Science.gov

Sample records for space vehicles

  1. Space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A space vehicle having an improved ascent configuration for use in traveling in space is presented. Components of the vehicle are: (1) a winged orbiter having an elongater fuselage and rearwardly directed main engines fixed to the fuselage; (2) an elongated tank assembly of an improved configuration disposed forwardly of the fuselage and connected with the main engines of the vehicle for supplying liquid propellants; and (3) a booster stage comprising a pair of integrated solid rocket boosters connected with the orbiter immediately beneath the fuselage and extended in substantial parallelism.

  2. Space vehicle chassis

    DOEpatents

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Seitz, Daniel; Martinez, John; Storms, Steven; Kestell, Gayle

    2017-07-18

    A modular space vehicle chassis may facilitate convenient access to internal components of the space vehicle. Each module may be removable from the others such that each module may be worked on individually. Multiple panels of at least one of the modules may swing open or otherwise be removable, exposing large portions of the internal components of the space vehicle. Such chassis architectures may reduce the time required for and difficulty of performing maintenance or modifications, may allow multiple space vehicles to take advantage of a common chassis design, and may further allow for highly customizable space vehicles.

  3. SPACE VEHICLE CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book acquaints the reader with the basic principles of space vehicle control. It contains three sections which consider the basic properties of... space vehicle are considered, and an investigation of spatial orientation of a vehicle with the help of flywheel engines is conducted. There appears the

  4. Solar space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.E.

    1982-10-19

    This invention relates to space vehicle where solar energy is used to generate steam, which in turn, propels the vehicle in space. A copper boiler is provided and a novel solar radiation condensing means is used to focus the sunlight on said boiler. Steam generated in said boiler is exhausted to the environment to provide a thrust for the vehicle.

  5. Space Vehicle Valve System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a space vehicle valve system which controls the internal pressure of a space vehicle and the flow rate of purged gases at a given internal pressure and aperture site. A plurality of quasi-unique variable dimension peaked valve structures cover the purge apertures on a space vehicle. Interchangeable sheet guards configured to cover valve apertures on the peaked valve structure contain a pressure-activated surface on the inner surface. Sheet guards move outwardly from the peaked valve structure when in structural contact with a purge gas stream flowing through the apertures on the space vehicle. Changing the properties of the sheet guards changes the response of the sheet guards at a given internal pressure, providing control of the flow rate at a given aperture site.

  6. Space robot simulator vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H.

    1985-01-01

    A Space Robot Simulator Vehicle (SRSV) was constructed to model a free-flying robot capable of doing construction, manipulation and repair work in space. The SRSV is intended as a test bed for development of dynamic and static control methods for space robots. The vehicle is built around a two-foot-diameter air-cushion vehicle that carries batteries, power supplies, gas tanks, computer, reaction jets and radio equipment. It is fitted with one or two two-link manipulators, which may be of many possible designs, including flexible-link versions. Both the vehicle body and its first arm are nearly complete. Inverse dynamic control of the robot's manipulator has been successfully simulated using equations generated by the dynamic simulation package SDEXACT. In this mode, the position of the manipulator tip is controlled not by fixing the vehicle base through thruster operation, but by controlling the manipulator joint torques to achieve the desired tip motion, while allowing for the free motion of the vehicle base. One of the primary goals is to minimize use of the thrusters in favor of intelligent control of the manipulator. Ways to reduce the computational burden of control are described.

  7. Space vehicle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Michael; Meredith, Oliver; Brothers, Bobby

    1986-01-01

    Several concepts of chemical-propulsion Space Vehicles (SVs) for manned Mars landing missions are presented. For vehicle sizing purposes, several specific missions were chosen from opportunities in the late 1990's and early 2000's, and a vehicle system concept is then described which is applicable to the full range of missions and opportunities available. In general, missions utilizing planetary opposition alignments can be done with smaller vehicles than those utilizing planetary opposition alignments. The conjunction missions have a total mission time of about 3 years, including a required stay-time of about 60 days. Both types of missions might be desirable during a Mars program, the opposition type for early low-risk missions and/or for later unmanned cargo missions, and the conjunction type for more extensive science/exploration missions and/or for Mars base activities. Since the opposition missions appeared to drive the SV size more severely, there were probably more cases examined for them. Some of the concepts presented utilize all-propulsive braking, some utilize and all aerobraking approach, and some are hybrids. Weight statements are provided for various cases. Most of the work was done on 0-g vehicle concepts, but partial-g and 1-g concepts are also provided and discussed. Several options for habitable elements are shown, such as large-diameter modules and space station (SS) types of modules.

  8. Aeroacoustics of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    While for airplanes the subject of aeroacoustics is associated with community noise, for space vehicles it is associated with vibro-acoustics and structural dynamics. Surface pressure fluctuations encountered during launch and travel through lower part of the atmosphere create intense vibro-acoustics environment for the payload, electronics, navigational equipment, and a large number of subsystems. All of these components have to be designed and tested for flight-certification. This presentation will cover all three major sources encountered in manned and unmanned space vehicles: launch acoustics, ascent acoustics and abort acoustics. Launch pads employ elaborate acoustic suppression systems to mitigate the ignition pressure waves and rocket plume generated noise during the early part of the liftoff. Recently we have used large microphone arrays to identify the noise sources during liftoff and found that the standard model by Eldred and Jones (NASA SP-8072) to be grossly inadequate. As the vehicle speeds up and reaches transonic speed in relatively denser part of the atmosphere, various shock waves and flow separation events create unsteady pressure fluctuations that can lead to high vibration environment, and occasional coupling with the structural modes, which may lead to buffet. Examples of wind tunnel tests and computational simulations to optimize the outer mold line to quantify and reduce the surface pressure fluctuations will be presented. Finally, a manned space vehicle needs to be designed for crew safety during malfunctioning of the primary rocket vehicle. This brings the subject of acoustic environment during abort. For NASAs Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), abort will be performed by lighting rocket motors atop the crew module. The severe aeroacoustics environments during various abort scenarios were measured for the first time by using hot helium to simulate rocket plumes in the Ames unitary plan wind tunnels. Various considerations used for the

  9. Space Shuttle Vehicle Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle represented an entirely new generation of space vehicle, the world's first reusable spacecraft. Unlike earlier expendable rockets, the Shuttle was designed to be launched over and over again and would serve as a system for ferrying payloads and persornel to and from Earth orbit. The Shuttle's major components are the orbiter spacecraft; the three main engines, with a combined thrust of more than 1.2 million pounds; the huge external tank (ET) that feeds the liquid hydrogen fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer to the three main engines; and the two solid rocket boosters (SRB's), with their combined thrust of some 5.8 million pounds. The SRB's provide most of the power for the first two minutes of flight. Crucially involved with the Space Shuttle program virtually from its inception, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a leading role in the design, development, testing, and fabrication of many major Shuttle propulsion components. The MSFC was assigned responsibility for developing the Shuttle orbiter's high-performance main engines, the most complex rocket engines ever built. The MSFC was also responsible for developing the Shuttle's massive ET and the solid rocket motors and boosters.

  10. The aerobraking space transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Glen; Carpenter, Brian; Corns, Steve; Harris, Robert; Jun, Brian; Munro, Bruce; Pulling, Eric; Sekhon, Amrit; Welton, Walt; Jakubowski, A.

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Station and the proposed Geosynchronous Operation Support Center (GeoShack) in the early 21st century, the need for a cost effective, reusable orbital transport vehicle has arisen. This transport vehicle will be used in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, the Space Station, and GeoShack. The vehicle will transfer mission crew and payloads between low earth and geosynchronous orbits with minimal cost. Recent technological advances in thermal protection systems such as those employed in the Space Shuttle have made it possible to incorporate and aerobrake on the transfer vehicle to further reduce transport costs. The research and final design configuration of the aerospace senior design team from VPISU, working in conjunction with NASA, are presented. The topic of aerobraking and focuses on the evolution of an Aerobraking Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV), is addressed.

  11. Robotics for space vehicle processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Manouchehri, D.; Hansen, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The work represents significant advances in robotics for the safe and efficient processing of the Space Shuttle. The rewaterproofing end-effector is complete and brings significant benefits. For example, the DMES leak-detection and containment feature fully contains all DMES, thus improving efficiency, and all data collection and analysis are automated. In addition, it lays the groundwork for the expanded use of robotics in other space vehicle launch-site operations.

  12. Leasecraft - An innovative space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deskevich, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Leasecraft system has been developed by an American aerospace company with the objective to further the industrialization of space with its significant business potential. This system comprises a low orbit space platform, an operation control center, user accommodations, and services such as payload interfaces, documentation, and ground support equipment and procedures. Potential applications of Leasecraft considered are related to the processing of pharmaceuticals and materials, satellite-aided search and rescue, data collection, and support of NASA's astrophysics programs. The Leasecraft space vehicle will accommodate up to five modular power subsystems, including a communications and data handling module, a modular attitude control subsystem, a special function module, two alternative solar array assemblies, a tracking and data relay satellite system antenna assembly, a propulsion module, and optional primary and secondary payload modules.

  13. SPACE VEHICLE NAVIGATION, GUIDANCE, AND CONTROL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report contains a summary of space vehicle guidance and control plus an extensive bibliography of the subject area. This report is intended to...encompass only the interplanetary portion of the space vehicle flight. Launch vehicle guidance and control is covered in RSIC-494, entitled Methods of

  14. Unmanned space vehicle technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, U.; Accardo, D.; Grassi, M.; Curreri, F.

    2007-02-01

    The unmanned space vehicle (USV) program has been undertaken by the Italian Center for Aerospace Research with the aim of developing flying test beds of next generation reentry launch vehicles. In this framework, the development of small demonstrators is also foreseen to validate technological and operational aspects of full-scale vehicles and missions. In this paper, a small-scale demonstrator of the sub-orbital re-entry test mission of the USV program is described. Both mission profile and objectives are very challenging in terms of demonstrator guidance, navigation and control. After a short description of the mission and demonstrator architectures, particular emphasis is given to the guidance and navigation analysis. To this end, mission objectives and reduced-scale system constaints are integrated and translated into innovative guidance solutions relying on optimization techniques. Then, performance of a commercial-off-the-shelf GPS-aided, miniature inertial navigation system over the proposed trajectories is evaluated by Monte Carlo analysis. Standalone inertial and GPS-aided inertial navigation performance is also compared considering GPS loss conditions due to antenna plasma effects.

  15. Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The space vehicle for Gravity Probe B (GP-B) arrives at the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Scheduled for launch in 2003 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center, development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation.

  16. ISS Update: Powering the Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Abbie Ryan, lead engineer for the fuel cell of the Multi-Mission Space E...

  17. Planned development of the space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information pertaining to the planned development of the space shuttle vehicle is presented. The package contains: (1) President's statement; (2) Dr. Fletcher's statement; (3) space shuttle fact sheet; (4) important reasons for the space shuttle.

  18. Space Vehicle Reliability Modeling in DIORAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tornga, Shawn Robert

    2016-07-12

    When modeling system performance of space based detection systems it is important to consider spacecraft reliability. As space vehicles age the components become prone to failure for a variety of reasons such as radiation damage. Additionally, some vehicles may lose the ability to maneuver once they exhaust fuel supplies. Typically failure is divided into two categories: engineering mistakes and technology surprise. This document will report on a method of simulating space vehicle reliability in the DIORAMA framework.

  19. Lightning Protection for the Orion Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Orion space vehicle is designed to requirements for both direct attachment and indirect effects of lightning. Both sets of requirements are based on a full threat 200kA strike, in accordance with constraints and guidelines contained in SAE ARP documents applicable to both commercial and military aircraft and space vehicles. This paper describes the requirements as levied against the vehicle, as well as the means whereby the design shows full compliance.

  20. Mission and space vehicle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, John

    1986-01-01

    A number of top-level considerations which affect Mars and vehicle selection are discussed. Indications are provided of the nature and severity of the impact of these considerations on missions and vehicles. Various types of missions, such as Mars fly-bys, Mars orbiting and landing mission, and missions to the moons of Mars are identified and discussed. Mission trajectories and opportunities are discused briefly. The different types of vehicles required in a Mars program are also discussed. Discussion includes several potential Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) vehicles, Mars surface vehicles, and 2 types of Orbit-to-Orbit (OTO) vehicles. Indications are provided as to preference for some of the concepts discussed.

  1. Space vehicle gyroscope sensor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Considerations which form the basis for the specification, design and evaluation of gyroscopes for spaceborne sensor applications are presented. The applications are distinguished by basic vehicle category: launch vehicles, spacecraft, entry vehicles and sounding rockets. Specifically excluded from discussion are gyroscope effector applications. Exotic or unconventional gyroscopes for which operational experience is nonexistent are mentioned only briefly to alert the reader of future trends. General requirements for testing and evaluation are discussed.

  2. Electric Vehicles at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesson, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    The story of how the transportation office began by introducing low speed electric cars (LSEV) to the fleet managers and employees. This sparked and interest in purchasing some of these LSEV and the usage on KSC. Transportation was approached by a vender of High Speed Electric Vehicle (HSEV) we decided to test the HSEV to see if they would meet our fleet vehicle needs. Transportation wrote a Space Act Agreement (SAA) for the loan of three Lithium Powered Electric vehicles for a one year test. The vehicles have worked very well and we have extended the test for another year. The use of HSEV has pushed for an independent Electric Vehicle Study to be performed to consider ways to effectively optimize the use of electric vehicles in replacement of gasoline vehicles in the KSC vehicle fleet. This will help the center to move closer to meeting the Executive Order 13423.

  3. Zack Crues on Space Exploration Vehicle Mockup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Zack Crues, the Space Exploration Vehicle modeling and simulation lead, talks to NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean about the importance of creating an immersive virtual reality environment fo...

  4. Skylab rescue space vehicle flight readiness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle flight readiness test is described which ensures that space vehicle systems are in a state of flight readiness and are compatible with associated ground support equipment. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, ignition, holddown arm release, liftoff, and service arm and tail service mast retraction are simulated. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, operations interface control chart, and flight test.

  5. Space vehicle propulsion systems: Environmental space hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Bahr, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    The hazards that exist in geolunar space which may degrade, disrupt, or terminate the performance of space-based LOX/LH2 rocket engines are evaluated. Accordingly, a summary of the open literature pertaining to the geolunar space hazards is provided. Approximately 350 citations and about 200 documents and abstracts were reviewed; the documents selected give current and quantitative detail. The methodology was to categorize the various space hazards in relation to their importance in specified regions of geolunar space. Additionally, the effect of the various space hazards in relation to spacecraft and their systems were investigated. It was found that further investigation of the literature would be required to assess the effects of these hazards on propulsion systems per se; in particular, possible degrading effects on exterior nozzle structure, directional gimbals, and internal combustion chamber integrity and geometry.

  6. Method and Apparatus for Coupling Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A first space vehicle is attached with a second space vehicle which includes a rocket propulsion nozzle having a combustion chamber upstream from the nozzle throat. Apparatus 10 includes an elongate grappling arm 12 extending from the first space vehicle, a pair of inflatable bladders 16, 18 positioned about the grappling arm for engaging an inner surface of the combustion chamber upon inflation. and a pair of rear bladders 20, 22 positioned about the grappling arm for engaging an inner surface of the nozzle downstream from the combustion chamber upon inflation for aligning the grappling arm and the rocket propulsion nozzle. A pressurized fluid source 24 is provided on the first space vehicle for supplying fluid pressure to the inflatable bladders. and a fluid control valve manifold 30 selectively controls the release of pressurized fluid to the bladders. According to the method of the invention. the grappling arm is inserted into the rocket propulsion nozzle. and the control valves are actuated to first inflate the front bladders and thereby interconnect the grappling arm and the rocket propulsion nozzle. The rear bladders are subsequently inflated to align a central axis of the grappling arm with a central axis of the rocket propulsion nozzle. Inflation of the rear bladders provides an axial reaction load to balance the axial load provided by the front bladders. Attaching the vehicles in space may be controlled from the earth by activating the control valves to inflate the bladders. The cost of attaching space vehicles is significantly reduced by attaching a grappling arm on one vehicle with the existing rocket propulsion nozzle of another vehicle.

  7. Solar powered system for a space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Garriott, O.K.; Harvey, T.J.; Jones, P.A.

    1993-07-20

    A solar power system is described for use with a space vehicle in orbit, the space vehicle having a payload bay and, for reference, a [+-]X axis extending in the direction of orbit, a [+-]Y axis extending to opposite sides of the payload bay and perpendicular to the [+-]X axis, a [+-]Z axis extending perpendicular to the [minus]X and [+-]Y axes and through the payload bay, and, when in orbit, the X-Z plane of the space vehicle coincides with the orbital plane of the space vehicle, comprising: a support structure fixed within the payload bay of the space vehicle; a boom; means for extending and retracting the boom along the [+-]Y axis; rotation means for rotating the boom about the [+-]Y axis; means for attaching the boom to the support structure, and the attachment means and support structure being dimensioned and arranged such that the boom has a z-axis level during stowage within the payload bay which is the same as the z-axis level of the boom when the boom is being extended and retracted by the extending and retracting means; and solar panels supported by the boom.

  8. Space transfer vehicle accommodations at transportation nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    1990-01-01

    This task identifies requirements for accommodation of space transfer vehicles (STVs) at orbital transportation nodes. Requirements are based on mission models which include high energy missions and human exploration initiatives. Study data includes results of trade studies evaluating STV accommodations concepts at Space Station nodes and at alternative free-flying nodes. Data and scars on the Phase One Space Station Freedom to allow growth to the accommodation concepts are identified.

  9. Space Station - The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Arthur G.

    1988-11-01

    NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will augment Space Shuttle operations by retrieving and replacing satellites while expending far less propellant than the heavier manned vehicle would require. At the Space Station, the OMV will ferry logistics modules to and from the Shuttle's orbit some 130 n.m. below, deploy and dock OTVs, assemble modules, and retrieve satellites for servicing; it will then proceed to redeploy the satellites. OMV operations will be controlled either from the Shuttle or from a ground station, via video monitors.

  10. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  11. Future space transportation vehicles - A NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1988-01-01

    NASA has conducted extensive analyses of several scenarios of potential payload applications in an attempt to project future space transportation capability requirements. Of particular concern is the development of increasingly capable launch system. The enhancement of the manned STS with a heavy liftcargo launch vehicle which would utilize Shuttle technology to provide an unmanned cargo version of the Shuttle is also being addressed.

  12. Ground Processing Affordability for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John; Scott, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles and most of their payloads spend the majority of their time on the ground. The cost of ground operations is very high. So, why so often is so little attention given to ground processing during development? The current global space industry and economic environment are driving more need for efficiencies to save time and money. Affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. We can not continue to treat space vehicles as mere science projects. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability which are not available for ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More human-rated vehicles are being developed, with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and for a new global space race, yet these cost more than the many unmanned vehicles of today. We can learn many lessons on affordability from RLV's. DFO (Design for Operations) considers ground operations during design, development, and manufacturing-before the first flight. This is often minimized for space vehicles, but is very important. Vehicles are designed for launch and mission operations. You will not be able to do it again if it is too slow or costly to get there. Many times, technology changes faster than space products such that what is launched includes outdated features, thus reducing competitiveness. Ground operations must be considered for the full product Lifecycle, from concept to retirement. Once manufactured, launch vehicles along with their payloads and launch systems require a long path of processing before launch. Initial assembly and testing always discover problems to address. A solid integration program is essential to minimize these impacts, as was seen in the Constellation Ares I-X test rocket. For RLV's, landing/recovery and post-flight turnaround activities are performed. Multi-use vehicles require reconfiguration. MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) must be well-planned--- even for the unplanned problems. Defect limits and

  13. ISRU Propellant Selection for Space Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical propulsion remains the only viable solution as technically matured technology for the near term human space transportation to Lunar and Mars. Current mode of space travel requires us to "take everything we will need", including propellant for the return trip. Forcing the mission designers to carry propellant for the return trip limits payload mass available for mission operations and results in a large and costly (and often unaffordable) design. Producing propellant via In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) will enable missions with chemical propulsion by the "refueling" of return-trip propellant. It will reduce vehicle propellant mass carrying requirement by over 50%. This mass reduction can translates into increased payload to enhance greater mission capability, reduces vehicle size, weight and cost. It will also reduce size of launch vehicle fairing size as well as number of launches for a given space mission and enables exploration missions with existing chemical propulsion. Mars remains the ultimate destination for Human Space Exploration within the Solar System. The Mars atmospheric consist of 95% carbon dioxide (CO2) and the presence of Ice (water) was detected on Mars surfaces. This presents a basic chemical building block for the ISRU propellant manufacturing. However, the rationale for the right propellant to produce via ISRU appears to be limited to the perception of "what we can produce" as oppose to "what is the right propellant". Methane (CH4) is often quoted as a logical choice for Mars ISRU propellant, however; it is believed that there are better alternatives available that can result in a better space transportation architecture. A system analysis is needed to determine on what is the right propellant choice for the exploration vehicle. This paper examines the propellant selection for production via ISRU method on Mars surfaces. It will examine propellant trades for the exploration vehicle with resulting impact on vehicle performance, size

  14. Space vehicle acoustics prediction improvement for payloads. [space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandridge, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The modal analysis method was extensively modified for the prediction of space vehicle noise reduction in the shuttle payload enclosure, and this program was adapted to the IBM 360 computer. The predicted noise reduction levels for two test cases were compared with experimental results to determine the validity of the analytical model for predicting space vehicle payload noise environments in the 10 Hz one-third octave band regime. The prediction approach for the two test cases generally gave reasonable magnitudes and trends when compared with the measured noise reduction spectra. The discrepancies in the predictions could be corrected primarily by improved modeling of the vehicle structural walls and of the enclosed acoustic space to obtain a more accurate assessment of normal modes. Techniques for improving and expandng the noise prediction for a payload environment are also suggested.

  15. Crewed Space Vehicle Battery Safety Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Darcy, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    This requirements document is applicable to all batteries on crewed spacecraft, including vehicle, payload, and crew equipment batteries. It defines the specific provisions required to design a battery that is safe for ground personnel and crew members to handle and/or operate during all applicable phases of crewed missions, safe for use in the enclosed environment of a crewed space vehicle, and safe for use in launch vehicles, as well as in unpressurized spaces adjacent to the habitable portion of a space vehicle. The required provisions encompass hazard controls, design evaluation, and verification. The extent of the hazard controls and verification required depends on the applicability and credibility of the hazard to the specific battery design and applicable missions under review. Evaluation of the design and verification program results shall be completed prior to certification for flight and ground operations. This requirements document is geared toward the designers of battery systems to be used in crewed vehicles, crew equipment, crew suits, or batteries to be used in crewed vehicle systems and payloads (or experiments). This requirements document also applies to ground handling and testing of flight batteries. Specific design and verification requirements for a battery are dependent upon the battery chemistry, capacity, complexity, charging, environment, and application. The variety of battery chemistries available, combined with the variety of battery-powered applications, results in each battery application having specific, unique requirements pertinent to the specific battery application. However, there are basic requirements for all battery designs and applications, which are listed in section 4. Section 5 includes a description of hazards and controls and also includes requirements.

  16. Space vehicle approach velocity judgments under simulated visual space conditions.

    PubMed

    Haines, R F

    1989-02-01

    There were 35 volunteers who responded when they first perceived an increase in apparent size of a collimated, two-dimensional perspective image of an Orbiter vehicle. The variables of interest included the presence (or absence) of a fixed reticle within the field of view (FOV), background starfield velocity, initial range to the vehicle and vehicle closure velocity. It was found that: 1) increasing vehicle approach velocity yielded a very small (but significant) effect of faster detection of vehicle movement, nevertheless, response variability was relatively large; 2) including the fixed reticle in the FOV produced significantly slower detection of vehicle radial movement, however this occurred only at the largest range and the magnitude of the effect was only about 15% of the one sigma value; and 3) increasing background star velocity during this judgment led to slower detection of vehicle movement. While statistically significant, this effect was small and occurred primarily at the largest range. A possible explanation for the last two findings is that other static and dynamic objects within the visual field may compete for available attention which otherwise would be available for judging image expansion; thus, the target's retinal image has to expand more than otherwise for its movement to be detected. This study also showed that the Proximity Operations Research Mockup at NASA/Ames can be used effectively to investigate a variety of visual judgment questions related to future space operations. These findings are discussed in relation to previous research and possible underlying mechanisms.

  17. Dynamics and Control of Flexible Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of this report is twofold: (1) to survey the established analytic procedures for the simulation of controlled flexible space vehicles, and (2) to develop in detail methods that employ a combination of discrete and distributed ("modal") coordinates, i.e., the hybrid-coordinate methods. Analytic procedures are described in three categories: (1) discrete-coordinate methods, (2) hybrid-coordinate methods, and (3) vehicle normal-coordinate methods. Each of these approaches is described and analyzed for its advantages and disadvantages, and each is found to have an area of applicability. The hybrid-coordinate method combines the efficiency of the vehicle normal-coordinate method with the versatility of the discrete-coordinate method, and appears to have the widest range of practical application. The results in this report have practical utility in two areas: (1) complex digital computer simulation of flexible space vehicles of arbitrary configuration subject to realistic control laws, and (2) preliminary control system design based on transfer functions for linearized models of dynamics and control laws.

  18. Ares Launch Vehicles Overview: Space Access Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Steve

    2007-01-01

    America is returning to the Moon in preparation for the first human footprint on Mars, guided by the U.S. Vision for Space Exploration. This presentation will discuss NASA's mission, the reasons for returning to the Moon and going to Mars, and how NASA will accomplish that mission in ways that promote leadership in space and economic expansion on the new frontier. The primary goals of the Vision for Space Exploration are to finish the International Space Station, retire the Space Shuttle, and build the new spacecraft needed to return people to the Moon and go to Mars. The Vision commits NASA and the nation to an agenda of exploration that also includes robotic exploration and technology development, while building on lessons learned over 50 years of hard-won experience. NASA is building on common hardware, shared knowledge, and unique experience derived from the Apollo Saturn, Space Shuttle, and contemporary commercial launch vehicle programs. The journeys to the Moon and Mars will require a variety of vehicles, including the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which transports the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle, which transports the Lunar Surface Access Module. The architecture for the lunar missions will use one launch to ferry the crew into orbit, where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Module in the Earth Departure Stage, which will then propel the combination into lunar orbit. The imperative to explore space with the combination of astronauts and robots will be the impetus for inventions such as solar power and water and waste recycling. This next chapter in NASA's history promises to write the next chapter in American history, as well. It will require this nation to provide the talent to develop tools, machines, materials, processes, technologies, and capabilities that can benefit nearly all aspects of life on Earth. Roles and responsibilities are shared between a nationwide Government and industry team. The Exploration Launch

  19. Automation for deep space vehicle monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.

    1991-01-01

    Information on automation for deep space vehicle monitoring is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on automation goals and strategy; the Monitor Analyzer of Real-time Voyager Engineering Link (MARVEL); intelligent input data management; decision theory for making tradeoffs; dynamic tradeoff evaluation; evaluation of anomaly detection results; evaluation of data management methods; system level analysis with cooperating expert systems; the distributed architecture of multiple expert systems; and event driven response.

  20. Next Generation of Launcher & Space Vehicles Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroye, J. F.; Brochard, P.; Grassien, J.-Y.; Masgrangeas, D.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents several examples of Saft lithium batteries in use onboard launchers & space vehicles: ATV primary lithium manganese dioxide (LiMnO2) batteries and Rosetta primary lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl2) batteries as well as the VEGA rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) avionics & thrust vector control (TVC) batteries.It gives an overview of possible chemistries and tradeoff to address these needs.

  1. NASA Space Flight Vehicle Fault Isolation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2016-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle in development and is scheduled for its first mission in 2018.SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. However, SLS also faces unique challenges related to testability. This presentation will address the SLS challenges for diagnostics and fault isolation, along with the analyses and decisions to mitigate risk..

  2. NASA Space Flight Vehicle Fault Isolation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bramon, Chris; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine; Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle in development and is scheduled for its first mission in 2018. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. However, SLS also faces unique challenges related to testability. This presentation will address the SLS challenges for diagnostics and fault isolation, along with the analyses and decisions to mitigate risk.

  3. Reusable Space Vehicle Ground Operations Baseline Conceptual Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND OPERATIONS BASELINE CONCEPTUAL MODEL THESIS DENNIS R...United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/GLM/ENS/04-12 REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND...for the next launch. v AFIT/GLM/ENS/04-12 REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND OPERATIONS BASELINE CONCEPTUAL MODEL DENNIS R. MAYNARD

  4. Launch Vehicle Assessment for Space Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.

    1998-01-01

    A recently completed study at Georgia Tech examined various launch vehicle options for deploying a future constellation of Space Solar Power satellites of the Suntower configuration. One of the motivations of the study was to determine whether the aggressive $400/kg launch price goal established for SSP package delivery would result in an attractive economic scenario for a future RLV developer. That is, would the potential revenue and traffic to be derived from a large scale SSP project be enough of an economic "carrot" to attract an RLV company into developing a new, low cost launch vehicle to address this market. Preliminary results presented in the attached charts show that there is enough economic reward for RLV developers, specifically in the case of the latest large GEO-based Suntower constellations (over 15,500 MT per year delivery for 30 years). For that SSP model, internal rates of return for the 30 year economic scenario exceed 22%. However, up-front government assistance to the RLV developer in terms of ground facilities, operations technologies, guaranteed low-interest rate loans, and partial offsets of some vehicle development expenses is necessary to achieve these positive results. This white paper is meant to serve as a companion to the data supplied in the accompanying charts. It's purpose is to provide more detail on the vehicles and design processes used, to highlight key decisions and issues, and to emphasize key results from each phase of the Georgia Tech study.

  5. NASA Space Flight Vehicle Fault Isolation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bramon, Christopher; Inman, Sharon K.; Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2016-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discrete programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as testability of the integrated flight vehicle especially problematic. The cost of fully automated diagnostics can be completely justified for a large fleet, but not so for a single flight vehicle. Fault detection is mandatory to assure the vehicle is capable of a safe launch, but fault isolation is another issue. SLS has considered various methods for fault isolation which can provide a reasonable balance between adequacy, timeliness and cost. This paper will address the analyses and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate risk while providing a reasonable testability solution for fault isolation.

  6. Ditching Simulation of Air and Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mahesh; Mouillet, Jean-Baptiste; Burkhalter, Drew; Robert, Adrien; Schwoertzig, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    The impact on water of an aircraft or a re-entry space vehicle is a very complex event and considered as an important issue for the air and space industry. To ensure the safety of the crew and to limit the risks of loss of the vehicle, a prediction of its structural behaviour under various ditching configurations must be performed. Structural tests are very costly and must be limited in scale or number, so numerical simulations may be of great help for this purpose.Numerical simulations aim to predict the trajectory of the vehicle under impact, the pressure repartition on the body, structural stress, possible damages to the structure and occupant 'g' levels during impact. Physically, two types of configurations involving different phenomenon can be identified, vertical impacts and impacts with high horizontal components, where air entrapment, ventilation and cavitations can be the dimensioning factors.The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the features of ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) transient dynamic explicit simulation methods to perform such simulations. This paper details analysis of the critical simulation parameters, fluid dynamic calculations, CPU and model size reduction techniques, Fluid-Structure contact modelling, examples of such simulations, correlation to physical tests using Explicit Finite Element based code RADIOSS from Altair Engineering. Two examples of re-entry and ditching numerical simulation are discussed in this paper with comparisons to physical test data.

  7. Launch - Apollo XV Space Vehicle - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-26

    S71-41356 (26 July 1971) --- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 15 (Spacecraft 112/Lunar Module 10/Saturn 510) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 9:34:00:79 a.m. (EDT), July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft were astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 15 is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) fourth manned lunar landing mission. While astronauts Scott and Irwin will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Worden will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  8. Biosafety in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing; Arneson, David; Pierson, Duane

    2010-09-01

    Biohazardous materials can be found in space vehicles and habitats include blood, body-waste, visible microbial contamination, and payload experiments containing bacteria, fungi, animals, plants, toxins, recombinant DNA, or mammalian cell lines. To mitigate the potential hazards that these biohazardous materials present to the crew and the space environments, sound biosafety principles and practices such as thorough risk assessment, sufficient level of containment, effective remedial actions, adequate system design, and the use of proper personal protective equipment are needed. The Biosafety Review Board(BRB) at Johnson Space Center plays a critical role in ensuring the proper biosafety principles and practices are applied. The BRB includes a team of microbiologists, cell biologists, physicians, industrial hygienists, and safety professionals to assess the wide range of biohazardous materials encountered.

  9. Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

    2006-01-01

    The terrestrial environment is an important driver of space vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of producing an update to an earlier Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development Handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, and sea state. In addition, the respective engineering design elements are discussed relative to terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are presented.

  10. Accelerating the Design of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Larry (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    One of NASA's key goals is to increase the safety and reduce the cost of space transportation. Thus, a key element of NASA's new Integrated Space Transportation Plan is to develop new propulsion, structures, and operations for future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). As part of this effort to develop the next RLV, the ClCT Program's Computing, Networking, and Information Systems (CNIS) Project is developing and demonstrating collaborative software technologies that use the collective power of the NASA Grid to accelerate spacecraft design. One of these technologies, called AeroDB, automates the execution and monitoring of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) parameter studies on the NASA Grid. About the NASA Grid The NASA Grid, or Information Power Grid,. is being developed to leverage the distributed resources of NASA's many computers. instruments, simulators, and data storage systems. The goal is to use these combined resources to sdve difficult NASA challenges, such as iimulating the entire flight of a space vehicle from ascent to descent.To realize the vision of the NASA Grid, the CNIS Project is developing the software framework and protocols for building domain-specific environments and interfaces, new Grid services based on emerging industry standards, and advanced networking and computing testbeds to support new Grid-based applications such as AeroDB.

  11. Accelerating the Design of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Larry (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    One of NASA's key goals is to increase the safety and reduce the cost of space transportation. Thus, a key element of NASA's new Integrated Space Transportation Plan is to develop new propulsion, structures, and operations for future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). As part of this effort to develop the next RLV, the ClCT Program's Computing, Networking, and Information Systems (CNIS) Project is developing and demonstrating collaborative software technologies that use the collective power of the NASA Grid to accelerate spacecraft design. One of these technologies, called AeroDB, automates the execution and monitoring of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) parameter studies on the NASA Grid. About the NASA Grid The NASA Grid, or Information Power Grid,. is being developed to leverage the distributed resources of NASA's many computers. instruments, simulators, and data storage systems. The goal is to use these combined resources to sdve difficult NASA challenges, such as iimulating the entire flight of a space vehicle from ascent to descent.To realize the vision of the NASA Grid, the CNIS Project is developing the software framework and protocols for building domain-specific environments and interfaces, new Grid services based on emerging industry standards, and advanced networking and computing testbeds to support new Grid-based applications such as AeroDB.

  12. Table of Space Vehicles: 1973-1977.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    IR AD—AOS6 692 ROYAL AIRCRA FT ESTABLISHMENT FARNBOROUGH (ENGLAND ) F~ G 22/2F TABLE OF SPACE VEHICLES: 1913—1977.(U)FEB 78 .J A PILKINSTON...73006. Copy ~’ight© Controller 111480 London 1978 * Consultant. Address: 72 Thornhill Street, Calver ley , Pudsey, Yorks. - 07 17 043 n- CONTENTS Pa... g ~~~a) ‘0 0 •t5 C~ ) ‘0 £ C’.) 3 4.. a) ‘0 0‘0 ‘0 a) 4.. -. c_S_I a) C~ C’.) ‘0 4) ~~ •.~ 4..a) C 9- 0 4 In 4$ — 4) 9

  13. Spacesuit and Space Vehicle Comparative Ergonomic Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott; Benson, Elizabeth; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Blackledge, Christopher; Perez, Esau; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the latest manned spaceflight objectives, a series of prototype launch and reentry spacesuit architectures were evaluated for eventual down selection by NASA based on the performance of a set of designated tasks. A consolidated approach was taken to testing, concurrently collecting suit mobility data, seat-suit-vehicle interface clearances and movement strategies within the volume of a Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle mockup. To achieve the objectives of the test, a requirement was set forth to maintain high mockup fidelity while using advanced motion capture technologies. These seemingly mutually exclusive goals were accommodated with the construction of an optically transparent and fully adjustable frame mockup. The mockup was constructed such that it could be dimensionally validated rapidly with the motion capture system. This paper will describe the method used to create a motion capture compatible space vehicle mockup, the consolidated approach for evaluating spacesuits in action, as well as the various methods for generating hardware requirements for an entire population from the resulting complex data set using a limited number of test subjects. Kinematics, hardware clearance, suited anthropometry, and subjective feedback data were recorded on fifteen unsuited and five suited subjects. Unsuited subjects were selected chiefly by anthropometry, in an attempt to find subjects who fell within predefined criteria for medium male, large male and small female subjects. The suited subjects were selected as a subset of the unsuited subjects and tested in both unpressurized and pressurized conditions. Since the prototype spacesuits were fabricated in a single size to accommodate an approximately average sized male, the findings from the suit testing were systematically extrapolated to the extremes of the population to anticipate likely problem areas. This extrapolation was achieved by first performing population analysis through a comparison of suited

  14. Navigation simulator for the Space Tug vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III; Peters, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    A general simulation program (GSP) for state estimation of a nonlinear space vehicle flight navigation system is developed and used as a basis for evaluating the performance of a Space Tug navigation system. An explanation of the iterative guidance mode (IGM) guidance law, derivation of the dynamics, coordinate frames and state estimation routines are given in order to clarify the assumptions and approximations made. A number of simulation and analytical studies are used to demonstrate the operation of the Tug system. Included in the simulation studies are (1) initial offset vector parameter study; (2) propagation time vs accuracy; (3) measurement noise parametric study and (4) reduction in computational burden of an on-board implementable scheme. From the results of these studies, conclusions and recommendations concerning future areas of practical and theoretical work are presented.

  15. Space Vehicle Powerdown Philosophies Derived from the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsey, Mark; Bailey, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In spaceflight, electrical power is a vital but limited resource. Almost every spacecraft system, from avionics to life support systems, relies on electrical power. Since power can be limited by the generation system s performance, available consumables, solar array shading, or heat rejection capability, vehicle power management is a critical consideration in spacecraft design, mission planning, and real-time operations. The purpose of this paper is to capture the powerdown philosophies used during the Space Shuttle Program. This paper will discuss how electrical equipment is managed real-time to adjust the overall vehicle power level to ensure that systems and consumables will support changing mission objectives, as well as how electrical equipment is managed following system anomalies. We will focus on the power related impacts of anomalies in the generation systems, air and liquid cooling systems, and significant environmental events such as a fire, decrease in cabin pressure, or micrometeoroid debris strike. Additionally, considerations for executing powerdowns by crew action or by ground commands from Mission Control will be presented. General lessons learned from nearly 30 years of Space Shuttle powerdowns will be discussed, including an in depth case-study of STS-117. During this International Space Station (ISS) assembly mission, a failure of computers controlling the ISS guidance, navigation, and control system required that the Space Shuttle s maneuvering system be used to maintain attitude control. A powerdown was performed to save power generation consumables, thus extending the docked mission duration and allowing more time to resolve the issue.

  16. NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1991-01-01

    Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

  17. ROCKET THRUST STAND SIMULATION OF SPACE VEHICLE FLIGHT DYNAMICS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The concept of rocket thrust stand simulation of space vehicle flight dynamics is developed. An electro-mechanical system is described wherein the... space vehicle rocket motor attach point motion may be simulated. The physical dimensions of the system are small such that it may be used in conjunction...with current environmental test cells. The degree of space vehicle simulation is a consequence of the limitations on the excursions of the active

  18. Multilayer insulation materials for reusable space vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.; Hyde, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an extensive study conducted to evaluate multilayer insulation (MLI) materials suitable for repeated space vehicle operation are presented. Materials studied were radiation shields, shield spacers, blanket face sheets, fasteners, and adhesives. The Superfloc MLI concept - Kapton shields goldized on both sides as the radiation barrier with Dacron flock tufts as the spacers - appeared to be an excellent MLI for reusable cryogenic tankage. Superfloc configurations consisting of various combinations of film, spacer, and adhesive materials were manufactured and tested. Tensile, flexing, expansion, and cycling tests were performed on goldized Kapton and Mylar Superfloc and Beta glass reinforced Pyre ML face sheet material. A face sheet material that retains its shape was developed. Polyphenylene oxide material was selected for fabricating lightweight twin and tri-pin fasteners, together with grommets, face sheets, and reinforcement slabs. Measured material thermal conductivity values are tabulated.

  19. Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV)-1 program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubstad, John; Blott, Richard J.; Shoemaker, James

    2000-11-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV)-1 program, initiated by the UK Ministry of Defence and the US Ballistic Missile Defense Organization under terms of an agreement originally signed by President Reagan and Prime Minister Thatcher, has resulted in new opportunities for researchers to acquire low-cost on-orbit data. The STRV-1 a/b satellites were launched into a geotransfer orbit (GTO) on June 1994, and continued operation until the mission was terminated in September, 1998. Data returned from the on-board experiments has provided new insights into the nature of the terrestrial radiation belts and the effects of this radiation on critical spacecraft materials and components. The flexibility of the on-board computer also enabled successful demonstration of new space communication protocol standards. Transfer of day-to-day satellite operations from the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency to the University of Colorado clearly showed that spacecraft conforming to CCSDS standard protocols can be rapidly cross- supported across an international boundary. The next satellites in the STRV-1 program, STRV-1 c/d, will carry 21 hardware experiments sponsored by the US, UK, Canada, and ESA, and will provide on-board computing capability for conducting three software experiments. Launch into GTO in the latter part of 2000 will result in exposure of all satellite systems and experiments to increasing solar activity and its resulting influence on Van Allen belt radiation fluence.

  20. Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-22

    412TW-PA-15264 CURRENT HYPERSONIC AND SPACE VEHICLE FLIGHT TEST AND INSTRUMENTATION John J. Spravka* and Timothy R. Jorris† AIR FORCE TEST...DATES COVERED (From - To) 22 – 26 July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation...utility can be leveraged by a wide range of flight test programs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hypersonic, flight test, instrumentation, space access, space

  1. Evaluation of Self-Sealing Structures for Space Vehicle Application.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-05-01

    The concept of a self-sealing wall is investigated as a technique for ensuring the sealed integrity of pressurized space vehicle compartments in a...micrometeorite environment. Experimental verification of the feasibility of this concept has been achieved with simulated space vehicle multi-sheet wall

  2. Concepts of Operations for a Reusable Launch Space Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    a Reusable Launch Space Vehicle Contract or Grant Number Program Element Number Authors Rampino, Michael A. Project Number Task Number Work Unit...of Operations for a Reusable Launch Space Vehicle by Michael A. Rampino A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR POWER STUDIES

  3. Wooden Spaceships: Human-Centered Vehicle Design for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twyford, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Presentation will focus on creative human centered design solutions in relation to manned space vehicle design and development in the NASA culture. We will talk about design process, iterative prototyping, mockup building and user testing and evaluation. We will take an inside look at how new space vehicle concepts are developed and designed for real life exploration scenarios.

  4. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or more...

  5. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or more...

  6. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel...

  7. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel...

  8. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel...

  9. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or more...

  10. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  11. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  12. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  13. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  14. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  15. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  16. Coupled Loads Analysis Accuracy from the Space Vehicle Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, J. M.; Wittbrodt, M. J.; Gate, M. M.; Li, L. H.; Stroeve, A.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled loads analysis (CLA) consists of performing a structural response analysis, usually a time-history response analysis, with reduced dynamic models typically provided by two different companies to obtain the coupled response of a launch vehicle and space vehicle to the launching and staging events required to place the space vehicle into orbit. The CLA is performed by the launch vehicle contractor with a reduced dynamics mathematical model that is coupled to the launch vehicle, or booster, model to determine the coupled loads for each substructure. Recently, the booster and space vehicle contractors have been from different countries. Due to the language differences and governmental restrictions, the verification of the CLA is much more difficult than when working with launch vehicle and space vehicle contractors of the same country. This becomes exceedingly clear when the CLA analysis results do not seem to pass an intuitive judgement. Presented in the sequel are three checks that a space vehicle contractor can perform on the results of a coupled loads analysis to partially verify the analysis.

  17. Automation of vehicle processing at Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargo, Rick; Sklar, Mike; Wegerif, Dan

    1991-02-01

    A methodology for applying the Kennedy Space Center vehicle processing experience to similar operations at Space Station Freedom is described. First, the required on-orbit processing tasks are identified. These tasks are then evaluated for automation suitability, and robotic manipulator and artificial intelligence technologies are investigated to automate selected physical and cognitive tasks. Effects on processing times, extra-vehicular activity savings, and required resources for incorporating these automation enhancements are identified. Results of the following case studies are included: Phobos Gateway Vehicle On-Orbit Assembly and Launch, Lunar Evolution Vehicle On-Orbit Refurbishment, and Mars Mission Vehicle On-Orbit Assembly and Launch.

  18. Simulation Based R&D for Space Vehicle Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    evaluation tools linked through a generalized, common database system that supports rapid assessment of space vehicle concepts. An end-to-end, simulation...detailed design, and finally operations of space vehicle system. This effort focused on implementation of the Integrated Database System (IDS), and...based development approach, featuring rapid prototyping and integrated development tools, can enable a small team of engineers to evaluate space

  19. Skylab 2 space vehicle data evaluation guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Vehicle telemetry measurements for all stages of Skylab 2 are presented. The data sources for the launch vehicle and command service module are identified. The data evaluation guide format is described. The system for designating the components of the spacecraft is defined. A list of abbreviations for technical terms used in the reporting documents is included.

  20. Modular space vehicle boards, control software, reprogramming, and failure recovery

    DOEpatents

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; McCabe, Kevin; Delapp, Jerry; Prichard, Dean; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Stein, Paul; Michel, John; Tripp, Justin; Palmer, Joseph; Storms, Steven

    2017-09-12

    A space vehicle may have a modular board configuration that commonly uses some or all components and a common operating system for at least some of the boards. Each modular board may have its own dedicated processing, and processing loads may be distributed. The space vehicle may be reprogrammable, and may be launched without code that enables all functionality and/or components. Code errors may be detected and the space vehicle may be reset to a working code version to prevent system failure.

  1. Vehicle for Space Transfer and Recovery (VSTAR), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Vehicle Space Transfer and Recovery (VSTAR) system is designed as a manned orbital transfer vehicle (MOTV) with the primary mission of Satellite Launch and Repair (SLR). VSTAR will provide for economic use of high altitude spaceflight for both the public and private sector. VSTAR components will be built and tested using earth based facilities. These components will then be launched using the space shuttle, into low earth orbit (LEO) where it will be constructed on a U.S. built space station. Once in LEO the vehicle components will be assembled in modules which can then be arranged in various configurations to perform the required missions.

  2. Use of GPS Differential Navigation Technology in Carina Capsule Reentry and Space Vehicle Rendezvous Operations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) will play a major role in space vehicle navigation and orbital determination. Absolute GPS navigation technology...GPS for relative navigation between two space vehicles and space vehicle reentry orbit determination.

  3. Vehicle performance impact on space shuttle design and concept evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    The continuing examination of widely varied space shuttle concepts makes an understanding of concept interaction with vehicle performance imperative. The estimation of vehicle performance is highly appurtenant to all aspects of shuttle design and hence performance has classically been a key indicator of overall concept desirability and potential. Vehicle performance assumes the added role of defining interactions between specific design characteristics, the sum total of which define a specific concept. Special attention is given to external tank effects.

  4. Status of advanced propulsion for space based orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Larry P.; Scheer, Dean D.

    1986-01-01

    A new Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) propulsion system will be required to meet the needs of space missions beyond the mid-1990's. As envisioned, the advanced OTV will be used in conjunction with earth-to-orbit vehicles, Space Station, and Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle. The OTV will transfer men, large space structures, and conventional payloads between low earth and higher energy orbits. Space probes carried by the OTV will continue the exploration of the solar system. When lunar bases are established, the OTV will be their transportation link to earth. NASA is currently funding the development of technology for advanced propulsion concepts for future Orbital Transfer Vehicles. Progress in key areas during 1986 is presented.

  5. Status of advanced propulsion for space based orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.; Scheer, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    A new Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) propulsion system will be required to meet the needs of space missions beyond the mid-1990's. As envisioned, the advanced OTV will be used in conjunction with Earth-to-orbit vehicles, Space Station, and Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle. The OTV will transfer men, large space structures, and conventional payloads between low Earth and higher energy orbits. Space probes carried by the OTV will continue the exploration of the solar system. When lunar bases are established, the OTV will be their transportation link to Earth. NASA is currently funding the development of technology for advanced propulsion concepts for future Orbital Transfer Vehicles. Progress in key areas during 1986 is presented.

  6. Risk Considerations of Bird Strikes to Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Christy; Ring, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Within seconds after liftoff of the Space Shuttle during mission STS-114, a turkey vulture impacted the vehicle's external tank. The contact caused no apparent damage to the Shuttle, but the incident led NASA to consider the potential consequences of bird strikes during a Shuttle launch. The environment at Kennedy Space Center provides unique bird strike challenges due to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and the Atlantic Flyway bird migration routes. NASA is currently refining risk assessment estimates for the probability of bird strike to space launch vehicles. This paper presents an approach for analyzing the risks of bird strikes to space launch vehicles and presents an example. The migration routes, types of birds present, altitudes of those birds, exposed area of the launch vehicle, and its capability to withstand impacts affect the risk due to bird strike. A summary of significant risk contributors is discussed.

  7. Space Vehicle Heat Shield Having Edgewise Strips of Ablative Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Poteet, Carl C. (Inventor); Bouslog, Stan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A heat shield for a space vehicle comprises a plurality of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) blocks secured to a surface of the space vehicle and arranged in a pattern with gaps therebetween. The heat shield further comprises a plurality of PICA strips disposed in the gaps between the PICA blocks. The PICA strips are mounted edgewise, such that the structural orientation of the PICA strips is substantially perpendicular to the structural orientation of the PICA blocks.

  8. Second Generation RLV Space Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Michelle; Daniel, Charles; Throckmorton, David A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA has a long history of conducting development programs and projects in a consistent fashion. Systems Engineering within those programs and projects has also followed a given method outlined by such documents as the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The relatively new NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is taking a new approach to developing a space vehicle, with innovative management methods as well as new Systems Engineering processes. With the program less than a year into its life cycle, the efficacy of these new processes has yet to be proven or disproven. At $776M for phase 1, SLI represents a major portion of the NASA focus; however, the new processes being incorporated are not reflected in the training provided by NASA to its engineers. The NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) offers core classes in program and project management and systems engineering to NASA employees with the purpose of creating a "knowledge community where ideas, skills, and experiences are exchanged to increase each other's capacity for strong leadership". The SLI program is, in one sense, a combination of a conceptual design program and a technology program. The program as a whole doesn't map into the generic systems engineering project cycle as currently, and for some time, taught. For example, the NASA APPL Systems Engineering training course teaches that the "first step in developing an architecture is to define the external boundaries of the system", which will require definition of the interfaces with other systems and the next step will be to "define all the components that make up the next lower level of the system hierarchy" where fundamental requirements are allocated to each component. Whereas, the SLI technology risk reduction approach develops architecture subsystem technologies prior to developing architectures. The higher level architecture requirements are not allowed to fully develop and undergo decomposition and allocation down to the subsystems

  9. Second Generation RLV Space Vehicle Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. D.; Daniel, C. C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA has a long history of conducting development programs and projects in a consistant fashion. Systems Engineering within those programs and projects has also followed a given method outlined by such documents as the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The relatively new NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is taking a new approach to developing a space vehicle, with innovative management methods as well as new Systems Engineering processes. With the program less than a year into its life cycle, the efficacy of these new processes has yet to be proven or disproven. At 776M for phase I, SLI represents a major portion of the NASA focus; however, the new processes being incorporated are not reflected in the training provided by NASA to its engineers. The NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) offers core classes in program and project management and systems engineering to NASA employees with the purpose of creating a "knowledge community where ideas, skills, and experiences are exchanged to increase each other's capacity for strong leadership". The SLI program is, in one sense, a combination of a conceptual design program and a technology program. The program as a whole doesn't map into the generic systems engineering project cycle as currently, and for some time, taught. For example, the NASA APPL Systems Engineering training course teaches that the "first step in developing an architecture is to define the external boundaries of the system", which will require definition of the interfaces with other systems and the next step will be to "define all the components that make up the next lower level of the system hierarchy" where fundamental requirements are allocated to each component. Whereas, the SLI technology risk reduction approach develops architecture subsystem technologies prior to developing architectures. The higher level architecture requirements are not allowed to fully develop and undergo decomposition and allocation down to the subsystems

  10. Design optimization for a space based, reusable orbit transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L.

    1985-01-01

    Future NASA and DOD missions will benefit from high performance, reusable orbit transfer vehicles. With the advent of a space station, advanced engine technology, and various new vehicle concepts, reusable orbit transfer vehicles that provide significant economic benefits and mission capability improvements will be realized. Engine and vehicle design criteria previously have lacked definition with regard to issues such as space basing and servicing, man-rating and reliability, performance, mission flexibility, and life cycle cost for a reusable vehicle. The design study described here has resulted in the definition of a reusable orbit transfer vehicle concept and subsequent recommendations for the design criteria of an advanced LO2/LH2 engine. These design criteria include number of engines per vehicle, nozzle design, etc. The major characteristics of the vehicle preliminary design include low lift to drag aerocapture capability, a main propulsion system failure criteria of fail operational/fail safe, and either two main engines with a high performance attitude control system for back-up or three main engines with which to meet this failure criteria. In addition, a maintenance approach has been established for the advanced vehicle concept.

  11. Atmospheric reentry flight test of winged space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Yoshifumi; Akiba, Ryojiro; Hinada, Motoki; Nagatomo, Makoto

    A summary of the atmospheric reentry flight experiment of winged space vehicle is presented. The test was conducted and carried out by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Feb. 1992 in Kagoshima Space Center. It is the first Japanese atmospheric reentry flight of the controlled lifting vehicle. A prime objective of the flight is to demonstrate a high speed atmospheric entry flight capability and high-angle-of-attack flight capability in terms of aerodynamics, flight dynamics and flight control of these kind of vehicles. The launch of the winged vehicle was made by balloon and solid propellant rocket booster which was also the first trial in Japan. The vehicle accomplishes the lfight from space-equivalent condition to the atmospheric flight condition where reaction control system (RCS) attitude stabilization and aerodynamic control was used, respectively. In the flight, the vehicle's attitude was measured by both an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and an air data sensor (ADS) which were employed into an auto-pilot flight control loop. After completion of the entry transient flight, the vehicle experienced unexpected instability during the atmospheric decelerating flight; however, it recovered the attitude orientation and completed the transonic flight after that. The latest analysis shows that it is due to the ADS measurement error and the flight control gain scheduling; what happened was all understood. Some details of the test and the brief summary of the current status of the post flight analysis are presented.

  12. Advanced Technology for Lighter and More Cost Effective Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, are working with industry partners to develop a new generation of more cost-efficient space vehicles. Lightweight fuel tanks and components under development will be the critical elements in tomorrow's reusable launch vehicles and will tremendously curb the costs of getting to space. In this photo, Tom DeLay, a materials processes engineer for MSFC, uses a new graphite epoxy technology to create lightweight cryogenic fuel lines for futuristic reusable launch vehicles. He is wrapping a water-soluble mandrel, or mold, with a graphite fabric coated with an epoxy resin. Once wrapped, the pipe will be vacuum-bagged and autoclave-cured. The disposable mold will be removed to reveal a thin-walled fuel line. In addition to being much lighter and stronger than metal, this material won't expand or contract as much in the extreme temperatures encountered by launch vehicles.

  13. Methods of assessing structural integrity for space shuttle vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Stuckenberg, F. H.

    1971-01-01

    A detailed description and evaluation of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are given which have application to space shuttle vehicles. Appropriate NDE design data is presented in twelve specifications in an appendix. Recommendations for NDE development work for the space shuttle program are presented.

  14. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  15. Artists drawing of partial cutaway view of Apollo/Saturn IB space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Artists drawing of a partial cutaway view of an Apollo/Saturn IB space vehicle in a launch configuration. Arrow point to various features and components of the vehicle. This drawing is representative of the Apollo 7 space vehicle.

  16. Modeling Space Launch Process Delays to Improve Space Vehicle Acquisition Timelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    evolution of the space launch process over the past 15 years is the Space Launch Vehicle Broad Area Review ( SLV BAR). The SLV BAR, led by Gen. Larry...to 9 in 51 launches, a 100% increase (US Air Force, 1999). The SLV BAR began a period of intense scrutiny related to launch vehicle mission

  17. SLI Artist's Concept-Vehicle Enroute to Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Space Launch Initiative (SLI), NASA's priority developmental program focused on empowering America's leadership in space. SLI includes commercial, higher education, and Defense partnerships and contracts to offer widespread participation in both the risk and success of developing our nation's next-generation reusable launch vehicle. This photo depicts an artist's concept of a future second-generation launch vehicle enroute to the International Space Station. For the SLI, architecture definition includes all components of the next-generation reusable launch system: Earth-to-orbit vehicles (the Space Shuttle is the first generation earth-to-orbit vehicle), crew transfer vehicles, transfer stages, ground processing systems, flight operations systems, and development of business case strategies. Three contractor teams have each been funded to develop potential second-generation reusable launch system architectures: The Boeing Company of Seal Beach, California; Lockheed Martin Corporation of Denver, Colorado along with a team including Northrop Grumman of El Segundo, California; and Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Virginia.

  18. Experiments in teleoperator and autonomous control of space robotic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Harold L.

    1991-01-01

    A program of research embracing teleoperator and automatic navigational control of freely flying satellite robots is presented. Current research goals include: (1) developing visual operator interfaces for improved vehicle teleoperation; (2) determining the effects of different visual interface system designs on operator performance; and (3) achieving autonomous vision-based vehicle navigation and control. This research program combines virtual-environment teleoperation studies and neutral-buoyancy experiments using a space-robot simulator vehicle currently under development. Visual-interface design options under investigation include monoscopic versus stereoscopic displays and cameras, helmet-mounted versus panel-mounted display monitors, head-tracking versus fixed or manually steerable remote cameras, and the provision of vehicle-fixed visual cues, or markers, in the remote scene for improved sensing of vehicle position, orientation, and motion.

  19. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  20. A cost engineered launch vehicle for space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, -Ing. Dietrich E., , Dr.

    1999-09-01

    The paper starts with a set of major requirements for a space tourism vehicle and discusses major vehicle options proposed for this purpose. It seems that the requirements can be met best with a Ballistic SSTO Vehicle which has the additional advantage of lowest development cost compared to other launch vehicle options — important for a commercial development venture. The BETA Ballistic Reusable Vehicle Concept is characterized by the plug nozzle cluster engine configuration where the plug nozzle serves also as base plate and re-entry heat shield. In this case no athmospheric turn maneuver is required (as in case-of the front-entry Delta-Clipper DC-Y concept). In our specific case for space tourism this mode has the avantage that the forces at launch and reentry are in exactly the same direction, easing passenger seating arrangements. The second basic advantage is the large available volume on top of the vehicle providing ample space for passenger accomodation, visibility and volume for zero-g experience (free floating), one of the major passenger mission requirements. An adequate passenger cabin design for 100 passengers is presented, as well as the modern BETA-STV Concept with its mass allocations.

  1. X-37 Space Vehicle: Starting a New Age in Space Control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Austin D.

    2001-04-01

    The U.S. can no longer rely on the "space as a sanctuary" policy, initiated by the Eisenhower Administration, to continue to exploit space for economic and military advantages. The X-37 space maneuvering vehicle demonstrator is an opportunity for the U.S. to begin to develop methods to more strategically defend and control the space environment. The X-37 is the first of NASA's x-vehicles intended to demonstrate leading edge technologies in orbit. This prototype space maneuvering vehicle co-sponsored by NASA, the Air Force and the Boeing Company is being designed to achieve the goals of reducing the cost to access space from 10,000 to 1000 per pound while improving reliability. The current project is funded to build an autonomous space maneuvering vehicle with on-orbit testing scheduled in 2002, The X-37 is an unmanned space plane that can carry a payload, and can conduct missions while orbiting, loitering, or rendezvousing with objects in space and then autonomously return to earth by landing on a conventional runway. If the Air Force develops the X-37 to its full potential the system could strategically support each of the Air Force's four space mission areas of force enhancement, space support, space control, and force application. Transition of the space maneuvering demonstrator into a space control platform will require a change in national policy. Capitalizing on the lessons from NASA's x-vehicles and partnering with the commercial sector can potentially save costs and shorten the development of a viable space platform that could be used for space control. Strategic development and funded evolution of the X-37 space vehicle is an immediate, tangible step the United States can take to actively pursue a more aggressive program to respond to threats in the space arena.

  2. Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV)-2 program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, James; Brooks, Paul; Korevaar, Eric J.; Arnold, Graham S.; Das, Alok; Stubstad, John; Hay, R. G.

    2000-11-01

    The STRV-2 program is the second in a series of three collaborative flight test programs between the U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) and the United Kingdom (UK) Minstry of Defence (MoD). The STRV-2 Experiment Module contains five major experiments to provide proof-of-concept data on system design, data on the mid-earth orbit (MEO) space environment, and data on durability of materials and components operating in the MEO environment. The UK Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) has provided a mid- wavelength infrared (MWIF) imager to evaluate passive detection of aircraft from space. BMDO, in conjunction with the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), have provided experiments to evaluate use of adaptive structures for vibration suppression, to investigate the use of high bandwidth laser communications to transmit data from space to ground or airborne receivers, to study the durability of materials and components in the MEO space environment, and to measure radiation and micrometeoroid/debris fluence. These experiments are mounted on all- composite structure. This structure provides a significant reduction in weight and cost over comparable aluminum designs while maintaining the high stiffness required by optical payloads. In 1994, STRV-2 was manifested for launch by the DOD Space Test Program. STRV-2, the primary payload on the Tri-Service eXperiment (TSX)-5 spacecraft, was successfully launched on 7 June 2000 on a Pegasus XL from Vandenbery AFB, CA. The STRV-2 program, like the companion STRV-1 program, validates the viability of multi-national, multi-agency collaborations to provide cost effective acquisition of space test data. The experimental data to be obtained will reduce future satellite risk and provide guidelines for further system development.

  3. Ground Vibration Testing Options for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Alan; Smith, Robert K.; Goggin, David; Newsom, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    New NASA launch vehicles will require development of robust systems in a fiscally-constrained environment. NASA, Department of Defense (DoD), and commercial space companies routinely conduct ground vibration tests as an essential part of math model validation and launch vehicle certification. Although ground vibration testing must be a part of the integrated test planning process, more affordable approaches must also be considered. A study evaluated several ground vibration test options for the NASA Constellation Program flight test vehicles, Orion-1 and Orion-2, which concluded that more affordable ground vibration test options are available. The motivation for ground vibration testing is supported by historical examples from NASA and DoD. The approach used in the present study employed surveys of ground vibration test subject-matter experts that provided data to qualitatively rank six test options. Twenty-five experts from NASA, DoD, and industry provided scoring and comments for this study. The current study determined that both element-level modal tests and integrated vehicle modal tests have technical merits. Both have been successful in validating structural dynamic math models of launch vehicles. However, element-level testing has less overall cost and schedule risk as compared to integrated vehicle testing. Future NASA launch vehicle development programs should anticipate that some structural dynamics testing will be necessary. Analysis alone will be inadequate to certify a crew-capable launch vehicle. At a minimum, component and element structural dynamic tests are recommended for new vehicle elements. Three viable structural dynamic test options were identified. Modal testing of the new vehicle elements and an integrated vehicle test on the mobile launcher provided the optimal trade between technical, cost, and schedule.

  4. Composite flexible insulation for thermal protection of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Tran, Huy K.; Chiu, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    A composite flexible blanket insulation (CFBI) system considered for use as a thermal protection system for space vehicles is described. This flexible composite insulation system consists of an outer layer of silicon carbide fabric, followed by alumina mat insulation, and alternating layers of aluminized polyimide film and aluminoborosilicate scrim fabric. A potential application of this composite insulation would be as a thermal protection system for the aerobrake of the aeroassist space transfer vehicle (ASTV). It would also apply to other space vehicles subject to high convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The thermal performance of this composite insulation as exposed to a simulated atmospheric entry environment in a plasma arc test facility is described. Other thermophysical properties which affect the thermal response of this composite insulation is included. It shows that this composite insulation is effective as a thermal protection system at total heating rates up to 30.6 W/sq cm.

  5. Composite flexible insulation for thermal protection of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Tran, Huy K.; Chiu, S. Amanda

    1991-01-01

    A composite flexible blanket insulation (CFBI) system considered for use as a thermal protection system for space vehicles is described. This flexible composite insulation system consists of an outer layer of silicon carbide fabric, followed by alumina mat insulation, and alternating layers of aluminized polyimide film and aluminoborosilicate scrim fabric. A potential application of this composite insulation would be as a thermal protection system for the aerobrake of the aeroassist space transfer vehicle (ASTV). It would also apply to other space vehicles subject to high convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The thermal performance of this composite insulation as exposed to a simulated atmospheric entry environment in a plasma arc test facility is described. Other thermophysical properties which affect the thermal response of this composite insulation is included. It shows that this composite insulation is effective as a thermal protection system at total heating rates up to 30.6 W/sq cm.

  6. Crewed Space Vehicle Battery Safety Requirements Revision D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The Crewed Space Vehicle Battery Safety Requirements document has been prepared for use by designers of battery-powered vehicles, portable equipment, and experiments intended for crewed spaceflight. The purpose of the requirements document is to provide battery designers with information on design provisions to be incorporated in and around the battery and on the verification to be undertaken to demonstrate a safe battery is provided. The term "safe battery" means that the battery is safe for ground personnel and crew members to handle and use; safe to be used in the enclosed environment of a crewed space vehicle; and safe to be mounted or used in unpressurized spaces adjacent to habitable areas. Battery design review, approval, and certification is required before the batteries can be used for ground operations and be certified for flight.

  7. Multi-objective trajectory optimization for the space exploration vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xiao, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    The research determines temperature-constrained optimal trajectory for the space exploration vehicle by developing an optimal control formulation and solving it using a variable order quadrature collocation method with a Non-linear Programming(NLP) solver. The vehicle is assumed to be the space reconnaissance aircraft that has specified takeoff/landing locations, specified no-fly zones, and specified targets for sensor data collections. A three degree of freedom aircraft model is adapted from previous work and includes flight dynamics, and thermal constraints.Vehicle control is accomplished by controlling angle of attack, roll angle, and propellant mass flow rate. This model is incorporated into an optimal control formulation that includes constraints on both the vehicle and mission parameters, such as avoidance of no-fly zones and exploration of space targets. In addition, the vehicle models include the environmental models(gravity and atmosphere). How these models are appropriately employed is key to gaining confidence in the results and conclusions of the research. Optimal trajectories are developed using several performance costs in the optimal control formation,minimum time,minimum time with control penalties,and maximum distance.The resulting analysis demonstrates that optimal trajectories that meet specified mission parameters and constraints can be quickly determined and used for large-scale space exloration.

  8. System Engineering of Autonomous Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Trevino, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system requires fully autonomous systems when travelling more than 5 light minutes from Earth. This autonomy is necessary to manage a large, complex spacecraft with limited crew members and skills available. The communication latency requires the vehicle to deal with events with only limited crew interaction in most cases. The engineering of these systems requires an extensive knowledge of the spacecraft systems, information theory, and autonomous algorithm characteristics. The characteristics of the spacecraft systems must be matched with the autonomous algorithm characteristics to reliably monitor and control the system. This presents a large system engineering problem. Recent work on product-focused, elegant system engineering will be applied to this application, looking at the full autonomy stack, the matching of autonomous systems to spacecraft systems, and the integration of different types of algorithms. Each of these areas will be outlined and a general approach defined for system engineering to provide the optimal solution to the given application context.

  9. Investigation of Vehicle Requirements and Options for Future Space Tourism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The research in support of this grant was performed by the PI, Dr. John Olds, and graduate students in the Space Systems Design Lab (SSDL) at Georgia Tech over the period December 1999 to December 2000. The work was sponsored by Dr. Ted Talay, branch chief of the Vehicle Analysis Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The objective of the project was to examine the characteristics of future space tourism markets and to identify the vehicle requirements that are necessary to enable this emerging new business segment.

  10. Autonomous Space Vehicles of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesq, L. M.; Some, R. R.; Lay, N. E.; Castano, R.; Nesnas, I. A.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Doyle, R. J.; Beauchamp, P. M.

    2017-02-01

    NASA’s vision to seek out life in the far reaches of and possibly beyond our solar system will demand technology advances in computing, communication, and on-board reasoning to achieve more physically and cognitively-capable robotic space explorers.

  11. On-Line Tracking of Six Orbital Elements of a Thrust Maneuvering Space Vehicle,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The problem of on-line tracking of the state variables of a thrust maneuvering space vehicle in three dimensional space described by non-linear...techniques for the application of tracking the thrust maneuvering space vehicle . (Author)

  12. Technical and Economical study of New Technologies and Reusable Space Vehicles promoting Space Tourism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Deepanshu; Malhotra, Sahil

    2012-07-01

    For many of us space tourism is an extremely fascinating and attractive idea. But in order for these to start we need vehicles that will take us to orbit and bring us back. Current space vehicles clearly cannot. Only the Space Shuttle survives past one use, and that's only if we ignore the various parts that fall off on the way up. So we need reusable launch vehicles. Launch of these vehicles to orbit requires accelerating to Mach 26, and therefore it uses a lot of propellant - about 10 tons per passenger. But there is no technical reason why reusable launch vehicles couldn't come to be operated routinely, just like aircraft. The main problem about space is how much it costs to get there, it's too expensive. And that's mainly because launch vehicles are expendable - either entirely, like satellite launchers, or partly, like the space shuttle. The trouble is that these will not only reduce the cost of launch - they'll also put the makers out of business, unless there's more to launch than just a few satellites a year, as there are today. Fortunately there's a market that will generate far more launch business than satellites ever well - passenger travel. This paper assesses this emerging market as well as technology that will make space tourism feasible. The main conclusion is that space vehicles can reduce the cost of human transport to orbit sufficiently for large new commercial markets to develop. Combining the reusability of space vehicles with the high traffic levels of space tourism offers the prospect of a thousandfold reduction in the cost per seat to orbit. The result will be airline operations to orbit involving dozens of space vehicles, each capable of more than one flight per day. These low costs will make possible a rapid expansion of space science and exploration. Luckily research aimed at developing low-cost reusable launch vehicles has increased recently. Already there are various projects like Spaceshipone, Spaceshiptwo, Spacebus, X-33 NASA etc. The

  13. Thermal Protection Systems for Future NASA Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The proposed first through fourth generation of future NASA Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) within NASA will be described, in general, along with their relative goals for improvement in performance (i.e., cost, safety, life, and turnaround time). A brief description of Spaceliner 100 activities representing a means to achieve those goals will be included. Some of the families of thermal protection materials with widely varying characteristics that are being developed for first generation space vehicles at Ames Research Center will be described as well as potential materials and composites for second and third generation applications as systems. These families of materials include functionally gradient material composites that are made from a variety of low-density substrates and moderate to fully dense surface treatments providing the resultant material with both toughness and higher temperature capability opening the envelope of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) capabilities. Some of the materials truly represent enabling technologies that are required to achieve substantially enhanced thermal protection system performance thereby reducing vehicle risk. Finally the needs for integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) of future vehicles thermal protection systems relative to achieving the goals for third generation reusable launch vehicles and for improving vehicle performance and capabilities reducing risk will be described along with the state of the art in TPS.

  14. Test Results for Entry Guidance Methods for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Jones, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to advanced guidance and control that have the potential for achieving the goals of significantly increasing reusable launch vehicle (or any space vehicle that enters an atmosphere) safety and reliability, and reducing the cost. This paper examines some approaches to entry guidance. An effort called Integration and Testing of Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies has recently completed a rigorous testing phase where these algorithms faced high-fidelity vehicle models and were required to perform a variety of representative tests. The algorithm developers spent substantial effort improving the algorithm performance in the testing. This paper lists the test cases used to demonstrate that the desired results are achieved, shows an automated test scoring method that greatly reduces the evaluation effort required, and displays results of the tests. Results show a significant improvement over previous guidance approaches. The two best-scoring algorithm approaches show roughly equivalent results and are ready to be applied to future vehicle concepts.

  15. Advanced robotics for in-space vehicle processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of spaceborne vehicle processing is described. Generic crew-extravehicular activity tasks are presented for a specific vehicle, the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), with general implications to other on-orbit vehicles. The OMV is examined with respect to both servicing and maintenance. Crew-EVA activities are presented by task and mapped to a common set of generic crew-EVA primitives to identify high-demand areas for robot services. Similarly, a set of robot primitives is presented that can be used to model robot actions for alternative robot reference configurations. The robot primitives are tied to technologies and used for composing robot operations for an automated refueling scenario. Robotics technology issues and design accommodation guidelines (hooks and scars) for Space Station Freedom are described.

  16. Advanced Robotics for In-Space Vehicle Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Estus, Jay; Heneghan, Cate; Bosley, John

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of spaceborne vehicle processing is described. Generic crew-EVA tasks are presented for a specific vehicle, the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), with general implications to other on-orbit vehicles. The OMV is examined with respect to both servicing and maintenance. Crew-EVA activities are presented by task and mapped to a common set of generic crew-EVA primitives to identify high-demand areas for telerobot services. Similarly, a set of telerobot primitives is presented that can be used to model telerobot actions for alternative telerobot reference configurations. The telerobot primitives are tied to technologies and used for composting telerobot operations for an automated refueling scenario. Telerobotics technology issues and design accomodation guidelines (hooks and scars) for the Space Station Freedom are described.

  17. Investigation of abort procedures for space shuttle-type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.; Eide, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been made of abort procedures for space shuttle-type vehicles using a point mass trajectory optimization program known as POST. This study determined the minimum time gap between immediate and once-around safe return to the launch site from a baseline due-East launch trajectory for an alternate space shuttle concept which experiences an instantaneous loss of 25 percent of the total main engine thrust.

  18. Terrestrial Planet Finder space vehicle architecture trades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Michael J.; Moses, Stewart L.; Kroening, Keith; Johnson, Elizabeth D.

    1998-07-01

    THe goal of NASA's Terrestrial PLanet Finder program is to detect Earth-size planets orbiting other stars and evaluate their ability to sustain life. This will be accomplished through spaced-based IR interferometry using baselines much longer than previously flown. This paper presents the technical trades being evaluated by TRW to implement this investigation. Two primary concepts are considered: a single monolithic deployed interferometer with a baseline of up to approximately 100 meters and a free-flying constellation of interferometer components featuring precision station- keeping over baselines of up to several kilometers. Exo- planet detection is best performed at approximately 10 micron wavelength requiring the instrument to operate at cryogenic temperatures to minimize the effects of telescope thermal emissions. Further improvements in sensitivity can be facilitated by flying on a deep space trajectory away from the Sun to reduce zodiacal background emissions. Numerous technical innovations are necessary to enable such a system; however, most of these technologies are being developed by existing programs and there should be no roadblocks to fielding such a terrestrial planet finder in the 2010-2020 time frame.

  19. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  20. Multi-mission space vehicle subsystem analysis tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, M.; Wood, E.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft engineers often rely on specialized simulation tools to facilitate the analysis, design and operation of space systems. Unfortunately these tools are often designed for one phase of a single mission and cannot be easily adapted to other phases or other misions. The Multi-Mission Pace Vehicle Susbsystem Analysis Tools are designed to provide a solution to this problem.

  1. Development of control systems for space shuttle vehicles, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, C. R.; Chase, T. W.; Kiziloz, B. M.; Skelley, E. D.; Stein, G.; Ward, M. D.; Skelton, G. B.; Yore, E. E.; Rupert, J. G.; Phelps, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    Control of winged two-stage space shuttle vehicles was investigated. Control requirements were determined and systems capable of meeting these requirements were synthesized. Control requirements unique to shuttles were identified. It is shown that these requirements can be satisfied by conventional control logics. Linear gain schedule controllers predominate. Actuator saturations require nonlinear compensation in some of the control systems.

  2. A shadowgraph study of Space Transportation System (STS): The Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    A shadowgraph study of the space transportation system (STS), the space shuttle launch vehicle, is presented. The shadowgraphs presented in this study were obtained over the past 10 years from wind tunnel tests performed in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel during the space shuttle development program. Shadowgraphs of the STS at various angles-of-attack and roll angles are shown for the Mach range of 0.6 to 4.96. The major flow field phenomena over the mated vehicle configuration are shown in these shadowgraphs. Shadowgraphs are also presented for the orbiter without the lower stack (reentry configuration) and the lower stack without the orbiter. A short study of external tank nose geometry effects on the mated vehicles flow field is presented. These shadowgraphs are used in the aerothermodynamic analysis of the external flow conditions the launch vehicle encounters during the ascent stage of flight.

  3. Cyber threat impact assessment and analysis for space vehicle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Robert M.; Fowler, Mark J.; Umphress, David; MacDonald, Richard A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper covers research into an assessment of potential impacts and techniques to detect and mitigate cyber attacks that affect the networks and control systems of space vehicles. Such systems, if subverted by malicious insiders, external hackers and/or supply chain threats, can be controlled in a manner to cause physical damage to the space platforms. Similar attacks on Earth-borne cyber physical systems include the Shamoon, Duqu, Flame and Stuxnet exploits. These have been used to bring down foreign power generation and refining systems. This paper discusses the potential impacts of similar cyber attacks on space-based platforms through the use of simulation models, including custom models developed in Python using SimPy and commercial SATCOM analysis tools, as an example STK/SOLIS. The paper discusses the architecture and fidelity of the simulation model that has been developed for performing the impact assessment. The paper walks through the application of an attack vector at the subsystem level and how it affects the control and orientation of the space vehicle. SimPy is used to model and extract raw impact data at the bus level, while STK/SOLIS is used to extract raw impact data at the subsystem level and to visually display the effect on the physical plant of the space vehicle.

  4. Human-Rated Space Vehicle Backup Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey A.; Busa, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    Human rated space vehicles have historically employed a Backup Flight System (BFS) for the main purpose of mitigating the loss of the primary avionics control system. Throughout these projects, however, the underlying philosophy and technical implementation vary greatly. This paper attempts to coalesce each of the past space vehicle program's BFS design and implementation methodologies with the accompanying underlining philosophical arguments that drove each program to such decisions. The focus will be aimed at Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle However, the ideologies and implementation of several commercial and military aircraft are incorporated as well to complete the full breadth view of BFS development across the varying industries. In particular to the non-space based vehicles is the notion of deciding not to utilize a BFS. A diverse analysis of BFS to primary system benefits in terms of reliability against all aspects of project development are reviewed and traded. The risk of engaging the BFS during critical stages of flight (e.g. ascent and entry), the level of capability of the BFS (subset capability of main system vs. equivalent system), and the notion of dissimilar hardware and software design are all discussed. Finally, considerations for employing a BFS on future human-rated space missions are reviewed in light of modern avionics architectures and mission scenarios implicit in exploration beyond low Earth orbit.

  5. Robust on-off pulse control of flexible space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Sinha, Ravi

    1993-01-01

    The on-off reaction jet control system is often used for attitude and orbital maneuvering of various spacecraft. Future space vehicles such as the orbital transfer vehicles, orbital maneuvering vehicles, and space station will extensively use reaction jets for orbital maneuvering and attitude stabilization. The proposed robust fuel- and time-optimal control algorithm is used for a three-mass spacing model of flexible spacecraft. A fuel-efficient on-off control logic is developed for robust rest-to-rest maneuver of a flexible vehicle with minimum excitation of structural modes. The first part of this report is concerned with the problem of selecting a proper pair of jets for practical trade-offs among the maneuvering time, fuel consumption, structural mode excitation, and performance robustness. A time-optimal control problem subject to parameter robustness constraints is formulated and solved. The second part of this report deals with obtaining parameter insensitive fuel- and time- optimal control inputs by solving a constrained optimization problem subject to robustness constraints. It is shown that sensitivity to modeling errors can be significantly reduced by the proposed, robustified open-loop control approach. The final part of this report deals with sliding mode control design for uncertain flexible structures. The benchmark problem of a flexible structure is used as an example for the feedback sliding mode controller design with bounded control inputs and robustness to parameter variations is investigated.

  6. Technology issues associated with using densified hydrogen for space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    Slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen offer the potential for reducing the size and weight of future space vehicles because these fluids have greater densities than normal-boiling-point liquid hydrogen. In addition, these fluids have greater heat capacities, which make them attractive fuels for such applications as the National Aerospace Plane and cryogenic depots. Some of the benefits of using slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen for space missions are quantified. Some of the major issues associated with using these densified cryogenic fuels for space applications are examined, and the technology efforts that have been made to address many of these issues are summarized.

  7. Worldwide Space Launch Vehicles and Their Mainstage Liquid Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.

    2010-01-01

    Space launch vehicle begins with a basic propulsion stage, and serves as a missile or small launch vehicle; many are traceable to the 1945 German A-4. Increasing stage size, and increasingly energetic propulsion allows for heavier payloads and greater. Earth to Orbit lift capability. Liquid rocket propulsion began with use of storable (UDMH/N2O4) and evolved to high performing cryogenics (LOX/RP, and LOX/LH). Growth versions of SLV's rely on strap-on propulsive stages of either solid propellants or liquid propellants.

  8. Mathematical model of a flexible space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a mathematical model of the lateral motion of a flexible space shuttle vehicle during ascent is described. The model was developed to perform control system synthesis using stochastic constrained optimization techniques. The goals of the control system synthesis are to demonstrate the applicability of the techniques and to discover any problems peculiar to the flexible nature of a shuttle vehicle. The equations of motion are derived. A brief description of the generation of numerical data is given. Explicit definitions and numerical values of trajectory data and coefficients appearing in the equations of motion are included.

  9. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) Concepts and Requirements studies were to provide sensitivity data on usage, economics, and technology associated with new space transportation systems. The study was structured to utilize data on the emerging launch vehicles, the latest mission scenarios, and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) payload manifesting and schedules, to define a flexible, high performance, cost effective, evolutionary space transportation system for NASA. Initial activities were to support the MSFC effort in the preparation of inputs to the 90 Day Report to the National Space Council (NSC). With the results of this study establishing a point-of-departure for continuing the STV studies in 1990, additional options and mission architectures were defined. The continuing studies will update and expand the parametrics, assess new cargo and manned ETO vehicles, determine impacts on the redefined Phase 0 Space Station Freedom, and to develop a design that encompasses adequate configuration flexibility to ensure compliance with on-going NASA study recommendations with major system disconnects. In terms of general requirements, the objectives of the STV system and its mission profiles will address crew safety and mission success through a failure-tolerant and forgiving design approach. These objectives were addressed through the following: engine-out capability for all mission phases; built-in-test for vehicle health monitoring to allow testing of all critical functions such as, verification of lunar landing and ascent engines before initiating the landing sequence; critical subsystems will have multiple strings for redundancy plus adequate supplies of onboard spares for removal and replacement of failed items; crew radiation protection; and trajectories that optimize lunar and Mars performance and flyby abort capabilities.

  10. Investigation of Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA missions will focus on deep space and Mars surface operations with large structures necessary for transportation of crew and cargo. In addition to the challenges of manufacturing these large structures, there are added challenges from the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, electronics, and vehicle materials. Primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle and the elements inside the vehicle. These interactions lead to the primary radiation being absorbed or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high-energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, which can be significant enough to cause concern. In a previous paper, we embarked upon our first steps toward studying neutron production from large vehicles by validating our radiation transport codes for neutron environments against flight data. The following paper will extend the previous work to focus on the deep space environment and the resulting neutron flux from large vehicles in this deep space environment.

  11. The Ergonomics of Human Space Flight: NASA Vehicles and Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher R.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Space...the final frontier...these are the voyages of the starship...wait, wait, wait...that's not right...let's try that again. NASA is currently focusing on developing multiple strategies to prepare humans for a future trip to Mars. This includes (1) learning and characterizing the human system while in the weightlessness of low earth orbit on the International Space Station and (2) seeding the creation of commercial inspired vehicles by providing guidance and funding to US companies. At the same time, NASA is slowly leading the efforts of reestablishing human deep space travel through the development of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) known as Orion and the Space Launch System (SLS) with the interim aim of visiting and exploring an asteroid. Without Earth's gravity, current and future human space travel exposes humans to micro- and partial gravity conditions, which are known to force the body to adapt both physically and physiologically. Without the protection of Earth's atmosphere, space is hazardous to most living organisms. To protect themselves from these difficult conditions, Astronauts utilize pressurized spacesuits for both intravehicular travel and extravehicular activities (EVAs). Ensuring a safe living and working environment for space missions requires the creativity of scientists and engineers to assess and mitigate potential risks through engineering designs. The discipline of human factors and ergonomics at NASA is critical in making sure these designs are not just functionally designed for people to use, but are optimally designed to work within the capacities specific to the Astronaut Corps. This lecture will review both current and future NASA vehicles and spacesuits while providing an ergonomic perspective using case studies that were and are being carried out by the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  12. Space and planetary environment criteria guidelines for use in space vehicle development. Volume 1: 1982 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E. (Compiler); West, G. S. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines on space and planetary environment criteria for use in space vehicle development are provided. Information is incorporated in the disciplinary areas of atmospheric and ionospheric properties, radiation, geomagnetic field, astrodynamic constants, and meteoroids for the Earth's atmosphere above 90 km, interplanetary space, and the atmosphere and surfaces (when available) of the Moon and the planets (other than Earth) of this solar system. The Sun, Terrestrial Space, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, and Mars are covered.

  13. Space vehicle with artificial gravity and earth-like environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A space vehicle adapted to provide an artificial gravity and earthlike atmospheric environment for occupants is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a cylindrically shaped, hollow pressure-tight body, one end of which is tapered from the largest diameter of the body, the other end is flat and transparent to sunlight. The vehicle is provided with thrust means which rotates the body about its longitudinal axis, generating an artificial gravity effect upon the interior walls of the body due to centrifugal forces. The walls of the tapered end of the body are maintained at a temperature below the dew point of water vapor in the body and lower than the temperature near the transparent end of the body. The controlled environment and sunlight permits an earth like environment to be maintained wherein the CO2/O2 is balanced, and food for the travelers is supplied through a natural system of plant life grown on spacecraft walls where soil is located.

  14. Space vehicle approach velocity judgments under simulated visual space conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-five volunteers responded when they first perceived an increase in apparent size of a collimated, 2-D image of an Orbiter vehicle. The test variables of interest included the presence of a fixed angular reticle within the field of view (FOV); three initial Orbiter distances; three constant Orbiter approach velocities corresponding to 1.6, 0.8, and 0.4 percent of the initial distance per second; and two background starfield velocities. It was found that: (1) at each initial range, increasing approach velocity led to a larger distance between the eye and Orbiter image at threshold; (2) including the fixed reticle in the FOV produced a smaller distance between the eye and Orbiter image at threshold; and (3) increasing background star velocity during this judgment led to a smaller distance between the eye and Orbiter image at threshold. The last two findings suggest that other detail within the FOV may compete for available attention which otherwise would be available for judging image expansion; thus, the target has to approach the observer nearer than otherwise if these details were present. These findings are discussed in relation to previous research and possible underlying mechanisms.

  15. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  16. Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles. Aerospace Education III. Instructional Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles." It provides guidelines for each chapter. The guide includes objectives, behavioral objectives, suggested outline, orientation, suggested key points, suggestions for…

  17. New space vehicle archetypes for human planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1991-01-01

    Contemporary, archetypal, crew-carrying spacecraft concepts developed for NASA are presented for: a lunar transportation system, two kinds of Mars landers, and five kinds of Mars transfer vehicles. These cover the range of propulsion technologies and mission modes of interest for the Space Exploration Initiative, and include both aerobraking and artificial gravity as appropriate. They comprise both upgrades of extant archetypes and completely new ones. Computer solid models, configurations and mass statements are presented for each.

  18. State Space Model for Autopilot Design of Aerospace Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    possibly for future application of non-linear analysis and synthesis techniques , particularly for autopilot design of aerospace vehicles executing high g...manoeuvres. This report also considers a locally linearised state space model that lends itself to better known linear techniques of the modern...control theory. A coupled multi-input multi-output (MIMO) model is derived suitable for both the application of the modern control techniques as well

  19. Thermal conductivity of Rene 41 honeycomb panels. [space transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deriugin, V.

    1980-01-01

    Effective thermal conductivities of Rene 41 panels suitable for advanced space transportation vehicle structures were determined analytically and experimentally for temperature ranges between 20.4K (423 F) and 1186K (1675 F). The cryogenic data were obtained using a cryostat whereas the high temperature data were measured using a heat flow meter and a comparative thermal conductivity instrument respectively. Comparisons were made between analysis and experimental data. Analytical methods appear to provide reasonable definition of the honeycomb panel effective thermal conductivities.

  20. Pointing control design for autonomous space vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    This paper addresses the design of pointing control systems for autonomous space vehicles. The function of the pointing control system is to keep distant orbiting objects within the field-of-view of an on-board optical sensor. We outline the development of novel nonlinear control algorithms which exploit the availability of on- board sensors. Simulation results comparing the performance of the different pointing control implementations are presented.

  1. Composite flexible insulation for thermal protection of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Tran, Huy K.; Chiu, S. Amanda

    1992-01-01

    A composite flexible blanket insulation (CFBI) system considered for use as a thermal protection system for space vehicles is described. This flexible composite insulation system consists of an outer layer of silicon carbide fabric, followed by alumina mat insulation, and alternating layers of aluminized polyimide film and aluminoborosilicate scrim fabric. A potential application of this composite insulation would be as a thermal protection system for the aerobrake of the Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV). It would also apply to other space vehicles subject to high convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The thermal performance of this composite insulation as exposed to a simulated atmospheric entry environment in a plasma arc test facility is described. Other thermophysical properties which affect the thermal response of this system are also described. Analytical modeling describing the thermal performance of this composite insulation is included. It shows that this composite insulation is effective as a thermal protection system at total heating rates up to 30.6 W/sq cm.

  2. Laser Fine-Adjustment Thruster For Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Egorov, M. S.; Rebrov, S. G.; Repina, E. V.; Safronov, A. L.

    2010-05-01

    To the present time, a few laser propulsion engine devices have been developed by using dominant mechanisms of laser propulsion. Generally these mechanisms are laser ablation, laser breakdown of gases, and laser detonation waves that are induced due to extraction of the internal energy of polymer propellants. In the paper, we consider the Aero-Space Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed earlier, in which all of these mechanisms are realized via interaction of laser radiation with polymers both in continuous wave (CW) and in repetitively pulsed modes of laser operation. The ASLPE is considered to be exploited as a unit of a laser propulsion device being arranged onboard space vehicles moving around the Earth or in interplanetary missions and intended to correct the vehicles orbits. To produce a thrust, a power of the solar pumped lasers designed to the present time is considered in the paper. The problem of increasing the efficiency of the laser propulsion device is analyzed as applied to space missions of vehicles by optimizing the laser propulsion propellant composition.

  3. Laser Fine-Adjustment Thruster For Space Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Egorov, M. S.; Repina, E. V.; Safronov, A. L.; Rebrov, S. G.

    2010-05-06

    To the present time, a few laser propulsion engine devices have been developed by using dominant mechanisms of laser propulsion. Generally these mechanisms are laser ablation, laser breakdown of gases, and laser detonation waves that are induced due to extraction of the internal energy of polymer propellants. In the paper, we consider the Aero-Space Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed earlier, in which all of these mechanisms are realized via interaction of laser radiation with polymers both in continuous wave (CW) and in repetitively pulsed modes of laser operation. The ASLPE is considered to be exploited as a unit of a laser propulsion device being arranged onboard space vehicles moving around the Earth or in interplanetary missions and intended to correct the vehicles orbits. To produce a thrust, a power of the solar pumped lasers designed to the present time is considered in the paper. The problem of increasing the efficiency of the laser propulsion device is analyzed as applied to space missions of vehicles by optimizing the laser propulsion propellant composition.

  4. Command and control displays for space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Zetocha, Paul; Aleva, Denise

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall examine several command and control facility display architectures supporting space vehicle operations, to include TacSat 2, TacSat 3, STPSat 2, and Communications Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS), located within the Research Development Test & Evaluation Support Complex (RSC) Satellite Operations Center 97 (SOC-97) at Kirtland Air Force Base. A principal focus is to provide an understanding for the general design class of displays currently supporting space vehicle command and control, e.g., custom, commercial-off-the-shelf, or ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf, and more specifically, what manner of display performance capabilities, e.g., active area, resolution, luminance, contrast ratio, frame/refresh rate, temperature range, shock/vibration, etc., are needed for particular aspects of space vehicle command and control. Another focus shall be to address the types of command and control functions performed for each of these systems, to include how operators interact with the displays, e.g., joystick, trackball, keyboard/mouse, as well as the kinds of information needed or displayed for each function. [Comparison with other known command and control facilities, such as Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD Operations Center, shall be made.] Future, anticipated display systems shall be discussed.

  5. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle support to the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, William E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and its intended role as a key element of the National Space Transportation System. Various types of missions, operating modes, and performance capabilities for the OMV are described as are typical mission scenarios, with the OMV based at the Shuttle and at the Space Station (SS). Particular emphasis is placed on OMV missions in support of the SS. Retrieval of a spacecraft to the SS for servicing, followed by redeployment of the spacecraft to its operational orbit is typical of SS-based projected missions.

  6. Space Operations for a New Era of Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Vanhooser, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is depending on the Ares Projects to deliver the crew and cargo launch capabilities needed to send human explorers to the Moon and beyond. Ares I and V will provide the core space launch capabilities needed to continue providing crew and cargo access to the International Space Station (ISS), and to build upon the U.S. history of human space exploration. Since 2005, Ares has made substantial progress on designing, developing, and testing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and has continued its in-depth studies of the Ares V cargo launch vehicles. The combined Ares I/Ares V architecture has been designed to reduce the complexity and labor intensity of ground operations for America's next journeys beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A deliberate effort is being made to ensure a high level of system operability to significantly increase safety and system availability as well as reduce recurring costs for this new launch vehicle. The Ares Projects goal is to instill operability as part of the vehicles requirements development, design, and operations. This simplicity will come from using simpler, proven engine designs, as in the case of the J-2X upper stage engine and RS-68 engine; improving existing hardware, as in the case of the Shuttle-heritage 5-segment solid rocket motor; and using common propulsion and instrument unit elements between Ares I and Ares V. Furthermore, lessons learned while developing Ares I will be applied directly to Ares V operations. In 2009, the Ares Projects plan to conduct the first flight test of Ares I, designated Ares I-X. Ares I-X preparations have already prompted changes to the vehicle stacking and launch infrastructure at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), including removing Shuttle-specific fixtures from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to accommodate Ares I-style stacking operations, new firing room computers and infrastructure in the VAB Launch Control Center, and new lightning protection system towers at Launch

  7. Space Operations for a New Era of Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Vanhooser, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is depending on the Ares Projects to deliver the crew and cargo launch capabilities needed to send human explorers to the Moon and beyond. Ares I and V will provide the core space launch capabilities needed to continue providing crew and cargo access to the International Space Station (ISS), and to build upon the U.S. history of human space exploration. Since 2005, Ares has made substantial progress on designing, developing, and testing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and has continued its in-depth studies of the Ares V cargo launch vehicles. The combined Ares I/Ares V architecture has been designed to reduce the complexity and labor intensity of ground operations for America's next journeys beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A deliberate effort is being made to ensure a high level of system operability to significantly increase safety and system availability as well as reduce recurring costs for this new launch vehicle. The Ares Projects goal is to instill operability as part of the vehicles requirements development, design, and operations. This simplicity will come from using simpler, proven engine designs, as in the case of the J-2X upper stage engine and RS-68 engine; improving existing hardware, as in the case of the Shuttle-heritage 5-segment solid rocket motor; and using common propulsion and instrument unit elements between Ares I and Ares V. Furthermore, lessons learned while developing Ares I will be applied directly to Ares V operations. In 2009, the Ares Projects plan to conduct the first flight test of Ares I, designated Ares I-X. Ares I-X preparations have already prompted changes to the vehicle stacking and launch infrastructure at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), including removing Shuttle-specific fixtures from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to accommodate Ares I-style stacking operations, new firing room computers and infrastructure in the VAB Launch Control Center, and new lightning protection system towers at Launch

  8. 77 FR 23463 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Missile Launch Operations at Kodiak Launch Complex, Alaska... two species of pinnipeds incidental to space vehicle and missile launch operations at the Kodiak... vitulina) (adults by harassment and pups by injury or mortality), incidental to space vehicle and...

  9. Applications of triggered lightning to space vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafferis, William; Sanicandro, Rocco; Rompalla, John; Wohlman, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the USAF Eastern Space Missile Center (ESMC) covering an area of 25 x 40 km are frequently called America's Spaceport. This title is earned through the integration, by labor and management, of many skills in a wide variety of engineering fields to solve many technical problems that occur during the launch processing of space vehicles. Weather is one of these problems, and although less frequent in time and duration when compared to engineering type problems, has caused costly and life threatening situations. This sensitivity to weather, especially lightning, was recognized in the very early pioneer days of space operations. The need to protect the many v\\facilities, space flight hardware, and personnel from electrified clouds capable of producing lightning was a critical element in improving launch operations. A KSC lightning committee was formed and directed to improve lightning protection, detection, and measuring systems and required that all theoretical studies be confirmed by KSC field data. Over the years, there have been several lightning incidents involving flight vehicles during ground processing as well as launch. Subsequent investigations revealed the need to improve these systems as well as the knowledge of the electrical atmosphere and its effects on operations in regard to cost and safety. Presented here is how, KSC Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory (AFSL), in particular Rocket Triggered Lightning, is being used to solve these problems.

  10. Applications of triggered lightning to space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, William; Sanicandro, Rocco; Rompalla, John; Wohlman, Richard

    1992-11-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the USAF Eastern Space Missile Center (ESMC) covering an area of 25 x 40 km are frequently called America's Spaceport. This title is earned through the integration, by labor and management, of many skills in a wide variety of engineering fields to solve many technical problems that occur during the launch processing of space vehicles. Weather is one of these problems, and although less frequent in time and duration when compared to engineering type problems, has caused costly and life threatening situations. This sensitivity to weather, especially lightning, was recognized in the very early pioneer days of space operations. The need to protect the many v\\facilities, space flight hardware, and personnel from electrified clouds capable of producing lightning was a critical element in improving launch operations. A KSC lightning committee was formed and directed to improve lightning protection, detection, and measuring systems and required that all theoretical studies be confirmed by KSC field data. Over the years, there have been several lightning incidents involving flight vehicles during ground processing as well as launch. Subsequent investigations revealed the need to improve these systems as well as the knowledge of the electrical atmosphere and its effects on operations in regard to cost and safety. Presented here is how, KSC Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory (AFSL), in particular Rocket Triggered Lightning, is being used to solve these problems.

  11. In-space operations for lunar and Mars space transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, James L., Sr.; Vargo, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the in-space operations required to process the lunar and Mars mission vehicles envisioned for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Recent studies, which have examined the degree to which on-orbit operations change as a function of the Earth-to-orbit (ETO) launch vehicle size, identified a common set of on-orbit vehicle processing tasks, and generated functional requirements for in-space processing nodes are summarized in this paper. Timelines for on-orbit processing of two different lunar transfer vehicles (LTV's) were developed to compare a 'current practice,' labor-intensive EVA approach to ones utilizing telerobotics and advanced automation. LTV aerobrake concepts ranging from simple deployment to considerable assembly are compared. Similar timelines for the on-orbit processing of a nuclear Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) are also presented. Aerobrakes can be processed in a timely manner and should not be ruled out for SEI missions. The 'tall pole' time interval for on-orbit vehicle initial processing is the delivery of elements to orbit, not the processing tasks.

  12. Some Problems of Rocket-Space Vehicles' Characteristics co- ordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    of the XX century suffered a reverse. The designers of the United States' firms and enterprises of aviation and rocket-space industry (Boeing, Rocketdyne, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas, Rockwell, etc.) and NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center and Lewis Research Center and others) could not correctly co-ordinate the characteristics of a propulsion system and a space vehicle for elaboration of the "Single-Stage-To-Orbit" reusable vehicle (SSTO) as an integral whole system, which is would able to inject a payload into an orbit and to return back on the Earth. jet nozzle design as well as the choice of propulsion system characteristics, ensuring the high ballistic efficiency, are considered in the present report. The efficiency criterions for the engine and launch system parameters optimization are discussed. The new methods of the nozzle block optimal parameters' choice for the satisfaction of the object task of flight are suggested. The family of SSTO with a payload mass from 5 to 20 ton and initial weight under 800 ton is considered.

  13. Human response to vibroacoustic environments of space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-10-01

    To insure efficient utilization of the system, space station design and operations will require special habitability considerations for the occupants and crew because of the relatively long duration missions. Of particular concern is the environment in which the personnel will live and work, and how it affects both the performance and comfort of the occupants. Current criteria do not consider possible effects of reduced gravity, long duration, and confinement. Preliminary to developing space station vibroacoustic habitability criteria, the adequacy of criteria for other space vehicles has been reviewed. In this paper, responses to the noise and vibration environments of both Skylab and Shuttle are discussed. Some astronauts have reported sleep interference, communication interference, distraction, and general annoyance as noise related complaints. In addition, information from the Russian Salyut missions, as well as similar based situtations (e.g., submarines), is reviewed.

  14. Human response to vibroacoustic environments of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To insure efficient utilization of the system, space station design and operations will require special habitability considerations for the occupants and crew because of the relatively long duration missions. Of particular concern is the environment in which the personnel will live and work, and how it affects both the performance and comfort of the occupants. Current criteria do not consider possible effects of reduced gravity, long duration, and confinement. Preliminary to developing space station vibroacoustic habitability criteria, the adequacy of criteria for other space vehicles has been reviewed. In this paper, responses to the noise and vibration environments of both Skylab and Shuttle are discussed. Some astronauts have reported sleep interference, communication interference, distraction, and general annoyance as noise related complaints. In addition, information from the Russian Salyut missions, as well as similar based situtations (e.g., submarines), is reviewed.

  15. Ariane Transfer Vehicle - Logistic support to Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cougnet, C.; Ricaud, C.; Deutscher, N.

    The attractiveness of the Ariane 5 and Ariane transfer vehicle (ATV) is described: it avoids the one-sidedness of the National STS, it increases the lift capacity to meet the demands of the Space Station, and it offers a system independent of, but consistent with, the STS in providing backup contingency capability. The Ariane 5/ATV system is able to launch and transfer any cargo module to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and dispose of it at the end of the mission. Consideration is given to Space Station and SSF logistic support, and ATV operations and design. Diagrams are provided to illustrate the ATV's requirements and capability; an ATV mission toward the SSF; ATV design and components; the ATV's attitude, layout, and the architecture of the main propulsion system and avionic; and the ATV's performance. It is demonstrated that the Ariane 5/ATV system would be an adequate complement to the NSTS for logistic support of the SSF.

  16. Space Launch System Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter Hardware Completes Manufacturing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-28

    The Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter for the first flight of the Space Launch System, NASA’s new deeps space rocket, recently completed manufacturing at NASA’s Marshal Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The LVSA, the largest piece of the rocket welded together in Marshall’s Huntsville manufacturing area, will connect two major sections of SLS – the 27.6-foot diameter core stage and the 16.4-foot interim cryogenic propulsion stage – for the first integrated flight of SLS and the Orion spacecraft. Teledyne Brown Engineering of Huntsville, the prime contractor for the adapter, has completed manufacturing, and engineers are preparing to apply thermal insulation. It will be the largest piece of hardware that Marshall. The LVSA was moved from the NASA welding area to NASA’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing where the thermal protection system will be applied.

  17. Folding retractable protective dome for space vehicle equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Paul R. (Inventor); Messinger, Ross H. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A folding, retractable dome for protecting a feature, such as a docking mechanism, a hatch or other equipment at an exterior surface of a space vehicle, includes a plurality of arcuate ribs, each having opposite ends respectively pinioned at opposite sides of the feature at the surface of the vehicle for rotational movement about an axis of rotation extending through the opposite ends and through an arcuate path of revolution extending over the feature, and a flexible cover attached to each of the ribs such that, in a deployed configuration of the dome, in which adjacent ribs are rotated apart from each other at a maximum relative angle therebetween, the cover is stretched generally tangentially between the adjacent ribs to form a generally arcuate shield over the feature, and in a retracted position of the dome, in which adjacent ribs are rotated together at a minimum relative angle therebetween, the cover is collapsed to define folded pleats between the adjacent ribs.

  18. Reliable compact electrical power source systems for space launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Described herein are several key technologies utilized in the design of a family of direct-drive turboalternator systems for space launch vehicles. These systems automatically provide conditioned and regulated electrical power at various voltages, powering actuators, valves, and avionics throughout the vehicle. The simple and robust ring-wound two-pole toothless alternator operates at peripheral speeds, making it suitable to be driven directly by a turbine, thereby eliminating the weight, reliability, zero ``g`` lubrication, and cooling issues of a speed-reducing gearbox, while allowing the turbine to operate at reasonable efficiency. Additionally, the use of self-aligning foil bearing and catalytic combustors or cold gas propellants enhance the reliability. The power conditioner and electronic controller provide hands-off regulated ac or dc power on demand, maintaining critical parameters within established limits and performance while reporting on built-in health-monitoring tests.

  19. The earth orbit shuttle as a space rescue vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, M. G., Jr.; Perchonok, E.

    1972-01-01

    According to present concepts starting with some future date all manned space missions beyond low-earth orbit are to originate in low-earth orbit and to return ultimately to low-earth orbit. The Earth-Orbit-Shuttle (EOS) is visualized as the only vehicle operating between earth and low-earth orbit. The ability of the EOS to provide rescue services in the case of emergency is evaluated. It is found that an employment of the EOS as rescue vehicle is basically feasible, although it has certain limitations. Complementary means of transportation are required for emergencies beyond low-earth orbit. Approaches to enhance the rescue mission utility of the EOS are discussed.

  20. Measurements of sonic-boom overpressures from Apollo space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents representative results of sonic-boom overpressure data recorded during the launch and reentry of the Apollo 15 and 16 space vehicle systems. Comparisons are made between measured overpressures and those predicted using available theory. The measurements were obtained along the vehicle ground track at 68, 87, 92, 129, and 970 km downrange from the launch site during ascent, and at 9, 13, 55, 185, and 500 km from the splash-down point during reentry. Also included are tracings of the sonic-boom signatures along with a brief description of the launch and recovery test areas in which the measurements were obtained, the sonic-boom instrumentation deployment, flight profiles and operating conditions, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas.

  1. Design Guidelines for Quiet Fans and Pumps for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, John S.; Magliozzi, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This document presents guidelines for the design of quiet fans and pumps of the class used on space vehicles. A simple procedure is presented for the prediction of fan noise over the meaningful frequency spectrum. A section also presents general design criteria for axial flow fans, squirrel cage fans, centrifugal fans, and centrifugal pumps. The basis for this report is an experimental program conducted by Hamilton Standard under NASA Contract NAS 9-12457. The derivations of the noise predicting methods used in this document are explained in Hamilton Standard Report SVHSER 6183, "Fan and Pump Noise Control," dated May 1973 (6).

  2. Numerical simulation of the integrated space shuttle vehicle in ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.; Chiu, I. T.; Obayashi, S.; Rizk, Y. M.; Steger, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    A simulation of the flow about the integrated space shuttle vehicle in ascent mode has been undertaken for various flight conditions using the Chimera composite grid discretization approach. Overset body-conforming grids were used to represent each geometric component, and an implicit approximately factored finite-difference procedure was used to solve the three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The computational results have been compared with both wind tunnel and flight test data. Although relatively good agreement is obtained with the experimental data, further refinement and evaluation of numerical error is under way.

  3. Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle OAT No. 1 Plugs in Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A test is described which demonstrates the compatibility of the Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle systems, the ground support equipment, and off-site support facilities by proceeding through a simulated launch countdown, liftoff, and flight. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, holddown arm release, service arm retraction, liftoff, and inflight separation are simulated. An external power source supplies transfer power to internal, and instrument unit commands are simulated by the digital command system. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, radio frequency matrix, and interface control chart.

  4. Comparison of basic launch vehicles of leading space countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkiy, Y. G.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of analysis and optimization, which is offered for consideration, relates to the area of scientific research, development and statements of the perspective ideas. The electoral approach to substantiation of the new technical concepts and to evaluation of the technical projects is formulated and offered, taking into account the availability of competitors. The opportunity of the particular realization of the offerred approach for solution of the practical tasks is demonstrated on the example of comparison of the technical and economical virtues of the main space vehicles.

  5. Radio Frequency (RF) Attenuation Measurements of the Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. C.; Kent, B. M.; Kempf, D. R.; Johnk, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Following the loss of Columbia, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) provided recommendations to be addressed prior to Return To Flight (RTF). As a part of CAIB Recommendation 3.4.1 - Ground Based Imagery, new C-band and X-band radars were added to the array of ground-based radars and cameras already in-situ at Kennedy Space Center. Because of higher power density considerations and new operating frequencies, the team of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) assembled to investigate the technical details of introducing the new radars recommended a series of radio frequency (RF) attenuation tests be performed on the Space Shuttle vehicle to establish the attenuation of the vehicle outer mold line structure with respect to its external RF environment. Because of time and complex logistical constraints, it was decided to split the test into two separate efforts. The first of these would be accomplished with the assistance of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), performing RF attenuation measurements on the aft section of OV-103 (Discovery) while in-situ in Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) 3, located at Kennedy Space Center. The second would be accomplished with the assistance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) laboratory out of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, Maryland (PAX River), performing RF attenuation measurements on OV-105 (Endeavour) in-situ inside the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) hangar, also located at Kennedy Space Center. This paper provides a summary description of these efforts and their results.

  6. Role of Process Control in Improving Space Vehicle Safety- a Space Shuttle External Tank Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Nguyen, Son C.

    2005-12-01

    Developing a safe and reliable space vehicle requires good design and good manufacturing, or in other words "design it right and build it right". A great design can be hard to build or manufacture mainly due to process control challenges. Difficulties with process control can lead to lower quality. As a result, the system suffers from low quality which leads to low reliability and high system risk. The Space Shuttle has experienced some of those cases, but has overcome these difficulties through extensive redesign efforts and process enhancements. The most recent example is the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Thermal Protection System (TPS) reliability issues that contributed to the Columbia accident. As a result, extensive redesign and process enhancement activities have been performed over the last two years to minimize the sensitivities and difficulties of the manual TPS application process.This paper discusses the importance of quality in system design, and the relationship between quality, reliability, and system safety for space vehicles.

  7. Space and planetary environment criteria guidelines for use in space vehicle development, 1971 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    A consolidation of natural environment data is presented for use as design criteria guidelines in space and planetary exploration vehicle development programs. In addition to information in the disciplinary areas of aeronomy, radiation, geomagnetism, astrodynamic constants, and meteoroids for the earth's environment above 90 kilometers, interplanetary space, and the planetary environments, the upper atmosphere model currently recommended for use at MSFC is discussed in detail.

  8. Space shuttle: Structural integrity and assessment study. [development of nondestructive test procedures for space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A study program was conducted to determine the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) requirements and to develop a preliminary nondestructive evaluation manual for the entire space shuttle vehicle. The rationale and guidelines for structural analysis and NDE requirements development are discussed. Recommendations for development of NDE technology for the orbiter thermal protection system and certain structural components are included. Recommendations to accomplish additional goals toward space shuttle inspection are presented.

  9. Development of a Refined Space Vehicle Rollout Forcing Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Tucker, Jon-Michael; Valle, Gerard; Grady, Robert; Schliesing, John; Fahling, James; Emory, Benjamin; Armand, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, American manned spaceflight vehicles and the associated launch platforms have been transported from final assembly to the launch pad via a pre-launch phase called rollout. The rollout environment is rich with forced harmonics and higher order effects can be used for extracting structural dynamics information. To enable this utilization, processing tools are needed to move from measured and analytical data to dynamic metrics such as transfer functions, mode shapes, modal frequencies, and damping. This paper covers the range of systems and tests that are available to estimate rollout forcing functions for the Space Launch System (SLS). The specific information covered in this paper includes: the different definitions of rollout forcing functions; the operational and developmental data sets that are available; the suite of analytical processes that are currently in-place or in-development; and the plans and future work underway to solve two immediate problems related to rollout forcing functions. Problem 1 involves estimating enforced accelerations to drive finite element models for developing design requirements for the SLS class of launch vehicles. Problem 2 involves processing rollout measured data in near real time to understand structural dynamics properties of a specific vehicle and the class to which it belongs.

  10. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    High temperature control surface seals have been identified as a critical technology in the development of future space vehicles. These seals must withstand temperatures of up to 2600 F and protect underlying temperature-sensitive structures (such as actuators and sealing capability by remaining resilient during flight conditions. The current baseline seal, used on the Shuttle orbiters and the X-38 vehicle, consists of a Nextel 312 sheath, an internal Inconel X-750 knitted spring tube, and hand-stuffed Saffil batting. Unfortunately at high temperatures (> 1500 F), the seal resiliency significantly degrades due to yielding and creep of the spring tube element. The permanent set in the seals can result in flow passing over the seals and subsequent damage to temperature sensitive components downstream of the seals. Another shortcoming of the baseline seal is that instances have been reported on Shuttle flights where some of the hand-stuffed Saffil batting insulation has been extracted, thus potentially compromising the seal. In vehicles where the thermal protection systems are delicate (such as with Shuttle tiles), the control surface seals must also limit the amount of force applied to the opposing surfaces. Additionally, in many applications the seals are subjected to scrubbing as control surfaces are actuated. The seals must be able to withstand any damage resulting from this high temperature scrubbing and retain their heat/flow blocking abilities.

  11. Classroom Analysis of Rotating Space Vehicles in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgwald, James M.; Schreiner, Serge

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the use of modern science fiction movies as a vehicle to teach scientific principles. The resulting artificial gravity from a spinning space station in movie "2001" is calculated from measurements taken off of the screen. A mathematical explanation is provided. (MVL)

  12. Classroom Analysis of Rotating Space Vehicles in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgwald, James M.; Schreiner, Serge

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the use of modern science fiction movies as a vehicle to teach scientific principles. The resulting artificial gravity from a spinning space station in movie "2001" is calculated from measurements taken off of the screen. A mathematical explanation is provided. (MVL)

  13. NASA's Space Launch System: One Vehicle, Many Destinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.; Creech, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, the SLS rocket will start its missions in 2017 with 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket that launched astronauts to the Moon 40 years ago. From there it will evolve into the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, via an upgrade approach that will provide building blocks for future space exploration and development. The International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has created the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths toward a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for all three destinations. This paper will explore the capability of SLS to meet those requirements and enable those missions. It will explain how the SLS Program is executing this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and developing advanced technology based on heritage systems, from the initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability through a block upgrade approach to an evolved 130-t capability. It will also detail the significant progress that has already been made toward its first launch in 2017. The SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they will need for extended trips to explore new frontiers. In addition, this paper will summarize the SLS rocket's capability to support science and robotic precursor missions to other worlds, or uniquely high-mass space facilities in Earth orbit. As this paper will explain, the SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global

  14. A Taskable Space Vehicle: Realizing Cost Savings by Combining Orbital and Suborbital Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    74 | Air & Space Power Journal Air Force Institute of Technology A Taskable Space Vehicle Realizing Cost Savings by Combining Orbital and...drive down the costs of both those components simultaneously so that we can prepare and launch a space vehicle within weeks at a fraction of the...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Taskable Space Vehicle : Realizing Cost Savings by Combining Orbital

  15. System for sterilizing objects. [cleaning space vehicle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, C. J.; Wright, E. E., Jr.; Moyers, C. V. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system for producing a stream of humidified sterilizing gas for sterilizing objects such as the water systems of space vehicles and the like includes a source of sterilant gas which is fed to a mixing chamber which has inlet and outlet ports. The level of the water only partially fills the mixing chamber so as to provide an empty space adjacent the top of the chamber. A heater is provided for heating the water in the chamber so as to produce a humidified atmosphere. The sterilant gas is fed through an arcuate shaped tubular member connected to the inlet port of the mixing chamber for producing a vortex type of flow of sterilant gas into the chamber for humidification. A tubular member extends from the mixing chamber for supplying the humidified sterilant gas to the object for being sterilized. Scrubbers are provided for removing the sterilant gas after use.

  16. Space vehicle pose estimation via optical correlation and nonlinear estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-03-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  17. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  18. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  19. Automated space vehicle control for rendezvous proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Rendezvous during the unmanned space exploration missions, such as a Mars Rover/Sample Return will require a completely automatic system from liftoff to docking. A conceptual design of an automated rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking system is being implemented and validated at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The emphasis is on the progress of the development and testing of a prototype system for control of the rendezvous vehicle during proximity operations that is currently being developed at JSC. Fuzzy sets are used to model the human capability of common sense reasoning in decision-making tasks and such models are integrated with the expert systems and engineering control system technology to create a system that performs comparably to a manned system.

  20. The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV1) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryden, K. A.

    This paper describes the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV1) mission and the overall spacecraft and ground segment design. STRV1 is a small (50 kg) research satellite which will test in-orbit the performance of new space technologies prior to their application to much more expensive operational missions. Included on the satellite are experiments which will investigate the performance of new solar cells and microelectronics, electrostatic hazard alleviation systems, improved structural materials and advanced on-board data handling systems. STRV1 is to be placed in a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) which provides a very severe orbital environment for the satellite and, in particular, a high radiation dose: it is therefore an excellent test of the technologies and experiments to be carried.

  1. Weight and cost forecasting for advanced manned space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    A mass and cost estimating computerized methology for predicting advanced manned space vehicle weights and costs was developed. The user friendly methology designated MERCER (Mass Estimating Relationship/Cost Estimating Relationship) organizes the predictive process according to major vehicle subsystem levels. Design, development, test, evaluation, and flight hardware cost forecasting is treated by the study. This methodology consists of a complete set of mass estimating relationships (MERs) which serve as the control components for the model and cost estimating relationships (CERs) which use MER output as input. To develop this model, numerous MER and CER studies were surveyed and modified where required. Additionally, relationships were regressed from raw data to accommodate the methology. The models and formulations which estimated the cost of historical vehicles to within 20 percent of the actual cost were selected. The result of the research, along with components of the MERCER Program, are reported. On the basis of the analysis, the following conclusions were established: (1) The cost of a spacecraft is best estimated by summing the cost of individual subsystems; (2) No one cost equation can be used for forecasting the cost of all spacecraft; (3) Spacecraft cost is highly correlated with its mass; (4) No study surveyed contained sufficient formulations to autonomously forecast the cost and weight of the entire advanced manned vehicle spacecraft program; (5) No user friendly program was found that linked MERs with CERs to produce spacecraft cost; and (6) The group accumulation weight estimation method (summing the estimated weights of the various subsystems) proved to be a useful method for finding total weight and cost of a spacecraft.

  2. Low thrust space vehicle trajectory optimization using regularized variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzfeger, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Optimizing the trajectory of a low thrust space vehicle usually means solving a nonlinear two point boundary value problem. In general, accuracy requirements necessitate extensive computation times. In celestial mechanics, regularizing transformations of the equations of motion are used to eliminate computational and analytical problems that occur during close approaches to gravitational force centers. It was shown in previous investigations that regularization in the formulation of the trajectory optimization problem may reduce the computation time. In this study, a set of regularized equations describing the optimal trajectory of a continuously thrusting space vehicle is derived. The computational characteristics of the set are investigated and compared to the classical Newtonian unregularized set of equations. The comparison is made for low thrust, minimum time, escape trajectories and numerical calculations of Keplerian orbits. The comparison indicates that in the cases investigated for bad initial guesses of the known boundary values a remarkable reduction in the computation time was achieved. Furthermore, the investigated set of regularized equations shows high numerical stability even for long duration flights and is less sensitive to errors in the guesses of the unknown boundary values.

  3. Space Vehicle Power System Comprised of Battery/Capacitor Combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarotte, C.; Lancaster, G. S.; Eichenberg, D.; Butler, S. M.; Miller, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Recent improvements in energy densities of batteries open the possibility of using electric rather that hydraulic actuators in space vehicle systems. However, the systems usually require short-duration, high-power pulses. This power profile requires the battery system to be sized to meet the power requirements rather than stored energy requirements, often resulting in a large and inefficient energy storage system. Similar transient power applications have used a combination of two or more disparate energy storage technologies. For instance, placing a capacitor and a battery side-by-side combines the high energy density of a battery with the high power performance of a capacitor and thus can create a lighter and more compact system. A parametric study was performed to identify favorable scenarios for using capacitors. System designs were then carried out using equivalent circuit models developed for five commercial electrochemical capacitor products. Capacitors were sized to satisfy peak power levels and consequently "leveled" the power requirement of the battery, which can then be sized to meet system energy requirements. Simulation results clearly differentiate the performance offered by available capacitor products for the space vehicle applications.

  4. NASA's Space Launch System: One Vehicle, Many Destinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.; Creech, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit (BEO). Developed with the goals of safety, affordability and sustainability in mind, SLS will start with 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket that launched astronauts to the Moon 40 years ago. From there it will evolve into the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, via an upgrade approach that will provide building blocks for future space exploration and development. The International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has worked together to create the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths towards a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for all three destinations. This paper will explore the requirements needed for missions to BEO destinations, and the capability of SLS to meet those requirements and enable those missions. It will explain how NASA will execute this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology, from the initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability through a block upgrade approach to an evolved 130-t capability. The SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they would need for extended trips to asteroids, the Moon, and Mars. In addition, this paper will detail SLS's capability to support missions beyond the human exploration roadmap, including robotic precursor missions to other worlds or uniquely high-mass space operation facilities in Earth orbit. As this paper will explain, the SLS provides game-changing mass and volume lift capability that makes it enhancing or enabling for a variety of

  5. A study of the compatibility of science instruments with the solar electric propulsion space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.; Ajello, J. M.; Bratenahl, A.; Clay, D. R.; Tsurutani, B.

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference and field-of-view constraints are identified as the areas of most concern to science on solar electric propulsion space vehicles. Several areas are indicated which more detailed data on the space vehicle environment are needed. In addition, possible means to attain or demonstrate science/space vehicle compatibility are recommended for further iteration between space vehicle design and science payload considerations. The space vehicle design developed by the solar electric propulsion system integration technology effort is used. Two payload sets for comet Encke missions (a slow flyby and a rendezvous), as well as several instruments which are not included in the two payload sets, are analyzed to determine requirements on the space vehicle imposed by the instruments in order to meet their objectives. Environmental requirements for the sets of instruments are developed and compared to both the SEPSIT design criteria and the environment as it is presently understood.

  6. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing advanced high temperature structural seals since the late 1980s and is currently developing seals for future space vehicles as part of the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. This includes control surface seals that seal the edges and hinge lines of movable flaps and elevons on future reentry vehicles. In these applications, the seals must operate at temperatures above 2000 F in an oxidizing environment, limit hot gas leakage to protect underlying structures, endure high temperature scrubbing against rough surfaces, and remain flexible and resilient enough to stay in contact with sealing surfaces for multiple heating and loading cycles. For this study, three seal designs were compared against the baseline spring tube seal through a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. In addition, canted coil springs were tested as preloaders behind the seals at room temperature to assess their potential for improving resiliency. Addition of these preloader elements resulted in significant increases in resiliency compared to seals by themselves and surpassed the performance of the baseline seal at room temperature. Flow tests demonstrated that the seal candidates with engineered cores had lower leakage rates than the baseline spring tube design. However, then the seals were placed on the preloader elements, the flow rates were higher as the seals were not compressed as much and therefore were not able to fill the groove as well. High temperature tests were also conducted to assess the compatability of seal fabrics against cermaic matrix composite (CMC) panels anticipated for use in next generation launch vehicles. These evaluations demonstrated potential bonding issues between the Nextel fabrics and CMC candidates.

  7. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, J. J.; Dunlap, P. H., Jr.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing advanced high temperature structural seals since the late 1980's and is currently developing seals for future space vehicles as part of the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. This includes control surface seals that seal the edges and hinge lines of movable flaps and elevons on future reentry vehicles. In these applications, the seals must operate at temperatures above 2000 F in an oxidizing environment, limit hot gas leakage to protect underlying structures, endure high temperature scrubbing against rough surfaces, and remain flexible and resilient enough to stay in contact with sealing surfaces for multiple heating and loading cycles. For this study, three seal designs were compared against the baseline spring tube seal through a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. In addition, canted coil springs were tested as preloaders behind the seals at room temperature to assess their potential for improving resiliency. Addition of these preloader elements resulted in significant increases in resiliency compared to the seals by themselves and surpassed the performance of the baseline seal at room temperature. Flow tests demonstrated that the seal candidates with engineered cores had lower leakage rates than the baseline spring tube design. However, when the seals were placed on the preloader elements, the flow rates were higher as the seals were not compressed as much and therefore were not able to fill the groove as well. High temperature tests were also conducted to asses the compatibility of seal fabrics against ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panels anticipated for use in next generation launch vehicles. These evaluations demonstrated potential bonding issues between the Nextel fabrics and CMC candidates.

  8. Observations of ELF Signatures Arising from Space Vehicle Disturbances of the Ionosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    May 1991 Professional Paper 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 FUNDING NUMBERS OBSERVATIONS OF ELF SIGNATURES ARISING FROM SPACE VEHICLE DISTURBANCES OF THE...Signatures Arising from Space Vehicle Disturbances of the Ionosphere Jack Y. Dea Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, CA/USA 92152-5000, Code 832 (619) 553...Low Frequency (ELF) signatures arising from space vehicle disturbances of the ionosphere. The sharply peaked signatures are observed in the lower ELF

  9. Nadir Seeker Orientation of a Space Vehicle in Relation to the Planet Being Orbited.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent relates to a space vehicle orientation system, for sensing the space vehicles orientation relative to the Z axis or vertical axis in the...deviation from the nadir will result in a change in either or both the doppler shift or the pulse width. By sensing these changes the radar beam may be redirected toward the spot directly below the space vehicle , the nadir.

  10. GPM's Launch Vehicle Arrives at Tanegashima Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The launch vehicle for the Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission's Core Observatory arrived at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, in the pre-dawn hours of Tuesday, Jan. 21, local time. Credits: NASA/Goddard/Warren Schultzaburger GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The Core Observatory will link data from a constellation of current and planned satellites to produce next-generation global measurements of rainfall and snowfall from space. The GPM mission is the first coordinated international satellite network to provide near real-time observations of rain and snow every three hours anywhere on the globe. The GPM Core Observatory anchors this network by providing observations on all types of precipitation. The observatory's data acts as the measuring stick by which partner observations can be combined into a unified data set. The data will be used by scientists to study climate change, freshwater resources, floods and droughts, and hurricane formation and tracking. Credit: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  12. A methodology for rapid vehicle scaling and configuration space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaba, Davis

    2009-12-01

    The Configuration-space Exploration and Scaling Methodology (CESM) entails the representation of component or sub-system geometries as matrices of points in 3D space. These typically large matrices are reduced using minimal convex sets or convex hulls. This reduction leads to significant gains in collision detection speed at minimal approximation expense. (The Gilbert-Johnson-Keerthi algorithm [79] is used for collision detection purposes in this methodology.) Once the components are laid out, their collective convex hull (from here on out referred to as the super-hull) is used to approximate the inner mold line of the minimum enclosing envelope of the vehicle concept. A sectional slicing algorithm is used to extract the sectional dimensions of this envelope. An offset is added to these dimensions in order to come up with the sectional fuselage dimensions. Once the lift and control surfaces are added, vehicle level objective functions can be evaluated and compared to other designs. The size of the design space coupled with the fact that some key constraints such as the number of collisions are discontinuous, dictate that a domain-spanning optimization routine be used. Also, as this is a conceptual design tool, the goal is to provide the designer with a diverse baseline geometry space from which to chose. For these reasons, a domain-spanning algorithm with counter-measures against speciation and genetic drift is the recommended optimization approach. The Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) [60] is shown to work well for the proof of concept study. There are two major reasons why the need to evaluate higher fidelity, custom geometric scaling laws became a part of this body of work. First of all, historical-data based regressions become implicitly unreliable when the vehicle concept in question is designed around a disruptive technology. Second, it was shown that simpler approaches such as photographic scaling can result in highly suboptimal concepts

  13. Cryogenic Moisture Uptake in Foam Insulation for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; ScholtensCoffman, Brekke E.; Sass, Jared P.; Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Meneghelli, Barrry J.

    2008-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams and rigid polyisocyanurate foams (spray-on foam insulation), like those flown on Shuttle, Delta IV, and will be flown on Ares-I and Ares-V, can gain an extraordinary amount of water when under cryogenic conditions for several hours. These foams, when exposed for eight hours to launch pad environments on one side and cryogenic temperature on the other, increase their weight from 35 to 80 percent depending on the duration of weathering or aging. This effect translates into several thousand pounds of additional weight for space vehicles at lift-off. A new cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus was designed to determine the amount of water/ice taken into the specimen under actual-use propellant loading conditions. This experimental study included the measurement of the amount of moisture uptake within different foam materials. Results of testing using both aged specimens and weathered specimens are presented. To better understand cryogenic foam insulation performance, cryogenic moisture testing is shown to be essential. The implications for future launch vehicle thermal protection system design and flight performance are discussed.

  14. Innovative concepts for the Titan II space launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Bruce M.

    1991-06-01

    A number of concepts that will enable Titan II to launch a greater spectrum of payloads is presented. The history of Titan development is outlined, and emphasis is placed on the development of the Titan II space launch vehicle (SLV) as well as on two types of missions contracted for the Titan II SLV. The current payload capabilities of the Titan II SLV are discussed, and attention is focused on a Titan II variant called the Titan IIS with a number of solid rocket motors added to the first stage, the Titan IIL employing liquid rocket boosters, and an enhanced attitude control system. A concept involving two small bipropellant engines on the aft end of stage II as well as a concept involving restarting of the stage-II main engine are considered.

  15. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Jeffrey H.; Vinopal, Tim; Andrews, Dana; Richards, Bill; Weber, Gary; Paddock, Greg; Maricich, Peter; Bouton, Bruce; Hagen, Jim; Kolesar, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This final report is a compilation of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 study findings and is intended as a Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) 'users guide' rather than an exhaustive explanation of STV design details. It provides a database for design choices in the general areas of basing, reusability, propulsion, and staging; with selection criteria based on cost, performance, available infrastructure, risk, and technology. The report is organized into the following three parts: (1) design guide; (2) STV Phase 1 Concepts and Requirements Study Summary; and (3) STV Phase 2 Concepts and Requirements Study Summary. The overall objectives of the STV study were to: (1) define preferred STV concepts capable of accommodating future exploration missions in a cost-effective manner; (2) determine the level of technology development required to perform these missions in the most cost effective manner; and (3) develop a decision database of programmatic approaches for the development of an STV concept.

  16. Dispersion analysis techniques within the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program was evaluated as a dispersion analysis tool. The Linear Error Analysis (LEA) post processor was examined in detail and simulation techniques relative to conducting a dispersion analysis using the SVDS were considered. The LEA processor is a tool for correlating trajectory dispersion data developed by simulating 3 sigma uncertainties as single error source cases. The processor combines trajectory and performance deviations by a root-sum-square (RSS process) and develops a covariance matrix for the deviations. Results are used in dispersion analyses for the baseline reference and orbiter flight test missions. As a part of this study, LEA results were verified as follows: (A) Hand calculating the RSS data and the elements of the covariance matrix for comparison with the LEA processor computed data. (B) Comparing results with previous error analyses. The LEA comparisons and verification are made at main engine cutoff (MECO).

  17. Optimizing electrostatic radiation shielding for manned space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisina, Warren

    The shield has three concentric grids having a net charge of zero. The voltage across the outer pair is chosen to repel electrons; and that across the inner pair is chosen to repel nucleons. The negative grid is coated to absorb ultraviolet light to prevent photoemission, and secondary emission is minimized by a grid/thin foil combination. Voltage is maximized and mass minimized by setting the ratio of the negative to the inner positive electrode radii to ≥ 2. The outer grid pair forms a space truss with rigid geodesic grid, from which catenary tensile members are suspended. For docking there is passage directly through the sparse gridwork of larger structures, or through a charge shifting vestibule on smaller. While efficiency increases indefinitely with size, favorable sizes for given voltages are indicated. Large modular habitats and small powered transport vehicles are protected with efficiencies several orders of magnitude over mass shielding against charged particle cosmic radiation.

  18. Experiments in teleoperator and autonomous control of space robotic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Harold L.

    1990-01-01

    A research program and strategy are described which include fundamental teleoperation issues and autonomous-control issues of sensing and navigation for satellite robots. The program consists of developing interfaces for visual operation and studying the consequences of interface designs as well as developing navigation and control technologies based on visual interaction. A space-robot-vehicle simulator is under development for use in virtual-environment teleoperation experiments and neutral-buoyancy investigations. These technologies can be utilized in a study of visual interfaces to address tradeoffs between head-tracking and manual remote cameras, panel-mounted and helmet-mounted displays, and stereoscopic and monoscopic display systems. The present program can provide significant data for the development of control experiments for autonomously controlled satellite robots.

  19. Contemporary technologies of early detection of fire in space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A. A.; Grigoriev, G. Yu.; Lagutin, A. S.; Nabiev, S. S.; Pisliakov, A. V.; Samotaev, N. N.; Sokolov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    A fairly reliable method of fire detection at an early stage is suggested and proved. The method is based on the monitoring of the air chemical composition, which changes strongly due to thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) of overheated combustible materials that are starting to smolder. It is at this stage of incipient fire that adequate measures can be taken for fire extinction with simple tools or, in the case of overheating of electrical equipment, for switching off this equipment automatically using a signal from the fire protection system thereby eliminating the fire hazardous situation. Fire detectors and microcontrollers are designed. These gas fire detectors are particularly suitable at the objects with active ventilation, for example, at space vehicles.

  20. TPS Sizing for Access-to-Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William; Olynick, David; Palmer, Grant; Chen, Y.-K.

    1996-01-01

    A study was carried out to identify, develop, and benchmark simulation techniques needed for optimum thermal protection system (TPS) material selection and sizing for reusable launch vehicles. Fully viscous, chemically reacting, Navier-Stokes flow solutions over the Langley wing-body single stage to orbit (SSTO) configuration were generated and coupled with an in-depth conduction code. Results from the study provide detailed TPS heat shield materials selection and thickness sizing for the wing-body SSTO. These results are the first ever achieved through the use of a complete, trajectory based hypersonic, Navier-Stokes solution database. TPS designs were obtained for both laminar and turbulent entry trajectories using the Access-to-Space baseline materials such as tailorable advanced blanket insulation. The TPS design effects (materials selection and thickness) of coupling material characteristics to the aerothermal environment are illustrated. Finally, a sample validation case using the shuttle flight database is included.

  1. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study. Volume 2, book 1: STV concept definition and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: mission analysis; initial and evolutionary space transfer vehicle (STV) concept definition; configuration and subsystem trade studies; and operations and logistics.

  2. Comparative Ergonomic Evaluation of Spacesuit and Space Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott; Cowley, Matthew; Benson, Elizabeth; Harvill, Lauren; Blackledge, Christopher; Perez, Esau; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of the latest human spaceflight objectives, a series of prototype architectures for a new launch and reentry spacesuit that would be suited to the new mission goals. Four prototype suits were evaluated to compare their performance and enable the selection of the preferred suit components and designs. A consolidated approach to testing was taken: concurrently collecting suit mobility data, seat-suit-vehicle interface clearances, and qualitative assessments of suit performance within the volume of a Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle mockup. It was necessary to maintain high fidelity in a mockup and use advanced motion-capture technologies in order to achieve the objectives of the study. These seemingly mutually exclusive goals were accommodated with the construction of an optically transparent and fully adjustable frame mockup. The construction of the mockup was such that it could be dimensionally validated rapidly with the motioncapture system. This paper describes the method used to create a space vehicle mockup compatible with use of an optical motion-capture system, the consolidated approach for evaluating spacesuits in action, and a way to use the complex data set resulting from a limited number of test subjects to generate hardware requirements for an entire population. Kinematics, hardware clearance, anthropometry (suited and unsuited), and subjective feedback data were recorded on 15 unsuited and 5 suited subjects. Unsuited subjects were selected chiefly based on their anthropometry in an attempt to find subjects who fell within predefined criteria for medium male, large male, and small female subjects. The suited subjects were selected as a subset of the unsuited medium male subjects and were tested in both unpressurized and pressurized conditions. The prototype spacesuits were each fabricated in a single size to accommodate an approximately average-sized male, so select findings from the suit testing were systematically extrapolated to the extremes

  3. Application Prospects of the Russian Hazard Alarm System Supporting Safe Flights of Operated Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Sokolov, N.; Kozlov, V.; Kornienko, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The issues are considered of elaboration and development of the Russian hazard alarm system to provide safe flight of operated space vehicles and life activities on Earth under the conditions of increasingly congested near-Earth space environment. The results are given characterizing the appearance intensity of hazardous approaches of space vehicles with space debris in the different areas of near-Earth space. The estimated probabilities are given of space vehicles collisions with the space objects, and also the statistical data on safety zone violations of space vehicles, performance of avoidance maneuvers, coordinates and time of deorbiting of the falling space objects. There is also a description of development prospects of the hazard alarm system.

  4. Practices in adequate structural design. [of space vehicles and space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the guidelines for safe and reliable space vehicle design, especially in the structural engineering area, which have been formulated by NASA in the aftermath of the Space Shuttle Challenger accident in 1986. Illustrative examples are presented from state-of-the-art, performance-driven hardware whose design ineluctably gives rise to a high sensitivity to small variations and uncertainties. It is recommended that such hardware be designed with a view to easy inspectability and manufacturability, with emphasis on the role played in system structures by fracture mechanics. Static and dynamic coupling effects must be precluded wherever possible.

  5. Practices in adequate structural design. [of space vehicles and space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the guidelines for safe and reliable space vehicle design, especially in the structural engineering area, which have been formulated by NASA in the aftermath of the Space Shuttle Challenger accident in 1986. Illustrative examples are presented from state-of-the-art, performance-driven hardware whose design ineluctably gives rise to a high sensitivity to small variations and uncertainties. It is recommended that such hardware be designed with a view to easy inspectability and manufacturability, with emphasis on the role played in system structures by fracture mechanics. Static and dynamic coupling effects must be precluded wherever possible.

  6. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Shipborne Barges § 176.168 Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces. (a) All...) Vehicles used to transport Class 1 (explosive) materials must conform to the requirements in §§ 177.834 and...) materials of different compatibility groups may not be stowed in the same vehicle except as allowed in §...

  7. O/S analysis of conceptual space vehicles. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    The application of recently developed computer models in determining operational capabilities and support requirements during the conceptual design of proposed space systems is discussed. The models used are the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model, the maintenance simulation model, and the operations and support (O&S) cost model. In the process of applying these models, the R&M and O&S cost models were updated. The more significant enhancements include (1) improved R&M equations for the tank subsystems, (2) the ability to allocate schedule maintenance by subsystem, (3) redefined spares calculations, (4) computing a weighted average of the working days and mission days per month, (5) the use of a position manning factor, and (6) the incorporation into the O&S model of new formulas for computing depot and organizational recurring and nonrecurring training costs and documentation costs, and depot support equipment costs. The case study used is based upon a winged, single-stage, vertical-takeoff vehicle (SSV) designed to deliver to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) a 25,000 lb payload including passengers without a crew.

  8. Tracking Debris Shed by a Space-Shuttle Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Phillip C.; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2009-01-01

    The DEBRIS software predicts the trajectories of debris particles shed by a space-shuttle launch vehicle during ascent, to aid in assessing potential harm to the space-shuttle orbiter and crew. The user specifies the location of release and other initial conditions for a debris particle. DEBRIS tracks the particle within an overset grid system by means of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the local flow field and a ballistic simulation that takes account of the mass of the particle and its aerodynamic properties in the flow field. The computed particle trajectory is stored in a file to be post-processed by other software for viewing and analyzing the trajectory. DEBRIS supplants a prior debris tracking code that took .15 minutes to calculate a single particle trajectory: DEBRIS can calculate 1,000 trajectories in .20 seconds on a desktop computer. Other improvements over the prior code include adaptive time-stepping to ensure accuracy, forcing at least one step per grid cell to ensure resolution of all CFD-resolved flow features, ability to simulate rebound of debris from surfaces, extensive error checking, a builtin suite of test cases, and dynamic allocation of memory.

  9. Modeling and Simulation for Multi-Missions Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Max

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and Near-Earth Objects [NEOs] are of great interest for future space missions. The Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle [MMSEV] is being considered for future Near Earth Object missions and requires detailed planning and study of its Guidance, Navigation, and Control [GNC]. A possible mission of the MMSEV to a NEO would be to navigate the spacecraft to a stationary orbit with respect to the rotating asteroid and proceed to anchor into the surface of the asteroid with robotic arms. The Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation [DARTS] laboratory develops reusable models and simulations for the design and analysis of missions. In this paper, the development of guidance and anchoring models are presented together with their role in achieving mission objectives and relationships to other parts of the simulation. One important aspect of guidance is in developing methods to represent the evolution of kinematic frames related to the tasks to be achieved by the spacecraft and its robot arms. In this paper, we compare various types of mathematical interpolation methods for position and quaternion frames. Subsequent work will be on analyzing the spacecraft guidance system with different movements of the arms. With the analyzed data, the guidance system can be adjusted to minimize the errors in performing precision maneuvers.

  10. Modeling and Simulation for Multi-Missions Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Max

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and Near-Earth Objects [NEOs] are of great interest for future space missions. The Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle [MMSEV] is being considered for future Near Earth Object missions and requires detailed planning and study of its Guidance, Navigation, and Control [GNC]. A possible mission of the MMSEV to a NEO would be to navigate the spacecraft to a stationary orbit with respect to the rotating asteroid and proceed to anchor into the surface of the asteroid with robotic arms. The Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation [DARTS] laboratory develops reusable models and simulations for the design and analysis of missions. In this paper, the development of guidance and anchoring models are presented together with their role in achieving mission objectives and relationships to other parts of the simulation. One important aspect of guidance is in developing methods to represent the evolution of kinematic frames related to the tasks to be achieved by the spacecraft and its robot arms. In this paper, we compare various types of mathematical interpolation methods for position and quaternion frames. Subsequent work will be on analyzing the spacecraft guidance system with different movements of the arms. With the analyzed data, the guidance system can be adjusted to minimize the errors in performing precision maneuvers.

  11. Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Activities at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) goals are to develop and integrate the technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce the costs of operations.

  12. ISS Update: SpaceX 2 Lead Visiting Vehicle Officer Dorrie Tomayko

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean conducts an interview with SpaceX 2 Lead Visiting Vehicle Officer Dorrie Tomayko about the second commercial resupply mission to the International Space Stat...

  13. Life Science on the International Space Station Using the Next Generation of Cargo Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. A.; Phillion, J. P.; Hart, A. T.; Comella, J.; Edeen, M.; Ruttley, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle and the transition of the International Space Station (ISS) from assembly to full laboratory capabilities, the opportunity to perform life science research in space has increased dramatically, while the operational considerations associated with transportation of the experiments has changed dramatically. US researchers have allocations on the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) and Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). In addition, the International Space Station (ISS) Cargo Resupply Services (CRS) contract will provide consumables and payloads to and from the ISS via the unmanned SpaceX (offers launch and return capabilities) and Orbital (offers only launch capabilities) resupply vehicles. Early requirements drove the capabilities of the vehicle providers; however, many other engineering considerations affect the actual design and operations plans. To better enable the use of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory, ground and on-orbit facility development can augment the vehicle capabilities to better support needs for cell biology, animal research, and conditioned sample return. NASA Life scientists with experience launching research on the space shuttle can find the trades between the capabilities of the many different vehicles to be confusing. In this presentation we will summarize vehicle and associated ground processing capabilities as well as key concepts of operations for different types of life sciences research being launched in the cargo vehicles. We will provide the latest status of vehicle capabilities and support hardware and facilities development being made to enable the broadest implementation of life sciences research on the ISS.

  14. Exercise Equipment Usability Assessment for a Deep Space Concept Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Brooke M.; Reynolds, David W.

    2015-01-01

    With international aspirations to send astronauts to deep space, the world is now faced with the complex problem of keeping astronauts healthy in unexplored hostile environments for durations of time never before attempted by humans. The great physical demands imparted by space exploration compound the problem of astronaut health, as the astronauts must not only be healthy, but physically fit upon destination arrival in order to perform the scientific tasks required of them. Additionally, future deep space exploration necessitates the development of environments conducive to long-duration habitation that would supplement propulsive vehicles. Space Launch System (SLS) core stage barrel sections present large volumes of robust structure that can be recycled and used for long duration habitation. This assessment will focus on one such conceptual craft, referred to as the SLS Derived Habitat (SLS-DH). Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) has formulated a high-level layout of this SLS-DH with parameters such as floor number and orientation, floor designations, grid dimensions, wall placement, etc. Yet to be determined, however, is the layout of the exercise area. Currently the SLS-DH features three floors laid out longitudinally, leaving 2m of height between the floor and ceilings. This short distance between levels introduces challenges for proper placement of exercise equipment such as treadmills and stationary bicycles, as the dynamic envelope for the 95th percentile male astronauts is greater than 2m. This study aims to assess the optimal equipment layout and sizing for the exercise area of this habitat. Figure 1 illustrates the layout of the DSH concept demonstrator located at MSFC. The exercise area is located on the lower level, seen here as the front half of the level occupied by a crew member. This small volume does not allow for numerous or bulky exercise machines, so the conceptual equipment has been limited to a treadmill and

  15. Influence of vibration modes on control system stabilization for space shuttle type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using conventional autopilot techniques to stabilize the vibration modes at the liftoff flight condition for two space shuttle configurations. One configuration is called the dual flyback vehicle in which both the orbiter and booster vehicles have wings and complete flyback capability. The other configuration is called the solid motor vehicle win which the orbiter only has flyback. The results of the linear stability analyses for each of the vehicles are summarized.

  16. Required Area for a Crew Person in a Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances E.

    1998-01-01

    This 176 page report was written in circa 1966 to examine the effects of confmement during space flight. One of the topics covered was the required size of a space vehicle for extended missions. Analysis was done using size of crew and length of time in a confmed space. The report was based on all information available at that time. The data collected and analyzed included both NASA and (when possible) Russian missions flown to date, analogs (such as submarines), and ground studies. Both psychological and physiological responses to confmement were examined. Factors evaluated in estimating the degree of impairment included the level of performance of intellectual, perceptual, manual and co-ordinated tasks, response to psychological testing, subjective comments of the participants, nature and extent of physiological change, and the nature and extent of behavioral change and the nature and extent of somatic complaints. Information was not included from studies where elements of perceptual isolation were more than mildly incidental - water immersion studies, studies in darkened and acoustically insulated rooms, studies with distorted environmental inputs - unpattemed light and white noise. Using the graph from the document, the upper line provides a threshold of minimum acceptable volumeall points above the line may be considered acceptable. The lower line provides a threshold of unacceptable volume - all points below the line are unacceptable. The area in between the two lines is the area of doubtful acceptability where impairment tends to increase with reduction in volume and increased duration of exposure. Reference is made of the Gemini VII, 14-day duration mission which had detectable impairment with a combination of 40 cubic feet per man for 14 days. In line with all other data this point should be in the 'marked impairment' zone. It is assumed that the state of fitness, dedication and experience influenced this outcome.

  17. Life cycle cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents progress to date by the University of Dayton on the development of a life cycle cost model for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of a life cycle cost model. Cost categories are initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. The focus will be on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the life cycle costing model include continual support and upgrade of the R&M model. The primary result of the completed research will be a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely cost analysis in support of the conceptual design activities. The major objectives of this research are: to obtain and to develop improved methods for estimating manpower, spares, software and hardware costs, facilities costs, and other cost categories as identified by NASA personnel; to construct a life cycle cost model of a space transportation system for budget exercises and performance-cost trade-off analysis during the conceptual and development stages; to continue to support modifications and enhancements to the R&M model; and to continue to assist in the development of a simulation model to provide an integrated view of the operations and support of the proposed system.

  18. Space transportation vehicle design evaluation using saturated designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1993-01-01

    An important objective in the preliminary design and evaluation of space transportation vehicles is to find the best values of design variables that optimize the performance characteristic (e.g. dry weight). For a given configuration, the vehicle performance can be determined by the use of complex sizing and performance evaluation computer programs. These complex computer programs utilize iterative algorithms and they are generally too expensive and/or difficult to use directly in multidisciplinary design optimization. An alternative is to use response surface methodology (RSM) and obtain quadratic polynomial approximations to the functional relationships between performance characteristics and design variables. In RSM, these approximation models are then used to determine optimum design parameter values and for rapid sensitivity studies. Constructing a second-order model requires that 'n' design parameters be studied at least at 3 levels (values) so that the coefficients in the model can be estimated. There, 3(n) factorial experiments (point designs or observations) may be necessary. For small values of 'n' such as two or three, this design works well. However, when a large number of design parameters are under study, the number of design points required for a full-factorial design may become excessive. Fortunately, these quadratic polynomial approximations can be obtained by selecting an efficient design matrix using central composite designs (CCD) from design of experiments theory. Each unique point design from the CCD matrix is then conducted using computerized analysis tools (e.g. POST, CONSIZ, etc.). In the next step, least squares regression analysis is used to calculate the quadratic polynomial coefficients from the data. However, in some multidisciplinary applications involving a large number of design variables and several disciplines, the computerized performance synthesis programs may get too time consuming and expensive to run even with the use of

  19. Milestones Towards Hot CMC Structures for Operational Space Rentry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hald, H.; Weihs, H.; Reimer, T.

    2002-01-01

    Hot structures made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) for space reentry vehicles play a key role regarding feasibility of advanced and reusable future space transportation systems. Thus realization of applicable flight hardware concerning hot primary structures like a nose cap or body flaps and thermal protection systems (TPS) requires system competence w.r.t. sophisticated know how in material processing, manufacturing and qualification of structural components and in all aspects from process control, use of NDI techniques, arc jet testing, hot structure testing to flight concept validation. This goal has been achieved so far by DLR while following a dedicated development road map since more than a decade culminating at present in the supply of the nose cap system for NASA's X-38; the flight hardware has been installed successfully in October 2001. A number of unique hardware development milestones had to be achieved in the past to finally reach this level of system competence. It is the intention of this paper to highlight the most important technical issues and achievements from the essential projects and developments to finally provide a comprehensive insight into DLR's past and future development road map w.r.t. CMC hot structures for space reentry vehicles. Based on DLR's C/C-SiC material which is produced with the inhouse developed liquid silicon infiltration process (LSI) the development strategy first concentrated on basic material properties evaluation in various arc jet testing facilities. As soon as a basic understanding of oxidation and erosion mechanisms had been achieved further efforts concentrated on inflight verification of both materials and design concepts for hot structures. Consequently coated and uncoated C/C-SiC specimens were integrated into the ablative heat shield of Russian FOTON capsules and they were tested during two missions in 1992 and 1994. Following on, a hot structure experiment called CETEX which principally was a kind of a

  20. Unmanned, space-based, reusable orbital transfer vehicle, DARVES. Volume 1: Trade analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The design of an unmanned, space-based, reusable Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is presented. This OTV will be utilized for the delivery and retrieval of satellites from geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) in conjunction with a space station assumed to be in existence in low Earth orbit (LEO). The trade analysis used to determine the vehicle design is presented, and from this study a vehicle definition is given.

  1. 78 FR 43861 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...-range ballistic target missiles, and other smaller missile systems at the KLC. The AAC has complied with... Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Missile Launch Operations at Kodiak Launch Complex, Alaska... two species of pinnipeds incidental to space vehicle and missile launch operations at the...

  2. Environmental Assessment for Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Integrated Experiments Division Office Space at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY SPACE VEHICLES INTEGRATED EXPERMENTS DIVISION OFFICE SPACE AT KIRTLAND AIR FORCE ... Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). The office building would house the Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Integrated Experiments Division...ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Space Vehicles Directorate,3550 Aberdeen Ave. SE, Kirtland

  3. Advanced automation for in-space vehicle processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, Michael; Wegerif, D.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of this 3-year planned study is to assure that the fully evolved Space Station Freedom (SSF) can support automated processing of exploratory mission vehicles. Current study assessments show that required extravehicular activity (EVA) and to some extent intravehicular activity (IVA) manpower requirements for required processing tasks far exceeds the available manpower. Furthermore, many processing tasks are either hazardous operations or they exceed EVA capability. Thus, automation is essential for SSF transportation node functionality. Here, advanced automation represents the replacement of human performed tasks beyond the planned baseline automated tasks. Both physical tasks such as manipulation, assembly and actuation, and cognitive tasks such as visual inspection, monitoring and diagnosis, and task planning are considered. During this first year of activity both the Phobos/Gateway Mars Expedition and Lunar Evolution missions proposed by the Office of Exploration have been evaluated. A methodology for choosing optimal tasks to be automated has been developed. Processing tasks for both missions have been ranked on the basis of automation potential. The underlying concept in evaluating and describing processing tasks has been the use of a common set of 'Primitive' task descriptions. Primitive or standard tasks have been developed both for manual or crew processing and automated machine processing.

  4. Common Cause Failure Modeling in Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFs are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused for example by system environments, manufacturing, transportation, storage, maintenance, and assembly. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, they can be reduced, but are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and dependent CCF. Because common cause failure data is limited in the aerospace industry, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Team at Bastion Technology Inc. is estimating CCF risk using generic data collected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Consequently, common cause risk estimates based on this database, when applied to other industry applications, are highly uncertain. Therefore, it is important to account for a range of values for independent and CCF risk and to communicate the uncertainty to decision makers. There is an existing methodology for reducing CCF risk during design, which includes a checklist of 40+ factors grouped into eight categories. Using this checklist, an approach to produce a beta factor estimate is being investigated that quantitatively relates these factors. In this example, the checklist will be tailored to space launch vehicles, a quantitative approach will be described, and an example of the method will be presented.

  5. Large Scale System Safety Integration for Human Rated Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    Since the 1960s man has searched for ways to establish a human presence in space. Unfortunately, the development and operation of human spaceflight vehicles carry significant safety risks that are not always well understood. As a result, the countries with human space programs have felt the pain of loss of lives in the attempt to develop human space travel systems. Integrated System Safety is a process developed through years of experience (since before Apollo and Soyuz) as a way to assess risks involved in space travel and prevent such losses. The intent of Integrated System Safety is to take a look at an entire program and put together all the pieces in such a way that the risks can be identified, understood and dispositioned by program management. This process has many inherent challenges and they need to be explored, understood and addressed.In order to prepare truly integrated analysis safety professionals must gain a level of technical understanding of all of the project's pieces and how they interact. Next, they must find a way to present the analysis so the customer can understand the risks and make decisions about managing them. However, every organization in a large-scale project can have different ideas about what is or is not a hazard, what is or is not an appropriate hazard control, and what is or is not adequate hazard control verification. NASA provides some direction on these topics, but interpretations of those instructions can vary widely.Even more challenging is the fact that every individual/organization involved in a project has different levels of risk tolerance. When the discrete hazard controls of the contracts and agreements cannot be met, additional risk must be accepted. However, when one has left the arena of compliance with the known rules, there can be no longer be specific ground rules on which to base a decision as to what is acceptable and what is not. The integrator must find common grounds between all parties to achieve

  6. Real-time motive vehicle detection with adaptive background updating model and HSV colour space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-hui; Bai, Yang; Jia, Hong-guang; Chen, Tao

    2009-05-01

    In the transportation monitor system, motive vehicle detection by adopting digital image is one of key technologies. To detect motive vehicle accurately, we establish an adaptive background updating model firstly. Noise is suppressed by using modality filter, and we obtain binary image by using maximum entropy to choose dynamic adaptive threshold. Based on positive information of shadow and aspect feature of motive vehicle, we adopt HSV colour space and double threshold to solve the problem of vehicle shadow. According to prediction result of Kalman filtering; we set up the area of interest (AOI) of the vehicle model and adjust the size of AOI dynamically in order to track vehicle accurately. The results of experiment show that, the arithmetic proposed in the paper can suppress shadow availably, detect motive vehicle accurately and satisfy real-time motive vehicle tracking.

  7. A space-based orbital transfer vehicle - Bridge to the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehder, J. J.; Eide, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison is made between a space-based and earth-based orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) for use in the Shuttle era and beyond. The space-based vehicle alleviates the limited capability inherent in an earth-based OTV whose design is constrained by a particular launch vehicle. Several sizes of space-based OTVs were generated and compared with an earth-based system for a number of mission scenarios with varying types and levels of traffic. The space-based OTVs showed substantial cost savings for each scenario, with the smallest space-based vehicle showing the largest saving. The space-based OTV retains the cost advantage even if the number of missions or the Shuttle cost-per-flight is drastically reduced.

  8. 48 CFR 1828.371 - Clauses for cross-waivers of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launches, and Space Station... of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launches, and Space Station activities. (a) In agreements covering Space Shuttle services, certain ELV launches, and Space...

  9. Catalysis study for space shuttle vehicle thermal protection systems. [for vehicle surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breen, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Delgass, W. N.; Nordine, P. C.; Cibrian, R.; Krishnan, N. G.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results on the problem of reducing aerodynamic heating on space shuttle orbiter surfaces are presented. Data include: (1) development of a laboratory flow reactor technique for measuring gamma sub O and gamma sub N on candidate materials at surfaces, T sub w, in the nominal range 1000 to 2000, (2) measurements of gamma sub O and gamma sub N above 1000 K for both the glass coating of a reusable surface insulation material and the siliconized surface of a reinforced pyrolyzed plastic material, (3) measurement of the ablation behavior of the coated RPP material at T sub w is greater than or equal to 2150 K, (4) X-ray photoelectron spectral studies of the chemical constituents on these surfaces before and after dissociated gas exposure, (5) scanning electron micrograph examination of as-received and reacted specimens, and (6) development and exploitation of a method of predicting the aerodynamic heating consquences of these gamma sub O(T sub w) and gamma sub N(T sub w) measurements for critical locations on a radiation cooled orbiter vehicle.

  10. Flight and Integrated Vehicle Testing: Laying the Groundwork for the Next Generation of Space Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Cockrell, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated vehicle testing will be critical to ensuring proper vehicle integration of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Ares Projects, based at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, created the Flight and Integrated Test Office (FITO) as a separate team to ensure that testing is an integral part of the vehicle development process. As its name indicates, FITO is responsible for managing flight testing for the Ares vehicles. FITO personnel are well on the way toward assembling and flying the first flight test vehicle of Ares I, the Ares I-X. This suborbital development flight will evaluate the performance of Ares I from liftoff to first stage separation, testing flight control algorithms, vehicle roll control, separation and recovery systems, and ground operations. Ares I-X is now scheduled to fly in summer 2009. The follow-on flight, Ares I-Y, will test a full five-segment first stage booster and will include cryogenic propellants in the upper stage, an upper stage engine simulator, and an active launch abort system. The following flight, Orion 1, will be the first flight of an active upper stage and upper stage engine, as well as the first uncrewed flight of an Orion spacecraft into orbit. The Ares Projects are using an incremental buildup of flight capabilities prior to the first operational crewed flight of Ares I and the Orion crew exploration vehicle in 2015. In addition to flight testing, the FITO team will be responsible for conducting hardware, software, and ground vibration tests of the integrated launch vehicle. These efforts will include verifying hardware, software, and ground handling interfaces. Through flight and integrated testing, the Ares Projects will identify and mitigate risks early as the United States prepares to take its next giant leaps to the Moon and beyond.

  11. Flight and Integrated Vehicle Testing: Laying the Groundwork for the Next Generation of Space Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Integrated vehicle testing will be critical to ensuring proper vehicle integration of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Ares Projects, based at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, created the Flight and Integrated Test Office (FITO) as a separate team to ensure that testing is an integral part of the vehicle development process. As its name indicates, FITO is responsible for managing flight testing for the Ares vehicles. FITO personnel are well on the way toward assembling and flying the first flight test vehicle of Ares I, th Ares I-X. This suborbital development flight will evaluate the performance of Ares I from liftoff to first stage separation, testing flight control algorithms, vehicle roll control, separation and recovery systems, and ground operations. Ares I-X is now scheduled to fly in summer 2009. The follow-on flight, Ares I-Y, will test a full five-segment first stage booster and will include cryogenic propellants in the upper stage, an upper stage engine simulator, and an active launch abort system. The following flight, Orion 1, will be the first flight of an active upper stage and upper stage engine, as well as the first uncrewed flight of an Orion spacecraft into orbit. The Ares Projects are using an incremental buildup of flight capabilities prior to the first operational crewed flight of Ares I and the Orion crew exploration vehicle in 2015. In addition to flight testing, the FITO team will be responsible for conducting hardware, software, and ground vibration tests of the integrated launch vehicle. These efforts will include verifying hardware, software, and grou handling interfaces. Through flight and integrated testing, the Ares Projects will identify and mitigate risks early the United States prepares to take its next giant leaps to the Moon and beyond.

  12. Future space transportation systems analysis study. Phase 1: Technical report, appendices. [a discussion of orbit transfer vehicles, lunar transport vehicles, space shuttles, and reusable spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transportation mass requirements developed for each mission and transportation mode were based on vehicle systems sized to fit the exact needs of each mission (i.e. rubber vehicles). The parametric data used to derive the mass requirements for each mission and transportation mode are presented to enable accommodation of possible changes in mode options or payload definitions. The vehicle sizing and functional requirements used to derive the parametric data will form the basis for conceptual configurations of the transportation elements in a later phase of study. An investigation of the weight growth approach to future space transportation systems analysis is presented. Parameters which affect weight growth, past weight histories, and the current state of future space-mission design are discussed. Weight growth factors of from 10 percent to 41 percent were derived for various missions or vehicles.

  13. The Space Shuttle Decision: NASA's Search for a Reusable Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppenheimer, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    This significant new study of the decision to build the Space Shuttle explains the Shuttle's origins and early development. In addition to internal NASA discussions, this work details the debates in the late 1960s and early 1970s among policymakers in Congress, the Air Force, and the Office of Management and Budget over the roles and technical designs of the Shuttle. Examining the interplay of these organizations with sometimes conflicting goals, the author not only explains how the world's premier space launch vehicle came into being, but also how politics can interact with science, technology, national security, and economics in national government. The weighty policy decision to build the Shuttle represents the first component of the broader story: future NASA volumes will cover the Shuttle's development and operational histories.

  14. Space Operations for a New Era of Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, Ares has made substantial progress on designing, developing, and testing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and has continued its in-depth studies of the Ares V cargo launch vehicles. The combined Ares I/Ares V architecture was designed to reduce the complexity and labor intensity of ground operations for America s next journeys beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). The Ares Projects goal is to instill operability as part of the vehicles requirements development, design, and operations. Since completing the Preliminary Design Review in 2008, work has continued to push the Ares I beyond the concept phase and into full vehicle development, while tackling fresh engineering challenges and performing pathfinding activities related to vehicle manufacturing and ground operations.

  15. Sensor Systems for Vehicle Environment Perception in a Highway Intelligent Space System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Gao, Feng; Xu, Guoyan; Ding, Nenggen; Cai, Yao; Ma, Mingming; Liu, Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    A Highway Intelligent Space System (HISS) is proposed to study vehicle environment perception in this paper. The nature of HISS is that a space sensors system using laser, ultrasonic or radar sensors are installed in a highway environment and communication technology is used to realize the information exchange between the HISS server and vehicles, which provides vehicles with the surrounding road information. Considering the high-speed feature of vehicles on highways, when vehicles will be passing a road ahead that is prone to accidents, the vehicle driving state should be predicted to ensure drivers have road environment perception information in advance, thereby ensuring vehicle driving safety and stability. In order to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the HISS, a traditional vehicle-mounted sensor system for environment perception is used to obtain the relative driving state. Furthermore, an inter-vehicle dynamics model is built and model predictive control approach is used to predict the driving state in the following period. Finally, the simulation results shows that using the HISS for environment perception can arrive at the same results detected by a traditional vehicle-mounted sensors system. Meanwhile, we can further draw the conclusion that using HISS to realize vehicle environment perception can ensure system stability, thereby demonstrating the method's feasibility. PMID:24834907

  16. Sensor systems for vehicle environment perception in a Highway Intelligent Space System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Gao, Feng; Xu, Guoyan; Ding, Nenggen; Cai, Yao; Ma, Mingming; Liu, Jianxing

    2014-05-15

    A Highway Intelligent Space System (HISS) is proposed to study vehicle environment perception in this paper. The nature of HISS is that a space sensors system using laser, ultrasonic or radar sensors are installed in a highway environment and communication technology is used to realize the information exchange between the HISS server and vehicles, which provides vehicles with the surrounding road information. Considering the high-speed feature of vehicles on highways, when vehicles will be passing a road ahead that is prone to accidents, the vehicle driving state should be predicted to ensure drivers have road environment perception information in advance, thereby ensuring vehicle driving safety and stability. In order to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the HISS, a traditional vehicle-mounted sensor system for environment perception is used to obtain the relative driving state. Furthermore, an inter-vehicle dynamics model is built and model predictive control approach is used to predict the driving state in the following period. Finally, the simulation results shows that using the HISS for environment perception can arrive at the same results detected by a traditional vehicle-mounted sensors system. Meanwhile, we can further draw the conclusion that using HISS to realize vehicle environment perception can ensure system stability, thereby demonstrating the method's feasibility.

  17. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    A description of the study in terms of background, objectives, and issues is provided. NASA is currently studying new initiatives of space exploration involving both piloted and unpiloted missions to destinations throughout the solar system. Many of these missions require substantial improvements in launch vehicle and upper stage capabilities. This study provides a focused examination of the Space Transfer Vehicles (STV) required to perform these missions using the emerging national launch vehicle definition, the Space Station Freedom (SSF) definition, and the latest mission scenario requirements. The study objectives are to define preferred STV concepts capable of accommodating future exploration missions in a cost-effective manner, determine the technology development (if any) required to perform these missions, and develop a decision database of various programmatic approaches for the development of the STV family of vehicles. Special emphasis was given to examining space basing (stationing reusable vehicles at a space station), examining the piloted lunar mission as a primary design mission, and restricting trade studies to the high-performance, near-term cryogenics (LO2/LH2) as vehicle propellant. The study progressed through three distinct 6-month phases. The first phase concentrated on supporting a NASA 3 month definition of exploration requirements (the '90-day study') and during this phase developed and optimized the space-based point-of-departure (POD) 2.5-stage lunar vehicle. The second phase developed a broad decision database of 95 different vehicle options and transportation architectures. The final phase chose the three most cost-effective architectures and developed point designs to carry to the end of the study. These reference vehicle designs are mutually exclusive and correspond to different national choices about launch vehicles and in-space reusability. There is, however, potential for evolution between concepts.

  18. The Need for a Dedicated Space Vehicle for Defensive Counterspace Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    AU/ACSC/280/1998-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE NEED FOR A DEDICATED SPACE VEHICLE FOR DEFENSIVE COUNTERSPACE OPERATIONS by...01-04-1998 2. REPORT TYPE Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-1998 to xx-xx-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Need for a Dedicated Space Vehicle for...removed from consideration because a space vehicle is inherently incapable of acting against them or because there exists other means of countering this

  19. View of the Apollo 10 space vehicle at Pad B, ready for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Ground-level view at sunset of the Apollo 10 (Spacecraft 106/Lunar Module 4/Saturn 505) space vehicle at Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 10 stack had just been positioned after being rolled out from the Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB) (34318); View of the Apollo 10 space vehicle (through palm trees and across water) on the way from the VAB to Pad B, Launch Complex 39. The Saturn V and its mobile launch tower are atop a crawler-transporter (34319).

  20. 77 FR 6086 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Test Flight Activities from Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA... harassment, incidental to space vehicle and test flight activities at VAFB. Summary of Activity and... space vehicle and test flight activities at VAFB. Issuance of this LOA is based on findings described...

  1. Combined Pressure and Thermal Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svartstrom, Kirk Nils (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a vehicle comprising a pressure and thermal window pane, a seal system, and a retainer system. The pressure and thermal window pane may be configured to provide desired pressure protection and desired thermal protection when exposed to an environment around the vehicle during operation of the vehicle. The pressure and thermal window pane may have a desired ductility. The seal system may be configured to contact the pressure and thermal window pane to seal the pressure and thermal window pane. The retainer system may be configured to hold the seal system and the pressure and thermal window pane.

  2. Combined Pressure and Thermal Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svartstrom, Kirk Nils (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A window system for a vehicle comprising a pressure and thermal window pane, a seal system, and a retainer system. The pressure and thermal window pane may be configured to provide desired pressure protection and desired thermal protection when exposed to an environment around the vehicle during operation of the vehicle. The pressure and thermal window pane may have a desired ductility. The seal system may be configured to contact the pressure and thermal window pane to seal the pressure and thermal window pane. The retainer system may be configured to hold the seal system and the pressure and thermal window pane.

  3. Guidelines for advanced manned space vehicle program, June 1960

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R. R.; Piland, R. O.; Faget, M. A.; White, S. C.; Chilton, R. C.; Donlan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    A very broad mission objective was established; i.e., manned circumlunar flight and return to earth. It is implicit that the Saturn will be the primary propulsion system for this mission. The following attempts to: (1) define the objective so as to achieve as much capability in the vehicle as possible; (2) draw on Mercury experience to provide broad guidelines for vehicle performance and safety; (3) provide flexibility in the vehicle capability in the event that the manned lunar mission is proved to be subject to unacceptable risk in the target time period; and (4) indicate problem areas where work appears to be particularly needed.

  4. Guidelines for advanced manned space vehicle program, June 1960

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R. R.; Piland, R. O.; Faget, M. A.; White, S. C.; Chilton, R. C.; Donlan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    A very broad mission objective was established; i.e., manned circumlunar flight and return to earth. It is implicit that the Saturn will be the primary propulsion system for this mission. The following attempts to: (1) define the objective so as to achieve as much capability in the vehicle as possible; (2) draw on Mercury experience to provide broad guidelines for vehicle performance and safety; (3) provide flexibility in the vehicle capability in the event that the manned lunar mission is proved to be subject to unacceptable risk in the target time period; and (4) indicate problem areas where work appears to be particularly needed.

  5. Application of System Operational Effectiveness Methodology to Space Launch Vehicle Development and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Kelley, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) defined System Operational Effectiveness (SOE) model provides an exceptional framework for an affordable approach to the development and operation of space launch vehicles and their supporting infrastructure. The SOE model provides a focal point from which to direct and measure technical effectiveness and process efficiencies of space launch vehicles. The application of the SOE model to a space launch vehicle's development and operation effort leads to very specific approaches and measures that require consideration during the design phase. This paper provides a mapping of the SOE model to the development of space launch vehicles for human exploration by addressing the SOE model key points of measurement including System Performance, System Availability, Technical Effectiveness, Process Efficiency, System Effectiveness, Life Cycle Cost, and Affordable Operational Effectiveness. In addition, the application of the SOE model to the launch vehicle development process is defined providing the unique aspects of space launch vehicle production and operations in lieu of the traditional broader SOE context that examines large quantities of fielded systems. The tailoring and application of the SOE model to space launch vehicles provides some key insights into the operational design drivers, capability phasing, and operational support systems.

  6. The Road from the NASA Access to Space Study to a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Cook, Stephen A.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    1998-01-01

    NASA is cooperating with the aerospace industry to develop a space transportation system that provides reliable access-to-space at a much lower cost than is possible with today's launch vehicles. While this quest has been on-going for many years it received a major impetus when the U.S. Congress mandated as part of the 1993 NASA appropriations bill that: "In view of budget difficulties, present and future..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall ... recommend improvements in space transportation." NASA, working with other organizations, including the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Defense identified three major transportation architecture options that were to be evaluated in the areas of reliability, operability and cost. These architectural options were: (1) retain and upgrade the Space Shuttle and the current expendable launch vehicles; (2) develop new expendable launch vehicles using conventional technologies and transition to these new vehicles beginning in 2005; and (3) develop new reusable vehicles using advanced technology, and transition to these vehicles beginning in 2008. The launch needs mission model was based on 1993 projections of civil, defense, and commercial payload requirements. This "Access to Space" study concluded that the option that provided the greatest potential for meeting the cost, operability, and reliability goals was a rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit fully reusable launch vehicle (RLV) fleet designed with advanced technologies.

  7. Role of Process Control in Improving Space Vehicle Safety A Space Shuttle External Tank Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Nguyen, Son C.; Burleson, Keith W.

    2006-01-01

    Developing a safe and reliable space vehicle requires good design and good manufacturing, or in other words "design it right and build it right". A great design can be hard to build or manufacture mainly due to difficulties related to quality. Specifically, process control can be a challenge. As a result, the system suffers from low quality which leads to low reliability and high system risk. The Space Shuttle has experienced some of those cases, but has overcome these difficulties through extensive redesign efforts and process enhancements. One example is the design of the hot gas temperature sensor on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which resulted in failure of the sensor in flight and led to a redesign of the sensor. The most recent example is the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Thermal Protection System (TPS) reliability issues that contributed to the Columbia accident. As a result, extensive redesign and process enhancement activities have been performed over the last two years to minimize the sensitivities and difficulties of the manual TPS application process.

  8. Orbital Dynamics of Low-Earth Orbit Laser-Propelled Space Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2008-04-28

    Trajectories applicable to laser-propelled space vehicles with a laser station in low-Earth orbit are investigated. Laser vehicles are initially located in the vicinity of the Earth-orbiting laser station in low-earth orbit at an altitude of several hundreds kilometers, and are accelerated by laser beaming from the laser station. The laser-propelled vehicles start from low-earth orbit and finally escape from the Earth gravity well, enabling interplanetary trajectories and planetary exploration.

  9. Parametric estimation of R&M parameters during the conceptual design of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Reliability and maintainability parameters of proposed space vehicles are estimated based on a comparability analysis of similar aircraft subsystems. Using multiple regression techniques, parametric equations are developed for each subsystem to predict mean flying hours between failure as a function of vehicle design and performance specifications. These estimates are then adjusted to account for reliability growth, environmental differences, and new technologies. Overall vehicle mission reliability may then be computed from subsystem reliability estimates.

  10. Global Positioning Svstem (GPS) on International Space Station (ISS) and Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.

    2002-01-01

    Both the International Space Station and Crew Return Vehicle desired to have GPS on their vehicles due to improve state determination over traditional ground tracking techniques used in the past for space vehicles. Both also opted to use GPS for attitude determination to save the expense of a star tracker. Both vehicles have stringent pointing requirements for roll, pitch, and heading, making a sun or earth sensor not a viable option since the heading is undetermined. This paper discusses the technical challenges associated with the implementation of GPS on both of these vehicles. ISS and CRY use the same GPS receiver, but have faced different challenges since the mission of each is di fferent. ISS will be discussed first, then CRY. The flight experiments flown on the Space Shuttle in support of these efforts is also discussed.

  11. Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles (EELV) for Operationally Responsive Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-12

    35 Jeff Foust , “Operationally Responsive Space: A Solution Seeking a Problem”, The Space Review, 13 October 2003, 2. http...www.globalsecurity.org/org/news/2001/010127-space2.htm Foust , Jeff. “Operationally Responsive Space: A Solution Seeking a Problem”. The Space Review, 13

  12. 48 CFR 1828.371 - Clauses for cross-waivers of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launches, and Space Station activities. 1828.371 Section 1828.371 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... of liability for Space Shuttle services, Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launches, and Space Station...

  13. Project EGRESS: Earthbound Guaranteed Reentry from Space Station. the Design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Unlike previously designed space-based working environments, the shuttle orbiter servicing the space station will not remain docked the entire time the station is occupied. While an Apollo capsule was permanently available on Skylab, plans for Space Station Freedom call for a shuttle orbiter to be docked at the space station for no more than two weeks four times each year. Consideration of crew safety inspired the design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle (ACRV). A conceptual design of an ACRV was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in space station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on space station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water-landing medium-lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing safety and reliability requirements. One or more seriously injured crew members could be returned to an earth-based health facility with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow a full evacuation of the space station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology, and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  14. Space vehicle electrical power processing distribution and control study. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krausz, A.

    1972-01-01

    A concept for the processing, distribution, and control of electric power for manned space vehicles and future aircraft is presented. Emphasis is placed on the requirements of the space station and space shuttle configurations. The systems involved are referred to as the processing distribution and control system (PDCS), electrical power system (EPS), and electric power generation system (EPGS).

  15. Study of automatic and manual terminal guidance and control systems for space shuttle vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osder, S.; Keller, R.

    1971-01-01

    A summary of the aerodynamic characteristics of the delta orbiter space shuttle vehicle is presented. Selected guidance and control system parameters, flight path geometry, landing performance obtained with winds and turbulence, and the influence of vehicle L/D on that performance are included.

  16. Bioresearch module design definition and space shuttle vehicle integration. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The baseline preliminary design developed for the Bioexplorer spacecraft under a previous contract was used, and further study effort devoted in areas of thermal control, attitude control, and power subsystem design. The use of the space shuttle vehicle as a potential launch and recovery vehicle for the Bioresearch module was also evaluated.

  17. Operational Considerations and Comparisons of the Saturn, Space Shuttle and Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Chavers, Greg; Wittenstein, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) space exploration policy has directed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to retire the Space Shuttle and to replace it with a new generation of space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As part of the Constellation Program, engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama are working to design and build the Ares I, the first of two large launch vehicles to return humans to the Moon. A deliberate effort is being made to ensure a high level of operability in order to significantly increase safety and availability as well as reduce recurring costs of this new launch vehicle. It is the Ares Project's goal to instill operability as part of the requirements development, design and operations of the vehicle. This paper will identify important factors in launch vehicle design that affect the operability and availability of the system. Similarities and differences in operational constraints will also be compared between the Saturn V, Space Shuttle and current Ares I design. Finally, potential improvements in operations and operability for large launch vehicles will be addressed. From the examples presented, the paper will discuss potential improvements for operability for future launch vehicles.

  18. Devices for Storing and Dispensing Rehydratable Foods Aboard a Space Vehicle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The feasibility of dispensing rehydratable food from bulk storage aboard a space vehicle was studied. Three candidate systems--Revolving Wheel, Butterfly Valve, and Gas Entrainment -- are described and analyzed. (Author)

  19. Application of the MESA reactive hydrocode to space vehicle explosive ordnance devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Selma

    1993-01-01

    The construction of detailed computational models of the dynamic behavior of various explosive ordnance devices used on space vehicles is discussed. The following topics are presented in viewgraph form: numerical methods, explosives and detonations, and the MESA computer code.

  20. METEROIDS AS A POSSIBLE HAZARD TO SPACE VEHICLE OPERATIONS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A bibliography is presented of meteoroids as a possible hazard to space vehicle operations. Citations to meteors and other interplanetary debris have been included when the material was of relevance to meteoroids as well. Citations to combined environmental parameters affecting the reliability of space vehicles in flight have also been included when meteoroids constituted one of the parameters. The period covered is from 1956 through 1962, with a few earlier citations.

  1. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  2. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  3. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  4. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  5. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) Concepts and Requirements Study has been an eighteen-month study effort to develop and analyze concepts for a family of vehicles to evolve from an initial STV system into a Lunar Transportation System (LTS) for use with the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV). The study defined vehicle configurations, facility concepts, and ground and flight operations concepts. This volume reports the program cost estimates results for this portion of the study. The STV Reference Concept described within this document provides a complete LTS system that performs both cargo and piloted Lunar missions.

  6. Simplified control and display concepts for space vehicle control, applied to space station, space shuttle and unmanned satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John M.

    NASA and the Air Force are constantly exploring ways to reduce launch vehicle, satellite, and planetary mission life cycle costs. A significant amount of these costs has been devoted to the control of these missions. This control is labor-intensive and requires a diversity of equipment and control devices. The diagnostic procedures involved in this control are duplicated in the development, testing, and operation of the space assets. This control philosophy tends to inhibit technological growth. Such growth is necessary in space systems which are being designed and modified over decades. This paper advocates and demonstrates an innovative approach to simplify the control and display concepts and improve the development and operational process for space assets. It visualizes traditional system engineering techniques in a concurrent engineering environment. This approach captures the knowledge of functional decomposition, failure modes and effects analysis and configuration management in a dynamic prototyping process. It can use existing testing and checkout information to control and operate the space asset during assembly, test, and operation. The implementation of this technique will reduce space development and operations costs, cycle time, and allow for technological growth.

  7. Human Engineering of Space Vehicle Displays and Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina L.; Boyer, Jennifer; Stephens, John-Paul; Ezer, Neta; Sandor, Aniko

    2010-01-01

    Proper attention to the integration of the human needs in the vehicle displays and controls design process creates a safe and productive environment for crew. Although this integration is critical for all phases of flight, for crew interfaces that are used during dynamic phases (e.g., ascent and entry), the integration is particularly important because of demanding environmental conditions. This panel addresses the process of how human engineering involvement ensures that human-system integration occurs early in the design and development process and continues throughout the lifecycle of a vehicle. This process includes the development of requirements and quantitative metrics to measure design success, research on fundamental design questions, human-in-the-loop evaluations, and iterative design. Processes and results from research on displays and controls; the creation and validation of usability, workload, and consistency metrics; and the design and evaluation of crew interfaces for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle are used as case studies.

  8. Application of the integrated modular engine (IME) to space vehicle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, John M.; Wakefield, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of integrated modular engines (IME) in space vehicles offers attractive benefits which include improved system reliability and fault tolerance, increased I(sp) and thrust/weight ratio, and improved operability and maintainability. This paper summarizes a study that was performed to define concepts for three cryogenic space vehicles incorporating the IME: a trans-lunar injection stage, a lunar lander, and an upper stage for a launch vehicle. The goals of the study were to quantify potential IME benefits, identify issues that must be addressed, and define the technical and programmatic actions required to develop the IME.

  9. Saturn 1B space vehicle for ASTP moves from VAB to launch complex

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-03-24

    S75-24007 (24 March 1975) --- The Saturn 1B space vehicle for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission, with its launch umbilical tower, rides atop a huge crawler-transporter as it moves slowly away from the Vehicle Assembly Building on its 4.24-mile journey to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The ASTP vehicle is composed of a Saturn 1B (first) stage, a Saturn IVB (second) stage, and a payload consisting of a Command/Service Module and a Docking Module. The joint U.S.-USSR ASTP docking mission in Earth orbit is scheduled for July 1975.

  10. Considerations Affecting Satellite and Space Probe Research with Emphasis on the "Scout" as a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Jack (Editor)

    1961-01-01

    This report reviews a number of the factors which influence space flight experiments. Included are discussions of payload considerations, payload design and packaging, environmental tests, launch facilities, tracking and telemetry requirements, data acquisition, processing and analysis procedures, communication of information, and project management. Particular emphasis is placed on the "Scout" as a launching vehicle. The document includes a description of the geometry of the "Scout" as well as its flight capabilities and limitations. Although oriented toward the "Scout" vehicle and its payload capabilities, the information presented is sufficiently general to be equally applicable to most space vehicle systems.

  11. Analysis of Dynamic Stability of Space Launch Vehicles under Aerodynamic Forces Using CFD Derived Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trikha, M.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2011-09-01

    A computational framework is developed to investigate the dynamic stability of space launch vehicles subjected to aerodynamic forces. A detailed mechanics based mathematical model of a moving flexible vehicle is used. The aerodynamic forces on the vehicle are obtained from simulation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package. The objective behind this investigation is to analyze the problem of aeroelastic instability in blunt/conical nose slender space launch vehicles. Coupling among the rigid-body modes, the longitudinal vibration modes, and the transverse vibrational modes are considered. The effect of propulsive thrust as a follower force is also considered. A one-dimensional finite element model is developed to investigate the occurrence of aeroelastic instabilities of various types. Eigenvalues of the vehicle are determined in order to analyze the stable regimes. As a special case, we show numerical simulations by considering a typical vehicle configuration, for a vehicle Mach number of 0.8. Phenomenon of flutter is observed at this Mach number. The proposed analysis is suitable for different launch events such as vehicle take-off, maximum dynamic pressure regime, thrust transients, stage separation etc. The approach developed in this paper can be utilized for preliminary design of launch vehicles and establishing the stability boundaries for different trajectory parameters.

  12. Modification of the ionosphere by large space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.

    Not Available Copyright 1980 by Michael Mendillo. Extracted from ``Space Systems and their Interactions with Earth's Space Environment'' (Vol. 71 of ``Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics'', eds. H.B. Garret and C.P. Pike), 1980

  13. SPACE LAUNCH VEHICLE FULL-SCALE DAMPING TESTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The wind study portion of testing showed that the SLV gantry tower is sufficiently stable to be used as a base for forced oscillation of the vehicle...experimental damping factors agreed reasonably well with the results of previous tests. Increased confidence in the recent SLV ground wind restrictions has been the direct result of this test.

  14. Concept to standardize space vehicle piggyback experiment modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, A.; Dowdy, W.; Morita, W. H.

    1968-01-01

    Study investigates the use of spent launch vehicle stages and modules to support earth orbital operations and functions after successful completion of the primary mission. Emphasis is placed primarily on determination of those uses that afford the greatest utility with minimum possibility of degradation to the primary mission.

  15. ULTRAVIOLET EFFECTS ON SPACE VEHICLE OPERATION IN ULTRAHIGH VACUUM ENVIRONMENT, SEPTEMBER 22, 1960 TO MARCH 21, 1961

    DTIC Science & Technology

    polymers, paints, and metallicALLOYS USED IN SPACE VEHICLE OR SPACE SIMULATOR CONSTRUCTION; (2) a theoretical study to find the significance of...photoemission and UV-induced outgassing on the performance of the space vehicle and the space simulator. A UV source was developed giving an effective

  16. Fundamental study of fuel cell system for space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, K.; Ozeki, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Kudo, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the future, satellites will become increasingly larger, and will require larger electric power. The solar array-storage battery combination will satisfy these power requirements because of its long life, light weight and high reliability. On the other hand, the fuel cell system will be mainly used for the winged re-entry vehicle, the orbital transfer vehicle, etc. A fundamental study of the alkaline-matrix type fuel cell system was carried out by using the experimental cell consisting of the anode and the cathode, separated by the asbestos matrix impregnated with electrolyte solution and the electrolyte reservoir plate made of porous nickel adjacent to the anode. The investigation was focused to establish the optimum operating condition which especially related to water balance. The 5 cell stack with an active area of 100 sq cm operated successfully, and put out a power of 79 W at 20 A.

  17. Assimilation of Wind Profiles from Multiple Doppler Radar Wind Profilers for Space Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Walker, John R.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Leach, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric wind data are required by space launch vehicles in order to assess flight vehicle loads and performance on day-of-launch. Space launch ranges at NASA's Kennedy Space Center co-located with the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and USAF's Western Range (WR) at Vandenberg Air Force Base have extensive networks of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation to measure atmospheric winds. Each instrument's technique to measure winds has advantages and disadvantages in regards to use within vehicle trajectory analyses. Balloons measure wind at all altitudes necessary for vehicle assessments, but two primary disadvantages exist when applying balloon output. First, balloons require approximately one hour to reach required altitudes. Second, balloons are steered by atmospheric winds down range of the launch site that could significantly differ from those winds along the vehicle ascent trajectory. These issues are mitigated by use of vertically pointing Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs). However, multiple DRWP instruments are required to provide wind data over altitude ranges necessary for vehicle trajectory assessments. The various DRWP systems have different operating configurations resulting in different temporal and spatial sampling intervals. Therefore, software was developed to combine data from both DRWP-generated profiles into a single profile for use in vehicle trajectory analyses. This paper will present details of the splicing software algorithms and will provide sample output.

  18. Assimilation of Wind Profiles from Multiple Doppler Radar Wind Profilers for Space Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Walker, James C.; Leach, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Space launch vehicles utilize atmospheric winds in design of the vehicle and during day-of-launch (DOL) operations to assess affects of wind loading on the vehicle and to optimize vehicle performance during ascent. The launch ranges at NASA's Kennedy Space Center co-located with the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and USAF's Western Range (WR) at Vandenberg Air Force Base have extensive networks of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation to measure atmospheric winds. Each instrument's technique to measure winds has advantages and disadvantages in regards to use for vehicle engineering assessments. Balloons measure wind at all altitudes necessary for vehicle assessments, but two primary disadvantages exist when applying balloon output on DOL. First, balloons need approximately one hour to reach required altitude. For vehicle assessments this occurs at 60 kft (18.3 km). Second, balloons are steered by atmospheric winds down range of the launch site that could significantly differ from those winds along the vehicle ascent trajectory. Figure 1 illustrates the spatial separation of balloon measurements from the surface up to approximately 55 kft (16.8 km) during the Space Shuttle launch on 10 December 2006. The balloon issues are mitigated by use of vertically pointing Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs). However, multiple DRWP instruments are required to provide wind data up to 60 kft (18.3 km) for vehicle trajectory assessments. The various DRWP systems have different operating configurations resulting in different temporal and spatial sampling intervals. Therefore, software was developed to combine data from both DRWP-generated profiles into a single profile for use in vehicle trajectory analyses. Details on how data from various wind measurement systems are combined and sample output will be presented in the following sections.

  19. Next generation earth-to-orbit space transportation systems: Unmanned vehicles and liquid/hybrid boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The United States civil space effort when viewed from a launch vehicle perspective tends to categorize into pre-Shuttle and Shuttle eras. The pre-Shuttle era consisted of expendable launch vehicles where a broad set of capabilities were matured in a range of vehicles, followed by a clear reluctance to build on and utilize those systems. The Shuttle era marked the beginning of the U.S. venture into reusable space launch vehicles and the consolidation of launch systems used to this one vehicle. This led to a tremendous capability, but utilized men on a few missions where it was not essential and compromised launch capability resiliency in the long term. Launch vehicle failures, between the period of Aug. 1985 and May 1986, of the Titan 34D, Shuttle Challenger, and the Delta vehicles resulted in a reassessment of U.S. launch vehicle capability. The reassessment resulted in President Reagan issuing a new National Space Policy in 1988 calling for more coordination between Federal agencies, broadening the launch capabilities and preparing for manned flight beyond the Earth into the solar system. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA are jointly assessing the requirements and needs for this nations's future transportation system. Reliability/safety, balanced fleet, and resiliency are the cornerstone to the future. An insight is provided into the current thinking in establishing future unmanned earth-to-orbit (ETO) space transportation needs and capabilities. A background of previous launch capabilities, future needs, current and proposed near term systems, and system considerations to assure future mission need will be met, are presented. The focus is on propulsion options associated with unmanned cargo vehicles and liquid booster required to assure future mission needs will be met.

  20. Demonstration of Self-Training Autonomous Neural Networks in Space Vehicle Docking Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, M. Clinton; Thaler, Stephen L.; Stevenson-Chavis, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Neural Networks have been under examination for decades in many areas of research, with varying degrees of success and acceptance. Key goals of computer learning, rapid problem solution, and automatic adaptation have been elusive at best. This paper summarizes efforts at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center harnessing such technology to autonomous space vehicle docking for the purpose of evaluating applicability to future missions.

  1. Protection of Space Vehicles from Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    As the environment that puts space vehicles at risk can never be eliminated, space vehicles must implement protection against the MMOD environment. In general, this protection has been implemented on a risk estimate basis, largely focused on estimates of impactor size and estimated flux. However, there is some uncertainty in applying these methods from data gathered in earth orbit to excursions outside. This paper discusses different past thresholds and processes of the past and suggests additional refinement or methods that could be used for future space endeavors.

  2. Protection of Space Vehicles from Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    As the environment that puts space vehicles at risk can never be eliminated, space vehicles must implement protection against the MMOD environment. In general, this protection has been implemented on a risk estimate basis, largely focused on estimates of impactor size and estimated flux. However, there is some uncertainty in applying these methods from data gathered in earth orbit to excursions outside. This paper discusses different past thresholds and processes of the past and suggests additional refinement or methods that could be used for future space endeavors.

  3. Space Wear Vision -Development of a Wardrobe for Life in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndorff, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    one of shirts used as sleep-wear. The IVA (Intra Vehicular Activity) Clothing Study has been the first study with Roscosmos under the "Utilization Sharing Plan On-Board ISS," while the other studies have been conducted at the Johnson Space Center in a controlled environment similar to the ISS. For exercise clothing, study participants wore garments during aerobic exercise. For routine wear clothing, study participants wore the T-shirts daily in an office or laboratory. Daily questionnaires collected data on ordinal preferences of nine sensory elements and on reasons for retiring a used garment. More studies have been initiated on Earth, and some should be planned to engage more astronauts and cosmonauts in the design of the new space wear. Future studies will extend to other types of garments in the wardrobe; another will address microbial growth on textiles. Others will address cleaning and sanitation of clothing in space vehicles. Efforts will be made for additional ISS studies with NASA's international partners.

  4. Maximum Aerodynamic Force on an Ascending Space Vehicle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The March 2010 issue of "The Physics Teacher" includes a great article by Metz and Stinner on the kinematics and dynamics of a space shuttle launch. Within those pages is a brief mention of an event known in the language of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as "maximum dynamic pressure" (called simply "Max.AirPressure" in…

  5. Maximum Aerodynamic Force on an Ascending Space Vehicle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The March 2010 issue of "The Physics Teacher" includes a great article by Metz and Stinner on the kinematics and dynamics of a space shuttle launch. Within those pages is a brief mention of an event known in the language of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as "maximum dynamic pressure" (called simply "Max.AirPressure" in…

  6. Requirements for a near-earth space tug vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for a small but powerful space tug, which will be capable of autonomous orbital rendezvous, docking and translating cargos between near-earth orbits by the end of this decade to support the growing national and international space infrastructure focused near the Space Station Freedom, is described. An aggregate of missions drives the need for a space tug including reboosting decaying satellites back to their operational altitudes, retrieving failed or exhausted satellites to Shuttle or SSF for on-orbit refueling or repair, and transporting a satellite servicer system with an FTS to ailing satellites for supervised in-place repair. It is shown that the development and operation of a space tug to perform such numerous missions is more cost effective than separate module and satellite systems to perform the same tasks.

  7. Project EGRESS: The design of an assured crew return vehicle for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Keeping preliminary studies by NASA in mind, an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in Space Station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on Space Station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water landing, medium lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing the safety and reliability requirements. With a single vehicle, one injured crew member could be returned to Earth with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow full evacuation of the Space Station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  8. Energy impact assessment of NASA's past, present, and future space launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to analyze the total energy required for overall support of space launch vehicles is outlined along with some of the basic data required for such analyses. Selected results obtained by using this approach are presented for various past (some are already phased out), present, and future NASA launch vehicles, including an estimate of the total annual energy required to support one projected NASA launch vehicle traffic model. The material presented is expected to give a better insight into the details of an energy impact analysis. Major conclusions are that: (1) for expendable launch vehicle systems, the energy required to manufacture hardware and support launch operations is most significant; (2) for totally reusable systems, the energy required to process/manufacture propellants and fluids is by far the most significant contributor; and (3) up to 1991, the projected highest annual energy requirement for the NASA launch vehicles does not constitute a significant energy impact relative to the nation's total energy needs.

  9. An Alternate Configuration of the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert L., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) Team has developed an alternate configuration of the vehicle that can be used as a lunar lander. The MMSEV was originally conceived of during the Constellation program as the successor to the Apollo lunar rover as a pressurized rover for two-person, multiday excursions on the lunar surface. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program, the MMSEV has been reconfigured to serve as a free-flying scout vehicle for exploration of a Near Earth Asteroid and is also being assessed for use as a Habitable Airlock in a Cislunar microgravity spacecraft. The Alternate MMSEV (AMMSEV) variant of the MMSEV would serve as the transport vehicle for a four-person lunar crew, providing descent from an orbiting spacecraft or space station and ascent back to the spaceborne asset. This paper will provide a high level overview of the MMSEV and preliminary results from human-in-the-loop testing.

  10. Environmental Controls and Life Support System (ECLSS) Design for a Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda; Sankaran, Subra

    2010-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV will aid to expand the human exploration envelope for Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GEO), Near Earth Object (NEO), or planetary missions by using pressurized surface exploration vehicles. The SEV, formerly known as the Lunar Electric Rover (LER), will be an evolutionary design starting as a ground test prototype where technologies for various systems will be tested and evolve into a flight vehicle. This paper will discuss the current SEV ECLSS design, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, and the plan to advance the ECLSS design based on the SEV vehicle and system needs.

  11. Environmental Controls and Life Support System Design for a Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda C.; Rodriguez, Branelle; Vonau, Walt, Jr.; Borrego, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV will aid to expand the human exploration envelope for Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GEO), Near Earth Object (NEO), or planetary missions by using pressurized surface exploration vehicles. The SEV, formerly known as the Lunar Electric Rover (LER), will be an evolutionary design starting as a ground test prototype where technologies for various systems will be tested and evolve into a flight vehicle. This paper will discuss the current SEV ECLSS design, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, and the plan to advance the ECLSS design based on the SEV vehicle and system needs.

  12. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study. Volume 2, book 3: STV system interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of systems analyses and conceptual design of space transfer vehicles (STV). The missions examined included piloted and unpiloted lunar outpost support and spacecraft servicing, and unpiloted payload delivery to various earth and solar orbits. The study goal was to examine the mission requirements and provide a decision data base for future programmatic development plans. The final lunar transfer vehicles provided a wide range of capabilities and interface requirements while maintaining a constant payload mission model. Launch vehicle and space station sensitivity was examined, with the final vehicles as point design covering the range of possible options. Development programs were defined and technology readiness levels for different options were determined. Volume 1 presents the executive summary, volume 2 provides the study results, and volume 3 the cost and WBS data.

  13. Geostationary Space Launch Vehicles and the U.S. Dilemma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-17

    APPENDIX H, Shuttle Payload to GEO Summaries ..................... HI APPENDIX I, Taurus GEO Launch Vehicle Family Summaries .............. I1 APPENDIX J...to GTO .. 3-28 3-19 Taurus /Pegasus Costs to GTO 3-30 3-20 Titan Costs to GTO . 3-33 3-21 Titan 3/4 Flights to GTO . 3-34 3-22 U.S. Launch Cost Summary...another would eventually drift into position. This constellation was soon replaced with more advanced satellites that could remain on station. The most

  14. Operational design factors for advanced space transportation vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehair, C. L.; Hickman, R. A.; Adams, J. D.; Wolfe, M. G.

    1992-08-01

    The tools and techniques needed to provide design decision-makers with balanced quantitative assessments of the potential operability consequences of their decisions are addressed. The factors controlling operability are identified, and a methodology to predict the impact of these factors on a specific launch vehicle is developed. Requirements to control these factors are established, and analytical tools developed specifically for performing detailed simulations to verify specific operability characteristics are described. An approach to collect, store, organize, and access high-quality historical, current, and future launch system data for the benefit of the USAF and the U.S. launch system community at large is outlined.

  15. A reactive torque control law for gyroscopically controlled space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method of control is developed based on the reactive torques as seen by the individual CMG gimbals. The application of a torque to the gimbal of a CMG rotates the momentum vector and applies a torque to the spacecraft according to well-known laws. The response (rotation) of the vehicle produces a reverse or reaction torque opposing the torque producing the gimbal movement. The reactive torque and the pseudoinverse control schemes are contrasted in order to point out the simplicity of the first method. Simulation was performed only to the extent necessary to prove that reactive torque stabilization and control is feasible.

  16. Centaur space vehicle pressurized propellant feed system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Engine firing tests, using a full-scale flight-weight vehicle, were performed to evaluate a pressurized propellant feed system for the Centaur. The pressurant gases used were helium and hydrogen. The system was designed to replace the boost pumps currently used on Centaur. Two liquid oxygen tank pressurization modes were studied: (1) directly into the ullage and (2) below the propellant surface. Test results showed the two Centaur RL10 engines could be started and run over the range of expected flight variables. No system instabilities were encountered. Measured pressurization gas quantities agreed well with analytically predicted values.

  17. The Application of the Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Laboratory for Space Vehicle Ground Processing Tasks at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Sarah K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of United Space Alliance's Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Laboratory began in early 2007 in an attempt to address the problematic workspace design issues that the Space Shuttle has imposed on technicians performing maintenance and inspection operations. The Space Shuttle was not expected to require the extensive maintenance it undergoes between flights. As a result, extensive, costly resources have been expended on workarounds and modifications to accommodate ground processing personnel. Consideration of basic human factors principles for design of maintenance is essential during the design phase of future space vehicles, facilities, and equipment. Simulation will be needed to test and validate designs before implementation.

  18. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations orbit transfer vehicle serving. Phase 2, task 1: Space station support of operational OTV servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Representative space based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), ground based vehicle turnaround assessment, functional operational requirements and facilities, mission turnaround operations, a comparison of ground based versus space based tasks, activation of servicing facilities prior to IOC, fleet operations requirements, maintenance facilities, OTV servicing facilities, space station support requirements, and packaging for delivery are discussed.

  19. Modification and development of the external tank hydrogen vent umbilical system for the space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatem, Bemis C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The design and development of a new T-O lock and secondary release mechanism which is being introduced to the ET Hydrogen Vent Umbilical System for the next launch of the Space Shuttle Vehicle is described. Critical analysis of the system in early 1986 indicated the need for an improvement in the secondary release system. The new T-O lock increases the clearance with the vehicle during secondary disconnect and is described.

  20. Vehicle for Space Transfer and Recovery (VSTAR), volume 2: Substantiating analyses and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Vehicle Space Transfer and Recovery (VSTAR) system is designed as a manned orbital transfer vehicle (MOTV) with the primary mission of Satellite Launch and Repair (SLR). Reference materials, calculations and trade studies used in the analysis and selection of VSTAR components. Each major VSTAR system is examined separately. Simple graphs and tables are used to make qualitative comparisons of various VSTAR component candidates. Equations and/or calculations used for a particular analysis are also included where applicable.

  1. Mass growth in space vehicle and exploration architecture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert W.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Reeves, David; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wagner, John

    2010-04-01

    Inert or dry mass in aerospace systems has historically grown during aerospace vehicle development because of a number of factors: changing requirements, uncertainty in the performance of the initial technology selection, addition of redundancy, errors in the original design, as well as uncertain masses and loads. In the case of exploration architectures for lunar missions, compounding effects of a multi-staged mission design makes mass-efficient vehicles a necessity for achieving the total delta-V performance required to reach the lunar surface and return to Earth. Current standards and guidelines for mass growth risk mitigation are compared, including the industry and NASA standard methods for risk management and mitigation through the application of mass margin. Historical mass growth trends are analyzed, and average levels of growth are compared to the standard margin allocation levels. Analysis of the available historical data shows that the mean inert mass growth is 28%, and 30% of historical programs experience inert mass growth in excess of the allowable growth and margin recommended level of 32.5%. As an illustrative example of the mass growth of lunar exploration architectures the mass growth sensitivity of the Apollo architecture is calculated. Results show that a kilogram of mass growth on the lunar ascent stage is compounded over 800 times in gross mass.

  2. Design of an interim space rescue ferry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsell, James D., Jr.; Widhalm, Joseph W.; Whitsett, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper proposes a stop-gap nonoptimum vehicle for transferring astronauts from a tumbling stranded spacecraft to a nearby rescue spacecraft. The design is limited to the use of available or 'soon-to-be' available flight-qualified hardware and consists of three major components: the manned maneuvering unit, the personnel rescue enclosure, and the apogee kick motor capture device. The apogee kick motor capture device is modified to serve as the connection between the manned maneuvering unit and the personnel rescue enclosure. The performance of this interim rescue vehicle is analyzed with NASA flight simulation software to test the feasibility of the design. Results show that the control system of the manned maneuvering unit adequately limits uncommanded rotations during all simulated maneuvers in the primary control mode but not during transverse translations in the backup control mode. Impingement of thruster plumes on the personnel rescue enclosure is shown to be of some importance in certain maneuvers. The satellite stabilization mode of the control system is found to have significant rotational-to-translational coupling that has associated adverse effects on flying qualities, making the mode undesirable for the rescue mission.

  3. Design of an interim space rescue ferry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsell, James D., Jr.; Widhalm, Joseph W.; Whitsett, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper proposes a stop-gap nonoptimum vehicle for transferring astronauts from a tumbling stranded spacecraft to a nearby rescue spacecraft. The design is limited to the use of available or 'soon-to-be' available flight-qualified hardware and consists of three major components: the manned maneuvering unit, the personnel rescue enclosure, and the apogee kick motor capture device. The apogee kick motor capture device is modified to serve as the connection between the manned maneuvering unit and the personnel rescue enclosure. The performance of this interim rescue vehicle is analyzed with NASA flight simulation software to test the feasibility of the design. Results show that the control system of the manned maneuvering unit adequately limits uncommanded rotations during all simulated maneuvers in the primary control mode but not during transverse translations in the backup control mode. Impingement of thruster plumes on the personnel rescue enclosure is shown to be of some importance in certain maneuvers. The satellite stabilization mode of the control system is found to have significant rotational-to-translational coupling that has associated adverse effects on flying qualities, making the mode undesirable for the rescue mission.

  4. Analysis of Rawinsonde Spatial Separation for Space Launch Vehicle Applications at the Eastern Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Spatial separation of HR rawinsonde data is directly correlated with climatological tropospheric wind environment over ER. Stronger winds in the winter result in further downrange drift. Lighter winds in the summer result in the less horizontal drift during ascent. Maximum downrange distance can exceed 200 km during winter months. Data could misrepresent the environment the vehicle will experience during ascent. PRESTO uses all available data sources to produce the best representative, vertically complete atmosphere for launch vehicle DOL operations. Capability planned for use by NASA Space Launch System vehicle's first flight scheduled for Fall 2018.

  5. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  6. 78 FR 8111 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Test Flight Activities From Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA... mammals, by harassment, incidental to space vehicle and test flight activities at VAFB. Summary of... of authorization (LOA) has been issued to the 30th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force (USAF), to take...

  7. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  8. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  9. From Antarctica to space: Use of telepresence and virtual reality in control of remote vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol; Hine, Butler P., III; Sims, Michael; Rasmussen, Daryl; Hontalas, Phil; Fong, Terrence W.; Steele, Jay; Barch, Don; Andersen, Dale; Miles, Eric

    1994-01-01

    In the Fall of 1993, NASA Ames deployed a modified Phantom S2 Remotely-Operated underwater Vehicle (ROV) into an ice-covered sea environment near McMurdo Science Station, Antarctica. This deployment was part of the antarctic Space Analog Program, a joint program between NASA and the National Science Foundation to demonstrate technologies relevant for space exploration in realistic field setting in the Antarctic. The goal of the mission was to operationally test the use of telepresence and virtual reality technology in the operator interface to a remote vehicle, while performing a benthic ecology study. The vehicle was operated both locally, from above a dive hole in the ice through which it was launched, and remotely over a satellite communications link from a control room at NASA's Ames Research Center. Local control of the vehicle was accomplished using the standard Phantom control box containing joysticks and switches, with the operator viewing stereo video camera images on a stereo display monitor. Remote control of the vehicle over the satellite link was accomplished using the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI) control software developed at NASA Ames. The remote operator interface included either a stereo display monitor similar to that used locally or a stereo head-mounted head-tracked display. The compressed video signal from the vehicle was transmitted to NASA Ames over a 768 Kbps satellite channel. Another channel was used to provide a bi-directional Internet link to the vehicle control computer through which the command and telemetry signals traveled, along with a bi-directional telephone service. In addition to the live stereo video from the satellite link, the operator could view a computer-generated graphic representation of the underwater terrain, modeled from the vehicle's sensors. The virtual environment contained an animate graphic model of the vehicle which reflected the state of the actual vehicle, along with ancillary information such

  10. From Antarctica to space: Use of telepresence and virtual reality in control of remote vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol; Hine, Butler P., III; Sims, Michael; Rasmussen, Daryl; Hontalas, Phil; Fong, Terrence W.; Steele, Jay; Barch, Don; Andersen, Dale; Miles, Eric

    1994-01-01

    In the Fall of 1993, NASA Ames deployed a modified Phantom S2 Remotely-Operated underwater Vehicle (ROV) into an ice-covered sea environment near McMurdo Science Station, Antarctica. This deployment was part of the antarctic Space Analog Program, a joint program between NASA and the National Science Foundation to demonstrate technologies relevant for space exploration in realistic field setting in the Antarctic. The goal of the mission was to operationally test the use of telepresence and virtual reality technology in the operator interface to a remote vehicle, while performing a benthic ecology study. The vehicle was operated both locally, from above a dive hole in the ice through which it was launched, and remotely over a satellite communications link from a control room at NASA's Ames Research Center. Local control of the vehicle was accomplished using the standard Phantom control box containing joysticks and switches, with the operator viewing stereo video camera images on a stereo display monitor. Remote control of the vehicle over the satellite link was accomplished using the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI) control software developed at NASA Ames. The remote operator interface included either a stereo display monitor similar to that used locally or a stereo head-mounted head-tracked display. The compressed video signal from the vehicle was transmitted to NASA Ames over a 768 Kbps satellite channel. Another channel was used to provide a bi-directional Internet link to the vehicle control computer through which the command and telemetry signals traveled, along with a bi-directional telephone service. In addition to the live stereo video from the satellite link, the operator could view a computer-generated graphic representation of the underwater terrain, modeled from the vehicle's sensors. The virtual environment contained an animate graphic model of the vehicle which reflected the state of the actual vehicle, along with ancillary information such

  11. Necessity of Mutual Understandings in Supply Chain Management of Lithium-Ion Battery for Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, T.; Nakajima, M.; Mori, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Application of Lithium Ion Battery (LIB) is getting growth these days in space industry. Through the supply chain of LIB, it is very important to establish deepen mutual understandings between space industry people and non-space industry people in order to meet requirements of space grade quality control. Furthermore, this approach has positive effects for safety handling and safety transportation. This paper explains necessity of mutual understandings based on the analysis of aviation incident report. The study is focused on its background and issues on each related industry. These contents are studied and discussed in the New Work Item Proposal of the International Standard of LIB for space vehicle.

  12. 100-LBF LO2/LCH4 - Reaction Control Engine Technology Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 100-lbf (445 N) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign MR, ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  13. The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) Modeling Package for Space Vehicle Flow System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jason; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) is a modeling software package that combines nodal analysis and the hydraulic-electric analogy to simulate fluid, electrical, and thermal flow systems. GUNNS is developed by L-3 Communications under the TS21 (Training Systems for the 21st Century) project for NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), primarily for use in space vehicle training simulators at JSC. It has sufficient compactness and fidelity to model the fluid, electrical, and thermal aspects of space vehicles in real-time simulations running on commodity workstations, for vehicle crew and flight controller training. It has a reusable and flexible component and system design, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI), providing capability for rapid GUI-based simulator development, ease of maintenance, and associated cost savings. GUNNS is optimized for NASA's Trick simulation environment, but can be run independently of Trick.

  14. Application of Closed Loop Optimal Guidance for a Constant Thrust Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Mahdy; Abbasi Mahale, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    This research presents derivation and implementation of the explicit guidance problem to steer a space vehicle into exo atmospheric phase of flight to develop three-dimensional optimal trajectory. The proposed guidance algorithm is in association with continuous powered flight of the space vehicle in ascent manoeuvre. Stability, accuracy and simplicity of this approach are the improved developments in comparison with the IGM approach. This algorithm uses the calculus of variation method for the two boundary-value injection problem to generate an optimal trajectory of space vehicle with online generation of steering command to inject to any desired orbit. Here the end conditions have been determined as the orbital height, inclination and eccentricity where the initial conditions are fixed. The simulation results are considered which shows the accuracy and simplicity of this method to reach to the desired orbit in minimum fuel.

  15. The Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle: Human Space Access for the Moon and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Constellation Program is depending on the Ares Projects to deliver the crew launch capabilities needed to send human explorers to the Moon and beyond. The Ares Projects continue to make progress toward design, component testing, and early flight testing of the Ares I crew launch vehicle (Figure 1), the United States first new human-rated launch vehicle in over 25 years. Ares I will provide the core space launch capabilities the United States needs to continue providing crew and cargo access to the International Space Station (ISS), maintaining the U.S. pioneering tradition as a spacefaring nation, and enabling cooperative international ventures to the Moon and beyond. This paper will discuss programmatic, design, fabrication, and testing progress toward building this new launch vehicle.

  16. Impact to Space Shuttle Vehicle Trajectory on Day of Launch from change in Low Frequency Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Puperi, Daniel; Leach, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle utilizes atmospheric winds on day of launch to develop throttle and steering commands to best optimize vehicle performance while keeping structural loading on the vehicle within limits. The steering commands and resultant trajectory are influenced by both the high and low frequency component of the wind. However, the low frequency component has a greater effect on the ascent design. Change in the low frequency wind content from the time of trajectory design until launch can induce excessive loading on the vehicle. Wind change limits have been derived to protect from launching in an environment where these temporal changes occur. Process of developing wind change limits are discussed followed by an observational study of temporal wind change in low frequency wind profiles at the NASA's Kennedy Space Center area are presented.

  17. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...automatic detemrinatio nof space vehicle potentials in real time." Final Report, Grant AFOSR-82-0147, University of Lowell Reserarch Foundation Spiegel

  18. Low vapor pressure cryogenic propellant tank design for the Space-Based Orbital Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, C. N.; McCool, R. C.; Rinker, M. W.; Bennett, F. O.; Kerr, J. R.

    1986-06-01

    Orbital Transfer Vehicle concepts are currently being studied by aerospace contractors for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to identify technology needs for development of these vehicles based at the Space Station in the mid-1990s. The Space-Based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (SBOTV) must be lightweight to minimize propellant mass while having durable structures and systems to minimize propellant mass while having durable structures and systems to minimize refurbishment/maintenance requirements and associated cost. Unlike ground-based vehicles, an SBOTV designed to operate solely in the vacuum environment of space does not require that propellant tank pressures be maintained above atmospheric pressure (14.7 psia). Reducing operating pressures results in a corresponding reduction in a corresponding reduction in vehicle inert weight, propellant weight, and operational costs. The economic and performance advantages of low vapor pressure aluminum tanks for the SBOTV system have been identified. Development of such tanks requires an examination of new low-density aluminum-lithium alloys, assessment of their micrometeoroid protection needs and thermal insulation characteristics, fracture and fatigue analyses of very thin gauges, and design of low-conductivity tank support concepts and low-pressure cryogenic liquid oxygen and hydrogen manufacturing and delivery. This paper describes a structural concept for one of many of the SBOTV cryogenic tank systems and presents the results of analytical models constructed to examine the feasibility of thin gauge tanks.

  19. Numerical methods for aerothermodynamic design of hypersonic space transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanie, K. M.; Brenneis, A.; Eberle, A.; Heiss, S.

    1993-04-01

    The requirement of the design process of hypersonic vehicles to predict flow past entire configurations with wings, fins, flaps, and propulsion system represents one of the major challenges for aerothermodynamics. In this context computational fluid dynamics has come up as a powerful tool to support the experimental work. A couple of numerical methods developed at MBB designed to fulfill the needs of the design process are described. The governing equations and fundamental details of the solution methods are shortly reviewed. Results are given for both geometrically simple test cases and realistic hypersonic configurations. Since there is still a considerable lack of experience for hypersonic flow calculations an extensive testing and verification is essential. This verification is done by comparison of results with experimental data and other numerical methods. The results presented prove that the methods used are robust, flexible, and accurate enough to fulfill the strong needs of the design process.

  20. Review of delta wing space shuttle vehicle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics of the proposed delta planform, high cross range, shuttle orbiters, are investigated. It is found that these vehicles are subject to five unsteady-flow phenomena that could compromise the flight dynamics. The phenomena are as follows: (1) leeside shock-induced separation, (2) sudden leading-edge stall, (3) vortex burst, (4)bow shock-flap shock interaction, and (5) forebody vorticity. Trajectory shaping is seen as the most powerful means of avoiding deterimental effects of the stall phenomena; however, stall must be fixed or controlled when traversing the stall region. Other phenomana may be controlled by carefully programmed control deflections and some configuration modifications. Ways to alter the occurrence of the various flow conditions are explored.

  1. Atmospheric disturbance model for aircraft and space capable vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimene, Beau C.; Park, Young W.; Bielski, W. P.; Shaughnessy, John D.; Mcminn, John D.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric disturbance model (ADM) is developed that considers the requirements of advanced aerospace vehicles and balances algorithmic assumptions with computational constraints. The requirements for an ADM include a realistic power spectrum, inhomogeneity, and the cross-correlation of atmospheric effects. The baseline models examined include the Global Reference Atmospheric Model Perturbation-Modeling Technique, the Dryden Small-Scale Turbulence Description, and the Patchiness Model. The Program to Enhance Random Turbulence (PERT) is developed based on the previous models but includes a revised formulation of large-scale atmospheric disturbance, an inhomogeneous Dryden filter, turbulence statistics, and the cross-correlation between Dryden Turbulence Filters and small-scale thermodynamics. Verification with the Monte Carlo approach demonstrates that the PERT software provides effective simulations of inhomogeneous atmospheric parameters.

  2. International Space Station Requirement Verification for Commercial Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garguilo, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The COTS program demonstrated NASA could rely on commercial providers for safe, reliable, and cost-effective cargo delivery to ISS. The ISS Program has developed a streamlined process to safely integrate commercial visiting vehicles and ensure requirements are met Levy a minimum requirement set (down from 1000s to 100s) focusing on the ISS interface and safety, reducing the level of NASA oversight/insight and burden on the commercial Partner. Partners provide a detailed verification and validation plan documenting how they will show they've met NASA requirements. NASA conducts process sampling to ensure that the established verification processes is being followed. NASA participates in joint verification events and analysis for requirements that require both parties verify. Verification compliance is approved by NASA and launch readiness certified at mission readiness reviews.

  3. Lighter and Stiffer Materials for Use in Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioja, R. J.; Denzer, D. K.; Mooy, D.; Venema, G.

    Materials for use in cryo-tanks need high specific strength, to reduce weight and high KIe fracture toughness, to avoid crack propagation through the thickness and prevent leakage. This paper presents the evolution of Aluminum alloys and products for use in rockets from the beginning of the space age to the Space Shuttle. The specific strength of alloys used in Juno, Saturn, Delta rockets and the external tank of the Space Shuttle are discussed. The microstructure and properties of 2195 plate and 2090 sheet products are reviewed. Finally, based on improved specific strength, use of 2099 and next generation upper wing 2055 Al-Li plate products is proposed for next generation rockets.

  4. Subjective and objective evaluation of sense of space for vehicle occupants based on anthropometric data.

    PubMed

    Hiamtoe, Pitarn; Steinhardt, Florian; Köhler, Uwe; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    At present, the number of the vehicle requirements has been continuously increasing. These requirements can be related to the customer as well as the technical requirements. Among these, the "feeling of space" of the occupants inside the vehicles can be regarded as one of the most important factors. In this respect, the driver and passengers should be able to experience positive feeling of space inside the vehicle. There are numerous factors that can influence the sense of space inside the vehicle. These include geometry (vehicle dimensions), light exposure, ambient lights, colors, material selection and material surface. Depending on the selection, the sense of space can be dramatically influenced by these factors. In general, human feeling is subjective and cannot be measured by any instrument. The measure can nevertheless be carried out by utilizing the method of subjective evaluation. Throughout the experiments, the method of evaluation is developed and the factors which can influence the interior feeling are analyzed. In this process, psychological perception, architectural aspects and anthropometry are considered and knowledge from the other domains is transferred in the form of a multidisciplinary approach. The experiments with an aim to evaluate the overall sense of space in the vehicle are carried out based on the physical mock up of BMW 1 series (E87). The space perception with different interior dimensions and anthropometric data of test persons are also analyzed. The use of Computer Aided Technology was shown by CATIA V5, PCMAN and RAMSIS. The results show a good correlation between the subjective evaluation and the geometric values.

  5. Space shuttle safety - A hybrid vehicle breeds new problems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I. I.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a few novel problems raised by the design and flight plan of the space shuttle and by the dangerous cargos it might carry. Among the problems cited are those connected with the inspection of the bearings of the propellant turbopumps, particularly those of the hydrogen pump, for evidence of spalling, as well as problems arising in the inspection of the high-temperature parts of the combustor and turbine section of the airbreathing turbofan for shuttle booster and orbiter, and problems resulting from the possibility of fire hazard due to spontaneous ignition of fuel vapor in the fuel tank vapor space.

  6. Expert system isssues in automated, autonomous space vehicle rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Mary Ann; Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    The problems involved in automated autonomous rendezvous are briefly reviewed, and the Rendezvous Expert (RENEX) expert system is discussed with reference to its goals, approach used, and knowledge structure and contents. RENEX has been developed to support streamlining operations for the Space Shuttle and Space Station program and to aid definition of mission requirements for the autonomous portions of rendezvous for the Mars Surface Sample Return and Comet Nucleus Sample return unmanned missions. The experience with REMEX to date and recommendations for further development are presented.

  7. High angle view of Apollo 14 space vehicle on way to Pad A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-09

    S70-54127 (9 Nov. 1970) --- A high-angle view at Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), showing the Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle on the way from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower sit atop a huge crawler-transporter. The Apollo 14 crewmen will be astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  8. High angle view of Apollo 14 space vehicle on way to Pad A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-09

    S70-54119 (9 Nov. 1970) --- A high-angle view at Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), showing the Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle on the way from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower sit atop a huge crawler-transporter. The Apollo 14 crewmen will be astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  9. Apollo/Saturn 5 space vehicle countdown. Volume 2: Turnaround from scrub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The procedures required to prepare a space vehicle for subsequent launch attempt after cancelling lift-off activities are presented. The cancellation must occur after the start of cryogenic loading, but prior to initiation of ignition sequences. The sequence of operations necessary to return the space vehicle to a predetermined configuration at which time the launch count can be resumed or rescheduled for following launch opportunities is developed. The considerations and constraints that are the basis for the scrub/turnaround times are described.

  10. Apollo PLSS: Environmental control of the smallest manned space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. C.; Goodwin, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The production of a portable life support system (PLSS) and associated backup equipment for supporting an astronaut working outside of the lunar module (LM) either in space or on the lunar surface is reported. Described are the system, the philosophy behind its design, basic requirements imposed on the system, and some of the evolutionary processes that led to the present configuration.

  11. Integrating Human Factors into Space Vehicle Processing for Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Sarah; Richards, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the multiple projects performed in United Space Alliance's Human Engineering Modeling and Performance (HEMAP) Lab, improvements that resulted from analysis, and the future applications of the HEMAP Lab for risk assessment by evaluating human/machine interaction and ergonomic designs.

  12. International Space Station Crew Return Vehicle: X-38. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide the world with an orbiting laboratory that will have long-duration micro-gravity experimentation capability. The crew size for this facility will depend upon the crew return capability. The first crews will consist of three astronauts from Russia and the United States. The crew is limited to three…

  13. A New Heavy-Lift Capability for Space Exploration: NASA's Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John P.; McArthur, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing new launch systems and preparing to retire the Space Shuttle by 2010, as directed in the United States (U.S.) Vision for Space Exploration. The Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the Ares V heavy-lift Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) systems will build upon proven, reliable hardware derived from the Apollo-Saturn and Space Shuttle programs to deliver safe, reliable, affordable space transportation solutions. This approach leverages existing aerospace talent and a unique infrastructure, as well as legacy knowledge gained from nearly 50 years' experience developing space hardware. Early next decade, the Ares I will launch the new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to the International Space Station (ISS) or to low-Earth orbit for trips to the Moon and, ultimately, Mars. Late next decade, the Ares V's Earth Departure Stage will carry larger payloads such as the lunar lander into orbit, and the Crew Exploration Vehicle will dock with it for missions to the Moon, where astronauts will explore new territories and conduct science and technology experiments. Both Ares I and Ares V are being designed to support longer future trips to Mars. The Exploration Launch Projects Office is designing, developing, testing, and evaluating both launch vehicle systems in partnership with other NASA Centers, Government agencies, and industry contractors. This paper provides top-level information regarding the genesis and evolution of the baseline configuration for the Ares V heavy-lift system. It also discusses riskbased, management strategies, such as building on powerful hardware and promoting common features between the Ares I and Ares V systems to reduce technical, schedule, and cost risks, as well as development and operations costs. Finally, it summarizes several notable accomplishments since October 2005, when the Exploration Launch Projects effort officially kicked off, and looks ahead at work planned for 2007

  14. Spacely's rockets: Personnel launch system/family of heavy lift launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    During 1990, numerous questions were raised regarding the ability of the current shuttle orbiter to provide reliable, on demand support of the planned space station. Besides being plagued by reliability problems, the shuttle lacks the ability to launch some of the heavy payloads required for future space exploration, and is too expensive to operate as a mere passenger ferry to orbit. Therefore, additional launch systems are required to complement the shuttle in a more robust and capable Space Transportation System. In December 1990, the Report of the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program, advised NASA of the risks of becoming too dependent on the space shuttle as an all-purpose vehicle. Furthermore, the committee felt that reducing the number of shuttle missions would prolong the life of the existing fleet. In their suggestions, the board members strongly advocated the establishment of a fleet of unmanned, heavy lift launch vehicles (HLLV's) to support the space station and other payload-intensive enterprises. Another committee recommendation was that a space station crew rotation/rescue vehicle be developed as an alternative to the shuttle, or as a contingency if the shuttle is not available. The committee emphasized that this vehicle be designed for use as a personnel carrier, not a cargo carrier. This recommendation was made to avoid building another version of the existing shuttle, which is not ideally suited as a passenger vehicle only. The objective of this project was to design both a Personnel Launch System (PLS) and a family of HLLV's that provide low cost and efficient operation in missions not suited for the shuttle.

  15. Spacely's rockets: Personnel launch system/family of heavy lift launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    During 1990, numerous questions were raised regarding the ability of the current shuttle orbiter to provide reliable, on demand support of the planned space station. Besides being plagued by reliability problems, the shuttle lacks the ability to launch some of the heavy payloads required for future space exploration, and is too expensive to operate as a mere passenger ferry to orbit. Therefore, additional launch systems are required to complement the shuttle in a more robust and capable Space Transportation System. In December 1990, the Report of the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program, advised NASA of the risks of becoming too dependent on the space shuttle as an all-purpose vehicle. Furthermore, the committee felt that reducing the number of shuttle missions would prolong the life of the existing fleet. In their suggestions, the board members strongly advocated the establishment of a fleet of unmanned, heavy lift launch vehicles (HLLV's) to support the space station and other payload-intensive enterprises. Another committee recommendation was that a space station crew rotation/rescue vehicle be developed as an alternative to the shuttle, or as a contingency if the shuttle is not available. The committee emphasized that this vehicle be designed for use as a personnel carrier, not a cargo carrier. This recommendation was made to avoid building another version of the existing shuttle, which is not ideally suited as a passenger vehicle only. The objective of this project was to design both a Personnel Launch System (PLS) and a family of HLLV's that provide low cost and efficient operation in missions not suited for the shuttle.

  16. Inter-Module Ventilation Changes to the International Space Station Vehicle to Support Integration of the International Docking Adapter and Commercial Crew Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Dwight E., Jr.; Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) is continuing to evolve in the post-Space Shuttle era. The ISS vehicle configuration that is in operation was designed for docking of a Space Shuttle vehicle, and designs currently under development for commercial crew vehicles require different interfaces. The ECLSS Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem (THC) Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) must be modified in order to support two docking interfaces at the forward end of ISS, to provide the required air exchange. Development of a new higher-speed IMV fan and extensive ducting modifications are underway to support the new Commercial Crew Vehicle interfaces. This paper will review the new ECLSS IMV development requirements, component design and hardware status, subsystem analysis and testing performed to date, and implementation plan to support Commercial Crew Vehicle docking.

  17. Thermal preparation of foods in space-vehicle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, R. B.; Cox, J. E.; Chen, C. K.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.

    1974-01-01

    Convection is the primary heat transfer mechanism for most foods heated in an earth-based environment. In contrast, in the low-gravity environment of space flight, the primary heat transfer mechanism is conduction (or radiation in the absence of a conducting medium). Conduction heating is significantly slower and less efficient than convection heating. This fact poses a problem for food heating during space flight. A numerical model has been developed to evaluate this problem. This model simulates the food-heating process for Skylab. The model includes the effect of a thermally controlled on/off heat flux. Parametric studies using this model establish how the required heating time is affected by: the thermal diffusivity of the nutrient materials, the power level of the heater, the initial food temperatures, and the food container dimensions.

  18. Thermal preparation of foods in space-vehicle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, R. B.; Cox, J. E.; Chen, C. K.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.

    1974-01-01

    Convection is the primary heat transfer mechanism for most foods heated in an earth-based environment. In contrast, in the low-gravity environment of space flight, the primary heat transfer mechanism is conduction (or radiation in the absence of a conducting medium). Conduction heating is significantly slower and less efficient than convection heating. This fact poses a problem for food heating during space flight. A numerical model has been developed to evaluate this problem. This model simulates the food-heating process for Skylab. The model includes the effect of a thermally controlled on/off heat flux. Parametric studies using this model establish how the required heating time is affected by: the thermal diffusivity of the nutrient materials, the power level of the heater, the initial food temperatures, and the food container dimensions.

  19. Composite propulsion feedlines for cryogenic space vehicles, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. A.; Laintz, D. J.; Phillips, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Thin metallic liners that provide leak-free service in cryogenic propulsion systems are overwrapped with a glass-fiber composite that provides strength and protection from handling damage. The resultant tube is lightweight, strong and has a very low thermal flux. Several styles of tubing ranging from 5 to 38 cm in diameter and up to 305 cm long were fabricated and tested at operating temperatures from 294 to 21 K and operating pressures up to 259 N/sq cm. The primary objective for the smaller sizes was thermal performance optimization of the propulsion system while the primary objective of the larger sizes was weight optimization and to prove fabricability. All major program objectives were met resulting in a design concept that is adaptable to a wide range of aerospace vehicle requirements. Major items of development included: bonding large diameter aluminum end fittings to the thin Inconel liner; fabrication of a 38 cm diameter tube from 0.008 cm thick Inconel; and evaluation of tubing which provides essentially zero quality propellant in a very short period of time resulting in a lower mass of propellant expended in chilldown.

  20. Space shuttle orbiter vehicle star tracker test program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development model test program was written to provide guidance for essential star tracker test support to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Program. The program organization included test equipment preparation, prototype baseline/acceptance tests, prototype total performance tests, and prototype special tests. Test configurations, preparation phase, documentation, scheduling, and manpower requirements are discussed. The test program permits an early evaluation of the tracker's performance prior to completion and testing of the final flight models.

  1. An Overview of the Characterization of the Space Launch Vehicle Aerodynamic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John A.; Campbell, John R., Jr.; Bennett, David W.; Rausch, Russ D.; Gomez, Reynaldo J.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic environments are some of the rst engineering data products that are needed to design a space launch vehicle. These products are used in performance predic- tions, vehicle control algorithm design, as well as determing loads on primary and secondary structures in multiple discipline areas. When the National Aeronautics and Space Admin- istration (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program was established with the goal of designing a new, heavy-lift launch vehicle rst capable of lifting the Orion Program Multi- Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to low-earth orbit and preserving the potential to evolve the design to a 200 metric ton cargo launcher, the data needs were no di erent. Upon commencement of the new program, a characterization of aerodynamic environments were immediately initiated. In the time since, the SLS Aerodynamics Team has produced data describing the majority of the aerodynamic environment de nitions needed for structural design and vehicle control under nominal ight conditions. This paper provides an overview of select SLS aerodynamic environments completed to date.

  2. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  3. Development of Backscatter X-Ray Imaging Techniques for Space Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartha, Bence B.; Hope, Dale; Vona, Paul; Born, Martin; Corak, Tony

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of backscatter x ray (BSX) imaging techniques to perform inspection of spacecraft components. The techniques are currently being enhanced to advance Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods for future space vehicle applications. The presentation includes an overview of x ray techniques, a description of current BSX applications used on the space shuttle, the development for Constellation applications, and the use of the system for foam applications.

  4. Space Vehicle Material and Plume Interactions With the Low Earth Orbital Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-15

    containing nanocomposite materials which could be space- durable alternatives to polymers that are currently employed on spacecraft. Proposed experiments...streams, but it also inhibits the durability of space vehicles. The high relative velocity between a spacecraft and ambient 0 atoms results in an O-atom...mechanisms, new test protocols, mitigation schemes, and materials have been and are being developed. A paradigm shift in durable materials design has

  5. Status of advanced propulsion for space-based orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Larry P.; Scheer, Dean D.

    This paper discusses the NASA technology program for Advanced Orbital Transfer Vehicle Propulsion. The program requirements and goals for a high performance, multiple restart, variable thrust, orbital transfer propulsion system which could be man-rated, space-based, and compatible with aeroassist maneuvering are presented. Three expander cycle engine concepts and critical technologies are discussed. Progress toward establishing technical feasibility of the concepts is reviewed for trubomachinery, combustion devices, health monitoring, space-based maintenance, and integrated component testing.

  6. Optimization of thermal protection systems for the space vehicle. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of the computational techniques for the design optimization of thermal protection systems for the space shuttle vehicle are discussed. The resulting computer program was then used to perform initial optimization and sensitivity studies on a typical thermal protection system (TPS) to demonstrate its application to the space shuttle TPS design. The program was developed in FORTRAN IV for CDC 6400 computer, but it was subsequently converted to the FORTRAN V language to be used on the Univac 1108.

  7. Analysis of International Space Station Vehicle Materials on MISSE 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Golden, Johnny; Kravchenko, Michael; O'Rourke, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station Materials and Processes team has multiple material samples on MISSE 6, 7 and 8 to observe Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environmental effects on Space Station materials. Optical properties, thickness/mass loss, surface elemental analysis, visual and microscopic analysis for surface change are some of the techniques employed in this investigation. Results for the following MISSE 6 samples materials will be presented: deionized water sealed anodized aluminum; Hyzod(tm) polycarbonate used to temporarily protect ISS windows; Russian quartz window material; Beta Cloth with Teflon(tm) reformulated without perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and electroless nickel. Discussion for current and future MISSE materials experiments will be presented. MISSE 7 samples are: more deionized water sealed anodized aluminum, including Photofoil(tm); indium tin oxide (ITO) over-coated Kapton(tm) used as thermo-optical surfaces; mechanically scribed tin-plated beryllium-copper samples for "tin pest" growth (alpha/beta transformation); and beta cloth backed with a black coating rather than aluminization. MISSE 8 samples are: exposed "scrim cloth" (fiberglass weave) from the ISS solar array wing material, protective fiberglass tapes and sleeve materials, and optical witness samples to monitor contamination.

  8. A Capability to Generate Physics-based Mass Estimating Relationships for Conceptual Space Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Marcus, Leland

    2002-01-01

    This paper is written in support of the on-going research into conceptual space vehicle design conducted at the Space Systems Design Laboratory (SSDL) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Research at the SSDL follows a sequence of a number of the traditional aerospace disciplines. The sequence of disciplines and interrelationship among them is shown in the Design Structure Matrix (DSM). The discipline of Weights and Sizing occupies a central location in the design of a new space vehicle. Weights and Sizing interact, either in a feed forward or feed back manner, with every other discipline in the DSM. Because of this principle location, accuracy in Weights and Sizing is integral to producing an accurate model of a space vehicle concept. Instead of using conceptual level techniques, a simplified Finite Element Analysis (FEA) technique is described as applied to the problem of the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank bending loads applied to the forward Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank of the Georgia Tech Air Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV).

  9. Process Improvement for Next Generation Space Flight Vehicles: MSFC Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housch, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from process improvement for Next Generation Space Flight Vehicles. The contents include: 1) Organizational profile; 2) Process Improvement History; 3) Appraisal Preparation; 4) The Appraisal Experience; 5) Useful Tools; and 6) Is CMMI working?

  10. Optimization of the power supply and temperature control system of a space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Grishutin, M.M.; Rogov, V.N.

    1986-05-01

    The problem of minimum-mass optimization of the thermodynamic, flow-rate, and structural parameters of the power supply and active temperature control system of a space vehicle is solved in a static determinate formulation. The factors determining the mass of this system are analyzed.

  11. Evolutionary computing for the design search and optimization of space vehicle power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, M.; Klimeck, G.; Hanks, D.

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary computing has proven to be a straightforward and robust approach for optimizing a wide range of difficult analysis and design problems. This paper discusses the application of these techniques to an existing space vehicle power subsystem resource and performance analysis simulation in a parallel processing environment.

  12. REACTION WHEEL ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR SPACE VEHICLES. PART II. EXPERIMENTAL. SECTION 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A laboratory model simulating, insofar as practical, a single axis of a space vehicle with a reaction wheel control system was constructed from off...activiated, generating sufficient impulse to reduce the wheel speed to zero. The system then returns to the reaction wheel mode of control. Several

  13. Compilation of Papers Presented to Meeting on Space Vehicle Landing and Recovery Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    A meeting on Space Vehicle Landing and Recovery was held on July 10-11, 1962 at NASA Headquarters. The Centers were asked to participate in this meeting in accordance with their interest, activities, and requirements in the subject area. Primary emphasis was directed toward parachutes, parachute-rocket systems, paragliders, and lifting rotor concepts applicable to bothe booster and spacecraft landing and recovery.

  14. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  15. Misalignment studies on space shuttle integrated vehicle (IA31FC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P.; Mcmeans, T.; Davis, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of test model element misalignments on test results were investigated. Transonic wind tunnel-573 was designed to study these misalignment effects in detail by purposely misaligning model elements a known amount. Misalignments in TWT-573 were achieved by use of special off-set spacers and mounting hardware to change, yaw, pitch and roll on various elements of a 0.004-Scale PRR Baseline space shuttle configuration model. By comparing the misalignment runs to the nominal configuration with no misalignment, relative effects of the misalignment could be seen. This data was obtained over a Mach range of .9 to 1.46 using an angle of attack sweep of minus 10 deg to plus 10 deg in 2 deg increments.

  16. Automated procedure execution for space vehicle autonomous control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broten, Thomas A.; Brown, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Increased operational autonomy and reduced operating costs have become critical design objectives in next-generation NASA and DoD space programs. The objective is to develop a semi-automated system for intelligent spacecraft operations support. The Spacecraft Operations and Anomaly Resolution System (SOARS) is presented as a standardized, model-based architecture for performing High-Level Tasking, Status Monitoring and automated Procedure Execution Control for a variety of spacecraft. The particular focus is on the Procedure Execution Control module. A hierarchical procedure network is proposed as the fundamental means for specifying and representing arbitrary operational procedures. A separate procedure interpreter controls automatic execution of the procedure, taking into account the current status of the spacecraft as maintained in an object-oriented spacecraft model.

  17. Expendable launch vehicles in Space Station Freedom logistics resupply operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. Steven; Courtney, Roy L.; Brunt, Peter

    The projected Space Station Freedom (SSF) annual logistics resupply requirements were predicted to exceed the 1988 baseline Shuttle resupply system capability. This paper examines the implications of employing a 'mixed fleet' of Shuttles and ELVs to provide postassembly, steady-state logistics resupply. The study concluded that ELVs supported by the OMV could provide the additional required resupply capability with one to three launches per annum. However, the study determined that such a capability would require significant programmatic commitments, including baseline SSF OMV accommodations, on-orbit OMV monoprop replenishment capability, and substantial economics investments. The study also found the need for a half-size pressurized logistics module for the increase in the efficiency of logistics manifesting on the Shuttle as well as ELVs.

  18. Expendable launch vehicles in Space Station Freedom logistics resupply operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. Steven; Courtney, Roy L.; Brunt, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The projected Space Station Freedom (SSF) annual logistics resupply requirements were predicted to exceed the 1988 baseline Shuttle resupply system capability. This paper examines the implications of employing a 'mixed fleet' of Shuttles and ELVs to provide postassembly, steady-state logistics resupply. The study concluded that ELVs supported by the OMV could provide the additional required resupply capability with one to three launches per annum. However, the study determined that such a capability would require significant programmatic commitments, including baseline SSF OMV accommodations, on-orbit OMV monoprop replenishment capability, and substantial economics investments. The study also found the need for a half-size pressurized logistics module for the increase in the efficiency of logistics manifesting on the Shuttle as well as ELVs.

  19. An Analytical Solution for Yaw Maneuver Optimization on the International Space Station and Other Orbiting Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrinskaya, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for optimizing yaw maneuvers, which are the most common large maneuvers on the International Space Station (ISS). The goal of the maneuver optimization is to find a maneuver trajectory with minimal torques acting on the vehicle during the maneuver. Therefore, the thruster firings necessary to perform the maneuver are minimized. Reduction of thruster firings saves propellant and decreases structural loads and contamination of the vehicle critical elements, thus saving the service life of the thrusters and the vehicle itself. Equations describing the pitch and roll motion needed to counteract the major torques during a yaw maneuver are obtained. Also, a yaw rate profile is suggested. In the obtained optimized case, the torques are significantly reduced. The proposed approximate analytical solution does not require extensive computer resources and, therefore, can be implemented using software onboard the ISS. As a result, the maneuver execution will be automatic. This is one of the major benefits of the simplified solution presented in this paper with respect to existing computational approaches. The suggested maneuver optimization method can be used not only for the ISS, but for other space vehicles as well.

  20. APPLICATION OF THE RATE DIAGRAM TECHNIQUE TO THE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF SPACE VEHICLE ON-OFF ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Preliminary single axis analysis and design of a space vehicle control system, consisting of a torque producing device and a dead-band within which...method. Two characteristics of typical space vehicle attitude control problems which make this method effective are the undamped rigid body motion of

  1. Further Development of a Computer Algorithm for the Automatic Determination of Space Vehicle Potential in Real Time.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    ALGORITHM FOR THE AUTOMATIC DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIAL IN REAL TIME DECEMBER 1983 LU Prepared By__J LA. Dr. Stanley L. Spiegel University of...30 INTRODUCTION It is important for Air Force applications to have a reliable, real time method of determining whether a space vehicle at geo

  2. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the...

  3. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the...

  4. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the...

  5. Temporal Wind Pairs for Space Launch Vehicle Capability Assessment and Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind assessments to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments make use of wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the winds over the time period between the assessment and launch introduces uncertainty in assessment of vehicle controllability and structural integrity that must be accounted for to ensure launch safety. Temporal wind pairs are used in engineering development of allowances to mitigate uncertainty. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (0.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the United States Air Force Eastern Range and Western Range, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Wallops Flight Facility are developed for use in upper-level wind assessments on vehicle performance. Historical databases are compiled from balloon-based and vertically pointing Doppler radar wind profiler systems. Various automated and manual quality control procedures are used to remove unacceptable profiles. Statistical analyses on the resultant wind pairs from each site are performed to determine if the observed extreme wind changes in the sample pairs are representative of extreme temporal wind change. Wind change samples in the Eastern Range and Western Range databases characterize extreme wind change. However, the small sample sizes in the Wallops Flight Facility databases yield low confidence that the sample population characterizes extreme wind change that could occur.

  6. Temporal Wind Pairs for Space Launch Vehicle Capability Assessment and Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind assessments to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments make use of wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the winds over the time period between the assessment and launch introduces uncertainty in assessment of vehicle controllability and structural integrity that must be accounted for to ensure launch safety. Temporal wind pairs are used in engineering development of allowances to mitigate uncertainty. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (0.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the United States Air Force Eastern Range and Western Range, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Wallops Flight Facility are developed for use in upper-level wind assessments on vehicle performance. Historical databases are compiled from balloon-based and vertically pointing Doppler radar wind profiler systems. Various automated and manual quality control procedures are used to remove unacceptable profiles. Statistical analyses on the resultant wind pairs from each site are performed to determine if the observed extreme wind changes in the sample pairs are representative of extreme temporal wind change. Wind change samples in the Eastern Range and Western Range databases characterize extreme wind change. However, the small sample sizes in the Wallops Flight Facility databases yield low confidence that the sample population characterizes extreme wind change that could occur.

  7. A two stage launch vehicle for use as an advanced space transportation system for logistics support of the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary design specifications for an Advanced Space Transportation System consisting of a fully reusable flyback booster, an intermediate-orbit cargo vehicle, and a shuttle-type orbiter with an enlarged cargo bay. It provides a comprehensive overview of mission profile, aerodynamics, structural design, and cost analyses. These areas are related to the overall feasibility and usefullness of the proposed system.

  8. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements, volume 2, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the systems engineering task was to develop and implement an approach that would generate the required study products as defined by program directives. This product list included a set of system and subsystem requirements, a complete set of optimized trade studies and analyses resulting in a recommended system configuration, and the definition of an integrated system/technology and advanced development growth path. A primary ingredient in the approach was the TQM philosophy stressing job quality from the inception. Included throughout the Systems Engineering, Programmatics, Concepts, Flight Design, and Technology sections are data supporting the original objectives as well as supplemental information resulting from program activities. The primary result of the analyses and studies was the recommendation of a single propulsion stage Lunar Transportation System (LTS) configuration that supports several different operations scenarios with minor element changes. This concept has the potential to support two additional scenarios with complex element changes. The space based LTS concept consists of three primary configurations--Piloted, Reusable Cargo, and Expendable Cargo.

  9. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements, volume 2, book 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the systems engineering task was to develop and implement an approach that would generate the required study products as defined by program directives. This product list included a set of system and subsystem requirements, a complete set of optimized trade studies and analyses resulting in a recommended system configuration, and the definition of an integrated system/technology and advanced development growth path. A primary ingredient in the approach was the TQM philosophy stressing job quality from the inception. Included throughout the Systems Engineering, Programmatics, Concepts, Flight Design, and Technology sections are data supporting the original objectives as well as supplemental information resulting from program activities. The primary result of the analyses and studies was the recommendation of a single propulsion stage Lunar Transportation System (LTS) configuration that supports several different operations scenarios with minor element changes. This concept has the potential to support two additional scenarios with complex element changes. The space based LTS concept consists of three primary configurations--Piloted, Reusable Cargo, and Expendable Cargo.

  10. Space vehicle glow measurements on STS 41-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Clifton, K. S.; Gause, R.; Leger, L.; Garriott, O. K.

    1985-01-01

    A flight experiment using a hand-held, image-intensified spectrographic camera was performed on mission 41-D. The instrument enabled the photographic documentation of the position of the spectral slit on the image to be subjected to spectrographic analysis. Because of this instrument feature, the spectrum of the glow on the Shuttle tail pod could be clearly separated from spectrum of the scattered light from the Orbiter. From the measurements it is clear that the spectrum of the glow is a continuum in the passband of the instrument between 4200 A and 8000 A. The measured spectral resolution of the instrument was 35 A. The scattered light from the Orbiter surfaces distinctly show the components of the earth's airglow at 5577 A and 7620 A. On the same flight material samples were also carried by the Orbiter attached to the Remote Manipulating System arm. These samples were representative of the material overcoatings used on the space telescope. The altitude of the 41-D flight was 290 km, instead of the 220 km which was originally planned for this experiment. The signal to noise ratio in the material glow discrimination experiment was quite low. This made it difficult to draw strong conclusions regarding the glow propensity of the materials. Nevertheless it was clear that polyethylene produces a very weak glow, while most black overcoating materials produce significant glow. MgF2 was also found to produce a relatively intense glow.

  11. A New Handbook for the Development of Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A new NASA document entitled "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development (NASA-HDBK-1001A) has been developed. The Handbook provides terrestrial environment information, data bases, models, recommendations, etc. for use in the design, development, trade studies, testing, and mission analyses for space (or launch) .vehicles. This document is organized into fourteen specific natural environment disciplines of which some are winds, atmospheric models, thermal radiation, precipitation-for-icing, cloud cover, atmospheric electricity, geologic hazards, toxic chemical release by propulsion systems, and sea state. Atmospheric phenomena play a significant role in the design and flight of aerospace vehicles and in the integrity of the associated aerospace systems and structures. Environmental design criteria guidelines in this document are based on measurements and observations of atmospheric and climatic phenomena relative to various aerospace development, operational, and vehicle launch locations. The natural environment criteria guidelines data presented in this Handbook were formulated based on discussions with and requests from engineers involved in aerospace vehicle development and operations. Therefore, they represent responses to actual engineering problems and are not just a general compilation of environmental data. The Handbook addresses the basis for the information presented, the interpretations of the terrestrial environment guideline given in the Handbook, and its application to the development of aerospace vehicle design requirements. Specific examples of the Handbook content and associated "lessons lenmed" are given in this paper.

  12. A New Handbook for the Development of Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A new NASA document entitled "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development (NASA-HDBK-IOO1A) has been developed. The Handbook provides terrestrial environment information, data bases, models, recommendations, etc. for use in the design, development, trade studies, testing, and mission analyses for space (or launch) vehicles. This document is organized into fourteen specific natural environment disciplines of which some are winds, atmospheric models, thermal radiation, precipitation-for-icing, cloud cover, atmospheric electricity, geologic hazards, toxic chemical release by propulsion systems, and sea state. Atmospheric phenomena play a significant role in the design and flight of aerospace vehicles and in the integrity of the associated aerospace systems and structures. Environmental design criteria guidelines in this document are based on measurements and observations of atmospheric and climatic phenomena relative to various aerospace development, operational, and vehicle launch locations. The natural environment criteria guidelines data presented in this Handbook were formulated based on discussions with and requests from engineers involved in aerospace vehicle development and operations. Therefore, they represent responses to actual engineering problems and are not just a general compilation of environmental data. The Handbook addresses the basis for the information presented, the interpretations of the terrestrial environment guideline given in the Handbook, and its application to the development of aerospace vehicle design requirements. Specific examples of the Handbook content and associated "lessons lenmed" are given in this paper.

  13. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles--Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Christopher E.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Gary M.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) is charting a renewed course for lunar exploration, with the fielding of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the venerable Space Shuttle, which will be retired after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station (ISS) and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Altair Lunar Lander, which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (fig. 1). This configuration will empower rekindled investigation of Earth's natural satellite in the not too distant future. This new exploration infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit (LEO) for extended lunar missions and preparation for the first long-distance journeys to Mars. All space-based operations - to LEO and beyond - are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective architecture solutions to sustain this multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging SO years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry and academia, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper outlines a few ways that the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Constellation Program and its project offices to streamline ground operations concepts by designing for operability, which reduces lifecycle costs and promotes sustainable space exploration.

  14. View of Apollo 15 space vehicle leaving VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-05-11

    S71-33786 (11 May 1971) --- The 363-feet tall Apollo (Spacecraft 112/Lunar Module 10/Saturn 510) space vehicle which leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower are atop a huge crawler-transporter. Apollo 15 is scheduled as the fourth manned lunar landing mission by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is scheduled to lift off on July 26, 1971. The crew men will be astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. While astronaut Scott and Irwin will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Worden will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  15. View of Apollo 15 space vehicle on way from VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-05-11

    S71-33781 (11 May 1971) --- High angle view showing the Apollo 15 (Spacecraft 112/Lunar Module 10/Saturn 510) space vehicle on the way from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower are atop a huge crawler-transporter. Apollo 15 is scheduled as the fourth manned lunar landing mission by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The crew men will be astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Scott and Irwin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Worden will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  16. Analysis of International Space Station Vehicle Materials Exposed on Materials International Space Station Experiment from 2001 to 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Golden, J. L.; Kravchenko, M.

    2013-01-01

    Since August 2001, the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) has provided data on a variety of materials and spacecraft components, including samples chosen to provide sustaining engineering and life extension data for the International Space Station vehicle itself. This Technical Publication is by no means a complete set of MISSE data but does provide changes in solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and visual appearance due to atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and thermal cycling in vacuum. Conversion coatings, anodizes, thermal control coatings with organic and inorganic binders, multilayer insulation components, optical materials, and part markings are discussed.

  17. Graphite/epoxy composite adapters for the Space Shuttle/Centaur vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, Harold J.; Ring, Darryl S.

    1990-01-01

    The decision to launch various NASA satellite and Air Force spacecraft from the Space Shuttle created the need for a high-energy upper stage capable of being deployed from the cargo bay. Two redesigned versions of the Centaur vehicle which employed a graphite/epoxy composite material for the forward and aft adapters were selected. Since this was the first time a graphite/epoxy material was used for Centaur major structural components, the development of the adapters was a major effort. An overview of the composite adapter designs, subcomponent design evaluation test results, and composite adapter test results from a full-scale vehicle structural test is presented.

  18. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC TORQUING FOR DESATURATION OF CONTROL MOMENT GYROS IN SPACE VEHICLE CONTROL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    space vehicle by exchanging momentum with the rest of the spacecraft. However, externally caused disturbance torques acting on the vehicle would saturate the momentum capability of the gyros if no auxiliary torquing methods were provided to unload the stored momentum. This function can be performed by a set of three current-carrying coils which interact with the earth’s magnetic field in a process of continually resetting the control moment gyro gimbal angles to ’zero’ position. The performance and weight of a magnetic system to momentum desaturate control

  19. Space vehicle design and operation for efficient use of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Mike L.; Hodge, John R.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is a high-leverage, and possibly enabling, propulsion choice for sending humans to Mars. Important performance gains are expected for NTP Mars transfer vehicle over their counterparts, the conventional chemical systems. These gains come in spite of vehicle unique requirements for NTP engine development and operations: expected higher development costs, prelaunch and in-space handing safeguards, extra propellant for reactor cool-down after engine burns, and safe, managed disposal of spent NTP engines. Prior studies have also shown that these NTP engines and stages, sized for Mars missions, could increase delivered payloads for some piloted lunar mission as well.

  20. A Study of a Lifting Body as a Space Station Crew Exigency Return Vehicle (CERV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacConochie, Ian O.

    2000-01-01

    A lifting body is described for use as a return vehicle for crews from a space station. Reentry trajectories, subsystem weights and performance, and costs are included. The baseline vehicle is sized for a crew of eight. An alternate configuration is shown in which only four crew are carried with the extra volume reserved for logistics cargo. A water parachute recovery system is shown as an emergency alternative to a runway landing. Primary reaction control thrusters from the Shuttle program are used for orbital maneuvering while the Shuttle verniers are used for all attitude control maneuvers.

  1. CARINA - A space vehicle with re-entry capabilities for microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borriello, G.; Sansone, A.; Ricciardi, A.

    1992-08-01

    An Italian autonomous space vehicle with recovery capabilities, named CARINA (Capsula di Rientro Non Abitata), is described with special attention given to the technological developments in areas pertaining to the reentry system, including reentry aerothermodynamics and the design of the thermal protection system. Consideration is also given to the configuration of the CARINA vehicle (comprised of the expendable Service Module and the Apollo-like Reentry Module), the subsystems and their performances, the mission life cycle, the microgravity utilization aspects, and the programmatic aspects.

  2. Heavy-lift launch vehicle options for future space exploration initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.; Harris, Ronald J.

    1990-10-01

    A review of present heavy-lift launch vehicles (HLLV) capable of placing heavy payloads in earth orbit is presented and the basis for an emerging consensus that an HLLV will be required in the near future is discussed. Some of the factors for the policies governing the roles and requirements for these vehicles in the future, such as cost, technology development, and lead time to first use are addressed. Potential Space Station Freedom application is discussed as well as application to the proposed initiatives for human exploration of Mars and the moon.

  3. A vehicle scheduling algorithm using non-serial discrete dynamic programming with space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupnick, E.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the development and operation of a vehicle-scheduling algorithm which has applications to the NASA problem of assigning payloads to space delivery vehicles. The algorithm is based on a discrete, integer-valued, nonserial, dynamic-programming solution to the classical problem of developing resource utilization plans with limited resources. The algorithm places special emphasis on incorporating interpayload (precedence) relationships; maintaining optimal alternate schedule definitions (a unique feature of dynamic programming) in the event of contingencies (namely, resource inventory changes) without problem resolution; and, by using a special information storage technique, reducing the computational complexity of solving realistic problems.

  4. Heavy-lift launch vehicle options for future space exploration initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.; Harris, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    A review of present heavy-lift launch vehicles (HLLV) capable of placing heavy payloads in earth orbit is presented and the basis for an emerging consensus that an HLLV will be required in the near future is discussed. Some of the factors for the policies governing the roles and requirements for these vehicles in the future, such as cost, technology development, and lead time to first use are addressed. Potential Space Station Freedom application is discussed as well as application to the proposed initiatives for human exploration of Mars and the moon.

  5. Heavy-lift launch vehicle options for future space exploration initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.; Harris, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    A review of present heavy-lift launch vehicles (HLLV) capable of placing heavy payloads in earth orbit is presented and the basis for an emerging consensus that an HLLV will be required in the near future is discussed. Some of the factors for the policies governing the roles and requirements for these vehicles in the future, such as cost, technology development, and lead time to first use are addressed. Potential Space Station Freedom application is discussed as well as application to the proposed initiatives for human exploration of Mars and the moon.

  6. Space shuttle orbiter reaction control system interactions with the vehicle flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Test data on the effect of the interaction between the space shuttle orbiter rear-mounted reaction control system jets and the flow over the vehicle in the atmosphere are analyzed with particular attention to yaw angle effects. Masted tank-plus-orbiter jet interactions resulting from combinations of forward and rear-mounted reaction control jets being fired prior to external tank staging are also documented. The primary correlating parameter used for the mated data is a single-jet momentum ratioed to free-stream momentum. An analytic model for computing reaction control system interactions for all control combinations used for mated vehicle coast is included.

  7. Applying a Crew Accommodations Resource Model to Future Space Vehicle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Jennifer Linda

    2003-01-01

    The success of research and development for human space flight depends heavily on modeling. In addition, the use of such models is especially critical at the earliest phase of research and development of any manned vehicle or habitat. NASA is currently studying various innovative and futuristic propulsion technologies to enable further exploration of space by untended as well as tended vehicles. Details such as vehicle mass, volume, shape and configuration are required variables to evaluate the success of the propulsion concepts. For tended vehicles, the impact of the crew's requirements on those parameters must be included. This is especially important on long duration missions where the crew requirements become more complex. To address these issues, a crew accommodations resource model, developed as a mission planning tool for human spaceflight (Stillwell, Boutros, & Connolly), was applied to a reference mission in order to estimate the volume and mass required to sustain a crew for a variety of long duration missions. The model, which compiled information from numerous different sources and contains various attributes which can be modified to enable comparisons across different dimensions, was instrumental in deriving volume and mass required for a tended long duration space flight. With the inclusion of some additional variables, a set of volume and mass requirements were provided to the project. If due consideration to crew requirements for volume and mass had not been entertained, the assumptions behind validation of the propulsion technology could have been found to be incorrect, possibly far into development of the technology or even into the design and build of test vehicles. The availability and use of such a model contributes significantly by increasing the accuracy of human space flight research and development activities and acts as a cost saving measure by preventing inaccurate assumptions from driving design decisions.

  8. Applying a Crew Accommodations Resource Model to Future Space Vehicle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Jennifer Linda

    2003-01-01

    The success of research and development for human space flight depends heavily on modeling. In addition, the use of such models is especially critical at the earliest phase of research and development of any manned vehicle or habitat. NASA is currently studying various innovative and futuristic propulsion technologies to enable further exploration of space by untended as well as tended vehicles. Details such as vehicle mass, volume, shape and configuration are required variables to evaluate the success of the propulsion concepts. For tended vehicles, the impact of the crew's requirements on those parameters must be included. This is especially important on long duration missions where the crew requirements become more complex. To address these issues, a crew accommodations resource model, developed as a mission planning tool for human spaceflight (Stillwell, Boutros, & Connolly), was applied to a reference mission in order to estimate the volume and mass required to sustain a crew for a variety of long duration missions. The model, which compiled information from numerous different sources and contains various attributes which can be modified to enable comparisons across different dimensions, was instrumental in deriving volume and mass required for a tended long duration space flight. With the inclusion of some additional variables, a set of volume and mass requirements were provided to the project. If due consideration to crew requirements for volume and mass had not been entertained, the assumptions behind validation of the propulsion technology could have been found to be incorrect, possibly far into development of the technology or even into the design and build of test vehicles. The availability and use of such a model contributes significantly by increasing the accuracy of human space flight research and development activities and acts as a cost saving measure by preventing inaccurate assumptions from driving design decisions.

  9. A New Heavy-Lift Capability for Space Exploration: NASA's Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John P.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing new launch systems in preparation for the retirement of the Space Shuttle by 2010, as directed in the United States (U.S.) Vision for Space Exploration. The Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the Ares V heavy-lift Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) systems will build upon proven, reliable hardware derived from the Apollo Saturn (1961 to 1975) and Space Shuttle (1972 to 2010) programs to deliver safe, reliable, affordable space transportation solutions. This approach leverages existing aerospace talent and a unique infrastructure, as well as the vast amount of legacy knowledge gained from almost a half-century of hard-won experience in the space enterprise. Beginning early next decade, the Ares I will launch the new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to the International Space Station (ISS) or to low-Earth orbit for trips to the Moon and, ultimately, Mars. Late next decade, the Ares V's Earth Departure Stage will carry larger payloads such as the lunar lander into orbit, and the Crew Exploration Vehicle will dock with it for missions to the Moon, where astronauts will explore new territories and conduct science and technology experiments. Both the Ares I and Ares V systems are being designed to support longer future trips to Mars. The Exploration Launch Projects Office, located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, is designing, developing, testing, and evaluating both launch vehicle systems in partnership with other NASA Centers, Government agencies, and industry contractors. This paper provides top-level information regarding the genesis and evolution of the baseline configuration for the Ares V heavy-lift system. It also touches on risk-based management strategies, such as building on powerful hardware and promoting common features between the Ares I and Ares V systems to reduce technical, schedule, and cost risks, as well as development and operations costs. Finally, it gives a summary of several

  10. Ground-based optical detection of low-dynamic vehicles in near-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Nan; Li, Chuang; Zhong, Peifeng

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based optical detection of low-dynamic vehicles in near-space is analyzed to detect, identify, and track high-altitude balloons and airships. The spectral irradiance of a representative vehicle on the entrance pupil plane of ground-based optoelectronic equipment was obtained by analyzing the influence of its geometry, surface material characteristics, infrared self-radiation, and the reflected background radiation. Spectral radiation characteristics of the target in both clear weather and complex meteorological weather were simulated. The simulation results show the potential feasibility of using visible-near-infrared (VNIR) equipment to detect objects in clear weather and long-wave infrared (LWIR) equipment to detect objects in complex meteorological weather. A ground-based VNIR and LWIR optoelectronic experimental setup is built to detect low-dynamic vehicles in different weather. A series of experiments in different weather are carried out. The experiment results validate the correctness of the simulation results.

  11. Missions to Phobos and Other Minor Bodies with Space Vehicle of New Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, M. Y.; Avduevsky, V. S.; Akim, E. L.; Efimov, G. B.; Eneev, T. M.; Kulikov, S. D.; Papkov, O. V.; Konstantinov, M. S. M. S.; Popov, G. A.

    1999-12-01

    Planetary exploration is a cornerstone of space science and technology development. To accomodate the new political and economical motivations and to recover with the Russian planetary program after ``Mars 96" loss, an approach for the development of space vehicle of new generation was elaboratively studied. The study was constrained by the principal requirement of ``Soyuz-Fregat" type rather than ``Proton" launcher utilization to accomplish a number of challenging goals with space missions. The vehicle design incorporates innovative technology being focused on small propulsion electrojet engines to be installed in order to significantly increase the potential mission's energetic capabilities. The project is optimized around Phobos sample return mission and missions targeted to study some main asteroid belt bodies and/or comets and for NEO approach, as well as for a potential lunar mission, the latter being addressed as a test flight at the beginnig phase of the vehicle exploitation. Preliminary evaluation made by the team allowed to find out basic criteria for these missions scenario and rationale and brought evidence on high efficiency of their implementation after the turn of the century. This study was supported by the Russian Aviation and Space Agency under ``Expedition" Grant.

  12. Missions to Phobos and other minor bodies with space vehicle of new generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avduevsky, V. S.; Akim, E. L.; Eflmov, G. B.; Eneev, T. M.; Marov, M. Ya.; Kulikov, S. D.; Papkov, O. V.; Konstantinov, M. S.; Popov, G. A.

    Planetary exploration is a cornerstone of space science and technology development. To accomodate the new political and economical motivations and to recover with the Russian planetary program after ``Mars 96'' loss, an approach for the development of space vehicle of new generation was elaboratively studied. The study was constrained by the principal requirement of ``Soyuz-Fregat'' type rather than ``Proton'' launcher utilization to accomplish a number of challenging goals with space missions. The vehicle design incorporates innovative technology focused on small propulsion electrojet engines to be installed in order to significantly increase the mission's energetic capabilities. The project is optimized for a Phobos sample return mission and missions targeted to study some main asteroid belt bodies and/or comets and for NEO approach, as well as for a potential lunar mission, addressed as a test flight at the beginning phase of the vehicle exploitation. Preliminary evaluation made by the team allowed to find out basic criteria for these missions scenario and rationale and brought evidence on high efficiency of their implementation after the turn of the century. This study is supported by the Russian Aviation and Space Agency under ``Expedition'' Grant.

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Artificial Gravity Impacts to Deep-Space Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joosten, B. Kent

    2007-01-01

    Even after more than thirty years of scientific investigation, serious concerns regarding human physiological effects of long-duration microgravity exposure remain. These include loss of bone mineral density, skeletal muscle atrophy, and orthostatic hypertension, among others. In particular, "Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions," states "loss of bone density, which apparently occurs at a rate of 1% per month in microgravity, is relatively manageable on the short-duration missions of the space shuttle, but it becomes problematic on the ISS [International Space Station]. ...If this loss is not mitigated, interplanetary missions will be impossible." While extensive investigations into potential countermeasures are planned on the ISS, the delay in attaining full crew complement and onboard facilities, and the potential for extending crews tours of duty threaten the timely (< 20 years!) accumulation of sufficient data for countermeasures formulation. Indeed, there is no guarantee that even with the data, a practical or sufficiently robust set of countermeasures will be forthcoming. Providing an artificial gravity (AG) environment by crew centrifugation aboard deep-space human exploration vehicles, long a staple technique of science fiction, has received surprisingly limited engineering assessment. This is most likely due to a number of factors: the lack of definitive design requirements, especially acceptable artificial gravity levels and rotation rates, the perception of high vehicle mass and performance penalties, the incompatibility of resulting vehicle configurations with space propulsion options (i.e., aerocapture), the perception of complications associated with de-spun components such as antennae and photovoltaic arrays, and the expectation of effective crew micro-gravity countermeasures. These perception and concerns may have been overstated, or may be acceptable alternatives to countermeasures of limited efficacy. This study was undertaken as

  14. International Space Station as an Observation Platform for Hypersonic Re-Entry of its Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will receive an armada of visiting supply vehicles during its life in orbit. Over 500 tons of material will be destroyed in targeted re-entries of these vehicles. Because all such re-entries lie in the same orbital plane of the station, and because the visiting vehicles typically deorbit within a few hours of departure, the ISS will usually be within sight of the re-entry process, at a range of only 300-600 kilometers. This vantage point offers an unprecedented opportunity for systematically measuring hypersonic destructive processes. This paper examines the integrated operational constraints of the ISS, its supply vehicles, and candidate sensors which can be employed in the scientific observation of the re-entry process. It is asserted the ISS program has the potential to reduce the worldwide risks from future deorbiting spacecraft, through systematic experimental characterization of the factors which affect the rupture, debris survival, and footprint size of its visiting vehicle fleet.

  15. Real-time vehicle detection and tracking based on perspective and non-perspective space cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arróspide, Jon; Salgado, Luis; Nieto, Marcos; Jaureguizar, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    In recent years advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) have received increasing interest to confront car accidents. In particular, video processing based vehicle detection methods are emerging as an efficient way to address accident prevention. Many video-based approaches are proposed in the literature for vehicle detection, involving sophisticated and costly computer vision techniques. Most of these methods require ad hoc hardware implementations to attain real-time operation. Alternatively, other approaches perform a domain change --via transforms like FFT, inverse perspective mapping (IPM) or Hough transform-- that simplifies otherwise complex feature detection. In this work, a cooperative strategy between two domains, the original perspective space and the transformed non-perspective space computed trough IPM, is proposed in order to alleviate the processing load in each domain by maximizing the information exchange between the two domains. A system is designed upon this framework that computes the location and dimension of the vehicles in a video sequence. Additionally, the system is made scalable to the complexity imposed by the scenario. As a result, real-time vehicle detection and tracking is accomplished in a general purpose platform. The system has been tested for sequences comprising a wide variety of scenarios, showing robust and accurate performance.

  16. Numerical study for flame deflector design of a space launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hwayoung; Lee, Jungil; Um, Hyungsik; Huh, Hwanil

    2017-04-01

    A flame deflector is a structure that prevents damage to a launch vehicle and a launch pad due to exhaust plumes of a lifting-off launch vehicle. The shape of a flame deflector should be designed to restrain the discharged gas from backdraft inside the deflector and to reflect the impact to the surrounding environment and the engine characteristics of the vehicle. This study presents the five preliminary flame deflector configurations which are designed for the first-stage rocket engine of the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II and surroundings of the Naro space center. The gas discharge patterns of the designed flame deflectors are investigated using the 3D flow field analysis by assuming that the air, in place of the exhaust gas, forms the plume. In addition, a multi-species unreacted flow model is investigated through 2D analysis of the first-stage engine of the KSLV-II. The results indicate that the closest Mach number and temperature distributions to the reacted flow model can be achieved from the 4-species unreacted flow model which employs H2O, CO2, and CO and specific heat-corrected plume.

  17. Contemporary conception of anti-G protection of cosmonauts in flights aboard "Soyuz" space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kotovskaya, A R; Vil-Viliams, I F; Lukianiuk, V Yu

    2004-07-01

    To ensure safety of cosmonauts impacted by +Gx loads during insertion into orbit of a Soyuz-type space vehicle, it is critical to conduct appropriate medical selection of candidates to space flights, to give them proper complete physical and specialized centrifuge training, and to make it sure that at the moment of actual injection the cosmonaut's posture is optimal relative to the g-vector and that the body is tight fitting the custom-molded couch. No AGS is needed. For the purposes of protection of cosmonauts descending in the Soyuz vehicles, vital are countermeasures applied in the course of flight, water-salt supplements on the descent day, and the optimal posture, an anti-g suit, and a custom-molded couch with an additional body-restraint system and dampers used on the phase of reentry.

  18. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wimsatt, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental sterilization facility was developed to simulate conditions that will be encountered during terminal sterilization of space vehicles. The system consists of a temperature controlled oven with a nitrogen gas stream containing a known concentration of water. Moisture analyzers are utilized to monitor the gas flowing over spore samples contained in the oven. In its original configuration, no provision was made for the control of water vapor during the sterilization cycle. Because moisture profoundly influences the thermal inactivation of bacterial spores, an upper limit for the moisture content in the gas used to sterilize the space vehicle was established (25% RH at 0 C STP). Accordingly, a controller was developed and installed to provide these conditions in the experimental sterilization facility.

  19. Advanced Key Technologies for Hot Control Surfaces in Space Re- Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogigli, Michael; Pradier, Alain; Tumino, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    (1)MAN Technologie AG, D- 86153 Augsburg, Germany (2,3) ESA, 2200 Noordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Current space re-entry vehicles (e.g. X-38 vehicle 201, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)) require advanced control surfaces (so called body flaps). Such control surfaces allow the design of smaller and lighter vehicles as well as faster re-entries (compared to the US Shuttle). They are designed as light-weight structures that need no metallic parts, need no mass or volume consuming heat sinks to protect critical components (e.g. bearings) and that can be operated at temperatures of more than 1600 "C in air transferring high mechanical loads (dynamic 40 kN, static 70 kN) at the same time. Because there is a need for CRV and also for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) in future, the European Space Agency (ESA) felt compelled to establish a "Future European Space Transportation and Investigation Program,, (FESTIP) and a "General Support for Technology Program,, (GSTP). One of the main goals of these programs was to develop and qualify key-technologies that are able to master the above mentioned challenging requirements for advanced hot control surfaces and that can be applied for different vehicles. In 1996 MAN Technologie has started the development of hot control surfaces for small lifting bodies in the national program "Heiü Strukturen,,. One of the main results of this program was that especially the following CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) key technologies need to be brought up to space flight standard: Complex CMC Structures, CMC Bearings, Metal-to-CMC Joining Technologies, CMC Fasteners, Oxidation Protection Systems and Static and Dynamic Seals. MAN Technologie was contracted by ESA to continue the development and qualification of these key technologies in the frame of the FESTIP and the GSTP program. Development and qualification have successfully been carried out. The key technologies have been applied for the X-38 vehicle

  20. Development of numerical methods for overset grids with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1995-01-01

    Algorithms and computer code developments were performed for the overset grid approach to solving computational fluid dynamics problems. The techniques developed are applicable to compressible Navier-Stokes flow for any general complex configurations. The computer codes developed were tested on different complex configurations with the Space Shuttle launch vehicle configuration as the primary test bed. General, efficient and user-friendly codes were produced for grid generation, flow solution and force and moment computation.

  1. Spatial Multiphysics Models of the Radiation Gas Dynamics of Super Orbital Re-Entry Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S. T.

    2017-05-01

    The multiphysics models of non equilibrium physical and chemical processes that should be considered together with radiative gas dynamic models for a description of the aero physics of super-orbital space vehicles are described. As an example of application of the multiphysics approach a three-dimensional numerical simulation analysis of radiative gas dynamics of Apollo-17 command module is analyzed. The results of calculations are compared with other numerical predictions, analytical correlations, and available experimental data.

  2. An Interactive Design Space Supporting Development of Vehicle Architecture Concept Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    ponents that are not designed to carry structural loads in the assembly, such as seats and other trim items. However, these inertial items have an...Denver, Colorado, USA IMECE2011-64510 AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN SPACE SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ARCHITECTURE CONCEPT MODELS Gary Osborne...early in the development cycle. Optimization taking place later in the cycle usually occurs at the detail design level, and tends to result in

  3. An Interactive Design Space Supporting Development of Vehicle Architecture Concept Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Denver, Colorado, USA IMECE2011-64510 AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN SPACE SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ARCHITECTURE CONCEPT MODELS Gary Osborne...early in the development cycle. Optimization taking place later in the cycle usually occurs at the detail design level, and tends to result in...architecture changes may be imposed, but such modifications are equivalent to a huge optimization cycle covering almost the entire design process, and

  4. Macroinformational analysis of conditions for controllability of space-vehicle orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    The general axiomatics of information measures for the macro analysis of relations of an information-cybernetic system in the control is introduced. The general structure of a semantically marked graph of open and closed relations of an information-cybernetic system between the participants in the environment, as well as thenecessary axiomatic and technological information-cybernetic system conditions of controllability and observability of objects, for the case of a space vehicle in orbit, are justified.

  5. Nonlinear resonances in the case of asymmetric space vehicles' free-fall in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanov, V. S.

    1992-10-01

    The uncontrolled motion around the mass center of a space vehicle with small dynamic and aerodynamic asymmetry during descent in the atmosphere is considered in a nonlinear formulation. The spatial motion is divided into quick and slow motions. Two fast variables are identified: the phase angle of attack and the roll angle relative to the wind. A general scheme for reducing the equations of motion to the standard two-frequency system is proposed. New nonlinear resonances are identified.

  6. Development of control systems for space shuttle vehicles. Volume 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, C. R.; Chase, T. W.; Kiziloz, B. M.; Ward, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    A launch phase random normal wind model is presented for delta wing, two-stage, space shuttle control system studies. Equations, data, and simulations for conventional launch studies are given as well as pitch and lateral equations and data for covariance analyses of the launch phase of MSFC vehicle B. Lateral equations and data for North American 130G and 134D are also included along with a high-altitude abort simulation.

  7. Applying a Crew Accommodations Resource Model to Future Space Vehicle Research: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Jennifer Linda

    2003-01-01

    Modeling for space vehicle design needs to consider: 1) The Human Factor; and 2) The Mission Factor. The Test Case of a crew resource model in this viewgraph presentation includes: 1) The Problem; 2) Crew Accomodations Resource Model; and 3) Conculsions on the model's utility for working the problem. The presentation uses the Crew Accomodations Resource Model to determine the mass and volume of supplies and equipment for a hypothetical manned Mars mission.

  8. Multi-functional annular fairing for coupling launch abort motor to space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Buning, Pieter G. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor); Engelund, Walter C. (Inventor); Schuster, David M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An annular fairing having aerodynamic, thermal, structural and acoustic attributes couples a launch abort motor to a space vehicle having a payload of concern mounted on top of a rocket propulsion system. A first end of the annular fairing is fixedly attached to the launch abort motor while a second end of the annular fairing is attached in a releasable fashion to an aft region of the payload. The annular fairing increases in diameter between its first and second ends.

  9. Doppler and range determination for deep space vehicles using active optical transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes two types of laser system employing active transponders that could accurately determine Doppler and range to deep space vehicles from earth-orbiting satellites. The first is a noncoherent optical system in which the Doppler effect on an intensity-modulating subcarrier is measured. The second is a coherent optical system in which the Doppler effect of the optical carrier itself is measured. Doppler and range measurement errors are mathematically modeled and, for three example systems, numerically evaluated.

  10. A transient response analysis of the space shuttle vehicle during liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunty, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed transient response method is formulated for the liftoff analysis of the space shuttle vehicles. It uses a power series approximation with unknown coefficients for the interface forces between the space shuttle and mobile launch platform. This allows the equation of motion of the two structures to be solved separately with the unknown coefficients at the end of each step. These coefficients are obtained by enforcing the interface compatibility conditions between the two structures. Once the unknown coefficients are determined, the total response is computed for that time step. The method is validated by a numerical example of a cantilevered beam and by the liftoff analysis of the space shuttle vehicles. The proposed method is compared to an iterative transient response analysis method used by Martin Marietta for their space shuttle liftoff analysis. It is shown that the proposed method uses less computer time than the iterative method and does not require as small a time step for integration. The space shuttle vehicle model is reduced using two different types of component mode synthesis (CMS) methods, the Lanczos method and the Craig and Bampton CMS method. By varying the cutoff frequency in the Craig and Bampton method it was shown that the space shuttle interface loads can be computed with reasonable accuracy. Both the Lanczos CMS method and Craig and Bampton CMS method give similar results. A substantial amount of computer time is saved using the Lanczos CMS method over that of the Craig and Bampton method. However, when trying to compute a large number of Lanczos vectors, input/output computer time increased and increased the overall computer time. The application of several liftoff release mechanisms that can be adapted to the proposed method are discussed.

  11. Analysis of Rawinsonde Spatial Separation for Space Launch Vehicle Applications at the Eastern Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Space launch vehicles develop day-of-launch steering commands based upon the upper-level atmospheric environments in order to alleviate wind induced structural loading and optimize ascent trajectory. Historically, upper-level wind measurements to support launch operations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Kennedy Space Center co-located on the United States Air Force's Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station use high-resolution rawinsondes. One inherent limitation with rawinsondes consists of taking approximately one hour to generate a vertically complete wind profile. Additionally, rawinsonde drift during ascent by the ambient wind environment can result in the balloon being hundreds of kilometers down range, which results in questioning whether the measured winds represent the wind environment the vehicle will experience during ascent. This paper will describe the use of balloon profile databases to statistically assess the drift distance away from the ER launch complexes during rawinsonde ascent as a function of season and discuss an alternative method to measure upper level wind environments in closer proximity to the vehicle trajectory launching from the ER.

  12. Analysis of Rawinsonde Spatial Separation for Space Launch Vehicle Applications at the Eastern Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Space launch vehicles use day-of-launch steering commands based upon the upper-level (UL) atmospheric environments in order to alleviate wind induced structural loading and optimize ascent trajectory. Historically, UL wind measurements to support launch operations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station use high-resolution (HR) rawinsondes. One inherent limitation with rawinsondes is the approximately one-hour sampling time necessary to measure tropospheric winds. Additionally, rawinsonde drift during ascent due to the ambient wind environment can result in the balloon being hundreds of kilometers down range, which results in questioning whether the measured winds represent the wind environment the vehicle will experience during ascent. This paper will describe the use of balloon profile databases to statistically assess the drift distance away from the ER launch complexes during HR rawinsonde ascent as a function of season. Will also discuss an alternative method to measure UL wind environments in closer proximity to the vehicle trajectory when launching from the ER.

  13. Inviscid and Viscous CFD Analysis of Booster Separation for the Space Launch System Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalle, Derek J.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Chan, William M.; Lee, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents details of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the Space Launch System during solid-rocket booster separation using the Cart3D inviscid and Overflow viscous CFD codes. The discussion addresses the use of multiple data sources of computational aerodynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and trajectory simulations for this critical phase of flight. Comparisons are shown between Cart3D simulations and a wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and further comparisons are shown between Cart3D and viscous Overflow solutions for the flight vehicle. The Space Launch System (SLS) is a new exploration-class launch vehicle currently in development that includes two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) modified from Space Shuttle hardware. These SRBs must separate from the SLS core during a phase of flight where aerodynamic loads are nontrivial. The main challenges for creating a separation aerodynamic database are the large number of independent variables (including orientation of the core, relative position and orientation of the boosters, and rocket thrust levels) and the complex flow caused by exhaust plumes of the booster separation motors (BSMs), which are small rockets designed to push the boosters away from the core by firing partially in the direction opposite to the motion of the vehicle.

  14. Considerations for Medical Transport from the Space Station via an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip; Hamilton, Glenn C.; Stizza, Denis; Garrison, Richard; Gerstner, David

    2001-01-01

    In developing a permanently crewed space station, the importance of medical care has been continually reaffirmed; and the health maintenance facility (HMF) is an integral component. It has diagnostic, therapeutic, monitoring, and information management capability. It is designed to allow supportive care for: (1) non-life-threatening illnesses; e.g., headache, lacerations; (2) moderate to severe, possibly life-threatening illnesses; e.g., appendicitis, kidney stones; and (3) severe, incapacitating, life-threatening illnesses; e.g., major trauma, toxic exposure. Since the HMF will not have a general surgical capability, the need for emergency escape and recovery methods has been studied. Medical risk assessments have determined that it is impossible to accurately predict the incidence of crewmember illness/injury. A best estimate is 1:3 per work-year, with 1% of these needing an ACRV. For an eight-person crew, this means that one assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) will be used every 4 to 12 years. The ACRV would serve at least three basic objectives as: (1) a crew return if the space shuttle is unavailable; (2) an escape vehicle from a major time-critical space station emergency; and (3) a full or partial crew return vehicle for a medical emergency. The focus of this paper is the third objective for the ACRV.

  15. Evolutionary computing for the design search and optimization of space vehicle power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, Mark; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hanks, David; Hua, Hook

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary computing has proven to be a straightforward and robust approach for optimizing a wide range of difficult analysis and design problems. This paper discusses the application of these techniques to an existing space vehicle power subsystem resource and performance analysis simulation in a parallel processing environment. Out preliminary results demonstrate that this approach has the potential to improve the space system trade study process by allowing engineers to statistically weight subsystem goals of mass, cost and performance then automatically size power elements based on anticipated performance of the subsystem rather than on worst-case estimates.

  16. The evolution of Orbiter depot support, with applications to future space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    The reasons for depot consolidation and the processes established to implement the Orbiter depot are presented. The Space Shuttle Orbiter depot support is presently being consolidated due to equipment suppliers leaving the program, escalating depot support costs, and increasing repair turnaround times. Details of the depot support program for orbiter hardware and selected pieces of support equipment are discussed. The benefits gained from this consolidation and the lessons learned are then applied to future reuseable space vehicles to provide program managers a forward look at the need for efficient depot support.

  17. On the way to creating a system of distant power supply for space vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Prisniakov, V.F.; Lyagushin, S.F.; Statsenko, I.N.; Dranovsky, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    Solar energy is the most suitable basis for power supply for the majority of projects in the near-Earth space. Passing on to the large-scale space-based systems of power supply requires putting into life demonstration experiments in which power transmission by electromagnetic emission is supposed. In the paper the expedience of developing an autonomous power module which provides the possibility of space programs with great power consumption and wireless transmission system running-up is proved. Ukraine can design a solar power satellite of 10-20kW power on the basis of the research satellite AUOS-SM. Two variants of design solutions for such satellite with solar arrays of great area are presented. Power transmission to the space vehicle-consumer can be conducted by cable as well as in a wireless way. The possibilities of placing microwave and laser energy transmission systems on board the satellite are analysed. It is shown that a power supply system for space vehicles with transmission distance of thousands km can be designed basing on modern lasers. Some experiments making use of great electric power generated by the plant of the satellite under consideration are proposed. The running-up of electric thrusters which are necessary for orientation and distancing is of great interest. Wireless power transmission may be carried on to a small satellite equipped with electric thrusters. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. [Cell biology researches aboard the robotic space vehicles: preparation and performance].

    PubMed

    Tairbekov, M G

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the unique aspects of preparation and performance of cell biology experiments flown on robotic space vehicles Bion and Foton, and gives an overview of key findings in researches made under the author's leadership over the past decades. Described are the criteria of selecting test objects, and the conditions required for preparation and implementation of space and control (synchronous) experiments. The present-day status and issues of researches into cell responsivity to space microgravity and other factors are discussed. Also, potentialities of equipment designed to conduct experiments with cell cultures in vitro and populations of single-celled organisms are presented, as well as some ideas for new devices and systems. Unveiled are some circumstances inherent to the development and performance of space experiments, setting up laboratory facilities at the launch and landing site, and methods of safe transportation and storage of biosamples. In conclusion, the author puts forward his view on biospecies, equipment and areas of research aboard future space vehicles.

  19. A Perspective on the Use of Storable Propellants for Future Space Vehicle Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, William C.; Brasher, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    Propulsion system configurations for future NASA and DOD space initiatives are driven by the continually emerging new mission requirements. These initiatives cover an extremely wide range of mission scenarios, from unmanned planetary programs, to manned lunar and planetary programs, to earth-oriented (Mission to Planet Earth) programs, and they are in addition to existing and future requirements for near-earth missions such as to geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). Increasing space transportation costs, and anticipated high costs associated with space-basing of future vehicles, necessitate consideration of cost-effective and easily maintainable configurations which maximize the use of existing technologies and assets, and use budgetary resources effectively. System design considerations associated with the use of storable propellants to fill these needs are presented. Comparisons in areas such as complexity, performance, flexibility, maintainability, and technology status are made for earth and space storable propellants, including nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine and LOX/monomethylhydrazine.

  20. Predicting Air Quality at First Ingress into Vehicles Visiting the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Romoser, Amelia A; Scully, Robert R; Limero, Thomas F; De Vera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti F; Hand, Jennifer J; James, John T; Ryder, Valerie E

    2017-02-01

    NASA regularly performs ground-based offgas tests (OGTs), which allow prediction of accumulated volatile pollutant concentrations at first entry on orbit, on whole modules and vehicles scheduled to connect to the International Space Station (ISS). These data guide crew safety operations and allow for estimation of ISS air revitalization systems impact from additional pollutant load. Since volatiles released from vehicle, module, and payload materials can affect crew health and performance, prediction of first ingress air quality is important. To assess whether toxicological risk is typically over or underpredicted, OGT and first ingress samples from 10 vehicles and modules were compared. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The rate of pollutant accumulation was extrapolated over time. Ratios of analytical values and Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations were used to predict total toxicity values (T-values) at first entry. Results were also compared by compound. Frequently overpredicted was 2-butanone (9/10), whereas propanal (6/10) and ethanol (8/10) were typically underpredicted, but T-values were not substantially affected. Ingress sample collection delay (estimated by octafluoropropane introduced from ISS atmosphere) and T-value prediction accuracy correlated well (R2 = 0.9008), highlighting the importance of immediate air sample collection and accounting for ISS air dilution. Importantly, T-value predictions were conservative 70% of the time. Results also suggest that T-values can be normalized to octafluoropropane levels to adjust for ISS air dilution at first ingress. Finally, OGT and ingress sampling has allowed small leaks in vehicle fluid systems to be recognized and addressed.Romoser AA, Scully RR, Limero TF, De Vera V, Cheng PF, Hand JJ, James JT, Ryder VE. Predicting air quality at first ingress into vehicles visiting the International Space Station. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(2):104-113.

  1. Asymmetrical booster guidance and control system design study. Volume 3: Space shuttle vehicle SRB actuator failure study. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. E.; Lemon, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of single actuator failures on the space shuttle solid rocket booster required the analysis of both square pattern and diamond pattern actuator configurations. It was determined that for failures occuring near or prior to the region of maximum dynamic pressure, control gain adjustments can be used to achieve virtually nominal mid-boost vehicle behavior. A distinct worst case failure condition was established near staging that could significantly delay staging. It is recommended that the square pattern be retained as a viable alternative to the baseline diamond pattern because the staging transient is better controlled resulting in earlier staging.

  2. RS-25 for the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle: The Evolution of SSME for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Michael H.; Genge, Gary G.; Greene, William D.; Jacobs, William; McArthur, J. Craig; Mims, Michael J.; Tepool, J. Eric; Wofford, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    As a first step towards the fulfillment of the National Vision for Space Exploration, NASA has begun development of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). The CLV will act, in conjunction with the Crew Exploration Vehicle, as the next generation human launch system to first support missions to the International Space Station (ISS), then later to support the lunar return missions, and then after that to exploration missions to Mars and beyond. The CLV is a two-stage launch vehicle with the first stage based upon the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster. The newly designed, expendable second stage is powered by a single RS-25 liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket engine. The RS-25 is essentially the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) evolved for a new mission, new environments, and new conditions. The CLV Upper-Stage Engine (USE) office has been established to develop the RS-25 in support of the CLV Project. This paper presents an outline and discussion of the risks associated with this endeavor of transforming the SSME into the upper-stage, altitude-start RS-25 and the plans being undertaken to understand and mitigate these risks. In addition, to meet the long-term requirements of the CLV launch manifest, it will be necessary to redevelop the RS-25, with its long history as the reusable SSME for the Space Shuttle Program, as an expendable engine. While the first flights of CLV will be using heritage SSME hardware, beyond that a new version of RS-25 as an expendable engine is being pursued by the CLV USE element. The goals of this work include the need to make the hardware more producible while maintaining the inherent and inherited reliability of the basic design. This paper will also discuss the risks and present the plans for developing both this next generation version of the RS-25 and for developing the manufacturing capacity necessary to support the CLV Project.

  3. RS-25 for the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle: The Evolution of SSME for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Michael H.; Genge, Gary G.; Greene, William D.; Jacobs, William; McArthur, J. Craig; Mims, Michael J.; Tepool, J. Eric; Wofford, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    As a first step towards the fulfillment of the National Vision for Space Exploration, NASA has begun development of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). The CLV will act, in conjunction with the Crew Exploration Vehicle, as the next generation human launch system to first support missions to the International Space Station (ISS), then later to support the lunar return missions, and then after that to exploration missions to Mars and beyond. The CLV is a two-stage launch vehicle with the first stage based upon the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster. The newly designed, expendable second stage is powered by a single RS-25 liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket engine. The RS-25 is essentially the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) evolved for a new mission, new environments, and new conditions. The CLV Upper-Stage Engine (USE) office has been established to develop the RS-25 in support of the CLV Project. This paper presents an outline and discussion of the risks associated with this endeavor of transforming the SSME into the upper-stage, altitude-start RS-25 and the plans being undertaken to understand and mitigate these risks. In addition, to meet the long-term requirements of the CLV launch manifest, it will be necessary to redevelop the RS-25, with its long history as the reusable SSME for the Space Shuttle Program, as an expendable engine. While the first flights of CLV will be using heritage SSME hardware, beyond that a new version of RS-25 as an expendable engine is being pursued by the CLV USE element. The goals of this work include the need to make the hardware more producible while maintaining the inherent and inherited reliability of the basic design. This paper will also discuss the risks and present the plans for developing both this next generation version of the RS-25 and for developing the manufacturing capacity necessary to support the CLV Project.

  4. Thermographic Testing Using on the X-33 Space Launch Vehicle Program by BFGoodrich Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 program is a team effort sponsored by NASA, under Cooperative Agreement NCC8-115, and led by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Team member BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group (formerly Rohr) is responsible for design, manufacture, and integration of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the X-33 launch vehicle. The X-33 is a half-scale, experimental prototype of a vehicle called RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) or VentureStar(Trademark), an SSTO (single stage to orbit) vehicle, which is a proposed successor to the aging Space Shuttle. Thermographic testing has been employed by BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group for a wide variety of uses in the testing of components of the X-33. Thermographic NDT (TNDT) has been used for inspecting large graphite-epoxy/aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels used on the Leeward Aeroshell structure of the X-33. And TNDT is being evaluated for use in inspecting carbon-carbon composite parts such as the nosecap and wing leading edge components. Pulsed Infrared Testing (PIRT), a special form of TNDT, is used for the routine inspection of sandwich panels made of brazed inconel honeycomb and facesheets. In the developmental and qualification testing of sub-elements of the X-33, thermography has been used to monitor 1) Arc Jet tests at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountainview, CA and NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, 2) High Temperature (wind) Tunnel Tests (HTT) at NASA Langley Research Center in Langley, VA, and 3) Hot Gas Tests at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL.

  5. Cascade Storage and Delivery System for a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagoda, Evan; Swickrath, Michael; Stambaugh, Imelda

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The MMSEV is a pressurized vehicle used to extend the human exploration envelope for Lunar, Near Earth Object (NEO), and Deep Space missions. The Johnson Space Center is developing the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the MMSEV. The MMSEV s intended use is to support longer sortie lengths with multiple Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) on a higher magnitude than any previous vehicle. This paper presents an analysis of a high pressure oxygen cascade storage and delivery system that will accommodate the crew during long duration Intra Vehicular Activity (IVA) and capable of multiple high pressure oxygen fills to the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) worn by the crew during EVAs. A cascade is a high pressure gas cylinder system used for the refilling of smaller compressed gas cylinders. Each of the large cylinders are filled by a compressor, but the cascade system allows small cylinders to be filled without the need of a compressor. In addition, the cascade system is useful as a "reservoir" to accommodate low pressure needs. A regression model was developed to provide the mechanism to size the cascade systems subject to constraints such as number of crew, extravehicular activity duration and frequency, and ullage gas requirements under contingency scenarios. The sizing routine employed a numerical integration scheme to determine gas compressibility changes during depressurization and compressibility effects were captured using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state. A multi-dimensional nonlinear optimization routine was used to find the minimum cascade tank system mass that meets the mission requirements. The sizing algorithms developed in this analysis provide a powerful framework to assess cascade filling, compressor, and hybrid systems to design long duration vehicle ECLSS architecture. 1

  6. Thermographic testing used on the X-33 space launch vehicle program by BFGoodrich Aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Douglas D.

    1999-03-01

    The X-33 program is a team effort sponsored by NASA under Cooperative Agreement NCC8-115, and led by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Team member BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group (formerly Rohr) is responsible for design, manufacture, and integration of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the X-33 launch vehicle. The X-33 is a half-scale, experimental prototype of a vehicle called RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) or VentureStarTM, an SSTO (single stage to orbit) vehicle, which is a proposed successor to the aging Space Shuttle. Thermographic testing has been employed by BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group for a wide variety of uses in the testing of components of the X-33. Thermographic NDT (TNDT) has been used for inspecting large graphite- epoxy/aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels used on the Leeward Aeroshell structure of the X-33. And TNDT is being evaluated for use in inspecting carbon-carbon composite parts such as the nosecap and wing leading edge components. Pulsed Infrared Testing (PIRT), a special form of TNDT, is used for the routine inspection of sandwich panels made of brazed inconel honeycomb and facesheets. In the developmental and qualification testing of sub-elements of the X-33, thermography has been used to monitor (1) Arc Jet tests at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain view, CA and NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, (2) High Temperature (wind) Tunnel Tests (HTT) at Nasa Langley Research Center in Langley, VA, and (3) Hot Gas Tests at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL.

  7. Thermographic Testing Using on the X-33 Space Launch Vehicle Program by BFGoodrich Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 program is a team effort sponsored by NASA, under Cooperative Agreement NCC8-115, and led by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Team member BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group (formerly Rohr) is responsible for design, manufacture, and integration of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the X-33 launch vehicle. The X-33 is a half-scale, experimental prototype of a vehicle called RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) or VentureStar(Trademark), an SSTO (single stage to orbit) vehicle, which is a proposed successor to the aging Space Shuttle. Thermographic testing has been employed by BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group for a wide variety of uses in the testing of components of the X-33. Thermographic NDT (TNDT) has been used for inspecting large graphite-epoxy/aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels used on the Leeward Aeroshell structure of the X-33. And TNDT is being evaluated for use in inspecting carbon-carbon composite parts such as the nosecap and wing leading edge components. Pulsed Infrared Testing (PIRT), a special form of TNDT, is used for the routine inspection of sandwich panels made of brazed inconel honeycomb and facesheets. In the developmental and qualification testing of sub-elements of the X-33, thermography has been used to monitor 1) Arc Jet tests at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountainview, CA and NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, 2) High Temperature (wind) Tunnel Tests (HTT) at NASA Langley Research Center in Langley, VA, and 3) Hot Gas Tests at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL.

  8. Vehicle Shield Optimization and Risk Assessment for Future Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nounu, Hatem N.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    As the focus of future human space missions shifts to destinations beyond low Earth orbit such as Near Earth Objects (NEO), the moon, or Mars, risks associated with extended stay in hostile radiation environment need to be well understood and assessed. Since future spacecrafts designs and shapes are evolving continuous assessments of shielding and radiation risks are needed. In this study, we use a predictive software capability that calculates risks to humans inside a spacecraft prototype that builds on previous designs. The software uses CAD software Pro/Engineer and Fishbowl tool kit to quantify radiation shielding provided by the spacecraft geometry by calculating the areal density seen at a certain point, dose point, inside the spacecraft. Shielding results are used by NASA-developed software, BRYNTRN, to quantify organ doses received in a human body located in the vehicle in case of solar particle event (SPE) during such prolonged space missions. Organ doses are used to quantify risks on astronauts health and life using NASA Space Cancer Model. The software can also locate shielding weak points-hotspots-on the spacecraft s outer surface. This capability is used to reinforce weak areas in the design. Results of shielding optimization and risk calculation on an exploration vehicle design for missions of 6 months and 30 months are provided in this study. Vehicle capsule is made of aluminum shell that includes main cabin and airlock. The capsule contains 5 sets of racks that surround working and living areas. Water shelter is provided in the main cabin of the vehicle to enhance shielding in case of SPE.

  9. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A reserach project to develop space stable thermal control coatings for large surfaces is discussed. Four major tasks are considered: (1) pigment development, (2) binder development, (3) environmental effects evaluations, and (4) general coatings investigations.

  10. Automatic theodolite for pre-launch azimuth alignment of the saturn space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Mrus, G J; Zukowsky, W S; Kokot, W; Yoder, P R; Wood, J T

    1971-03-01

    The inertial guidance system in the Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 space vehicles is aligned in azimuth prior to lift-off by a Perkin-Elmer high precision, automatic alignment theodolite. This special theodolite, designated the AALT-SV-M2, acquires and locks onto the autocollimated images from each of two porro prisms mounted within the instrument unit on top of the S4-B booster stage of the vehicle. A separate retroreflecting prism on the skin of the instrument unit near the porro prisms is also tracked to eliminate the effects of vehicle sway. The theodolite itself is located in an underground hut between the crawler-ways about 232 m from the base of the vehicle. Six of these theodolite systems have been built by Perkin-Elmer under contract to NASA. These units have been used successfully in all the Saturn launches to date; they have consistently achieved better than the required alignment accuracy of +/-2 sec of arc for all missions. In this paper, we describe the theodolite and its function as an integrated electrooptical system. The means employed to separate the various return images into the proper channels and to generate the required error signals are discussed.

  11. Integrated Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System (INS/GPS) for automatic space return vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, Kevin; Browning, Clint; Gelderloos, Hendrik

    A digital global navigation and communications system that automatically returns a space vehicle from orbit to a precision touchdown/landing is described. It is demonstrated that a capsule or lifting body manned return vehicle (MRV) with integrated INS/GPS (inertial navigation system/Global Positioning System) provides a highly autonomous and automatic deorbit, entry, and precision landing capability. Simulation results are used to demonstrate automatic MRV landing feasibility using absolute GPS for a vertically landing capsule vehicle and the feasibility of using integrated differential GPS/INS to provide the accuracy for a lifting body to perform a safe runway landing without needing TACAN (tactical air navigation) or microwave landing system (MLS) navigational aids. An advanced system using differential GPS/INS will be tested with the NASA Langley transport research vehicle during approach and landing flight phases in October 1990. It is expected that these proof-of-concept flight tests will provide an extensive database on GPS/INS system accuracies and will demonstrate a lower cost alternative to TACAN, DME (distance measuring equipment), and MLS navigation aids.

  12. Quadratic programming-based approach for autonomous vehicle path planning in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Han, Jianda; Wu, Huaiyu

    2012-07-01

    Path planning for space vehicles is still a challenging problem although considerable progress has been made over the past decades. The major difficulties are that most of existing methods only adapt to static environment instead of dynamic one, and also can not solve the inherent constraints arising from the robot body and the exterior environment. To address these difficulties, this research aims to provide a feasible trajectory based on quadratic programming(QP) for path planning in three-dimensional space where an autonomous vehicle is requested to pursue a target while avoiding static or dynamic obstacles. First, the objective function is derived from the pursuit task which is defined in terms of the relative distance to the target, as well as the angle between the velocity and the position in the relative velocity coordinates(RVCs). The optimization is in quadratic polynomial form according to QP formulation. Then, the avoidance task is modeled with linear constraints in RVCs. Some other constraints, such as kinematics, dynamics, and sensor range, are included. Last, simulations with typical multiple obstacles are carried out, including in static and dynamic environments and one of human-in-the-loop. The results indicate that the optimal trajectories of the autonomous robot in three-dimensional space satisfy the required performances. Therefore, the QP model proposed in this paper not only adapts to dynamic environment with uncertainty, but also can satisfy all kinds of constraints, and it provides an efficient approach to solve the problems of path planning in three-dimensional space.

  13. Soyuz-TM-based interim Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Babkov, Oleg I.; Timchenko, Vladimir A.; Craig, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using the available Soyuz-TM Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) spacecraft for the assurance of the safety of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew after the departure of the Space Shuttle from SSF was proposed by the NPO Energia and was accepted by NASA in 1992. The ACRV will provide the crew with the capability to evacuate a seriously injured/ill crewmember from the SSF to a ground-based care facility under medically tolerable conditions and with the capability for a safe evacuation from SSF in the events SSF becomes uninhabitable or the Space Shuttle flights are interrupted for a time that exceeds SSF ability for crew support and/or safe operations. This paper presents the main results of studies on Phase A (including studies on the service life of ACRV; spacecraft design and operations; prelaunch processing; mission support; safety, reliability, maintenance and quality and assurance; landing, and search/rescue operations; interfaces with the SSF and with Space Shuttle; crew accommodation; motion of orbital an service modules; and ACRV injection by the Expendable Launch Vehicles), along with the objectives of further work on the Phase B.

  14. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  15. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  16. Soyuz-TM-based interim Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Babkov, Oleg I.; Timchenko, Vladimir A.; Craig, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using the available Soyuz-TM Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) spacecraft for the assurance of the safety of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew after the departure of the Space Shuttle from SSF was proposed by the NPO Energia and was accepted by NASA in 1992. The ACRV will provide the crew with the capability to evacuate a seriously injured/ill crewmember from the SSF to a ground-based care facility under medically tolerable conditions and with the capability for a safe evacuation from SSF in the events SSF becomes uninhabitable or the Space Shuttle flights are interrupted for a time that exceeds SSF ability for crew support and/or safe operations. This paper presents the main results of studies on Phase A (including studies on the service life of ACRV; spacecraft design and operations; prelaunch processing; mission support; safety, reliability, maintenance and quality and assurance; landing, and search/rescue operations; interfaces with the SSF and with Space Shuttle; crew accommodation; motion of orbital an service modules; and ACRV injection by the Expendable Launch Vehicles), along with the objectives of further work on the Phase B.

  17. Environmental Controls and Life Support System (ECLSS) Design for a Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda; Baccus, Shelley; Buffington, Jessie; Hood, Andrew; Naids, Adam; Borrego, Melissa; Hanford, Anthony J.; Eckhardt, Brad; Allada, Rama Kumar; Yagoda, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV). The purpose of the MMSEV is to extend the human exploration envelope for Lunar, Near Earth Object (NEO), or Deep Space missions by using pressurized exploration vehicles. The MMSEV, formerly known as the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV), employs ground prototype hardware for various systems and tests it in manned and unmanned configurations. Eventually, the system hardware will evolve and become part of a flight vehicle capable of supporting different design reference missions. This paper will discuss the latest MMSEV ECLSS architectures developed for a variety of design reference missions, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, lessons learned from testing prototype hardware, and the plan to advance the ECLSS toward a flight design.

  18. Environmental Controls and Life Support System (ECLSS) Design for a Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda; Baccus, Shelley; Naids, Adam; Hanford, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV). The purpose of the MMSEV is to extend the human exploration envelope for Lunar, Near Earth Object (NEO), or Deep Space missions by using pressurized exploration vehicles. The MMSEV, formerly known as the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV), employs ground prototype hardware for various systems and tests it in manned and unmanned configurations. Eventually, the system hardware will evolve and become part of a flight vehicle capable of supporting different design reference missions. This paper will discuss the latest MMSEV ECLSS architectures developed for a variety of design reference missions, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, lessons learned from testing prototype hardware, and the plan to advance the ECLSS toward a flight design.

  19. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 1: Fracture control design methods. [for space shuttle configuration planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic approach for applying methods for fracture control in the structural components of space vehicles consists of four major steps. The first step is to define the primary load-carrying structural elements and the type of load, environment, and design stress levels acting upon them. The second step is to identify the potential fracture-critical parts by means of a selection logic flow diagram. The third step is to evaluate the safe-life and fail-safe capabilities of the specified part. The last step in the sequence is to apply the control procedures that will prevent damage to the fracture-critical parts. The fracture control methods discussed include fatigue design and analysis methods, methods for preventing crack-like defects, fracture mechanics analysis methods, and nondestructive evaluation methods. An example problem is presented for evaluation of the safe-crack-growth capability of the space shuttle crew compartment skin structure.

  20. Early Impacts of a Human-in-the-Loop Evaluation in a Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Vicky; Vos, Gordon; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2008-01-01

    The development of a new space vehicle, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), provides Human Factors engineers an excellent opportunity to have an impact early in the design process. This case study highlights a Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) evaluation conducted in a Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility and will describe the human-centered approach and how the findings are impacting design and operational concepts early in space vehicle design. The focus of this HITL evaluation centered on the activities that astronaut crewmembers would be expected to perform within the functional internal volume of the Crew Module (CM) of the space vehicle. The primary objective was to determine if there are aspects of a baseline vehicle configuration that would limit or prevent the performance of dynamically volume-driving activities (e.g. six crewmembers donning their suits in an evacuation scenario). A second objective was to step through concepts of operations for known systems and evaluate them in integrated scenarios. The functional volume for crewmember activities is closely tied to every aspect of system design (e.g. avionics, safety, stowage, seats, suits, and structural support placement). As this evaluation took place before the Preliminary Design Review of the space vehicle with some designs very early in the development, it was not meant to determine definitely that the crewmembers could complete every activity, but rather to provide inputs that could improve developing designs and concepts of operations definition refinement.

  1. Quantity Distance for the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building for Solid Propellant Fueled Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, Steven; Diebler, Corey; Frazier, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The NASA KSC VAB was built to process Apollo launchers in the 1960's, and later adapted to process Space Shuttles. The VAB has served as a place to assemble solid rocket motors (5RM) and mate them to the vehicle's external fuel tank and Orbiter before rollout to the launch pad. As Space Shuttle is phased out, and new launchers are developed, the VAB may again be adapted to process these new launchers. Current launch vehicle designs call for continued and perhaps increased use of SRM segments; hence, the safe separation distances are in the process of being re-calculated. Cognizant NASA personnel and the solid rocket contractor have revisited the above VAB QD considerations and suggest that it may be revised to allow a greater number of motor segments within the VAB. This revision assumes that an inadvertent ignition of one SRM stack in its High Bay need not cause immediate and complete involvement of boosters that are part of a vehicle in adjacent High Bay. To support this assumption, NASA and contractor personnel proposed a strawman test approach for obtaining subscale data that may be used to develop phenomenological insight and to develop confidence in an analysis model for later use on full-scale situations. A team of subject matter experts in safety and siting of propellants and explosives were assembled to review the subscale test approach and provide options to NASA. Upon deliberations regarding the various options, the team arrived at some preliminary recommendations for NASA.

  2. Space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (Project SLICK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The project SLICK (Space Laser Interorbital Cargo Kite) involves conceptual designs of reusable space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (LOTV) for ferrying 16,000 kg cargo primarily between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). The power of LOTV is beamed by a single 32-MW solar-pumped iodide laser orbiting the Earth at an altitude of one Earth radius. The laser engine selected for the LOTV is based on a continuous-wave, steady-state propulsion scheme and uses an array of seven discrete plasmas in a flow of hydrogen propellant. Both all-propulsive and aerobraked LOTV configurations were analyzed and developed. The all-propulsive vehicle uses a rigid 11.5-m aperture primary mirror and its engine produces a thrust of 2000 N at a specific impulse of 1500 sec. For the LEO-to-GEO trip, the payload ratio, m(sub payload/m(sub propellant)+m(sub dry vehicle) = 1.19 and the trip time is about 6 days. The aerobraked version uses a lightweight, retractable wrapped-rib primary mirror which is folded for aerobraking and a 20-m-diameter inflatable-ballute aeroshield which is jettisoned after aeromaneuver. Lifecycle cost analysis shows that the aerobraked configuration may have an economic advantage over the all-propulsive configuration as long as the cost of launching the propellant to LEO is higher than about $500/kg in current dollars.

  3. Study of the commonality of space vehicle applications to future national needs (unclassified portion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A midterm progress report was presented on the study of commonality of space vehicle applications to future national needs. Two of the four objectives in the entire study were discussed. The first one involved deriving functional requirements for space systems based on future needs and environments for the military and civilian communities. Possible space initiatives based on extrapolations of technology were compiled without regard as to need but only with respect to feasibility, given the advanced state of technology which could exist through the year 2,000. The second one involved matching the initiatives against the requirements, developing a methodology to match and select the initiatives with each of the separate plans based on the future environments, and deriving common features of the military and civilian support requirements for these programs.

  4. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  5. [The ergonomic aspects of space vehicle manual motion control during re-entry].

    PubMed

    Barer, A S

    2006-01-01

    In 1960s, the Russian space program spared no resources for extensive theoretical and empiric studies of manual control by vehicles during re-entry at the second and first space speeds by cosmonauts experiencing g-loads of up to 18 g. About 6,000 static and 400 centrifuge experiments were performed, and if g-loads caused loss of vision the cosmonaut remained operational getting audible indication. Ergonomic characteristics of the control organs and indicators were high enough to guarantee accuracy despite the g-loads comparable with values under static conditions. The store of knowledge acquired in those studies does not lose significance for the present-day piloted space programs.

  6. Heavy-lift vehicle-launched Space Station method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Donald C. (Inventor); Delafuente, Horatio (Inventor); Berka, Reginald B. (Inventor); Rickman, Steven L. (Inventor); Castro, Edgar O. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Pelischek, Timothy E. (Inventor); Schleisling, John A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a single heavylift launch to place a complete, operational space station on-orbit. A payload including the space station takes the place of a Shuttle Orbiter using the launch vehicle of the Shuttle Orbiter. The payload includes a forward shroud, a core module, a propulsion module, and a transition module between the core module and the propulsion module. The essential subsystems are pre-integrated and verified on Earth. The core module provides means for attaching international modules with minimum impact to the overall design. The space station includes six control moment gyros for selectably operating in either LVLH (local-vertical local-horizontal) or SI (solar inertial) flight modes.

  7. Impact gages for detecting meteoroid and other orbital debris impacts on space vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastandrea, J. R.; Scherb, M. V.

    1973-01-01

    Impacts on space vehicles have been simulated using the McDonnell Douglas Aerophysics Laboratory (MDAL) Light-Gas Guns to launch particles at hypervelocity speeds into scaled space structures. Using impact gages and a triangulation technique, these impacts have been detected and accurately located. This paper describes in detail the various types of impact gages (piezoelectric PZT-5A, quartz, electret, and off-the-shelf plastics) used. This description includes gage design and experimental results for gages installed on single-walled scaled payload carriers, multiple-walled satellites and space stations, and single-walled full-scale Delta tank structures. A brief description of the triangulation technique, the impact simulation, and the data acquisition system are also included.

  8. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  9. Heavy-lift vehicle-launched Space Station method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Donald C. (Inventor); Delafuente, Horacio M. (Inventor); Berka, Reginald B. (Inventor); Rickman, Steven L. (Inventor); Castro, Edgar O. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Pelischek, Timothy E. (Inventor); Schliesing, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a single heavy-lift launch to place a complete, operational space station on-orbit. A payload including the space station takes the place of a shuttle orbiter using the launch vehicle of the shuttle orbiter. The payload includes a forward shroud, a core module, a propulsion module, and a transition module between the core module and the propulsion module. The essential subsystems are preintegrated and verified on Earth. The core module provides means for attaching international modules with minimum impact to the overall design. The space station includes six control moment gyros for selectably operating in either LVLH (local-vertical local-horizontal) or SI (solar inertial) flight modes.

  10. Multi-Reflex Propulsion Systems for Space and Air Vehicles and Energy Transfer for Long Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to the revolutionary idea of light multi-reflection. This idea allows the design of new engines, space and air propulsion systems, storage (of a beam and solar energy), transmitters of energy (to millions of kilometers), creation of new weapons, etc. This method and the main innovations were offered by the author in 1983 in the former USSR. Now the author shows in a series of articles the immense possibilities of this idea in many fields of engineering - astronautics, aviation, energy, optics, direct converter of light (laser beam) energy to mechanical energy (light engine), to name a few. This article considers the multi-reflex propulsion systems for space and air vehicles and energy transmitter for long distances in space.

  11. Preliminary design of a cargo return vehicle for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Stephen; Vano, Andrew

    1990-09-01

    The design of an unmanned, reusable cargo return vehicle (CRV) incorporated as a class project at the University of Minnesota under NASA auspices is presented. Two configurations are considered, a winged and a biconic with a parafoil advanced recovery system. Three inline liquid rocket boosters would propel the CRV into a low earth orbit with onboard orbital maneuvering system engines used to reach station orbit and dock to the station. The main objective of the courses was to develop the design skills of the students while allowing them to work together in teams with NASA and industry engineers on a specific NASA project. The final conclusion of the study was that the winged CRV was the best vehicle for space station resupply.

  12. Bioresearch Module Design Definition and Space Shuttle Vehicle Integration Study. Volume 1: Basic Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, A. L., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Preliminary designs of the Bioexplorer spacecraft, developed in an earlier study program, are analyzed and updated to conform to a new specification which includes use of both the Scout and the space shuttle vehicle for launch. The updated spacecraft is referred to as bioresearch module. It is capable of supporting a variety of small biological experiments in near-earth and highly elliptical earth orbits. The baseline spacecraft design is compatible with the Scout launch vehicle. Inboard profile drawings, weight statements, interface drawings, and spacecraft parts and aerospace ground equipment lists are provided to document the design. The baseline design was analyzed to determine the design and cost impact of a set of optional features. These include reduced experiment power and thermal load, addition of an experiment television monitor, and replacement of VHF with S-band communications. The impact of these options on power required, weight change and cost is defined.

  13. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  14. A spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor space propulsion vehicle concept for fast interplanetary travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a>5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all major systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including diverter and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, and component design.

  15. Flutter of Winged Reentry Space Vehicles Affected by an Elastic Attachment in Launching Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Atsushi; Ueda, Tetsuhiko

    This paper reports the flutter investigation of a winged reentry space vehicle having rotational modes in dynamic deflection due to an elastic attachment between a vehicle and a booster rocket. The elastic rotational mode is taken into consideration as an elastic rolling mode or an elastic yawing mode. Flutter experiments have been conducted in a transonic wind tunnel. The doublet-point method (DPM) is used to calculate flutter boundaries for this model. It is shown that an elastic rolling mode may lower the critical speed of anti-symmetric mode flutter because its existence alters the natural vibration mode of anti-symmetric bending which causes flutter. On the other hand, a coupling between an elastic yawing mode and an anti-symmetric bending one becomes critical in the different model.

  16. Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.; Mackin, T. E.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, includes a discussion of the essentials of propulsion, control, and guidance and the conditions of space travel. Chapter 1 provides a brief account of basic laws of celestial mechanics. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 are devoted to the chemical principles of propulsion. Included are the basics of…

  17. Exploiting operational vehicles for in-flight research - Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Paul F.; Breckenridge, Roger A.

    1989-01-01

    Five Orbiter Experiments in which NASA's Langley Research Center has had significant involvement are described. These experiments are the Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensing experiment, the Shuttle Upper Atmosphere Mass Spectrometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package experiment, the Orbital Acceleration Research experiment, and the Space Station structural characterization experiment. The Shuttle Entry Air Data System is also described.

  18. Exploiting operational vehicles for in-flight research - Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Paul F.; Breckenridge, Roger A.

    1989-01-01

    Five Orbiter Experiments in which NASA's Langley Research Center has had significant involvement are described. These experiments are the Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensing experiment, the Shuttle Upper Atmosphere Mass Spectrometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package experiment, the Orbital Acceleration Research experiment, and the Space Station structural characterization experiment. The Shuttle Entry Air Data System is also described.

  19. Simulation of the Effect of Realistic Space Vehicle Environments on Binary Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Poirier, D. R.; Heinrich, J. C.; Sung, P. K.; Felicelli, S. D.; Phelps, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Simulations that assess the effect of space vehicle acceleration environments on the solidification of Pb-Sb alloys are reported. Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a near zero-g acceleration environment for various types of scientific experiments. Realistically. these space missions cannot provide a perfect environment. Vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems stems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps can all cause perturbations to the microgravity environment. In addition, the drag on the space vehicle is a source of acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibration-perturbations and the steady-state drag acceleration on the experiments. These predictions can be used to design mission timelines. so that the experiment is run during times that the impact of the acceleration environment is acceptable for the experiment of interest. The simulations reported herein were conducted using a finite element model that includes mass, species, momentum, and energy conservation. This model predicts the existence of "channels" within the processing mushy zone and subsequently "freckles" within the fully processed solid, which are the effects of thermosolutal convection. It is necessary to mitigate thermosolutal convection during space experiments of metal alloys, in order to study and characterize diffusion-controlled transport phenomena (microsegregation) that are normally coupled with macrosegregation. The model allows simulation of steady-state and transient acceleration values ranging from no acceleration (0 g). to microgravity conditions (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) g), to terrestrial gravity conditions (1 g). The transient acceleration environments simulated were from the STS-89 SpaceHAB mission and from the STS-94 SpaceLAB mission. with on-orbit accelerometer data during different mission periods used as inputs for the simulation model. Periods of crew exercise

  20. Simulation of the Effect of Realistic Space Vehicle Environments on Binary Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Poirier, D. R.; Heinrich, J. C.; Sung, P. K.; Felicelli, S. D.; Phelps, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Simulations that assess the effect of space vehicle acceleration environments on the solidification of Pb-Sb alloys are reported. Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a near zero-g acceleration environment for various types of scientific experiments. Realistically. these space missions cannot provide a perfect environment. Vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems stems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps can all cause perturbations to the microgravity environment. In addition, the drag on the space vehicle is a source of acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibration-perturbations and the steady-state drag acceleration on the experiments. These predictions can be used to design mission timelines. so that the experiment is run during times that the impact of the acceleration environment is acceptable for the experiment of interest. The simulations reported herein were conducted using a finite element model that includes mass, species, momentum, and energy conservation. This model predicts the existence of "channels" within the processing mushy zone and subsequently "freckles" within the fully processed solid, which are the effects of thermosolutal convection. It is necessary to mitigate thermosolutal convection during space experiments of metal alloys, in order to study and characterize diffusion-controlled transport phenomena (microsegregation) that are normally coupled with macrosegregation. The model allows simulation of steady-state and transient acceleration values ranging from no acceleration (0 g). to microgravity conditions (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) g), to terrestrial gravity conditions (1 g). The transient acceleration environments simulated were from the STS-89 SpaceHAB mission and from the STS-94 SpaceLAB mission. with on-orbit accelerometer data during different mission periods used as inputs for the simulation model. Periods of crew exercise

  1. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles -- Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Singer, Christopher E.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) plans to return to the Moon by 2020, with the development of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the Space Shuttle, which is due for retirement in 2010 after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Lander. which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. This new transportation infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit for extended lunar exploration and preparation for the first footprint on Mars. All space-based operations begin and are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective solutions to sustain a multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging 50 years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper will discuss how the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Ares Projects Office to streamline ground operations concepts and reduce costs. Currently, NASA's budget is around $17 billion, which is less than 1 percent of the U.S. Federal budget. Of this amount, NASA invests approximately $4.5 billion each year in Space Shuttle operations, regardless of whether the spacecraft is flying or not. The affordability requirement is for the Ares I to reduce this expense by 50 percent, in order to allow NASA to invest more in space-based scientific operations. Focusing on this metric, the Engineering Directorate provides several solutions-oriented approaches, including Lean/Six Sigma practices and streamlined hardware testing and integration, such as assembling major hardware

  2. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles -- Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Singer, Christopher E.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) plans to return to the Moon by 2020, with the development of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the Space Shuttle, which is due for retirement in 2010 after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Lander. which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. This new transportation infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit for extended lunar exploration and preparation for the first footprint on Mars. All space-based operations begin and are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective solutions to sustain a multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging 50 years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper will discuss how the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Ares Projects Office to streamline ground operations concepts and reduce costs. Currently, NASA's budget is around $17 billion, which is less than 1 percent of the U.S. Federal budget. Of this amount, NASA invests approximately $4.5 billion each year in Space Shuttle operations, regardless of whether the spacecraft is flying or not. The affordability requirement is for the Ares I to reduce this expense by 50 percent, in order to allow NASA to invest more in space-based scientific operations. Focusing on this metric, the Engineering Directorate provides several solutions-oriented approaches, including Lean/Six Sigma practices and streamlined hardware testing and integration, such as assembling major hardware

  3. Backscatter x-ray development for space vehicle thermal protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bartha, Bence B.; Hope, Dale; Vona, Paul; Born, Martin; Corak, Tony

    2011-06-23

    The Backscatter X-Ray (BSX) imaging technique is used for various single sided inspection purposes. Previously developed BSX techniques for spray-on-foam insulation (SOFI) have been used for detecting defects in Space Shuttle External Tank foam insulation. The developed BSX hardware and techniques are currently being enhanced to advance Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods for future space vehicle applications. Various Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials were inspected using the enhanced BSX imaging techniques, investigating the capability of the method to detect voids and other discontinuities at various locations within each material. Calibration standards were developed for the TPS materials in order to characterize and develop enhanced BSX inspection capabilities. The ability of the BSX technique to detect both manufactured and natural defects was also studied and compared to through-transmission x-ray techniques. The energy of the x-ray, source to object distance, angle of x-ray, focal spot size and x-ray detector configurations were parameters playing a significant role in the sensitivity of the BSX technique to image various materials and defects. The image processing of the results also showed significant increase in the sensitivity of the technique. The experimental results showed BSX to be a viable inspection technique for space vehicle TPS systems.

  4. Raven: An On-Orbit Relative Navigation Demonstration Using International Space Station Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strube, Matthew; Henry, Ross; Skeleton, Eugene; Eepoel, John Van; Gill, Nat; McKenna, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Since the last Hubble Servicing Mission five years ago, the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been focusing on maturing the technologies necessary to robotically service orbiting legacy assets-spacecraft not necessarily designed for in-flight service. Raven, SSCO's next orbital experiment to the International Space Station (ISS), is a real-time autonomous non-cooperative relative navigation system that will mature the estimation algorithms required for rendezvous and proximity operations for a satellite-servicing mission. Raven will fly as a hosted payload as part of the Space Test Program's STP-H5 mission, which will be mounted on an external ExPRESS Logistics Carrier (ELC) and will image the many visiting vehicles arriving and departing from the ISS as targets for observation. Raven will host multiple sensors: a visible camera with a variable field of view lens, a long-wave infrared camera, and a short-wave flash lidar. This sensor suite can be pointed via a two-axis gimbal to provide a wide field of regard to track the visiting vehicles as they make their approach. Various real-time vision processing algorithms will produce range, bearing, and six degree of freedom pose measurements that will be processed in a relative navigation filter to produce an optimal relative state estimate. In this overview paper, we will cover top-level requirements, experimental concept of operations, system design, and the status of Raven integration and test activities.

  5. Stereo vision-based obstacle avoidance for micro air vehicles using an egocylindrical image space representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockers, R.; Fragoso, A.; Matthies, L.

    2016-05-01

    Micro air vehicles which operate autonomously at low altitude in cluttered environments require a method for onboard obstacle avoidance for safe operation. Previous methods deploy either purely reactive approaches, mapping low-level visual features directly to actuator inputs to maneuver the vehicle around the obstacle, or deliberative methods that use on-board 3-D sensors to create a 3-D, voxel-based world model, which is then used to generate collision free 3-D trajectories. In this paper, we use forward-looking stereo vision with a large horizontal and vertical field of view and project range from stereo into a novel robot-centered, cylindrical, inverse range map we call an egocylinder. With this implementation we reduce the complexity of our world representation from a 3D map to a 2.5D image-space representation, which supports very efficient motion planning and collision checking, and allows to implement configuration space expansion as an image processing function directly on the egocylinder. Deploying a fast reactive motion planner directly on the configuration space expanded egocylinder image, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this new approach experimentally in an indoor environment.

  6. A navigation and control system for an autonomous rescue vehicle in the space station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkel, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    A navigation and control system was designed and implemented for an orbital autonomous rescue vehicle envisioned to retrieve astronauts or equipment in the case that they become disengaged from the space station. The rescue vehicle, termed the Extra-Vehicular Activity Retriever (EVAR), has an on-board inertial measurement unit ahd GPS receivers for self state estimation, a laser range imager (LRI) and cameras for object state estimation, and a data link for reception of space station state information. The states of the retriever and objects (obstacles and the target object) are estimated by inertial state propagation which is corrected via measurements from the GPS, the LRI system, or the camera system. Kalman filters are utilized to perform sensor fusion and estimate the state propagation errors. Control actuation is performed by a Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). Phase plane control techniques are used to control the rotational and translational state of the retriever. The translational controller provides station-keeping or motion along either Clohessy-Wiltshire trajectories or straight line trajectories in the LVLH frame of any sufficiently observed object or of the space station. The software was used to successfully control a prototype EVAR on an air bearing floor facility, and a simulated EVAR operating in a simulated orbital environment. The design of the navigation system and the control system are presented. Also discussed are the hardware systems and the overall software architecture.

  7. Backscatter X-Ray Development for Space Vehicle Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartha, Bence B.; Hope, Dale; Vona, Paul; Born, Martin; Corak, Tony

    2011-06-01

    The Backscatter X-Ray (BSX) imaging technique is used for various single sided inspection purposes. Previously developed BSX techniques for spray-on-foam insulation (SOFI) have been used for detecting defects in Space Shuttle External Tank foam insulation. The developed BSX hardware and techniques are currently being enhanced to advance Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods for future space vehicle applications. Various Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials were inspected using the enhanced BSX imaging techniques, investigating the capability of the method to detect voids and other discontinuities at various locations within each material. Calibration standards were developed for the TPS materials in order to characterize and develop enhanced BSX inspection capabilities. The ability of the BSX technique to detect both manufactured and natural defects was also studied and compared to through-transmission x-ray techniques. The energy of the x-ray, source to object distance, angle of x-ray, focal spot size and x-ray detector configurations were parameters playing a significant role in the sensitivity of the BSX technique to image various materials and defects. The image processing of the results also showed significant increase in the sensitivity of the technique. The experimental results showed BSX to be a viable inspection technique for space vehicle TPS systems.

  8. SpaceX: Breaking the Barrier to the Space Launch Vehicle Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-22

    Different innovation techniques can be used to help overcome entry barriers to an industry. Innovation by simple definition does not equate to success or...investments and this is the starting point for their success . They both also leveraged some techniques used to overcome revealed barriers. FedEx...like FedEx, implemented a unique technique to the industry and found success . SpaceX was also evaluated against guidelines and principles presented by

  9. Non-Intrusive Techniques of Inspections During the Pre-Launch Phase of Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rejkumar; Bardina, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a method of non-intrusive local inspection of surface and sub-surface conditions, interfaces, laminations and seals in both space vehicle and ground operations with an integrated suite of imaging sensors during pre-launch operations. It employs an advanced Raman spectrophotometer with additional spectrophotometers and lidar mounted on a flying robot to constantly monitor the space hardware as well as inner surface of the vehicle and ground operations hardware. This paper addresses a team of micro flying robots with necessary sensors and photometers to monitor the entire space vehicle internally and externally. The micro flying robots can reach altitude with least amount of energy, where astronauts have difficulty in reaching and monitoring the materials and subsurface faults. The micro flying robot has an embedded fault detection system which acts as an advisory system and in many cases micro flying robots act as a Supervisor to fix the problems. As missions expand to a sustainable presence in the Moon, and extend for durations longer than one year in lunar outpost, the effectiveness of the instrumentation and hardware has to be revolutionized if NASA is to meet high levels of mission safety, reliability, and overall success. The micro flying robot uses contra-rotating propellers powered by an ultra-thin, ultrasonic motor with currently the world's highest power weight ratio, and is balanced in mid-air by means of the world's first stabilizing mechanism using a linear actuator. The essence of micromechatronics has been brought together in high-density mounting technology to minimize the size and weight. The robot can take suitable payloads of photometers, embedded chips for image analysis and micro pumps for sealing cracks or fixing other material problems. This paper also highlights advantages that this type of non-intrusive techniques offer over costly and monolithic traditional techniques.

  10. Integration Assessment of Visiting Vehicle Induced Electrical Charging of the International Space Station Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Leonard; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Galofaro, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) undergoes electrical charging in low Earth orbit (LEO) due to positively biased, exposed conductors on solar arrays that collect electrical charges from the space plasma. Exposed solar array conductors predominately collect negatively charged electrons and thus drive the metal ISS structure electrical ground to a negative floating potential (FP) relative to plasma. This FP is variable in location and time as a result of local ionospheric conditions. ISS motion through Earth s magnetic field creates an addition inductive voltage up to 20 positive and negative volts across ISS structure depending on its attitude and location in orbit. ISS Visiting Vehicles (VVs), such as the planned Orion crew exploration vehicle, contribute to the ISS plasma charging processes. Upon physical contact with ISS, the current collection properties of VVs combine with ISS. This is an ISS integration concern as FP must be controlled to minimize arcing of ISS surfaces and ensure proper management of extra vehicular activity crewman shock hazards. This report is an assessment of ISS induced charging from docked Orion vehicles employing negatively grounded, 130 volt class, UltraFlex (ATK Space Systems) solar arrays. To assess plasma electron current collection characteristics, Orion solar cell test coupons were constructed and subjected to plasma chamber current collection measurements. During these tests, coupon solar cells were biased between 0 and 120 V while immersed in a simulated LEO plasma. Tests were performed using several different simulated LEO plasma densities and temperatures. These data and associated theoretical scaling of plasma properties, were combined in a numerical model which was integrated into the Boeing Plasma Interaction Model. It was found that the solar array design for Orion will not affect the ISS FP by more than about 2 V during worst case charging conditions. This assessment also motivated a trade study to determine

  11. Nonintrusive techniques of inspections during the pre-launch phase of space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge E.; Miyazawa, Osamu

    2005-05-01

    As missions expand to a sustainable presence in the Moon, and extend for durations longer than one year in lunar outpost, the effectiveness of the instrumentation and hardware has to be revolutionized if NASA is to meet high levels of mission safety, reliability, and overall success. This paper addresses a method of non-intrusive local inspection of surface and sub-surface conditions, interfaces, laminations and seals in both space vehicle and ground operations with an integrated suite of imaging sensors during pre-launch operations. It employs an advanced Raman spectrometer with additional spectrometers and lidar mounted on a flying robot to constantly monitor the space hardware as well as inner surface of the vehicle and ground operations hardware. A team of micro flying robots with necessary sensors and photometers is required to internally and externally monitor the entire space vehicle. The micro flying robots should reach an altitude with least amount of energy, where astronauts have difficulty in reaching and monitoring the materials and subsurface faults. The micro flying robots have an embedded fault detection system which acts as an advisory system and in many cases micro flying robots act as a `Supervisor' to fix the problems. The micro flying robot uses contra-rotating propellers powered by an ultra-thin, ultrasonic motor with currently the world's highest power weight ratio, and is balanced in mid-air by means of the world's first stabilizing mechanism using a linear actuator. The essence of micromechatronics has been brought together in high-density mounting technology to minimize the size and weight. Each robot can take suitable payloads of photometers, embedded chips for image analysis and micro pumps for sealing cracks or fixing other material problems. This paper also highlights advantages that this type of non-intrusive techniques offer over costly and monolithic traditional techniques.

  12. Improved Fractal Space Filling Curves Hybrid Optimization Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yi-xiang; Zhang, Tong; Yue, Qun-xing

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) is one of the key issues in optimization of modern logistics system. In this paper, a modified VRP model with hard time window is established and a Hybrid Optimization Algorithm (HOA) based on Fractal Space Filling Curves (SFC) method and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is introduced. By incorporating the proposed algorithm, SFC method can find an initial and feasible solution very fast; GA is used to improve the initial solution. Thereafter, experimental software was developed and a large number of experimental computations from Solomon's benchmark have been studied. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the HOA. PMID:26167171

  13. Development of an interactive real-time graphics system for the display of vehicle space positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comperini, Robert; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Outlined is a new approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range to display real-time space positioning data using computer-generated images that produce a graphic representation of an area map integrated with the research flight test aircraft track. This display system supports research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV), AFTI F-111 mission adaptive wing (MAW), F-15, and X-29A forward-swept wing. This paper will discuss the requirements, system configuration and capability, and future system applications.

  14. Development of an interactive real-time graphics system for the display of vehicle space positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comperini, Robert; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will outline a new approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range to display real-time space positioning data using computer-generated images that produce a graphic representation of an area map integrated with the research flight test aircraft track. This display system supports research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV), AFTI F-111 mission adaptive wing (MAW), F-15, and X-29A forward-swept wing. This paper will discuss the requirements, system configuration and capability, and future system applications.

  15. A generalized analytical model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainova, Irina V.; Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Nenarokomov, Aleksey V.; Budnik, Sergey A.; Titov, Dmitry M.; Alifanov, Oleg M.

    2017-08-01

    The previously developed spectral model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles is generalized to take into account possible thermal contact between a fibrous spacer and one of the neighboring aluminum foil layers. An approximate analytical solution based on slightly modified two-flux approximation for radiative transfer in a semi-transparent fibrous spacer is derived. It was shown that thermal contact between the spacer and adjacent foil may decrease significantly the quality of thermal insulation because of an increase in radiative flux to/from the opposite aluminum foil. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by comparison with new results of laboratory experiments.

  16. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  17. Development and characterization of lubricants for use near nuclear reactors in space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, G. L.; Akawie, R. I.; Gardos, M. N.; Krening, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation program was conducted to develop wide-temperature range lubricants suitable for use in space vehicles particularly in the vicinity of nuclear reactors. Synthetic approaches resulted in nonpolymeric, large molecular weight materials, all based on some combination of siloxane and aromatic groups. Evaluation of these materials indicated that certain tetramethyl and hexamethyl disiloxanes containing phenyl thiophenyl substituents are extremely promising with respect to radiation stability, wide temperature range, good lubricity, oxidation resistance and additive acceptance. The synthesis of fluids is discussed, and the equipment and methods used in evaluation are described, some of which were designed to evaluate micro-quantities of the synthesized lubricants.

  18. Improved Fractal Space Filling Curves Hybrid Optimization Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yi-xiang; Zhang, Tong; Yue, Qun-xing

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) is one of the key issues in optimization of modern logistics system. In this paper, a modified VRP model with hard time window is established and a Hybrid Optimization Algorithm (HOA) based on Fractal Space Filling Curves (SFC) method and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is introduced. By incorporating the proposed algorithm, SFC method can find an initial and feasible solution very fast; GA is used to improve the initial solution. Thereafter, experimental software was developed and a large number of experimental computations from Solomon's benchmark have been studied. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the HOA.

  19. Lab Development for INS/GPS Testing of Launch and Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrock, Ken; Freestone, Todd; Bell, Leon

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's experience with different GPS simulators and receivers over the last 10 years has shown a need for testing the receivers in more than just a nominal mission. The Spaceliner 100 program is researching blended INS/GPS data tuned specifically for launch vehicles and orbital deployments. The paper will discuss layout of the testing lab, the test equipment, test scenarios that all receivers will be evaluated under, and a discussion of receiver types planned to test. It will conclude with a discussion of some of the current tests and goals of future testing.

  20. Measurements of sea surface slopes by laser sensing from a space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokazeev, K. V.; Zapevalov, A. S.; Lebedev, K. E.

    2017-07-01

    The measurement errors of dispersions of sea surface slopes using spacecraft lidar were analyzed. The errors caused by deviations of the actual wave field from the Gaussian isotropic surface were considered. It is revealed that the unaccounted deviations of slope distributions from the Gaussian distribution lead to a systematic underestimation of the calculated slope dispersion by approximately 11-14%. In addition, it is revealed that the anisotropy of slopes during their dispersion calculation using the data of vertical laser sensing from space vehicle can be neglected.

  1. An improved space-based algorithm for recognizing vehicle models from the side view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ding, Youdong; Zhang, Li; Li, Rong; Zhu, Jiang; Xie, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle model matching problem from the side view is a problem meets the practical needs of actual users, but less focus by researchers. We propose a improved feature space-based algorithm for this problem. The algorithm combines the various advantages of some classic algorithms, and effectively combining global and local feature, eliminate data redundancy and improve data divisibility. And finally complete the classification by quick and efficient KNN. The real scene test results show that the proposed method is robust, accurate, insensitive to external factors, adaptable to large angle deviations, and can be applied to a formal application.

  2. Dynamics of multirate sampled data control systems. [for space shuttle boost vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naylor, J. R.; Hynes, R. J.; Molnar, D. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effect was investigated of the synthesis approach (single or multirate) on the machine requirements for a digital control system for the space shuttle boost vehicle. The study encompassed four major work areas: synthesis approach trades, machine requirements trades, design analysis requirements and multirate adaptive control techniques. The primary results are two multirate autopilot designs for the low Q and maximum Q flight conditions that exhibits equal or better performance than the analog and single rate system designs. Also, a preferred technique for analyzing and synthesizing multirate digital control systems is included.

  3. Dynamic stability characteristics of the combination space shuttle orbiter and ferry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, D. C., Jr.; Boyden, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    Subsonic forced-oscillation tests of a 0.015 scale model of the space shuttle orbiter/747 ferry vehicle were conducted in the Langley high speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.5 for angles of attack up to 12 deg. Tests were made of the basic 747 airplane, of the modified 747 (tip fins and struts added), of the ferry configuration, (747 plus orbiter at an incidence angle of 3 deg), and of the approach and landing test configuration (747 plus orbiter at an incidence angle of 6 deg).

  4. Characterization of an Integral Thermal Protection and Cryogenic Insulation Material for Advanced Space Transportation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; White, S. M.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's planned advanced space transportation vehicles will benefit from the use of integral/conformal cryogenic propellant tanks which will reduce the launch weight and lower the earth-to-orbit costs considerably. To implement the novel concept of integral/conformal tanks requires developing an equally novel concept in thermal protection materials. Providing insulation against reentry heating and preserving propellant mass can no longer be considered separate problems to be handled by separate materials. A new family of materials, Superthermal Insulation (STI), has been conceiving and investigated by NASA's Ames Research Center to simultaneously provide both thermal protection and cryogenic insulation in a single, integral material.

  5. Nozzle exit exhaust products from space shuttle boost vehicle (November 1973 design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Principal exhaust species emitted at various altitudes for two trajectories of the space shuttle vehicle are presented. The exhaust composition is given for the nozzle exit plane on the basis of equilibrium chemistry. Afterburning of excess H, H2, and CO in the plume is accounted for. Species considered include HCl and Al2O3, which have been recognized as environmentally significant, as well as others such as H2O (produced by both the solid rocket motor and the orbiter main engine) which, although innocuous, may participate in subsequent chemical reactions in the atmosphere.

  6. Airborne measurements of launch vehicle effluent: Launch of Space Shuttle (STS-1) on 12 April 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Woods, D. C.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1983-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent environmental impact activities from the first space shuttle (STS-1) included airborne measurements within the exhaust cloud from about 9 min after launch (T + 9) to T + 120 min. Measurements included total hydrogen chloride (gaseous plus aqueous) concentrations, particulate concentrations, temperature, and dewpoint temperature. The airborne measurements are summarized. The physical growth and behavior of exhaust clouds is presented as well as the results of laboratory analysis of elemental composition of particulate samples collected by the aircraft. Observed results from the STS-1 launch are compared with earlier Titan III results. Shuttle effluent concentrations are found to be within the range of Titan III observations.

  7. Preliminary assessment of the vacuum environment in the wake of large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The vacuum environment in the wake region of presently planned large space vehicles is calculated using simplified models of the particle fluxes from the various sources. The fluxes which are calculated come directly from the ambient, are due to ambient particles backscattered from spacecraft emissions, and are due to self scattering of spacecraft emissions. Using nominal values for the surface emissions, the flux density environment behind a large unmanned craft at 550 km altitude is calculated. Calculations indicate that the flux density on a wake vacuum experiment conducted in the vicinity of the shuttle is substantially greater than that behind unmanned craft.

  8. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  9. International Space Station (ISS) Soyuz Vehicle Descent Module Evaluation of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Penetration Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The descent module (DM) of the ISS Soyuz vehicle is covered by thermal protection system (TPS) materials that provide protection from heating conditions experienced during reentry. Damage and penetration of these materials by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts could result in loss of vehicle during return phases of the mission. The descent module heat shield has relatively thick TPS and is protected by the instrument-service module. The TPS materials on the conical sides of the descent module (referred to as backshell in this test plan) are exposed to more MMOD impacts and are relatively thin compared to the heat shield. This test program provides hypervelocity impact (HVI) data on materials similar in composition and density to the Soyuz TPS on the backshell of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz TPS penetration risk assessments. The impact testing was coordinated by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) Group [1] in Houston, Texas. The HVI testing was conducted at the NASA-JSC White Sands Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Figure

  10. Highly Reusable Space Transportation System Concept Evaluation (The Argus Launch Vehicle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Bellini, Peter X.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual design study that was performed in support of NASA's recent Highly Reusable Space Transportation study. The Argus concept uses a Maglifter magnetic-levitation sled launch assist system to accelerate it to a takeoff ground speed of 800 fps on its way to delivering a payload of 20,000 lb. to low earth orbit. Main propulsion is provided by two supercharged ejector rocket engines. The vehicle is autonomous and is fully reusable. A conceptual design exercise determined the vehicle gross weight to be approximately 597,250 lb. and the dry weight to be 75,500 lb. Aggressive weight and operations cost assumptions were used throughout the design process consistent with a second-generation reusable system that might be deployed in 10-15 years. Drawings, geometry, and weight of the concept are included. Preliminary development, production, and operations costs along with a business scenario assuming a price-elastic payload market are also included. A fleet of three Argus launch vehicles flying a total of 149 flights per year is shown to have a financial internal rate of return of 28%. At $169/lb., the recurring cost of Argus is shown to meet the study goal of $100/lb.-$200/lb., but optimum market price results in only a factor of two to five reduction compared to today's launch systems.

  11. Orbital Transfer Vehicle (space taxi) with aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    equipped with complete guidance, navigation, control and communications systems modules attached near the crew module. Control of vehicle attitude will be provided by a set of small reaction control thrusters quite similar to those on the current Space Shuttle. All crew module and vehicle electrical functions will be powered via a set of H2/O2 fuel cells with radio-isotopic generators as backup supplies. Also included in the burnout mass of 98,000 lb is allowance for 10,000 lbm of miscellaneous payload (scientific equipment or other supplies).

  12. Orbital Transfer Vehicle (space taxi) with aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    equipped with complete guidance, navigation, control and communications systems modules attached near the crew module. Control of vehicle attitude will be provided by a set of small reaction control thrusters quite similar to those on the current Space Shuttle. All crew module and vehicle electrical functions will be powered via a set of H2/O2 fuel cells with radio-isotopic generators as backup supplies. Also included in the burnout mass of 98,000 lb is allowance for 10,000 lbm of miscellaneous payload (scientific equipment or other supplies).

  13. The Role of Habitability Studies in Space Facility and Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Constance M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation which reviews the role of the space architect in designing a space vehicle with habitability as a chief concern. Habitability is composed of the qualities of the environment or system which support the crew in working and living. All the impacts from habitability are interdependent; i.e., impacts to well-being can impact performance, safety or efficiency. After reviewing the issues relating to habitability the presentation discusses the application of these issues in two case studies. The first studies the Bio-Plex Hab chamber which includes designs of the living and working areas. The second case study is the ISS-TransHab which is being studied as a prototype for Mars transit.

  14. An integrated power/attitude control system /IPACS/ for space vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Keckler, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    An integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS) concept with potential application to a broad class of space missions is discussed. The concept involves the storage and supply on demand of electrical energy in rotating flywheels while simultaneously providing control torques by controlled precession of the flywheels. The system is thus an alternative to the storage batteries used on present spacecraft while providing similar capability for attitude control as that represented by a control moment gyroscope (CMG) system. Potential IPACS configurations discussed include single- and double-rotor double-gimbal IPACS units. Typical sets of control laws which would manage the momentum and energy exchange between the IPACS and a typical space vehicle are discussed. Discussion of a simulation of a typical potential IPACS configuration and candidate mission concerned with pointing capability, power supply and demand flow, and discussion of the interactions between stabilization and control requirements and power flow requirements are presented.

  15. H2-O2 auxiliary power unit for Space Shuttle vehicles - A progress report.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, J. P.; Beremand, D. G.; Cameron, H. M.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a program to establish technology readiness of hydrogen-oxygen (H2-O2) auxiliary power units for use on board the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle. Fundamental objectives include experimentally establishing an acceptable propellant flow control method, verification of combustor stability, and adequate thermal management. An initial auxiliary power unit (APU) configuration with recycled hydrogen flow has been studied and revised toward greater simplicity and scaling ease. The selected APU is a recuperated open-cycle, turbine-driven unit. Series flow of cryogenic hydrogen removes internally-generated heat and heat from the hydraulic system. The revised configuration schematic and its calculated performance are reviewed. A weight comparison is made between the shuttle baseline hydrazine and H2-O2 APU systems, showing that hydrogen-oxygen APUs have the potential of increasing the payload of the Space Shuttle.

  16. Comparison of reusable insulation systems for cryogenically-tanked earth-based space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Barber, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Three reusable insulation systems concepts were developed for use with cryogenic tanks of earth-based space vehicles. Two concepts utilized double-goldized Kapton (DGK) or double-aluminized Mylar (DAM) multilayer insulation (MLI), while the third utilized a hollow-glass-microsphere, loadbearing insulation (LBI). Thermal performance measurements were made under space-hold (vacuum) conditions for insulating warm boundary temperatures of approximately 291 K. The resulting effective thermal conductivity was approximately 0.00008 W/m-K (W = weight,Kg; m = measured; K = temperature) for the MLI systems (liquid hydrogen test results) and 0.00054 W/m-K for the LBI system (liquid nitrogen test results corrected to liquid hydrogen temperature).

  17. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The following papers are presented: (1) numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the Integrated Space Shuttle vehicle; (2) a generalized scheme for 3-D hyperbolic grid generation; (3) collar grids for intersecting geometric components within the Chimera overlapped grid scheme; and (4) application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows.

  18. Solar Electric Propulsion System Integration Technology (SEPSIT). Volume 2: Encke rendezvous mission and space vehicle functional description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A solar electric propulsion system integration technology study is discussed. Detailed analyses in support of the solar electric propulsion module were performed. The thrust subsystem functional description is presented. The space vehicle and the space mission to which the propulsion system is applied are analyzed.

  19. An Analytical Solution for Yaw Maneuver Optimization on the International Space Station and Other Orbiting Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrinskaya, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    This paper suggests a new method for optimizing yaw maneuvers on the International Space Station (ISS). Yaw rotations are the most common large maneuvers on the ISS often used for docking and undocking operations, as well as for other activities. When maneuver optimization is used, large maneuvers, which were performed on thrusters, could be performed either using control moment gyroscopes (CMG), or with significantly reduced thruster firings. Maneuver optimization helps to save expensive propellant and reduce structural loads - an important factor for the ISS service life. In addition, optimized maneuvers reduce contamination of the critical elements of the vehicle structure, such as solar arrays. This paper presents an analytical solution for optimizing yaw attitude maneuvers. Equations describing pitch and roll motion needed to counteract the major torques during a yaw maneuver are obtained. A yaw rate profile is proposed. Also the paper describes the physical basis of the suggested optimization approach. In the obtained optimized case, the torques are significantly reduced. This torque reduction was compared to the existing optimization method which utilizes the computational solution. It was shown that the attitude profiles and the torque reduction have a good match for these two methods of optimization. The simulations using the ISS flight software showed similar propellant consumption for both methods. The analytical solution proposed in this paper has major benefits with respect to computational approach. In contrast to the current computational solution, which only can be calculated on the ground, the analytical solution does not require extensive computational resources, and can be implemented in the onboard software, thus, making the maneuver execution automatic. The automatic maneuver significantly simplifies the operations and, if necessary, allows to perform a maneuver without communication with the ground. It also reduces the probability of command

  20. Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics for Thermal Protection of Next Generation Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehman, R. E.; Ellerby, D. T.; Gusman, M. I.; Stackpoole, M.; Johnson, S. M.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Materials with improved properties are needed for thermal protection of next generation space vehicles. Sharp leading edges on these vehicles will have to withstand exposure to high temperatures (> 2200 C or 4000 F) and severe thermal cycling in both neutral and oxidizing environments. These extreme conditions will require materials that possess superior oxidation resistance, low creep, and excellent thermal shock properties. This presentation will first discuss the system requirements for thermal protection of advanced space vehicles and then show how they are driving development of new materials systems. The presentation will focus on ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs) that are promising candidates for such applications. ZrB2 and HfB2 and composites of those ceramics with SiC are two particular families of UHTCs that are currently under development for sharp leading edges. These ceramics are appealing because their melting temperatures are 3245 C (5873 F) for ZrB2 and 3380 C (6116 F) for HfB2 and because they may form protective, oxidation resistant coatings in use. The mechanical properties of the UHTCs are strongly dependent on phase purity and the processing route used to make them, both of which factors are being actively investigated. For example, oxide impurities could form glassy grain boundary phases that soften at high temperatures and make the ceramic susceptible to creep deformation. Results from scanning and transmission electron microscopic studies of the UHTCs have shown how their processing can be improved to give better properties. This presentation will discuss the UHTC characterization results in some detail, focusing particularly on the structure and composition of the ceramic grain boundaries. The presentation will conclude with some remarks on how the properties of these promising UHTCs can be further improved and how they might be made more economically.