Science.gov

Sample records for space telescope nicmos

  1. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Polarization Measurements of OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Burton, Michael G.; Schultz, A. S. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 micrometer polarization measurements of positions in the BN region of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) made with NICMOS Camera 2 (0.2" resolution) on Hubble Space Telescope. Our goals are to seek the sources of heating for IRc2, 3, 4, and 7, identify possible young stellar objects (YSOs), and characterize the grain alignment in the dust clouds along the lines-of-sight to the stars. Our results are as follows: BN is approximately 29% polarized by dichroic absorption and appears to be the illuminating source for most of the nebulosity to its north and up to approximately 5" to its south. Although the stars are probably all polarized by dichroic absorption, there are a number of compact, but non-point-source, objects that could be polarized by a combination of both dichroic absorption and local scattering of star light. We identify several candidate YSOs, including an approximately edge-on bipolar YSO 8.7" east of BN, and a deeply-embedded IRc7, all of which are obviously self-luminous at mid-infrared wavelengths and may be YSOs. None of these is a reflection nebula illuminated by a star located near radio source I, as was previously suggested. Other IRc sources are clearly reflection nebulae: IRc3 appears to be illuminated by IRc2-B or a combination of the IRc2 sources, and IRc4 and IRc5 appear to be illuminated by an unseen star in the vicinity of radio source I, or by Star n or IRc2-A. Trends in the magnetic field direction are inferred from the polarization of the 26 stars that are bright enough to be seen as NICMOS point sources. Their polarization ranges from N less than or equal to 1% (all stars with this low polarization are optically visible) to greater than 40%. The most polarized star has a polarization position angle different from its neighbors by approximately 40 degrees, but in agreement with the grain alignment inferred from millimeter polarization measurements of the cold dust cloud in the southern part of OMC-1. The polarization

  2. FIVE DEBRIS DISKS NEWLY REVEALED IN SCATTERED LIGHT FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE NICMOS ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Chen, Christine; Golimowski, David A.; Brendan Hagan, J.; Moerchen, Margaret; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Wolff, Schuyler; Debes, John; Hines, Dean C.; Mittal, Tushar; Rajan, Abhijith; Schneider, Glenn

    2014-05-10

    We have spatially resolved five debris disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, HD 141943, HD 191089, and HD 202917) for the first time in near-infrared scattered light by reanalyzing archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/NICMOS coronagraphic images obtained between 1999 and 2006. One of these disks (HD 202917) was previously resolved at visible wavelengths using the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys. To obtain these new disk images, we performed advanced point-spread function subtraction based on the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection algorithm on recently reprocessed NICMOS data with improved detector artifact removal (Legacy Archive PSF Library And Circumstellar Environments (LAPLACE) Legacy program). Three of the disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, and HD 141943) appear edge-on, while the other two (HD 191089 and HD 202917) appear inclined. The inclined disks have been sculpted into rings; in particular, the disk around HD 202917 exhibits strong asymmetries. All five host stars are young (8-40 Myr), nearby (40-100 pc) F and G stars, and one (HD 141943) is a close analog to the young Sun during the epoch of terrestrial planet formation. Our discoveries increase the number of debris disks resolved in scattered light from 19 to 23 (a 21% increase). Given their youth, proximity, and brightness (V = 7.2-8.5), these targets are excellent candidates for follow-up investigations of planet formation at visible wavelengths using the HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph, at near-infrared wavelengths with the Gemini Planet Imager and Very Large Telescope/SPHERE, and at thermal infrared wavelengths with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope Pointing Performance Due to Micro-Dynamic Disturbances from the NICMOS Cryogenic Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, Brian R.; Sills, Joel W., Jr.; Voorhees, Carl R.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Vibration Admittance Test (VET) was performed to measure the emitted disturbances of the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryogenic Cooler (NCC) in preparation for NCC installation onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during Servicing Mission 3B (SM3B). Details of the VET ground-test are described, including facility characteristics, sensor complement and configuration, NCC suspension, and background noise measurements. Kinematic equations used to compute NCC mass center displacements and accelerations from raw measurements are presented, and dynamic equations of motion for the NCC VET system are developed and verified using modal test data. A MIMO linear frequency-domain analysis method is used to compute NCC-induced loads and HST boresight jitter from VET measurements. These results are verified by a nonlinear time-domain analysis approach using a high-fidelity structural dynamics and pointing control simulation for HST. NCC emitted acceleration levels not exceeding 35 micro-g rms were measured in the VET and analysis methods herein predict 3.1 milli-areseconds rms jitter for HST on-orbit. Because the NCC is predicted to become the predominant disturbance source for HST, VET results indicate that HST will continue to meet the 7 milli-arcsecond pointing stability mission requirement in the post-SM3B era.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS Observations of I Zw 18: A Population of Old Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Revealed.

    PubMed

    Östlin

    2000-06-01

    I present the first results from a Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging study of the most metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy, I Zw 18. The near-infrared color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is dominated by two populations, one 10-20 Myr population of red supergiants and one 0.1-5 Gyr population of asymptotic giant branch stars. Stars older than 1 Gyr are required to explain the observed CMD at the adopted distance of 12.6 Mpc, showing that I Zw 18 is not a young galaxy. The results hold also if the distance to I Zw 18 is significantly larger. This rules out the possibility that I Zw 18 is a truly young galaxy formed recently in the local universe.

  5. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/NICMOS Imaging of Disks and Envelopes around Very Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Deborah L.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Strom, Stephen E.; Terebey, Susan; Koerner, David

    1999-03-01

    We present HST/NICMOS observations with ~0.1"~15 AU resolution of six young stellar objects in the Taurus star formation region. The targets of our survey are three Class I IRAS sources (IRAS 04016+2610, IRAS 04248+2612, and IRAS 04302+2247) and three low-luminosity stars (DG Tau B, Haro 6-5B, and CoKu Tau/1) associated with Herbig-Haro jets. The broadband images show that the near-infrared radiation from these sources is dominated by light scattered from dusty circumstellar material distributed in a region 10-15 times the size of our solar system. Although the detailed morphologies of the individual objects are unique, the observed young stellar objects share common features. All of the circumstellar reflection nebulae are crossed by dark lanes from 500 to 900 AU in extent and from less than 50 to 350 AU in apparent thickness. The absorption lanes extend perpendicular to known optical and millimeter outflows in these sources. We interpret the dark lanes as optically thick circumstellar disks seen in silhouette against bright reflection nebulosity. The bipolar reflection nebulae extending perpendicular to the dust lanes appear to be produced by scattering from the upper and lower surfaces of the disks and from dusty material within or on the walls of the outflow cavities. Of five objects in which the central source is directly detected, two are found to be subarcsecond binaries. This minisurvey is the highest resolution near-infrared study to date of circumstellar environments around solar-type stars with age<=1 Myr.

  6. The Lower Main Sequence of ω Centauri from Deep Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Near-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulone, Luigi; De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco; Allard, France

    1998-01-01

    A 20" × 20" field located ~7' from the center of the massive galactic globular cluster ω Centauri (NGC 5139) was observed by the NIC2 camera of the Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrometer on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) through the F110W and F160W broadband filters centered at 1.1 and 1.6 μm for a total of 3000 and 4000 s for the two filters, respectively. Standard photometric analysis of the resulting images yields 340 stars with a signal above a 10 σ threshold in both filters, covering the range of HST m160 magnitudes between 20 and 26, the deepest probe yet of a globular cluster in this wavelength region. These objects form a well-defined sequence in the m160 versus m110-m160 plane that is consistent with the theoretical near-IR color-magnitude diagram expected from recent low-mass stellar model calculations. The resulting stellar luminosity function increases steadily with increasing magnitude up to a peak at m160~=25, where it turns over and drops slowly down to the detection limit set by the incompleteness limit of 60% at m160~=26. With the theoretical mass-luminosity relationship that provides the best fit to the IR color-magnitude diagram, we obtain an excellent fit to the observed luminosity function down to a mass of ~0.2 Msolar with a power-law mass function having a slope of α=-1. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA under contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  8. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  9. Highlights HST-NICMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.

    The Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope in February, 1997. After twenty-two months of operation the 110 kg. supply of solid N2 which cooled the NICMOS-3 HgCdTe detectors was exhausted and the cryostat warmed up leaving the instrument in an electromechanically functional, but scientifically non-viable, passive state. Following a two year suspension of observations, an active cooling system featuring a reverse Brayton cycle micro-turbine was installed and integrated with NICMOS during HST servicing mission 3B. As a result the NICMOS detectors and cold optics have successfully been re-cooled to operationally effective temperatures and the science program has begun following an instrumental verification and re-calibration program. Today, we present an assessment of the performance of the instrument in terms of its optical quality, quantum efficiencies, dark currents, and other metrics, in absolute terms and in comparison to its previous on-orbit incarnation which define the define the scope and nature of the astronomical investigations which have now resumed. Some of the first scientific results from a subset of those programs will be presented and discussed. This work is supported by NASA grants NAG5 - 3042 and 10843 to the NICMOS Instrument Definition and Guaranteed Time Observing Teams.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have identified what may be the most luminous star known; a celestial mammoth that releases up to 10-million times the power of the Sun and is big enough to fill the diameter of Earth's orbit. The star unleashes as much energy in six seconds as our Sun does in one year. The image, taken by a UCLA-led team with the recently installed Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) aboard the HST, also reveals a bright nebula, created by extremely massive stellar eruptions. The UCLA astronomers estimate that the star, called the Pistol Star, (for the pistol shaped nebula surrounding it), is approximately 25,000 light-years from Earth, near the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The Pistol Star is not visible to the eye, but is located in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius, hidden behind the great dust clouds along the Milky Way

  11. Highlights from HST/NICMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.

    2004-01-01

    The near-infrared camera and multi-object spectrometer (NICMOS) was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope in February 1997. After 22 months of operation the 110 kg supply of solid N 2, which cooled the NICMOS-3 HgCdTe detectors, was exhausted. The cryostat warmed up leaving the instrument in an electromechanically functional, but scientifically non-viable, passive state. Following a three year suspension of observations, an active cooling system featuring a reverse Brayton cycle micro-turbine was installed and integrated with NICMOS during HST servicing mission 3B. As a result the NICMOS detectors and cold optics have successfully been re-cooled to operationally effective temperatures and the science program has begun. We review the operating characteristics of the NICMOS instrument, its new cooling system, and its performance both in absolute terms and in comparison to its previous on-orbit incarnation. We discuss the scope and nature of the astronomical investigations that have been and are again enabled with NICMOS. Additionally, we present some of the first scientific results from programs executed with the re-cooled NICMOS.

  12. Space Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the Kirkpatrick–Baez type systems and the focussing colli- mator or ‘ lobster -eye’ systems. 1http://henke.lbl.gov/optical constants/ 176 9. Space...mirror requires a longer telescope. Focussing collimator or ‘ lobster -eye’ telescopes The Wolter and the Kirkpatrick–Baez systems have in common a...9.13: Flat-mirror two-dimensional focussing collimator or detached lobster - eye configuration (Schmidt 1975). within one tube but from adjacent walls a

  13. Future directions for NICMOS arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Young, Erick T.; Mccarthy, D.; Rasche, Robert; Blessinger, Michael; Vural, Kadri; Kleinhans, William

    1989-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) requires focal plane arrays of 256x256 pixels for both its cameras and its spectrometers. The new arrays, developed by the Rockwell Corporation for NICMOS, have 40 microns pixels of HgCdTe bump bonded to a switched MOSFET readout. Expected read noise and dark current for the arrays at 60 K are 30 e and 1 e/sec. respectively. The basis for these numbers is previous experience with 128x128 arrays.

  14. The space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers concerning the development of the Space Telescope which were presented at the Twenty-first Annual Meeting of the American Astronautical Society in August, 1975 are included. Mission planning, telescope performance, optical detectors, mirror construction, pointing and control systems, data management, and maintenance of the telescope are discussed.

  15. A Mechanical Cryogenic Cooler for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrich, Nicholas; Zimbelman, Darell; Swift, Walter; Dolan, Francis; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryo Cooler (NCC), the cutting edge technology involved, its evolution, performance, and future space applications. The NCC is the primary hardware component of the NICMOS Cooling System comprised of the NCC, an Electronics Support Module, a Capillary Pumped Loop/Radiator, and associated interface harnessing. The system will be installed during extravehicular activities on HST during Servicing Mission 3B scheduled for launch in February 2002. The NCC will be used to revive the NICMOS instrument, which experienced a reduced operational lifetime due to an internal thermal short in its dewar structure, and restore HST scientific infrared capability to operational status. The NCC is a state-of-the-art reverse Turbo-Brayton cycle cooler employing gas bearing micro turbo machinery, driven by advanced power conversion electronics, operating at speeds up to 7300 revolutions per second (rps) to remove heat from the NICMOS instrument.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency which will be used to study deep space, as well as our solar system is presented. The video contains animations depicting the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit, as well as footage of scientists at the Space Telescope Science Institute making real time observations. The images Hubble acquires will be downloaded into a database that contains images of over 19,000,000 celestial objects called the Star Catalog.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This photograph shows the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) flight article assembly with multilayer insulation, high gain anterna, and solar arrays in a clean room of the Lockheed Missile and Space Company. The HST is the first of NASA's great observatories and the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made. The purpose of the HST is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit by placing the telescope in space, enabling astronomers to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had overall responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Sunnyvale, California, produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  18. NICMOS PEERS INTO HEART OF DYING STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Egg Nebula, also known as CRL 2688, is shown on the left as it appears in visible light with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and on the right as it appears in infrared light with Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Since infrared light is invisible to humans, the NICMOS image has been assigned colors to distinguish different wavelengths: blue corresponds to starlight reflected by dust particles, and red corresponds to heat radiation emitted by hot molecular hydrogen. Objects like the Egg Nebula are helping astronomers understand how stars like our Sun expel carbon and nitrogen -- elements crucial for life -- into space. Studies on the Egg Nebula show that these dying stars eject matter at high speeds along a preferred axis and may even have multiple jet-like outflows. The signature of the collision between this fast-moving material and the slower outflowing shells is the glow of hydrogen molecules captured in the NICMOS image. The distance between the tip of each jet is approximately 200 times the diameter of our solar system (out to Pluto's orbit). Credits: Rodger Thompson, Marcia Rieke, Glenn Schneider, Dean Hines (University of Arizona); Raghvendra Sahai (Jet Propulsion Laboratory); NICMOS Instrument Definition Team; and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on the Internet via anonymous ftp from ftp.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Program on STS-95 Supported by Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    John Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS 95 space shuttle mission; however, the 83 science payloads aboard were the focus of the flight activities. One of the payloads, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital System Test (HOST), was flown in the cargo bay by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It served as a space flight test of upgrade components for the telescope before they are installed in the shuttle for the next Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. One of the upgrade components is a cryogenic cooling system for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). The cooling is required for low noise in the receiver's sensitive electronic instrumentation. Originally, a passive system using dry ice cooled NICMOS, but the ice leaked away and must be replaced. The active cryogenic cooler can provide the cold temperatures required for the NICMOS, but there was a concern that it would create vibrations that would affect the fine pointing accuracy of the Hubble platform.

  20. Telescopes and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in contemporary astronomy and astrophysics is shown to depend on complementary investigations with sensitive telescopes operating in several wavelength regions, some of which can be on the Earth's surface and others of which must be in space.

  1. Composite Space Telescope Truss

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA engineers are recycling an idea for a lightweight, compact space telescope structure from the early 1990s. The 315 struts and 84 nodes were originally designed to enable spacewalking astronaut...

  2. Hubble Space Telescope: The Telescope, the Observations & the Servicing Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    replaced by COSTAR. During the second Servicing Mission instruments and other equipment were repaired and updated. The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) replaced the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) and the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) replaced the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS). Servicing mission 3A The original Servicing Mission 3 (initially planned for June 2000) has been split into two missions - SM3A and SM3B - due in part to its complexity, and in part to the urgent need to replace the failed gyroscopes on board. Three gyroscopes must function to meet the telescope's very precise pointing requirements. With only two new operational, observations have had to be suspended, but the telescope will remain safely in orbit until the servicing crew arrives. During this servicing mission * all six gyroscopes will be replaced, * a Fine Guidance Sensor will be replaced, * the spacecraft's computer will be replaced by a new one which will reduce the burden of flight software maintenance and significantly lower costs, * six voltage/temperature kits will be installed to protect spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating if the spacecraft enters safe mode, * a new S-Band Single Access Transmitter will replace a failed spare currently aboard the spacecraft, * a solid-state recorder will be installed to replace the tape recorder, * degraded telescope thermal insulation will be replaced if time allows; this insulation is necessary to control the internal temperature on HST. For the mission to be fully successful the gyroscopes, the Fine Guidance Sensor, the computer and the voltage/temperature kits must be installed. The minimum mission success criterion is that HST will have 5 operational gyros after the mission, 4 of them newly installed. The Future During SM3B (presently scheduled for 2001) the astronauts will replace the Faint Object Camera with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), install a cooling system for

  3. Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John; Stockman, H. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for launch in 2009, will be an 8-m class radiatively cooled infrared telescope at the Lagrange point L2. It will cover the wavelength range from 0.6 to 28 microns with cameras and spectrometers, to observe the first luminous objects after the Big Bang, and the formation, growth, clustering, and evolution of galaxies, stars, and protoplanetary clouds, leading to better understanding of our own Origins. It will seek evidence of the cosmic dark matter through its gravitational effects. With an aperture three times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope, it will provide extraordinary advances in capabilities and enable the discovery of many new phenomena. It is a joint project of the NASA, ESA, and CSA, and scientific operations will be provided by the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  4. Spectroradiometry with space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluhn, Anuschka; Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Colina, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Radiometry, i.e. measuring the power of electromagnetic radiation—hitherto often referred to as "photometry"—is of fundamental importance in astronomy. We provide an overview of how to achieve a valid laboratory calibration of space telescopes and discuss ways to reliably extend this calibration to the spectroscopic telescope's performance in space. A lot of effort has been, and still is going into radiometric "calibration" of telescopes once they are in space; these methods use celestial primary and transfer standards and are based in part on stellar models. The history of the calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope serves as a platform to review these methods. However, we insist that a true calibration of spectroscopic space telescopes must directly be based on and traceable to laboratory standards, and thus be independent of the observations. This has recently become a well-supported aim, following the discovery of the acceleration of the cosmic expansion by use of type-Ia supernovae, and has led to plans for launching calibration rockets for the visible and infrared spectral range. This is timely, too, because an adequate exploitation of data from present space missions, such as Gaia, and from many current astronomical projects like Euclid and WFIRST demands higher radiometric accuracy than is generally available today. A survey of the calibration of instruments observing from the X-ray to the infrared spectral domains that include instrument- or mission-specific estimates of radiometric accuracies rounds off this review.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineers and technicians conduct a fit check of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Solar Array flight article in a clean room of the Lockheed Missile and Space Company. The Solar Array is 40- feet (12.1-meters) long and 8.2-feet (2.5-meters) wide, and provides power to the spacecraft. The HST is the first of NASA's great observatories and the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made. The purpose of the HST is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit by placing the telescope in space, enabling astronomers to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had overall responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Sunnyvale, California, produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  6. Cryo Cooler Induced Micro-Vibration Disturbances to the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrich, Nick; Zimbelman, Darrell; Turczyn, Mark; Sills, Joel; Voorhees, Carl; Clapp, Brian; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryo Cooler (MCC) system, a description of the micro-vibration characterization testing performed, and a discussion of the simulated performance. The NCC is a reverse Brayton cycle system that employs micro turbo-machinery to provide cooling to the NICMOS instrument. Extensive testing was conducted to quantify the expected on-orbit disturbances caused by the micro turbo-machinery and provide input to a flexible-body dynamic simulation to demonstrate compliance with the HST 7 milli-arcsecond root mean square jitter requirement.

  7. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Vassigh, Kenny; Bendek, Selman; Young, Zion W; Lynch, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide strawman mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible andor UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST.

  8. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  9. TAUVEX - UV Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, Jeremy; Braun, Ofer; Brosch, Noah

    1993-01-01

    The TAUVEX UV Space Telescope currently under construction by El-Op Ltd. in Israel is designed both for recording images of the sky in the UV region and to serve as the optical monitor for the SODART X-Ray Telescope being built by the Danish Space Research Institute. The two systems, together with several other experiments, will be flown on the S-R-G satellite to be launched by the CIS in 1995. TAUVEX will image a field of about 1 deg simultaneously in three spectral bands. In addition, it will record a selected object in a high-speed time-resolved mode in these bands. The concept and design of TAUVEX is described in this paper.

  10. Science operations with Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacconi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The operation, instrumentation, and expected contributions of the Space Telescope are discussed. Space Telescope capabilities are described. The organization and nature of the Space Telescope Science Institute are outlined, including the allocation of observing time and the data rights and data access policies of the institute.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This image illustrates the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). One of the three major elements of the HST, the OTA consists of two mirrors (a primary mirror and a secondary mirror), support trusses, and the focal plane structure. The mirrors collect and focus light from selected celestial objects and are housed near the center of the telescope. The primary mirror captures light from objects in space and focuses it toward the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror redirects the light to a focal plane where the Scientific Instruments are located. The primary mirror is 94.5 inches (2.4 meters) in diameter and the secondary mirror is 12.2 inches (0.3 meters) in diameter. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth Orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from the Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The spacecraft is 42.5 feet (13 meters) long and weighs 25,000 pounds (11,600 kilograms). The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  12. Origins Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha R.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. I will summarize the OST STDT, mission design and instruments, key science drivers, and the study plan over the next two years.

  13. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) telescope overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schember, Helene; Manhart, Paul; Guiar, Cecilia; Stevens, James H.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will be the first true infrared observatory in space, building upon the technical and scientific experience gained through its two NASA survey-oriented predecessors: the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer. During its minimum five year lifetime, the SIRTF will perform pointed scientific observations at wavelengths from 1.8 to 1200 microns with an increase in sensitivity over previous missions of several orders of magnitude. This paper discusses a candidate design for the SIRTF telescope, encompassing optics, cryostat, and instrument accommodation, which has been undertaken to provide a fulcrum for the development of functional requirements, interface definition, risk assessment and cost. The telescope optics employ a baffled Ritchey-Chretien Cassegrain system with a 1-m class primary mirror, an active secondary mirror, and a stationary facetted tertiary mirror. The optics are embedded in a large superfluid He cryostat designed to maintain the entire telescope-instrument system at temperatures below 3 K.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope, named for the American astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble, will be the largest and most powerful astronomical instrument ever orbited. Placed above the obscuring effects of the earth's atmosphere in a 600-km orbit, this remotely-controlled, free-flying satellite observatory will expand the terrestrial-equivalent resolution of the universe by a factor of seven, or a volumetric factor of 350. This telescope has a 2.4-m primary mirror and can accommodate five scientific instruments (cameras, spectrographs and photometers). The optics are suitable for a spectral range from 1100 angstrom to 1 mm wavelength. With a projected service life of fifteen years, the spacecraft can be serviced on-orbit for replacement of degraded systems, to insert advanced scientific instruments, and to reboost the telescope from decayed altitudes. The anticipated image quality will be a result of extremely precise lambda/20 optics, stringent cleanliness, and very stable pointing: jitter will be held to less than 0.01 arcsecond for indefinite observation periods, consistent with instrument apertures as small as 0.1 arcsecond.

  15. Telescopes and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    The necessity for different types of telescopes for astronomical investigations is discussed. Major findings in modern astronomy by ground-based and spaceborne telescopes are presented. Observations of the Crab Nebula, solar flares, interstellar gas, and the Black Hole are described. The theory of the oscillating universe is explored. Operating and planned telescopes are described.

  16. The NICMOS Cooling SYSTEM-5 Years of Successful On-Orbit Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, W. L.; Dolan, F. X.; Zagarola, M. V.

    2008-03-01

    The NICMOS Cooling System consists of a closed-loop turbo-Brayton cryocooler coupled with a cryogenic circulator that provides refrigeration to the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The cryocooler heat is rejected to space through a capillary pumped loop connected to radiators mounted on the side of the telescope. The system was deployed and integrated with NICMOS by astronauts during STS-109 (Space Shuttle Columbia) in March 2002. It has operated nearly continuously without performance degradation since that time, maintaining NICMOS detectors at a constant temperature of 77 K. Miniature, high-speed turbomachines are used in the cryocooler and the circulator loop to provide vibration-free, long-life operation. A small centrifugal compressor and miniature turboalternator are key elements of the closed loop cryocooler. A miniature cryogenic centrifugal circulator in a separate pressurized neon loop transports heat from the NICMOS instrument to the cryocooler interface heat exchanger. This paper describes the development of the system, key operational features, ground and orbital tests prior to its deployment, and operational results during its five-year operational history on orbit.

  17. Cost Modeling for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are an important tool for planning missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper presents on-going efforts to develop single variable and multi-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). These models are based on data collected from historical space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models.

  18. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Leprince, Sebastien; Michel, Remi

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  19. Space Telescope Systems Description Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Space Telescope Project is to orbit a high quality optical 2.4-meter telescope system by the Space Shuttle for use by the astronomical community in conjunction with NASA. The scientific objectives of the Space Telescope are to determine the constitution, physical characteristics, and dynamics of celestial bodies; the nature of processes which occur in the extreme physical conditions existing in stellar objects; the history and evolution of the universe; and whether the laws of nature are universal in the space-time continuum. Like ground-based telescopes, the Space Telescope was designed as a general-purpose instrument, capable of utilizing a wide variety of scientific instruments at its focal plane. This multi-purpose characteristic will allow the Space Telescope to be effectively used as a national facility, capable of supporting the astronomical needs for an international user community and hence making contributions to man's needs. By using the Space Shuttle to provide scientific instrument upgrading and subsystems maintenance, the useful and effective operational lifetime of the Space Telescope will be extended to a decade or more.

  20. NICMOS CAPTURES THE HEART OF OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared vision of the Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) is providing a dramatic new look at the beautiful Orion Nebula which contains the nearest nursery for massive stars. For comparison, Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image on the left shows a large part of the nebula as it appears in visible light. The heart of the giant Orion molecular cloud, OMC-1, is included in the relatively dim and featureless area inside the blue outline near the top of the image. Light from a few foreground stars seen in the WFPC2 image provides only a hint of the many other stars embedded in this dense cloud. NICMOS's infrared vision reveals a chaotic, active star birth region (as seen in the right-hand image). Here, stars and glowing interstellar dust, heated by and scattering the intense starlight, appear yellow-orange. Emission by excited hydrogen molecules appears blue. The image is oriented with north up and east to the left. The diagonal extent of the image is about 0.4 light-years. Some details are as small as the size of our solar system. The brightest object in the image is a massive young star called BN (Becklin-Neugebauer). Blue 'fingers' of molecular hydrogen emission indicate the presence of violent outflows, probably produced by a young star or stars still embedded in dust (located to the lower left, southeast, of BN). The outflowing material may also produce the crescent-shaped 'bow shock' on the edge of a dark feature north of BN and the two bright 'arcs' south of BN. The detection of several sets of closely spaced double stars in these observations further demonstrates NICMOS's ability to see fine details not possible from ground-based telescopes. Credits: NICMOS image -- Rodger Thompson, Marcia Rieke, Glenn Schneider, Susan Stolovy (University of Arizona); Edwin Erickson (SETI Institute/Ames Research Center); David Axon (STScI); and NASA WFPC2 image -- C. Robert O'Dell, Shui Kwan Wong (Rice

  1. The STScI NICMOS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Skinner, C.; MacKenty, J.; Axon, D.; Stobie, E.

    1997-12-01

    Reduction and calibration of data from the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has presented new challenges, as well as opportunities, for the pipeline processing systems at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which have resulted in many features that are new and different from what has been employed for previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) instruments. The biggest challenge is the need to handle, as a group, multiple exposures associated with a single target. Associated images are required for several reasons, including the need to measure the near-infrared thermal background signal, cosmic-ray rejection via anticoincidence detection, and mosaicing of large angular-sized targets. STScI has taken advantage of the opportunities presented by the creation of a new pipeline system to make other changes and advancements as well. First, all reduction and analysis software for NICMOS is written in the ANSI C language, and uses C-to-IRAF interface libraries to allow access to IRAF data I/O and analysis routines. Second, the run-time file format for all NICMOS data reduction and analysis is FITS format, with extensive use of FITS image and table extensions. Two levels of physical packaging of NICMOS data are employed. Images produced by multiple non-destructive detector readouts during the course of a single exposure are packaged together within one FITS file. Second, error estimate and data quality flag images associated with each science image are also contained within the same FITS file. A third, logical, grouping of images is used to relate multiple observations of a single target. The data reduction and calibration process is divided into two distinct phases. The first phase, accomplished by the program "calnica", is used to perform standard instrumental calibration (e.g. dark current subtraction, flat-fielding) for individual exposures. The second phase, "calnicb", performs background subtraction and image combination for associated

  2. Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1990 NASA launched the HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE. In addition to cameras and spectrographs usable from the far ultraviolet to the near-infrared, the observatory contains three white-light INTERFEROMETERS. As part of engineering and science support their primary task was telescope guiding; to position and hold science targets within the science instrument apertures with tolerances approaching 0.1'...

  3. Space Telescope moving target tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strikwerda, T. E.; Strohbehn, K.; Fowler, K. R.; Skillman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper formulates a Space Telescope (ST) moving target tracking algorithm and evaluates a practical implementation. The algorithm is shown to be satisfactory for tracking such moving objects as the moons of Mars.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This illustration depicts a side view of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This is a cutaway illustration of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with callouts. The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than is visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  7. Telescoping Space-Station Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    New telescoping-space-station design involves module within a module. After being carried to orbit within payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter, outer module telescopically deployed to achieve nearly twice as much usable space-station volume per Space Shuttle launch. Closed-loop or "race-track" space-station configurations possible with this concept and provide additional benefits. One benefit involves making one of modules double-walled haven safe from debris, radiation, and like. Module accessible from either end, and readily available to all positions in space station. Concept also provides flexibility in methods in which Space Shuttle orbiter docked or berthed with space station and decrease chances of damage.

  8. NICMOS flight FPA qualification program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markum, Arvel D.; Kormos, Karen A.; Edwards, Jere B.

    1993-10-01

    A comprehensive program has been developed for the production of focal plane assemblies (FPA) for use on the University of Arizona Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) instrument which is to be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This paper describes the current schedule, tests to be performed, test conditions and unique test facilities of the flight FPA qualification test program. This test series is intended to validate design, assembly, performance and reliability of flight qualified FPAs. Also described are the design features, performance characteristics and test results obtained with prototype FPAs used as engineering evaluation units prior to committing the flight qualification units to manufacture. The qualification tests will demonstrate performance margins over and above requirements under operating environmental conditions. Included in the qualification tests are electrical, mechanical and thermal tests. Random vibration tests and mechanical shock tests will be performed at 1.5 times the load level specified for acceptance requirements. The random vibration tests simulate launch conditions and will induce stresses to uncover any potential structural deficiencies that might exist. The mechanical shock tests will simulate potential impacts incurred as a result of handling or transport. The qualification test program is intended to maximize confidence in the quality and integrity of the flight FPAs.

  9. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is being developed by NASA in partnership with the European and Canadian space agencies for launch during 2013. This mission is expected to carry the legacy of discovery of the Hubble Space Telescope through the next decade, and is designed with unique capability to address key questions about formation of the first galaxies after the Big Bang, their subsequelet volution, and the formation of stars and planets within our own galaxy. This talk will present an overview of the mission science objectives and the status of the mission development.

  10. HST STIS & NICMOS Coronagraphy of Four Debris Disks around Young Solar Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Choquet, Elodie; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Ren, Bin; Debes, John H.; Mazoyer, Johan; Ygouf, Marie; Pueyo, Laurent; Aguilar, Jonathan; Chen, Christine; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Schneider, Glenn; Soummer, Remi; Stark, Chris; Wolff, Schuyler

    2016-01-01

    We present new deep Hubble Space Telescope STIS coronagraphy of four debris disks around nearby young solar type stars (<40 Myr, G2-F3), corresponding to the age at which terrestrial planet formation was being completed in our own solar system. The four disks were first seen by our team in a reprocessing of the NICMOS archive using modern principal component analysis PSF subtraction algorithms. Our new STIS observations surpass the earlier NICMOS imagery in angular resolution, contrast, and sensitivity to extended diffuse scattered light, enabling a much clearer view of the diverse disk structures and asymmetries. Careful forward modeling of the PSF-subtraction process allows us to accurately assess the surface brightnesses in scattered light. Visible to near-infrared colors from HST STIS and NICMOS can constrain the dust particle properties. Analysis and modeling of these young planetary systems are ongoing.

  11. The Spitzer Space Telescope Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, NASA's Great Observatory for infrared astronomy, was launched 2003 August 25 and is returning excellent scientific data from its Earth-trailing solar orbit. Spitzer combines the intrinsic sensitivity achievable with a cryogenic telescope in space with the great imaging and spectroscopic power of modern detector arrays to provide the user community with huge gains in capability for exploration of the cosmos in the infrared. The observatory systems are largely performing as expected, and the projected cryogenic lifetime is about five years. Spitzer is thus both a scientific and a technical precursor to the infrared astronomy missions of the future. This very brief paper refers interested readers to several sets of recent publications which describe both the scientific and the technical features of Spitzer in detail. Note that, until 2003 December, Spitzer was known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

  12. James Webb Space Telescope: large deployable cryogenic telescope in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Atkinson, Charles; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an infrared space telescope designed to explore four major science themes: first light and reionization, the assembly of galaxies, the birth of stars and protoplanetary systems, and planetary systems and origins of life. JWST is a segmented architecture telescope with an aperture of 6.6 m. It will operate at cryogenic temperature (40 K), achieved via passive cooling, in an orbit about the Earth-Sun second Lagrange point (L2). Passive cooling is facilitated by means of a large sunshield that provides thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the Sun. The large size of the telescope and spacecraft systems require that they are stowed for launch in a configuration that fits the Ariane 5 fairing, and then deployed after launch. Routine wavefront sensing and control measurements are used to achieve phasing of the segmented primary mirror and initial alignment of the telescope. A suite of instruments will provide the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6- to 27-μm wavelengths with imaging and spectroscopic configurations. An overview is presented of the architecture and selected optical design features of JWST are described.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope prescription retrieval.

    PubMed

    Redding, D; Dumont, P; Yu, J

    1993-04-01

    Prescription retrieval is a technique for directly estimating optical prescription parameters from images. We apply it to estimate the value of the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror conic constant. Our results agree with other studies that examined primary-mirror test fixtures and results. In addition they show that small aberrations exist on the planetary-camera repeater optics.

  14. The Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bely, Pierre-Yves (Editor); Burrows,, Christopher J. (Editor); Illingworth,, Garth D.

    1989-01-01

    In Space Science in the Twenty-First Century, the Space Science Board of the National Research Council identified high-resolution-interferometry and high-throughput instruments as the imperative new initiatives for NASA in astronomy for the two decades spanning 1995 to 2015. In the optical range, the study recommended an 8 to 16-meter space telescope, destined to be the successor of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and to complement the ground-based 8 to 10-meter-class telescopes presently under construction. It might seem too early to start planning for a successor to HST. In fact, we are late. The lead time for such major missions is typically 25 years, and HST has been in the making even longer with its inception dating back to the early 1960s. The maturity of space technology and a more substantial technological base may lead to a shorter time scale for the development of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). Optimistically, one could therefore anticipate that NGST be flown as early as 2010. On the other hand, the planned lifetime of HST is 15 years. So, even under the best circumstances, there will be a five year gap between the end of HST and the start of NGST. The purpose of this first workshop dedicated to NGST was to survey its scientific potential and technical challenges. The three-day meeting brought together 130 astronomers and engineers from government, industry and universities. Participants explored the technologies needed for building and operating the observatory, reviewed the current status and future prospects for astronomical instrumentation, and discussed the launch and space support capabilities likely to be available in the next decade. To focus discussion, the invited speakers were asked to base their presentations on two nominal concepts, a 10-meter telescope in space in high earth orbit, and a 16-meter telescope on the moon. The workshop closed with a panel discussion focused mainly on the scientific case, siting, and the

  15. Photon Sieve Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; Dearborn, M.; Hcharg, G.

    2010-09-01

    We are investigating new technologies for creating ultra-large apertures (>20m) for space-based imagery. Our approach has been to create diffractive primaries in flat membranes deployed from compact payloads. These structures are attractive in that they are much simpler to fabricate, launch and deploy compared to conventional three-dimensional optics. In this case the flat focusing element is a photon sieve which consists of a large number of holes in an otherwise opaque substrate. A photon sieve is essentially a large number of holes located according to an underlying Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) geometry. The advantages over the FZP are that there are no support struts which lead to diffraction spikes in the far-field and non-uniform tension which can cause wrinkling of the substrate. Furthermore, with modifications in hole size and distribution we can achieve improved resolution and contrast over conventional optics. The trade-offs in using diffractive optics are the large amounts of dispersion and decreased efficiency. We present both theoretical and experimental results from small-scale prototypes. Several key solutions to issues of limited bandwidth and efficiency have been addressed. Along with these we have studied the materials aspects in order to optimize performance and achieve a scalable solution to an on-orbit demonstrator. Our current efforts are being directed towards an on-orbit 1m solar observatory demonstration deployed from a CubeSat bus.

  16. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Gehrz, R D; Roellig, T L; Werner, M W; Fazio, G G; Houck, J R; Low, F J; Rieke, G H; Soifer, B T; Levine, D A; Romana, E A

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) is the fourth and final facility in the Great Observatories Program, joining Hubble Space Telescope (1990), the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991-2000), and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (1999). Spitzer, with a sensitivity that is almost three orders of magnitude greater than that of any previous ground-based and space-based infrared observatory, is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the creation of the universe, the formation and evolution of primitive galaxies, the origin of stars and planets, and the chemical evolution of the universe. This review presents a brief overview of the scientific objectives and history of infrared astronomy. We discuss Spitzer's expected role in infrared astronomy for the new millennium. We describe pertinent details of the design, construction, launch, in-orbit checkout, and operations of the observatory and summarize some science highlights from the first two and a half years of Spitzer operations. More information about Spitzer can be found at http://spitzer.caltech.edu/.

  17. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched in about 5 years into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  18. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  19. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched in about 5 years into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Proto planetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  20. NICMOS Calibration Pipeline---A Collaborative Project Between IDT and STScI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; MacKenty, J.; Skinner, C.; Axon, D.; Stobie, E.; Schneider, G.

    The Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) is a second-generation instrument to be installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the second servicing mission in early 1997. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the NICMOS Investigation Definition Team (IDT) are collaborating on the development of a data calibration pipeline where not only algorithms, but also code will be shared. STScI is developing its pipeline in the IRAF environment, while the IDT pipeline is being developed in an IDL environment. Code common to both environments is written in ANSI C. We describe the methodology used for this project, as well as hurdles overcome in making it work.

  1. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (SDK) telescope launched into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. The science goals for JWST include the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe; the chemical, morphological and dynamical buildup of galaxies and the formation of stars and planetary systems. Recently, the goals have expanded to include studies of dark energy, dark matter, active galactic nuclei, exoplanets and Solar System objects. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to S microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. The observatory is confirmed for launch in 2018; the design is complete and it is in its construction phase. Recent progress includes the completion of the mirrors, the delivery of the first flight instruments and the start of the integration and test phase.

  2. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Maria; Eichorn, William; Hill, Michael; Hylan, Jason; Marsh, James; Ohl, Raymond; Sampler, Henry; Wright, Geraldine; Crane, Allen; Herrera, Acey; Quigley, Robert; Jetten, Mark; Young, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (approx.40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The ISIM optical metering structure is a roughly 2.2x1.7x2.2mY, asymmetric frame that is composed of carbon fiber and resin tubes bonded to invar end fittings and composite gussets and clips. The structure supports the SIs, isolates the SIs from the OTE, and supports thermal and electrical subsystems. The structure is attached to the OTE structure via strut-like kinematic mounts. The ISM structure must meet its requirements at the approx.40K cryogenic operating temperature. The SIs are aligned to the structure s coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using laser tracker and theodolite metrology. The ISM structure is thermally cycled for stress relief and in order to measure temperature-induced mechanical, structural changes. These ambient-to-cryogenic changes in the alignment of SI and OTE-related interfaces are an important component in the JWST Observatory alignment plan and must be verified.

  3. Spitzer Space Telescope mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Johnny H.; Garcia, Mark D.; Bonfiglio, Eugene; Long, Stacia M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the mission design, launch, orbit, and navigation results for the Spitzer space telescope mission. The Spitzer telescope was launched by the Delta II Heavy launch vehicle into a heliocentric Earth trailing orbit. This orbit is flown for the first time and will be used by several future astronomical missions such as Kepler, SIM, and LISA. This paper describes the launch strategy for a winter versus a summer launch and how it affects communications. It also describes how the solar orbit affects the design and operations of the Observatory. It describes the actual launch timeline, launch vehicle flight performance, and the long term behavior of the as flown orbit. It also provides the orbit knowledge from in-flight navigation data.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Servicing begins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    The day's work began when astronauts Story Musgrave and Jeff Hoffman stepped out into the cargo bay at 9h41 pm CST, Saturday (4h41 am CET, Sunday). They immediately set to work replacing two gyroscope assemblies, known as the Rate Sensor Units, two associated electronics boxes, called Electronic Control Units, and eight electrical fuse plugs. The work was completed ahead of schedule, but the astronauts had trouble closing the doors of the compartment housing the gyros and took over an hour to get them shut. The astronauts also prepared equipment for the replacement of the solar arrays. "The feeling down here is one of great satisfaction for a tremendous job today" said spacecraft communicator Greg Harbaugh in mission control. "We are very proud of the work that you all did and we are very confident in the continued success of the mission. Everything is going great and tomorrow is going to be another great day". ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier played a vital role during the spacewalk moving the astronauts and their equipment around the cargo bay with the shuttle's robot arm. The Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission features more robot arm operations than any other shuttle flight. The telescope's left-hand solar array was rolled up successfully at 6h24 am CST (1h24 pm CET). The 11-tonne observatory was rotated 180 degrees on its turntable before commands were sent to retract the second array at 8h23 am CST (3h23 pm CET). The crew stopped the retraction when it appeared the system may have jammed. Mission control instructed the crew to jettison the array, a procedure that they have trained for. Tomorrow astronauts Kathy Thornton and Tom Akers will make a six-hour spacewalk to jettison the troublesome wing, store the other in the cargo bay, and install two new panels supplied by ESA. The second set of arrays feature thermal shields and a modified thermal compensation system to prevent the flexing that affected the first pair. The Hubble Space Telescope was plucked

  5. Infrastructure for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEwen, Howard A.; Lillie, Charles F.

    2016-10-01

    It is generally recognized (e.g., in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration response to recent congressional appropriations) that future space observatories must be serviceable, even if they are orbiting in deep space (e.g., around the Sun-Earth libration point, SEL2). On the basis of this legislation, we believe that budgetary considerations throughout the foreseeable future will require that large, long-lived astrophysics missions must be designed as evolvable semipermanent observatories that will be serviced using an operational, in-space infrastructure. We believe that the development of this infrastructure will include the design and development of a small to mid-sized servicing vehicle (MiniServ) as a key element of an affordable infrastructure for in-space assembly and servicing of future space vehicles. This can be accomplished by the adaptation of technology developed over the past half-century into a vehicle approximately the size of the ascent stage of the Apollo Lunar Module to provide some of the servicing capabilities that will be needed by very large telescopes located in deep space in the near future (2020s and 2030s). We specifically address the need for a detailed study of these servicing requirements and the current proposals for using presently available technologies to provide the appropriate infrastructure.

  6. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  7. Space Telescopes and Orbital Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Almost 12,000 artificial objects orbiting the Earth are currently in the public catalog of orbital elements maintained by the USAF. Only a small fraction of them are operational satellites. The remainder is satellites whose missions have ended, rocket bodies, and parts and debris from larger parent objects. And the catalog only contains the biggest and brightest of the objects in orbit. The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) regime where most of this population concentrates is also a regime of incredible interest to astronomers, since it is where flagship missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and other Great Observatories operate. I'll review the current state of knowledge of the orbital debris population, how it has grown with time, and how this environment could affect current and future space telescopes. There are mitigation measures which many spacecraft operators have adopted which can control the growth of the debris population. Orbital debris research at the University of Michigan is funded by NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope battery background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standlee, Dan

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the MSFC Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Contract; HST battery design requirements; HST nickel-hydrogen battery development; HST nickel-hydrogen battery module; HST NiH2 battery module hardware; pressure vessel design; HST NiH2 cell design; offset non-opposing vs. rabbit ear cell; HST NiH2 specified capacity; HST NiH2 battery design; and HST NiH2 module design.

  9. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    The scientific capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and active nuclei within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. To enable these four science themes, JWST will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched to the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point early in the next decade. It is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, and is a partnership of NASA, ESA and CSA. JWST will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. In this paper, the status and capabilities of the observatory and instruments in the context of the major scientific goals are reviewed.

  10. Far Ultraviolot Space Telescope (FAUST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope is a compact, wide field-of-view, far ultraviolet instrument designed for observations of extended and point sources of astronomical interest. It was originally used in sounding rocket work by both French and American investigators. The instrument was modified for flight on the space shuttle and flew on the Spacelab 1 mission as a joint effort between the Laboratoire d'Astronomie Spatiale and the University of California, Berkeley. The prime experiment objective of this telescope on the Atmospheric Laboratory Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission is to observe faint astronomical sources in the far ultraviolet with sensitivities far higher than previously available. The experiment will cover the 1300 to 1800 A band, which is inaccessible to observers on earth. The observing program during the mission consists of obtaining deep sky images during spacecraft nighttime. The targets will include hot stars and nebulae in our own galaxy, faint diffuse galactic features similar to the cirrus clouds seen by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), large nearby galaxies, nearby clusters of galaxies, and objects of cosmological interest such as quasars and the diffuse far ultraviolet background.

  11. Origins Space Telescope: Study Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha R.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the OST STDT, the OST Study Team based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, study partners, and the advisory panel to the study. This presentation will also summarize recent activities, including the process used to reach a decision on the mission architecture, the identification of key science drivers, and the key study milestones between 2017 and 2020.

  12. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  13. Origins Space Telescope: Community Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Sean J.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. This poster will outline the ways in which the astronomical community can participate in the STDT activities and a summary of tools that are currently available or are planned for the community during the study. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.

  14. NICMOS Defocus parameter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevsky, Ilana

    2007-07-01

    This proposal tests the new NICMOS non-nominal focus positions, which are implemented in the front-end systems and are specified in the Phase II using the CAMERA-FOCUS=DEFOCUS Optional Parameter. The targets from Proposals 9832 and 11063 are used in this Proposal. The GO Proposal 9832 is an example of how GOs may use the new non-nominal focus implementation for detector 3. Proposal 11063 is the NICMOS focus monitor, which will be used to verify the non-nominal focus for all 3 detectors.

  15. The Hubble Space Telescope: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villard, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is the best understanding of the flaw discovered in the optics of the Hubble Space Telescope and the possible solutions to the problems. The spherical aberration in the telescope's mirror and its effect on the quality of the telescope's imaging ability is discussed. (CW)

  16. Preliminary Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Prince, F. Andrew; Smart, Christian; Stephens, Kyle; Henrichs, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. However, great care is required. Some space telescope cost models, such as those based only on mass, lack sufficient detail to support such analysis and may lead to inaccurate conclusions. Similarly, using ground based telescope models which include the dome cost will also lead to inaccurate conclusions. This paper reviews current and historical models. Then, based on data from 22 different NASA space telescopes, this paper tests those models and presents preliminary analysis of single and multi-variable space telescope cost models.

  17. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Transportation Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ready for transportation to the Kennedy Space Center, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is pictured onboard the strongback dolly at the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF) at the Lockheed assembly plant upon completion of final testing and verification.

  18. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  19. Parallaxes with Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, B. E.; Harrison, T. E.; Lee, J.; Slesnick, C. L.; HST Astrometry Science Team

    2001-11-01

    We report on parallaxes for astrophysically interesting stars obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensor interferometer on Hubble Space Telescope. These objects include the central star of the planetary nebula NGC 6853, the cataclysmic variable TV Col, and the distance scale calibrators RR Lyr and delta Cep. We will discuss our considerable efforts to characterize the reference stars associated with each prime target, necessary to effect the correction from relative to absolute parallax. These targets were originally chosen by L. W. Fredrick in 1980. We compare these and our past results with all past, non-HST determinations, including those from HIPPARCOS for our brighter targets. The HST Astrometry Sceince Team consists of W. H. Jefferys , P.I., G. F. Benedict, deputy P.I., B. E. McArthur, P. J. Shelus, R. Duncombe (UTexas), E. Nelan (STScI), W. van Altena and J. Lee (Yale), O. Franz and L. Wasserman (Lowell Obs.), and L. Fredrick (UVirginia). We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA grant NAG5-1603 and our many supporters at STScI and Goddard Spaceflight Center. We thank R. Patterson, J. Rhee, and S. Majewski (UVirginia) and T. Montemayor (UTexas) for assistance with reference star photometry.

  20. Beyond the Hubble Space Telescope: Early Development of the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Patrick McCray, W.

    In this paper we investigate the early history of what was at first called the Next Generation Space Telescope, later to be renamed the James Webb Space Telescope. We argue that the initial ideas for such a Next Generation Space Telescope were developed in the context of the planning for a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Much the most important group of astronomers and engineers examining such a successor was based at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. By the late 1980s, they had fashioned concepts for a successor that would work in optical, ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths, concepts that would later be regarded as politically unrealistic given the costs associated with them. We also explore how the fortunes of the planned Next Generation Space Telescope were intimately linked to that of its "parent," the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. NICMOS focus monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is used to determine and monitor the optimal focus and tilt settings for all three NICMOS cameras. It is derived from SM2/NIC 7041, but is structurally quite a bit different. This proposal is built to run NIC1/2 focus sweeps on a weekly basis, and NIC3 focus sweeps twice a week during SMOV {following the "interim" runs of the 7150}. 7043 will run for as long as it is deemed necessary to keep track of the camera focii and to monitor the dewar anomaly. After the discussion on 20/3/96, this proposal is written to run 4 complete 1-week iterations starting 3 days after the last run of the 7150 {NICMOS COARSE OPTICAL ALIGNMENT, PART 2}.

  2. NICMOS OBSERVATIONS OF THE TRANSITING HOT JUPITER XO-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Bergeron, L. E.; Long, Douglas; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Nelan, Edmund P.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Janes, Kenneth A.

    2010-08-20

    We refine the physical parameters of the transiting hot Jupiter planet XO-1b and its stellar host XO-1 using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) NICMOS observations. XO-1b has a radius R{sub p} = 1.21 {+-} 0.03 R{sub J} , and XO-1 has a radius R{sub *} = 0.94 {+-} 0.02 R{sub sun}, where the uncertainty in the mass of XO-1 dominates the uncertainty of R{sub p} and R{sub *}. There are no significant differences in the XO-1 system properties between these broadband NIR observations and previous determinations based upon ground-based optical observations. We measure two transit timings from these observations with 9 s and 15 s precision. As a residual to a linear ephemeris model, there is a 2.0{sigma} timing difference between the two HST visits that are separated by three transit events (11.8 days). These two transit timings and additional timings from the literature are sufficient to rule out the presence of an Earth mass planet orbiting in 2:1 mean motion resonance coplanar with XO-1b. We identify and correct for poorly understood 'gain-like' variations present in NICMOS time series data. This correction reduces the effective noise in time series photometry by a factor of 2 for the case of XO-1.

  3. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Dollinger, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    Multivariable parametric cost models for space telescopes provide several benefits to designers and space system project managers. They identify major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades. They enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment. And, they provide a basis for estimating total project cost. A survey of historical models found that there is no definitive space telescope cost model. In fact, published models vary greatly [1]. Thus, there is a need for parametric space telescopes cost models. An effort is underway to develop single variable [2] and multi-variable [3] parametric space telescope cost models based on the latest available data and applying rigorous analytical techniques. Specific cost estimating relationships (CERs) have been developed which show that aperture diameter is the primary cost driver for large space telescopes; technology development as a function of time reduces cost at the rate of 50% per 17 years; it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; and increasing mass reduces cost.

  4. Analysis of space telescope data collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Multiple Access (MA) communication link of the Space Telescope (ST) is described. An expected performance bit error rate is presented. The historical perspective and rationale behind the ESTL space shuttle end-to-end tests are given. The concatenated coding scheme using a convolutional encoder for the outer coder is developed. The ESTL end-to-end tests on the space shuttle communication link are described. Most important is how a concatenated coding system will perform. This is a go-no-go system with respect to received signal-to-noise ratio. A discussion of the verification requirements and Specification document is presented, and those sections that apply to Space Telescope data and communications system are discussed. The Space Telescope System consists of the Space Telescope Orbiting Observatory (ST), the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the Space Telescope Operation Control Center. The MA system consists of the ST, the return link from the ST via the Tracking and Delay Relay Satellite system to White Sands, and from White Sands via the Domestic Communications Satellite to the STOCC.

  5. Space Infrared Telescope Facility science instruments overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothwell, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will contain three cryogenically cooled infrared instruments: the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and the Multiband Infrared Photometer for SIRTF (MIPS). These instruments are sensitive to infrared radiation in the 1.8-1,200 micrometer range. This paper will discuss the three instruments' functional requirements and their accommodation in the SIRTF telescope system.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Primer for Cycle 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, S.; et al.

    2012-12-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Primer for Cycle 21 is a companion document to the HST Call for Proposals1. It provides an overview of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with basic information about telescope operations, instrument capabilities, and technical aspects of the proposal preparation process. A thorough understanding of the material in this document is essential for the preparation of a competitive proposal. This document is available as an online HTML document and a PDF file. The HTML version, optimized for online browsing, contains many links to additional information. The PDF version is optimized for printing, but online PDF readers have search capabilities for quick retrieval of specific information.

  8. Low noise HgCdTe 128 x 128 SWIR FPA for Hubble space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blessinger, Michael; Vural, Kadri; Kleinhans, William; Rieke, Marcia J.; Thompson, Rodger; Rasche, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Large area focal plane arrays of unprecedented performance were developed for use in Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS), a proposed Hubble Space Telescope refurbishment instrument. These FPAs are 128x128-element, HgCdTe hybrid arrays with a cutoff wavelength of 2.5 microns. The multiplexer consists of a CMOS field effect transistor switch array with a typical mean readout noise of less than 30 electrons. The detectors typically have a mean dark current of less than 10 electrons/s at 77 K, with currents below 2 electrons measured at 60 K (both at 0.5 V reverse bias). The mean quantum efficiency is 40 to 60 percent at 77 K for 1.0 to 2.4 microns. Functional pixel yield is typically greater than 99 percent, and the power consumption is approximately 0.2 mW (during readout only).

  9. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE TREASURY PROGRAM ON THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Robberto, M.; Soderblom, D. R.; Bergeron, E.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Makidon, R. B.; McCullough, P. R.; McMaster, M.; Panagia, N.; Reid, I. N.; Levay, Z.; Frattare, L.; Da Rio, N.; Andersen, M.; O'Dell, C. R.; Stassun, K. G.; Simon, M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Stauffer, J. R.; Meyer, M.; Reggiani, M.; and others

    2013-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury Program on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) has used 104 orbits of HST time to image the Great Orion Nebula region with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), and the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrograph (NICMOS) instrument in 11 filters ranging from the U band to the H band equivalent of HST. The program has been intended to perform the definitive study of the stellar component of the ONC at visible wavelengths, addressing key questions like the cluster initial mass function, age spread, mass accretion, binarity, and cirumstellar disk evolution. The scanning pattern allowed us to cover a contiguous field of approximately 600 arcmin{sup 2} with both ACS and WFPC2, with a typical exposure time of approximately 11 minutes per ACS filter, corresponding to a point source depth AB(F435W) = 25.8 and AB(F775W) = 25.2 with 0.2 mag of photometric error. We describe the observations, data reduction, and data products, including images, source catalogs, and tools for quick look preview. In particular, we provide ACS photometry for 3399 stars, most of them detected at multiple epochs; WFPC2 photometry for 1643 stars, 1021 of them detected in the U band; and NICMOS JH photometry for 2116 stars. We summarize the early science results that have been presented in a number of papers. The final set of images and the photometric catalogs are publicly available through the archive as High Level Science Products at the STScI Multimission Archive hosted by the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  10. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2003-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in August 2003. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  11. Compact telescope for free-space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganov, Vladimir; James, Daryl G.

    2002-10-01

    Several types of telescopes are used for free space telecommunications. The most common are Cassegrain and Gregorian telescopes. The main difference between Cassegrain and Gregorian optical systems is that Gregorian telescopes employ a concave secondary mirror located beyond the focus of the primary mirror. This results in longer tube lengths, as the distance between mirrors is slightly more than the sum of their focal lengths, which is the reason Cassegrain systems are the most common. In addition, Gregorian telescopes produce an upright image, while Cassegrain telescopes produce an inverted image. FSONA is presenting a new compact optical system, which can be described as a modified Gregorian telescope. This telescope is ideally suited for free space optical communications but also has many other applications. The compact telescope is created from a standard Gregorian system by flipping the secondary mirror over a folding mirror installed approximately in the middle of the optical path between primary and secondary mirrors. In this manner, the primary mirror is constructed with a concentric "double curved" geometry, and a central obscuring folding mirror which matches the diameter of the smaller curve of the primary is mounted a short distance in front. This "double curved" geometry is easily produced using diamond turning technology, and the result is a compact telescope approximately 1/2 the length of a regular Gregorian telescope and roughly 2/3 the length of a Cassegrain telescope. There are several advantages to using this type of telescope: 1. The system is very compact. Telescope can be as short as 1/7 of the focal length of the system. 2. For Cassegrain and Gregorian systems it is very critical to keep tight tolerances on the centration between primary and secondary mirrors. The modified Gregorian telescope will always have perfect centration because both curved surfaces are machined at the same time on a diamond turning lathe. The folding mirror is flat

  12. James Webb Space Telescope Project (JWST) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Mitra

    2008-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project. The JWST is an infrared telescope designed to collect data in the cosmic dark zone. Specifically, the mission of the JWST is to study the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. It is a deployable telescope with a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, adjustable primary mirror. outfitted with cryogenic temperature telescope and instruments for infrared performance. The JWST is several times more sensitive than previous telescope and other photographic and electronic detection methods. It hosts a near infrared camera, near infrared spectrometer, mid-infrared instrument and a fine guidance sensor. The JWST mission objection and architecture, integrated science payload, instrument overview, and operational orbit are described.

  13. The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, H.; Bock, J.; Freund, M. M.; Guo, H.; Hirao, T.; Lange, A. E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Mcmahon, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) is a cryogenically cooled small infrared telescope that will fly aboard the small space platform Space Flyer Unit. It will survey approximately 10% of the sky with a relatively wide beam during its 20 day emission. Four focal-plane instruments will make simultaneous observations of the sky at wavelengths ranging from 1 to 1000 microns. The IRTS will provide significant information on cosmology, interstellar matter, late-type stars, and interplanetary dust. This paper describes the instrumentation and mission.

  14. Teaching a Course about the Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Thornton

    1983-01-01

    "Astronomy with the Space Telescope" is a course designed to show scientists/engineers how this instrument can make important advances in astrophysics, planetology, and geophysics. A description of the course (taught to 11 students working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and sample student paper on black holes are…

  15. Hubble Space Telescope 2004 Battery Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2004-01-01

    Battery cell wear out mechanisms and signatures are examined and compared to orbital data from the six on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries, and the Flight Spare Battery (FSB) Test Bed at Marshall Space Fiight Center (MSFC), which is instrumented with individual cell voltage monitoring.

  16. Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Located on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus, Baltimore, Maryland. The institute is responsible to NASA's GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER for the scientific operations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). It was established by NASA, following a recommendation by the National Academy of Sciences, and is operated by ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITIES FOR RESEARCH IN ASTRONOMY (AURA) under contract ...

  17. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is an engineering test {described in SMOV4 Activity Description NICMOS-04} to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in SMOV4. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal operating temperature.Addition of visits G0 - G9 {9/9/09}: Ten visits copied from proposal 11868 {visits 20, 30, ..., 90, A0, B0}. Each visit moves two filter positions, takes lamp ON/OFF exposures and then moves back to the blank position. Visits G0, G1 and G2 will leave the filter wheels disabled. The remaining visits will leave the filter wheels enabled. There are sufficient in between times to allow for data download and analysis. In the case of problem is encountered, the filter wheels will be disabled through a real time command. The in between times are all set to 22-50 hours. It is preferable to have as short as possible in between time.

  18. 8-Meter UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes using the unprecedented capability of the planned Ares V launch vehicle, to place a 8 meter monolithic space telescope at the Earth-Sun L2 point. This new capability enables a new design pardigm -- simplicity. The six to eight meter class telescope with a massive high Technical Readiness Level ground observatory class monolithic primary mirror has been determined feasible. The proposed design, structural analysis, spacecraft design and shroud integration, thermal analysis, propulsion system, guidance navigation and pointing control assumptions about the avionics, and power systems, operational lifetime, and the idea of in-space servicing are reviewed.

  19. DESTINY, The Dark Energy Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasquale, Bert A.; Woodruff, Robert A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed the development of a low-cost space telescope, Destiny, as a concept for the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission. Destiny is a 1.65m space telescope, featuring a near-infrared (0.85-1.7m) survey camera/spectrometer with a moderate flat-field field of view (FOV). Destiny will probe the properties of dark energy by obtaining a Hubble diagram based on Type Ia supernovae and a large-scale mass power spectrum derived from weak lensing distortions of field galaxies as a function of redshift.

  20. Origins Space Telescope: Telescope Design and Instrument Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Carter, Ruth; Leisawitz, David; Dipirro, Mike; Flores, Anel; Staguhn, Johannes; Kellog, James; Roellig, Thomas L.; Melnick, Gary J.; Bradford, Charles; Wright, Edward L.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, one of the four science and technology definition studies of NASA Headquarters for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey. The renaming of the mission reflects Origins science goals that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, nearby galaxies and the Milky Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. This poster will show the preliminary telescope design that will be a large aperture (>8 m in diameter), cryogenically cooled telescope. We will also present the specifications for the spectrographs and imagers over a potential wavelength range of ~10 microns to 1 millimeter. We look forward to community input into this mission definition over the coming year as we work on the concept design for the mission. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. We welcome you to contact the Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) with your science needs and ideas by emailing us at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.

  1. The polarimetric capabilities of NICMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, D. C.; Schmidt, G. D.; Lytle, Dyer

    1997-01-01

    The polarimetric capabilities of Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) are demonstrated from data obtained during the Early Release Observations of IRC+10216 and CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula). Preflight Thermal Vacuum tests revealed that each polarizer has a unique polarizing efficiency, and that the position angle offsets differ from the nominal positions of O deg, 120 deg and 240 deg. Therefore an algorithm different from that of an ideal polarizer is required for proper reduction of astronomical polarimetry data. We discuss this new algorithm and the results of its application to NICMOS data. We also present preliminary estimates of the Instrumental Polarization, the sensitivity of the grisms to polarized light, and the accuracy of NICMOS imaging polarimetry for faint and low polarization objects. Finally, we suggest strategies for maximizing the success of NICMOS polarimetry observations.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Briefing: HST Science Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video release presents a broad overview of the science that is now possible as a result of the servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Dr. Ed Weiler (HST Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters), Dr. Dave Leckrone (HST, Senior Project Scientist, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)), Dr. John Trauger (Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) Principal Investigator, Jet Propulsion Lab. (JPL)), Dr. Chris Burrows (WFPC2 Co-Investigator, Space Telescope Science Inst.(STSci)-European Space Agency (ESA), Jim Crocker ((Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement) COSTAR Team Leader, STSci), Dr. Holland Ford (COSTAR Project Scientist, Johns Hopkins Univ., STSci), and Dr. Duccio Machetto (European Space Agency (ESA)) give brief presentations, which feature images of stars and galaxies taken from the ground, from WFPC1 (prior to the servicing mission), and from WFPC2 (after the servicing mission). The main theme of the discussions center around the spherical aberration that was found in the images prior to servicing and the corrected images seen without the aberration following servicing. A question and answer period rounds out the press conference, with questions posed from scientific journalists at GSFC and other NASA centers.

  3. Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Cleveland, Paul; Durand, Dale; Klavins, Andy; Muheim, Daniella; Paine, Christopher; Petach, Mike; Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, Jason; Walyus, Keith

    2007-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program funded an effort to develop a system cooling technology, which is applicable to all future infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter cryogenic space telescopes. In particular, this technology is necessary for the proposed large space telescope Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) mission. This technology will also enhance the performance and lower the risk and cost for other cryogenic missions. The new paradigm for cooling to low temperatures will involve passive cooling using lightweight deployable membranes that serve both as sunshields and V-groove radiators, in combination with active cooling using mechanical coolers operating down to 4 K. The Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes (LST) mission planned to develop and demonstrate a multi-layered sunshield, which is actively cooled by a multi-stage mechanical cryocooler, and further the models and analyses critical to scaling to future missions. The outer four layers of the sunshield cool passively by radiation, while the innermost layer is actively cooled to enable the sunshield to decrease the incident solar irradiance by a factor of more than one million. The cryocooler cools the inner layer of the sunshield to 20 K, and provides cooling to 6 K at a telescope mounting plate. The technology readiness level (TRL) of 7 will be achieved by the active cooling technology following the technology validation flight in Low Earth Orbit. In accordance with the New Millennium charter, tests and modeling are tightly integrated to advance the technology and the flight design for "ST-class" missions. Commercial off-the-shelf engineering analysis products are used to develop validated modeling capabilities to allow the techniques and results from LST to apply to a wide variety of future missions. The LST mission plans to "rewrite the book" on cryo-thermal testing and modeling techniques, and validate modeling techniques to scale to future space telescopes such as SAFIR.

  4. Observing New Worlds with Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The search for exoplanets and characterization of their properties has seen increasing success over the last few years. In excess of 500 explanets are known and there are approximately 1200 additional candidates. Recently, progress has been made in direct imaging planets, both from the ground and in space. This presentation will discuss the history and current state of technology used for such discoveries, and highlight the new results enabled by the current and future space telescopes.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope: Battery Capacity Trend Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. Gopalakrishna; Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Battery cell wear out mechanisms and signatures are examined and compared to orbital data from the six on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries, and the Flight Spare Battery (FSB) Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which is instrumented with individual cell voltage monitoring. Capacity trend data is presented which suggests HST battery replacement is required in 2005-2007 or sooner.

  6. Optimal Calibration of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Kang, Bryan; Brugarolas, Paul; Boussalis, Dhemetrio

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses the focal-plane calibration of the Spitzer Space Telescope by use of the instrument pointing frame (IPF) Kalman filter, which was described in Kalman Filter for Calibrating a Telescope Focal Plane (NPO-40798), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 9 (September 2006), page 62. To recapitulate: In the IPF Kalman filter, optimal estimates of both engineering and scientific focal-plane parameters are obtained simultaneously, using data taken in each focalplane survey activity. The IPF Kalman filter offers greater efficiency and economy, relative to prior calibration practice in which scientific and engineering parameters were estimated by separate teams of scientists and engineers and iterated upon each other. In the Spitzer Space Telescope application, the IPF Kalman filter was used to calibrate 56 frames for precise telescope pointing, estimate >1,500 parameters associated with focal-plane mapping, and process calibration runs involving as many as 1,338 scientific image centroids. The final typical survey calibration accuracy was found to be 0.09 arc second. The use of the IPF Kalman filter enabled a team of only four analysts to complete the calibration processing in three months. An unanticipated benefit afforded by the IPF Kalman filter was the ability to monitor health and diagnose performance of the entire end-to-end telescope-pointing system.

  7. Science with the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the fourth and final member of NASA's series of Great Observatories, is scheduled to launch on April 15,2003. Together with the Hubbie Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma ray Telescope, and the Chandra X-Ray Telescope this series of observatories offers observational capabilities across the electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared to high-energy gamma rays. SIRTF is based on three focal plane instruments - an infrared spectrograph and two infrared imagers - coupled to a superfluid-helium cooled telescope to achieve unprecedented sensitivity from 3 to 180 microns. Although SIRTF is a powerful general-purpose infrared observatory, its design was based on the capability to address four broad science themes: (1) understanding the structure and composition of the early universe, (2) understanding the nature of brown dwarfs and super-planets, (3) probing protostellar, protoplanetary, and planetary debris disk systems, and (4) understanding the origin and structure of ultraluminous infrared galaxies and active galactic nuclei. This talk will address the design and capabilities of the SIRTF observatory, provide an overview of some of the initial science investigations planned by the SIRTF Guaranteed Time Observers, and give a brief overview of the General Observer proposal process.

  8. TeraHertz Space Telescope (TST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Marina Madeline; Lesser, David; O'Dougherty, Stephan; Swift, Brandon; Pat, Terrance; Cortez, German; Smith, Steve; Goldsmith, Paul; Walker, Christopher K.

    2017-01-01

    The Terahertz Space Telescope (TST) utilizes breakthrough inflatable technology to create a ~25 m far-infrared observing system at a fraction of the cost of previous space telescopes. As a follow-on to JWST and Herschel, TST will probe the FIR/THz regime with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, answering fundamental questions concerning the origin and destiny of the cosmos. Prior and planned space telescopes have barely scratched the surface of what can be learned in this wavelength region. TST will pick up where JWST and Herschel leave off. At ~30µm TST will have ~10x the sensitivity and ~3x the angular resolution of JWST. At longer wavelengths it will have ~1000x the sensitivity of Herschel and ~7 times the angular resolution. TST can achieve this at low cost through the innovative use of inflatable technology. A recently-completed NIAC Phase II study (Large Balloon Reflector) validated, both analytically and experimentally, the concept of a large inflatable spherical reflector and demonstrated critical telescope functions. In our poster we will introduce the TST concept and compare its performance to past, present, and proposed far-infrared observatories.

  9. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  10. The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope (CAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Lynch, Dana H.; Vassigh, Kenny K.; Young, Zion

    2016-07-01

    The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope, CAST, is a concept that provides access to a UV/visible-infrared wavelength sub-arcsecond imaging platform from space, something that will be in high demand after the retirement of the astronomy workhorse, the 2.4 meter diameter Hubble Space Telescope. CAST allows building large aperture telescopes based on small, compatible and low-cost segments mounted on autonomous cube-sized satellites. The concept merges existing technology (segmented telescope architecture) with emerging technology (smartly interconnected modular spacecraft, active optics, deployable structures). Requiring identical mirror segments, CAST's optical design is a spherical primary and secondary mirror telescope with modular multi-mirror correctors placed at the system focal plane. The design enables wide fields of view, up to as much as three degrees, while maintaining aperture growth and image performance requirements. We present a point design for the CAST concept based on a 0.6 meter diameter (3 x 3 segments) growing to a 2.6 meter diameter (13 x 13 segments) primary, with a fixed Rp=13,000 and Rs=8,750 mm curvature, f/22.4 and f/5.6, respectively. Its diffraction limited design uses a two arcminute field of view corrector with a 7.4 arcsec/mm platescale, and can support a range of platescales as fine as 0.01 arcsec/mm. Our paper summarizes CAST, presents a strawman optical design and requirements for the underlying modular spacecraft, highlights design flexibilities, and illustrates applications enabled by this new method in building space observatories.

  11. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  12. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave; McEnery, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Gamma Ray Astronomy as enhanced by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and Radio Astronomy as a synergistic relationship. Gamma rays often represent a significant part of the energy budget of a source; therefore, gamma-ray studies can be critical to understanding physical processes in such sources. Radio observations offer timing and spatial resolutions vastly superior to anything possible with gamma-ray telescopes; therefore radio is often the key to understanding source structure. Gamma-ray and radio observations can complement each other, making a great team. It reviews the Fermi Guest Investigator (GI) program, and calls for more cooperative work that involves Fermi and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes.

  13. HST NICMOS Observations of the Polarization of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Hines, Dean C.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Trammell, Susan R.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the polarized light at 2 microns in the center of NGC 1068 with HST (Hubble Space Telescope) NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi Object Spectrometer) Camera 2. The nucleus is dominated by a bright, unresolved source, polarized at a level of 6.0 +/- 1.2% with a position angle of 122 degrees +/- 1.5 degrees. There are two polarized lobes extending tip to 8" northeast and southwest of the nucleus. The polarized flux in both lobes is quite clumpy, with the maximum polarization occurring in the southwest lobe at a level of 17% when smoothed to 0.23" resolution. The perpendiculars to the polarization vectors in these two lobes point back to the intense unresolved nuclear source to within one 0.076" Camera 2 pixel, thereby confirming that this source is the origin of the scattered light and therefore the probable AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) central engine. Whereas the polarization of the nucleus is probably caused by dichroic absorption, the polarization in the lobes is almost certainly caused by scattering, with very little contribution from dichroic absorption. Features in the polarized lobes include a gap at a distance of about 1" from the nucleus toward the southwest lobe and a "knot" of emission about 5" northwest of the nucleus. Both features had been discussed by groundbased observers, but they are much better defined with the high spatial resolution of NICMOS. The northeast knot may be the side of a molecular cloud that is facing the nucleus, which cloud may be preventing the expansion of the northeast radio lobe at the head of the radio synchrotron-radiation-emitting jet. We also report the presence of two ghosts in the Camera 2 polarizers.

  14. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  15. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator- NB38 -Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown are astronauts Bruce McCandless and Sharnon Lucid being fitted for their space suits prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope: A cosmic time machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.; Harms, R. J.; Brandt, J. C.; Bless, R. C.; Macchetto, F. D.; Jefferys, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The mission of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is to explore the expanding and evolving universe. During the 3,000 operating hours every year for the next 15 years or more, the HST will be used to study: galaxies; pulsars; globular clusters; neighboring stars where planets may be forming; binary star systems; condensing gas clouds and their chemical composition; and the rings of Saturn and the swirling ultraviolet clouds of Venus. The major technical achievements - its nearly perfect mirrors, its precise guidance system of rate gyroscopes, reaction wheels, star trackers, and fine guidance sensors are briefly discussed. The scientific instruments on board HST are briefly described. The integration of the equipment and instruments is outlined. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has approved time for 162 observations from among 556 proposals. The mission operation and data flow are explained.

  17. Preliminary Multivariable Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. Previously, the authors published two single variable cost models based on 19 flight missions. The current paper presents the development of a multi-variable space telescopes cost model. The validity of previously published models are tested. Cost estimating relationships which are and are not significant cost drivers are identified. And, interrelationships between variables are explored

  18. Creation of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been the most successful space astronomy project to date, producing images that put the public in awe and images and spectra that have produced many scientific discoveries. It is the natural culmination of a dream envisioned when rocket flight into space was first projected and a goal set for the US space program soon after NASA was created. The design and construction period lasted almost two decades and its operations have already lasted almost as long. The capabilities of the observatory have evolved and expanded with periodic upgrading of its instrumentation, thus realizing the advantages of its unique design. The success of this long-lived observatory is closely tied to the availability of the Space Shuttle and the end of the Shuttle program means that the end of the Hubble program will follow before long.

  19. A Scientific Revolution: The Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a Rood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, Dr. Gardner will discuss some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the last 10 years, and the role that space telescopes have played in those discoveries. The next decade looks equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. Building the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. JWST will make progress In almost every area of astronomy, from the first galaxies to form in the early universe to exoplanets and Solar System objects. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. The observatory Is confirmed for launch in 2018; the design is complete and it is in its construction phase. Innovations that make JWST possible include large-area low-noise infrared detectors, cryogenic ASICs, a MEMS micro-shutter array providing multi-object spectroscopy, a non-redundant mask for interferometric coronagraphy and diffraction-limited segmented beryllium mirrors with active wavefront sensing and control. Recent progress includes the completion of the mirrors, the delivery of the first flight instruments and the start of the integration and test phase.

  1. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched into orbit around the second Earth-Sun lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. The science goals for JWST include the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe; the chemical, morphological and dynamical buildup of galaxies and the formation of stars and planetary systems. Recently, the goals have expanded to include studies of dark energy, dark matter, active galactic nuclei, exoplanets and Solar System objects. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitiess Spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. The observatory is confirmed for launch in 2018; the design is complete and it is in its construction phase. Recent progress includes the completion of the mirrors, the delivery of the first flight instrument(s) and the start of the integration and test phase.

  2. Spacecraft momentum management procedures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.; Davenport, P. B.; Sturch, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques appropriate for implementation onboard the space telescope and other spacecraft to manage the accumulation of momentum in reaction wheel control systems using magnetic torquing coils are described. Generalized analytical equations are derived for momentum control laws that command the magnetic torquers. These control laws naturally fall into two main categories according to the methods used for updating the magnetic dipole command: closed loop, in which the update is based on current measurements to achieve a desired torque instantaneously, and open-loop, in which the update is based on predicted information to achieve a desired momentum at the end of a period of time. Physical interpretations of control laws in general and of the Space Telescope cross product and minimum energy control laws in particular are presented, and their merits and drawbacks are discussed. A technique for retaining the advantages of both the open-loop and the closed-loop control laws is introduced. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of these control laws in the Space Telescope environment.

  3. New Eyes for Space Exploration: Upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunsfeld, John

    2002-10-01

    In March 2002, a team of seven astronauts launched from the KennedyCenter aboard Space Shuttle Columbia in route to the Hubble SpaceTelescope. The Hubble Space Telescope was designed to be servicedperiodically to upgrade its instruments and fix broken equipment. TheSTS-109 mission, the fourth Hubble servicing mission, was the mostambitious repair mission to date. Over a series of five space walks,astronauts in space suits replaced the solar arrays and power system,installed a new sensitive camera, and brought an infra-red cameraback to life. Details of the mission will be presented, as well assome of the first exciting pictures from the new camera.John Mace Grunsfeld received a B.S. degree in physics fromM.I.T. ; an M.S. degree and Ph.D. in physics from the University ofChicago. Dr. Grunsfeld studies binary pulsars and energetic x-ray andgamma ray sources using the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, x-rayastronomy satellites, radio telescopes, and optical telescopesincluding the NASA Hubble Space Telescope. He became an astronaut in1992 and led a team of scientists tasked with defining and producingthe crew displays for command and control of the International SpaceCenter (ISS). He has logged over 45 days in space, including 5 spacewalks. He participated in the second flight of the astro observatoryin 1995. He served as flight engineer of a 10 day mission to dockwith Russia's Space Station Mir in 1997. He has participated in twoservicing missions of the Hubble Telescope in 1999 and 2002.

  4. New Eyes for Space Exploration: Upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunsfeld, John

    2002-09-01

    In March 2002, a team of seven astronauts launched from the KennedyCenter aboard Space Shuttle Columbia in route to the Hubble SpaceTelescope. The Hubble Space Telescope was designed to be servicedperiodically to upgrade its instruments and fix broken equipment. TheSTS-109 mission, the fourth Hubble servicing mission, was the mostambitious repair mission to date. Over a series of five space walks,astronauts in space suits replaced the solar arrays and power system,installed a new sensitive camera, and brought an infra-red cameraback to life. Details of the mission will be presented, as well assome of the first exciting pictures from the new camera.John Mace Grunsfeld received a B.S. degree in physics fromM.I.T. ; an M.S. degree and Ph.D. in physics from the University ofChicago. Dr. Grunsfeld studies binary pulsars and energetic x-ray andgamma ray sources using the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, x-rayastronomy satellites, radio telescopes, and optical telescopesincluding the NASA Hubble Space Telescope. He became an astronaut in1992 and led a team of scientists tasked with defining and producingthe crew displays for command and control of the International SpaceCenter (ISS). He has logged over 45 days in space, including 5 spacewalks. He participated in the second flight of the astro observatoryin 1995. He served as flight engineer of a 10 day mission to dockwith Russia's Space Station Mir in 1997. He has participated in twoservicing missions of the Hubble Telescope in 1999 and 2002.

  5. Europe discusses role in future space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    Prof. Roger Bonnet said it was important for Europe to make an informed decision in the next few years on whether to support NASA's proposed New Generation Space Telescope (NGST), a follow-on programme to the Hubble Space Telescope. NGST's observing capabilities will far extend the reach of existing ground or space-based telescopes, providing the opportunity for the first time to look back through eons of time to the very first stars and galaxies in the Universe. With an aperture greater than four metres, NGST could also provide European astronomers with a crucial complement to some of ESA's planned future space projects, like FIRST (the Far InfraRed Submillimetre Telescope) and Planck (a mission to study the cosmic background radiation field). NASA and ESA are already involved in preliminary NGST studies but Europe has yet to make a commitment to support the programme. NASA wants to start formal development in 2003, with a launch currently planned for 2007. This week's conference at Liege in Belgium was the first opportunity for many astronomers to exchange ideas and compare technological notes on a Next Generation Space Telescope. It also provided a forum for representatives of Europe's space industry to discuss the technological challenges presented by such a project. Prof. Bonnet said: "From recent experience it is clear that the best scientific results in astronomy and astrophysics are obtained by coordinated observations in different wavelength ranges. "The joint effort of the European space programme and of the various large European ground observatories currently allows European astronomers to be on the front-line of astrophysics research."He said that ESA - if supported programmatically and financially by its member states - is willing to discuss with NASA a mutually fruitful form of NGST participation. But Prof. Bonnet stressed that for this type of collaboration to be approved it remained crucial that the European share contained both scientific and

  6. NICMOS FINDS A GOLDEN RING AT THE HEART OF A GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The revived Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has pierced the dusty disk of the 'edge-on' galaxy NGC 4013 and peered all the way to the galactic core. To the surprise of astronomers, NICMOS found a brilliant band-like structure, that may be a ring of newly formed stars [yellow band in middle photo] seen edge-on. In the visible-light view of the galaxy [top photo], the star-forming ring cannot be seen because it is embedded in dust. The most prominent feature in the visible-light image -- taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) -- is the thin, dark band of gas and dust, which is about 500 light-years thick. NICMOS enables the Hubble telescope to see in near-infrared wavelengths of light, so that it can penetrate the dust that obscures the inner hub of the galaxy. The ring-like structure spied by NICMOS encircles the core and is about 720 light-years wide, which is the typical size of most star-forming rings found in disk galaxies. The small ring is churning out stars at a torrid pace. The Milky Way Galaxy, for example, is more than 10,000 times larger than the ring. If the Milky Way produced stars at the same rate, it would be making 1,000 times more stars a year. The human eye cannot see infrared light, so colors have been assigned to correspond with near-infrared wavelengths. The blue light represents shorter near-infrared wavelengths and the red light corresponds to longer wavelengths. The ring-like structure is seen more clearly in the photo at bottom. This picture, taken with a filter sensitive to hydrogen, shows the glow of stars and gas. Astronomers used this information to calculate the rate of star formation in the ring-like structure. The extremely bright star near the center of each picture is a nearby foreground star belonging to our own Milky Way. Rings of developing stars are common in barred spiral galaxies, which have 'bars' of stars and gas slicing across their disks. The

  7. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  8. A Calibration of NICMOS Camera 2 for Low Count Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, D.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Barbary, K.; Dawson, K. S.; Deustua, S.; Faccioli, L.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gladders, M. D.; de Jong, R. S.; Koekemoer, A.; Krechmer, E.; Lidman, C.; Meyers, J.; Nordin, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Schlegel, D. J.; Spadafora, A.; Suzuki, N.

    2015-05-01

    NICMOS 2 observations are crucial for constraining distances to most of the existing sample of z\\gt 1 SNe Ia. Unlike conventional calibration programs, these observations involve long exposure times and low count rates. Reciprocity failure is known to exist in HgCdTe devices and a correction for this effect has already been implemented for high and medium count rates. However, observations at faint count rates rely on extrapolations. Here instead, we provide a new zero-point calibration directly applicable to faint sources. This is obtained via inter-calibration of NIC2 F110W/F160W with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the low count-rate regime using z∼ 1 elliptical galaxies as tertiary calibrators. These objects have relatively simple near-IR spectral energy distributions, uniform colors, and their extended nature gives a superior signal-to-noise ratio at the same count rate than would stars. The use of extended objects also allows greater tolerances on point-spread function profiles. We find space telescope magnitude zero points (after the installation of the NICMOS cooling system, NCS) of 25.296\\+/- 0.022 for F110W and 25.803\\+/- 0.023 for F160W, both in agreement with the calibration extrapolated from count rates ≳1000 times larger (25.262 and 25.799). Before the installation of the NCS, we find 24.843\\+/- 0.025 for F110W and 25.498\\+/- 0.021 for F160W, also in agreement with the high-count-rate calibration (24.815 and 25.470). We also check the standard bandpasses of WFC3 and NICMOS 2 using a range of stars and galaxies at different colors and find mild tension for WFC3, limiting the accuracy of the zero points. To avoid human bias, our cross-calibration was “blinded” in that the fitted zero-point differences were hidden until the analysis was finalized. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, under programs

  9. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    The scientific capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and active nuclei within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. To enable these for science themes, JWST will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched to the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point in 2014. It is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, and is a partnership of NASA, ESA and CSA.

  10. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a candidate NASA Origins Probe Mission. SPIRIT is a two-telescope Michelson interferometer covering wavelengths from 25-400 microns, providing simultaneously high spectral resolution and high angular resolution. With comparable sensitivity to Spitzer, but two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution, SPIRIT will enable us to address a wide array of compelling scientific questions, including how planetary systems form in disks and how new planets interact with the disk. Further, SPIRIT will lay the technological groundwork for an array of future interferometry missions with ambitious scientific goals, including the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer / Darwin, and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure.

  11. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a candidate NASA Origins Probe Mission. SPIRIT is a two-telescope Michelson interferometer covering wavelengths from 25-400 microns, providing simultaneously high spectral resolution and high angular resolution. With comparable sensitivity to Spitzer, but two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution, SPIRIT will enable us to address a wide array of compelling scientific questions, including how planetary systems form in disks and how new planets interact with the disk. Further, SPIRIT will lay the technological groundwork for an array of future interferometry missions with ambitious scientific goals, including the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer/Darwin, and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure.

  12. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope's Operational Mission Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert K.; Scott, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    New Generation of Detector Arrays(100 to 10,000 Gain in Capability over Previous Infrared Space Missions). IRAC: 256 x 256 pixel arrays operating at 3.6 microns, 4.5 microns, 5.8 microns, 8.0 microns. MIPS: Photometer with 3 sets of arrays operating at 24 microns, 70 microns and 160 microns. 128 x 128; 32 x 32 and 2 x 20 arrays. Spectrometer with 50-100 micron capabilities. IRS: 4 Array (128x128 pixel) Spectrograph, 4 -40 microns. Warm Launch Architecture: All other Infrared Missions launched with both the telescope and scientific instrument payload within the cryostat or Dewar. Passive cooling used to cool outer shell to approx.40 K. Cryogenic Boil-off then cools telescope to required 5.5K. Earth Trailing Heliocentric Orbit: Increased observing efficiency, simplification of observation planning, removes earth as heat source.

  13. Lightweight deformable mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith

    This thesis presents a concept for ultra-lightweight deformable mirrors based on a thin substrate of optical surface quality coated with continuous active piezopolymer layers that provide modes of actuation and shape correction. This concept eliminates any kind of stiff backing structure for the mirror surface and exploits micro-fabrication technologies to provide a tight integration of the active materials into the mirror structure, to avoid actuator print-through effects. Proof-of-concept, 10-cm-diameter mirrors with a low areal density of about 0.5 kg/m2 have been designed, built and tested to measure their shape-correction performance and verify the models used for design. The low cost manufacturing scheme uses replication techniques, and strives for minimizing residual stresses that deviate the optical figure from the master mandrel. It does not require precision tolerancing, is lightweight, and is therefore potentially scalable to larger diameters for use in large, modular space telescopes. Other potential applications for such a laminate could include ground-based mirrors for solar energy collection, adaptive optics for atmospheric turbulence, laser communications, and other shape control applications. The immediate application for these mirrors is for the Autonomous Assembly and Reconfiguration of a Space Telescope (AAReST) mission, which is a university mission under development by Caltech, the University of Surrey, and JPL. The design concept, fabrication methodology, material behaviors and measurements, mirror modeling, mounting and control electronics design, shape control experiments, predictive performance analysis, and remaining challenges are presented herein. The experiments have validated numerical models of the mirror, and the mirror models have been used within a model of the telescope in order to predict the optical performance. A demonstration of this mirror concept, along with other new telescope technologies, is planned to take place during

  14. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared astrophysics community is eager to follow up Spitzer and Herschel observations with sensitive, high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, for such measurements are needed to understand merger-driven star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies, star and planetary system formation, and the development and prevalence of water-bearing planets. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a wide field-of-view space-based spatio-spectral interferometer designed to operate in the 25 to 400 micron wavelength range. This talk will summarize the SPIRIT mission concept, with a focus on the science that motivates it and the technology that enables it. Without mentioning SPIRIT by name, the astrophysics community through the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap Committee recently recommended this mission as the first in a series of space-based interferometers. Data from a laboratory testbed interferometer will be used to illustrate how the spatio-spectral interferometry technique works.

  15. Asteroid observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Wells, Eddie N.; Chapman, Clark R.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The ways that the asteroids can be studied with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are examined. Spectrophotometry of asteroids and the study of asteroid surfaces, shape, spins, configuration, normal reflectance, and limb darkening of asteroids using the HST are addressed along with the detection of asteroid satellites and the discovery of small asteroids using the HST. The relation of the HST to its ground system is described, as are the spectrophotometric instruments of the HST. Imaging with the HST using the Faint Object Camera and the Wide Field and Planetary Camera is examined. Finally, the SIRTF observatory, instrumentation, and capabilities for solar system science are discussed.

  16. NICMOS PEERS THROUGH DUST TO REVEAL YOUNG STELLAR DISKS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following images were taken by NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). All of the objects are extremely young stars, 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Most of the nebulae represent small dust particles around the stars, which are seen because they are reflecting starlight. In the color-coding, regions of greatest dust concentration appear red. All photo credits: D. Padgett (IPAC/Caltech), W. Brandner (IPAC), K. Stapelfeldt (JPL) and NASA [Top left]: CoKu Tau/1. This image shows a newborn binary star system, CoKu Tau/1, lying at the center of four 'wings' of light extending as much as 75 billion miles from the pair. The 'wings' outline the edges of a region in the stars' dusty surroundings, which have been cleared by outflowing gas. A thin, dark lane extends to the left and to right of the binary, suggesting that a disk or ring of dusty material encircles the two young stars. [Top center]: DG Tau B - An excellent example of the complementary nature of Hubble's instruments may be found by comparing the infrared NICMOS image of DG Tau B to the visible-light Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image of the same object. WFPC2 highlights the jet emerging from the system, while NICMOS penetrates some of the dust near the star to more clearly outline the 50 billion-mile-long dust lane (the horizontal dark band, which indicates the presence of a large disk forming around the infant star). The young star itself appears as the bright red spot at the corner of the V-shaped nebula. [Top right]: Haro 6-5B - This image of the young star Haro 6-5B shows two bright regions separated by a dark lane. As seen in the WFPC2 image of the same object, the bright regions represent starlight reflecting from the upper and lower surfaces of the disk, which is thicker at its edges than its center. However, the infrared view reveals the young star just above the dust lane. [Bottom left]: I04016 - A very young star

  17. Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, Randy; Miller, Jim; Leisgang, Tom

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes one of the most comprehensive models ever developed for a spacecraft electrical power system (EPS). The model was developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to evaluate vehicle power system performance and to assist in scheduling maintenance and refurbishment missions by providing data needed to forecast EPS power and energy margins for the mission phases being planned. The EPS model requires a specific mission phase description as the input driver and uses a high granularity database to produce a multi-orbit power system performance report. The EPS model accurately predicts the power system response to various mission timelines over the entire operational life of the spacecraft.

  18. Webb Telescope Backplane Arrives at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    Webb Telescope's Backplane arrived at Joint Base Andrews on Monday, August 24, 2015 aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5 cargo plane. The Backplane, inside the Space Telescope Transporter for Air Road and S...

  19. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The scientific capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and active nuclei within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. To enable these for science themes, JWST will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope in orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is the successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is a partnership of NASA, ESA and CSA. JWST will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  20. Space Telescope - Eye on the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA Space Telescope, which is to be put into orbit by the Space Shuttle in 1985, is described with attention to the design characteristics and fabrication processes of its optics and the five scientific instruments that will be mounted at the focal plane, behind the primary mirror. The primary mirror is fabricated from Ultra Low Expansion Glass, weighed 907 kg as a blank and took three and a half years to grind and polish to a deviation of no more than 0.000025 mm from the ideal surface. The instruments carried are the Wide Field Planetary Camera, which employs CCD detectors, the Faint Object Camera, the Faint Object Spectrograph, for use at visible and UV wavelengths, the UV High Resolution Spectrograph for 1100-2300 A wavelengths, and the High Speed Photometer for the study of time-dependent brightness fluctuations.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Bush, John R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) electrical power system (EPS) is supplying between 2000 and 2400 W of continuous power to the electrical loads. The major components of the EPS are the 5000-W back surface field reflector solar array, the six nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) 22-cell 88-Ah batteries, and the charge current controllers, which, in conjunction with the flight computer, control battery charging. The operation of the HST EPS and the results of the HST NiH2 six-battery test are discussed, and preliminary flight data are reviewed. The HST NiH2 six-battery test is a breadboard of the HST EPS on test at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Battery Capacity Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2007-01-01

    Orbital battery performance for the Hubble Space Telescope is discussed and battery life is predicted which supports decision to replace orbital batteries by 2009-2010 timeframe. Ground characterization testing of cells from the replacement battery build is discussed, with comparison of data from battery capacity characterization with cell studies of Cycle Life and 60% Stress Test at the Naval Weapons Surface Center (NWSC)-Crane, and cell Cycle Life testing at the Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC). The contents of this presentation includes an update to the performance of the on-orbit batteries, as well as a discussion of the HST Service Mission 4 (SM4) batteries manufactured in 1996 and activated in 2000, and a second set of SM4 backup replacement batteries which began manufacture Jan 11, 2007, with delivery scheduled for July 2008.

  3. Unveiling the Galaxy Population at 1.3 < z < 4: the HUDF05 NICMOS Parallel Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Sara M.; deMello, Duilia F.; Wiklind, Tomy; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Mountain, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (HUDF-NICMOS) UDF05 parallel fields, we cross-matched 301 out of 630 galaxies with the ACS filters V606 and z850, NICMOS filters J110 and H160, and Spitzer IRAC filters at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 , and 8.0 (mu)m. We modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to estimate: photometric redshifts, dust extinction, stellar mass, bolometric luminosity, starburst age and metallicity. To validate the photometric redshifts, comparisons with 16 spectroscopic redshifts give 75% within Delta < 0.2, which agrees with the sensitivities expected from the Balmer-break in our dataset. Five parallel fields observed by NICMOS have sensitivities in the H160-band of 80% at mAB = 25.4 and 50% at mAB = 26.7. Because the sample is H160-band selected, it is sensitive to stellar mass rather than UV luminosities. We also use Monte Carlo simulations to determine that the parameters from the best-fit SEDs are robust for the redshift ranges z > or approx. 1.3. Based on the robustness of the photometric redshifts, we analyze a subsample of the 301 galaxies at 1.3 < or = z < or = 2 (35 objects) and 3 < or = z < or = 4 (31 objects) and determine that L(BoI) and the star formation rate increase significantly from z approx. 1.5 to 4. The Balmer decrement is indicative of more evolved galaxies, and at high redshifts, they serve as records of some of the first galaxies. Therefore, the galaxies in this sample are great candidates for future surveys with the James Webb Space Telescope and Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  4. Asteroid Detection with the Space Surveillance Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D.; Shah, R.; Johnson, J.; Pearce, E.; Lambour, R.; Faccenda, W.

    2013-09-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) is a 3.5 m wide field-of-view system developed for DARPA by MIT Lincoln Laboratory to advance the nation's capabilities in space situational awareness. In addition to the national interest in identifying and cataloging man-made space objects, there is a growing concern for near-Earth asteroid identification and tracking. MIT is developing a program to detect near-Earth asteroids, as an extension of the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey, to identify potentially hazardous near-Earth objects, and to extend the catalog of known asteroids to smaller sizes (< 140 m). MIT believes SST's capability to detect asteroids on size scales as small as 5-10 m is well suited to provide NASA with a sample of small asteroids of interest for its proposed mission to send astronauts to near-Earth asteroids as a stepping-stone to further manned exploration of the Solar System. The Keck Institute for Space Studies (Brophy et al. 2012), studied the feasibility of asteroid capture into lunar orbit as a destination for additional investigation. A major requirement of such an effort is the development of a sample of suitable asteroids, a job that SST is uniquely able to achieve by means of its capacity for search rate and sensitivity. The SST also brings the capability of high speed photometry at rates of 100 Hz to 1 kHz; we present initial observations of asteroids using the photometers.

  5. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE RESOLVES VOLCANOES ON IO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This picture is a composite of a black and white near infrared image of Jupiter and its satellite Io and a color image of Io at shorter wavelengths taken at almost the same time on March 5, 1994. These are the first images of a giant planet or its satellites taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since the repair mission in December 1993. Io is too small for ground-based telescopes to see the surface details. The moon's angular diameter of one arc second is at the resolution limit of ground based telescopes. Many of these markings correspond to volcanoes that were first revealed in 1979 during the Voyager spacecraft flyby of Jupiter. Several of the volcanoes periodically are active because Io is heated by tides raised by Jupiter's powerful gravity. The volcano Pele appears as a dark spot surrounded by an irregular orange oval in the lower part of the image. The orange material has been ejected from the volcano and spread over a huge area. Though the volcano was first discovered by Voyager, the distinctive orange color of the volcanic deposits is a new discovery in these HST images. (Voyager missed it because its cameras were not sensitive to the near-infrared wavelengths where the color is apparent). The sulfur and sulfur dioxide that probably dominate Io's surface composition cannot produce this orange color, so the Pele volcano must be generating material with a more unusual composition, possibly rich in sodium. The Jupiter image, taken in near-infrared light, was obtained with HST's Wide Field and Planetary Camera in wide field mode. High altitude ammonia crystal clouds are bright in this image because they reflect infrared light before it is absorbed by methane in Jupiter's atmosphere. The most prominent feature is the Great Red Spot, which is conspicuous because of its high clouds. A cap of high-altitude haze appears at Jupiter's south pole. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Orbit Determination Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Sungpil; Rosales, Jose; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is designed to study and answer fundamental astrophysical questions from an orbit about the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 libration point, 1.5 million km away from Earth. This paper describes the results of an orbit determination (OD) analysis of the JWST mission emphasizing the challenges specific to this mission in various mission phases. Three mid-course correction (MCC) maneuvers during launch and early orbit phase and transfer orbit phase are required for the spacecraft to reach L2. These three MCC maneuvers are MCC-1a at Launch+12 hours, MCC-1b at L+2.5 days and MCC-2 at L+30 days. Accurate OD solutions are needed to support MCC maneuver planning. A preliminary analysis shows that OD performance with the given assumptions is adequate to support MCC maneuver planning. During the nominal science operations phase, the mission requires better than 2 cm/sec velocity estimation performance to support stationkeeping maneuver planning. The major challenge to accurate JWST OD during the nominal science phase results from the unusually large solar radiation pressure force acting on the huge sunshield. Other challenges are stationkeeping maneuvers at 21-day intervals to keep JWST in orbit around L2, frequent attitude reorientations to align the JWST telescope with its targets and frequent maneuvers to unload momentum accumulated in the reaction wheels. Monte Carlo analysis shows that the proposed OD approach can produce solutions that meet the mission requirements.

  7. Origins Space Telescope: Solar System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.In the Solar System, OST will provide km/sec resolution on lines from planet, moons and comets. OST will measure molecular abundances and isotope ratios in planets and comets. OST will be able to do continuum surveys for faint moving sources such as Kuiper Belt Objects, enabling a census of smaller objects in the Kuiper Belt. If the putative Planet IX is massive enough to be self-luminous, then OST will be able to detect it out to thousands of AU from the Sun.

  8. James Webb Space Telescope Orbit Determination Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Sungpil; Rosales, Jose; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is designed to study and answer fundamental astrophysical questions from an orbit about the Sun-EarthMoon L2 libration point, 1.5 million km away from Earth. Three mid-course correction (MCC) maneuvers during launch and early orbit phase and transfer orbit phase are required for the spacecraft to reach L2. These three MCC maneuvers are MCC-1a at Launch+12 hours, MCC-1b at L+2.5 days and MCC-2 at L+30 days. Accurate orbit determination (OD) solutions are needed to support MCC maneuver planning. A preliminary analysis shows that OD performance with the given assumptions is adequate to support MCC maneuver planning. During the nominal science operations phase, the mission requires better than 2 cmsec velocity estimation performance to support stationkeeping maneuver planning. The major challenge to accurate JWST OD during the nominal science phase results from the unusually large solar radiation pressure force acting on the huge sunshield. Other challenges are stationkeeping maneuvers at 21-day intervals to keep JWST in orbit around L2, frequent attitude reorientations to align the JWST telescope with its targets and frequent maneuvers to unload momentum accumulated in the reaction wheels. Monte Carlo analysis shows that the proposed OD approach can produce solutions that meet the mission requirements.

  9. Astronomers, Congress, and the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, P. A.

    1985-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project was initiated near the end of the Apollo program and immediately encountered fiscal contraints. Planned as a long-term facility, the HST had to be continually justified to the public, astronomers and Congress from 1973 onward. Budgetary restraints caused design reductions which for a while threatened the practicality of the HST and changed it from a pressurized, manned unit to an automatic mode, teleoperated, intermittently visited spacecraft. It is noted that numerous exaggerations were made of both the power of the HST for scientific research and the total support of the astronomical community during promotion of the HST program, although the HST is the most powerful visual wavelength telescope ever to be built due to its unique operating environment. NASA's consistent and steadily more detailed definitions of the design features and missions of the HST proved to be a decisive factor in repeated requests for information by funding committees who were deliberating in the presence of severe fiscal difficulties.

  10. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets coronagraphic operations: lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Ygouf, Marie; Choquet, Elodie; Hines, Dean C.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Golimowski, David A.; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; van der Marel, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraphic instrument (CGI) currently proposed for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) mission will be the first example of a space-based coronagraph optimized for extremely high contrasts that are required for the direct imaging of exoplanets reflecting the light of their host star. While the design of this instrument is still in progress, this early stage of development is a particularly beneficial time to consider the operation of such an instrument. We review current or planned operations on the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope with a focus on which operational aspects will have relevance to the planned WFIRST-AFTA CGI. We identify five key aspects of operations that will require attention: (1) detector health and evolution, (2) wavefront control, (3) observing strategies/postprocessing, (4) astrometric precision/target acquisition, and (5) polarimetry. We make suggestions on a path forward for each of these items.

  11. Uranus's auroras observed from Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-05-01

    New observations from the Hubble Space Telescope provide the first ever images of Uranus's auroras. The new observations, described by Lamy et al., are also the first unambiguous detections of Uranus's auroras since they were first discovered using the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which few by the planet in 1986. Auroras arise from the solar wind's interaction with a planet's magnetosphere. Uranus's magnetosphere, which is not well studied, is unusual because the planet's magnetic axis is both offset and sharply tilted with respect to the planet's spin axis. The newly detected auroras, seen on the dayside of the planet in November 2011, are quite different from Earth's—Uranus's auroras were faint dots of light that lasted online a few minutes, unlike the dancing colored curtains organized along rings of emissions around Earth's magnetic poles, intensified on the nightside and lasting for hours. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/ 2012GL051312, 2012)

  12. Automation of Hubble Space Telescope Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard; Goulet, Gregory; Slater, Mark; Huey, William; Bassford, Lynn; Dunham, Larry

    2012-01-01

    On June 13, 2011, after more than 21 years, 115 thousand orbits, and nearly 1 million exposures taken, the operation of the Hubble Space Telescope successfully transitioned from 24x7x365 staffing to 815 staffing. This required the automation of routine mission operations including telemetry and forward link acquisition, data dumping and solid-state recorder management, stored command loading, and health and safety monitoring of both the observatory and the HST Ground System. These changes were driven by budget reductions, and required ground system and onboard spacecraft enhancements across the entire operations spectrum, from planning and scheduling systems to payload flight software. Changes in personnel and staffing were required in order to adapt to the new roles and responsibilities required in the new automated operations era. This paper will provide a high level overview of the obstacles to automating nominal HST mission operations, both technical and cultural, and how those obstacles were overcome.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Data and Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Carol A.

    2015-08-01

    The general public is enthusiastic about astronomy and in particular the research and associated imagery produced by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST Education and Outreach program (EPO) offers myriad resources for education and also engagement by the public in the research endeavor (hubblesite.org). One facet of this landscape is the opportunity to participate in Citizen Science projects. There are many flavors of citizen science and those discussed here are focussed on producing research results through the collaboration and activity of volunteer members of the public who conduct tasks that only can be accomplished through human endeavor. This paper touches upon several projects based on HST data and reviews a few others that are derived from the archives at STScI covering several different astrophysics areas.

  14. Variable Stars with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Szabó, R.; Plachy, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets and stars and is continuing to do so in the K2 mission. The exquisite photometric precision, together with the long, uninterrupted observations opened up a new way to investigate the structure and evolution of stars. Asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, allowed us to investigate solar-like stars, and to peer into the insides of red giants and massive stars. But many discoveries have been made about classical variable stars, too, ranging from pulsators like Cepheids and RR Lyraes to eclipsing binary stars and cataclysmic variables, and even supernovae. In this review, which is far from an exhaustive summary of all results obtained with Kepler, we collected some of the most interesting discoveries, and ponder on the role for amateur observers in this golden era of stellar astrophysics.

  15. Surface analysis of space telescope material specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Daneshvar, K.

    1985-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative data on Space Telescope materials which were exposed to low Earth orbital atomic oxygen in a controlled experiment during the 41-G (STS-17) mission were obtained utilizing the experimental techniques of Rutherford backscattering (RBS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and ellipsometry (ELL). The techniques employed were chosen with a view towards appropriateness for the sample in question, after consultation with NASA scientific personnel who provided the material specimens. A group of eight samples and their controls selected by NASA scientists were measured before and after flight. Information reported herein include specimen surface characterization by ellipsometry techniques, a determination of the thickness of the evaporated metal specimens by RBS, and a determination of trace impurity species present on and within the surface by PIXE.

  16. The Multimission Archive at Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian; Abney, Faith; Comeau, Thomas; Hanisch, Robert; Harrison, Jill; Imhoff, Catherine; Kidwell, Richard; Kimball, Timothy; Levay, Karen; Padovani, Paolo; Postman, Marc; Richon, Joel; Smith, Myron; Thompson, Randall

    We present an overview of the recently created Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST). The Hubble Data Archive has expanded to provide easy access to non-HST data sets. MAST includes the following: the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), Copernicus (OAO-3), ASTRO HUT, WUPPE and UIT data sets, and VLA FIRST data. The Digitized Sky survey is also accessible through MAST. Data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) currently scheduled for launch in early 1999, ORFEUS 1 & 2 EUV spectrometer data, and Voyager-1,2 UVS data will be added in the near future. Two 480-platter Plasmon CD-ROM jukeboxes provide data storage and easy access to the MAST data. Data hierarchy, ingest and retrievals, plans for expansion, and features of the web interface are also presented. Users can access data via a WWW interface at htmladdURL{http://archive.stsci.edu/mast.html}.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this sturning image provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Omega Nebula (M17) resembles the fury of a raging sea, showing a bubbly ocean of glowing hydrogen gas and small amounts of other elements such as oxygen and sulfur. The nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, is a hotbed of newly born stars residing 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The wavelike patterns of gas have been sculpted and illuminated by a torrent of ultraviolet radiation from the young massive stars, which lie outside the picture to the upper left. The ultraviolet radiation is carving and heating the surfaces of cold hydrogen gas clouds. The warmed surfaces glow orange and red in this photograph. The green represents an even hotter gas that masks background structures. Various gases represented with color are: sulfur, represented in red; hydrogen, green; and oxygen blue.

  18. The pointing system for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Dougherty, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the Space Telescope (ST) Pointing System (PS), and an overview of the pointing operations and procedures that support celestial observations. It is aimed at indicating to the user-astronomer the ST pointing capabilities and the mechanics of insuring the presence of the correct star in an instrument aperture. The paper begins by summarizing the general requirements regarding image stability and pointing accuracy to which the ST is being designed. This is followed by a description of the PS, in which primary elements are rate gyros, star sensors, reaction wheels, and an onboard digital computer. The Fine Guidance System is the star sensor that provides the precise, long term celestial reference and is given special emphasis, since its autonomous modes are so intimately tied to the acquisition process. A description of a nominal acquisition sequence is given, and some strategies for dealing with acquisition and pointing anomalies are discussed.

  19. Surface analysis of space telescope material specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analysis by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) was used to characterize a number of the material samples for the space telescope. With ESCA, the sample is irradiated with monoenergetic soft X-rays and the resulting emitted electrons are energy analyzed to determine the binding energy of electrons to the surface atoms. The major peaks were used in the quantitative determination of the surface composition. The presence of trace elements (impurities below 1% atomic composition) was also detailed. Initially a survey scan was run for each sample to deduce the elemental composition. Then the major peaks of interest and those of the trace elements were individually examined. After this, the samples were argon sputtered to etch away surface layers, and then additional measurements were carried out in order to obtain depth profile information. In this way it was possible for those species present only on the surface to be distinguished from those having a significant depth distribution within the sample.

  20. The Hubble Space Telescope Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. IV. Infrared Imaging of Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Urry, C. Megan; Padovani, Paolo; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Dowd, Matthew

    2000-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Camera 2 was used for H-band imaging of 12 BL Lacertae objects taken from the larger sample observed with the WFPC2 in the R band by Urry and coworkers and Scarpa and coworkers. Ten of the 12 BL Lacs are clearly resolved, and the detected host galaxies are large, bright ellipticals with average absolute magnitude =-26.2+/-0.45 mag and effective radius =10+/-5 kpc. The rest-frame integrated color of the host galaxies is on average =2.3+/-0.3, consistent with the value for both radio galaxies and normal, nonactive elliptical galaxies and indicating that the dominant stellar population is old. The host galaxies tend to be bluer in their outer regions than in their cores, with average color gradient Δ(R-H)/Δlogr=-0.2 mag, again consistent with results for normal nonactive elliptical galaxies. The infrared Kormendy relation, derived for the first time for BL Lac host galaxies, is μe=3.8logre+14.8, fully in agreement with the relation for normal ellipticals. The close similarity between BL Lac host galaxies and normal ellipticals suggests that the active nucleus has surprisingly little effect on the host galaxy. This supports a picture in which all elliptical galaxies harbor black holes that can be actively accreting for some fraction of their lifetime.

  1. Primary mirror assemblies for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    In this report are considered the basic problems which relate to developemnt, manufacture, experimental trying out, and usage of primary mirrors (PM) of the large space telescopes intended to perform distant sounding of the Earth. Attention is concentrated on development of weight-reduced passive mirrors which ensure more reliable operation of the telescope as a whole. In the report we expressed the opinion that it is quite possible to manufacture a passive weight-reduced PM if its diameter is equal approximately to 3 m. Materials which may be used for the manufacturing of PM are beryllium and silicon carbide, physical and mechanical parameters of which are the most preferable ones. But it should be taken into consideration that this is the glass ceramic of CO115M brand which has been mastered by the industry of Russia in the greatest extent. It was confirmed that parameters of this material remain unchanged during a long period of time. Constructions of the PM, made of glass ceramic, as well as constructions of holders intended to fix the mirror, are presented in this report. A holder is used first of all to prevent lowering of a PM surface quality after a mirror has been removed from a machine and fixed in a primary mirror assembly (PMA). At present two-layer construction of a PM is preferable. This construction consists of thick base including weight reduction structure, which is in a radius which is optimum from the standpoint of deformation of a mirror operating surface. In the process of manufacture a mirror is deprived of its weight with the use of special pneumatic off-loading elements. PMA is erected in vertical plane by means of using an interferometric inspection system. In the end of this report we expressed the views on an approach to engineering of a PM by taking into account potentialities both of space ships and of carrier rockets.

  2. A Scientific Revolution: The Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a flood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, I will discuss some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the last 10 years, and the role that space telescopes have played in those discoveries. The next decade looks equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. I will describe how Hubble was upgraded and how and why we are building Webb.

  3. A Scientific Revolution: the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a flood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, I will discuss some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the last IO years, and the role that space telescopes have played in those discoveries. The next decade looks equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. I will describe how Hubble was upgraded and how and why we are building Webb.

  4. A Scientific Revolution: the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a flood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, I will discuss some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the last 10 years, and the role that space telescopes have played in those discoveries. The next decade looks equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. I will describe how Hubble was upgraded and how and why we are building Webb.

  5. Efficient Mosaicking of Spitzer Space Telescope Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Makovoz, David; Eisenhardt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A parallel version of the MOPEX software, which generates mosaics of infrared astronomical images acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope, extends the capabilities of the prior serial version. In the parallel version, both the input image space and the output mosaic space are divided among the available parallel processors. This is the only software that performs the point-source detection and the rejection of spurious imaging effects of cosmic rays required by Spitzer scientists. This software includes components that implement outlier-detection algorithms that can be fine-tuned for a particular set of image data by use of a number of adjustable parameters. This software has been used to construct a mosaic of the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Shallow Survey, which comprises more than 17,000 exposures in four wavelength bands from 3.6 to 8 m and spans a solid angle of about 9 square degrees. When this software was executed on 32 nodes of the 1,024-processor Cosmos cluster computer at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a speedup of 8.3 was achieved over the serial version of MOPEX. The performance is expected to improve dramatically once a true parallel file system is installed on Cosmos.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Crew Rescue Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlin, Teri L.; Canga, Michael A.; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2003 Columbia accident, NASA removed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) from the Space Shuttle manifest. Reasons cited included concerns that the risk of flying the mission would be too high. The HST SM4 was subsequently reinstated and flown as Space Transportation System (STS)-125 because of improvements in the ascent debris environment, the development of techniques for astronauts to perform on orbit repairs to damaged thermal protection, and the development of a strategy to provide a viable crew rescue capability. However, leading up to the launch of STS-125, the viability of the HST crew rescue capability was a recurring topic. For STS-125, there was a limited amount of time available to perform a crew rescue due to limited consumables (power, oxygen, etc.) available on the Orbiter. The success of crew rescue depended upon several factors, including when a problem was identified; when and what actions, such as powering down, were begun to conserve consumables; and where the Launch on Need (LON) vehicle was in its ground processing cycle. Crew rescue success also needed to be weighed against preserving the Orbiter s ability to have a landing option in case there was a problem with the LON vehicle. This paper focuses on quantifying the HST mission loss of crew rescue capability using Shuttle historical data and various power down strategies. Results from this effort supported NASA s decision to proceed with STS-125, which was successfully completed on May 24th 2009.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope 2004 Battery Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Whitt, Tom; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Battery cell wear out mechanisms and signatures are examined and compared to orbital data from the six on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries, and the Flight Spare Battery (FSB) Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which is instrumented with individual cell voltage monitoring. The on-orbit HST batteries were manufactured on an expedited basis after the Challenger Shuttle Disaster in 1986. The original design called for the HST to be powered by six 50 Ah Nickel Cadmium batteries, which would have required a shuttle mission every 5 years for battery replacement. The decision to use NiH2 instead has resulted in a longer life battery set which was launched with HST in April 1990, with a design life of 7 years that has now exceeded 14+ years of orbital cycling. This chart details the specifics of the original HST NiH2 cell design. The HST replacement batteries for Service Mission 4, originally scheduled for Spring 2005, are currently in cold storage at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SM4 battery cells utilize slurry process electrodes having 80% porosity.

  8. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) is a segmented, cryogenic telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. In September of 2002, NASA selected prime contractor Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to build the observatory including management of the OTE. NGST is teamed with subcontractors Ball Aerospace, Alliant Techsystems (ATK). and Kodak. The team has completed several significant design, technology, architecture definition, and manufacturing milestones in the past year that are summarized in this paper.

  9. Origins Space Telescope: Cosmology and Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Joaquin D.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.A core science goal of the OST mission is to study the the cosmological history of star, galaxy, and structure formation into the epoch of reionization (EoR). OST will probe the birth of galaxies through warm molecular hydrogen emission during the cosmic dark ages. Utilizing the unique power of the infrared fine-structure emission lines, OST will trace the rise of metals from the first galaxies until today. It will quantify the dust enrichment history of the Universe, uncover its composition and physical conditions, reveal the first cosmic sources of dust, and probe the properties of the earliest star formation. OST will provide a detailed astrophysical probe into the condition of the intergalactic medium at z > 6 and the galaxies which dominate the epoch of reionization.

  10. Single-variable parametric cost models for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Smart, Christian; Prince, Frank A.

    2010-07-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts, and justify technology investments. Unfortunately, there is no definitive space telescope cost model. For example, historical cost estimating relationships (CERs) based on primary mirror diameter vary by an order of magnitude. We present new single-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). They are based on data collected from 30 different space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models

  11. Rapid Cadence Collections with the Space Surveillance Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    as a function of mean magnitude. Telescope : Diameter (actual): 3.50 meter Diameter (effective): 2.90 meter Effective focal length ...Rapid Cadence Collections with the Space Surveillance Telescope D. Monet U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station T. Axelrod, C. Claver LSST...ABSTRACT The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has constructed the 3.5-meter Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) on North Oscura Peak

  12. Astronaut Hoffman replaces fuse plugs on Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman sees to the replacement of fuse plugs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the first of five space walks. Thunderclouds are all that is visible on the dark earth in the background.

  13. Lessons Learned from the Kepler Mission and Space Telescope Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned over the course of several space telescope mission and instrument developments spanning two decades. These projects involved astronomical telescopes developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and were designed to further our understanding of the Universe. It is hoped that the lessons drawn from these experiences may be of use to future mission developers.

  14. Exploring the Universe with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A general overview is given of the operations, engineering challenges, and components of the Hubble Space Telescope. Deployment, checkout and servicing in space are discussed. The optical telescope assembly, focal plane scientific instruments, wide field/planetary camera, faint object spectrograph, faint object camera, Goddard high resolution spectrograph, high speed photometer, fine guidance sensors, second generation technology, and support systems and services are reviewed.

  15. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The science objectives of the James Webb Space Telescope fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and to investigate the potential for life in those systems. These four science themes were used to establish the design requirements for the observatory and instrumentation. Since Webb's capabilities are unique, those science themes will remain relevant through launch and operations and goals contained within these themes will continue to guide the design and implementation choices for the mission. More recently, it has also become clear that Webb will make major contributions to other areas of research, including dark energy, dark matter, active galactic nuclei, stellar populations, exoplanet characterization and Solar System objects. In this paper, we review the original four science themes and discuss how the scientific output of Webb will extend to these new areas of research. The James Webb Space Telescope was designed to meet science objectives in four themes: The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization, The Assembly of Galaxies, The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems, and Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life. More recently, it has become clear that Webb will also make major contributions to studies of dark energy, dark matter

  16. An evolvable space telescope for future astronomical missions 2015 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidan, Ronald S.; Breckinridge, James B.; Lillie, Charles F.; MacEwen, Howard A.; Flannery, Martin R.; Dailey, Dean R.; Baldauf, Brian; Makowski, David; Rafanelli, Gerald L.

    2015-09-01

    In 2014 we presented a concept for an Evolvable Space Telescope (EST) that was assembled on orbit in 3 stages, growing from a 4x12 meter telescope in Stage 1, to a 12-meter filled aperture in Stage 2, and then to a 20-meter filled aperture in Stage 3. Stage 1 is launched as a fully functional telescope and begins gathering science data immediately after checkout on orbit. This observatory is then periodically augmented in space with additional mirror segments, structures, and newer instruments to evolve the telescope over the years to a 20-meter space telescope. In this 2015 update of EST we focus upon three items: 1) a restructured Stage 1 EST with three mirror segments forming an off-axis telescope (half a 12-meter filled aperture); 2) more details on the value and architecture of the prime focus instrument accommodation; and 3) a more in depth discussion of the essential in-space infrastructure, early ground testing and a concept for an International Space Station testbed called MoDEST. In addition to the EST discussions we introduce a different alternative telescope architecture: a Rotating Synthetic Aperture (RSA). This is a rectangular primary mirror that can be rotated to fill the UV-plane. The original concept was developed by Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems for non-astronomical applications. In collaboration with Raytheon we have begun to explore the RSA approach as an astronomical space telescope and have initiated studies of science and cost performance.

  17. Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor Bearing Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S.; Esper, J.; Pan, J.; Decker, J.

    1996-01-01

    Early in 1993, a servo motor within one of three Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) reached stall torque levels on several occasions. Little time was left to plan replacement during the first servicing mission, scheduled at the end of '93. Accelerated bearing life tests confirmed that a small angle rocking motion, known as Coarse Track (CT), accelerated bearing degradation. Saturation torque levels were reached after approximately 20 million test cycles, similar to the flight bearings. Reduction in CT operation, implemented in flight software, extended FGS life well beyond the first servicing mission. However in recent years, bearing torques have resumed upward trends and together with a second, recent bearing torque anomaly has necessitated a scheduled FGS replacement during the upcoming second servicing mission in '97. The results from two series of life tests to quantify FGS bearing remaining life, discussion of bearing on-orbit performance, and future plans to service the FGS servos are presented in this paper.

  18. Space Telescope precision pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, G. A.; Crum, R. C.; Dougherty, H. J.; Hegel, D. K.; Kelley, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has the most stringent pointing requirements imposed on any spacecraft to date. The overall HST stability shall not exceed 0.007 arc-seconds rms. The Pointing Control System utilizes fine guidance sensors and rate gyros for attitude reference and rate information. Control torques are provided by reaction wheels. A digital computer collects the sensor data, performs the control law computations, and sends torque commands to the reaction wheels. To attain this precision pointing, improvements were made to the rate gyros to lower their noise characteristics and to the reaction wheels to reduce their emitted vibration levels. The control system design was validated in a test sequence which progressed from model verification tests on an air-bearing to operations-oriented, closed loop testing on the assembled vehicle. A test system is described which allowed the simultaneous production of test case command loads for the flight computer and plots of predicted profiles to assist in test data analysis. Workarounds were required during system test to accommodate gyro biases and noise introduced into the closed loop system. Testing and analysis indicate that the HST will provide the capability to meet the requirements for precision pointing.

  19. Parallaxes with Hubble Space Telescope II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, B. E.; Harrison, T. E.; Lee, J.; Slesnick, C. L.; HST Astrometry Science Team

    2001-11-01

    We report on parallaxes for astrophysically interesting stars obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensor interferometer on Hubble Space Telescope. These objects include the central star of the planetary nebula NGC 6853, the cataclysmic variable TV Col, and the distance scale calibrators RR Lyr and delta Cep. We will discuss our considerable efforts to characterize the reference stars associated with each prime target, necessary to effect the correction from relative to absolute parallax. These targets were originally chosen by L. W. Fredrick in 1980. We compare these and our past results with all past, non-HST determinations, including those from HIPPARCOS for our brighter targets. The HST Astrometry Sceince Team consists of W. H. Jefferys , P.I., G. F. Benedict, deputy P.I., B. E. McArthur, P. J. Shelus, R. Duncombe (UTexas), E. Nelan (STScI), W. van Altena and J. Lee (Yale), O. Franz and L. Wasserman (Lowell Obs.), and L. Fredrick (UVirginia). We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA grant NAG5-1603 and our many supporters at STScI and Goddard Spaceflight Center. We thank R. Patterson, J. Rhee, and S. Majewski (UVirginia) and T. Montemayor (UTexas) for assistance with reference star photometry.

  20. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING AND SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF TWO BROWN DWARF BINARIES AT THE L DWARF/T DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Bardalez-Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Gizis, John E.

    2011-03-15

    We present a detailed examination of the brown dwarf multiples 2MASS J08503593+1057156 and 2MASS J17281150+3948593, both suspected of harboring components that straddle the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. Resolved photometry from Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS shows opposite trends in the relative colors of the components, with the secondary of 2MASS J0850+1057 being redder than its primary, while that of 2MASS J1728+3948 is bluer. We determine near-infrared component types by matching combined-light, near-infrared spectral data to binary templates, with component spectra scaled to resolved NICMOS and K{sub p} photometry. Combinations of L7 + L6 for 2MASS J0850+1057 and L5 + L6.5 for 2MASS J1728+3948 are inferred. Remarkably, the primary of 2MASS J0850+1057 appears to have a later-type classification compared to its secondary, despite being 0.8-1.2 mag brighter in the near-infrared, while the primary of 2MASS J1728+3948 is unusually early for its combined-light optical classification. Comparison to absolute magnitude/spectral type trends also distinguishes these components, with 2MASS J0850+1057A being {approx}1 mag brighter and 2MASS J1728+3948A {approx} 0.5 mag fainter than equivalently classified field counterparts. We deduce that thick condensate clouds are likely responsible for the unusual properties of 2MASS J1728+3948A, while 2MASS J0850+1057A is either an inflated young brown dwarf or a tight unresolved binary, making it potentially part of a wide, low-mass, hierarchical quintuple system.

  1. Innovative telescope architectures for future large space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidan, Ronald S.; Breckinridge, James B.; Lillie, Charles F.; MacEwen, Howard A.; Flannery, Martin R.; Dailey, Dean R.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past few years, we have developed a concept for an evolvable space telescope (EST) that is assembled on orbit in three stages, growing from a 4×12-m telescope in Stage 1, to a 12-m filled aperture in Stage 2, and then to a 20-m filled aperture in Stage 3. Stage 1 is launched as a fully functional telescope and begins gathering science data immediately after checkout on orbit. This observatory is then periodically augmented in space with additional mirror segments, structures, and newer instruments to evolve the telescope over the years to a 20-m space telescope. We discuss the EST architecture, the motivation for this approach, and the benefits it provides over current approaches to building and maintaining large space observatories.

  2. Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, working to a 2018 launch date. Ground testing for the JWST will occur in two test campaigns, at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center. The talk describes the JWST and its optical ground testing, highlighting the roles of many of the University of Rochester Institute of Optics' alumni as well as current faculty and students.

  3. Progress on the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    I will describe the scientific program anticipated for the James Webb Space Telescope and the progress in its construction. When the JWST was conceived in 1995 it was expected to make its greatest contributions in the study of the first objects to form after the Big Bang, in the evolution of galaxies, and in the formation and evolution of stars and planetary systems. Since then, the age-distance-redshift relation has become clear with the precise measurement of the Hubble constant, the discovery of the accelerating universe, and the remarkable agreement of CMBR calculations with direct measurements of the large-scale structure. So what is left and what has changed? Galaxy formation and growth is still mysterious, star formation is still hidden, the dark matter and dark energy are still unobservable, and the tools at hand may or may not help enough. But the JWST, as a general-purpose observatory, will be available for imaginative use, and is just what Simon White's polemic seems to request. As an example, the JWST should be quite capable of observing transiting exoplanets with remarkable precision, even though there was no requirement to do so, and its coronagraphs will be very good even without a monolithic primary mirror. The JWST mission has now been officially approved by NASA and is in the Federal budget. It is planned for launch in 2014. Flight instruments will begin to arrive at Goddard in mid-2010, and the first flight mirror segments have already passed their first cryogenic tests. The flight detectors have been selected and have remarkable performance; for example, the near IR detectors have dark currents of the order of 10 electrons per pixel per hour.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) shipping container test operations at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ground crews look on as a crane lifts the 11,500 pound aluminum cap from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) shipping container in front of the Multiuse Mission Support Equipment (MMSE) Building at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC workers continue to test and checkout the container which will be used to transport the 43 foot long, 14 foot diameter telescope from Lockheed in Sunnyvale, California to KSC next year. The telescope is scheduled for launch aboard the space shuttle in November 1988. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-87PC-502.

  6. Payload maintenance cost model for the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optimum maintenance cost model for the space telescope for a fifteen year mission cycle was developed. Various documents and subsequent updates of failure rates and configurations were made. The reliability of the space telescope for one year, two and one half years, and five years were determined using the failure rates and configurations. The failure rates and configurations were also used in the maintenance simulation computer model which simulate the failure patterns for the fifteen year mission life of the space telescope. Cost algorithms associated with the maintenance options as indicated by the failure patterns were developed and integrated into the model.

  7. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.; Campbell, Doug; Clampin, Mark; Decker, John; Greenhouse, Matt; Johns, Alan; Menzel, Mike; Smith, Robert; Sullivan, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  8. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the recent selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  9. Status of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the largest cryogenic, space telescope ever built, and will address a broad range of scientific goals from first light in the universe and re-ionization, to characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Recently, significant progress has been made in the construction of the observatory with the completion of all 21 flight mirrors that comprise the telescope's optical chain, and the start of flight instrument deliveries to the Goddard Space Flight Center. In this paper we discuss the design of the observatory, and focus on the recent milestone achievements in each of the major observatory sub-systems.

  10. Design of optical systems for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    On the basis of long-term experience of LOMO PLC in creating large optical systems for ground and space telescopes, with diameter of primary mirror from 1 to 6 meters, the following issues should be considered: principles of constructing optical systems for space telescopes and selecting their optimum design in respect of dimensions/mass and performance criteria; ensuring the fulfillment of image quality requirements in the process of manufacturing optical systems for controlling ground telescope elements in operating conditions; providing automatic adjustment of telescope secondary mirror, automatic focusing, interferometric control of image quality by means of stellar interferometer with radial shift and internal control with Gartman's test. Description of space telescope equipped with primary mirror of diameter 1.5 m, manufactured in LOMO PLC, is given.

  11. NICMOS non-linearity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Roelof

    2005-07-01

    This program incorporates a number of tests to analyse the count rate dependent non-linearity seen in NICMOS spectro-photometric observations. In visit 1 we will observe a few fields with stars of a range in luminosity in NGC1850 with NICMOS in NIC1 in F090M, F110W and F160W and NIC2 F110W, F160W, and F180W. We will repeat the observations with flatfield lamp on, creating artificially high count-rates, allowing tests of NICMOS linearity as function of count rate. To access the effect of charge trapping and persistence, we first take darks {so there is not too much charge already trapped}, than take exposures with the lamp off, exposures with the lamp on, and repeat at the end with lamp off. Finally, we continue with taking darks during occultation. In visit 2 we will observe spectro-photometric standard P041C using the G096 and G141 grisms in NIC3, and repeat the lamp off/on/off test to artificially create a high background. In visits 3&4 we repeat photometry measurements of faint standard stars SNAP-2 and WD1657+343, on which the NICMOS non-linearity was originally discovered using grism observations. These measurements are repeated, because previous photometry was obtained with too short exposure times, hence substantially affected by charge trapping non-linearity. Measurements will be made with NIC1: Visit 5 forms the persistence test of the program. The bright star GL-390 {used in a previous persistence test} will iluminate the 3 NICMOS detectors in turn for a fixed time, saturating the center many times, after which a series of darks will be taken to measure the persistence {i.e. trapped electrons and the decay time of the traps}. To determine the wavelength dependence of the trap chance, exposures of the bright star in different filters will be taken, as well as one in the G096 grism with NIC3. Most exposures will be 128s long, but two exposures in the 3rd orbit will be 3x longer, to seperate the effects of count rate versus total counts of the trap

  12. Early Scientific Results from the Rejuvenated Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    With the complete success of Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope in May, 2009, the Observatory's capabilities are extremely broad and beyond anything it has previously been equipped with. I will present results on the important early science corning out of the telescope and discuss prospects for the future."

  13. Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a cryogenic, 6.5 meter diameter space telescope. JWST has a unique architecture, compared to previous space telescopes, that is driven by its science requirements, ia passively cooled cryogenic design, and the need to stow the observatory for launch. JWST's large, segmented mirror meets the requirement for high angular resolution in the infrared coupled with a significant increase in collecting area compared to the Spitzer and Hubble Space telescopes in order to detect the first galaxies. JWST's unique five-layer sunshield allows the telescope and instrument module to passively cool to cryogenic temperatures. JWST will be launched on an Ariane 5, and so both its telescope optics, and the sunshield have to be stowed in order to fit the Ariane 5 fairing. Following launch the sunshield and telescope optics must be deployed, and the primary mirror phased for science operations. In this presentation we will review the design of the observatory and highlight recent progress in the construction of the JWST observatory. In particular, we address recent progress with the telescope optics, sunshield and spacecraft. We will discuss predicted observatory performance in terms of the scientific goals of JWST and address key operational considerations that might bear upon frontier science observations.

  14. The Core of NGC 6240 from Keck Adaptive Optics and HST NICMOS Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Canalizo, G; Macintosh, B A; Raschke, L; Whysong, D; Antonucci, R; Schneider, G

    2004-11-19

    We present results of near infrared imaging of the disk-galaxy-merger NGC 6240 using adaptive optics on the Keck II Telescope and reprocessed archival data from NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both the North and South nuclei of NGC 6240 are clearly elongated, with considerable sub-structure within each nucleus. In K' band there are at least two point-sources within the North nucleus; we tentatively identify the south-western point-source within the North nucleus as the position of one of the two AGNs. Within the South nucleus, the northern subnucleus is more highly reddened. Based upon the nuclear separation measured at 5 GHz, we suggest that the AGN in the South nucleus is still enshrouded in dust at K' band, and is located slightly to the north of the brightest point in K' band. Within the South nucleus there is strong H{sub 2} 1-0 S(1) line emission from the northern sub-nucleus, contrary to the conclusions of previous seeing-limited observations. Narrowband H{sub 2} emission-line images show that a streamer or ribbon of excited molecular hydrogen connects the North and South nuclei. We suggest that this linear feature corresponds to a bridge of gas connecting the two nuclei, as seen in computer simulations of mergers. Many any point-like regions are seen around the two nuclei. These are most prominent at 1.1 microns with NICMOS, and in K'-band with Keck adaptive optics. We suggest that these point-sources represent young star clusters formed in the course of the merger.

  15. The Core of NGC 6240 from Keck Adaptive Optics and HST NICMOS Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Canalizo, G; Macintosh, B A; Raschke, L; Whysong, D; Antonucci, R; Schneider, G

    2004-06-28

    We present results of near infrared imaging of the disk-galaxy-merger NGC 6240 using adaptive optics on the Keck II Telescope and reprocessed archival data from NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both the North and South nuclei of NGC 6240 are clearly elongated, with considerable sub-structure within each nucleus. In K' band there are at least two point-sources within the North nucleus; we tentatively identify the south-western point-source within the North nucleus as the position of one of the two AGNs. Within the South nucleus, the northern subnucleus is more highly reddened. Based upon the nuclear separation measured at 5 GHz, we suggest that the AGN in the South nucleus is still enshrouded in dust at K' band, and is located slightly to the north of the brightest point in K' band. Within the South nucleus there is strong H{sub 2} 1-0 S(1) line emission from the northern sub-nucleus, contrary to the conclusions of previous seeing-limited observations. Narrowband H{sub 2} emission-line images show that a streamer or ribbon of excited molecular hydrogen connects the North and South nuclei. We suggest that this linear feature corresponds to a bridge of gas connecting the two nuclei, as seen in computer simulations of mergers. Many point-like regions are seen around the two nuclei. These are most prominent at 1.1 microns with NICMOS, and in K'-band with Keck adaptive optics. We suggest that these point-sources represent star clusters formed in the course of the merger.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  17. Space telescope observatory management system preliminary test and verification plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, J. S.; Kaldenbach, C. F.; Williams, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary plan for the Space Telescope Observatory Management System Test and Verification (TAV) is provided. Methodology, test scenarios, test plans and procedure formats, schedules, and the TAV organization are included. Supporting information is provided.

  18. How Long Can the Hubble Space Telescope Operate Reliably?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Jordan, T.; Poivey, C.; Lum, G.; Haskins, D. N.; Pergosky, A. M.; Smith, D. C.; LaBel, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Total ionizing dose exposure of electronic parts in the Hubble Space Telescope is analyzed using 3-D ray trace and Monte Carlo simulations. Results are discussed along with other potential failure mechanisms for science operations.

  19. Fine Guidance System for the James Webb Space Telescope Delivered

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video has music in the background but no dialogue. The second of four main instruments to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) has been delivered to NASA. The Fine Guidance Sensor (F...

  20. Space telescope - Meeting the pointing control challenge with today's technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, H.; Rodoni, C.; Rodden, J.; Tompetrini, K.

    1982-01-01

    The pointing control system of the Space Telescope, which provides target-to-target maneuvering capability and precision pointing on the target star (with 0.007-arcsec stability and 0.01-arcsec accuracy), is described. Spacecraft attitude control is undertaken by onboard computer processing of attitude and rate sensor data that generates reaction wheel torque commands. The Space Telescope Operations Control Center communicates with the Space Telescope via the synchronous altitude tracking and data relay satellite system, and determines vehicle attitude more precisely by means of sun sensors, magnetometers and fixed-head star trackers. Such disturbance torques as those of gravity gradients and aerodynamics act on the Space Telescope, causing the speeds of the four reaction wheels to increase. In order to prevent the wheels from reaching a speed-saturated condition, a momentum control system is provided for the management of reaction wheel speed buildup. Attention is given to development testing and control hardware investigations and improvements.

  1. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  2. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  3. POST: a stratospheric testbed for testing new space telescope technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, James N.; Friedman, Ed; Ford, Holland C.; Bely, Pierre Y.

    1995-06-01

    The Polar Stratospheric Telescope payload will be the prototype of a diffraction limited, large space telescope and will fly in the stratosphere to validate a number of new technologies that future large space telescopes will require. The telescope is a 6-m diameter, sparsely-filled array comprised on one 1.8-m and six 60-cm mirrors. Each mirror is a segment of an f/1.2 primary. The mirrors have an unequal spacing around the circumference which optimizes spatial coverage of the u,v plane. The mirror segments are coaligned and cophased by a combination of internal metrology and re-imaging of the pupil onto a small active mirror for the correction of piston and tilt errors. The telescope will be flown during the winter in a polar region where the tropopause is a factor of two lower than at lower latitudes, making the stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. The telescope is suspended approximately 100 m below a tethered aerostat flying at an altitude of about 12 km. The telescope body is stabilized gyroscopically with two reaction wheels, and fine guidance of the line of sight is provided by a fast steering mirror. The telescopes primary mirrors are at the ambient temperature of 190 to 220 K, and internal baffles and relay optics are cooled to 160 K to minimize the instrumental background in the near infrared.

  4. Space telescope neutral buoyancy simulations: The first two years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, F. G.

    1982-01-01

    Neutral Buoyancy simulations which were conducted to validate the crew systems interface as it relates to space telescope on-orbit maintenance and contingency operations is discussed. The initial concept validation tests using low fidelity mockups is described. The entire spectrum of proposed space telescope refurbishment and selected contingencies using upgraded mockups which reflect flight hardware are reported. Findings which may be applicable to future efforts of a similar nature are presented.

  5. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  6. Infiltration of Supermicron Aerosols into a Simulated Space Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-10

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-2011(8550)-1 Infiltration of Supermicron Aerosols into a Simulated Space Telescope February 10,2011 De-Ling Liu and... Telescope 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-09-C-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) De-Ling Liu and Kenneth T. Luey 5d. PROJECT...system, such as a space telescope , during a purge outage. This study presents experi- mental work performed to measure time-dependent aerosol

  7. Working model of a gossamer membrane spectrographic space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joe; Valliant, John

    2009-08-01

    The nineteenth century Fraunhofer primary objective grating (POG) telescope has been redesigned with a secondary spectrometer. The POG is embossed on a membrane and placed at an angle of grazing exodus relative to a conventional spectrographic telescope. The result is a new type of telescope that disambiguates overlapping spectra and can capture spectral flux from all objects over its free spectral range, nearly 40°. For space deployment, the ribbon-shaped membrane can be stowed as a cylinder under a rocket fairing for launch and deployed in space from a cylindrical drum. Any length up to kilometer scale could be contemplated.

  8. Space environmental effects observed on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, Joel E.; Mason, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Repair Mission of December, 1993, was first and foremost a mission to improve the performance of the observatory. But for a specialized segment of the aerospace industry, the primary interest is in the return to Earth of numerous pieces of the HST hardware, pieces which have been replaced, repaired, improved, or superseded. The returned hardware is of interest because of the information it potentially carries about the effects of exposure to the space environment for three and a half years. Like the LDEF retrieval mission four years ago, the HST repair mission is of interest to many engineering disciplines, including all of the disciplines represented by the LDEF Special Investigation Groups (SIG's). There is particular interest in the evaluation of specific materials and systems in the returned components. Some coated surfaces have been processed with materials which are newer and still in use by, or under consideration for, other spacecraft in a variety of stages of development. Several of the systems are being returned because a specific failure or anomaly has been observed and thus there is, at the outset, a specific investigative trail that needs to be followed. These systems are much more complex than those flown on LDEF and, in two instances, comprised state-of-the-art science instruments. Further, the parts used in these systems generally were characterized more rigorously prior to flight than were those in the LDEF systems, and thus post flight testing may yield more significant results.

  9. James Webb Space Telescope stray light performance status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Wei, Zongying

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large space based astronomical telescope that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. The architecture has the telescope exposed to space, with a large sun shield providing thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the sun. The instruments will have the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6 µm to 28 µm wavelengths. The following paper will present updated stray light analysis results characterizing the stray light getting to the instrument focal planes from the full galactic sky, zodiacal background, bright objects near the line of sight, and scattered earth and moon shine. Included is a discussion of internal alignments of pupils at relevant interface planes to stray light. The amount of self-generated infrared background from the Observatory that reaches the instrument focal planes will be presented including the tolerance to the alignment of the edges of the sun shield membranes relative to each other and the telescope.

  10. Feasibility study of an optically coherent telescope array in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical methods of image construction which can be used to produce very high angular resolution images at optical wavelengths of astronomical objects from an orbiting array of telescopes are discussed and a concept is presented for a phase-coherent optical telescope array which may be deployed by space shuttle in the 1990's. The system would start as a four-element linear array with a 12 m baseline. The initial module is a minimum redundant array with a photon-counting collecting area three times larger than space telescope and a one dimensional resolution of better than 0.01 arc seconds in the visible range. Later additions to the array would build up facility capability. The advantages of a VLBI observatory in space are considered as well as apertures for the telescopes.

  11. NICMOS History Database and Web Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullos, C.

    1998-04-01

    The history of NICMOS platescale, focus, and coronographic hole data has been stored in a database which is accessible via tools on the World Wide Web. The history tool which allows queries on the data, is available to the public.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope: Optical telescope assembly handbook. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Chris

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope is described along with how its design affects the images produced at the Science Instruments. An overview is presented of the hardware. Details are presented of the focal plane, throughput of the telescope, and the point spread function (image of an unresolved point source). Some detailed simulations are available of this, which might be useful to observers in planning their observations and in reducing their data.

  13. The STScI NICMOS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H. A.; Stobie, E.

    The NICMOS data reduction and calibration pipeline employs file formats and software architecture techniques that are new and different from what has been used for previous HST instruments. This paper describes the FITS file format used for NICMOS data, which includes error estimate and data quality arrays for each science image, and describes the approach used to associate multiple observations of a single target. The software architecture, which employs ANSI C language algorithms and C bindings to IRAF libraries, is also described.

  14. Enthusiasm for Europe's space telescope ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-11-01

    . Several new candidate Vega-like dust disks are reported in Astronomy and Astrophysics by Harm Habing of Leiden in the Netherlands, and his colleagues. Their preliminary conclusion is that the dust disks are a common feature of ordinary stars as massive as the Sun or heavier, but they are by no means ubiquitous. Further measurements on Vega itself show relatively low emissions at the longest wavelengths, which implies that the dust grains are small. In a related programme, a Belgian-led team has used ISO's Short-Wavelength Spectrometer to probe the composition of dust near very young stars. It reports the discovery of crystals of olivine, a silicate mineral and a major constituent of the Earth's own rocky mantle. The firm detection of olivine crystals builds a bridge from the stars to the minerals of the solar system. Most mineral grains in interstellar space lack the crystalline forms of common minerals, even if they have the same chemical composition. Hints of infrared emissions from olivine crystals, detected by ground-based telescopes at around 11 microns wavelength, are confused by emissions coming also from carbon compounds. ISO, with its unhampered view at longer wavelengths, sees signatures of magnesium-rich olivine crystals at 20, 24 and 34 microns. The minerals crystallize when gravity concentrates them near a young star, and intense radiation from the star modifies the grains. ISO also sees similar materials in the dust shells of old stars, in a project headed by the Dutch astronomer Rens Waters, who is also closely involved in the work on young stars. Apparently the mineral crystals do not survive in interstellar space, but have to be refashioned near young stars. The most clear-cut evidence for olivine crystals comes from the vicinity of HD 100546, a young blue star about 500 light-years away near the Southern Cross. It is thought to be only a few million years old and it is a strong infrared emitter. The star also shows peculiar ultraviolet absorptions

  15. Improving active space telescope wavefront control using predictive thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2015-01-01

    Active control algorithms for space telescopes are less mature than those for large ground telescopes due to differences in the wavefront control problems. Active wavefront control for space telescopes at L2, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), requires weighing control costs against the benefits of correcting wavefront perturbations that are a predictable byproduct of the observing schedule, which is known and determined in advance. To improve the control algorithms for these telescopes, we have developed a model that calculates the temperature and wavefront evolution during a hypothetical mission, assuming the dominant wavefront perturbations are due to changes in the spacecraft attitude with respect to the sun. Using this model, we show that the wavefront can be controlled passively by introducing scheduling constraints that limit the allowable attitudes for an observation based on the observation duration and the mean telescope temperature. We also describe the implementation of a predictive controller designed to prevent the wavefront error (WFE) from exceeding a desired threshold. This controller outperforms simpler algorithms even with substantial model error, achieving a lower WFE without requiring significantly more corrections. Consequently, predictive wavefront control based on known spacecraft attitude plans is a promising approach for JWST and other future active space observatories.

  16. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  17. A Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Alberto; Arenberg, Jonathan; Baldauf, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The “Search for Life” (direct imaging of earth-like planets) will require extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. Such apertures are larger than what can be delivered to space using current or planned future launch vehicles. Building and assembling large telescopes in space is therefore likely to require not only multiple launches but importantly assembly in spce. As a result, space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to our conventional telescope design and architecture.Here we report on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST) to demonstrates the on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of an optical telescope in space. MODEST is a proposed International Space Station (ISS demonstration that will make use of the standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets.MODEST will provides significant risk reduction for the next generation of space observatories, and demonstrates the technology needed to assemble a six-mirror phased telescope. Key modest features include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control to allow on-orbit optimization, and the precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion. Mirrors built from these materials can be rapidly replicated in a highly cost effective manner, making them an excellent candidate for a low cost, high performance Optical Telescope Assembly paving the way for enabling affordable solutions for the next generation of large aperture space-based telescope.MODEST post-assembly value includes space, ground, and

  18. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Julie; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated ScienceInstrument Module (ISIM)are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirrorcenter of curvatureoptical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard SpaceFlight Center beforebeing shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparationfor the cryogenicoptical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two OpticalGround SystemEquipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize opticaltest results todate and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  19. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element/Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  20. An 8 Meter Monolithic UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing and at least 55,600 kg capacity to Earth Sun L2 enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. A consortium from NASA, Space Telescope Science Institute, and aerospace industry are studying an 8-meter monolithic primary mirror UV/optical/NIR space telescope to enable new astrophysical research that is not feasible with existing or near-term missions, either space or ground. This paper briefly reviews the science case for such a mission and presents the results of an on-going technical feasibility study, including: optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing; mass budget and cost.

  1. MEMS Microshutter Arrays for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Beamesderfer, Michael; Babu, Sachi; Bajikar, Sateesh; Ewin, Audrey; Franz, Dave; Hess, Larry; Hu, Ron; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kelly, Dan; King, Todd; Kletetschkar, Gunther; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lynch, Barney; Moseley, Harvey; Mott, Brent; Oh, Lance; Rapchum, Dave; Ray, Chris; Sappington, Carol; Silverberg, Robert; Smith, Wayne; Snodgrass, Steve; Steptoe-Jackson, Rosalind; Valeriano

    2006-01-01

    MEMS microshutter arrays are being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use as an aperture array for a Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NirSpec). The instruments will be carried on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next generation of space telescope after Hubble Space Telescope retires. The microshutter arrays are designed for the selective transmission of light with high efficiency and high contrast, Arrays are close-packed silicon nitride membranes with a pixel size of 100x200 microns. Individual shutters are patterned with a torsion flexure permitting shutters to open 90 degrees with a minimized mechanical stress concentration. Light shields are made on to each shutter for light leak prevention so to enhance optical contrast, Shutters are actuated magnetically, latched and addressed electrostatically. The shutter arrays are fabricated using MEMS technologies.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope. Update: 18 months in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In April 1990, Space Shuttle Discovery launched the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). An 18 month in-orbit update of the operations and performance of the HST is presented. Numerous color photographs are shown of objects already observed, and mission plans are presented for future observations by the HST.

  3. Three-mirror space telescope, volume 2. [coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1978-01-01

    The anastigmatic three mirror telescope for STARSAT, a space astronomy facility, was redesigned and reoptimized in order to improve the optical system and increase its versatility. A more compact system was obtained by decreasing the primary focal ratio from 2.2 to 2.0. A high performance Rowland spectrograph that uses only a total of three reflections and does not interfere with the imaging process, was successfully incorporated into the telescope so that it could be a permanent part of the system. The usefulness of this telescope concept as a high resolution coronagraph is examined.

  4. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Automated star pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Vanbezooijen, R. W. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a free flying spacecraft carrying a 1 meter class cryogenically cooled infrared telescope nearly three oders of magnitude most sensitive than the current generation of infrared telescopes. Three automatic target acquisition methods will be presented that are based on the use of an imaging star tracker. The methods are distinguished by the number of guidestars that are required per target, the amount of computational capability necessary, and the time required for the complete acquisition process. Each method is described in detail.

  5. Preliminary Multi-Variable Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hendrichs, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews the methodology used to develop space telescope cost models; summarizes recently published single variable models; and presents preliminary results for two and three variable cost models. Some of the findings are that increasing mass reduces cost; it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; and technology development as a function of time reduces cost at the rate of 50% per 17 years.

  6. Telescopes for a Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Shannon; Livas, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Telescopes are an important part of the science measurement for a space-based gravitational wave observatory. The telescopes should not introduce excess phase noise which might lower the signal-to-noise of the gravitational wave signal. This requirement constrains both the telescope stability and the phase noise due to scattered light. The photoreceiver senses a combination of a local beam, the received beam and scattered light. If the scattered light has significant spatial overlap, and if there is displacement noise in the scatter path, the signal-to-noise of the main measurement can be impacted. We will discuss our approach to addressing this concern. We model the scattered power from the telescope under expected conditions and use these models for evaluating potential telescope designs. We also determine allowable mirror surface roughness and contamination levels from the scattered light models. We implement the best designs by fabricating a series of prototype telescopes of increasing flight readiness, using eLISA as a reference mission for design specifications. Finally, we perform laboratory tests of the fabricated prototype telescope to validate the models and inform our understanding of the eventual flight telescopes.

  7. Performance of the second MEMS space telescope for observation of extreme lightning from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-A.; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Jik; Park, Il H.

    2016-03-01

    A small space-telescope equipped with a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) micro-mirror is applied to space missions for observing random, rare and temporal events like transient luminous events (TLEs). The measurement of TLEs with fine time resolution will show the different temporal profiles predicted by the various models for sprites, blue jets, elves and halos. The proposed space-telescope consists of three components: two sub-telescopes with different focal lengths and a spectrometer. The trigger telescope with a short focal length surveys a wide field of view. The zoom-in telescope with a long focal length looks into a small field of view area that is part of the trigger telescope's wide field of view. Upon identifying a candidate TLE, the trigger telescope determines the location of the event and provides the location to the MEMS micro-mirror. Then, the micro-mirror, which is placed as a pinhole in front of the zoom-in telescope, rotates its mirror plane by such an angle that the zoom-in telescope will watch the small field of view around the center of the event. In this manner, the zoom-in telescope achieves the zoom-in designed by its long focal length. The first such small-space telescope, the MEMS Telescope for Extreme Lightning (MTEL), was launched into space in 2009 and identified a few candidates sprites. However a power failure (over-charge of the solar battery) of the main satellite occurred, and the MTEL was not able to continue space operation to acquire sizable statistics for TLE events. We developed and constructed the second small-space telescope, called MTEL-II, to continue to observe TLE events in space. In this paper, we present the performance of MTEL-II based on ground tests.

  8. Artist's Concept of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pictured is the chosen artist's rendering of NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, was named the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. To further our understanding of the way our present universe formed following the the big bang, NASA is developing the JWST to observe the first stars and galaxies in the universe. This grand effort will help to answer the following fundamental questions: How galaxies form and evolve, how stars and planetary systems form and interact, how the universe builds up its present elemental/chemical composition, and what dark matter is. To see into the depths of space, the JWST is currently plarning to carry instruments that are sensitive to the infrared wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. The new telescope will carry a near-infrared camera, a multi-object spectrometer, and a mid-infrared camera/spectrometer. The JWST is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by creating an ultra-lightweight mirror for the telescope at MSFC's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center. GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the JWST, and TRW will design and fabricate the observatory's primary mirror and spacecraft. The program has a number of industry, academic, and government partners, as well as the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. (Image: Courtesy of TRW)

  9. Looking Back in Time: Building the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee

    2016-01-01

    When it launches in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will look back in time at the earliest stars and galaxies forming in the universe. This talk will look back in time at the development of the JWST telescope. This will include a discussion of the design, technology development, mirror development, wave front sensing and control algorithms, lightweight cryogenic deployable structure, pathfinder telescope, and integration and test program evolution and status. The talk will provide the engineering answers on why the mirrors are made of Beryllium, why there are 18 segments, where and how the mirrors were made, how the mirrors get aligned using the main science camera, and how the telescope is being tested. It will also look back in time at the many dedicated people all over the country who helped build it.

  10. Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Brian; Conti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The "Search for Life" via imaging of exoplanets is a mission that requires extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. The High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) envisioned for this mission would have an aperture >10 m, which is a larger payload than what can be delivered to space using a single launch vehicle. Building and assembling the mirror segments enabling large telescopes will likely require multiple launches and assembly in space. Space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to system architectures.The Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) for HDST is a primary mission cost driver. Enabling and affordable solutions for this next generation of large aperture space-based telescope are needed.This paper reports on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST), which demonstrates on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of a precision optical telescope in space. It will also facilitate demonstration of active correction of phase and mirror shape. MODEST is proposed to be delivered to the ISS using standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets. Post-assembly value includes space, ground, and environmental studies, and a testbed for new instruments. This demonstration program for next generation mirror technology provides significant risk reduction and demonstrates the technology in a six-mirror phased telescope. Other key features of the demonstration include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control that allows on-orbit optimization and demonstration of precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal

  11. Structural Modeling of the Next Generation Space Telescope's Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulet, J. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, astronomical observations made with space telescopes have dramatically increased our understanding of the history of the universe. In particular, the cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have yielded observations that cannot be achieved at ground-based observatories. We now have views of the universe before galaxies existed (from COBE) and views of young galaxies (from HST). But none of the existing observatories can provide views of the period in which the galaxies were born, about 100 million to one billion years after the "big bang". NASA expects the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) to fill this gap. An investigation into the structural modeling of the primary mirror of the NGST, its methodology and results are presented.

  12. Moisture loss from graphite structures for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facey, T. A.; Defilippis, N. A.; Young, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The construction and telescope assembly of the NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described with particular reference to the features of its construction material. Due to the hygroscopic nature of the graphite-fiber reinforced epoxy, used for much of the structure of the HST, the telescope, when in orbit, suffers losses of water, absorbed during on-ground procedures, accompanied by shrinkage of the epoxy matrix, and needs periodic realignment. Using a combination of analytic, laboratory measured, and in-space measured data, an operational plan for adjusting the alignment of the HST is presented. The refocusing plan must take into account the preceding ground environment, as well as the prelaunch, lift-off, and predeployment environments of the HST-bearing Space Shuttle.

  13. The James Webb Space Telescope: Solar System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Dean C.; Hammel, H. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Milam, S. N.; Kalirai, J. S.; Sonneborn, G.

    2013-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is poised to revolutionize many areas of astrophysical research including Solar System Science. Scheduled for launch in 2018, JWST is ~100 times more powerful than the Hubble and Spitzer observatories. It has greater sensitivity, higher spatial resolution in the infrared, and significantly higher spectral resolution in the mid infrared. Imaging and spectroscopy (both long-slit and integral-field) will be available across the entire 0.6 - 28.5 micron wavelength range. Herein, we discuss the capabilities of the four science instruments with a focus on Solar System Science, including instrument modes that enable observations over the huge range of brightness presented by objects within the Solar System. The telescope is being built by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems for NASA, ESA, and CSA. JWST development is led by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is the Science and Operations Center (S&OC) for JWST.

  14. The Virtual Space Telescope: A New Class of Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Neerav; Calhoun, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Many science investigations proposed by GSFC require two spacecraft alignment across a long distance to form a virtual space telescope. Forming a Virtual Space telescope requires advances in Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) enabling the distribution of monolithic telescopes across multiple space platforms. The capability to align multiple spacecraft to an intertial target is at a low maturity state and we present a roadmap to advance the system-level capability to be flight ready in preparation of various science applications. An engineering proof of concept, called the CANYVAL-X CubeSat MIssion is presented. CANYVAL-X's advancement will decrease risk for a potential starshade mission that would fly with WFIRST.

  15. Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.; Spitzer Science Center

    2016-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, launched on 2003 August 25, continues to produce new and exciting views of the Universe as seen in infrared light. Spitzer is the fourth and final space telescope in NASA's Great Observatory series. Originally it consisted of a liquid-helium-cooled 85-cm telescope and three imaging and spectroscopic instruments capable of observing infrared light (3-160 micron wavelength) from regions of space invisible to optical telescopes. In mid-2009 Spitzer's cryogen was exhausted, leaving the observatory with two operating imaging arrays at 3.6 and 4.5 micron wavelength. "Warm" Spitzer, as it is now called, continues to match the sensitivity achieved at these wavelengths during the cryogenic mission and remains very much in demand. The Spitzer Space Telescope has changed our view of the Universe. Spitzer's scientific results include the study of the formation and evolution of galaxies in the early Universe, star formation and evolution, exoplanets, the structure and evolution of planetary disks around nearby stars, the cosmic distance scale, clusters of galaxies, near-Earth asteroids, and comets. After a brief description of the Spitzer mission, achievements of Spitzer's extragalactic and galactic observational programs will be presented, including many of Spitzer's very spectacular images.

  16. Cats: Optical to Near-Infrared Colors of the Bulge and Disk of Two z = 0.7 Galaxies Using Hubble Space Telescope and Keck Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, E.; Melbourne, J.; Metevier, A. J.; Koo, D. C.; Chun, M. R.; Simard, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Max, C. E.

    2008-10-01

    We have employed laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) on the Keck II telescope to obtain near-infrared (NIR) images in the Extended Groth Strip deep galaxy survey field. This is a continuation of our Center for Adaptive Optics Treasury Survey program of targeting 0.5 < z < 1 galaxies where existing images with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are already in hand. Our AO field has already been imaged by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Near Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph (NICMOS). Our AO images at 2.2 μm (K') are comparable in depth to those from the HST, have Strehl ratios up to 0.4, and full width at half-maximum resolutions superior to that from NICMOS. By sampling the field with the LGS at different positions, we obtain better quality AO images than with an immovable natural guide star. As examples of the power of adding LGS AO to HST data, we study the optical to NIR colors and color gradients of the bulge and disk of two galaxies in the field with z = 0.7. All authors except L.S. are affiliated with the Center for Adaptive Optics.

  17. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), The First Light Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Scheduled to begin its 10 year mission after 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will search for the first luminous objects of the Universe to help answer fundamental questions about how the Universe came to look like it does today. At 6.5 meters in diameter, JWST will be the world s largest space telescope. This talk reviews science objectives for JWST and how they drive the JWST architecture, e.g. aperture, wavelength range and operating temperature. Additionally, the talk provides an overview of the JWST primary mirror technology development and fabrication status.

  18. James Webb Space Telescope: The First Light Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Scheduled to begin its 10 year mission no sooner than 2013, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will search for the first luminous objects of the Universe to help answer fundamental questions about how the Universe came to look like it does today. At 6.5 meters in diameter, JWST will be the world's largest space telescope. This talk reviews science objectives for JWST and how they drive the JWST architecture, e.g. aperture, wavelength range and operating temperature. Additionally, the talk provides an overview of the JWST primary mirror technology development and fabrication status.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): The First Light Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation review the mission objective, the organization of the mission planning, the design, and testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). There is also information about the orbit, in comparison to the Hubble Space Telescope, the mirror design, and the science instruments. Pictures of the full scale mockup of the JWST are given. A brief history of the universe is also presented from the big bang through the formation of galaxies, and the planets, to life itself. One of the goals of the JWST is to search for extra solar planets and then to search for signs of life.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope maintenance and refurbishment planning analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzano, F.; Kincade, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an updated analytical approach toward the identification of Hubble Space Telescope system failures and downstates, maintenance requirements, and overall support to maintenance mission planning. Different sparing options of Orbital Replacement Units are evaluated, and the optimum spares complement that satisfies the expected servicing requirements is identified. Specific Space Telescope Reliability and maintenance Simulation Computer Program (SPATEL) updates and refinements are reported, and input data updates relevant to failure rates, downstate ground rules, and maintenance policy are addressed. A summary of the latest SPATEL outputs is provided along with maintenance analysis results.

  1. Giving Birth to the James Webb Space Telescope: Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    2013-01-01

    In late October 1995, I found a remarkable message on my answering machine from Ed Weiler, then the Program Scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope. Would I work on the next generation space telescope, the successor to the beautiful HST? It took me mere moments to work out the answer: Of course! At the time, my work on the COsmic Background Explorer (COBE) was finished, I was writing a book about it (The Very First Light, with John Boslough), and I thought NASA might never do anything nearly as spectacular again. Wow, was I happy to be surprised by that call!

  2. Capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope for Exoplanet Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 m to 28 m. JWST s primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. We also review the expected scientific performance of the observatory for observations of exosolar planets by means of transit photometry and spectroscopy, and direct coronagraphic imaging.

  3. Development of CFRP mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Ryuzo

    2013-09-01

    CFRP (Caron fiber reinforced plastics) have superior properties of high specific elasticity and low thermal expansion for satellite telescope structures. However, difficulties to achieve required surface accuracy and to ensure stability in orbit have discouraged CFRP application as main mirrors. We have developed ultra-light weight and high precision CFRP mirrors of sandwich structures composed of CFRP skins and CFRP cores using a replica technique. Shape accuracy of the demonstrated mirrors of 150 mm in diameter was 0.8 μm RMS (Root Mean Square) and surface roughness was 5 nm RMS as fabricated. Further optimization of fabrication process conditions to improve surface accuracy was studied using flat sandwich panels. Then surface accuracy of the flat CFRP sandwich panels of 150 mm square was improved to flatness of 0.2 μm RMS with surface roughness of 6 nm RMS. The surface accuracy vs. size of trial models indicated high possibility of fabrication of over 1m size mirrors with surface accuracy of 1μm. Feasibility of CFRP mirrors for low temperature applications was examined for JASMINE project as an example. Stability of surface accuracy of CFRP mirrors against temperature and moisture was discussed.

  4. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope characterized by using phase-retrieval algorithms.

    PubMed

    Fienup, J R; Marron, J C; Schulz, T J; Seldin, J H

    1993-04-01

    We describe several results characterizing the Hubble Space Telescope from measured point spread functions by using phase-retrieval algorithms. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds show that point spread functions taken well out of focus result in smaller errors when aberrations are estimated and that, for those images, photon noise is not a limiting factor. Reconstruction experiments with both simulated and real data show that the calculation of wave-front propagation by the retrieval algorithms must be performed with a multiple-plane propagation rather than a simple fast Fourier transform to ensure the high accuracy required. Pupil reconstruction was performed and indicates a misalignment of the optical axis of a camera relay telescope relative to the main telescope. After we accounted for measured spherical aberration in the relay telescope, our estimate of the conic constant of the primary mirror of the HST was - 1.0144.

  6. Contamination Control Considerations for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Space Science Program, in its ongoing mission to study the universe, has begun planning for a telescope that will carry on the Hubble Space Telescope's exploration. This telescope, the 'Next Generation Space Telescope' (NGST), will be 6-8 meters in diameter, will be radiatively cooled to 30-60 Kelvin in order to enable extremely deep exposures at near infrared wavelengths, and will operate for a lifetime of 5-10 years. The requirement will be to measure wavelengths from 1-5 microns, with a goal to measure wavelengths from 0.6-30 microns. As such, NGST will present a new contamination control challenge. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) performed one of three preliminary feasibility studies for the NGST, presenting a telescope with an 8 meter, deployable primary mirror and a deployable secondary mirror. The telescope would be radiatively cooled, with the optical telescope assembly (OTA) and the science instrument module (SIM) isolated from the warmer spacecraft support module (SSM). The OTA and the SIM would also be shielded from sunlight with an enormous, inflatable sun-shield. The GSFC telescope was designed for launch on an Atlas HAS, which would require launching the telescope in a stowed configuration, with the SSM, antennae, sun-shield, primary mirror 'petals', and secondary mirror deployed once on-orbit. The launch configuration and deployment scenario of an exposed telescope measuring near infrared and cooled to 30-60 K are the factors presenting contamination hazards to the NGST mission. Preliminary science requirements established are: less than 20% reflectance decrease on optical surfaces over the wavelength range, and less than 0.3% obscuration of optical surfaces. In order to meet these requirements, NGST must be built and launched with careful attention to contamination control. Initial contamination control design options include strict selecting of materials and baking out of hardware down to the component level, minimizing or

  7. Pointing History Engine for the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Ahmed, Asif; Brugarolas, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The Pointing History Engine (PHE) is a computer program that provides mathematical transformations needed to reconstruct, from downlinked telemetry data, the attitude of the Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) as a function of time. The PHE also serves as an example for development of similar pointing reconstruction software for future space telescopes. The transformations implemented in the PHE take account of the unique geometry of the Spitzer telescope-pointing chain, including all data on relative alignments of components, and all information available from attitude-determination instruments. The PHE makes it possible to coordinate attitude data with observational data acquired at the same time, so that any observed astronomical object can be located for future reference and re-observation. The PHE is implemented as a subroutine used in conjunction with telemetry-formatting services of the Mission Image Processing Laboratory of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to generate the Boresight Pointing History File (BPHF). The BPHF is an archival database designed to serve as Spitzer s primary astronomical reference documenting where the telescope was pointed at any time during its mission.

  8. Twenty Meter Space Telescope Based on Diffractive Fresnel Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Hyde, R; Baron, R

    2003-06-26

    Diffractive lenses offer two potential advantages for very large aperture space telescopes; very loose surface-figure tolerances and physical implementation as thin, flat optical elements. In order to actually realize these advantages one must be able to build large diffractive lenses with adequate optical precision and also to compactly stow the lens for launch and then fully deploy it in space. We will discuss the recent fabrication and assembly demonstration of a 5m glass diffractive Fresnel lens at LLNL. Optical performance data from smaller full telescopes with diffractive lens and corrective optics show diffraction limited performance with broad bandwidths. A systems design for a 20m space telescope will be presented. The primary optic can be rolled to fit inside of the standard fairings of the Delta IV vehicle. This configuration has a simple deployment and requires no orbital assembly. A twenty meter visible telescope could have a significant impact in conventional astronomy with eight times the resolution of Hubble and over sixty times the light gathering capacity. If the light scattering is made acceptable, this telescope could also be used in the search for terrestrial planets.

  9. Feasibility of Exoplanet Coronagraphy with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Woodruff, Robert A.; Brown, Robert; Noecker, M. Charley; Cheng, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report on a preliminary study to assess the use of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for the direct detection and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets and debris disks - an application for which HST was not originally designed. Coronagraphic advances may enable the design of a science instrument that could achieve limiting contrasts approx.10deg beyond 275 milli-arcseconds (4 lambda/D at 800 nm) inner working angle, thereby enabling detection and characterization of several known jovian planets and imaging of debris disks. Advantages of using HST are that it already exists in orbit, it's primary mirror is thermally stable and it is the most characterized space telescope yet flown. However there is drift of the HST telescope, likely due to thermal effects crossing the terminator. The drift, however, is well characterized and consists of a larger deterministic components and a smaller stochastic component. It is the effect of this drift versus the sensing and control bandwidth of the instrument that would likely limit HST coronagraphic performance. Herein we discuss the science case, quantifY the limiting factors and assess the feasibility of using HST for exoplanet discovery using a hypothetical new instrument. Keywords: Hubble Space Telescope, coronagraphy, exoplanets, telescopes

  10. The James Webb Space Telescope: Mission Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the Infrared successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. It is a cryogenic infrared space observatory with a 25 sq m aperture (6 m class) telescope yielding diffraction limited angular resolution at a wave1ength of 2 micron. The science instrument payload includes three passively cooled near-infrared instruments providing broad- and narrow-band imagery, coronagraphy, as well as multi-object and integral-field spectroscopy over the 0.6 Space Agencies, as a general user facility with science observations to be proposed by the international astronomical community in a manner similar to the Hubble Space Telescope. Technology development and mission design are complete, and construction is underway in all areas of the program.

  11. STS-61 Onboard Photograph-Hubble Space Telescope Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Hoffman held the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field/Planetary Camera-1 (WF/PC1) that was replaced by WF/PC2 in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour during Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The STS-61 mission was the first of the series of the HST servicing missions. Two months after its deployment in space, scientists detected a 2-micron spherical aberration in the primary mirror of the HST that affected the telescope's ability to focus faint light sources into a precise point. This imperfection was very slight, one-fiftieth of the width of a human hair. During four spacewalks, the STS-61 crew replaced the solar panel with its flexing problems; the WF/PC1 with WF/PC2, with built-in corrective optics; and the High-Speed Photometer with the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) to correct the aberration for the remaining instruments. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit for 15 years or more. The HST provides fine detail imaging, produces ultraviolet images and spectra, and detects very faint objects. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  12. Multilayer active shell mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John; Jackson, Kathryn; Pellegrino, Sergio; Redding, David; Wallace, J. Kent; Bradford, Samuel Case; Barbee, Troy

    2016-07-01

    A novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) substrates and replication techniques has been developed. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the design serving various functions. Nanolaminate metal films are used to provide a high quality reflective front surface. A backing layer of thin active material is implemented to provide the surface-parallel actuation scheme. Printed electronics are used to create a custom electrode pattern and flexible routing layer. Mirrors of this design are thin (< 1.0 mm), lightweight (2.7 kg/m2), and have large actuation capabilities. These capabilities, along with the associated manufacturing processes, represent a significant change in design compared to traditional optics. Such mirrors could be used as lightweight primaries for small CubeSat-based telescopes or as meter-class segments for future large aperture observatories. Multiple mirrors can be produced under identical conditions enabling a substantial reduction in manufacturing cost and complexity. An overview of the mirror design and manufacturing processes is presented. Predictions on the actuation performance have been made through finite element simulations demonstrating correctabilities on the order of 250-300× for astigmatic modes with only 41 independent actuators. A description of the custom metrology system used to characterize the active mirrors is also presented. The system is based on a Reverse Hartmann test and can accommodate extremely large deviations in mirror figure (> 100 μm PV) down to sub-micron precision. The system has been validated against several traditional techniques including photogrammetry and interferometry. The mirror performance has been characterized using this system, as well as closed-loop figure correction experiments on 150 mm dia. prototypes. The mirrors have demonstrated post-correction figure accuracies of 200 nm RMS (two dead actuators limiting performance).

  13. Novel In-Space Manufacturing Concepts for the Development of Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, James T.; Reardon, Patrick; Gregory Don; Manning, Andrew; Blackmon, Jim; Howsman, Tom; Williams, Philip; Brantley, Whitt; Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for larger, lighter, and higher quality telescopes. Over the past several decades, we have seen the evolution from launchable 2 meter-class telescopes (such as Hubble), to today s demand for deployable 6 meter-class telescopes (such as JWST), to tomorrow s need for up to 150 meter-class telescopes. As the apertures continue to grow, it will become much more difficult and expensive to launch assembled telescope structures. To address this issue, we are seeing the emergence of new novel structural concepts, such as inflatable structures and membrane optics. While these structural concepts do show promise, it is very difficult to achieve and maintain high surface figure quality. Another potential solution to develop large space telescopes is to move the fabrication facility into space and launch the raw materials. In this paper we present initial in-space manufacturing concepts to enable the development of large telescopes. This includes novel approaches for the fabrication of both the optical elements and the telescope support structure. We will also discuss potential optical designs for large space telescopes and describe their relation to the fabrication methods. These concepts are being developed to meet the demanding requirements of DARPA s LASSO (Large Aperture Space Surveillance Optic) program which currently requires a 150 meter optical aperture with a 17 degree field of view.

  14. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope primary mirror integration: testing the multiwavelength interferometer on the test bed telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczak, Gene; Fischer, David J.; Connelly, Mark; Wells, Conrad

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) integration includes a center of curvature test on its 18 primary mirror segment assemblies (PMSAs). This important test is the only ground test that will demonstrate the ability to align all 18 PMSAs. Using a multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) integrated to the test bed telescope (TBT), a one-sixth scale model of the JWST, we verify our ability to align and phase the 18 PMSAs. In this paper we will discuss data analysis and test results when using the MWIF to align the segments of the TBT in preparation for alignment of the JWST.

  16. The Optical Telescope Element Simulator for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Pamela S.; Bos, Brent J.; Cheng, Edward S.; Chang, Bill; Eichhorn, William L.; Frey, Bradley J.; Garza, Mario; Gong, Qian; Greeley, Bradford W.; Guzek, Jeff; Hakun, Claef F.; Hovmand, Lars; Kirk, Jeff; Kubalak, David A.; Leviton, Douglas; Nagle, Adrian; Nyquist, Rich; Pham, Thai; Robinson, F. David; Sabatke, Derek; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Volmer, Paul; VonHandorf, Rob; Youngworth, Richard N.

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Observatory will consist of three flight elements: (1) the Optical Telescope Element (OTE), (2) the Integrated Science Instrument Module Element (ISIM), and (3) the Spacecraft Element. The ISIM element consists of a composite bench structure that uses kinematic mounts to interface to each of the optical benches of the three science instruments and the guider. The ISIM is also kinematically mounted to the telescope primary mirror structure. An enclosure surrounds the ISIM structure, isolates the ISIM region thermally from the other thermal regions of the Observatory, and serves as a radiator for the science instruments and guider. Cryogenic optical testing of the ISIM Structure and the Science Instruments will be conducted at Goddard Space Flight Center using an optical telescope simulator that is being developed by a team from Ball Aerospace and Goddard Space Flight Center, and other local contractors. This simulator will be used to verify the performance of the ISIM element before delivery to the Northup Grumman team for integration with the OTE. In this paper, we describe the O OTE Sim TE Simulator (OSIM) and provide a brief overview of the optical test program. ulator

  17. Capturing the Imagination: The Promise of the Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Livio, M.; Eisenhammer, B.; Kakadelis, S.; Villard, R.; Stiavelli, M.; Stockman, P.

    2010-08-01

    The Webb Space Telescope will take us on a journey back to the beginning, enabling us to see the first galaxies, the birth of stars, the creation of planets, and the origins of galactic structure. News, education, and outreach activities led by the Space Telescope Science Institute Office of Public Outreach use the promise of Webb's scientific return and technical prowess to capture the imagination—inspiring and educating youth and adults about key science, technology, engineering, and mathematics concepts and the process of science itself. We highlight activities designed to introduce cutting-edge Webb science and technology to established audiences cultivated through a decade of Hubble-based Amazing Space, ViewSpace, HubbleSite, and NewsCenter products and services. Critical underlying components include a commitment to evaluation of audience needs and partnerships between scientists and educators.

  18. Infiltration of supermicron aerosols into a simulated space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Ling; Luey, Kenneth T.

    2010-08-01

    Purging is a common scheme to protect sensitive surfaces of payloads and spacecraft from airborne contaminant intrusion during ground assembly, integration, and launch vehicle encapsulation. However, the purge for space volumes must be occasionally interrupted. Thus it is important to gain insights into the transport of ambient particles penetrating through vent holes and entering the interior of a confined space system, such as a space telescope, during a purge outage. This study presents experimental work performed to measure time-dependent aerosol concentration changes during a purge outage. The laboratory results from the aerosol experiments were compared with a mass balance based mechanistic model which had been experimentally validated for aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 2 μm. The experimental data show that the steady-state aerosol concentration inside a simulated space telescope (SST) is governed by the surrounding particle concentration, SST air exchange rate, and the particle deposition rate.

  19. The James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Sullivan, Pamela C.; Boyce, Leslye A.; Glazer, Stuart D.; Johnson, Eric L.; McCloskey, John C.; Voyton, Mark F.

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Science Instrument Module of the James Webb Space Telescope is described from a systems perspective with emphasis on unique and advanced technology aspects. The major subsystems of this flight element are described including: structure, thermal, command and data handling, and software.

  20. Space telescope searches for black holes in galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will allow astronomers to obtain luminosity profiles, rotation curves, and velocity dispersions at angular scales that are an order of magnitude superior to those obtained previously. This enhanced spatial resolution will greatly improve the sensitivity for detecting centrally condensed matter in nearby galactic nuclei including, possibly, black holes.

  1. Polarizer mechanism for the space telescope faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulson, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarizer mechanism for the Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph is described. This device will allow spectropolarimetric measurements of faint astronomical objects. The mechanism employs a unique arrangement to meet functional requirements in a compact package and with only one actuator. Detailed tolerance analysis and a variety of tests indicate that the polarizer is capable of accurate and reliable performance.

  2. A Scientific Revolution: The Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a flood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, I will discuss some of the important discoveries of the last decade, from dwarf planets in the outer Solar System to the mysterious dark energy that overcomes gravity to accelerate the expansion of the Universe. The next decade will be equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. An infrared-optimized 6.5m space telescope, Webb is designed to find the first galaxies that formed in the early universe and to peer into the dusty gas clouds where stars and planets are born. With MEMS technology, a deployed primary mirror and a tennis-court sized sunshield, the mission presents many technical challenges. I will describe Webb's scientific goals, its design and recent progress in constructing the observatory. Webb is scheduled for launch in 2014.

  3. Wavefront Control for Space Telescope Applications Using Adaptive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    SPACE TELESCOPE APPLICATIONS USING ADAPTIVE OPTICS by Matthew R. Allen December 2007 Thesis Advisor: Brij Agrawal Second Reader...ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2007 Author: Matthew R. Allen Approved by: Dr, Brij Agrawal...34 3. Direct Iterative Zonal Feedback Control ........................................ 35 4. Direct Iterative

  4. Preliminary Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hendrichs, Todd

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews creating a preliminary multi-variable cost model for the contract costs of making a space telescope. There is discussion of the methodology for collecting the data, definition of the statistical analysis methodology, single variable model results, testing of historical models and an introduction of the multi variable models.

  5. The first year of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Maran, S. P.

    1991-12-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has gathered unique information that supports many very significant scientific investigations during its early orbital operations, despite the limitations imposed by an unexpected spherical aberration in the primary mirror. These early results, gathered primarily with the HST cameras and spectrographs, are reviewed, with emphasis on extragalactic, stellar, and nebular astronomy.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope cycle 5 call for proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document invites and supports participation by the international astronomical community in the HST General Observer and Archival Research programs. These documents contain the basic procedural and technical information required for HST proposal preparation and submission, including applicable deadlines. The telescope and its instruments were built under the auspices of the NASA and the European Space Agency.

  7. Space telescope coordinate systems, symbols, and nomenclature definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    The major coordinate systems as well as the transformations and transformation angles between them, for the Space Telescope are defined. The coordinate systems were primarily developed for use in pointing and control system analysis and simulation. Additional useful information (on nomenclature, symbols, quaternion operations, etc.) is also contained.

  8. Scientific Instrument Package for the large space telescope (SIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a scientific instrument package (SIP) that will satisfy the requirements of the large space telescope was established. A reference configuration serving as a study model and data which will aid in the trade-off studies leading to the final design configuration are reported.

  9. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  10. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  11. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee D.; Russell, Kevin; Texter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) conducted a phase down select process via the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) project to assess the Technology Readiness Level of various candidate mirror materials. This process culminated in the selection of Beryllium as the JWST primary mirror material. This paper outlines the mirror evaluation process, defines the selection criteria and summarizes the candidate mirror's performances.

  12. Observing Exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin Mark

    2011-01-01

    The search for exoplanets and characterization of their properties has seen increasing success over the last few years. In excess of 500 exoplanets are known and Kepler has approx. 1000 additional candidates. Recently, progress has been made in direct imaging planets, both from the ground and in space. This presentation will discuss the history and current state of technology used for such discoveries, and highlight the new capabilities that will be enabled by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope First Servicing Mission Prelaunch Mission Operation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a high-performance astronomical telescope system designed to operate in low-Earth orbit. It is approximately 43 feet long, with a diameter of 10 feet at the forward end and 14 feet at the aft end. Weight at launch was approximately 25,000 pounds. In principle, it is no different than the reflecting telescopes in ground-based astronomical observatories. Like ground-based telescopes, the HST was designed as a general-purpose instrument, capable of using a wide variety of scientific instruments at its focal plane. This multi-purpose characteristic allows the HST to be used as a national facility, capable of supporting the astronomical needs of an international user community. The telescope s planned useful operational lifetime is 15 years, during which it will make observations in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared portions of the spectrum. The extended operational life of the HST is possible by using the capabilities of the Space Transportation System to periodically visit the HST on-orbit to replace failed or degraded components, install instruments with improved capabilities, re-boost the HST to higher altitudes compensating for gravitational effects, and to bring the HST back to Earth when the mission is terminated. The largest ground-based observatories, such as the 200-inch aperture Hale telescope at Palomar Mountain, California, can recognize detail in individual galaxies several billion light years away. However, like all earthbound devices, the Hale telescope is limited because of the blurring effect of the Earth s atmosphere. Further, the wavelength region observable from the Earth s surface is limited by the atmosphere to the visible part of the spectrum. The very important ultraviolet portion of the spectrum is lost. The HST uses a 2.4-meter reflective optics system designed to capture data over a wavelength region that reaches far into the ultraviolet and infrared portions of the spectrum.

  14. STARING INTO THE WINDS OF DESTRUCTION: HST/NICMOS IMAGES OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has captured a glimpse of a brief stage in the burnout of NGC 7027, a medium-mass star like our sun. The infrared image (on the left) shows a young planetary nebula in a state of rapid transition. This image alone reveals important new information. When astronomers combine this photo with an earlier image taken in visible light, they have a more complete picture of the final stages of star life. NGC 7027 is going through spectacular death throes as it evolves into what astronomers call a 'planetary nebula.' The term planetary nebula came about not because of any real association with planets, but because in early telescopes these objects resembled the disks of planets. A star can become a planetary nebula after it depletes its nuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium - and begins puffing away layers of material. The material settles into a wind of gas and dust blowing away from the dying star. This NICMOS image captures the young planetary nebula in the middle of a very short evolutionary phase, lasting perhaps less than 1,000 years. During this phase, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star lights up a region of gas surrounding it. (This gas is glowing brightly because it has been made very hot by the star's intense ultraviolet radiation.) Encircling this hot gas is a cloud of dust and cool molecular hydrogen gas that can only be seen by an infrared camera. The molecular gas is being destroyed by ultraviolet light from the central star. THE INFRARED VIEW -- The composite color image of NGC 7027 (on the left) is among the first data of a planetary nebula taken with NICMOS. This picture is actually composed of three separate images taken at different wavelengths. The red color represents cool molecular hydrogen gas, the most abundant gas in the universe. The image reveals the central star, which is difficult to see in images taken with visible light. Surrounding it is an

  15. STARING INTO THE WINDS OF DESTRUCTION: HST/NICMOS IMAGES OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has captured a glimpse of a brief stage in the burnout of NGC 7027, a medium-mass star like our sun. The infrared image (on the left) shows a young planetary nebula in a state of rapid transition. This image alone reveals important new information. When astronomers combine this photo with an earlier image taken in visible light, they have a more complete picture of the final stages of star life. NGC 7027 is going through spectacular death throes as it evolves into what astronomers call a 'planetary nebula.' The term planetary nebula came about not because of any real association with planets, but because in early telescopes these objects resembled the disks of planets. A star can become a planetary nebula after it depletes its nuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium - and begins puffing away layers of material. The material settles into a wind of gas and dust blowing away from the dying star. This NICMOS image captures the young planetary nebula in the middle of a very short evolutionary phase, lasting perhaps less than 1,000 years. During this phase, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star lights up a region of gas surrounding it. (This gas is glowing brightly because it has been made very hot by the star's intense ultraviolet radiation.) Encircling this hot gas is a cloud of dust and cool molecular hydrogen gas that can only be seen by an infrared camera. The molecular gas is being destroyed by ultraviolet light from the central star. THE INFRARED VIEW -- The composite color image of NGC 7027 (on the left) is among the first data of a planetary nebula taken with NICMOS. This picture is actually composed of three separate images taken at different wavelengths. The red color represents cool molecular hydrogen gas, the most abundant gas in the universe. The image reveals the central star, which is difficult to see in images taken with visible light. Surrounding it is an

  16. Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Brian

    2016-06-01

    The key driver for a telescope's sensitivityis directly related to the size of t he mirror area that collects light from the objects being observed.The "Search for Life" via imaging of exoplanets is a mission that requires extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. The HDST envisioned for this mission would have an aperture >10 m, which is a larger payload than can be delivered to space using a single launch vehicle. Building and assembling the mirror segments enabling large telescopes will likely require multiple launches and assembly in space. The Optical Telescope Assembly for HDST is a primary mission cost driver. Enabling affordable solutions for this next generation of large aperture space-based telescope are needed.This reports on the concept for the MODEST, which demonstrates on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of a precision optical telescope in space. It will facilitate demonstration of active correction of phase and mirror shape. MODEST is proposed to be delivered to the ISS using standard Express Logistics Carriers and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets. Post-assembly value includes space, ground, and environmental studies, a testbed for new instruments, and a tool for student's exploration of space. This demonstration program for next generation mirror technology provides significant risk reduction and demonstrates the technology in a six-mirror phased telescope. Key features of the demonstration include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control that allows on-orbit optimization and demonstration of precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Ceramic Matrix Composite that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion. It has been demonstrated

  17. 18 years of science with the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Dalcanton, Julianne J

    2009-01-01

    After several decades of planning, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched in 1990 as the first of NASA's Great Observatories. After a rocky start arising from an error in the fabrication of its main mirror, it went on to change forever many fields of astronomy, and to capture the public's imagination with its images. An ongoing programme of servicing missions has kept the telescope on the cutting edge of astronomical research. Here I review the advances made possible by the HST over the past 18 years.

  18. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): The First Light Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), expected to launch in 2011, will study the origin and evolution of luminous objects, galaxies, stars, planetary systems and the origins of life. It is optimized for near infrared wavelength operation of 0.6-28 micrometers and will have a 5 year mission life (with a 10 year goal). This presentation reviews JWST's science objectives, the JWST telescope and mirror requirements and how they support the JWST architecture. Additionally, an overview of the JWST primary mirror technology development effort is highlighted.

  19. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    After more than 2 years of science operations, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope continues to survey the high-energy sky on a daily basis. In addition to the more than 1400 sources found in the first Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog (I FGL), new results continue to emerge. Some of these are: (1) Large-scale diffuse emission suggests possible activity from the Galactic Center region in the past; (2) a gamma-ray nova was found, indicating particle acceleration in this binary system; and (3) the Crab Nebula, long thought to be a steady source, has varied in the energy ranges seen by both Fermi instruments.

  20. The James Webb Space Telescope: Observatory Status Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Bowers, Charles W.; Clampin, Mark; Niedner, Malcolm B.; Kimble, Randy A.

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.5 m) segmented aperture telescope equipped with near- and mid-infrared instruments (0.6-28 microns), all of which are passively cooled to ~40 K by a 5-layer sunshield while the mid-infrared instrument is actively cooled to 7 K. JWST is currently in the integration and test phase, with parallel activities on-going across the project. The current estimated JWST performance metrics will be presented, such as the image quality, pointing stability, sensitivity, and stray light backgrounds. The JWST development status and future schedule will be described for the full integration, launch, and commissioning.

  1. Ares V Launch Capability Enables Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle offers the potential to completely change the paradigm of future space science mission architectures. A major finding of the NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap Study was that current launch vehicle mass and volume constraints severely limit future space science missions. And thus, that significant technology development is required to package increasingly larger collecting apertures into existing launch shrouds. The Ares V greatly relaxes these constraints. For example, while a Delta IV has the ability to launch approximate a 4.5 meter diameter payload with a mass of 13,000 kg to L2, the Ares V is projected to have the ability to launch an 8 to 12 meter diameter payload with a mass of 60,000 kg to L2 and 130,000 kg to Low Earth Orbit. This paper summarizes the Ares V payload launch capability and introduces how it might enable new classes of future space telescopes such as 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror observatories, 15 meter class segmented telescopes, 6 to 8 meter class x-ray telescopes or high-energy particle calorimeters.

  2. Multivariable parametric cost model for space and ground telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost (X) D (1.75 +/- 0.05) λ (-0.5 +/- 0.25) T-0.25 e (-0.04) Y Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  3. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  4. Will cosmic strings be discovered using the Space Telescope?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacynski, B.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic strings are topologically stable defects in the vacuum of space which may be produced by a phase transition in the early universe. Here, it is suggested that observations of very distant galaxies are a more useful means of discovering strings than quasar observations. It is argued that if there is only one string out to redshift z - about 1 the probability that it crosses a random image obtained using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) of the Space Telescope is about 0.0001. In order to discover a cosmic string the Space Telescope WFC will be required to operate almost continuously in primary and serendipity modes, and a cosmic string, if it exists, may be discovered within the first few years of operation.

  5. Rigid ultralight primary mirror segments for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2000-10-01

    The development of ultra-light fibrous substrate mirrors allows serious contemplation of large multi-mirror space telescopes using rigid segments. Mirrors made of silica and alumina fibers have a small coefficient of thermal expansion and a density competitive with inflatable structures. Furthermore, they are without the imagery problems caused by non parabolic figures, gaseous expansion and contraction, tidal distortion of large gas filled structures, leaks, and long lived transient mirror perturbations caused by intentional pointing and tracking movements, micrometeor and space debris impacts, and mechanical vibrations. Fibrous substrate primary mirrors also have logistical advantages, since segments can be fabricated in orbit from small amounts of dense raw materials. One space shuttle flight, lifting about half its payload capacity, is adequate to transport all the material necessary to fabricate substrates for a one hundred meter telescope whose primary mirror consists of 12,086 hexagonal segments, each having a diameter of 1 meter and an area of 0.6495 square meters.

  6. Thermal design of the TAUVEX astronomical space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasberger, Avigdor; Levi, Moshe

    1993-09-01

    TAUVEX (Tel Aviv Ultra Violet EXplorer) is an astronomical telescope designed and built by EL-OP in conjunction with the Tel Aviv University Wise Observatory, for space research. It will be launched on the SRG satellite in 1995 as a part of the SODART X-Ray telescope. The thermal design has to cope with the extreme space environmental conditions caused by the solar heat flux and deep space, the satellite low power consumption requirement and the temperature restrictions of the various optical elements combined with surface finish requirements dictated by the stray light demands. In this paper we summarize the TAUVEX design considerations and the analysis which leads to the final thermal design.

  7. The Hubble Space Telescope Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teays, T. J.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, J.; Amazing Space Team

    2001-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has conducted a long-standing and vigorous program in education and public outreach. This program uses a variety of methods to reach a broad spectrum of audiences. Education products are developed in a team environment that partners educators, curriculum experts, scientists, and production experts, such as graphic artists, Web designers, programmers, and education evaluators. A popular Web site is maintained, and has been substantially augmented in the past year. The Amazing Space program consists of a suite of online, interactive modules for use in the kindergarten through 12th grade classroom. The program is rooted in the national education standards and benefits from a robust evaluation process. The HST images and data are used to engage students in learning basic science and mathematics concepts. The activity/lessons include extensive, online assistance for educators, so that they can be readily used in the classroom. Hardcopy products such as posters, lithographs, teacher guides, and trading cards are generally tied to online products, to provide multiple entries to the material. We also provide training for teachers in the use of our products, as appropriate. Informal science education is supported by providing services to museums, planetariums, libraries and related institutions. The very popular ViewSpace, a computer-based video service is being used by many informal science facilities. In addition, HST has supported the creation of both permanent and traveling exhibits about HST. The Space Telescope Science Institute operates the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA.

  8. FalconSAT-7: a membrane space solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Geoff; Asmolova, Olha; McHarg, Matthew G.; Quiller, Trey; Maldonado, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The US Air Force Academy of Physics has built FalconSAT-7, a membrane solar telescope to be deployed from a 3U CubeSat in LEO. The primary optic is a 0.2m photon sieve - a diffractive element consisting of billions of tiny circular dimples etched into a Kapton sheet. The membrane its support structure, secondary optics, two imaging cameras and associated control, recording electronics are packaged within half the CubeSat volume. Once in space the supporting pantograph structure is deployed, extending out and pulling the membrane flat under tension. The telescope will then be directed at the Sun to gather images at H-alpha for transmission to the ground. We will present details of the optical configuration, operation and performance of the flight telescope which has been made ready for launch in early 2017.

  9. [Activities of Space Telescope Science Institute with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Neff, James E.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    A number of studies, especially in recent years with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), have been presented on the UV line profiles of late-type stars. Generally, these consist of a few "snapshot" spectra of several different key diagnostic emission lines. From this it has become clear that many active stars possess non-gaussian line profiles. Unlike the case with AR Lac, observed with IUE, no assymetric profile has been clearly identified that results from an inhomogeneous surface temperature or density distribution. In 1993 we attempted to observe the RS CVn binary V711 Tau at several phases with the GHRS in a number of UV bandpasses in order to study profile variations as a function of phase. Unfortunately, scheduling problems, pointing errors, continuous flaring and the sparse and uneven phase sampling prevented us from achieving the primary goal. However, it is clear that a number of UV lines in the system, notably C IV, Si IV and Mg II show very extended emission out to several hundred km/s. The profiles were also clearly variable. Vilhu et al. (1997) and Walter et al. (1995) conducted a campaign on the rapidly rotating, single star AB Dor, where they observed C IV continuously for 14 hours. They found extended, non-gaussian emission in the C IV doublet and that Doppler images derived from these images were remarkably similar to the simultaneous spot-image. In a follow up study of V711 Tau we have observed another RS CVn with complete phase coverage in three key wavelength bandpasses, utilizing the ability of HST to observe some stars at high latitudes in uninterrupted fashion. Generally classified as an RS CVn, V824 Ara (HD 155555) consists of a G5 IV star in a short period orbit (P=ld.68) with a K0 V-IV companion. However, the system does not eclipse and therefore does not rigorously fit the Hall (1976) definition. There is also a visual M star companion (LDS587B) 33 arcsec away. The space velocities of the stars

  10. NASA in Crisis: The Space Agency's Public Relations Efforts Regarding the Hubble Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James

    1997-01-01

    Examines the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) public relations efforts concerning the Hubble telescope. Proposes that NASA's poor public relations exacerbated problems: NASA oversold the telescope before it was deployed, failed to develop a plan for release of images, provided misleading flight reports, and reported…

  11. UBVR and Hubble Space Telescope Mid-Ultraviolet and Near-Infrared Surface Photometry and Radial Color Gradients of Late-Type, Irregular, and Peculiar Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Violet A.; Jansen, Rolf A.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Odewahn, Stephen C.; Hibbard, John E.

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a data set of 142 mostly late-type spiral, irregular, and peculiar (interacting or merging) nearby galaxies observed in UBVR at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT), and we present an analysis of their radial color gradients. We confirm that nearby elliptical and early- to mid-type spiral galaxies show either no or only small color gradients, becoming slightly bluer with radius. In contrast, we find that late-type spiral, irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies become on average redder with increasing distance from the center. The scatter in radial color gradient trends increases toward later Hubble type. As a preliminary analysis of a larger data set obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we also analyze the color gradients of six nearby galaxies observed with NICMOS in the near-IR (H) and with WFPC2 in the mid-UV (F300W) and red (F814W). We discuss the possible implications of these results on galaxy formation and compare our nearby galaxy color gradients to those at high redshift. We present examples of images and UBVR radial surface brightness and color profiles, as well as of the tables of measurements; the full atlas and tables are published in the electronic edition only. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 8645, 9124, and 9824.

  12. Space Telescope Sensitivity and Controls for Exoplanet Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Herein we address design considerations and outline requirements for space telescopes with capabilities for high contrast imaging of exoplanets. The approach taken is to identify the span of potentially detectable Earth-sized terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of the nearest stars within 30 parsecs and estimate their inner working angles, flux ratios, SNR, sensitivities, wavefront error requirements and sensing and control times parametrically versus aperture size. We consider 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16-meter diameter telescope apertures. The achievable science, range of telescope architectures, and the coronagraphic approach are all active areas of research and are all subject to change in a rapidly evolving field. Thus, presented is a snapshot of our current understanding with the goal of limiting the choices to those that appear currently technically feasible. We describe the top-level metrics of inner working angle, contrast and photometric throughput and explore how they are related to the range of target stars. A critical point is that for each telescope architecture and coronagraphic choice the telescope stability requirements have differing impacts on the design for open versus closed-loop sensing and control.

  13. Development of a very small telescope for space astrometry surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Yamada, Y.; Takato, N.; Yamauchi, M.

    2006-08-01

    We report an outline and a current status of developing a small, all-aluminum made telescope for Nano-JASMINE. Nano-JASMINE is a nano-size astrometry satellite that is to be launched in 2008 and will demonstrate some key technologies required for JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration) in a real space environment. It also measures absolute positions of bright stars (z≤8 mag) with accuracies about 1 milli-arcsecond in a few years mission. It has a Ritchey-Chretien type telescope with a 5-cm effective aperture, a 167-cm focal length and a field of view of 0.5x0.5 degree. The telescope only occupies a volume about 15x12x12 cm, and weighs two kilograms or less. Almost all of the structures and the optical elements of the telescope, including two aspherical mirrors three flat mirrors and a dual-angled flat mirror that combines the beam from a relative angle of 99.5 degrees into the primary mirror, are made out of aluminum alloy, being figured by diamond turning machines. The Bread Board Model (BBM) of the telescope was now measured to be achieving a diffraction-limited performance.

  14. Development of a very small telescope for space astrometry surveyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Yamada, Y.; Takato, N.; Yamauchi, M.

    We report an outline and a current status of developing a small, all-aluminum made telescope for Nano-JASMINE. Nano-JASMINE is a nano-size astrometry satellite that is to be launched in 2008 and will demonstrate some key technologies required for JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration) in a real space environment. It also measures absolute positions of bright stars (z< 8 mag) with accuracies about 1 milli-arcsecond in a few years mission. It has a Ritchey-Chretien type telescope with a 5-cm effective aperture, a 167-cm focal length and a field of view of 0.5x0.5 degree. The telescope only occupies a volume about 15x12x12 cm, and weighs two kilograms or less. Almost all of the structures and the optical elements of the telescope, including two aspherical mirrors three flat mirrors and a dual-angled flat mirror that combines the beam from a relative angle of 99.5 degrees into the primary mirror, are made out of aluminum alloy, being figured by diamond turning machines. The Bread Board Model (BBM) of the telescope is found to be achieving a diffraction-limited performance at room temperature.

  15. Life Extension Activities for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith D.; Pepe, Joyce A. K.; Prior, Michael

    2004-01-01

    With the cancellation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), the HST Project will face numerous challenges to keep the Telescope operating during the remainder of the decade. As part of the SM4, the HST Project had planned to install various upgrades to the Telescope including the installation of new batteries and new rate integrating gyros. Without these upgrades, reliability analysis indicates that the spacecraft will lose the capability to conduct science operations later this decade. The HST team will be severely challenged to maximize the Telescope's remaining operational lifetime, while still trying to maximize - its science output and quality. Two of the biggest areas of concern are the age and condition of the batteries and gyros. Together they offer the largest potential extension in Telescope lifetime and present the biggest challenges to the HST team. The six Ni-H batteries on HST are the original batteries from launch. With fourteen years of operational life, these batteries have collectively lasted longer than any other comparable mission. Yet as with all batteries, their capacity has been declining. Engineers are examining various methods to prolong the life of these mission critical batteries, and retard the rate of degradation. This paper will focus on these and other efforts to prolong the life of the HST, thus enabling it to remain a world-class observatory for as long as possible.

  16. INFRARED TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE EXOPLANETS HD 209458b AND XO-1b USING THE WIDE FIELD CAMERA-3 ON THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; McCullough, Peter; Crouzet, Nicolas; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Agol, Eric; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Desert, Jean-Michel; Knutson, Heather A.; Line, Michael; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haynes, Korey; Magic, Zazralt; Mandell, Avi M.; Clampin, Mark; Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David; Seager, Sara; and others

    2013-09-10

    Exoplanetary transmission spectroscopy in the near-infrared using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) NICMOS is currently ambiguous because different observational groups claim different results from the same data, depending on their analysis methodologies. Spatial scanning with HST/WFC3 provides an opportunity to resolve this ambiguity. We here report WFC3 spectroscopy of the giant planets HD 209458b and XO-1b in transit, using spatial scanning mode for maximum photon-collecting efficiency. We introduce an analysis technique that derives the exoplanetary transmission spectrum without the necessity of explicitly decorrelating instrumental effects, and achieves nearly photon-limited precision even at the high flux levels collected in spatial scan mode. Our errors are within 6% (XO-1) and 26% (HD 209458b) of the photon-limit at a resolving power of {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 70, and are better than 0.01% per spectral channel. Both planets exhibit water absorption of approximately 200 ppm at the water peak near 1.38 {mu}m. Our result for XO-1b contradicts the much larger absorption derived from NICMOS spectroscopy. The weak water absorption we measure for HD 209458b is reminiscent of the weakness of sodium absorption in the first transmission spectroscopy of an exoplanet atmosphere by Charbonneau et al. Model atmospheres having uniformly distributed extra opacity of 0.012 cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} account approximately for both our water measurement and the sodium absorption. Our results for HD 209458b support the picture advocated by Pont et al. in which weak molecular absorptions are superposed on a transmission spectrum that is dominated by continuous opacity due to haze and/or dust. However, the extra opacity needed for HD 209458b is grayer than for HD 189733b, with a weaker Rayleigh component.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Near-infrared and Optical Imaging of Faint Radio Sources in the Distant Cluster CL 0939+4713

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smail, Ian; Morrison, G.; Gray, M. E.; Owen, F. N.; Ivison, R. J.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ellis, R. S.

    1999-11-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph (NICMOS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) optical imaging of a small region in the core of the distant rich cluster Cl 0939+4713 (z=0.41). We compare the optical and near-infrared morphologies of cluster members and find apparent small-scale optical structures within the galaxies that are absent in the near-infrared. We conclude that strong dust obscuration is a common feature in the late-type galaxies in distant clusters. We then concentrate on a sample of 10 faint radio galaxies lying within our NICMOS field and selected from a very deep 1.4 GHz VLA map of the cluster with a 1 σ flux limit of 9 μJy. Using published data we focus on the spectral properties of the eight radio-selected cluster members and show that these comprise a large fraction of the poststarburst population in the cluster. The simplest interpretation of the radio emission from these galaxies is that they are currently forming massive stars, contradicting their classification as poststarburst systems based on the optical spectra. We suggest that this star formation is hidden from view in the optical by the same obscuring dust that is apparent in our comparison on the optical and near-infrared morphologies of these galaxies. We caution that even in the rest-frame optical the effects of dust cannot be ignored when comparing samples of distant galaxies to low-redshift systems, particularly if dust is as prevalent in distant galaxies as appears to be the case in our study.

  18. High-Redshift Galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes and will continue their rich legacy of high-z galaxy studies with a combination of deep, high-resolution infrared photometry and multi-object or integral field spectroscopy. As a large (6.6m) cold (50K) space telescope, JWST is well optimized for studying high-z galaxies and the science goals include the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe and the chemical, morphological and dynamical buildup of galaxies. Webb has four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. The observatory is confirmed for launch into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point in 2018; the design is complete and it is in its construction and test phase. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Recent progress includes the completion of the mirrors and scientific instruments and the start of high-level assembly and cryogenic testing. Proposals for the first cycle of scientific observations will be due in February 2018; the community should begin planning their proposals now.

  19. The LATT way towards large active primaries for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Biasi, Roberto; Patauner, Christian; Gallieni, Daniele; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; d'Amato, Francesco; Pucci, Mauro; Duò, Fabrizio; Vettore, Christian; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    The Large Aperture Telescope Technology (LATT) goes beyond the current paradigm of future space telescopes, based on a deformable mirror in the pupil relay. Through the LATT project we demonstrated the concept of a low-weight active primary mirror, whose working principle and control strategy benefit from two decades of advances in adaptive optics for ground-based telescopes. We developed a forty centimeter spherical mirror prototype, with an areal density lower than 17 kg/m2, controlled through contactless voice coil actuators with co-located capacitive position sensors. The prototype was subjected to thermo-vacuum, vibration and optical tests, to push its technical readiness toward level 5. In this paper we present the background and the outcomes of the LATT activities under ESA contract (TRP programme), exploring the concept of a lightweight active primary mirror for space telescopes. Active primaries will open the way to very large segmented apertures, actively shaped, which can be lightweight, deployable and accurately phased once in flight.

  20. Hartmann test for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. Scott; Feinberg, Lee; Howard, Joseph; Acton, D. Scott; Whitman, Tony L.; Smith, Koby

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) end-to-end optical system will be tested in a cryogenic vacuum environment before launch at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Apollo-era, historic Chamber A thermal vacuum facility. During recent pre-test runs with a prototype "Pathfinder" telescope, the vibration in this environment was found to be challenging for the baseline test approach, which uses phase retrieval of images created by three sub-apertures of the telescope. To address the vibration, an alternate strategy implemented using classic Hartmann test principles combined with precise mirror mechanisms to provide a testing approach that is insensitive to the dynamics environment of the chamber. The measurements and sensitivities of the Hartmann approach are similar to those using phase retrieval over the original sparse aperture test. The Hartmann test concepts have been implemented on the JWST Test Bed Telescope, which provided the rationale and empirical evidence indicating that this Hartmann style approach would be valuable in supplementing the baseline test approach. This paper presents a Hartmann approach implemented during the recent Pathfinder test along with the test approach that is currently being considered for the full optical system test of JWST. Comparisons are made between the baseline phase retrieval approach and the Hartmann approach in addition to demonstrating how the two test methodologies support each other to reduce risk during the JWST full optical system test.

  1. Origins Space Telescope: Planet-forming disks and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the science case related to planet formation and exoplanets. Leveraging orders of magnitude of improvements in sensitivity, the Origins Telescope will reveal the path of water from the interstellar medium to the inner regions of planet-forming disks, and determine the total masses of disks around stars across the stellar mass range out to distances of 500 pc. It will measure the temperatures and search for basic chemical ingredients for life on rocky planets. Beyond this, the Origins Telescope will open a vast discovery space in the general areas of star formation, protoplanetary and debris disks, and cool exoplanets in habitable zones.

  2. Multispectral optical telescope alignment testing for a cryogenic space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newswander, Trent; Hooser, Preston; Champagne, James

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral space telescopes with visible to long wave infrared spectral bands provide difficult alignment challenges. The visible channels require precision in alignment and stability to provide good image quality in short wavelengths. This is most often accomplished by choosing materials with near zero thermal expansion glass or ceramic mirrors metered with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) that are designed to have a matching thermal expansion. The IR channels are less sensitive to alignment but they often require cryogenic cooling for improved sensitivity with the reduced radiometric background. Finding efficient solutions to this difficult problem of maintaining good visible image quality at cryogenic temperatures has been explored with the building and testing of a telescope simulator. The telescope simulator is an onaxis ZERODUR® mirror, CFRP metered set of optics. Testing has been completed to accurately measure telescope optical element alignment and mirror figure changes in a cryogenic space simulated environment. Measured alignment error and mirror figure error test results are reported with a discussion of their impact on system optical performance.

  3. Launch Window Trade Analysis for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Wayne H.; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large-scale space telescope mission designed to study fundamental astrophysical questions ranging from the formation of the universe to the origin of planetary systems and the origins of life. JWSTs orbit design is a Libration Point Orbit (LPO) around the Sun-Earth/Moon (SEM) L2 point for a planned mission lifetime of 10.5 years. The launch readiness period for JWST is from Oct 1st, 2018 November 30th, 2018. This paper presents the first launch window analysis for the JWST observatory using finite-burn modeling; previous analysis assumed a single impulsive midcourse correction to achieve the mission orbit. The physical limitations of the JWST hardware stemming primarily from propulsion, communication and thermal requirements alongside updated mission design requirements result in significant launch window within the launch readiness period. Future plans are also discussed.

  4. Observing supernova 1987A with the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Heng, Kevin; Kirshner, Robert P; Challis, Peter; Bouchet, Patrice; Crotts, Arlin; Dwek, Eli; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen S; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S J; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Stocke, John T; Wang, Lifan; Wheeler, J Craig

    2010-09-24

    Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), conducted since 1990, now offer an unprecedented glimpse into fast astrophysical shocks in the young remnant of supernova 1987A. Comparing observations taken in 2010 with the use of the refurbished instruments on HST with data taken in 2004, just before the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph failed, we find that the Lyα and Hα lines from shock emission continue to brighten, whereas their maximum velocities continue to decrease. We observe broad, blueshifted Lyα, which we attribute to resonant scattering of photons emitted from hot spots on the equatorial ring. We also detect N v λλ1239, 1243 angstrom line emission, but only to the red of Lyα. The profiles of the N v lines differ markedly from that of Hα, suggesting that the N4+ ions are scattered and accelerated by turbulent electromagnetic fields that isotropize the ions in the collisionless shock.

  5. Transit Imaging and Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 microns to 28 microns. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. Recent progress in hardware development for the observatory will be presented, including a discussion of the status of JWST's optical system and Beryllium mirror fabrication, progress with sunshield prototypes, and recent changes in the integration and test configuration. We also review the expected scientific performance of the observatory for observations of exosolar planets by means of transit imaging and spectroscopy. We will review the capabilities of each science instrument, and discuss the performance of each mode, with reference to current transiting systems.

  6. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger

    2013-05-31

    Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

  7. James Webb Space Telescope Launch Window Trade Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Wayne; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large-scale space telescope mission designed to study fundamental astrophysical questions ranging from the formation of the universe to the origin of planetary systems and the origins of life. JWSTs orbit design is a Libration Point Orbit (LPO) around the Sun-EarthMoon (SEM) L2 point for a planned mission lifetime of 10.5 years. The launch readiness period for JWST is from Oct 1st, 2018 November 30th, 2018. This paper presents the first launch window analysis for the JWST observatory using finite-burn modeling; previous analysis assumed a single impulsive midcourse correction to achieve the mission orbit. The physical limitations of the JWST hardware stemming primarily from propulsion, communication and thermal requirements alongside updated mission design requirements result in significant launch window within the launch readiness period. Future plans are also discussed.

  8. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  9. Mineralogy of Asteroids from Observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, J. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cleve, J. Van; Stansberry, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared (approximately 0.3 to 4.0 microns) spectroscopy has been successfully employed since the early 1970 s to infer the surface compositions of asteroids. Spectroscopic observations in the thermal infrared (approximately 5 to 40 microns) are similarly promising. Silicate spectra in this range are dominated by Si-O stretch and bend fundamentals, and other minerals have similarly diagnostic bands. Observations in this spectral range are difficult from the ground due to strong telluric absorptions and background emission. Nevertheless, spectral structure has been detected on a few asteroids in the 8 to 14-micron range from the ground, as well as from orbit with the ISO satellite. The Spitzer Space Telescope can observe asteroids with much higher sensitivity over a broader wavelength range than is possible from the ground or was possible with ISO. We present results of measurements of asteroids with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  10. The James Webb Space Telescope: Capabilities for Exoplanet Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 micron to 28 micron. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, stellar and planetary system formation, and the formation and evolution of planetary systems. We will review the design of JWST, and discuss the current status of the project, with emphasis on recent progress in the construction of the observatory. We also review the capabilities of the observatory for observations of exosolar planets and debris disks by means of coronagraphic imaging, and high contrast imaging and spectroscopy. This discussion will focus on the optical and thermal performance of the observatory, and will include the current predictions for the performance of the observatory, with special reference to the demands of exoplanet science observations.

  11. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema

    Romani, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

  12. Space telescope low scattered light camera - A model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuper, T. G.; Shack, R. V.

    1982-01-01

    A design approach for a camera to be used with the space telescope is given. Camera optics relay the system pupil onto an annular Gaussian ring apodizing mask to control scattered light. One and two dimensional models of ripple on the primary mirror were calculated. Scattered light calculations using ripple amplitudes between wavelength/20 wavelength/200 with spatial correlations of the ripple across the primary mirror between 0.2 and 2.0 centimeters indicate that the detection of an object a billion times fainter than a bright source in the field is possible. Detection of a Jovian type planet in orbit about alpha Centauri with a camera on the space telescope may be possible.

  13. "Amazing Space": Creating Educational Resources from Current Scientific Research Results from the Hubble Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, C. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, Jonathan; Teays, Terry

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Amazing Space program which is designed to enhance student mathematics, science, and technology skills using recent data and results from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Hubble Space Telescope mission. Explains the process of designing multi-media resources in a five-week summer workshop that partners…

  14. Long range science scheduling for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Glenn; Johnston, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are scheduled with the assistance of a long-range scheduling system (SPIKE) that was developed using artificial intelligence techniques. In earlier papers, the system architecture and the constraint representation and propagation mechanisms were described. The development of high-level automated scheduling tools, including tools based on constraint satisfaction techniques and neural networks is described. The performance of these tools in scheduling HST observations is discussed.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Neptune's Cloud Structure in 1994.

    PubMed

    Hammel, H B; Lockwood, G W; Mills, J R; Barnet, C D

    1995-06-23

    Images of Neptune taken at six wavelengths with the Hubble Space Telescope in October and November 1994 revealed several atmospheric features not present at the time of the Voyager spacecraft encounter in 1989. Furthermore, the largest feature seen in 1989, the Great Dark Spot, was gone. A dark spot of comparable size had appeared in the northern hemisphere, accompanied by discrete bright features at methane-band wavelengths. At visible wavelengths, Neptune's banded structure appeared similar to that seen in 1989.

  16. Teflon FEP Analyzed After Retrieval From the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Wang, Len; He, Charles

    1999-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission, 6.8 years after the telescope was deployed in low Earth orbit, degradation of unsupported Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer (see the photograph) was retrieved during the second servicing mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. Also retrieved was a Teflon FEP radiator surface from a cryogen vent cover that was exposed to the space environment on the aft bulkhead of the HST. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included determining the FEP degradation mechanisms. As part of the investigations into the degradation mechanisms, specimens retrieved from the first and second HST servicing missions, 3.6 and 6.8 years after launch, respectively, were characterized through exhaustive mechanical, optical, and chemical testing. Testing led by Goddard included scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, tensile testing, solar absorptance measurements, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), Fourier transform infrared microscopy (m-FTIR), attenuated total reflectance infrared microscopy (ATR/FTIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The NASA Lewis Research Center contributed significantly to the analysis of the retrieved HST materials by leading efforts and providing results of bend testing, surface microhardness measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and density measurements. Other testing was conducted by Nano Instruments, Inc., and the University of Akron.

  17. Seasonal Variations of the James Webb Space Telescope Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Petersen, Jeremy; Villac, Benjamin; Yu, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    While spacecraft orbital variations due to the Earth's tilt and orbital eccentricity are well-known phenomena, the implications for the James Webb Space Telescope present unique features. We investigate the variability of the observatory trajectory characteristics, and present an explanation of some of these effects using invariant manifold theory and local approximation of the dynamics in terms of the restricted three-body problem.

  18. Technicians assembly the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    At JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A, technicians install a high gain antenna (HGA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup. On the ground a technician operates the controls for the overhead crane that is lifting the HGA into place on the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell. Others in a cherry picker basket wait for the HGA to near its final position so they can secure it on the mockup.

  19. European astronaut selected for the third Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    The STS-104 crew will rendezvous with the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope, which is the size of a city bus, capture it using the Shuttle's Canadian robot arm and secure it in Columbia's payload bay. Then, working in teams of two, the four astronauts will leave the Shuttle's pressurised cabin and venture into the payload bay, performing a variety of tasks that will improve the productivity and reliability of the telescope. The four astronauts will perform a series of six "extravehicular" activities in the open space environment. Such activities are commonly called spacewalks, but this term does little justice to the considerable physical and mental efforts that astronauts need to make in doing the very demanding work involved. The Shuttle commander and pilot for this flight have not yet been appointed, but the four designated mission specialists begin training for the STS-104 mission immediately. "The ambitious nature of this mission, with its six spacewalks, made it important for the payload crew to begin training as early as possible," said David C. Leestma, NASA Director of Flight Crew Operations at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, to which Claude Nicollier is on resident assignment from ESA's European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, the home base of the European astronaut corps. The Hubble Space Telescope was launched into orbit in April 1990. It is one of the most capable optical telescopes available to astronomers today, producing images and spectral observations at the forefront of astronomy. The European Space Agency contributed a 15 share to the development of Hubble. One of the five scientific instruments on board, the Faint Object Camera, was built by a European industrial consortium made up of British Aerospace, Dornier and Matra under a contract with the European Space Agency. The solar arrays which provide Hubble with electrical power were manufactured by British Aerospace and Dornier. In its eight years of operation, the telescope has not

  20. Architecture for in-space robotic assembly of a modular space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicolas; Backes, Paul; Burdick, Joel; Pellegrino, Sergio; Fuller, Christine; Hogstrom, Kristina; Kennedy, Brett; Kim, Junggon; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan; Seubert, Carl; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2016-10-01

    An architecture and conceptual design for a robotically assembled, modular space telescope (RAMST) that enables extremely large space telescopes to be conceived is presented. The distinguishing features of the RAMST architecture compared with prior concepts include the use of a modular deployable structure, a general-purpose robot, and advanced metrology, with the option of formation flying. To demonstrate the feasibility of the robotic assembly concept, we present a reference design using the RAMST architecture for a formation flying 100-m telescope that is assembled in Earth orbit and operated at the Sun-Earth Lagrange Point 2.

  1. Optical Communications Study for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceniceros, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), part of NASA's Origins program, is a follow on to the Hubble Space Telescope expected to provide timely new science along with answering fundamental questions. NGST is a large diameter, infrared optimized telescope with imaging and spectrographic detectors which will be used to help study the origin of galaxies. Due to the large data NGST will collect, Goddard Space Flight Center has considered the use of optical communications for data downlink. The Optical Communications Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has performed a study on optical communications systems for NGST. The objective of the study was to evaluate the benefits gained through the use of optical communication technologies. Studies were performed for each of four proposed NGST orbits. The orbits considered were an elliptical orbit about the semi stable second Lagrangian point, a 1 by 3 AU elliptic orbit around the sun, a 1 AU drift orbit, and a 1 AU drift orbit at a 15 degree incline to the ecliptic plane. An appropriate optical communications system was determined for each orbit. Systems were evaluated in terms of mass, power consumption, size, and cost for each of the four proposed orbits.

  2. Stray light field dependence for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large space based astronomical telescope that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. The architecture has the telescope exposed to space, with a large sun shield providing thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the sun. The instruments will have the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6 μm to 29 μm wavelengths. Stray light analysis has been performed to characterize the stray light getting to the instrument focal planes from the celestial sky. A Radiance Transfer Function (RTF) is defined for the susceptibility of stray light to sky radiance relative to the observatory frame of reference. The stray light is calculated by overlaying the radiance maps of the celestial sky background (both galactic and zodiacal background) onto the RTF map. The product of the two is summed to obtain the total stray light background at the instrument detectors. The orientation of the observatory for observing a given field location in the sky depends on the direction of the sun, hence the day of the year. The variability of stray light with time of year for observing a given sky locations is determined.

  3. The preliminary design of an orbiting observatory - The Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmons, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    The systems and subsystems of the Space Telescope proposed for an orbiting observatory to be launched by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s are described. The structural design is simple and based on existing technologies for high reliability. Provisions are made for on-orbit servicing and maintenance. All deployable appendages are designed for manual override to insure retrieval and return of the Space Telescope to earth for major refurbishing, which should occur at intervals of not less than six years. Low performance risk, passive techniques are used in the thermal control subsystem to provide a cold-biased design with thermostatically controlled heaters to adjust temperature. The electrical power system utilizes NASA Standard Hardware - 50 ampere hour nickel-cadmium battery cells, a standard power regulator unit, and a flight-proven flexible rollup solar array with high-efficiency (12.5 per cent) silicon solar cells. The communication subsystem is designed for compatibility with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. The pointing control system will have a maximum line of sight variation of 0.007 arc seconds. The telescope optics are a Ritchey-Chretien version of the Cassegrain configuration.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finlay, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched April 24, 1990, and was deployed April 25 into low Earth orbit (LEO). It was soon discovered that the metal poles holding the solar arrays were expanding and contracting as the telescope orbited the Earth passing between the sunlight and the Earth s shadow. The expansion and contraction, although very small, was enough to cause the telescope to shake because of thermal-induced jitters, a detrimental effect when trying to take pictures millions of miles away. Therefore, the European Space Agency (ESA, the provider of the solar arrays) built new solar arrays (SA-11) that contained bi-stem thermal shields which insulated the solar array metal poles. These thermal shields were made of 2 mil thick aluminized-Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) rings fused together into a circular bellows shape. The new solar arrays were put on the HST during an extravehicular activity (EVA), also called an astronaut space walk, during the first servicing mission (SM1) in December 1993. An on-orbit photograph of the HST with the SA-11, and a close up of the bellows-like structure of the thermal shields is provided in Figure 1.

  5. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Pathfinder status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Booth, Andrew; Whitman, Tony

    2014-08-01

    A JWST OTE Pathfinder telescope that includes two spare primary mirror segments, a spare secondary mirror, and a large composite structure with a deployed secondary support structure is in the assembly stage and will be fully completed this year. This Pathfinder will check out key steps in the ambient mirror integration process and also be used at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to check out the optical Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and associated procedures that will be used to test the full JWST telescope and instruments at JSC. This paper will summarize the Pathfinder integration and testing flow, the critical Ground Support Equipment it will test and the key tests planned with the Pathfinder.

  6. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  7. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TcV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a Galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  8. Demonstration of the James Webb Space Telescope commissioning on the JWST testbed telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, D. Scott; Towell, Timothy; Schwenker, John; Swensen, John; Shields, Duncan; Sabatke, Erin; Klingemann, Lana; Contos, Adam R.; Bauer, Brian; Hansen, Karl; Atcheson, Paul D.; Redding, David; Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott; Dean, Bruce; Burns, Laura

    2006-06-01

    The one-meter Testbed Telescope (TBT) has been developed at Ball Aerospace to facilitate the design and implementation of the wavefront sensing and control (WFS&C) capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The TBT is used to develop and verify the WFS&C algorithms, check the communication interfaces, validate the WFS&C optical components and actuators, and provide risk reduction opportunities for test approaches for later full-scale cryogenic vacuum testing of the observatory. In addition, the TBT provides a vital opportunity to demonstrate the entire WFS&C commissioning process. This paper describes recent WFS&C commissioning experiments that have been performed on the TBT.

  9. The Space Surveillance Telescope: Focus and Alignment of a Three Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D.; Shah, R.; Johnson, J.; Szabo, A.; Pearce, E.; Lambour, R.; Faccenda, W.

    2012-09-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) is a DARPA-funded technology initiative to dramatically increase sensitivity to microsatellites at the geosynchronous belt and to improve cataloging of the deep space resident space object (RSO) population. The SST achieves increased sensitivity to faint objects and rapid search capabilities by combining a large 3.5-meter aperture Mersenne-Schmidt telescope design and a highly sensitive curved mosaic focal surface CCD camera. While the unique system design is advantageous for space surveillance capabilities, it presents a challenge to alignment due to an inherently small depth of focus and the additional degrees of freedom introduced with a powered tertiary mirror. This paper will provide a brief overview of the SST, discuss the methodology for achieving and maintaining focus and alignment of the system across a range of temperature and elevation conditions, and present recent results of the system alignment performance. This work is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government. Distribution Statement A: Distribution is Unlimited

  10. EMC Test Challenges for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  11. EMC Test Challenges for NASAs James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  12. Hubble space telescope six-battery test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajak, J. A.; Bush, J. R., Jr.; Lanier, J. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A test bed for a large space power system breadboard for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed and built to test the system under simulated orbital conditions. A discussion of the data acquisition and control subsystems designed to provide for continuous 24 hr per day operation and a general overview of the test bed is presented. The data acquisition and control subsystems provided the necessary monitoring and protection to assure safe shutdown with protection of test articles in case of loss of power or equipment failure over the life of the test (up to 5 years).

  13. Analysis of Retrieved Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Triolo, Jack J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the nearly seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Astronaut observations and photographs from the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP, the outer-layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. Also, the emissivity of the bonded metallized Teflon FEP radiator surfaces of the telescope has increased over time. Samples of the top layer of the MLI and radiator material were retrieved during SM2, and a thorough investigation into the de-radiation followed in order to determine the primary cause of the damage. Mapping of the cracks on HST and the ground testing showed that thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation are necessary to cause the observed embrittlement. Further, strong, evidence was found indicating that chain scission (reduced molecular weight) is the dominant form of damage to the metallized Teflon FEP.

  14. eta Carinae: Testing a Binary Orbit Model with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph.

    PubMed

    Davidson; Ishibashi; Gull; Humphreys; Smith

    2000-02-20

    Ground-based spectroscopy of eta Car shows periodic changes in some emission-line wavelengths. These variations have been cited as strong evidence that this object is a 5.5 yr binary system and have been used to produce specific orbit models. High spatial resolution data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, however, do not confirm the predicted velocity behavior; therefore, the published orbit models are almost certainly invalid. Wavelength fluctuations seen at ground-based spatial resolution most likely result from other effects, which we describe. If this object is a binary system (which has not been proven), then the parameters of the secondary star and of the orbit remain largely unknown.

  15. Zero CTE Glass in the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2008-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the Earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies fainter than 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 13.7 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are "standard candles," astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion. The Hubble Space Telescope is a two-mirror Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 2.4m aperture in low earth orbit. The mirrors are made of Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) glass by Corning Glass Works. This material allows rapid figuring and outstanding performance in space astronomy applications. The paper describes how the primary mirror was mis-figured in manufacturing and later corrected in orbit. Outstanding astronomical images taken over the last 17 years show how the application of this new technology has advanced our knowledge of the universe. Not only has the acceleration of the expansion been discovered, the excellent imaging capability of HST has allowed gravitational lensing to become a tool to study the distribution of dark matter and dark energy in distant clusters of galaxies. The HST has touched practically every field of astronomy enabling astronomers to solve many long-standing puzzles. It will be a long time until the end of the universe when the density is near zero and all of the stars have long since evaporated. It is remarkable that humankind has found the technology and developed the ability to interpret the measurements in order to understand this dramatic age we live in.

  16. Innovative research in the design and operation of large telescopes for space: Aspects of giant telescopes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The capability and understanding of how to finish the reflector surfaces needed for large space telescopes is discussed. The technology for making very light glass substrates for mirrors is described. Other areas of development are in wide field imaging design for very fast primaries, in data analysis and retrieval methods for astronomical images, and in methods for making large area closely packed mosaics of solid state array detectors.

  17. THE Pa{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF H II REGIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES FROM HST/NICMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Schinnerer, Eva; Sofue, Yoshiaki; Komugi, Shinya; Egusa, Fumi; Scoville, Nicholas Z.

    2013-07-20

    The H II region luminosity function (LF) is an important tool for deriving the birthrates and mass distribution of OB associations and is an excellent tracer of the newly formed massive stars and associations. To date, extensive work (predominantly in H{alpha}) has been done from the ground, which is hindered by dust extinction and the severe blending of adjacent (spatially or in projection) H II regions. Reliably measuring the properties of H II regions requires a linear resolution <40 pc, but analyses satisfying this requirement have been done only in a handful of galaxies, so far. As the first space-based work using a galaxy sample, we have selected 12 galaxies from our HST/NICMOS Pa{alpha} survey and studied the LF and size distribution of H II regions both in individual galaxies and cumulatively, using a virtually extinction-free tracer of the ionizing photon rate. The high angular resolution and low sensitivity to diffuse emission of NICMOS also offer an advantage over ground-based imaging by enabling a higher degree of de-blending of the H II regions. We do not confirm the broken power-law LFs found in ground-based studies. Instead, we find that the LFs, both individual and co-added, follow a single power law dN(L)/dln L{proportional_to}L {sup -1}, are consistent with the mass function of star clusters in nearby galaxies, and are in agreement with the results of the existing analyses with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. The individual and co-added size distributions of H II regions are both roughly consistent with dN(D)/dln D{proportional_to}D {sup -3}, but the power-law scaling is probably contaminated by blended regions or complexes.

  18. Herschel Space Observatory Telescope characterization with Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovillaire, Guillaume; Wang, Yong; Toth, Rémy; Porcar-Guézénec, Raphael

    2012-09-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory Telescope is the first of its kind to cover the 60-670 μm far infrared spectral band. Its optical characterization, performed in the visible range, was a true technological challenge requiring very large dynamic range coupled to very high accuracy. A specific Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (HWFS) was designed to meet the demanding specifications of the measurement. The metrological system used by the EADS Astrium team to characterize the silicon car-bide based telescope will be presented as well as the main features of the specifically developed HWFS. The large expected wavefront error was measured in a double path set-up using the HWFS positioned in an extra-focal plane and a point source in the focal plane. The auto-collimation was carried out thanks to several liquid mirrors covering the M1 pupil plane and located in the conjugation plane of the HWFS sub-apertures. The results on the wavefront error obtained at the Centre Spatial de Liege (CSL) in Belgium will be shown as well as the simulated Point Spread Function to be compared to the real PSF obtained during on flight measurements. The thermally induced focal length variations are also presented as the telescope is meant to operate at 70°K in space.

  19. Solar System Observations with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, Heidi B.; Lunine, J.; Sonneborn, G.; Rieke, G.; Rieke, M.; Stansberry, J.; Schaller, E.; Orton, G.; Isaacs, J.

    2010-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is a large infrared space telescope currently scheduled for launch in 2014. Webb will reside in a elliptical orbit about the semi-stable second Lagrange point (L2). Its 6.5-meter primary mirror is designed to work primarily in the infrared, with some capability in the visible (i.e., from 0.6 to 27 microns). Webb has four science instruments: the Near InfraRed Camera (NIRCam), the Near InfraRed Spectrograph (NIRSpec), the Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI), and the Fine Guidance Sensor Tunable Filter Camera (FGS-TFI). One of Webb's science themes is "Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life" which includes observations of Solar System objects; the telescope will be able to track moving targets with rates up to 0.030 arcseconds per second. Its combination of broad wavelength range, high sensitivity, and near-diffraction limited imaging around 2 microns make it a superb facility for a variety of Solar System programs. In this poster, we present an overview of Webb's scientific capabilities and their relevance to current topics in planetary science.

  20. Asteroid Detection Results Using the Space Surveillance Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, Jessica D.; Ushomirsky, Gregory; Woods, Deborah F.; Viggh, Herbert E. M.; Varey, Jacob; Cornell, Mark E.; Stokes, Grant

    2015-11-01

    From 1998-2013, MIT Lincoln Laboratory operated a highly successful near-Earth asteroid search program using two 1-m optical telescopes located at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Experimental Test Site (ETS) in Socorro, N.M. In 2014, the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) program successfully transitioned operations from the two 1-m telescopes to the 3.5-m Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) located at Atom Site on White Sands Missile Range, N.M. This paper provides a summary of first-year performance and results for the LINEAR program with SST and provides an update on recent improvements to the moving-object pipeline architecture that increase utility of SST data for NEO discovery and improve sensitivity to fast-moving objects. Ruprecht et al. (2014) made predictions for SST NEO search productivity as a function of population model. This paper assesses the NEO search performance of SST in the first 1.5 years of operation and compares results to model predictions.This work is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. The views, opinions, and/or findings contained in this article/presentation are those of the authors / presenters and should not be interpreted as representing the official views or policies of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited.

  1. Asteroid Detection Results Using the Space Surveillance Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, J.; Ushomirsky, G.; Woods, D.; Viggh, H.; Varey, J.; Cornell, M.; Stokes, G.

    From 1998-2013, MIT Lincoln Laboratory operated a highly successful near-Earth asteroid search program using two 1-m optical telescopes located at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Experimental Test Site (ETS) in Socorro, N.M. In 2014, the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) program successfully transitioned operations from the two 1-m telescopes to the 3.5-m Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) located at Atom Site on White Sands Missile Range, N.M. This paper provides a summary of first-year performance and results for the LINEAR program with SST and provides an update on recent improvements to the moving-object pipeline architecture that increase utility of SST data for NEO discovery and improve sensitivity to fast-moving objects. Ruprecht et al. (2014) made predictions for SST NEO search productivity as a function of population model. This paper assesses the NEO search performance of SST in the first 1.5 years of operation and compares results to model predictions. This work is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. The views, opinions, and/or findings contained in this article/presentation are those of the authors / presenters and should not be interpreted as representing the official views or policies of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited.

  2. The Potential of Small Space Telescopes for Exoplanet Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    The imaging of faint exoplanets near bright stars requires the development of very high contrast detection techniques, including both precise wavefront control and deep starlight rejection. A system-level proof-of-principle experiment carried out at at the Palomar Observatory has recently demonstrated that exoplanets can be detected very near stars even with a fairly small (1.5 m diameter) telescope aperture, such as someday might be used by a first space-based exoplanet imaging mission. Using fine-scale wavefront correction across this small aperture, together with fine pointing and focus control, pre- and post-detection speckle reduction, and a vector vortex coronagraph, it has been possible to achieve extremely good starlight rejection within a small number of diffractions beams of the stellar position. This performance has recently allowed the imaging of the three HR8799 planets and the HD32297 disk, thus providing a first system-level validation of the steps needed to achieve high-contrast observations at very small angles. These results thus serve to highlight the potential of small space telescopes aiming at high-contrast exoplanet observations. Specifically, a small-angle coronagraph enables the use of smaller telescopes, thus potentially reducing mission cost significantly.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope fine-guidance-sensor transfer function and its impact on telescope alignment and guidance.

    PubMed

    Ftaclas, C; Basedow, R; Nonnenmacher, A; Weindling, F; Story, D; Nelan, E

    1993-04-01

    We describe the use of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor transfer scans to characterize telescope alignment. To accomplish this we developed a software system to extract the aberration content from the observed transfer scans. The transfer scans show large aberration levels that do not originate in the telescope. The appearance of significant coma in the transfer scans has been identified as resulting from the shearing of spherical aberration caused by a beam misalignment within the Fine Guidance Sensors themselves.

  4. A tunable crystal diffraction telescope for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonBallmoos, P.; Kohnle, A.; Olive, J. F.; Vedrenne, G.; Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Graber, T.

    1996-01-01

    A focusing gamma ray telescope is proposed for use onboard the International Space Station. It consists of a tunable crystal diffraction lens which focuses gamma rays onto a small array of germanium detectors located on an extendable boom. While the weight of such an instrument is less than 500 kg, it features an angular resolution of 15 arcsec, an energy resolution of 2 keV and a 3 sigma sensitivity of the order of 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm sec for any individual narrow line at energies of between 200 and 1300 keV. The scientific potential of such a telescope is discussed. The principles of a diffraction lens and a tunable diffraction lens are described.

  5. CFRP composite thin-shelled mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Chen, Peter C.

    2002-12-01

    The need for extremely large aperture telescopes drives the requirement for new materials and novel approaches to mirror production. Many lightweight mirror concepts are currently being persued, some with promise for extending their ability to facilitate 100-meter and larger space telescope primaries. These concepts include some rather unorthodox materials in unique configurations. Past experience in producing extremely thin CFRP composite mirrors, using unidirectional CFRP prepreg tape, has led us to a more novel CFPR material, which could further reduce the mass and cost of their predecessors. We present a carbon-based, ultra-lightweight fleece material, which have been shown to exhibit high specularity and extremely low areal density, 200 grams/m2, at 2-plies, in contrast to more typical unidirectional CFPR material.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope: the new telemetry archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Manfred P.

    2000-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the first of NASA's Great Observatories, was launched on April 24, 1990. The HST was designed for a minimum fifteen-year mission with on-orbit servicing by the Space Shuttle System planned at approximately three-year intervals. Major changes to the HST ground system have been implemented for the third servicing mission in December 1999. The primary objectives of the ground system re- engineering effort, a project called 'Vision 2000 Control Center System (CCS),' are to reduce both development and operating costs significantly for the remaining years of HST's lifetime. Development costs are reduced by providing a more modern hardware and software architecture and utilizing commercial off the shelf (COTS) products wherever possible. Part of CCS is a Space Telescope Engineering Data Store, the design of which is based on current Data Warehouse technology. The Data Warehouse (Red Brick), as implemented in the CCS Ground System that operates and monitors the Hubble Space Telescope, represents the first use of a commercial Data Warehouse to manage engineering data. The purpose of this data store is to provide a common data source of telemetry data for all HST subsystems. This data store will become the engineering data archive and will provide a queryable database for the user to analyze HST telemetry. The access to the engineering data in the Data Warehouse is platform-independent from an office environment using commercial standards (Unix, Windows98/NT). The latest Internet technology is used to reach the HST engineering community. A WEB-based user interface allows easy access to the data archives. This paper will provide a CCS system overview and will illustrate some of the CCS telemetry capabilities: in particular the use of the new Telemetry Archiving System. Vision 20001 is an ambitious project, but one that is well under way. It will allow the HST program to realize reduced operations costs for the Third Servicing Mission and

  7. Feasibility of utilizing Cherenkov Telescope Array gamma-ray telescopes as free-space optical communication ground stations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Cabrero, Juan Francisco

    2013-04-10

    The signals that will be received on Earth from deep-space probes in future implementations of free-space optical communication will be extremely weak, and new ground stations will have to be developed in order to support these links. This paper addresses the feasibility of using the technology developed in the gamma-ray telescopes that will make up the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory in the implementation of a new kind of ground station. Among the main advantages that these telescopes provide are the much larger apertures needed to overcome the power limitation that ground-based gamma-ray astronomy and optical communication both have. Also, the large number of big telescopes that will be built for CTA will make it possible to reduce costs by economy-scale production, enabling optical communications in the large telescopes that will be needed for future deep-space links.

  8. The James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhouse, M. A.; Boyce, L. A.; Glazer, S. D.; Johnson, E. L.; McCloskey, J. C.; Sullivan, P. C.; Voyton, M. F.

    2005-12-01

    In this poster, we describe the major design features of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). The JWST mission is under development by NASA in partnership with the European and Canadian Space Agencies for launch during 2013. The JWST is designed to enable a five year science mission that is focused on four themes: [1] observation of the first luminous objects after the Big Bang, [2] the assembly of these objects into galaxies, [3] the birth of stars and planetary systems, and [4] the formation of planets and the origins of life. The above science themes require high sensitivity and HST-like angular resolution over the near- to mid-infrared spectrum. A 40 K cryogenic radiatively cooled telescope with a 25 m2 collecting area was selected to meet these requirments. A mission architecture involving a Lissajous orbit about the Earth-Sun L2 point was chosen to meet optical stability and data downlink requirments. A modular flight segment architecture was selected to enable incremental integration and test of the cryogenic payload. The ISIM is one key feature of this modular architecture that enables a feasible cryogenic test program. The ISIM element is the science instrument payload of the observatory. It contains 70 million infrared detector pixels allocated among four science instrument systems and a fine guidance sensor system. Brief instrument descriptions are available at: www.stsci.edu/jwst/docs/flyers. The ISIM also contains a passive 40 K thermal control system, a 6 K cryo-cooler system, a command and data handling system, a flight software system, and an optical metering structure system. The ISIM element is responsible for acquisition of the JWST science data, fine guidance data for telescope pointing control, and wavefront sensing data for in-flight adjustment of the telescope optics. Further information about the JWST mission is available at: www.jwst.nasa.gov.

  9. Applying artificial intelligence to the control of space telescopes (extended abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Swanson, Keith; Bresina, John; Philips, Andrew; Levinson, Rich

    1992-01-01

    The field of astronomy has recently benefited from the availability of space telescopes. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), for instance, despite its problems, provides a unique and valuable view of the universe. However, unlike HST, a telescope need not be in low Earth orbit to escape our thickening atmosphere: it is currently technologically feasible to put a telescope on the moon, and there are excellent reasons for doing this. Either in low Earth orbit or on the moon, a space telescope represents an expensive and sought-after resource. Thus, the planning, scheduling, and control of these telescopes is an important problem that must be seriously studied.

  10. Meteoroid and space debris impacts in grazing-incidence telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. D.; Wells, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Ambrosi, R. M.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Micrometeoroid or space debris impacts have been observed in the focal planes of the XMM-Newton and Swift-XRT (X-ray Telescope) X-ray observatories. These impacts have resulted in damage to, and in one case the failure of, focal-plane Charge-Coupled Device (CCDs) detectors. Aims: We aim to quantify the future risks of focal-plane impacts in present and future X-ray observatories. Methods: We present a simple model for the propagation of micrometeoroids and space debris particles into telescopes with grazing-incidence X-ray optics, which is based on the results of previous investigations into grazing-incidence hypervelocity impacts by microscopic particles. We then calculate micrometeoroid and space debris fluxes using the Micrometeoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference model (MASTER2005). The risks of future focal-plane impact events in three present (Swift-XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra) and two future (SIMBOL-X and XEUS) X-ray observatories are then estimated on the basis of the calculated fluxes and the model for particle propagation. Results: The probabilities of at least one impact occurring in the Swift-XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra focal planes, in a one year period from the time of writing in November 2007 are calculated to be ~5% and ~50% and ~3%. First-order predictions of the impact rates expected for the future SIMBOL-X and XEUS X-ray observatories yield probabilities for at least one focal-plane impact, during nominal 5-year missions, of more than 94% and 99%, respectively. Conclusions: The propagation of micrometeoroids and space debris particles into the focal planes of X-ray telescopes is highest for Wolter optics with the largest collecting areas and the lowest grazing angles. Telescopes in low-Earth orbits encounter enhanced particle fluxes compared with those in higher orbits and a pointing avoidance strategy for certain directions can reduce the risk of impacts. Future X-ray observatories, with large collecting areas and

  11. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Anderson, B. Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bartelt, J.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bederede, D.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bisello, D.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy {gamma}-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure

  12. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror.

  13. Search Space Characterization for a Telescope Scheduling Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John; Drummond, Mark; Swanson, Keith; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for statistically characterizing a search space and demonstrates the use of this technique within a practical telescope scheduling application. The characterization provides the following: (i) an estimate of the search space size, (ii) a scaling technique for multi-attribute objective functions and search heuristics, (iii) a "quality density function" for schedules in a search space, (iv) a measure of a scheduler's performance, and (v) support for constructing and tuning search heuristics. This paper describes the random sampling algorithm used to construct this characterization and explains how it can be used to produce this information. As an example, we include a comparative analysis of an heuristic dispatch scheduler and a look-ahead scheduler that performs greedy search.

  14. Eyes on the Universe: The Legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope and Looking to the Future with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. Most recently, the complete refurbishment of Hubble in 2009 has given new life to the telescope and the new science instruments have already produced groundbreaking science results, revealing some of the most distant galaxy candidates ever discovered. Despite the remarkable advances in astrophysics that Hubble has provided, the new questions that have arisen demand a new space telescope with new technologies and capabilities. I will present the exciting new technology development and science goals of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which is currently being built and tested and will be launched this decade.

  15. Surveying the Inner Solar System with an Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Reitsema, Harold J.; Linfield, Roger P.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of surveying the inner solar system for objects that may pose some threat to Earth. Most of the analysis is based on understanding the capability provided by Sentinel, a concept for an infrared space-based telescope placed in a heliocentric orbit near the distance of Venus. From this analysis, we show that (1) the size range being targeted can affect the survey design, (2) the orbit distribution of the target sample can affect the survey design, (3) minimum observational arc length during the survey is an important metric of survey performance, and (4) surveys must consider objects as small as D=15{--}30 m to meet the goal of identifying objects that have the potential to cause damage on Earth in the next 100 yr. Sentinel will be able to find 50% of all impactors larger than 40 m in a 6.5 yr survey. The Sentinel mission concept is shown to be as effective as any survey in finding objects bigger than D = 140 m but is more effective when applied to finding smaller objects on Earth-impacting orbits. Sentinel is also more effective at finding objects of interest for human exploration that benefit from lower propulsion requirements. To explore the interaction between space and ground search programs, we also study a case where Sentinel is combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and show the benefit of placing a space-based observatory in an orbit that reduces the overlap in search regions with a ground-based telescope. In this case, Sentinel+LSST can find more than 70% of the impactors larger than 40 m assuming a 6.5 yr lifetime for Sentinel and 10 yr for LSST.

  16. Hubble space telescope calspec flux standards: Sirius (and Vega)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has measured the flux for Sirius from 0.17 to 1.01 μm on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) White Dwarf scale. Because of the cool debris disk around Vega, Sirius is commonly recommended as the primary IR flux standard. The measured STIS flux agrees well with predictions of a special Kurucz model atmosphere, adding confidence to the modeled IR flux predictions. The IR flux agrees to 2%-3% with respect to the standard template of Cohen and to 2% with the Midcourse Space Experiment absolute flux measurements in the mid-IR. A weighted average of the independent visible and mid-IR absolute flux measures implies that the monochromatic flux at 5557.5 Å (5556 Å in air) for Sirius and Vega, respectively, is 1.35 × 10{sup –8} and 3.44 × 10{sup –9} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} Å{sup –1} with formal uncertainties of 0.5%. Contrary to previously published conclusions, the Hipparcos photometry offers no support for the variability of Vega. Pulse pileup severely affects the Hp photometry for the brightest stars.

  17. Structural Design Considerations for an 8-m Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R. Sr.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    NASA's upcoming ARES V launch vehicle, with its' immerse payload capacities (both volume and mass) has opened the possibilities for a whole new paradigm of space observatories. It becomes practical to consider a monolith mirror of sufficient size to permit significant scientific advantages, both in collection area and smoothness or figure at a reasonable price. The technologies and engineering to manufacture and test 8 meter class monoliths is mature, with nearly a dozen of such mirrors already in operation around the world. This paper will discuss the design requirements to adapt an 8m meniscus mirror into a Space Telescope System, both launch and operational considerations are included. With objects this massive and structurally sensitive, the mirror design must include all stages of the process. Based upon the experiences of the Hubble Space Telescope, testing and verification at both component and integrated system levels are considered vital to mission success. To this end, two different component level test methods for gravity sag (the so call zero- gravity simulation or test mount) are proposed, with one of these methods suitable for the full up system level testing as well.

  18. Astronomers Make First Images With Space Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    Marking an important new milestone in radio astronomy history, scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, have made the first images using a radio telescope antenna in space. The images, more than a million times more detailed than those produced by the human eye, used the new Japanese HALCA satellite, working in conjunction with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array (VLA) ground-based radio telescopes. The landmark images are the result of a long-term NRAO effort supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "This success means that our ability to make detailed radio images of objects in the universe is no longer limited by the size of the Earth," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "Astronomy's vision has just become much sharper." HALCA, launched on Feb. 11 by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), is the first satellite designed for radio astronomy imaging. It is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by NRAO; Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. On May 22, HALCA observed a distant active galaxy called PKS 1519-273, while the VLBA and VLA also observed it. Data from the satellite was received by a tracking station at the NRAO facility in Green Bank, West Virginia. Tape-recorded data from the satellite and from the radio telescopes on the ground were sent to NRAO's Array Operations Center (AOC) in Socorro, NM. In Socorro, astronomers and computer scientists used a special-purpose computer to digitally combine the signals from the satellite and the ground telescopes to make them all work together as a single, giant radio telescope. This dedicated machine, the VLBA Correlator, built as

  19. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Photometry of the Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Bolte, Michael; Bond, Howard E.; Hesser, James E.; Pryor, Carlton; Stetson, Peter B.

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of the acquisition and processing of a large body of imaging data for three fields in the globular cluster M4 taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis with the ALLFRAME package yielded the deepest photometry yet obtained for this cluster. The resulting data set for 4708 stars (positions and calibrated photometry in V, I, and, in two fields, U) spanning approximately six cluster core radii is presented. The scientific analysis is deferred to three companion papers, which investigate the significant white dwarf population discovered and the main-sequence population.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope NiH2 six battery test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Lanier, J. Roy

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the test are: (1) to get a better understanding of the operating characteristics of the NiH2 batteries in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electric Power Subsystem (EPS) by simulating every aspect of the expected operating environment; (2) to determine the optimum charge level and charge scheme for the NiH2 batteries in the HST EPS; (3) to predict the performance of the actual HST EPS; (4) to observe the aging characteristics of the batteries; and (5) to test different EPS anomalies before experiencing the anomalies on the actual HST.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Blanket Repair Design and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ousley, Wes; Skladany, Joseph; Dell, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Substantial damage to the outer layer of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) thermal blankets was observed during the February 1997 servicing mission. After six years in LEO, many areas of the aluminized Teflon(R) outer blanket layer had significant cracks, and some material was peeled away to expose inner layers to solar flux. After the mission, the failure mechanism was determined, and repair materials and priorities were selected for follow-on missions. This paper focuses on the thermal, mechanical, and EVA design requirements for the blanket repair, the creative solutions developed for these unique problems, hardware development, and testing.

  2. Reflective correctors for the Hubble Space Telescope axial instruments.

    PubMed

    Bottema, M

    1993-04-01

    Reflective correctors to compensate the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope are placed in front of three of the axial scientific instruments (a camera and two spectrographs) during the first scheduled refurbishment mission. The five correctors required are deployed from a new module that replaces the fourth axial instrument. Each corrector consists of a field mirror and an aspherical, aberration-correcting reimaging mirror. In the camera the angular resolution capability is restored, be it in reduced fields, and in the spectrographs the potential for observations in crowded areas is regained along with effective light collection at the slits.

  3. The Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Catherine; Christian, Damian; Corbin, Michael; Donahue, Megan; Kimball, Tim; Levay, Karen; Padovani, Paolo; Postman, Marc; Smith, Myron; Thompson, Randy

    The Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) supports a variety of astronomical data archives, with its primary focus on NASA-supported mission data sets in the optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared. We present an overview of recent developments, in particular projects to provide enhanced scientific user support. These endeavors include the newly redesigned website, new data services including the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey, the Spectral/Imaging Scrapbook, an interactive web-based tool to produce customized spectral plots, and the new WFPC2 Pointings Table and search tool.

  4. An evaluation of reaction wheel emitted vibrations for space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Emitted forces and moments characteristics of the Space Telescope Reaction Wheel Assembly (ST RWA) were measured under room temperature and pressure, thermal extremes, and vibratory conditions. The RWA/Emitted Vibration Measurement Fixture was calibrated statically and dynamically, and background noise was measured with ST RWA not operating. A base line set of forces and moments of the ST RWA along and about three mutually perpendicular axes were recorded at room ambient. The temperature vibration sensitivites shown are those which were concluded to be a function of rotor unbalance changes and not associated with either spin motor nor rotor electronic changes.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope servicing - Experience base for a new era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, James C.; Brown, William W.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the conceptual evolution of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) maintenance methodology, and the belated recognition of its long-term support requirements, as well as measures conceived for the extension of this orbiting observatory's service life, and the prospective benefits derivable by comparable programs from HST experience. Attention is given to HST cost and capability tradeoffs, the maintenance concept's definition, the integrated logistic support planning instituted by the program and its failure-prediction methods, as well as the institutional support base employed.

  6. Moving Target Tracking for a Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope required a complex method for tracking targets in motion in the solar system, due mostly to atmospheric drag effects. A NGST in high earth orbit, or on the Moon, would not suffer these drag effects, thus mitigating the tracking problem. Many of the HST problems arise from the "open-loop" nature of the tracking method. An NGST would be better off if it could use "closed-loop" tracking of all targets, both fixed and moving. A method to accomplish this is proposed. Methods to reduce the jitter and lower the ambient temperature of the optics via a tethered optical system are proposed.

  7. Investigation of small solar system objects with the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1979-01-01

    The application of the space telescope (ST) to study small objects in the solar system in order to understand the birth and the early evolution of the solar system is discussed. The upper size limit of the small bodies is defined as approximately 5000 km and includes planetary satellites, planetary rings, asteroids, and comets.The use of the astronomical instruments aboard the ST, such as the faint object camera, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, to study the small solar system objects is discussed.

  8. Reflective correctors for the Hubble Space Telescope axial instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottema, Murk

    1993-01-01

    Reflective correctors to compensate the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope are placed in front of three of the axial scientific instruments (a camera and two spectrographs) during the first scheduled refurbishment mission. The five correctors required are deployed from a new module that replaces the fourth axial instrument. Each corrector consists of a field mirror and an aspherical, aberration-correcting reimaging mirror. In the camera the angular resolution capability is restored, be it in reduced fields, and in the spectrographs the potential for observations in crowded areas is regained along with effective light collection at the slits.

  9. The James Webb Space Telescope and its Detector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission, it's scientific goals, and how these drive detector systems technology. We describe the specific technologies that were developed (2.5 um and 5 um cutoff HgCdTe HAWAIIW2RG arrays for the 3 near-IR instruments, SIDECAR ASICs for the near-IR instruments, and Si:As arrays for the raid-IR instrument). We describe status in each of these areas with an emphasis on the performance of the flight detector systems themselves.

  10. Bimorph mirrors for adaptive optics in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaluf, D.; Bastaits, R.; Wang, K.; Horodinca, M.; Burda, I.; Martic, G.; Preumont, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses a concept of bimorph deformable mirror used in adaptive optics to compensate for manufacturing errors, gravity release and thermal distortion affecting large lightweight mirrors in space telescopes. The mirror consists of a single-crystal Silicon wafer (D=75 mm t=500μm) covered with an optical coating on the front side and an array of 25 independent PZT actuators acting in d31 mode on the back side. The mirror is mounted on an isostatic support with three linear PZT actuators controlling the rigid-body motion. The paper presents the experimental results obtained with this design and a new, more compact alternative.

  11. Expert systems tools for Hubble Space Telescope observation scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Glenn; Rosenthal, Don; Cohen, William; Johnston, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The utility of expert systems techniques for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) planning and scheduling is discussed and a plan for development of expert system tools which will augment the existing ground system is described. Additional capabilities provided by these tools will include graphics-oriented plan evaluation, long-range analysis of the observation pool, analysis of optimal scheduling time intervals, constructing sequences of spacecraft activities which minimize operational overhead, and optimization of linkages between observations. Initial prototyping of a scheduler used the Automated Reasoning Tool running on a LISP workstation.

  12. Primary mirror alignment and assembly for a multispectral space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Chen-Peng; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Huang, Po-Hsuan; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Chin, Chi-Chieh; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-10-01

    For a currently developing multispectral space Cassegrain telescope, the primary mirror with 450 mm clear aperture is made of Zerodur and lightweighted at a ratio about 50 % to meet both thermal and mass requirement. For this mirror, it is critical to reduce the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect, bonding process and the deformation from the mounting to the main structure of the telescope (main plate). In this article, the primary mirror alignment, MGSE, assembly process and the optical performance test for the primary mirror assembly are presented. The mechanical shim is the interface between the iso-static mount and main plate. It is used to compensate the manufacture errors of components and differences of local co-planarity errors to prevent the stress while iso-static mount (ISM) is screwed to main plate. After primary mirror assembly, an optical performance test method called bench test with novel algorithm is used to analyze the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect and the deformation from the mounting or supporter. In an effort to achieve the requirement for the tolerance in primary mirror assembly, the astigmatism caused from the gravity and deformation by the mounting force could be less than P-V 0.02λ at 633 nm. The consequence of these demonstrations indicates that the designed mechanical ground supported equipment (MGSE) for the alignment and assembly processes meet the critical requirements for primary mirror assembly of the telescope.

  13. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE (HST) IMAGERY OF THE 30 DORADUS NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the 30 Doradus Nebula show its remarkable cluster of tightly-packed young stars 160,000 light years from Earth in the large Magellanic cloud galaxy. Panel A is a portion of a image made with the HST Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC). WFPC photographed four adjoining sky regions simultaneously which are assembled in this mosaic. Panel B is an enlargement of the central portion of the HST image which was made in violet light. It shows the compact star cluster R136, which consists of very hot and massive young stars. The star images have bright cores that are only 0.1 arc seconds wide, allowing many more stars to be distinguished than in previous ground-based telescopic photos. Panel C is a photograph of the same region as Panel B, obtained with the Max Planck 2.2 meter telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. The star images are 0.6 arc seconds wide. Panel D shows how computer processing of the HST image in Panel B has sharpened its

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope optical systems failure report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The findings of the Hubble Space Telescope Optical Systems Board of Investigation are reported. The Board was formed to determine the cause of the flaw in the telescope, how it occurred, and why it was not detected before launch. The Board conducted its investigation to include interviews with personnel involved in the fabrication and test of the telescope, review of documentation, and analysis and test of the equipment used in the fabrication of the telescope's mirrors. The investigation proved that the primary mirror was made in the wrong shape (a 0.4-wave rms wavefront error at 632.8 nm). The primary mirror was manufactured by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation (Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc.). The critical optics used as a template in shaping the mirror, the reflective null corrector (RNC), consisted of two small mirrors and a lens. This unit had been preserved by the manufacturer exactly as it was during the manufacture of the mirror. When the Board measured the RNC, the lens was incorrectly spaced from the mirrors. Calculations of the effect of such displacement on the primary mirror show that the measured amount, 1.3 mm, accounts in detail for the amount and character of the observed image blurring. No verification of the reflective null corrector's dimensions was carried out by Perkin-Elmer after the original assembly. There were, however, clear indications of the problem from auxiliary optical tests made at the time. A special optical unit called an inverse null corrector, designed to mimic the reflection from a perfect primary mirror, was built and used to align the apparatus; when so used, it clearly showed the error in the reflective null corrector. A second null corrector was used to measure the vertex radius of the finished primary mirror. It, too, clearly showed the error in the primary mirror. Both indicators of error were discounted at the time as being themselves flawed. The Perkin-Elmer plan for fabricating the primary mirror placed complete

  15. James Webb Space Telescope: The First Light Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    NASA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will search for the first luminous objects of the Universe to help answer fundamental questions about how the Universe came to look like it does today. At 6.5 meters in diameter, JWST will be the world's largest space telescope. Its architecture, e.g. aperture, wavelength range and operating temperature, is driven by JWST's science objectives. Introduction: Scheduled to start its 5 year mission after 2018, JWST will study the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. Its science mission is to: Identify the first bright objects that formed in the early Universe, and follow the ionization history. Determine how galaxies form. Determine how galaxies and dark matter, including gas, stars, metals, overall morphology and active nuclei evolved to the present day. Observe the birth and early development of stars and the formation of planets. And, study the physical and chemical properties of solar systems for the building blocks of Life. Principle: To accomplish the JWST science objectives requires a larger aperture infrared cryogenic space telescope. A large aperture is required because the objects are very faint. The infrared spectral range is required because the objects are so far away that their ultraviolet and visible wavelength spectral lines are red-shifted into the infrared. Because the telescope is infrared, it needs to be cryogenic. And, because of the telescope is infrared, it must operate above the Earth's atmosphere, i.e. in space. JWST is probably the single most complicated mission that humanity has attempted. It is certainly the most difficult optical fabrication and testing challenge of our generation. The JWST 6.5 m diameter primary mirror is nearly a parabola with a conic constant of -0.9967 and radius of curvature at 30K of 15.880 m. The primary mirror is divided into 18 segments with 3 different prescriptions; each with its own off-axis distance and aspheric departure. The radius of curvature

  16. Developing Astrometric Drift Scans for the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Sean J.; Ingalls, J.; Stauffer, J. R.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are currently developing and optimizing a new observing mode using the IRAC instrument on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The new method which uses a constant rate drift scan while the instrument collects data is based on the successful HST drift scan method for producing high astrometric precision (20 micro-arcsecond) parallaxes to improve the cosmological distance scale. The HST experience indicates that a factor of 10 improvement in astrometric precision is possible. Currently Spitzer astrometric precision is of order 20-40 milli-arcseconds per epoch. Increasing the precision by even a factor of three greatly facilitates studies of nearby brown dwarfs and increases our ability to measure parallaxes to these intrinsically faint and cool sources out to ~30 parsecs. Initial tests of the method with observations of NGC 2516 at 3.6 and 4.5 microns have shown that useful data are taken in drift scan mode and the scans are in the specified direction and rate. We have developed a tool to measure source centroids in the stacks of images taken while scanning. The tool groups the centroids into tracklets which can then be simultaneously fit to remove telescope jitter and instrumental distortion. We present our latest results in the analysis of this mode and the prospects for the scientific exploitation of this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  17. Titan Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Ádámkovics, Máté; Bézard, Bruno; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Cornet, Thomas; Hayes, Alexander G.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lemmon, Mark T.; López-Puertas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; West, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018, is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) but with a significantly larger aperture (6.5 m) and advanced instrumentation focusing on infrared science (0.6-28.0 μm). In this paper, we examine the potential for scientific investigation of Titan using JWST, primarily with three of the four instruments: NIRSpec, NIRCam, and MIRI, noting that science with NIRISS will be complementary. Five core scientific themes are identified: (1) surface (2) tropospheric clouds (3) tropospheric gases (4) stratospheric composition, and (5) stratospheric hazes. We discuss each theme in depth, including the scientific purpose, capabilities, and limitations of the instrument suite and suggested observing schemes. We pay particular attention to saturation, which is a problem for all three instruments, but may be alleviated for NIRCam through use of selecting small sub-arrays of the detectors—sufficient to encompass Titan, but with significantly faster readout times. We find that JWST has very significant potential for advancing Titan science, with a spectral resolution exceeding the Cassini instrument suite at near-infrared wavelengths and a spatial resolution exceeding HST at the same wavelengths. In particular, JWST will be valuable for time-domain monitoring of Titan, given a five- to ten-year expected lifetime for the observatory, for example, monitoring the seasonal appearance of clouds. JWST observations in the post-Cassini period will complement those of other large facilities such as HST, ALMA, SOFIA, and next-generation ground-based telescopes (TMT, GMT, EELT).

  18. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold (<50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral fie ld units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's k ey science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and miss ion status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limite d down to a wavelength of 2 micron. The MIRI instrument just complete d its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  19. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold <50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral field units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's key science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and mission status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limited down to a wavelength of 2 microns. The MIRI instrument just completed its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  20. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) design and thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    The design and performance characteristics of an observatory are compared with those of a storage dewar. The critical design technologies required to increase cryogen dewar lifetime are discussed. In particular, outer shell temperature, vapor cooled shields, multilayer insulation performance, and tank support systems are analyzed to assess their impact on cryogen lifetime for both the observatory and the storage dewar. The cryogen lifetime and cryogen mass loss rate of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are compared with that of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite. A 0.1 percent mass loss per day of superfluid helium dewar can be designed using current state-of-the-art dewar technology. Space-based liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks can be designed for a 5-year lifetime.

  1. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2016-01-25

    We have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror features 44 actuators, has an aperture of 50 mm, and is designed to reproduce low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of μm. We assessed the space compliance by operating the mirror in thermal vacuum, and exposing it to random and sinusoidal vibrations, as well as to ionizing irradiation. Additionally, the operational life time and the laser power handling capability were tested. The mirror was successfully operated in thermal vacuum at 100 K. We report on the conducted tests and the methods used to evaluate the mirror's performance, and discuss the compliance with the demanded requirements.

  2. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  3. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  4. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROPHOTOMETRY AND MODELS FOR SOLAR ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2010-04-15

    Absolute flux distributions for seven solar analog stars are measured from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m by Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrophotometry. In order to predict the longer wavelength mid-IR fluxes that are required for James Webb Space Telescope calibration, the HST spectral energy distributions are fit with Castelli and Kurucz model atmospheres; and the results are compared with fits from the MARCS model grid. The rms residuals in 10 broadband bins are all <0.5% for the best fits from both model grids. However, the fits differ systematically: the MARCS fits are 40-100 K hotter in T {sub eff}, 0.25-0.80 higher in log g, 0.01-0.10 higher in log z, and 0.008-0.021 higher in the reddening E(B - V), probably because their specifications include different metal abundances. Despite these differences in the parameters of the fits, the predicted mid-IR fluxes differ by only {approx}1%; and the modeled flux distributions of these G stars have an estimated ensemble accuracy of 2% out to 30 {mu}m.

  5. Imaging and Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2013. JWST will find the first stars and galaxies that formed in the early universe, connecting the Big Bang to our own Milky Way galaxy. JWST will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own Solar System. JWST's instruments are designed to work primarily in the infrared range of 1 - 28 microns, with some capability in the visible range. JWST will have a large mirror, 6.5 meters in diameter, and will be diffraction-limited at 2 microns (0.1 arcsec resolution). JWST will be placed in an L2 orbit about 1.5 million km from the Earth. The instruments will provide imaging, coronography, and multi-object and integral-field spectroscopy across the full 1 - 28 micron wavelength range. The breakthrough capabilities of JWST will enable new studies of star formation and evolution in the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, and the early universe.

  6. Wavefront Control Toolbox for James Webb Space Telescope Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Ron; Aronstein, David L.; Smith, Jeffery Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Sabatke, Erin

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Matlab toolbox for wavefront control of optical systems. We have applied this toolbox to the optical models of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in general and to the JWST Testbed Telescope (TBT) in particular, implementing both unconstrained and constrained wavefront optimization to correct for possible misalignments present on the segmented primary mirror or the monolithic secondary mirror. The optical models implemented in Zemax optical design program and information is exchanged between Matlab and Zemax via the Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) interface. The model configuration is managed using the XML protocol. The optimization algorithm uses influence functions for each adjustable degree of freedom of the optical mode. The iterative and non-iterative algorithms have been developed to converge to a local minimum of the root-mean-square (rms) of wavefront error using singular value decomposition technique of the control matrix of influence functions. The toolkit is highly modular and allows the user to choose control strategies for the degrees of freedom to be adjusted on a given iteration and wavefront convergence criterion. As the influence functions are nonlinear over the control parameter space, the toolkit also allows for trade-offs between frequency of updating the local influence functions and execution speed. The functionality of the toolbox and the validity of the underlying algorithms have been verified through extensive simulations.

  7. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Co-Investigator Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, Donna

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this contract has been to support investigation of astronomical problems primarily using data from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a Co-investigator on STIS, I participated in several projects, which will be described below. The research resulted in 19 papers in refereed journals, 8 papers published in conference proceedings, and 27 papers presented at meetings. There are still at least four papers submitted or in press, as well as some additional research yet to be written up for publication. The research has also produced one master's thesis and two PhD dissertations currently underway, with one to be completed Spring 2003. Undergraduates have participated in the analysis of supporting observations. One student has published some of his results in a web- based refereed publication for undergraduate research (www.jyi.org). I have given several talks to the general public describing results from the HST as well as the results of my research. I have been named the UNLV Regents' Outstanding Faculty Member for 1995 and received the 2002 College of Science Distinguished Researcher's Award as a result of these activities.

  8. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 microns and 0.6 mag at 4.5 microns. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 microns) and W2 (4.6 microns) from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010-2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude approximately 0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude approximately 0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune's atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune's atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 micron filters.

  9. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  10. Europe's latest space telescope is off to a good start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    The world's most powerful observatory for X-ray astronomy, the European Space Agency's XMM satellite, set off into space from Kourou, French Guiana, at 15:32 Paris time on 10 December. The mighty Ariane 5 launcher, making its very first commercial launch, hurled the 3.9-tonne spacecraft into a far-ranging orbit. Within one hour of lift-off the European Space Operations Centre at Darmstadt, Germany, confirmed XMM was under control with electrical power available from the solar arrays. "XMM is the biggest and most innovative scientific spacecraft developed by ESA so far," said Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science. "The world's space agencies now want the new technology that ESA and Europe's industries have put into XMM's amazingly sensitive X-ray telescopes. And the world's astronomers are queuing up to use XMM to explore the hottest places in the universe. We must ask them to be patient while we get XMM fully commissioned." XMM's initial orbit carries it far into space, to 114,000 kilometres from the Earth at its most distant point. On its return the satellite's closest approach, or perigee, will be at 850 kilometres. The next phase of the operation, expected to take about a week, will raise that perigee to 7000 kilometres by repeated firing of XMM's own thrusters. The spacecraft will then be on its intended path, spending 40 hours out of every 48-hour orbit clear of the radiation belts which spoil the view of the X-ray universe. Technical commissioning and verification of the performance of the telescopes and scientific instruments will then follow. XMM should be fully operational for astronomy in the spring of 2000. All of ESA's science missions present fresh technological challenges to Europe's aerospace industries. In building XMM, the prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme in Friedrichshafen in Germany (part of DaimlerChrysler Aerospace) has led an industrial consortium involving 46 companies from 14 European countries and one in the United States. XMM

  11. Solar System Observing Capabilities With The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Milam, S. N.; Hines, D. C.; Stansberry, J. A.; Hammel, H. B.; Lunine, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide important new capabilities to study our Solar System. JWST is a large aperture, cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018 into a L2 orbit. Imaging, spectroscopy, and coronography covers 0.6-29 microns. Integral-field spectroscopy is performed with apertures 3 to 7 arcsec square (spatial slices of 0.1 to 0.6 arcsec). JWST is designed to observe Solar System objects having apparent rates of motion up to 0.030 arcseconds/second. This tracking capability includes the planets, satellites, asteroids, Trans-Neptunian Objects, and comets beyond Earth’s orbit. JWST will observe in the solar elongation range of 85 to 135 degrees, and a roll range of +/-5 degrees about the telescope’s optical axis. During an observation of a moving target, the science target is held fixed in the desired science aperture by controlling the guide star to follow the inverse of the target’s trajectory. The pointing control software uses polynomial ephemerides for the target generated using data from JPL’s HORIZON system. The JWST guider field of view (2.2x2.2 arcmin) is located in the telescope focal plane several arcmin from the science apertures. The instrument apertures are fixed with respect to the telescope focal plane. For targets near the ecliptic, those apertures also have a nearly fixed orientation relative to the ecliptic. This results from the fact that the Observatory's sunshield and solar panels must always be between the telescope and the Sun. On-board scripts autonomously control the execution of the JWST science timeline. The event-driven scripts respond to actual slew and on-board command execution, making operations more efficient. Visits are scheduled with overlapping windows to provide execution flexibility and to avoid lost time. An observing plan covering about ten days will be uplinked weekly. Updates could be more frequent if necessary (for example

  12. Solar System Observing Capabilities With The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Milam, S. N.; Hines, D. C.; Stansberry, J.; Hammel, H. B.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide breakthrough capabilities to study our Solar System. JWST is a large aperture, cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018 into a L2 orbit. Imaging, spectroscopy, and coronography covers 0.6-29 microns. JWST is designed to observe Solar System objects having apparent rates of motion up to 0.030 arcseconds/second. This capability includes the planets, satellites, asteroids, Trans-Neptunian Objects, and comets beyond Earth’s orbit. JWST can observe solar elongation of 85 to 135 degrees, and a roll range of +/-5 degrees about the telescope’s optical axis. During the observation of a moving target, the science target is held fixed in the desired science aperture by controlling the guide star to follow the inverse of the target’s trajectory. The pointing control software uses polynomial ephemerides for the target generated using JPL’s HORIZON system. The JWST guider field of view (2.2x2.2 arcmin) is located in the telescope focal plane several arcmin from the science apertures. The instrument apertures are fixed with respect to the telescope focal plane. For targets near the ecliptic, those apertures also have a nearly-fixed orientation relative to the ecliptic. This resultsfrom the fact that the Observatory's sun-shade and solar panels must always be between the telescope and the Sun. On-board scripts autonomously control the execution of the JWST science timeline. The event-driven scripts respond to actual slew and on-board command execution, making operations more efficient. Visits are scheduled with overlapping windows to provide execution flexibility and to avoid lost time. An observing plan covering about ten days will be uplinked weekly. Updates could be more frequent if necessary (for example, to accommodate a Target of Opportunity - TOO). The event-driven operations system supports time-critical observations and TOOs. The minimum response

  13. Spitzer Space Telescope Sequencing Operations Software, Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was launched in August, 2003, and renamed to the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2004. Two years of observing the universe in the wavelength range from 3 to 180 microns has yielded enormous scientific discoveries. Since this magnificent observatory has a limited lifetime, maximizing science viewing efficiency (ie, maximizing time spent executing activities directly related to science observations) was the key operational objective. The strategy employed for maximizing science viewing efficiency was to optimize spacecraft flexibility, adaptability, and use of observation time. The selected approach involved implementation of a multi-engine sequencing architecture coupled with nondeterministic spacecraft and science execution times. This approach, though effective, added much complexity to uplink operations and sequence development. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) manages Spitzer s operations. As part of the uplink process, Spitzer s Mission Sequence Team (MST) was tasked with processing observatory inputs from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) into efficiently integrated, constraint-checked, and modeled review and command products which accommodated the complexity of non-deterministic spacecraft and science event executions without increasing operations costs. The MST developed processes, scripts, and participated in the adaptation of multi-mission core software to enable rapid processing of complex sequences. The MST was also tasked with developing a Downlink Keyword File (DKF) which could instruct Deep Space Network (DSN) stations on how and when to configure themselves to receive Spitzer science data. As MST and uplink operations developed, important lessons were learned that should be applied to future missions, especially those missions which employ command-intensive operations via a multi-engine sequence architecture.

  14. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION OF THE IRAC INSTRUMENT ON THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE USING HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FLUX STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Deustua, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Flanagan, K.; Kalirai, J.; Meixner, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Engelbracht, C.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ardila, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.

    2011-05-15

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al., i.e., in agreement within their estimated errors of {approx}2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the spectral energy distributions of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 {mu}m band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. are about 1.5% {+-} 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 {mu}m result.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Lauer, Tod R.; Postman, Marc; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.

    2003-02-01

    We used the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to obtain I-band images of the centers of 81 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), drawn from a volume-limited sample of nearby BCGs. The images show a rich variety of morphological features, including multiple or double nuclei, dust, stellar disks, point-source nuclei, and central surface brightness depressions. High-resolution surface brightness profiles could be inferred for 60 galaxies. Of those, 88% have well-resolved cores. The relationship between core size and galaxy luminosity for BCGs is indistinguishable from that of Faber et al. (published in 1997, hereafter F97) for galaxies within the same luminosity range. However, the core sizes of the most luminous BCGs fall below the extrapolation of the F97 relationship rb~L1.15V. A shallower relationship, rb~L0.72V, fits both the BCGs and the core galaxies presented in F97. Twelve percent of the BCG sample lacks a well-resolved core; all but one of these BCGs have ``power law'' profiles. Some of these galaxies have higher luminosities than any power-law galaxy identified by F97 and have physical upper limits on rb well below the values observed for core galaxies of the same luminosity. These results support the idea that the central structure of early-type galaxies is bimodal in its physical properties but also suggest that there exist high-luminosity galaxies with power-law profiles (or unusually small cores). The BCGs in the latter category tend to fall at the low end of the BCG luminosity function and tend to have low values of the quantity α (the logarithmic slope of the metric luminosity as a function of radius, at 10 kpc). Since theoretical calculations have shown that the luminosities and α-values of BCGs grow with time as a result of accretion, this suggests a scenario in which elliptical galaxies evolve from power-law profiles to core profiles through accretion and merging. This is consistent with theoretical scenarios that invoke the

  16. Request to Monitor EF Eri for Hubble Space Telescope Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2008-01-01

    Request to Monitor EF Eri for Hubble Space Telescope Observations January 6, 2008 Dr. Paula Szkody (University of Washington) has requested our help in monitoring the magnetic cataclysmic variable (intermediate polar) EF Eri for upcoming Hubble Space Telescope observations. Confirming observations are requested to ensure that EF Eri is fainter than the safe observing threshold during the HST observing window on 2008 January 17 UT. Time-resolved spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope will be used to investigate the physical origin of ultraviolet variability observed with the GALEX satellite in 2004 (also by Szkody et al). HST can only observe objects fainter than 14th magnitude due to the sensitivity of its instruments, and so observations of EF Eri can only be made if it is known that the star is fainter than those limits. AAVSO observers are asked to begin monitoring this star nightly beginning immediately, and to monitor this object intensely immediately prior to and during the observing window beginning 2008 January 17 01:30 UT and continuing th! rough the closing of the observing window at 2008 January 17 16:15 UT. Both positive and "fainter-than" observations are useful for this campaign. Visual observers are asked to report the faintest comparison star they can reliably detect, with the two nearby stars at m(V) = 14.5 and m(V) = 14.8 being ideal. CCD observers should observe such that they obtain a signal to noise of 10 in the faintest comparison star they can reliably detect in reasonable time. EF Eri is currently around m(V) = 18.1; if you are able to detect EF Eri with S/N of 10 in reasonable time using a CCD, please do so. Filtered CCD observations are not required, but please indicate which if any filters you are using when submitting observations. Please report all observations promptly via WebObs. Please note that EF Eri is approximately 20 arcseconds East of the m(V) = 14.8 comparison star, so please make sure you are measuring (and reporting

  17. NICMOS Calibration Challenges in the Ultra Deep Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of NICMOS observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field required unique reduction and calibration techniques, not required for images containing brighter sources. This paper describes some of these techniques which may be useful in the reduction of other fields containing extremely faint sources. These techniques apply to NICMOS camera 3 which was the only NICMOS camera utilized in the observations. The absolute accuracy of the NICMOS camera 3 photometry was also investigated using the observations of the solar analog star P330-E. As a result the sensitivity of the camera in the F110W and F160W was found to be less than the sensitivities used in the construction of the Version 2.0 NICMOS Treasury catalog for the observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The catalog fluxes are too low by between 8 and 9%.

  18. Lyot coronagraph design study for large, segmented space telescope apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Stark, Christopher C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Perrin, Marshall; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, Stuart; Carlotti, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Recent efforts combining the optimization techniques of apodized pupil Lyot coronagraphs (APLC) and shaped pupils have demonstrated the viability of a binary-transmission mask architecture for extremely high contrast (10-10) exoplanet imaging. We are now building on those innovations to carry out a survey of Lyot coronagraph performance for large, segmented telescope apertures. These apertures are of the same kind under considera- tion for NASA's Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) observatory concept. To map the multi-dimensional design parameter space, we have developed a software toolkit to manage large sets of mask optimization programs and execute them on a computing cluster. Here we summarize a preliminary survey of 500 APLC solutions for 4 reference hexagonal telescope apertures. Several promising designs produce annular, 10-10 contrast dark zones down to inner working angle 4λ0=D over a 15% bandpass, while delivering a half-max PSF core throughput of 18%. We also report our progress on devising solutions to the challenges of Lyot stop alignment/fabrication tolerance that arise in this contrast regime.

  19. Planet Diversity Yields with Space-based Direct Imaging Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Hébrard, Eric; Stark, Chris; Robinson, Tyler D.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; McElwain, Michael W.; Clampin, Mark; Meadows, Victoria; Arney, Giada; Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope Science Team, Exoplanet Climate Group

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, we will estimate the yield for a diversity of planets from future space-based flagship telescopes. We first divvy up planets into categories that are based on current observables, and that should impact the spectra we hope to observe in the future. The two main classification parameters we use here are the size of a planet and the energy flux into the planet's atmosphere. These two parameters are measureable or inferable from present-day observations, and should have a strong influence on future spectroscopy observations from JWST, WFIRST (with a coronagraph and/or starshade), and concept flagship missions that would fly some time after WFIRST. This allows us to calculate "ηplanet" values for each kind of planet. These η values then allow calculations of the expected yields from direct imaging missions, by leveraging the models and prior work by Stark and colleagues (2014, 2015). That work estimated the yields for potentially Earth-like worlds (i.e. of a size and stellar irradiation consistent with definitions of the habitable zone) for telescopes with a variety of observational parameters. We will do the same thing here, but for a wider variety of planets. This will allow us to discuss the implications of architecture and instrument properties on the diversity of worlds that future direct imaging missions would observe.

  20. Optical transmission for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Gallagher, Benjamin B.; Nickles, Neal; Copp, Tracy

    2012-09-01

    The fabrication and coating of the mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope has been completed. The spectral reflectivity of the protected gold coated beryllium mirrors has been measured. The predicted end-of-life transmission through the telescope builds from these values. The additional phenomena that have been analyzed are contamination effects and effects of the environment for the JWST operation about the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange libration point. The L2 environment analysis has been based on radiation testing of mirror samples and hypervelocity testing to assess the micrometeoroid impact effects. The mirror showed no change in reflectance over the VIS-SWIR wavelengths after exposure to 6-9 Grad (Si) that simulated 6 years orbiting the L2 Lagrange point. The effects of hypervelocity particle impacts on the mirrors from test data has been extrapolated to the to the anticipated flux characteristics for micrometeoroids at the L2 environment. The results show that the micrometeoroid effects are orders of magnitude below the particulate contamination effects. The final end-of-life transmission for the mirrors including all of these phenomena will meet the performance requirements for JWST.

  1. Origins Space Telescope: Interstellar Medium, Milky Way, and Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.This presentation will provide a summary of the science case related to the Interstellar Medium (ISM), the Milky Way, and Nearby Galaxies. Origins will enable a comprehensive view of magnetic fields, turbulence, and the multi-phase ISM; connecting physics at all scales, from galaxies to protostellar cores. With unprecedented sensitivity, Origins will measure and characterize the mechanisms of feedback from star formation and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) over cosmic time and trace the trail of water from interstellar clouds, to protoplanetary disks, to Earth itself in order to understand the abundance and availability of water for habitable planets.

  2. Next Generation Space Telescope Integrated Science Module Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnurr, Richard G.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Jurotich, Matthew M.; Whitley, Raymond; Kalinowski, Keith J.; Love, Bruce W.; Travis, Jeffrey W.; Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The Data system for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Module (ISIM) is the primary data interface between the spacecraft, telescope, and science instrument systems. This poster includes block diagrams of the ISIM data system and its components derived during the pre-phase A Yardstick feasibility study. The poster details the hardware and software components used to acquire and process science data for the Yardstick instrument compliment, and depicts the baseline external interfaces to science instruments and other systems. This baseline data system is a fully redundant, high performance computing system. Each redundant computer contains three 150 MHz power PC processors. All processors execute a commercially available real time multi-tasking operating system supporting, preemptive multi-tasking, file management and network interfaces. These six processors in the system are networked together. The spacecraft interface baseline is an extension of the network, which links the six processors. The final selection for Processor busses, processor chips, network interfaces, and high-speed data interfaces will be made during mid 2002.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope - New view of an ancient universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, David S.; Longair, Malcolm S.; Stockman, Peter; Olivier, Jean R.

    1989-01-01

    Scheduled for a March 1990 Shuttle launch, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will give astronomers a tool of unprecedented accuracy to observe the universe: an optically superb instrument free of the atmospheric turbulence, distortion, and brightness that plague all earthbound telescopes. The observatory will carry into orbit two cameras, a pair of spectrographs, a photometer, and fine guidance sensors optimized for astrometry. The diffraction limit for the 2.4-m aperture of the HST corresponds to 90 percent of the radiation from a point source falling within a circle of 0.1 arcsec angular radius at a wavelength of 633 nm. The 15-year mission will make observations in the ultraviolet as well as the optical spectral region, thus, widening the wavelength window to a range extending from the Lyman alpha wavelengnth of 122 nm to just about 2 microns. The observational program that awaits the HST will include the study of planetary atmospheres, in particular the search for aerosols; the study of globular star clusters within the Galaxy; and the determination of the present rate of expansion of the universe. The HST will achieve resolutions of 0.1 arcsec consistently, regardless of observation duration. The HST engineering challenge is also discussed.

  4. Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors by Matthew William Smith Submitted to the Department of...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Heritage space telescope mirror technology-i.e. large, monolithic glass primary

  5. Hubble Space Telescope: The Real ‘First Light’ Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, B.

    2014-01-01

    To prove that a telescope will meet the design specifications laid down years previously, that it will eventually produce the science envisioned by those designers, they make a ‘first light’ observation, assess it, and pronounce “Here is our new telescope! It works!” That observation is often made with an instrument on the telescope that goes on to make many scientifically productive discoveries. The official Hubble Space Telescope (HST) first light image was secured by the Wide Field Planetary Camera on 5/20/1990, certainly a productive science instrument. The HST Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS), white-light interferometers, have an essential role to play in any scientific observation made with HST. They stabilize HST by locking onto guide stars. The Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) have on their own produced useful and exciting astrometric scientific results ranging from parallaxes of Galactic Cepheids useful for the cosmic distance scale (Benedict et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 1810) to a demonstration of the degree of coplanarity in an exoplanetary system (McArthur et al. 2010, ApJ, 715, 1203). Hence, we argue that an FGS made the actual first light observation shortly after midnight on 1 May 1990 by successfully locking onto the V=12.97 star GSC 02666-01602. That FGS observation demonstrated light passing through the HST entire optical system and HST tracking. With a little (well, actually quite a lot of) tweaking, scientific results would surely flood forth. However, on May Day 1990 locking success was oddly sporadic. We had a few weeks more to enjoy our blissful ignorance of flapping solar panels and a mis-figured primary mirror, both of which contributed that night to our true first light observation problems. The events of that night and subsequent successful FGS astrometry are thanks to contributions over the years from L. Abramowicz-Reed, A. Bradley*, R. Duncombe, O. Franz, L. Fredrick, P. Hemenway, W. Jefferys, E. Nelan*, P. Shelus, D. Story*, W. van Altena, L

  6. HUBBLE VISION: A Planetarium Show About Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Carolyn Collins

    1995-05-01

    In 1991, a planetarium show called "Hubble: Report From Orbit" outlining the current achievements of the Hubble Space Telescope was produced by the independent planetarium production company Loch Ness Productions, for distribution to facilities around the world. The program was subsequently converted to video. In 1994, that program was updated and re-produced under the name "Hubble Vision" and offered to the planetarium community. It is periodically updated and remains a sought-after and valuable resource within the community. This paper describes the production of the program, and the role of the astronomical community in the show's production (and subsequent updates). The paper is accompanied by a video presentation of Hubble Vision.

  7. Scientific and Technical Development of the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is part of the Origins program and is the key mission to discover the origins of galaxies in the Universe. It is essential that scientific requirements be translated into technical specifications at the beginning of the program and that there is technical participation by astronomers in the design and modeling of the observatory. During the active time period of this grant, the PI participated in the NGST program at GSFC by participating in the development of the Design Reference Mission, the development of the full end-to-end model of the observatory, the design trade-off based on the modeling, the Science Instrument Module definition and modeling, the study of proto-mission and test-bed development, and by participating in meetings including quarterly reviews and support of the NGST SWG. This work was documented in a series of NGST Monographs that are available on the NGST web site.

  8. Solar System Observations with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid-infrared, with sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010. It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV, in 2012.

  9. Next-Generation Space Telescope design reference mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric P.; Mather, John C.; Stockman, Hervey S.; Bely, Pierre Y.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Burg, Richard

    1998-08-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Design Reference Mission (DRM) represents a suite of potential astronomical programs and targets along with their expected physical properties, and desired observation modes. This broad science program is being used to drive the observatory design in a way as fundamental as traditional engineering parameters. Astronomers use the DRM to communicate their desires in a quantitative fashion to the engineers who will eventually construct the observatory. The DRM is also the primary tool used to measure the relative value of NGST mission architectures and technological readiness of the program. Specifically, the fraction of the DRM completed by a given observatory configuration in a given time is, to first order, a measure of the value of the design. Those designs which complete a higher fraction of the observations listed below are more capable than those complete lesser fractions.

  10. Small Space Telescopes for Spectroscopic Surveys of z>1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Kruk, J. W.; Rigby, J. R.; Robberto, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a preliminary study of small space telescopes (<2 m) for conducting a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies with the goals of determining the properties of galaxies at 1-2 and identifying the processes leading to the establishment of the Hubble Sequence seen today. All the cases studied so far have a multi-object slit selector based on TI’s 2000x1000 digital micromirror device (DMD), and all have 4 spectroscopic channels simultaneously viewing the UV, blue, red, and near-IR spectral regions, altogether covering 0.2-1.7 μ at a resolving power of 400. We judge the performance of the various cases against the goal of achieving a spectrum with S/N=7 per resolution element for an input flux of ~1x10^{-18} erg/s/cm^2/A.

  11. Detecting opportunities for parallel observations on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucks, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The presence of multiple scientific instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope provides opportunities for parallel science, i.e., the simultaneous use of different instruments for different observations. Determining whether candidate observations are suitable for parallel execution depends on numerous criteria (some involving quantitative tradeoffs) that may change frequently. A knowledge based approach is presented for constructing a scoring function to rank candidate pairs of observations for parallel science. In the Parallel Observation Matching System (POMS), spacecraft knowledge and schedulers' preferences are represented using a uniform set of mappings, or knowledge functions. Assessment of parallel science opportunities is achieved via composition of the knowledge functions in a prescribed manner. The knowledge acquisition, and explanation facilities of the system are presented. The methodology is applicable to many other multiple criteria assessment problems.

  12. Giant Planet Observations with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, James; Moses, Julianne; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Atreya, Sushil; Rages, Kathy; Cavalié, Thibault; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, Ricardo; Chanover, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This white paper examines the benefit of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for studies of the Solar System's four giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. JWST's superior sensitivity, combined with high spatial and spectral resolution, will enable near- and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of these objects with unprecedented quality. In this paper, we discuss some of the myriad scientific investigations possible with JWST regarding the giant planets. This discussion is preceded by the specifics of JWST instrumentation most relevant to giant-planet observations. We conclude with identification of desired pre-launch testing and operational aspects of JWST that would greatly benefit future studies of the giant planets.

  13. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  14. Making the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission safe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, N. J.; Depalo, S. V.

    This paper will detail how the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) system safety program is conducted. Numerous safety analyses are conducted through the various phases of design, test, and fabrication, and results are presented to NASA management for discussion during dedicated safety reviews. This paper will then address the system safety assessment and risk analysis methodologies used (i.e. hazard analysis, fault tree analysis, and failure modes and effects analysis), and how they are coupled with enginering and test analyses for a 'synergistic picture' of the system. Some preliminary safety analysis results, showing the relationship between hazard identification, control or abatement, and finally control verification, will be presented as examples of this safety process.

  15. The Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, P.; Abney, F.; Christian, D.; Comeau, T.; Donahue, M.; Hanisch, R. J.; Harrison, J.; Imhoff, C.; Kidwell, R.; Kimball, T.; Levay, K.; Postman, M.; Richon, J.; Smith, M.; Thompson, R.

    We describe the expansion of the Hubble Data Archive into the Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST), which provides access also to non-HST data. MAST includes the following: International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), Copernicus, ORFEUS IMAPS and BEFS, ASTRO HUT, WUPPE, and UIT data, and VLA FIRST data. MAST is also the active archive site for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), launched in June 1999, and provides access to the Digitized Sky Survey. MAST data are stored on two 480-platter Plasmon CD-ROM jukeboxes. Data retrievals, plans for expansion, and features of the World Wide Web interface are also presented. The MAST homepage is at http://archive.stsci.edu/mast.html.

  16. Reed Solomon error correction for the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Cameron, K.; Canaris, J.; Vincent, P.; Liu, N.; Owsley, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a single 8.2mm by 8.4mm, 200,000 transistor CMOS chip implementation of the Reed Solomon code required by the Space Telescope. The chip features a 10 MHz sustained byte rate independent of error pattern. The 1.6 micron CMOS integrated circuit has complete decoder and encoder functions and uses a single data/system clock. Block lengths up to 255 bytes as well as shortened codes are supported with no external buffering. Erasure corrections as well as random error corrections are supported with programmable corrections of up to 10 symbol errors. Correction time is independent of error pattern and the number of errors.

  17. System Engineering the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tristram T.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) was designed to accomplish three scientific objectives: (1) learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks and how they acquire their inhomogeneous chemical composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. SPIRIT will accomplish these objectives through infrared observations with a two aperture interferometric instrument. This paper gives an overview of SPIRIT design and operation, and how the three design cycle concept study was completed. The error budget for several key performance values allocates tolerances to all contributing factors, and a performance model of the spacecraft plus instrument system demonstrates meeting those allocations with margin.

  18. First Light Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-16

    later transported toward the corona . 2)We investigated properties of magnetic fields in nearly 400 solar active regions. Time profiles of...1.6 Meter Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather Telescope. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0655 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In early 2009 at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), first light science observations were made

  19. Observing Supernova 1987A with the Refurbished Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Heng, Kevin; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Bouchet, Patrice; Crotts, Arlin; Dwek, Eli; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M.; Larsson, Josefin; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Stocke, John T.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2010-01-01

    The young remnant of supernova 1987A (SN 1987A) offers an unprecedented glimpse into the hydrodynamics and kinetics of fast astrophysical shocks. We have been monitoring SN 1987A with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since it was launched. The recent repair of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) allows us to compare observations in 2004, just before its demise, with those in 2010, shortly after its resuscitation by NASA astronauts. We find that the Ly-alpha and H-alpha lines from shock emission continue to brighten, while their maximum velocities continue to decrease. We report evidence for nearly coherent, resonant scattering of Lya photons (to blueshifts approximately -12,000 km /s) from hotspots on the equatorial ring. We also report emission to the red of Ly-alpha that we attribute to N v lambda lambda 1239,1243 Angstrom line emission. These lines are detectable because, unlike hydrogen atoms, N4+ ions emit hundreds of photons before they are ionized. The profiles of the N v lines differ markedly from that of H-alpha. We attribute this to scattering of N4+ ions by magnetic fields in the ionized plasma. Thus, N v emission provides a unique probe of the isotropization zone of the collisionless shock. Observations with the recently installed Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) will enable us to observe the N v lambda lambda 1239,1243 Angstrom line profiles with much higher signal-to-noise ratios than possible with STIS and may reveal lines of other highly ionized species (such as C IVlambda lambda 1548,1551 Angstrom) that will test our explanation for the N v emission

  20. Propagating orientation constraints for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Ashim; Gerb, Andy

    1994-01-01

    An observing program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described in terms of exposures that are obtained by one or more of the instruments onboard the HST. Many requested exposures might specify orientation requirements and accompanying ranges. Orientation refers to the amount of roll (in degrees) about the line of sight. The range give the permissible tolerance (also in degrees). These requirements may be (1) absolute (in relation to the celestial coordinate system), (2) relative to the nominal roll angle for HST during that exposure, or (3) relative (in relation to other exposures in the observing program). The TRANSformation expert system converts proposals for astronomical observations with HST into detailed observing plans. Part of the conversion involves grouping exposures into higher level structures based on exposure characteristics. Exposures constrained to be at different orientations cannot be grouped together. Because relative orientation requirements cause implicit constraints, orientation constraints have to be propagated. TRANS must also identify any inconsistencies that may exist so they can be corrected. We have designed and implemented an orientation constraint propagator as part of TRANS. The propagator is based on an informal algebra that facilitates the setting up and propagation of the orientation constraints. The constraint propagator generates constraints between directly related exposures, and propagates derived constraints between exposures that are related indirectly. It provides facilities for path-consistency checking, identification of unsatisfiable constraints, and querying of orientation relationships. The system has been successfully operational as part of TRANS for over seven months. The solution has particular significance to space applications in which satellite/telescope pointing and attitude are constrained and relationships exist between multiple configurations.

  1. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-11-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 μm and 0.6 mag at 4.5 μm. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 μm) and W2 (4.6 μm) from the Wide-feld Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010-2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude ˜0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude ˜0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune’s atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune’s atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 μm filters.

  2. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  3. Propagating orientation constraints for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Ashim; Gerb, Andy

    1994-05-01

    An observing program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described in terms of exposures that are obtained by one or more of the instruments onboard the HST. Many requested exposures might specify orientation requirements and accompanying ranges. Orientation refers to the amount of roll (in degrees) about the line of sight. The range give the permissible tolerance (also in degrees). These requirements may be (1) absolute (in relation to the celestial coordinate system), (2) relative to the nominal roll angle for HST during that exposure, or (3) relative (in relation to other exposures in the observing program). The TRANSformation expert system converts proposals for astronomical observations with HST into detailed observing plans. Part of the conversion involves grouping exposures into higher level structures based on exposure characteristics. Exposures constrained to be at different orientations cannot be grouped together. Because relative orientation requirements cause implicit constraints, orientation constraints have to be propagated. TRANS must also identify any inconsistencies that may exist so they can be corrected. We have designed and implemented an orientation constraint propagator as part of TRANS. The propagator is based on an informal algebra that facilitates the setting up and propagation of the orientation constraints. The constraint propagator generates constraints between directly related exposures, and propagates derived constraints between exposures that are related indirectly. It provides facilities for path-consistency checking, identification of unsatisfiable constraints, and querying of orientation relationships. The system has been successfully operational as part of TRANS for over seven months. The solution has particular significance to space applications in which satellite/telescope pointing and attitude are constrained and relationships exist between multiple configurations.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the HD 202628 Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Plavchan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A ring-shaped debris disk around the G2V star HD 202628 (d = 24.4 pc) was imaged in scattered light at visible wavelengths using the coronagraphic mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ring is inclined by approx.64deg from face-on, based on the apparent major/minor axis ratio, with the major axis aligned along PA = 130deg. It has inner and outer radii (> 50% maximum surface brightness) of 139 AU and 193 AU in the northwest ansae and 161 AU and 223 AU in the southeast ((Delta)r/r approx. = 0.4). The maximum visible radial extent is approx. 254 AU. With a mean surface brightnesses of V approx. = 24 mag arcsec.(sup -2), this is the faintest debris disk observed to date in reflected light. The center of the ring appears offset from the star by approx.28 AU (deprojected). An ellipse fit to the inner edge has an eccentricity of 0.18 and a = 158 AU. This offset, along with the relatively sharp inner edge of the ring, suggests the influence of a planetary-mass companion. There is a strong similarity with the debris ring around Fomalhaut, though HD 202628 is a more mature star with an estimated age of about 2 Gyr. We also provide surface brightness limits for nine other stars in our study with strong Spitzer excesses around which no debris disks were detected in scattered light (HD 377, HD 7590, HD 38858, HD 45184, HD 73350, HD 135599, HD 145229, HD 187897, and HD 201219).

  5. Fine pointing control for a Next-Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, Gary E.; Femiano, Michael; Ha, Kong; Bely, Pierre Y.; Burg, Richard; Redding, David C.; Kissil, Andrew; Rakoczy, John; Craig, Larry

    1998-08-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope will provide at least ten times the collecting area of the Hubble Space Telescope in a package that fits into the shroud of an expendable launch vehicle. The resulting large, flexible structure provides a challenge to the design of a pointing control system for which the requirements are at the milli-arcsecond level. This paper describes a design concept in which pointing stability is achieved by means of a nested-loop design involving an inertial attitude control system (ACS) and a fast steering mirror (FSM). A key to the integrated control design is that the ACS controllers has a bandwidth well below known structural modes and the FSM uses a rotationally balanced mechanism which should not interact with the flexible modes that are within its control bandwidth. The ACS controller provides stable pointing of the spacecraft bus with star trackers and gyros. This low bandwidth loop uses nearly co-located sensors and actuators to slew and acquire faint guide stars in the NIR camera. This controller provides a payload reference stable to the arcsecond level. Low-frequency pointing errors due to sensor noise and dynamic disturbances are suppressed by a 2-axis gimbaled FSM locate din the instrument module. The FSM servo bandwidth of 6 Hz is intended to keep the guide star position stable in the NIR focal plane to the required milli-arcsecond level. The mirror is kept centered in its range of travel by a low-bandwidth loop closed around the ACS. This paper presents the result of parametric trade studies designed to assess the performance of this control design in the presence of modeled reaction wheel disturbances, assumed to be the principle source of vibration for the NGST, and variations in structural dynamics. Additionally, requirements for reaction wheel disturbance levels and potential vibration isolation subsystems were developed.

  6. Dynamic wavefront control for lightweight mirrors in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2007-09-01

    Future space telescopes require larger apertures to continue to improve performance. However, balancing the large, high performance optics with the desire for lightweight systems proves quite challenging. One way to achieve both goals is to utilize active, on-orbit wavefront control. A promising method of wavefront control implementation is surface-parallel piezo-electric actuation. The primary mirror backplane is ribbed to provide increased stiffness even at very low areal densities, with piezo-electric actuators embedded at the top of each rib. When the piezo-electrics expand or contract, they bend the surface of the mirror and can be used to directly correct for dynamic distortions of the wavefront. In addition, rigid-body petal control can be used to allow for the possibility of systems with segmented primary mirrors. This paper examines the implementation of both the piezoelectric deformable mirror and petal wavefront controllers, along with their implications on both optical performance and stability robustness. The systems analyzed in this paper are integrated models of the entire space telescope system, considering the transmission of disturbances and vibrations from the reaction wheels in the bus through the structure, isolators, and bipods to the aperture. The deformable mirror control is performed using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, while the mirror segment control is performed using a positive position feedback (PPF) controller. For all cases, the wavefront error is the primary optical performance metric and is calculated using the Zernikes of the primary mirror. The major deterrents to the use of control are complexity and the loss of stability robustness. The integrated model allows for the calculation of all metrics together to enable the examination of the potential benefits of implementing dynamic wavefront control.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CAPTURES FIRST DIRECT IMAGE OF A STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is the first direct image of a star other than the Sun, made with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Called Alpha Orionis, or Betelgeuse, it is a red supergiant star marking the shoulder of the winter constellation Orion the Hunter (diagram at right). The Hubble image reveals a huge ultraviolet atmosphere with a mysterious hot spot on the stellar behemoth's surface. The enormous bright spot, more than ten times the diameter of Earth, is at least 2,000 Kelvin degrees hotter than the surface of the star. The image suggests that a totally new physical phenomenon may be affecting the atmospheres of some stars. Follow-up observations will be needed to help astronomers understand whether the spot is linked to oscillations previously detected in the giant star, or whether it moves systematically across the star's surface under the grip of powerful magnetic fields. The observations were made by Andrea Dupree of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA, and Ronald Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, who announced their discovery today at the 187th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Antonio, Texas. The image was taken in ultraviolet light with the Faint Object Camera on March 3, 1995. Hubble can resolve the star even though the apparent size is 20,000 times smaller than the width of the full Moon -- roughly equivalent to being able to resolve a car's headlights at a distance of 6,000 miles. Betelgeuse is so huge that, if it replaced the Sun at the center of our Solar System, its outer atmosphere would extend past the orbit of Jupiter (scale at lower left). Credit: Andrea Dupree (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), Ronald Gilliland (STScI), NASA and ESA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  8. Solar System Studies with the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) is the final element in NASA's 'Great Observatories' program. It consists of an 85-cm cryogenically-cooled observatory for infrared astronomy from space. SIRTF is scheduled for launch in late 2001 or early 2002 on a Delta rocket into a heliocentric orbit trailing the Earth. Data from SIRTF will be processed and disseminated to the community through the SIRTF Science Center (SSC) located at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) at Caltech. Some 80/% of the total observing time (estimated at a minimum of 7500 hours of integration time per year for the mission lifetime of about 4 years) will be available to the scientific community at large through a system of refereed proposals. Three basic instruments are located in the SIRTF focal plane. The Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS), the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), and the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS), taken together, provide imaging and spectroscopy from 3.5 to 160 microns. Among the solar system studies suited to SIRTF are the following: 1) spectroscopy and radiometry of small bodies from the asteroid main belt, through the Trojan clouds, to the Kuiper Disk; 2) dust distribution in the zodiacal cloud and the Earth's heliocentric dust ring; 3) spectroscopy and radiometry of comets; and 4) spectroscopy and radiometry of planets and their satellites. Searches for, and studies of dust disks around other stars, brown dwarfs, and superplanets will also be conducted with SIRTF. The SORTIE web site (http://ssc.ipac.caltech.edu/sirtf) contains important details and documentation on the project, the spacecraft, the telescope, instruments, and observing procedures. A community-wide workshop for solar system studies with SIRTF is in the planning stages by the author and Martha S. Hanner for the summer of 1999.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  10. MEMS Microshutter Array System for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Adachi, Tomoko; Allen, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Bajikar, Sateesh; Beamesderfer, Michael; Bradley, Ruth; Denis, Kevin; Costen, Nick; Ewin, Audrey; Franz, Dave; Hess, Larry; Hu, Ron; Jackson, Kamili; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kelly, Dan; King, Todd; Kletetschka, Gunther; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lynch, Barney; Miller, Timothy; Moseley, Harvey; Mikula, Vilem; Mott. Brent; Oh, Lance

    2008-01-01

    A complex MEMS microshutter array system has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use as a multi-object aperture array for a Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec). The NIRSpec is one of the four major instruments carried by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next generation of space telescope after the Hubble Space Telescope retires. The microshutter arrays (MSAs) are designed for the selective transmission of light with high efficiency and high contrast. It is demonstrated in Figure 1 how a MSA is used as a multiple object selector in deep space. The MSAs empower the NIRSpec instrument simultaneously collect spectra from more than 100 targets therefore increases the instrument efficiency 100 times or more. The MSA assembly is one of three major innovations on JWST and the first major MEMS devices serving observation missions in space. The MSA system developed at NASA GSFC is assembled with four quadrant fully addressable 365x171 shutter arrays that are actuated magnetically, latched and addressed electrostatically. As shown in Figure 2, each MSA is fabricated out of a 4' silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer using MEMS bulk-micromachining technology. Individual shutters are close-packed silicon nitride membranes with a pixel size close to 100x200 pm (Figure 3). Shutters are patterned with a torsion flexure permitting shutters to open 90 degrees with a minimized mechanical stress concentration. In order to prevent light leak, light shields are made on to the surrounding frame of each shutter to cover the gaps between the shutters and the Game (Figure 4). Micro-ribs and sub-micron bumps are tailored on hack walls and light shields, respectively, to prevent sticktion, shown in Figures 4 and 5. JWST instruments are required to operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 35K, though they are to be subjected to various levels of ground tests at room temperature. The shutters should therefore maintain nearly flat in the entire temperature range

  11. Cryogenic optical test planning using the Optical Telescope Element Simulator with the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Timothy A.; Bond, Nicholas A.; Greeley, Bradford W.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Melendez, Marcio; Shiri, Ron; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Antonille, Scott R.; Birkmann, Stephan; Davis, Clinton; Dixon, William V.; Martel, André R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Sabatke, Derek; Sullivan, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic infrared space astronomy ( 40 K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SIs), including a guider. The SI and guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical Telescope Element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a 1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the flight structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology and customized interfaces. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors and metrology in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. The comprehensive optical test plans include drafting OSIM source configurations for thousands of exposures ahead of the start of a cryogenic test campaign. We describe how we predicted the performance of OSIM light sources illuminating the ISIM detectors to aide in drafting these optical tests before a test campaign began. We also discuss the actual challenges and successes of those exposure predictions encountered during a test campaign to fulfill the demands of the ISIM optical performance verification.

  12. Self-deployable structure designed for space telescope for microsatellite application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Chuang; Zhou, Nan; Liao, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    With the gradual development of micro-satellite technology and the extension of application field of earth observation technology, researchers show more concern and attention on how to obtain high-resolution images with microsatellite platform equipped with space telescope. Such microsatellites require the space telescopes with small volume, low mass, and low cost. Deployable telescope is a good choice to meet these requirements, and it has the same capabilities as the traditional space telescope. We investigate a space telescope with smart self-deployable structure. The telescope is folded before launch, the distance between primary mirror and secondary mirror becomes short and the volume of the telescope becomes small, and the telescope extends to its working configuration after it is in orbit. The deployable structure is one of the key techniques of deployable space telescope, and this paper focuses on the design of a self-deployable structure of the secondary mirror. There are mainly three parts in this paper. Firstly, the optics of the telescope is presented, and a Ritchey-Chretien (RC) type optical system is designed. Secondly, the self-deployable structure is designed and the finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze dynamics of the extended telescope. Thirdly, an adjusting mechanism with six degrees of freedom to correct the misalignment of the secondary mirror is investigated, and the kinematics is discussed.

  13. Crew of Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission visits Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    The Hubble Space telescope servicing mission in December (STS-61) was a great success and the fully refurbished orbiting telescope produced absolutely remarkable first results just two weeks ago. The 7-member crew who carried out the mission will soon be in Europe to share their experience with the Press, ESA space specialists and the European space community. Public conferences will also be held in Switzerland, the home country of ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier. The visit of the STS-61 crew is scheduled as follows: Friday 11 February, 1994 - ESA Paris, France Presentation and Press Conference Location: ESA, 8/10 Rue Mario Nikis, 75015 Paris time: 16:00 hrs - 17:30 hrs contact: ESA, Public Relations Office Tel. (+33) 1 42 73 71 55 Fax. (+33) 1 42 73 76 90 Monday 14 February, 1994 - British Aerospace, Bristol, United Kingdom Presentation and Press Conference Location: British Aerospace, FPC 333, Filton, Bristol BS12 7QW time: 10:00 hrs - 12:00 hrs contact: BAe, Public Relations Tel. (+44) 272 36 33 69 Tel. (+44) 272 36 33 68 Tuesday 15 February, 1994 - ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk, the Netherlands Presentation and Press Conference Location: Noordwijk Space Expo, Keplerlaan 3, 2201 AZ Noordwijk, the Netherlands time: 09:30 hrs - 12:00 hrs contact: ESTEC Public Relations Office Tel. (+31) 1719 8 3006 Fax. (+31) 1719 17 400 Wednesday 16 February, 1944 - ESO, Garching - Munich, Germany Presentation and Press Conference Location: European Southern Observatory, Karl- Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching -Munich, Germany time: to be decided contact: ESO Information Service Tel. (+49) 89 32 006 276 Fax. (+49) 89 320 23 62 Thursday 17 February, 1994 - Bern, Switzerland a. Presentation and Press Conference Location: Hotel Bern, Zeughausgasse 9, 3001 Bern, Switzerland time: 09:30 hrs contact: Press & Information Service of the Federal Dept. for Education & Sciences Tel. (+41) 31 322 80 34 Fax. (+41) 31 312 30 15 b. Public conference Location: University of Bern, Institute of Physics

  14. Astronomy from Space: The Hubble, Herschel and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Space-based astronomy is going through a renaissance, with three Great Observatories currently flying: Hubble in the visible and ultraviolet, Spitzer in the infrared and Chandra in X-rays. The future looks equally bright. The final servicing mission to Hubble will take place in February 2009 and promises to make the observatory more capable than ever with two new cameras, and refurbishment that will allow it to last at least five years. The upcoming launch of the Herschel Space Telescope will open the far-infrared to explore the cool and dusty Universe. Finally, we look forward to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2013, which wil provide a successor to both Hubble and Spitzer. In this talk, the author discusses some of the highlights of scientific discovery in the last 10 years and reveals the promise to the next 10 years.

  15. Space Shuttle Mission STS-61: Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission-01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This press kit for the December 1993 flight of Endeavour on Space Shuttle Mission STS-61 includes a general release, cargo bay payloads and activities, in-cabin payloads, and STS-61 crew biographies. This flight will see the first in a series of planned visits to the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The first HST servicing mission has three primary objectives: restoring the planned scientific capabilities, restoring reliability of HST systems and validating the HST on-orbit servicing concept. These objectives will be accomplished in a variety of tasks performed by the astronauts in Endeavour's cargo bay. The primary servicing task list is topped by the replacement of the spacecraft's solar arrays. The spherical aberration of the primary mirror will be compensated by the installation of the Wide Field/Planetary Camera-II and the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement. New gyroscopes will also be installed along with fuse plugs and electronic units.

  16. Line of Sight Stabilization of James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meza, Luis; Tung, Frank; Anandakrishnan, Satya; Spector, Victor; Hyde, Tupper

    2005-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) builds upon the successful flight experience of the Chandra Xray Telescope by incorporating an additional LOS pointing servo to meet the more stringent pointing requirements. The LOS pointing servo, referred to in JWST as the Fine Guidance Control System (FGCS), will utilize a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) as the sensor, and a Fine Steering Mirror (FSM) as the actuator. The FSM is a part of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and is in the optical path between the tertiary mirror and the instrument focal plane, while the FGS is part of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). The basic Chandra spacecraft bus attitude control and determination architecture, utilizing gyros, star trackers/aspect camera, and reaction wheels, is retained for JWST. This system has achieved pointing stability of better than 0.5 arcseconds. To reach the JWST requirements of milli-arcsecond pointing stability with this ACS hardware, the local FGCS loop is added to the optical path. The FGCS bandwidth is about 2.0 Hz and will therefore attenuate much of the spacecraft ACS induced low frequency jitter. In order to attenuate the higher frequency (greatet than 2.0 Hz) disturbances associated with reaction wheel static and dynamic imbalances, as well as bearing run-out, JWST will employ a two-stage passive vibration isolation system consisting of (1) 7.0 Hz reaction wheel isolators between each reaction wheel and the spacecraft bus, and (2) a 1.0 Hz tower isolator between the spacecraft bus and the Optical Telescope Element (OTE). In order to sense and measure the LOS, the FGS behaves much like an autonomous star tracker that has a very small field of view and uses the optics of the telescope. It performs the functions of acquisition, identification and tracking of stars in its 2.5 x 2.5 arcminute field of view (FOV), and provides the centroid and magnitude of the selected star for use in LOS control. However, since only a single star is being tracked

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Spectroscopy of the Environment in the Starburst Core of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; O'Connell, R. W.; Rosario, D. J.; de Grijs, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present optical HST STIS observations made with two slits crossing four of the optically brightest starburst clumps near the nucleus of M82. These provide Hα kinematics, extinction, electron density, and emission measures. From the radial velocity curves derived from both slits we confirm the presence of a stellar bar. We derive a new model for the orientation of the bar and disk with respect to the main starburst clumps and the cluster M82-A1. We propose that clump A has formed within the bar region as a result of gas interactions between the bar orbits, whereas region C lies at the edge of the bar and regions D and E are located farther out from the nucleus but heavily obscured. We derive extremely high interstellar densities of 500-900 cm-3, corresponding to ISM pressures of P/k~(0.5-1.0)×107 cm-3 K, and discuss the implications of the measured gas properties on the production and evolution of the galactic wind. Despite varying pressures, the ionization parameter is uniform down to parsec scales, and we discuss why this might be so. Where the signal-to-noise ratios of our spectra are high enough, we identify multiple emission-line components. Through detailed Gaussian line fitting, we identify a ubiquitous broad (200-300 km s-1) underlying component to the bright Hα line and discuss the physical mechanism(s) that could be responsible for such widths. We conclude that evaporation and/or ablation of material from interstellar gas clouds caused by the impact of high-energy photons and fast flowing cluster winds produce a highly turbulent layer on the surface of the clouds from which the emission arises. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9117.

  18. The James Webb Telescope Instrument Suite Layout: Optical System Engineering Considerations for a Large, Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Davila, Pam; Jurotich, Matthew; Hobbs, Gurnie; Lightsey, Paul; Contreras, Jim; Whitman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space-based, infrared observatory designed to study the early stages of galaxy formation in the Universe. The telescope will be launched into an elliptical orbit about the second Lagrange point and passively cooled to 30-50 K to enable astronomical observations from 0.6 to 28 microns. A group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Northrop Grumman Space Technology prime contractor team has developed an optical and mechanical layout for the science instruments within the JWST field of view that satisfies the telescope s high-level performance requirements. Four instruments required accommodation within the telescope's field of view: a Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) provided by the University of Arizona; a Near-Mared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) provided by the European Space Agency; a Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a European consortium; and a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) with a tunable filter module provided by the Canadian Space Agency. The size and position of each instrument's field of view allocation were developed through an iterative, concurrent engineering process involving the key observatory stakeholders. While some of the system design considerations were those typically encountered during the development of an infrared observatory, others were unique to the deployable and controllable nature of JWST. This paper describes the optical and mechanical issues considered during the field of view layout development, as well as the supporting modeling and analysis activities.

  19. XML: James Webb Space Telescope Database Issues, Lessons, and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detter, Ryan; Mooney, Michael; Fatig, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    This paper will present the current concept using extensible Markup Language (XML) as the underlying structure for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) database. The purpose of using XML is to provide a JWST database, independent of any portion of the ground system, yet still compatible with the various systems using a variety of different structures. The testing of the JWST Flight Software (FSW) started in 2002, yet the launch is scheduled for 2011 with a planned 5-year mission and a 5-year follow on option. The initial database and ground system elements, including the commands, telemetry, and ground system tools will be used for 19 years, plus post mission activities. During the Integration and Test (I&T) phases of the JWST development, 24 distinct laboratories, each geographically dispersed, will have local database tools with an XML database. Each of these laboratories database tools will be used for the exporting and importing of data both locally and to a central database system, inputting data to the database certification process, and providing various reports. A centralized certified database repository will be maintained by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. One of the challenges for the database is to be flexible enough to allow for the upgrade, addition or changing of individual items without effecting the entire ground system. Also, using XML should allow for the altering of the import and export formats needed by the various elements, tracking the verification/validation of each database item, allow many organizations to provide database inputs, and the merging of the many existing database processes into one central database structure throughout the JWST program. Many National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) projects have attempted to take advantage of open source and commercial technology. Often this causes a greater reliance on the use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS), which is often limiting

  20. Hubble vision : further adventures with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Carolyn Collins; Brandt, John C.

    The first edition of Hubble Vision became an international bestseller and won world-wide, critical acclaim. This eagerly awaited second edition is the most comprehensive, most authoritative and best illustrated popular book available on the Hubble Space Telescope. It provides a magnificent portfolio of the latest and greatest images from the HST, woven together with a lucid text explaining the most exciting discoveries and setting them in the context of our current understanding in astronomy. This second edition has been completely revised, updated and expanded to include all the latest astronomical discoveries - from supernovae and protostars to gravitational lensing, black holes and the early universe. It is now even better illustrated, with nearly 25% more figures, and more than 100 entirely new. The unique combination of authors - an award-winning science writer and a key scientist involved in the development of the mission - ensure that the text is both engaging and authoritative. Hubble Vision offers a view of the Universe as never seen before. It will capture the imagination of all those interested in the astronomical quest of understanding our Universe - from high-school students to general readers and amateur astronomers. * Stellar fireworks within Colliding galaxies * The sharpest views of Mars yet * Newborn stars in M16 * A gallery of the latest images of planetary nebulae as never seen before * The deepest, most penetrating view into space ever : the Hubble Deep Field * Views into the heart of a comet (Hale-Bopp) * New views of Jupiter and Io

  1. Titan Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard; Adamkovics, Mate; Bezard, Bruno; Bjoraker, Gordon; Cornet, Thomas; Hayes, Alexander; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lemmon, Mark; Lopez Puertas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Teanby, Nicholas; Turtle, Elizabeth; West, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018, is an ambitious next-generation large-aperture (6.5 m) space observatory focused on pushing the boundaries of infrared astronomy (0.6-28.0 μm). This long-wavelength focus gives it very substantial potential for solar system science, since the thermal emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of many planets, moons and small bodies peak in this part of the spectrum. Here we report the findings of a task team convened to examine the potential for Titan science using JWST. These can be divided into five broad areas: (i) the surface, especially the rotational lightcurve; (ii) clouds in the lower atmosphere from direct imaging and near-IR spectroscopy; (iii) composition of the lower atmosphere, especially methane relative humidity; (iv) composition of the middle atmosphere, including thermal and fluorescent emissions from gases; (v) hazes in the middle atmosphere, including seasonal changes in hemispheric contrast. The capability of the major JWST instruments in each area is considered, and limitations such as potential saturation is noted and mitigation strategies (such as sub-arraying) discussed. Overall we find that JWST can make significant contributions to Titan science in many areas, not least in temporal monitoring of seasonal change after the end of the Cassini mission in 2017, in partnership with other next-generation observing facilities (TMT, GMT, EELT, ALMA).

  2. Hubble Space Telescope: SRM/QA observations and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, George A.

    1990-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Optical Systems Board of Investigation was established on July 2, 1990 to review, analyze, and evaluate the facts and circumstances regarding the manufacture, development, and testing of the HST Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). Specifically, the board was tasked to ascertain what caused the spherical aberration and how it escaped notice until on-orbit operation. The error that caused the on-orbit spherical aberration in the primary mirror was traced to the assembly process of the Reflective Null Corrector, one of the three Null Correctors developed as special test equipment (STE) to measure and test the primary mirror. Therefore, the safety, reliability, maintainability, and quality assurance (SRM&QA) investigation covers the events and the overall product assurance environment during the manufacturing phase of the primary mirror and Null Correctors (from 1978 through 1981). The SRM&QA issues that were identified during the HST investigation are summarized. The crucial product assurance requirements (including nonconformance processing) for the HST are examined. The history of Quality Assurance (QA) practices at Perkin-Elmer (P-E) for the period under investigation are reviewed. The importance of the information management function is discussed relative to data retention/control issues. Metrology and other critical technical issues also are discussed. The SRM&QA lessons learned from the investigation are presented along with specific recommendations. Appendix A provides the MSFC SRM&QA report. Appendix B provides supplemental reference materials. Appendix C presents the findings of the independent optical consultants, Optical Research Associates (ORA). Appendix D provides further details of the fault-tree analysis portion of the investigation process.

  3. Solar System Observing with the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleve, J. Van; Meadows, V. S.; Stansberry, J.

    2003-01-01

    SIRTF is NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility. Currently planned for launch on 15 Apr 2003, it is the final element in NASA's Great Observatories Program. SIRTF has an 85 cm diameter f/12 lightweight beryllium telescope, cooled to lekss than 5.5K. It is diffraction-limited at 6.5 microns, and has wavelengthcoverage from 3-180 microns. Its estimated lifetime (limited by cryogen) is 2.5 years at minimum, with a goal of 5+ years. SIRTF has three instruments, IRAC, IRS, and MIPS. IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) provides simultaneous images at wavelengths of 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns. IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) has 4 modules providing low-resolution (R=60-120) spectra from 5.3 to 40 microns, high-resolution (R=600) spectra from 10 to 37 microns, and an autonomous target acquisition system (PeakUp) which includes small-field imaging at 15 microns. MIPS (Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF)} does imaging photometry at 24, 70, and 160 m and low-resolution (R=15-25) spectroscopy (SED) between 55 and 96 microns. The SIRTF Guaranteed Time Observers (GTOs) are planning to observe Outer Solar System satellites and planets, extinct comets and low-albedo asteroids, Centaurs and Kuiper Belt Objects, cometary dust trails, and a few active short-period comets. The GTO programs are listed in detail in the SIRTF Reserved Observations Catalog (ROC). We would like to emphasize that there remain many interesting subjects for the General Observers (GO). Proposal success for the planetary observer community in the first SIRTF GO proposal cycle (GO-1) determines expectations for future GO calls and Solar System use of SIRTF, so we would like promote a strong set of planetary GO-1 proposals. Towards that end, we present this poster, and we will convene a Solar System GO workshop 3.5 months after launch.

  4. The Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/4039) Revisited: Advanced Camera for Surveys and NICMOS Observations of a Prototypical Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Schweizer, François; Rothberg, Barry; Leitherer, Claus; Rieke, Marcia; Rieke, George; Blair, W. P.; Mengel, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.

    2010-07-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) have been used to obtain new Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC 4038/4039 ("The Antennae"). These new observations allow us to better differentiate compact star clusters from individual stars, based on both size and color. We use this ability to extend the cluster luminosity function (LF) by approximately 2 mag over our previous WFPC2 results, and find that it continues as a single power law, dN/dL vprop L α with α = -2.13 ± 0.07, down to the observational limit of MV ≈ -7. Similarly, the mass function (MF) is a single power law dN/dM vprop M β with β = -2.10 ± 0.20 for clusters with ages <3 × 108 yr, corresponding to lower mass limits that range from 104 to 105 M sun, depending on the age range of the subsample. Hence, the power-law indices for the luminosity and MFs are essentially the same. The LF for intermediate-age clusters (i.e., ~100-300 Myr old objects found in the loops, tails, and outer areas) shows no bend or turnover down to MV ≈ -6, consistent with relaxation-driven cluster disruption models which predict the turnover should not be observed until MV ≈ -4. An analysis of individual ~0.5 kpc sized areas over diverse environments shows good agreement between values of α and β, similar to the results for the total population of clusters in the system. There is tentative evidence that the values of both α and β are flatter for the youngest clusters in some areas, but it is possible that this is caused by observational biases. Several of the areas studied show evidence for age gradients, with somewhat older clusters appearing to have triggered the formation of younger clusters. The area around Knot B is a particularly interesting example, with a ~10-50 Myr old cluster of estimated mass ~106 M sun having apparently triggered the formation of several younger, more massive (up to 5 × 106 M sun) clusters along a dust lane. A comparison with

  5. Image inversion analysis of the HST OTA (Hubble Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Technical work during September-December 1990 consisted of: (1) analyzing HST point source images obtained from JPL; (2) retrieving phase information from the images by a direct (noniterative) technique; and (3) characterizing the wavefront aberration due to the errors in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mirrors, in a preliminary manner. This work was in support of JPL design of compensating optics for the next generation wide-field planetary camera on HST. This digital technique for phase retrieval from pairs of defocused images, is based on the energy transport equation between these image planes. In addition, an end-to-end wave optics routine, based on the JPL Code 5 prescription of the unaberrated HST and WFPC, was derived for output of the reference phase front when mirror error is absent. Also, the Roddier routine unwrapped the retrieved phase by inserting the required jumps of +/- 2(pi) radians for the sake of smoothness. A least-squares fitting routine, insensitive to phase unwrapping, but nonlinear, was used to obtain estimates of the Zernike polynomial coefficients that describe the aberration. The phase results were close to, but higher than, the expected error in conic constant of the primary mirror suggested by the fossil evidence. The analysis of aberration contributed by the camera itself could be responsible for the small discrepancy, but was not verified by analysis.

  6. Simulation of MEMS for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, Brent; Kuhn, Jonathan; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adequately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  7. What the Longest Exposures from the Hubble Space Telescope Will eveal.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, J N; Guhathakurta, P; Schneider, D P

    1990-04-13

    Detailed simulations are presented of the longest exposures on representative fields that will be obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as predictions for the numbers and types of objects that will be recorded with exposures of different durations. The Hubble Space Telescope will reveal the shapes, sizes, and content of faint, distant galaxies and could discover a new population of Galactic stars.

  8. Ultraprecise photometry from space: exploring pulsations with the "Humble Space Telescope"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jaymie; Kuschnig, Rainer; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2001-01-01

    Size doesn't always matter. In the case of stellar seismology (using the high-overtone pulsations of stars to probe their global structures and ages), we can use tiny oscillations (a few micromagnitudes in amplitude) to address big questions (maybe even the age of the Universe?). For bright stars, one can reach the photon-noise limit even with a small telescope. But to avoid being swamped by atmospheric scintillation noise and confused by 1 cycle/day aliases inherent to single-site groundbased observing, that telescope must be in space. Fortunately, the cost can still be kept low by exploiting proven optical and detector technology and recent advances in microsatellite attitude control. MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) is a Canadian microsatellite mission to launch a small optical telescope (aperture = 15 cm) into low Earth orbit, equipped with a CCD photometer designed to return unprecedented photometric precision (δL/L ~ 10-6) and eigenfrequency resolution (δν ~ 0.1 μHz) on stars other than the Sun. This should allow it to detect acoustic modes like the solar five-minute oscillations; the fine spacing in these modes is sensitive to the core composition and hence, main sequence age. Among the MOST targets are Population II metal-poor subdwarfs, so an age determination for these may set a meaningful lower limit on the age of the Universe. The MOST space telescope is scheduled for launch in 2002 - 2003. Other space missions with similar goals are the French COROT satellite (also funded and scheduled for launch in 2004) and the Danish MONS project (currently awaiting funding).

  9. Use of the moon and the large space telescope as an extrasolar planet detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, G. L.; Fennelly, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Roman (1959), Spitzer (1962), and Huang (1973) have discussed photometric detection of extrasolar planets using a 3-m space telescope such as the Large Space Telescope (LST). A space telescope could be an extrasolar planet detection system if used in conjunction with an occulter placed 10,000 km in front of the telescope. The occulter would reduce the amount of light received from the star under observation. For a semi-infinite plane occulter 10,000 km in front of the telescope, Spitzer and Huang's results indicate that a Jupiter-like planet would be observed with a signal/noise of 1.00, for observations at 0.4 micron using a 3-m telescope like the LST.

  10. THE SEARCH FOR PLANETARY MASS COMPANIONS TO FIELD BROWN DWARFS WITH HST/NICMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Stumpf, M. B.; Brandner, W.; Joergens, V.; Henning, Th.; Bouy, H.; Koehler, R.; Kasper, M.

    2010-11-20

    We present the results of a high-resolution spectral differential imaging survey of 12 nearby, relatively young field L dwarfs ({<=}1 Gyr) carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS to search for planetary mass companions at small physical separations from their host. The survey resolved two brown dwarf binaries: the L dwarf system Kelu-1 AB and the newly discovered L/T transition system 2MASS 031059+164815 AB. For both systems, common proper motion has already been confirmed in follow-up observations which have been published elsewhere. The derived separations of the binaries are smaller than 6 AU and consistent with previous brown dwarf binary statistics. Their mass ratios of q {>=} 0.8 confirm the preference for equal-mass systems similar to a large number of other surveys. Furthermore, we found tentative evidence for a companion to the L4 dwarf 2MASSW 033703-175807, straddling the brown dwarf/planetary mass boundary and revealing an uncommonly low-mass ratio system (q {approx} 0.2) compared to the vast majority of previously found brown dwarf binaries. With a derived minimum mass of 10-15 M{sub Jup} a planetary nature of the secondary cannot be ruled out yet. However, it seems more likely to be a very low mass brown dwarf secondary at the border of the spectral T/Y transition regime, primarily due to its similarities to recently found very cool T dwarfs. This would make it one of the closest resolved brown dwarf binaries (0.''087 {+-} 0.''015, corresponding to 2.52 {+-} 0.44 AU at a distance of 29 pc) with the coolest (T{sub eff} {approx} 600-630 K) and least massive companion to any L or T dwarf.

  11. A flat array large telescope concept for use on the moon, earth, and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    An astronomical optical telescope concept is described which can provide very large collecting areas, of order 1000 sq m. This is an order of magnitude larger than the new generation of telescopes now being designed and built. Multiple gimballed flat mirrors direct the beams from a celestial source into a single telescope of the same aperture as each flat mirror. Multiple images of the same source are formed at the telescope focal plane. A beam combiner collects these images and superimposes them into a single image, onto a detector or spectrograph aperture. This telescope could be used on the earth, the moon, or in space.

  12. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  13. Solar System Observations with Spitzer Space Telescope: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2005-01-01

    The programs of observations of Solar System bodies conducted in the first year of the operation of the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Guaranteed Observing Time allocations are described. Initial results include the determination of the albedos of a number of Kuiper Belt objects and Centaurs from observations of their flux densities at 24 and 70 microns, and the detection of emission bands in the spectra of several distant asteroids (Trojans) around 10 and 25 microns. The 10 Kuiper Belt objects observed to date have albedos in the range 0.08 - 0.15, significantly higher than the earlier estimated 0.04. An additional KBO [(55565) 2002 AW(sub l97)] has an albedo of 0.17 plus or minus 0.03. The emission bands in the asteroid spectra are indicative of silicates, but specific minerals have not yet been identified. The Centaur/comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 has a nucleus surface albedo of 0.025 plus or minus 0.01, and its dust production rate was calculated from the properties of the coma. Several other investigations are in progress as the incoming data are processed and analyzed.

  14. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE View of the Heart of Ursa Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, Paolo; Demers, Serge

    1999-04-01

    Hubble Space Telescope F606W observations to 26th magnitude are used to investigate the stellar distribution in the center of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The central surface density is found to be low, less than 700 stars arcmin^-2, with no sign of a pronounced cusp. The maximum of the surface density is not found at our adopted center but in a ringlike structure some 13" from it. We identify this feature with the subclustering identified by Olszewski & Aaronson, who believed that it was off-center. The currently accepted King's structural parameters, r_c and r_t, of Ursa Minor are found to be unsuitable to represent the stellar surface density near the center. Our star counts are used to obtain a lower limit of the central stellar density without the use of the velocity dispersion. We find a lower limit of 1.7+/-1.1 M_solar pc^-3 from stars that were counted. By extrapolating the mass function to lower masses, we estimate that the true density could increase be a factor of 7.

  15. The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Spectral Library Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet (1150-3100 Å) spectra of bright stars, utilizing the echelle modes of powerful Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; with resolution and signal-to-noise rivaling the best that can be achieved at ground-based observatories in the visible. During HST Cycle 18 (2010-2011), ASTRAL was allocated 146 orbits to record eight representative late-type ("cool") stars, including well-known cosmic denizens like Procyon and Betelgeuse. In Cycle 21 (2013-2014), ASTRAL was awarded an additional 230 orbits to extend the project to the hot side of the H-R diagram: 21 targets covering the O-A spectral types, including household favorites Vega and Sirius. The second part of the program was completed in January 2015. I describe the scientific motivations for observing hot and cool stars in the UV; the unique instrumental characteristics of STIS that enabled a broad survey like ASTRAL; progress in the program to date; and prospects for the future.

  16. The James Webb Space Telescope: Extending the Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The science objectives of the James Webb Space Telescope fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks. to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and to investigate the potential for life in those systems. These four science themes were used to establish the design requirements for the observatory and instrumentation. Since Webb's capabilities are unique, those science themes will remain relevant through launch and operations and goals contained within these themes will continue to guide the design and implementation choices for the mission. More recently, it has also become clear that Webb will make major contributions to other areas of research, including dark energy, dark matter, exoplanet characterization and Solar System objects. In this paper, I review the original four science themes and discuss how the scientific output of Webb will extend to these new areas of research.

  17. Saturn's northern auroras as observed using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bunce, E. J.; Clarke, J. T.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Hunt, G. J.; Provan, G.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the features of Saturn's northern FUV auroras as observed during a program of Hubble Space Telescope observations which executed over 2011-2013 and culminated, along with Cassini observations, in a comprehensive multi-spectral observing campaign. Our 2011-2013 observations of the northern aurora are also compared with those from our 2007-2008 observation of the southern aurora. We show that the variety of morphologies of the northern auroras is broadly consistent with the southern, and determine the statistical equatorward and poleward boundary locations. We find that our boundaries are overall consistent with previous observations, although a modest poleward displacement of the poleward boundaries is due to the increased prevalence of poleward auroral patches in the noon and afternoon sectors during this program, likely due to the solar wind interaction. We also show that the northern auroral oval oscillates with the northern planetary period oscillation (PPO) phase in an elongated ellipse with semi-major axis ∼1.6° oriented along the post-dawn/post-dusk direction. We further show that the northern auroras exhibit dawn-side brightenings at zero northern magnetic PPO phase, although there is mixed evidence of auroral emissions fixed in the rotating frame of the northern PPO current system, such that overall the dependence of the auroras on northern magnetic phase is somewhat weak.

  18. Stress analysis of the space telescope focal plane structure joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Shoemaker, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Two major efforts were begun concerning the Space Telescope focal plane structure joint. The 3-D solid finite element modeling of the bipod flexure plate was carried out. Conceptual models were developed for the load transfer through the three major bolts to the flexure plate. The flexure plate drawings were reconstructed using DADAM for the purpose of developing a file from which the coordinates of any point on the flexure plate could be determined and also to locate the attachment points of the various components which connect with the flexure plate. For modeling convenience the CADAM drawing of the flexure plate has been divided into several regions which will be subdivided into finite elements using MSGMESH, which is a finite element mesh generator available with MSC/NASTRAN. In addition to the CADAM work on the flexure plate, an effort was also begun to develop computer aided drawings of the peripheral beam which will be used to assist in modeling the connection between it and the flexure plate.

  19. Custom CMOS Reed Solomon coder for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Cameron, K.; Owsley, P.; Maki, G.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI coder is presented that can function either as an encoder or decoder for Reed-Solomon codes. VLSI is one approach to implementing high-performance Reed-Solomon decoders. There are three VLSI technologies that could be used: gate arrays, standard cells, and full custom. The first two approaches are relatively easy to implement, but are limited in both performance and density. Full-custom VLSI is used to achieve both circuit density and speed, and allows control of the amount of interconnect. Speed, which is a function of capacitance, which is a function of interconnect, is an important parameter in high-performance VLSI. A single 8.2 mm x 8.4 mm, 200,000 transistor CMOS chip implementation of the Reed-Solomon code required by the Hubble Space Telescope is reported. The chip features a 10-MHz sustained byte rate independent of error pattern. The 1.6-micron CMOS integrated circuit has complete decoder and encoder functions and uses a single data/system clock. Block lengths up to 255 bytes and shortened codes are supported with no external buffering. Erasure corrections and random error corrections are supported with programmable correction of up to 10 symbol errors. Correction time is independent of error pattern and the number of errors in the incoming message.

  20. Reliability models applicable to space telescope solar array assembly system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A complex system may consist of a number of subsystems with several components in series, parallel, or combination of both series and parallel. In order to predict how well the system will perform, it is necessary to know the reliabilities of the subsystems and the reliability of the whole system. The objective of the present study is to develop mathematical models of the reliability which are applicable to complex systems. The models are determined by assuming k failures out of n components in a subsystem. By taking k = 1 and k = n, these models reduce to parallel and series models; hence, the models can be specialized to parallel, series combination systems. The models are developed by assuming the failure rates of the components as functions of time and as such, can be applied to processes with or without aging effects. The reliability models are further specialized to Space Telescope Solar Arrray (STSA) System. The STSA consists of 20 identical solar panel assemblies (SPA's). The reliabilities of the SPA's are determined by the reliabilities of solar cell strings, interconnects, and diodes. The estimates of the reliability of the system for one to five years are calculated by using the reliability estimates of solar cells and interconnects given n ESA documents. Aging effects in relation to breaks in interconnects are discussed.

  1. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Stationkeeping Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald J.; Alberding, Cassandra; Yu, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will launch in 2018 into a Libration Point Orbit (LPO) around the Sun-EarthMoon (SEM) L2 point, with a planned mission lifetime of 11 years. This paper discusses our approach to Stationkeeping (SK) maneuver planning to determine an adequate SK delta-V budget. The SK maneuver planning for JWST is made challenging by two factors: JWST has a large Sunshield, and JWST will be repointed regularly producing significant changes in Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). To accurately model SRP we employ the Solar Pressure and Drag (SPAD) tool, which uses ray tracing to accurately compute SRP force as a function of attitude. As an additional challenge, the future JWST observation schedule will not be known at the time of SK maneuver planning. Thus there will be significant variation in SRP between SK maneuvers, and the future variation in SRP is unknown. We have enhanced an earlier SK simulation to create a Monte Carlo simulation that incorporates random draws for uncertainties that affect the budget, including random draws of the observation schedule. Each SK maneuver is planned to optimize delta-V magnitude, subject to constraints on spacecraft pointing. We report the results of the Monte Carlo simulations and discuss possible improvements during flight operations to reduce the SK delta-V budget.

  2. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for signals of hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a brief description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  3. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  4. Observational magnetometer calibration with the Hubble Space Telescope's new magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broude, Sidney M.

    1995-05-01

    The two magnetometers recently replaced on the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-61 Servicing Mission are now being used successfully for Coarse Attitude Determination during spacecraft vehicle safemode recovery operation. The magnetometer alignments relative to the spacecraft's vehicle's reference frame and the magnetic coupling of the sensors to the four magnetic torquer bars were determined. Coarse Attitude determination errors are now reduced to an average of 0.6 deg. Magnetometer Sensing System calibration and Coarse Attitude determination testing with the new calibration parameters is a geometrical problem. Telemetered earth magnetic field data was collected at twenty-six different vehicle attitudes. The spacecraft attitudes selected were distributed as widely apart as possible throughout the Geocentric Inertial Coordinate reference frame. It is also desirable to sample the Earth's magnetic field over as many different locations of the spacecraft's passage over the Earth as possible, within the limitation of the +/- 28.5 deg orbital inclination. A full range of magnetic moment outputs from the torquer bars needs to be sampled, +/- 3600 ampmeters squared, as well as data when the torquer bars have zero current. Graphic utilities were also developed to visually aid in optimizing the data collection process. Finally, a brief discussion of a method for collecting data for future calibrations is suggested.

  5. Replacing a technology - The Large Space Telescope and CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. W.; Tatarewicz, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The technological improvements, design choices and mission goals which led to the inclusion of CCD detectors in the wide field camera of the Large Space Telescope (LST) to be launched by the STS are recounted. Consideration of CCD detectors began before CCDs had seen wide astronomical applications. During planning for the ST, in the 1960s, photographic methods and a vidicon were considered, and seemed feasible provided that periodic manual maintenance could be performed. The invention of CCDs was first reported in 1970 and by 1973 the CCDs were receiving significant attention as potential detectors instead of a vidicon, which retained its own technological challenges. The CCD format gained new emphasis when success was achieved in developments for planetary-imaging spacecraft. The rapidity of progress in CCD capabilities, coupled with the continued shortcomings of the vidicon, resulted in a finalized choice for a CCD device by 1977. The decision was also prompted by continuing commercial and military interest in CCDs, which was spurring the development of the technology and improving the sensitivities and reliability while lowering the costs.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The 6.5-m aperture James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool for studying and advancing numerous areas of astrophysics. Its Fine Guidance Sensor, Near-Infrared Camera, Near-Infrared Spectrograph, and Mid-Infrared Instrument will be capable of making very sensitive, high angular resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations spanning 0.7 - 28 ?m wavelength. These capabilities are very well suited for probing the conditions of star formation in the distant and local Universe. Indeed, JWST has been designed to detect first light objects as well as to study the fine details of jets, disks, chemistry, envelopes, and the central cores of nearby protostars. We will be able to use its cameras, coronagraphs, and spectrographs (including multi-object and integral field capabilities) to study many aspects of star forming regions throughout the galaxy, the Local Group, and more distant regions. I will describe the basic JWST scientific capabilities and illustrate a few ways how they can be applied to star formation issues and conditions with a focus on Galactic regions.

  7. Stationkeeping Monte Carlo Simulation for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald J.; Alberding, Cassandra M.; Yu, Wayne H.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is scheduled to launch in 2018 into a Libration Point Orbit (LPO) around the Sun-Earth/Moon (SEM) L2 point, with a planned mission lifetime of 10.5 years after a six-month transfer to the mission orbit. This paper discusses our approach to Stationkeeping (SK) maneuver planning to determine an adequate SK delta-V budget. The SK maneuver planning for JWST is made challenging by two factors: JWST has a large Sunshield, and JWST will be repointed regularly producing significant changes in Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). To accurately model SRP we employ the Solar Pressure and Drag (SPAD) tool, which uses ray tracing to accurately compute SRP force as a function of attitude. As an additional challenge, the future JWST observation schedule will not be known at the time of SK maneuver planning. Thus there will be significant variation in SRP between SK maneuvers, and the future variation in SRP is unknown. We have enhanced an earlier SK simulation to create a Monte Carlo simulation that incorporates random draws for uncertainties that affect the budget, including random draws of the observation schedule. Each SK maneuver is planned to optimize delta-V magnitude, subject to constraints on spacecraft pointing. We report the results of the Monte Carlo simulations and discuss possible improvements during flight operations to reduce the SK delta-V budget.

  8. Discoveries by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Fermi is a large space gamma-ray mission developed by NASA and the DOE with major contributions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Sweden. It was launched in June 2008 and has been performing flawlessly since then. The main instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV range and a smaller monitor instrument is the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating in the 8 keV to 40 MeV range. New findings are occurring every week. Some of the key discoveries are: 1) Discovery of many new gamma-ray pulsars, including gamma-ray only and millisecond pulsars. 2) Detection of high energy gamma-ray emission from globular clusters, most likely due to summed emission from msec pulsars. 3) Discovery of delayed and extended high energy gamma-ray emission from short and long gamma-ray busts. 4) Detection of approximately 250 gamma-ray bursts per year with the GBM instrument. 5) Most accurate measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum between 30 GeV and 1 TeV, showing some excess above the conventional diffusion model. The talk will present the new discoveries and their implications.

  9. Astrometry of the omega Centauri Hubble Space Telescope Calibration Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    Astrometry, on the International Celestial Reference Frame (epoch J2000.0), is presented for the Walker (1994, PASP, 106, 828) stars in the omega Centauri (=NGC 5139=C 1323-1472) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) calibration field of Harris et al. (1993, AJ, 105, 1196). Harris et al. stars were first identified on a WFPC2 observation of the omega Cen HST calibration field. Relative astrometry of the Walker stars in this field was then obtained using Walker's CCD positions and astrometry derived using the STSDAS METRIC task on the positions of the Harris et al. stars on the WFPC2 observation. Finally, the relative astrometry, which was based on the HST Guide Star Catalog, is placed on the International Celestial Reference Frame with astrometry from the USNO-A2.0 catalog. An ASCII text version of the astrometric data of the Walker stars in the omega Cen HST calibration field is available electronically in the online version of the article.

  10. Formation Flying of Components of a Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Quadrelli, Marco; Breckenridge, William

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual space telescope having an aperture tens of meters wide and a focal length of hundreds of meters would be implemented as a group of six separate optical modules flying in formation: a primary-membrane-mirror module, a relay-mirror module, a focal-plane-assembly module containing a fast steering mirror and secondary and tertiary optics, a primary-mirror-figure-sensing module, a scanning-electron-beam module for controlling the shape of the primary mirror, and a sunshade module. Formation flying would make it unnecessary to maintain the required precise alignments among the modules by means of an impractically massive rigid structure. Instead, a control system operating in conjunction with a metrology system comprising optical and radio subsystems would control the firing of small thrusters on the separate modules to maintain the formation, thereby acting as a virtual rigid structure. The control system would utilize a combination of centralized- and decentralized-control methods according to a leader-follower approach. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated in computational simulations that showed that relative positions could be maintained to within a fraction of a millimeter and orientations to within several microradians.

  11. Spike: Artificial intelligence scheduling for Hubble space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark; Miller, Glenn; Sponsler, Jeff; Vick, Shon; Jackson, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Efficient utilization of spacecraft resources is essential, but the accompanying scheduling problems are often computationally intractable and are difficult to approximate because of the presence of numerous interacting constraints. Artificial intelligence techniques were applied to the scheduling of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This presents a particularly challenging problem since a yearlong observing program can contain some tens of thousands of exposures which are subject to a large number of scientific, operational, spacecraft, and environmental constraints. New techniques were developed for machine reasoning about scheduling constraints and goals, especially in cases where uncertainty is an important scheduling consideration and where resolving conflicts among conflicting preferences is essential. These technique were utilized in a set of workstation based scheduling tools (Spike) for HST. Graphical displays of activities, constraints, and schedules are an important feature of the system. High level scheduling strategies using both rule based and neural network approaches were developed. While the specific constraints implemented are those most relevant to HST, the framework developed is far more general and could easily handle other kinds of scheduling problems. The concept and implementation of the Spike system are described along with some experiments in adapting Spike to other spacecraft scheduling domains.

  12. Observational magnetometer calibration with the Hubble Space Telescope's new magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broude, Sidney M.

    1995-01-01

    The two magnetometers recently replaced on the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-61 Servicing Mission are now being used successfully for Coarse Attitude Determination during spacecraft vehicle safemode recovery operation. The magnetometer alignments relative to the spacecraft's vehicle's reference frame and the magnetic coupling of the sensors to the four magnetic torquer bars were determined. Coarse Attitude determination errors are now reduced to an average of 0.6 deg. Magnetometer Sensing System calibration and Coarse Attitude determination testing with the new calibration parameters is a geometrical problem. Telemetered earth magnetic field data was collected at twenty-six different vehicle attitudes. The spacecraft attitudes selected were distributed as widely apart as possible throughout the Geocentric Inertial Coordinate reference frame. It is also desirable to sample the Earth's magnetic field over as many different locations of the spacecraft's passage over the Earth as possible, within the limitation of the +/- 28.5 deg orbital inclination. A full range of magnetic moment outputs from the torquer bars needs to be sampled, +/- 3600 ampmeters squared, as well as data when the torquer bars have zero current. Graphic utilities were also developed to visually aid in optimizing the data collection process. Finally, a brief discussion of a method for collecting data for future calibrations is suggested.

  13. First Solar System Results of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanCleve, J.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Stansberry, J. A.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Devost, D.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Glaccum, W.; Grillmair, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, formerly known as SIRTF, is now operational and delivers unprecedented sensitivity for the observation of Solar System targets. Spitzer's capabilities and first general results were presented at the January 2004 AAS meeting. In this poster, we focus on Spitzer's performance for moving targets, and the first Solar System results. Spitzer has three instruments, IRAC, IRS, and MIPS. IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) provides simultaneous images at wavelengths of 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns. IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) has 4 modules providing low-resolution (R=60-120) spectra from 5.3 to 40 microns, high-resolution (R=600) spectra from 10 to 37 m, and an autonomous target acquisition system (PeakUp) which includes small-field imaging at 15 m. MIPS (Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF) does imaging photometry at 24, 70, and 160 m and low-resolution (R=15-25) spectroscopy (SED) between 55 and 96 microns. Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) programs include the moons of the outer Solar System, Pluto, Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects, and comets

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 3A Rendezvous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Connor, C.; Moy, E.; Smith, D.; Myslinski, M.; Markley, L.; Vernacchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) hardware complement includes six gas bearing, pulse rebalanced rate integrating gyros, any three of which are sufficient to conduct the science mission. After the loss of three gyros between April 1997 and April 1999 due to a known corrosion mechanism, NASA decided to split the third HST servicing mission into SM3A, accelerated to October 1999, and SM3B, scheduled for November 2001. SM3A was developed as a quick turnaround 'Launch on Need' mission to replace all six gyros. Loss of a fourth gyro in November 1999 caused HST to enter Zero Gyro Sunpoint (ZGSP) safemode, which uses sun sensors and magnetometers for attitude determination and momentum bias to maintain attitude stability during orbit night. Several instances of large attitude excursions during orbit night were observed, but ZGSP performance was adequate to provide power-positive sun pointing and to support low gain antenna communications. Body rates in ZGSP were estimated to exceed the nominal 0.1 deg/sec rendezvous limit, so rendezvous operations were restructured to utilize coarse, limited life, Retrieval Mode Gyros (RMGs) under Hardware Sunpoint (HWSP) safemode. Contingency procedures were developed to conduct the rendezvous in ZGSP in the event of RMGA or HWSP computer failure. Space Shuttle Mission STS-103 launched on December 19, 1999 after a series of weather and Shuttle-related delays. After successful rendezvous and grapple under HWSP/RMGA, the crew changed out all six gyros. Following deploy and systems checkout, HST returned to full science operations.

  15. Segmented X-Ray Optics for Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of approx.17 sq cm/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope Ka-Band Trade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Luers, Ed

    2004-01-01

    In August 2003 James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) had its Initial Review Confirmation Assessment Briefing with NASA HQ management. This is a major milestone as the project was approved to proceed from Phase A to B, and NASA will commit funds for the project towards meeting its science goals from the Earth-Sun s Lagrange 2 (L2) environment. At this briefing, the Project was asked, "to take another look" into using, the JPL s Deep Space Network (DSN) as the provider of ground stations and evaluate other ground station options. The current operations concept assumes S-band and X-band communications with a daily &hour contact using the DSN with the goal of transmitting over 250 Gigabit (Gb) of data to the ground. The Project has initiated a trade study to look at this activity, and we would like to share the result of the trade in the conference. Early concept trades tends to focus on the "normal" operation mode of supporting telemetry (science and engineering), command and radio metrics. Entering the design phase, we find that we have the unique ranging requirement for our L2 orbit using alternating ground stations located in different hemispheres. The trade must also address emergency operations (which are covered when using the DSN). This paper describes the issues confronting this Project and how the DSN and the JWST Project are working together to find an optimized approach for meeting these issues. We believe this trade is of major interest for future Code S and other L2 missions in that JWST will set the standard.

  17. DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING IN NGC 6397: STELLAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyl, J. S.; Richer, H.; Woodley, K. A.; Anderson, J.; Dotter, A.; Kalirai, J.; Fahlman, G.; Stetson, P.; Hurley, J.; Rich, R. M.; Shara, M.; Zurek, D.

    2012-12-10

    Multi-epoch observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope provide a unique and comprehensive probe of stellar dynamics within NGC 6397. We are able to confront analytic models of the globular cluster with the observed stellar proper motions. The measured proper motions probe well along the main sequence from 0.8 to below 0.1 M{sub Sun} as well as white dwarfs younger than 1 Gyr. The observed field lies just beyond the half-light radius where standard models of globular cluster dynamics (e.g., based on a lowered Maxwellian phase-space distribution) make very robust predictions for the stellar proper motions as a function of mass. The observed proper motions show no evidence for anisotropy in the velocity distribution; furthermore, the observations agree in detail with a straightforward model of the stellar distribution function. We do not find any evidence that the young white dwarfs have received a natal kick in contradiction with earlier results. Using the observed proper motions of the main-sequence stars, we obtain a kinematic estimate of the distance to NGC 6397 of 2.2{sup +0.5}{sub -0.7} kpc and a mass of the cluster of 1.1 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at the photometric distance of 2.53 kpc. One of the main-sequence stars appears to travel on a trajectory that will escape the cluster, yielding an estimate of the evaporation timescale, over which the number of stars in the cluster decreases by a factor of e, of about 3 Gyr. The proper motions of the youngest white dwarfs appear to resemble those of the most massive main-sequence stars, providing the first direct constraint on the relaxation time of the stars in a globular cluster of greater than or about 0.7 Gyr.

  18. Orbits and Pointing Strategies for Space-Based Telescopes into a European Space Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Ramos-Lerate, Mercedes

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the inclusion of optical images acquired from orbiting telescopes into an autonomous European space surveillance system via the Advance Space Surveillance System Simulator (AS4). Special interest on space-based observation of GEO objects exists since it avoids the weather dependence and longitudinal restrictions of ground-based observations of those objects. Furthermore, space-based observations allow the detection of small objects that are not detected from ground-based sensors.In order to analyze the impact of space-based telescopes images, several aspects have to be studied. The first consideration is the selection of the appropriate orbits to locate the telescopes. A description of the most suitable orbits and strategies for the observation of space debris population will be provided.Once an appropriated orbit has been selected, the next important consideration is the analysis of an optimized pointing strategy and its associated requirements for feasibility. Several pointing strategies will be exposed by analyzing, among other factors, the impact of luminosity conditions in the most populated regions to be observed. Numerical results are presented in the form of statistics, which reflect the compromise between the density of detected objects, and other important parameters for orbit determination and cataloguing purposes as re-acquisition times or measurement track duration.Finally, overall analyses of possible space-based constellations are presented. Such constellations are aimed to solve the main drawbacks in considering only one satellite at the selected orbit. This is for example the case of revisit times when considering a sub GEO orbiting telescope which can be solve by re-distributing several sensors in the orbit. It will also allow carrying on more complex pointing strategies by the definition of several sensors located at same orbit pointed at two different regions.The AS4 was developed by DEIMOS Space ([1], [2] and also [5]). The

  19. Selling the Space Telescope - The interpenetration of science, technology, and politics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the politics of initiating the Space Telescope program and to the manner in which the coalition, or working consensus, for the Telescope was assembled, in particular, the role played by astronomers. It is contended that what ensued was a case study in the influence of government patronage on a large-scale scientific and technological program. It is concluded that while a politically feasible Space Telescope did result, in the selling process the Telescope had been both oversold and underfunded.

  20. New Observational Constraints on the υ Andromedae System with Data from the Hubble Space Telescope and Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Barnes, Rory; Martioli, Eder; Korzennik, Sylvain; Nelan, Ed; Butler, R. Paul

    2010-06-01

    We have used high-cadence radial velocity (RV) measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with existing velocities from the Lick, Elodie, Harlan J. Smith, and Whipple 60'' telescopes combined with astrometric data from the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors to refine the orbital parameters and determine the orbital inclinations and position angles of the ascending node of components υ And A c and d. With these inclinations and using M * = 1.31M sun as a primary mass, we determine the actual masses of two of the companions: υ And A c is 13.98+2.3 -5.3 M JUP, and υ And A d is 10.25+0.7 -3.3 M JUP. These measurements represent the first astrometric determination of mutual inclination between objects in an extrasolar planetary system, which we find to be 29fdg9 ± 1°. The combined RV measurements also reveal a long-period trend indicating a fourth planet in the system. We investigate the dynamic stability of this system and analyze regions of stability, which suggest a probable mass of υ And A b. Finally, our parallaxes confirm that υ And B is a stellar companion of υ And A. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitt Mnchen, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  1. NICMOS Imaging of the Dusty Microjansky Radio Source VLA J123642+621331 at z = 4.424.

    PubMed

    Waddington; Windhorst; Cohen; Partridge; Spinrad; Stern

    1999-12-01

    We present the discovery of a radio galaxy at a likely redshift of z=4.424 in one of the flanking fields of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). Radio observations with the Very Large Array and MERLIN centered on the HDF yielded a complete sample of microjansky radio sources, of which about 20% have no optical counterpart to ISpace Telescope near-infrared camera and multiobject spectrometer (NICMOS) images in the F110W (J110) and F160W (H160) filters. VLA J123642+621331 has a single emission line at 6595 Å, which we identify with Lyalpha at z=4.424. We argue that this faint (H160=23.9 mag), compact (re approximately 0&farcs;2), red (I814-K=2.0) object is most likely a dusty, star-forming galaxy with an embedded active nucleus.

  2. On the detection of molecules in the atmosphere of HD 189733b using HST NICMOS transmission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Mark R.; Deroo, Pieter; Line, Michael R.

    2014-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS transmission spectrum measurements of HD 189733b that suggest the detection of methane (CH{sub 4}) in an exoplanet atmosphere have been a source of significant controversy. With what is probably the best analyzed exoplanet spectroscopy data set to date, different teams, using different methods, have claimed evidence both contradicting and supporting the original findings. Here, we report results from a uniform spectral retrieval analysis of the three independent published spectra together with null hypothesis testing. Based on Bayesian model comparison, we find that two of the three spectra show strong evidence (≥3.6σ) for the detection of molecular features mainly due to water and methane while the third is consistent with a weak molecular detection at the 2.2σ level. We interpret the agreement in the spectral modulation established by previous authors and the atmospheric retrieval results presented here, as a confirmation of the original detection of molecular absorbers in the atmosphere of HD 189733b.

  3. Cosmic water traced by Europe's space telescope ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    In retracing this history, ISO also observes water in the form of ice in cooler regions around the stars, and in the dust surrounding young stars, from which planets could evolve. Comets represent an intermediate stage in planet-building, and they contain much water ice. According to one hypothesis the newly formed Earth received some of its water directly from impacting comets. Water vapour in the Earth's atmosphere has prevented telescopes on the ground from detecting the water vapour among the stars, except in very unusual circumstances. ISO orbiting in space escapes the impediment of the atmosphere. Excellent onboard instruments register the characteristic infrared signatures of water vapour, water ice and many other materials. When ISO scrutinizes selected objects, it detects emissions or absorptions of infrared rays at particular wavelengths, or "lines" in a spectrum, which reveal the presence of identifiable atoms, molecules and solids. The Short Wavelength Specrometer and the Long Wavelength Spectrometer provide detailed chemical diagnoses, and the photometer ISOPHOT and camera ISOCAM also have important spectroscopic capabilities. Examples of water detection were among many topics reviewed at the First ISO Science Workshop held at ESA's Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands (29-31 May) when 300 astronomers from Europe, the USA and Japan gathered to assess results from ISO since its launch on 17 November 1995. The Long Wavelength Spectrometer has made remarkable observations of water-vapour lines in the vicinity of dying stars and in star-forming regions. So has the Short Wavelength Spectrometer, which also detects water ice. The photometer lSOPHOT has registered water ice in a large number of objects. Although fascinated by the natural history of water in the cosmos, astronomers have more technical reasons for welcoming ISO's observations. They can use thc details in a spectrum to reduce the abundance of water and its

  4. James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Mather, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has contributed significantly to studies of dark energy. It was used to find the first evidence of deceleration at z=1.8 (Riess et al. 2001) through the serendipitous discovery of a type 1a supernova (SN1a) in the Hubble Deep Field. The discovery of deceleration at z greater than 1 was confirmation that the apparent acceleration at low redshift (Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999) was due to dark energy rather than observational or astrophysical effects such as systematic errors, evolution in the SN1a population or intergalactic dust. The GOODS project and associated follow-up discovered 21 SN1a, expanding on this result (Riess et al. 2007). HST has also been used to constrain cosmological parameters and dark energy through weak lensing measurements in the COSMOS survey (Massey et al 2007; Schrabback et al 2009) and strong gravitational lensing with measured time delays (Suyu et al 2010). Constraints on dark energy are often parameterized as the equation of state, w = P/p. For the cosmological constant model, w = -1 at all times; other models predict a change with time, sometimes parameterized generally as w(a) or approximated as w(sub 0)+(1-a)w(sub a), where a = (1+z)(sup -1) is the scale factor of the universe relative to its current scale. Dark energy can be constrained through several measurements. Standard candles, such as SN1a, provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance as a function of redshift, which can be converted to H(z), the change in the Hubble constant with redshift. An analysis of weak lensing in a galaxy field can be used to derive the angular-diameter distance from the weak-lensing equation and to measure the power spectrum of dark-matter halos, which constrains the growth of structure in the Universe. Baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), imprinted on the distribution of matter at recombination, provide a standard rod for measuring the cosmological geometry. Strong gravitational lensing of a

  5. Update on Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Models for Ground and Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper reports on recent revisions and improvements to our ground telescope cost model and refinements of our understanding of space telescope cost models. One interesting observation is that while space telescopes are 50X to 100X more expensive than ground telescopes, their respective scaling relationships are similar. Another interesting speculation is that the role of technology development may be different between ground and space telescopes. For ground telescopes, the data indicates that technology development tends to reduce cost by approximately 50% every 20 years. But for space telescopes, there appears to be no such cost reduction because we do not tend to re-fly similar systems. Thus, instead of reducing cost, 20 years of technology development may be required to enable a doubling of space telescope capability. Other findings include: mass should not be used to estimate cost; spacecraft and science instrument costs account for approximately 50% of total mission cost; and, integration and testing accounts for only about 10% of total mission cost.

  6. Spiral Galaxies with HST/NICMOS. II. Isophotal Fits and Nuclear Cusp Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc; Carollo, C. Marcella; Stiavelli, Massimo; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Dejonghe, Herwig

    2002-01-01

    NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  7. Distance determinations to shield galaxies from Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Cave, Ian; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Salzer, John J.; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Elson, Ed C.; Ott, Juërgen; Saintonge, Amélie

    2014-04-10

    The Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarf (SHIELD) galaxies is an ongoing multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey based on their inferred low H I mass and low baryonic mass, and all systems have recent star formation. Thus, the SHIELD sample probes the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function for star-forming galaxies. Here, we measure the distances to the 12 SHIELD galaxies to be between 5 and 12 Mpc by applying the tip of the red giant method to the resolved stellar populations imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. Based on these distances, the H I masses in the sample range from 4 × 10{sup 6} to 6 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, with a median H I mass of 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. The tip of the red giant branch distances are up to 73% farther than flow-model estimates in the ALFALFA catalog. Because of the relatively large uncertainties of flow-model distances, we are biased toward selecting galaxies from the ALFALFA catalog where the flow model underestimates the true distances. The measured distances allow for an assessment of the native environments around the sample members. Five of the galaxies are part of the NGC 672 and NGC 784 groups, which together constitute a single structure. One galaxy is part of a larger linear ensemble of nine systems that stretches 1.6 Mpc from end to end. Three galaxies reside in regions with 1-9 neighbors, and four galaxies are truly isolated with no known system identified within a radius of 1 Mpc.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Image: Planetary Nebula IC 4406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a rainbow of colors in this dying star, called IC 446. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 446 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We do not see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting HST. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut. This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.' The donut of material confines the intense radiation coming from the remnant of the dying star. Gas on the inside of the donut is ionized by light from the central star and glows. Light from oxygen atoms is rendered blue in this image; hydrogen is shown as green, and nitrogen as red. The range of color in the final image shows the differences in concentration of these three gases in the nebula. This image is a composite of data taken by HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in June 2001 and in January 2002 by Bob O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and collaborators, and in January by the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). Filters used to create this color image show oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas glowing in this object.

  9. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY OF THE PROCYON SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Howard E.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Nelan, Edmund P.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Demarque, Pierre; Girard, Terrence M.; Holberg, Jay B.; Gudehus, Donald; Mason, Brian D.; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Barstow, Martin A.

    2015-11-10

    The nearby star Procyon is a visual binary containing the F5 IV-V subgiant Procyon A, orbited in a 40.84-year period by the faint DQZ white dwarf (WD) Procyon B. Using images obtained over two decades with the Hubble Space Telescope, and historical measurements back to the 19th century, we have determined precise orbital elements. Combined with measurements of the parallax and the motion of the A component, these elements yield dynamical masses of 1.478 ± 0.012 M{sub ⊙} and 0.592 ± 0.006 M{sub ⊙} for A and B, respectively. The mass of Procyon A agrees well with theoretical predictions based on asteroseismology and its temperature and luminosity. Use of a standard core-overshoot model agrees best for a surprisingly high amount of core overshoot. Under these modeling assumptions, Procyon A’s age is ∼2.7 Gyr. Procyon B’s location in the H-R diagram is in excellent agreement with theoretical cooling tracks for WDs of its dynamical mass. Its position in the mass–radius plane is also consistent with theory, assuming a carbon–oxygen core and a helium-dominated atmosphere. Its progenitor’s mass was 1.9–2.2 M{sub ⊙}, depending on its amount of core overshoot. Several astrophysical puzzles remain. In the progenitor system, the stars at periastron were separated by only ∼5 AU, which might have led to tidal interactions and even mass transfer; yet there is no direct evidence that these have occurred. Moreover the orbital eccentricity has remained high (∼0.40). The mass of Procyon B is somewhat lower than anticipated from the initial-to-final-mass relation seen in open clusters. The presence of heavy elements in its atmosphere requires ongoing accretion, but the place of origin is uncertain.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Image of NGC 4676, 'The Mice'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), the newest camera on the Hubble Space Telescope, has captured a spectacular pair of galaxies. Located 300 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices, the colliding galaxies have been nicknamed 'The Mice' because of the long tails of stars and gas emanating from each galaxy. Otherwise known as NGC 4676, the pair will eventually merge into a single giant galaxy. In the galaxy at left, the bright blue patch is resolved into a vigorous cascade of clusters and associations of young, hot blue stars, whose formation has been triggered by the tidal forces of the gravitational interaction. The clumps of young stars in the long, straight tidal tail (upper right) are separated by fainter regions of material. These dim regions suggest that the clumps of stars have formed from the gravitational collapse of the gas and dust that once occupied those areas. Some of the clumps have luminous masses comparable to dwarf galaxies that orbit the halo of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Computer simulations by astronomers show that we are seeing two near identical spiral galaxies approximately 160 million years after their closest encounter. The simulations also show that the pair will eventually merge, forming a large, nearly spherical galaxy (known as an elliptical galaxy). The Mice presage what may happen to our own Milky Way several billion years from now when it collides with our nearest large neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). This picture is assembled from three sets of images taken on April 7, 2002, in blue, orange, and near-infrared filters. Credit: NASA, H. Fort (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry of the Procyon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Demarque, Pierre; Girard, Terrence M.; Holberg, Jay B.; Gudehus, Donald; Mason, Brian D.; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Burleigh, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The nearby star Procyon is a visual binary containing the F5 IV-V subgiant Procyon A, orbited in a 40.84-year period by the faint DQZ white dwarf (WD) Procyon B. Using images obtained over two decades with the Hubble Space Telescope, and historical measurements back to the 19th century, we have determined precise orbital elements. Combined with measurements of the parallax and the motion of the A component, these elements yield dynamical masses of 1.478 plus or minus 0.012M and 0.592 plus or minus 0.006M for A and B, respectively. The mass of Procyon A agrees well with theoretical predictions based on asteroseismology and its temperature and luminosity. Use of a standard core-overshoot model agrees best for a surprisingly high amount of core overshoot. Under these modeling assumptions, Procyon A's age is approximately 2.7 Gyr. Procyon B's location in the H-R diagram is in excellent agreement with theoretical cooling tracks for WDs of its dynamical mass. Its position in the mass-radius plane is also consistent with theory, assuming a carbon-oxygen core and a helium-dominated atmosphere. Its progenitor's mass was 1.9-2.2M, depending on its amount of core overshoot. Several astrophysical puzzles remain. In the progenitor system, the stars at periastron were separated by only approximately AU, which might have led to tidal interactions and even mass transfer; yet there is no direct evidence that these have occurred. Moreover the orbital eccentricity has remained high (approximately 0.40). The mass of Procyon B is somewhat lower than anticipated from the initial-to-final-mass relation seen in open clusters. The presence of heavy elements in its atmosphere requires ongoing accretion, but the place of origin is uncertain.

  12. Spitzer Space Telescope Observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, T.; Woodward, C. E.; Gehrz, R. D.; Polomski, E. F.; Rudnick, L.; Davidson, K. D.

    2005-05-01

    Supernova events play an important role in the study of nucleosynthesis of heavy elements and the enrichment of the interstellar medium. The Crab Nebula was formed by a supernova explosion in 1054 A.D. making it one of the youngest known supernova remnants and one of the most studied objects in the Galaxy. Here we present the first high resolution infrared images of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) at all bands as well as the MIPS 24 micron image. The 8.0 micron image resembles the general morphology of H-α and [Fe II] line emission, while the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images seem to be dominated by continuum emission. The ratio of the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images reveals a spatial variation in the synchrotron power law index ranging from 0.2 to 0.7 across the nebula, with an overall index of 0.42. The ratio map also reveals local flux enhancements that suggest the presence of dust in the nebula. These correspond to absorption features at visible wavelengths, the cores of filaments at 8.0 microns, and the brightest features in the 24 micron image. One of these features includes the ropelike structure identified in HST WFPC2 images (see Blair et al. 1997, ApJS, 109, 473). We also find evidence for point-like emission in all bands that is coincident with the position of the puslar. Support for this work is in part provided by NASA through contracts 1256406 and 1215746 issued by JPL/Caltech to the University of Minnesota as well as an NSF grant, Ast 02-05814.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  14. Hubble Space Telescope EVA Power Ratchet Tool redesign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Paul W.; Park, Chan; Brown, Lee

    The Power Ratchet Tool (PRT) is a self contained, power-driven, 3/8 inch drive ratchet wrench which will be used by astronauts during Extravehicular Activities (EVA). This battery-powered tool is controlled by a dedicated electonic controller. The PRT was flown during the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Deployment Mission STS-31 to deploy the solar arrays if the automatic mechanisms failed. The PRT is currently intended for use during the first HST Servicing Mission STS-61 as a general purpose power tool. The PRT consists of three major components; the wrench, the controller, and the battery module. Fourteen discrete combinations of torque, turns, and speed may be programmed into the controller before the EVA. The crewmember selects the desired parameter profile by a switch mounted on the controller. The tool may also be used in the manual mode as a non-powered ratchet wrench. The power is provided by a silver-zinc battery module, which fits into the controller and is replaceable during an EVA. The original PRT did not meet the design specification of torque output and hours of operation. To increase efficiency and reliability the PRT underwent a redesign effort. The majority of this effort focused on the wrench. The original PRT drive train consisted of a low torque, high speed brushless DC motor, a face gear set, and a planocentric gear assembly. The total gear reduction was 300:1. The new PRT wrench consists of a low speed, high torque brushless DC motor, two planetary gear sets and a bevel gear set. The total gear reduction is now 75:1. A spline clutch has also been added to disengage the drive train in the manual mode. The design changes to the controller will consist of only those modifications necessary to accomodate the redesigned wrench.

  15. A bandwidth efficient coding scheme for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrobon, Steven S.; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    As a demonstration of the performance capabilities of trellis codes using multidimensional signal sets, a Viterbi decoder was designed. The choice of code was based on two factors. The first factor was its application as a possible replacement for the coding scheme currently used on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST at present uses the rate 1/3 nu = 6 (with 2 (exp nu) = 64 states) convolutional code with Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation. With the modulator restricted to a 3 Msym/s, this implies a data rate of only 1 Mbit/s, since the bandwidth efficiency K = 1/3 bit/sym. This is a very bandwidth inefficient scheme, although the system has the advantage of simplicity and large coding gain. The basic requirement from NASA was for a scheme that has as large a K as possible. Since a satellite channel was being used, 8PSK modulation was selected. This allows a K of between 2 and 3 bit/sym. The next influencing factor was INTELSAT's intention of transmitting the SONET 155.52 Mbit/s standard data rate over the 72 MHz transponders on its satellites. This requires a bandwidth efficiency of around 2.5 bit/sym. A Reed-Solomon block code is used as an outer code to give very low bit error rates (BER). A 16 state rate 5/6, 2.5 bit/sym, 4D-8PSK trellis code was selected. This code has reasonable complexity and has a coding gain of 4.8 dB compared to uncoded 8PSK (2). This trellis code also has the advantage that it is 45 deg rotationally invariant. This means that the decoder needs only to synchronize to one of the two naturally mapped 8PSK signals in the signal set.

  16. Determination and characterization of the Hubble Space Telescope pointing stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, A. J.; Connor, C. T.; Del Toro, Y.; Andersen, G. C.; Bely, Pierre Y.; Decker, J.; Franz, O. G.; Wasserman, L. H.; Van Altena, William F.

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed to maintian a pointing stability (jitter) of 0.007 arc seconds rms throughout every observing period, which can last from a few seconds to several orbits. On-orbit measurements indicate that the hardware excitation induced by the reaction wheels. gyros, high gain antennae, science instrument mechanisms and tape recorders are well within specifications. Unexpectedly, the solar arrays because the dominant source of jitter. Every passage through an orbital terminator produces vibrations which emanate from the solar arrays due to thermal effects, which affect the relative positional stability. Broadband frequencies centered about 0.11 and 0.65 Hz were detected in the frequency content of the vehicle jitter. On-board modifications to the control law have attenuated the disturbance torques and reduced the vehicle jitter close to specification. Replacement of the solar arrays in December, 1993, should eliminate the torque distubances. Astrometric science observations are extremely susceptible to corruption from vehicle jitter. The removal of vehicle jitter from astrometric Transfer function scans of binary stars is explained in detail. A binary star separation of 16 milli-seconds of arc has been achieved, a separation resolution of 10 to 12 milli-seconds of arc appears feasible, with a binary star magnitude of 9 m(sub V). The achievement of this resolution is in part due to vehicle jitter removal. Comparison of vehicle jitter measurements from the position path of the vehicle control law, or from the guiding Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS), are shown to be equivalent to approximately 0.001 arc second.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF POST-STARBURST QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cales, S. L.; Brotherton, M. S.; Shang Zhaohui; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Canalizo, G.; Stoll, R.; Ganguly, R.; Vanden Berk, D.; Paul, C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. E-mail: mbrother@uwyo.edu E-mail: bennert@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: stoll@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: daniel.vandenberk@email.stvincent.edu E-mail: aleks@ucsd.edu

    2011-11-10

    We present images of 29 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel Snapshot program. These broadlined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive (M{sub burst} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}), moderate-aged stellar populations (hundreds of Myr). Thus, their composite nature provides insight into the AGN-starburst connection. We measure quasar-to-host galaxy light contributions via semi-automated two-dimensional light profile fits of point-spread-function-subtracted images. We examine the host morphologies and model the separate bulge and disk components. The HST/ACS-F606W images reveal an equal number of spiral (13/29) and early-type (13/29) hosts, with the remaining three hosts having indeterminate classifications. AGNs hosted by early-type galaxies have on average greater luminosity than those hosted by spiral galaxies. Disturbances such as tidal tails, shells, star-forming knots, and asymmetries are seen as signposts of interaction/merger activity. Disturbances like these were found in 17 of the 29 objects and are evenly distributed among early-type and spiral galaxies. Two of these systems are clearly merging with their companions. Compared to other AGNs of similar luminosity and redshift, these PSQs have a higher fraction of early-type hosts and disturbances. Our most luminous objects with disturbed early-type host galaxies appear to be consistent with merger products. Thus, these luminous galaxies may represent a phase in an evolutionary scenario for merger-driven activity. Our less luminous objects appear to be consistent with Seyfert galaxies not requiring triggering by major mergers. Many of these Seyferts are barred spiral galaxies.

  18. The Development and Mission of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, David B.; Irace, William R.; Werner, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the SIRTF mission, telescope, cryostat, instruments, spacecraft, orbit, operations and project management approach; and this paper serves as an introduction to the accompanying set of detailed papers about specific aspects of SIRTF.

  19. Design of a shuttle-based space debris telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Talent, D. L.; Tritsch, C. L.; Vilas, F.

    1990-01-01

    A 1.6-meter diameter f/0.95 all-reflecting telescope was designed to observe orbital debris particles as small as 1 mm from the shuttle payload bay. The telescope was specified to have a flat focal surface without the imposition of refractive elements. Two design configurations involving three mirrors were evaluated - a reflective Schmidt-Cassegrain and a modified Paul corrector. The Paul system was found to be more compact and appropriate for this application.

  20. Development of a Multivariable Parametric Cost Analysis for Space-Based Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollinger, Courtnay

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 400 years, the telescope has proven to be a valuable tool in helping humankind understand the Universe around us. The images and data produced by telescopes have revolutionized planetary, solar, stellar, and galactic astronomy and have inspired a wide range of people, from the child who dreams about the images seen on NASA websites to the most highly trained scientist. Like all scientific endeavors, astronomical research must operate within the constraints imposed by budget limitations. Hence the importance of understanding cost: to find the balance between the dreams of scientists and the restrictions of the available budget. By logically analyzing the data we have collected for over thirty different telescopes from more than 200 different sources, statistical methods, such as plotting regressions and residuals, can be used to determine what drives the cost of telescopes to build and use a cost model for space-based telescopes. Previous cost models have focused their attention on ground-based telescopes due to limited data for space telescopes and the larger number and longer history of ground-based astronomy. Due to the increased availability of cost data from recent space-telescope construction, we have been able to produce and begin testing a comprehensive cost model for space telescopes, with guidance from the cost models for ground-based telescopes. By separating the variables that effect cost such as diameter, mass, wavelength, density, data rate, and number of instruments, we advance the goal to better understand the cost drivers of space telescopes.. The use of sophisticated mathematical techniques to improve the accuracy of cost models has the potential to help society make informed decisions about proposed scientific projects. An improved knowledge of cost will allow scientists to get the maximum value returned for the money given and create a harmony between the visions of scientists and the reality of a budget.