most community-associated MRSA infections and is an increasingly common cause of health care–associated MRSA infections. USA300 probably emerged during the early 1990s. To assess the spatiotemporal diffusion of USA300 MRSA and USA100 MRSA throughout the United States, we systematically reviewed 354 articles for data on 33,543 isolates, of which 8,092 were classified as USA300 and 2,595 as USA100. Using the biomedical literature as a proxy for USA300 prevalence among genotyped MRSA samples, we found that USA300 was isolated during 2000 in several states, including California, Texas, and midwestern states. The geographic mean center of USA300 MRSA then shifted eastward from 2000 to 2013. Analyzing genotyping studies enabled us to track the emergence of a new, successful MRSA type in space and time across the country. PMID:26484389

  19. USA300 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Margaret; Perencevich, Eli N; David, Michael Z

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with the USA300 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type causes most community-associated MRSA infections and is an increasingly common cause of health care-associated MRSA infections. USA300 probably emerged during the early 1990s. To assess the spatiotemporal diffusion of USA300 MRSA and USA100 MRSA throughout the United States, we systematically reviewed 354 articles for data on 33,543 isolates, of which 8,092 were classified as USA300 and 2,595 as USA100. Using the biomedical literature as a proxy for USA300 prevalence among genotyped MRSA samples, we found that USA300 was isolated during 2000 in several states, including California, Texas, and midwestern states. The geographic mean center of USA300 MRSA then shifted eastward from 2000 to 2013. Analyzing genotyping studies enabled us to track the emergence of a new, successful MRSA type in space and time across the country.

  20. Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    2000-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Space Biology and Medicine points out that space medicine is unique among space sciences, because in addition to addressing questions of fundamental scientific interest, it must address clinical or human health and safety issues as well. Efforts to identify how microgravity affects human physiology began in earnest by the United States in 1960 with the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Life Sciences program. Before the first human space missions, prediction about the physiological effects of microgravity in space ranged from extremely severe to none at all. The understanding that has developed from our experiences in space to date allows us to be guardedly optimistic about the ultimate accommodations of humans to space flight. Only by our travels into the microgravity environment of space have we begun to unravel the mysteries associated with gravity's role in shaping human physiology. Space medicine is still at its very earliest stages. Development of this field has been slow for several reasons, including the limited number of space flights, the small number of research subjects, and the competition within the life sciences community and other disciplines for flight opportunities. The physiological changes incurred during space flight may have a dramatic effect on the course of an injury or illness. These physiological changes present an exciting challenge for the field of space medicine: how to best preserve human health and safety while simultaneously deciphering the effects of microgravity on human performance. As the United States considers the future of humans in long-term space travel, it is essential that the many mysteries as to how microgravity affects human systems be addressed with vigor. Based on the current state of our knowledge, the justification is excellent indeed compelling- for NASA to develop a sophisticated capability in space medicine. Teams of physicians

  1. St. Louis, MO, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-06-14

    STS040-614-066 (5-14 June 1991) --- St. Louis, Missouri-East St. Louis, Illinois and surrounding area were photographed by the STS 40 crewmembers aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. The winding Mississippi River serves as a reference point for finding features of the area. Busch Stadium is clearly seen. NASA photo experts studying the STS 40 imagery claim photographs of this type aid in following demographic changes and in planning for development. The ground track of STS-40 and the existence of exceptionally clear skies during much of the nine-day flight permitted photographic acquisition of several cities not generally seen from the space flights flying at 28-degree inclinations to the Equator.

  2. A framework for space object surveillance based on the integration of space and Earth platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peiquan; Wu, Zhigang; Wan, Shouhong

    2007-11-01

    Space object surveillance takes a very important role in space defense and future space operation. In this paper, the state-of- the-art of space object surveillance is first analyzed, in which the development of space object surveillance in U.S.A., Russia and Canada is mainly discussed. After a survey on space object surveillance in China, this paper propounds a framework for space object surveillance based on the integration of space and Earth platforms. The intention of the integration of space and Earth platforms is emphasized, and some key issues of the space object surveillance based on the integration of space and Earth platforms are explored in detail.

  3. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    Pictured is the chosen artist's rendering of NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, was named the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. To further our understanding of the way our present universe formed following the the big bang, NASA is developing the JWST to observe the first stars and galaxies in the universe. This grand effort will help to answer the following fundamental questions: How galaxies form and evolve, how stars and planetary systems form and interact, how the universe builds up its present elemental/chemical composition, and what dark matter is. To see into the depths of space, the JWST is currently plarning to carry instruments that are sensitive to the infrared wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. The new telescope will carry a near-infrared camera, a multi-object spectrometer, and a mid-infrared camera/spectrometer. The JWST is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by creating an ultra-lightweight mirror for the telescope at MSFC's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center. GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the JWST, and TRW will design and fabricate the observatory's primary mirror and spacecraft. The program has a number of industry, academic, and government partners, as well as the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. (Image: Courtesy of TRW)

  4. Telerobotics test bed for space structure assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitami, M.; Ogimoto, K.; Yasumoto, F.; Katsuragawa, T.; Itoko, T.; Kurosaki, Y.; Hirai, S.; Machida, K.

    1994-01-01

    A cooperative research on super long distance space telerobotics is now in progress both in Japan and USA. In this program. several key features will be tested, which can be applicable to the control of space robots as well as to terrestrial robots. Local (control) and remote (work) sites will be shared between Electrotechnical Lab (ETL) of MITI in Japan and Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in USA. The details of a test bed for this international program are discussed in this report.

  5. Emerging Technologies in Global Communication: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Improve the Preparation of School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Roberts, B. E.; McLeod, Scott; Niles, Rae; Christopherson, Kelly; Singh, Paviter; Berry, Miles

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how practitioners from Canada, the UK, Singapore, and the USA, university educational administration faculty from the USA, and the editor of a premier international journal of educational management engaged in a collaborative process to discover how to improve the preparation and practice of…

  6. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-01

    In this photograph, the composite material mirror is tested in the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The mirror test conducted was to check the ability to accurately model and predict the cryogenic performance of complex mirror systems, and the characterization of cryogenic dampening properties of beryllium. The JWST, a next generation successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was named in honor of James W. Webb, NASA's second administrator, who led NASA in the early days of the fledgling Aerospace Agency. Scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle, the JWST will be able to look deeper into the universe than the HST because of the increased light-collecting power of its larger mirror and the extraordinary sensitivity of its instrument to infrared light.

  7. 75 FR 13763 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; GSA Form 1217...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; GSA Form 1217, Lessor's Annual Cost Statement AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics...

  8. Toward an Applied Administrative Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Roger L. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 65 articles from the 1981 volumes of "Administrative Science Quarterly" and "Harvard Business Review," using smallest space analysis, found that the few studies adopting subjective (instead of objective) approaches to analyzing organizational change were most likely to provide a basis for an applied administrative…

  9. Toward an Applied Administrative Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Roger L. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 65 articles from the 1981 volumes of "Administrative Science Quarterly" and "Harvard Business Review," using smallest space analysis, found that the few studies adopting subjective (instead of objective) approaches to analyzing organizational change were most likely to provide a basis for an applied administrative…

  10. Space Shuttle Discovery Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and other NASA management watch the launch of space shuttle Discovery (STS-133) from the firing room at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Discovery, on its 39th and final flight, is carrying the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), Express Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4) and Robonaut 2, the first humanoid robot in space to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Individuals in a Collectivist World: Born in the U.S.A., Teaching in Caracas, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warring, Douglas F.; Huber-Warring, Tonya

    2006-01-01

    Venezuela is a country slightly larger than twice the size of California, the third largest U.S.A. state in land area. Caracas, the capitol city, is home to a population of 6 million people nested into a space that is actually smaller in size than the area of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.A., a city/suburb of only 2.8 million people. In…

  12. Accommodation space in a high-wave-energy inner-shelf during the Holocene marine transgression: Correlation of onshore and offshore inner-shelf deposits (0–12 ka) in the Columbia River littoral cell system, Washington and Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, C. D.; Twichell, D. C.; Roberts, M. C.; Vanderburgh, S.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia River Littoral Cell (CRLC), a high-wave-energy littoral system, extends 160 km alongshore, generally north of the large Columbia River, and 10–15 km in across-shelf distance from paleo-beach backshores to about 50 m present water depths. Onshore drill holes (19 in number and 5–35 m in subsurface depth) and offshore vibracores (33 in number and 1–5 m in subsurface depth) constrain inner-shelf sand grain sizes (sample means 0.13–0.25 mm) and heavy mineral source indicators (> 90% Holocene Columbia River sand) of the inner-shelf facies (≥ 90% fine sand). Stratigraphic correlation of the transgressive ravinement surface in onshore drill holes and in offshore seismic reflection profiles provide age constraints (0–12 ka) on post-ravinement inner-shelf deposits, using paleo-sea level curves and radiocarbon dates. Post-ravinement deposit thickness (1–50 m) and long-term sedimentation rates (0.4–4.4 m ka− 1) are positively correlated to the cross-shelf gradients (0.36–0.63%) of the transgressive ravinement surface. The total post-ravinement fill volume of fine littoral sand (2.48 × 1010 m3) in the inner-shelf represents about 2.07 × 106 m3 year− 1 fine sand accumulation rate during the last 12 ka, or about one third of the estimated middle- to late-Holocene Columbia River bedload or sand discharge (5–6 × 106 m3 year− 1) to the littoral zone. The fine sand accumulation in the inner-shelf represents post-ravinement accommodation space resulting from 1) geometry and depth of the transgressive ravinement surface, 2) post-ravinement sea-level rise, and 3) fine sand dispersal in the inner-shelf by combined high-wave-energy and geostrophic flow/down-welling drift currents during major winter storms.

  13. The Space Station Freedom and space launch issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opening statements are given by Senator Gore and two other senators. Two witnesses, the Associate Administrator of NASA Office of Space Systems Development, and the Associate Administrator of NASA Office of Space Flight, presented prepared statements, the latter's concluding remarks speak of the Space Station Freedom as the next vital step toward evolving mankind's capabilities to live and work in space and to explore and benefit from this new frontier. Additional comments from the American Space Transportation Association are found in the appendix. These comments, in the main touch on both the Space Station Freedom and commercial space launch vehicles as well as the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor.

  14. Dyslexia Laws in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youman, Martha; Mather, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the various states of the USA, the appropriate identification of dyslexia and the timely provision of interventions are characterized by variability and inconsistency. Several states have recognized the existence of this disorder and the well-established need for services. These states have taken proactive steps to implement laws and…

  15. Dyslexia Laws in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youman, Martha; Mather, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the various states of the USA, the appropriate identification of dyslexia and the timely provision of interventions are characterized by variability and inconsistency. Several states have recognized the existence of this disorder and the well-established need for services. These states have taken proactive steps to implement laws and…

  16. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Visitors crowd the NASA exhibits during the USA Science and Engineering Festival, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, on the National Mall in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Participants look through telescopes to observe the Sun during the USA Science and Engineering Festival, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at Freedom Plaza in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Visitors to the USA Science and Engineering Festival look over the many exhibits, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at Freedom Plaza in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials participate in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. From left are NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy, KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy, and KSC Director Roy D. Bridges. The press conference followed the official announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials participate in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. From left are NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy, KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy, and KSC Director Roy D. Bridges. The press conference followed the official announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (RTFTG) look at a Reinforced Carbon-Carbon panels with a T-seal held by Tom Roberts, with United Space Alliance. From left are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, Dr. Kathryn Clark, James Adamson, Joe Engle, William Wegner and Dr. Amy Donahue. Chairing the task group are Covey and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (RTFTG) look at a Reinforced Carbon-Carbon panels with a T-seal held by Tom Roberts, with United Space Alliance. From left are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, Dr. Kathryn Clark, James Adamson, Joe Engle, William Wegner and Dr. Amy Donahue. Chairing the task group are Covey and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson, with United Space Alliance, describes an orbiter’s Thermal Protection System for members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Handling some of the blanket insulation are Dr. Kathryn Clark and Joe Engle. Third from left is Richard Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, who is co-chair of the SCTG, along with Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson, with United Space Alliance, describes an orbiter’s Thermal Protection System for members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Handling some of the blanket insulation are Dr. Kathryn Clark and Joe Engle. Third from left is Richard Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, who is co-chair of the SCTG, along with Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at one of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon panels, being shown by Tom Roberts with United Space Alliance, from the orbiter Endeavour. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at one of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon panels, being shown by Tom Roberts with United Space Alliance, from the orbiter Endeavour. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  4. 78 FR 53496 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). DATES: The teleconference will take place on Tuesday...

  5. 78 FR 14401 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Practices for Crew and Space Flight Participants. We would like to explore industry views on medical best... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space...

  6. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  7. 78 FR 37648 - Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching (STIM) Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching (STIM) Grants Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of non-availability of Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching Grants in FY 2013. SUMMARY: The Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) will...

  8. 75 FR 23841 - Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request for grant proposals for the Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program. SUMMARY: The FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) requests...

  9. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 12: Space Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels comprised user…

  10. Fargo, North Dakota, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the east side of a much broader, topographically distinct pathway of former glaciation that narrows to about 190 km (120 miles) wide. South of Fargo this narrowed pathway splits into two distinct paths (broad dark swaths on the image) that were carved by the southward flowing glaciers. Arcuate glacial moraines (deposits of rocks that were carried by glaciers) can be seen near this split, near what is now the approximate boundary between the Hudson Bay and Gulf of Mexico drainage basins (the latter via the Mississippi River).

    This glacial landscape has features that were favorable for the transport of ice but are not now so favorable for the transport of water. As measured in the digital elevation data, the Red River decreases in elevation only 40 meters (130 feet) from Fargo to the Canadian border (top of image) over a straight-line distance of 235 kilometers (145 miles) along the glacial trough. This is a gradient of only 17 centimeters per kilometer (11 inches per mile), and the actual river gradient is much lower as it follows a longer curvilinear path. Areas surrounding the trough (more rugged and bright in the image) have variable but generally much steeper gradients. In simple terms, this is a fundamental cause of flooding in Fargo. The speed of drainage of the rainfall and snowmelt is greatly related to topographic slope. The steeper slopes and merging streams concentrate water runoff into the glacial trough at Fargo, while the lower gradients within the trough allow the water to spread (and flood) but not drain quickly away.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. The mission was a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies, and was managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

    Size: 440x380

  11. Fargo, North Dakota, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the east side of a much broader, topographically distinct pathway of former glaciation that narrows to about 190 km (120 miles) wide. South of Fargo this narrowed pathway splits into two distinct paths (broad dark swaths on the image) that were carved by the southward flowing glaciers. Arcuate glacial moraines (deposits of rocks that were carried by glaciers) can be seen near this split, near what is now the approximate boundary between the Hudson Bay and Gulf of Mexico drainage basins (the latter via the Mississippi River).

    This glacial landscape has features that were favorable for the transport of ice but are not now so favorable for the transport of water. As measured in the digital elevation data, the Red River decreases in elevation only 40 meters (130 feet) from Fargo to the Canadian border (top of image) over a straight-line distance of 235 kilometers (145 miles) along the glacial trough. This is a gradient of only 17 centimeters per kilometer (11 inches per mile), and the actual river gradient is much lower as it follows a longer curvilinear path. Areas surrounding the trough (more rugged and bright in the image) have variable but generally much steeper gradients. In simple terms, this is a fundamental cause of flooding in Fargo. The speed of drainage of the rainfall and snowmelt is greatly related to topographic slope. The steeper slopes and merging streams concentrate water runoff into the glacial trough at Fargo, while the lower gradients within the trough allow the water to spread (and flood) but not drain quickly away.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. The mission was a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies, and was managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

    Size: 440x380

  12. Making Space for Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Sue

    2001-01-01

    Introduces some ideas for using space in classrooms. Provides a rationale for using space as part of the curriculum and focuses on the concept of a space mission as a vehicle for learning. Includes a list of some space-related web sites. (DDR)

  13. 14 CFR 1206.500 - Associate Deputy Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Associate Deputy Administrator. 1206.500 Section 1206.500 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF..., making final determinations under § 1206.607, within the time limits specified in Subpart 6 of this part...

  14. Nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.; Causey, W. E.; Galloway, W. E.; Nelson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Work on nuclear waste disposal in space conducted by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and contractors are reported. From the aggregate studies, it is concluded that space disposal of nuclear waste is technically feasible.

  15. Administrator Helps Students Discover Lab Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited the Langdon Elementary School in Washington to support National Lab Day. Bolden, a veteran of four space shuttle flights, spoke with the fifth graders abou...

  16. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Sierra Nevada Corporation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot is seen as he flies the Dream Chaser Space System simulator, Thursday, April 6, 2017 during a visit to Sierra Nevada Corporation in Louisville, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  18. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-13

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the integrated Mars Observer/Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) payload is ready for encapsulation in the Titan III nose fairing. The TOS booster maiden flight was dedicated to Thomas O. Paine, a former NASA administrator who strongly supported interplanetary exploration and was an early backer of the TOS program. Launched September 25, 1992 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center aboard a Titan III rocket and the TOS, the Mars Observer spacecraft was to be the first U.S. spacecraft to study Mars since the Viking missions 18 years prior. Unfortunately, the Mars Observer spacecraft fell silent just 3 days prior to entering orbit around Mars.

  19. Senior Administrators Should Have Administrative Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Recognizing that termination is viewed by the employee as the equivalent to capital punishment of a career, an administrative contract can reduce the emotional and financial entanglements that often result. Administrative contracts are described. (MLW)

  20. Senior Administrators Should Have Administrative Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Recognizing that termination is viewed by the employee as the equivalent to capital punishment of a career, an administrative contract can reduce the emotional and financial entanglements that often result. Administrative contracts are described. (MLW)

  1. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-08-01

    In response to President Reagan's directive to NASA to develop a permanent marned Space Station within a decade, part of the State of the Union message to Congress on January 25, 1984, NASA and the Administration adopted a phased approach to Station development. This approach provided an initial capability at reduced costs, to be followed by an enhanced Space Station capability in the future. This illustration depicts a configuration with enhanced capabilities. It builds on the horizontal boom and module pattern of the revised baseline. This configuration would feature dual keels, two vertical spines 105-meters long joined by upper and lower booms. The structure carrying the modules would become a transverse boom of a basically rectangular structure. The two new booms, 45-meters in length, would provide extensive accommodations for attached payloads, and would offer a wide field of view. Power would be increased significantly, with the addition if a 50-kW solar dynamic power system.

  2. 78 FR 53498 - Petition for Exemption From the Vehicle Theft Prevention Standard; Fuji Heavy Industries U.S.A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Vehicle Theft Prevention Standard; Fuji Heavy Industries U.S.A., Inc. AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration...

  3. Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-09-18

    In this view of Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA (29.5N, 95.5W), heavy spring rains emphasize the several bodies of water in the area. Even though partially cloud covered, the progressive nature of the Houston highway and freeway system can easily be observed in this highly detailed view. To the south, the NASA, Clear Lake area just off of Galveston Bay can easily be seen. In the center, is the downtown business district.

  4. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Children react as a tiny Mars Rover rolls over their backs at the USA Science and Engineering Festival, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at Freedom Plaza in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Visitors to the USA Science and Engineering Festival look on at one of the many exhibits, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, on the National Mall in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    Priniciples of air flow are explained to visitors to the wind tunnel exhibit at the USA Science and Engineering Festival, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at Freedom Plaza in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  7. USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-22

    A young girl watches as her paper airplane is flown in a small wind tunnel during the USA Science and Engineering Festival, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at Freedom Plaza in Washington. NASA, joined with more than 500 science organizations this weekend to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers during the first national science and engineering festival held in the nation's capital. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  8. Thunderstorm, Texas Gulf Coast, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-04-29

    This thunderstorm along the Texas Gulf Coast (29.0N, 95.0W), USA is seen as the trailing edge of a large cloud mass formed along the leading edge of a spring frontal system stretching northwest to southeast across the Texas Gulf Coast. This system brought extensive severe weather and flooding to parts of Texas and surrounding states. Muddy water discharging from coastal streams can be seen in the shallow Gulf of Mexico as far south as Lavaca Bay.

  9. 14 CFR 13.205 - Administrative law judges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative law judges. 13.205 Section... Administrative law judges. (a) Powers of an administrative law judge. In accordance with the rules of this subpart, an administrative law judge may: (1) Give notice of, and hold, prehearing conferences...

  10. 14 CFR 13.205 - Administrative law judges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative law judges. 13.205 Section... Administrative law judges. (a) Powers of an administrative law judge. In accordance with the rules of this subpart, an administrative law judge may: (1) Give notice of, and hold, prehearing conferences...

  11. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  12. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-23

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  13. Space Shuttle Payload Information Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Payload Information Source Compact Disk (CD) is a joint NASA and USA project to introduce Space Shuttle capabilities, payload services and accommodations, and the payload integration process. The CD will be given to new payload customers or to organizations outside of NASA considering using the Space Shuttle as a launch vehicle. The information is high-level in a visually attractive format with a voice over. The format is in a presentation style plus 360 degree views, videos, and animation. Hyperlinks are provided to connect to the Internet for updates and more detailed information on how payloads are integrated into the Space Shuttle.

  14. Space Shuttle Payload Information Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Payload Information Source Compact Disk (CD) is a joint NASA and USA project to introduce Space Shuttle capabilities, payload services and accommodations, and the payload integration process. The CD will be given to new payload customers or to organizations outside of NASA considering using the Space Shuttle as a launch vehicle. The information is high-level in a visually attractive format with a voice over. The format is in a presentation style plus 360 degree views, videos, and animation. Hyperlinks are provided to connect to the Internet for updates and more detailed information on how payloads are integrated into the Space Shuttle.

  15. The Spatial Structure of Administrative Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massam, Byran H.

    Designed to supplement undergraduate college geography courses, this paper discusses a particular type of territorial division--the administrative area within a state. The study of administrative patterns allows geographers to formulate and test hypotheses about man's organization of space, and also to assist in a very practical way by applying…

  16. NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot All Hands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-15

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot and Deputy Associate Administrator Lesa Roe speak to employees during a town hall meeting in the conference room of Operations Support Building II. During the gathering, they updated progress on NASA programs.

  17. NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot All Hands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-15

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot speaks to employees during a town hall meeting in the conference room of Operations Support Building II. To the right is Deputy Associate Administrator Lesa Roe. During the gathering, they updated progress on NASA programs.

  18. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...., Washington, DC 20405, (202) 501-4755. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several... Acquisition Policy. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Final Rule Stage Regulation Sequence Title Identifier Number...

  19. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-08-01

    In response to President Reagan's directive to NASA to develop a permanent marned Space Station within a decade, part of the State of the Union message to Congress on January 25, 1984, NASA and the Administration adopted a phased approach to Station development. This approach provided an initial capability at reduced costs, to be followed by an enhanced Space Station capability in the future. This illustration depicts the baseline configuration, which features a 110-meter-long horizontal boom with four pressurized modules attached in the middle. Located at each end are four photovoltaic arrays generating a total of 75-kW of power. Two attachment points for external payloads are provided along this boom. The four pressurized modules include the following: A laboratory and habitation module provided by the United States; two additional laboratories, one each provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Japan; and an ESA-provided Man-Tended Free Flyer, a pressurized module capable of operations both attached to and separate from the Space Station core. Canada was expected to provide the first increment of a Mobile Serving System.

  20. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-01

    This photograph depicts the Solar X-Ray Imager (SXI) being installed in the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) vacuum chamber for testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The XRCF vacuum chamber simulates a space environment with low temperature and pressure. The x-ray images from SXI on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-12 (GOES-12) will be used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and U.S. Air Force to forecast the intensity and speed of solar disturbances that could destroy satellite electronics or disrupt long-distance radio communications. The SXI will observe solar flares, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes, and active regions in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These features are the dominant sources of disturbances in space weather. The imager instrument consists of a telescope assembly with a 6.3-inch (16-centimeter) diameter grazing incidence mirror and a detector system. The imager was developed, tested, and calibrated by MSFC, in conjunction with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and U.S. Air Force.

  1. NASA Facts, Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This newsletter from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contains a description of the purposes and potentials of the Space Shuttle craft. The illustrated document explains some of the uses for which the shuttle is designed; how the shuttle will be launched from earth, carry out its mission, and land again on earth; and what a…

  2. NASA Facts, Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This newsletter from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contains a description of the purposes and potentials of the Space Shuttle craft. The illustrated document explains some of the uses for which the shuttle is designed; how the shuttle will be launched from earth, carry out its mission, and land again on earth; and what a…

  3. Madrid space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahnestock, R. J.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Madrid space station, operated under bilateral agreements between the governments of the United States and Spain, is described in both Spanish and English. The space station utilizes two tracking and data acquisition networks: the Deep Space Network (DSN) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) operated under the direction of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The station, which is staffed by Spanish employees, comprises four facilities: Robledo 1, Cebreros, and Fresnedillas-Navalagamella, all with 26-meter-diameter antennas, and Robledo 2, with a 64-meter antenna.

  4. 78 FR 66964 - International Space Station National Laboratory Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION International Space Station National Laboratory Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of renewal of the charter of the International Space Station National Laboratory Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to...

  5. 76 FR 41307 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee; Joint Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee; Joint... and Space Administration announces a joint meeting of the Space Operations Committee and Exploration... CONTACT: Dr. Bette Siegel, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, National Aeronautics and...

  6. 78 FR 71028 - Combi USA, Inc., Denial of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Management System (FDMS) Web site at: http://www.regulations.gov/ . Then follow the online search... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Combi USA, Inc., Denial of Petition for Decision...

  7. 76 FR 13227 - Syncreon USA, Formerly Known as TDS US Automotive, Belvidere, IL; Amended Certification Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Syncreon USA, Formerly Known as TDS US Automotive, Belvidere, IL... Automotive. Accordingly, the Department is amending this certification to properly reflect this matter. The..., formerly known as TDS US Automotive, Belvidere, Illinois, who became totally or partially separated...

  8. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  9. Veterans Health Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... code here VA » Veterans Health Administration Veterans Health Administration Marine Continues to Serve by Serving Veterans David ... Read more » VA Medical Centers The Veterans Health Administration is home to the United States’ largest integrated ...

  10. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  11. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  12. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama tours the commercial rocket processing facility of Space Exploration Technologies, known as SpaceX, along with Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama also visited the NASA Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was created on October 1, 1958, to perform civilian research related to space flight and aeronautics. President Eisenhower commissioned Dr. T. Keith Glernan, right, as the first administrator for NASA and Dr. Hugh L. Dryden as deputy administrator.

  14. Target spacespace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Nick

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the significance of T-duality in string theory: the indistinguishability with respect to all observables, of models attributing radically different radii to space-larger than the observable universe, or far smaller than the Planck length, say. Two interpretational branch points are identified and discussed. First, whether duals are physically equivalent or not: by considering a duality of the familiar simple harmonic oscillator, I argue that they are. Unlike the oscillator, there are no measurements 'outside' string theory that could distinguish the duals. Second, whether duals agree or disagree on the radius of 'target space', the space in which strings evolve according to string theory. I argue for the latter position, because the alternative leaves it unknown what the radius is. Since duals are physically equivalent yet disagree on the radius of target space, it follows that the radius is indeterminate between them. Using an analysis of Brandenberger and Vafa (1989), I explain why-even so-space is observed to have a determinate, large radius. The conclusion is that observed, 'phenomenal' space is not target space, since a space cannot have both a determinate and indeterminate radius: instead phenomenal space must be a higher-level phenomenon, not fundamental.

  15. Certain problems of space biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyarov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments in the field of biotechnology conducted by the USA Apollo and Skylab space probes are described, as well as the joint Soviet-American Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). Experiments in electrophoretic separation in space of biological compounds in a liquid medium are detailed. Space processing of vaccines and separation of human and animal cells are described. Methyl-cellulose, a coating for use in electrophoresis was developed. Erythropoietin, which stimulates the formation of red blood corpuscles in bone marrow, was obtained in pure form.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, emcees a ceremony in the Space Station Processing Facility to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Speakers at the ceremony included KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, emcees a ceremony in the Space Station Processing Facility to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Speakers at the ceremony included KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. The signing was part of a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. The signing was part of a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager, points to one of the components as he speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager, points to one of the components as he speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA). At right is NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA). At right is NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are (left) Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, and (right) NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. Also part of the signing is (center) Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (background, left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are (left) Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, and (right) NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. Also part of the signing is (center) Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (background, left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, media and guests listen intently to remarks during a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony included these speakers: KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, media and guests listen intently to remarks during a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony included these speakers: KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left) , deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left) , deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  13. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. "USA Today": Can the Nation's Newspaper Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert H.

    The failure of 17 newspaper markets between 1957 and 1975 raises the question of whether the 1982 entrance of "USA Today" into the newspaper market demonstrated fiscal prudence. A 20-month advertising content analysis was conducted to assess advertising trends in "USA Today." These data were compared with industry statistics…

  16. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    An attendee of the USA Science and Engineering Festival uses marbles to build a universe consisting of atoms and dark matter. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. USA Science and Engineering Festival 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Attendees of the USA Science and Engineering Festival explore all of the exhibits at the NASA Stage. The USA Science and Engineering Festival took place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. African Studies as a Part of Philologists' Professional Training in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikonnikova, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    It has been concluded that until recently debates on what is understood as African Studies have involved American scholars or have been mainly located within the African Studies Association (ASA) in the USA. Lately, European scholars have begun to occupy more discursive space and challenged Afrocentric orientations as well. African Studies…

  19. African Studies as a Part of Philologists' Professional Training in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikonnikova, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    It has been concluded that until recently debates on what is understood as African Studies have involved American scholars or have been mainly located within the African Studies Association (ASA) in the USA. Lately, European scholars have begun to occupy more discursive space and challenged Afrocentric orientations as well. African Studies…

  20. Spatial and seasonal variability of forested headwater stream temperatures in western Oregon, USA

    Treesearch

    J. A. Leach; D. H. Olson; P. D. Anderson; B. N. I. Eskelson

    2017-01-01

    Thermal regimes of forested headwater streams control the growth and distribution of various aquatic organisms. In a western Oregon, USA, case study we examined: (1) forested headwater stream temperature variability in space and time; (2) relationships between stream temperature patterns and weather, above-stream canopy cover, and geomorphic attributes; and (3) the...