Science.gov

Sample records for space-based microlensing survey

  1. On the Feasibility of Characterizing Free-floating Planets with Current and Future Space-based Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Yossi

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous space- and ground-based microlensing surveys, such as K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) and WFIRST, facilitate measuring the masses and distances of free-floating planet (FFP) candidates, which are identified as single-lens events with timescales that are of the order of 1 day. Measuring the mass and distance of an FFP lens requires determining the size of the source star ρ, measuring the microlens parallax {π }{{E}}, and using high-resolution imaging to search for the lens flux {F}{\\ell } from a possible host star. Here we investigate the accessible parameter space for each of these components considering different satellites for a range of FFP masses, Galactic distances, and source star properties. We find that at the beginning of K2C9, when its projected separation {D}\\perp from the Earth is ≲0.2 au, it will be able to measure {π }{{E}} for Jupiter-mass FFP candidates at distances larger than ∼2 kpc and to Earth-mass lenses at ∼8 kpc. At the end of K2C9, when {D}\\perp = 0.81 au, it is sensitive to planetary-mass lenses for distances ≳3.5 kpc, and even then only to those with mass ≳M Jup. From lens flux constraints we find that it will be possible to exclude hosts down to the deuterium-burning limit for events within ∼2 kpc. This indicates that the ability to characterize FFPs detected during K2C9 is optimized for events occurring toward the beginning of the campaign. WFIRST, on the other hand, will be able to detect and characterize FFP masses down to or below super-Earths throughout the Galaxy during its entire microlensing survey.

  2. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  3. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}ȯ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  4. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  5. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Rattenbury, N.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.; The Wise Group

    2015-12-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity, and therefore probability, for detecting planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  6. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  7. Space Based Dark Energy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Dark energy, the name given to the cause of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, is one of the most tantalizing mystery in modern physics. Current cosmological models hold that dark energy is currently the dominant component of the Universe, but the exact nature of DE remains poorly understood. There are ambitious ground-based surveys underway that seek to understand DE and NASA is participating in the development of significantly more ambitious space-based surveys planned for the next decade. NASA has provided mission enabling technology to the European Space Agency's (ESA) Euclid mission in exchange for US scientists to participate in the Euclid mission. NASA is also developing the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST) mission for possible launch in 2024. WFIRST was the highest ranked space mission in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey and the current design uses a 2.4m space telescope to go beyond what was then envisioned. Understanding DE is one of the primary science goals of WFIRST-AFTA. This talk will review the state of DE, the relevant activities of the Cosmic Structure Interest Group (CoSSIG) of the PhyPAG, and detail the status and complementarity between Euclid, WFIRST and ot ambitious ground-based efforts.

  8. Microlensing Surveys and Long Period Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennessier, Marie-Odile

    After briefly recalling how microlensing surveys can greatly help research on Long Period Variable stars (LPVs), I present examples from two research projects, Etude et Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) and DUO, and give some examples of preliminary data. This paper is essentially based on the theses of P. Grison (Institute d'Astrophysique [IAP], Paris), J.P. Beaulieu (IAP, Paris), C. Alard (Centre d'Analyse d'Images, Paris), and on the Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies of Y. Audior (IAP, Paris).

  9. Testing LMC Microlensing Scenarios: The Discrimination Power of the SuperMACHO Microlensing Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Stubbs, C; Becker, A C; Miknaitis, G A; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Hawley, S L; Smith, C; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J; Hiriart, R; Welch, D L; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Proctor, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Garg, A; Challis, P; Keller, S C; Scmidt, B P

    2004-05-27

    Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the observed microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. They present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey pointed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. they consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing of LMC stars. The optical depth for ''screen-lensing'' is essentially constant across the face of the LMC; whereas, the optical depth for self-lensing shows a strong spatial dependence. they have carried out extensive simulations, based upon actual data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. In the simulations they predict the expected number of observed microlensing events for each of their fields by adding artificial stars to the images and estimating the spatial and temporal efficiency of detecting microlensing events using Monte-Carlo methods. They find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function shape and other parameters, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. By instead determining the differential event rate across the LMC, they can decrease the impact of these systematic uncertainties rendering the conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations and provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects.

  10. Determination of Microlensing Selection Criteria for the SuperMACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, A

    2008-10-10

    The SuperMACHO project is a 5 year survey to determine the nature of the lens population responsible for the excess microlensing rate toward the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the MACHO project [1]. The survey probes deeper than earlier surveys unveiling many more extragalactic contaminants, particularly type Ia supernovae and active galactic nuclei. Using {approx}10{sup 7} simulated light curves of both microlensing events and type Ia supernovae we determine selection criteria optimized to maximize the microlensing detection efficiency while minimizing the contamination rate from non-microlensing events. We discuss these simulations and the selection criteria.

  11. Microlensing Surveys of M31 in the Wide Field Imaging ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.

    2004-10-27

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way, thus it is an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in galactic halos (MACHOs) by gravitational microlensing. Such studies strongly complement the studies of the Milky Way halo using the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We consider the possibilities for microlensing surveys of M31 using the next generation of wide field imaging telescopes with fields of view in the square degree range. We consider proposals for such imagers both on the ground and in space. For concreteness, we specialize to the SNAP proposal for a space telescope and the LSST proposal for a ground based telescope. We find that a modest space-based survey of 50 visits of one hour each is considerably better than current ground based surveys covering 5 years. Crucially, systematic effects can be considerably better controlled with a space telescope because of both the infrared sensitivity and the angular resolution. To be competitive, 8 meter class wide-field ground based imagers must take exposures of several hundred seconds with several day cadence.

  12. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  13. Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Moniez, M.; Horne, K.; Street, R.

    2012-04-01

    Gravitational microlensing is a well established and unique field of time-domain astrophysics. For two decades microlensing surveys have been regularly observing millions of stars to detect elusive events that follow a characteristic Paczyński lightcurve. This workshop reviewed the current state of the field, and covered the major topics related to microlensing: searches for extrasolar planets, and studies of dark matter. There were also discussions of issues relating to the organisation of follow-up observations for microlensing, as well as serendipitous scientific outcomes resulting from extensive microlensing data.

  14. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. I. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    Motivated by the order of magnitude difference in the frequency of giant planets orbiting M dwarfs inferred by microlensing and radial velocity (RV) surveys, we present a method for comparing the statistical constraints on exoplanet demographics inferred from these methods. We first derive the mapping from the observable parameters of a microlensing-detected planet to those of an analogous planet orbiting an RV-monitored star. Using this mapping, we predict the distribution of RV observables for the planet population inferred from microlensing surveys, taking care to adopt reasonable priors for, and properly marginalize over, the unknown physical parameters of microlensing-detected systems. Finally, we use simple estimates of the detection limits for a fiducial RV survey to predict the number and properties of analogs of the microlensing planet population such an RV survey should detect. We find that RV and microlensing surveys have some overlap, specifically for super-Jupiter mass planets (m{sub p} ≳ 1 M {sub Jup}) with periods between ∼3-10 yr. However, the steeply falling planetary mass function inferred from microlensing implies that, in this region of overlap, RV surveys should infer a much smaller frequency than the overall giant planet frequency (m{sub p} ≳ 0.1 M {sub Jup}) inferred by microlensing. Our analysis demonstrates that it is possible to statistically compare and synthesize data sets from multiple exoplanet detection techniques in order to infer exoplanet demographics over wider regions of parameter space than are accessible to individual methods. In a companion paper, we apply our methodology to several representative microlensing and RV surveys to derive the frequency of planets around M dwarfs with orbits of ≲ 30 yr.

  15. Microlensing detection of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Emanuela; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2013-05-01

    We review the method of exoplanetary microlensing with a focus on two-body planetary lensing systems. The physical properties of planetary systems can be successfully measured by means of a deep analysis of lightcurves and high-resolution imaging of planetary systems, countering the concern that microlensing cannot determine planetary masses and orbital radii. Ground-based observers have had success in diagnosing properties of multi-planet systems from a few events, but space-based observations will be much more powerful and statistically more complete. Since microlensing is most sensitive to exoplanets beyond the snow line, whose statistics, in turn, allow for testing current planetary formation and evolution theories, we investigate the retrieval of semi-major axis density by a microlensing space-based survey with realistic parameters. Making use of a published statistical method for projected exoplanets quantities (Brown 2011), we find that one year of such a survey might distinguish between simple power-law semi-major axis densities. We conclude by briefly reviewing ground-based results hinting at a high abundance of free-floating planets and describing the potential contribution of space-based missions to understanding the frequency and mass distribution of these intriguing objects, which could help unveil the formation processes of planetary systems.

  16. Microlensing detection of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Emanuela; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2013-05-01

    We review the method of exoplanetary microlensing with a focus on two-body planetary lensing systems. The physical properties of planetary systems can be successfully measured by means of a deep analysis of lightcurves and high-resolution imaging of planetary systems, countering the concern that microlensing cannot determine planetary masses and orbital radii. Ground-based observers have had success in diagnosing properties of multi-planet systems from a few events, but space-based observations will be much more powerful and statistically more complete. Since microlensing is most sensitive to exoplanets beyond the snow line, whose statistics, in turn, allow for testing current planetary formation and evolution theories, we investigate the retrieval of semi-major axis density by a microlensing space-based survey with realistic parameters. Making use of a published statistical method for projected exoplanets quantities (Brown 2011), we find that one year of such a survey might distinguish between simple power-law semi-major axis densities. We conclude by briefly reviewing ground-based results hinting at a high abundance of free-floating planets and describing the potential contribution of space-based missions to understanding the frequency and mass distribution of these intriguing objects, which could help unveil the formation processes of planetary systems. PMID:23604071

  17. Space-based infrared surveys of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.

    2014-07-01

    Most small bodies in the Solar System are too small and too distant to be spatially resolved, precluding a direct diameter derivation. Furthermore, measurements of the optical brightness alone only allow a rough estimate of the diameter, since the surface albedo is usually unknown and can have values between about 3 % and 60 % or more. The degeneracy can be resolved by considering the thermal emission of these objects, which is less prone to albedo effects and mainly a function of the diameter. Hence, the combination of optical and thermal-infrared observational data provides a means to independently derive an object's diameter and albedo. This technique is used in asteroid thermal models or more sophisticated thermophysical models (see, e.g., [1]). Infrared observations require cryogenic detectors and/or telescopes, depending on the actual wavelength range observed. Observations from the ground are additionally compromised by the variable transparency of Earth's atmosphere in major portions of the infrared wavelength ranges. Hence, space-based infrared telescopes, providing stable conditions and significantly better sensitivities than ground-based telescopes, are now used routinely to exploit this wavelength range. Two observation strategies are used with space-based infrared observatories: Space-based Infrared All-Sky Surveys. Asteroid surveys in the thermal infrared are less prone to albedo-related discovery bias compared to surveys with optical telescopes, providing a more complete picture of small body populations. The first space-based infrared survey of Solar System small bodies was performed with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) for 10 months in 1983. In the course of the 'IRAS Minor Planet Survey' [2], 2228 asteroids (3 new discoveries) and more than 25 comets (6 new discoveries) were observed. More recent space-based infrared all-sky asteroid surveys were performed by Akari (launched 2006) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE

  18. Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Simulations, Requirements, Survey Strategies, and Precursor Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, Bernard

    As one of the four primary investigations of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, the microlensing survey will monitor several square degrees of the Galactic bulge for a total of roughly one year. Its primary science goal is to "Complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from the outer habitable zone to free floating planets, including analogs of all of the planets in our Solar System with the mass of Mars or greater.'' WFIRST will therefore (a) measure the mass function of cold bound planets with masses greater than that of roughly twice the mass of the moon, including providing an estimate of the frequency of sub-Mars-mass embryos, (b) determine the frequency of free-floating planets with masses down to the Earth and below, (c) inform the frequency and habitability of potentially habitable worlds, and (d) revolutionize our understanding of the demographics of cold planets with its exquisite sensitivity to, and large expected yield of, planets in a broad and unexplored region of parameter space. In order for the microlensing survey to be successful, we must develop a plan to go from actual survey observations obtained by the WFIRST telescope and hardware to the final science products. This plan will involve many steps, the development of software, data reduction, and analysis tools at each step, and a list of requirements for each of these components. The overarching goal of this proposal is thus to develop a complete flowdown from the science goals of the microlensing survey to the mission design and hardware components. We have assembled a team of scientists with the breadth of expertise to achieve this primary goal. Our specific subgoals are as follows. Goal 1: We will refine the input Galactic models in order to provide improved microlensing event rates in the WFIRST fields. Goal 2: We will use the improved event rate estimates, along with improvements in our simulation methodology, to provide higher

  19. MOA-2011-BLG-322Lb: a `second generation survey' microlensing planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Han, C.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.

    2014-03-01

    Global `second-generation' microlensing surveys aim to discover and characterize extrasolar planets and their frequency, by means of round-the-clock high-cadence monitoring of a large area of the Galactic bulge, in a controlled experiment. We report the discovery of a giant planet in microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-322. This moderate-magnification event, which displays a clear anomaly induced by a second lensing mass, was inside the footprint of our second-generation microlensing survey, involving MOA, OGLE and the Wise Observatory. The event was observed by the survey groups, without prompting alerts that could have led to dedicated follow-up observations. Fitting a microlensing model to the data, we find that the time-scale of the event was tE = 23.2 ± 0.8 d, and the mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q = 0.028 ± 0.001. Finite-source effects are marginally detected, and upper limits on them help break some of the degeneracy in the system parameters. Using a Bayesian analysis that incorporates a Galactic structure model, we estimate the mass of the lens at 0.39^{+0.45}_{-0.19} M_{⊙}, at a distance of 7.56 ± 0.91 kpc. Thus, the companion is likely a planet of mass 11.6^{+13.4}_{-5.6} M_J, at a projected separation of 4.3^{+1.5}_{-1.2} AU, rather far beyond the snow line. This is the first pure-survey planet reported from a second-generation microlensing survey, and shows that survey data alone can be sufficient to characterize a planetary model. With the detection of additional survey-only planets, we will be able to constrain the frequency of extrasolar planets near their systems' snow lines.

  20. Identifying Microlenses In Large, Non-uniformly Sampled Surveys: The Case Of PTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agúeros, M.; Fournier, A.; Ofek, E.; Street, R.

    2012-05-01

    Many current photometric, time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as supernova searches, transiting exoplanet discoveries, or stellar variability studies, which set the cadence with which individual fields get re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several such sub-surveys are being conducted in parallel, leading to an extremely non-uniform sampling gradient over the survey footprint of nearly 20,000 deg^2: while the typical 7.26 deg^2 PTF field has been imaged 15 times, 1000 deg^2 of the survey has been observed more than 150 times. We use the existing PTF data to study the trade-off between a large survey footprint and irregular sampling when searching for microlensing events, and to examine the probability that such events can be recovered in these data. We conduct Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate our detection efficiency in a hypothetical survey field as a function of both the baseline and number of observations. We also apply variability statistics to systematically differentiate between periodic, transient, and flat light curves. Preliminary results suggest that both recovery and discovery of microlensing events are possible with a careful consideration of photometric systematics. This work can help inform predictions about the observability of microlensing signals in future wide-field time-domain surveys such as that of LSST.

  1. Microlens masses from astrometry and parallax in space-based surveys: From planets to black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-20

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors ≲ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  2. Microlens Masses from Astrometry and Parallax in Space-based Surveys: From Planets to Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-01

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors <~ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  3. Analysis of Photometric Uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic Bulge Microlensing Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Mróz, P.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; Soszyński, I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical assessment of both, observed and reported, photometric uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic bulge microlensing survey data. This dataset is widely used for the detection of variable stars, transient objects, discovery of microlensing events, and characterization of the exo-planetary systems. Large collections of RR Lyr stars and Cepheids discovered by the OGLE project toward the Galactic bulge provide light curves based on this dataset. We describe the method of analysis, and provide the procedure, which can be used to update preliminary photometric uncertainties, provided with the light curves, to the ones reflecting the actual observed scatter at a given magnitude and for a given CCD detector of the OGLE-IV camera. This is of key importance for data modeling, in particular, for the correct estimation of the goodness of fit.

  4. The POINT-AGAPE survey: comparing automated searches of microlensing events towards M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Carr, B. J.; Weston, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Baillon, P.; Gould, A.; Paulin-Henriksson, S.

    2010-05-01

    Searching for microlensing in M31 using automated superpixel surveys raises a number of difficulties which are not present in more conventional techniques. Here we focus on the problem that the list of microlensing candidates is sensitive to the selection criteria or `cuts' imposed, and some subjectivity is involved in this. Weakening the cuts will generate a longer list of microlensing candidates but with a greater fraction of spurious ones; strengthening the cuts will produce a shorter list but may exclude some genuine events. We illustrate this by comparing three analyses of the same data set obtained from a 3 yr observing run on the Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma. The results of two of these analyses have been already reported: Belokurov et al. obtained between three and 22 candidates, depending on the strength of their cuts, while Calchi Novati et al. obtained six candidates. The third analysis is presented here for the first time and reports 10 microlensing candidates, seven of which are new. Only two of the candidates are common to all three analyses. In order to understand why these analyses produce different candidate lists, a comparison is made of the cuts used by the three groups. Particularly crucial are the method employed to distinguish between a microlensing event and a variable star, and the extent to which one encodes theoretical prejudices into the cuts. Another factor is that the superpixel technique requires the masking of resolved stars and bad pixels. Belokurov et al. and the present analysis use the same input catalogue and the same masks but Calchi Novati et al. use different ones and a somewhat less automated procedure. Because of these considerations, one expects the lists of candidates to vary and it is not possible to pronounce a candidate a definite microlensing event. Indeed we accept that several of our new candidates, especially the long time-scale ones, may not be genuine. This uncertainty also impinges on one of the most

  5. K2 Microlensing and Campaign 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Campaign 9 of K2 will observe a contiguous 3.7 deg^2 region of the Galactic bulge in order to search for microlensing events and measure microlens parallaxes. It will also perform targeted follow-up of approximately 50 microlensing events spread throughout the Kepler focal plane. Parallax measurements are a critical ingredient for measurements of both the lens mass and distance, which contribute to our understanding of the formation of cold exoplanets, and the formation of planets as a function of Galactic environment. Additionally, as the first un-targeted, space-based microlensing survey, K2C9 offers us the first chance to measure the masses and kinematics of a large population of free-floating planet candidates, whose large abundance has been a puzzle since their discovery.I will review the scientific goals of the K2C9 survey, which will be well underway, and report on the ongoing activity of the K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team and the wider microlensing community, with a focus on the progress that has been made towards analyzing K2 data in crowded fields.

  6. A GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT-ENABLED, HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bate, N. F.; Fluke, C. J.

    2012-01-10

    In the era of synoptic surveys, the number of known gravitationally lensed quasars is set to increase by over an order of magnitude. These new discoveries will enable a move from single-quasar studies to investigations of statistical samples, presenting new opportunities to test theoretical models for the structure of quasar accretion disks and broad emission line regions (BELRs). As one crucial step in preparing for this influx of new lensed systems, a large-scale exploration of microlensing convergence-shear parameter space is warranted, requiring the computation of O(10{sup 5}) high-resolution magnification maps. Based on properties of known lensed quasars, and expectations from accretion disk/BELR modeling, we identify regions of convergence-shear parameter space, map sizes, smooth matter fractions, and pixel resolutions that should be covered. We describe how the computationally time-consuming task of producing {approx}290,000 magnification maps with sufficient resolution (10,000{sup 2} pixel map{sup -1}) to probe scales from the inner edge of the accretion disk to the BELR can be achieved in {approx}400 days on a 100 teraflop s{sup -1} high-performance computing facility, where the processing performance is achieved with graphics processing units. We illustrate a use-case for the parameter survey by investigating the effects of varying the lens macro-model on accretion disk constraints in the lensed quasar Q2237+0305. We find that although all constraints are consistent within their current error bars, models with more densely packed microlenses tend to predict shallower accretion disk radial temperature profiles. With a large parameter survey such as the one described here, such systematics on microlensing measurements could be fully explored.

  7. Identifying Microlensing Events in Large, Non-Uniformly Sampled Surveys: The Case of the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agueros, M. A.; Fournier, A.; Street, R.; Ofek, E.; Levitan, D. B.; PTF Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Many current photometric, time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, or studies of stellar variability. These goals in turn set the cadence with which individual fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several such sub-surveys are being conducted in parallel, leading to extremely non-uniform sampling over the survey's nearly 20,000 sq. deg. footprint. While the typical 7.26 sq. deg. PTF field has been imaged 20 times in R-band, ~2300 sq. deg. have been observed more than 100 times. We use the existing PTF data 6.4x107 light curves) to study the trade-off that occurs when searching for microlensing events when one has access to a large survey footprint with irregular sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we also test previous statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that one such statistic, the von Neumann ratio, performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from all PTF fields with >100 observations to uncover a number of interesting candidate events. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large datasets, both of which will be useful to future wide-field, time-domain surveys such as the LSST.

  8. The Angstrom Project: a microlensing survey of the structure and composition of the bulge of the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Newsam, A.; Park, B.-G.

    2006-02-01

    The Andromeda Galaxy Stellar Robotic Microlensing Project (The Angstrom Project) aims to use stellar microlensing events to trace the structure and composition of the inner regions of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). We present microlensing rate and time-scale predictions and spatial distributions for stellar and sub-stellar lens populations in combined disc and barred bulge models of M31. We show that at least half of the stellar microlenses in and around the bulge are expected to have characteristic durations between 1 and 10 d, rising to as much as 80 per cent for brown-dwarf dominated mass functions. These short-duration events are mostly missed by current microlensing surveys that are looking for Macho candidates in the M31 dark matter halo. Our models predict that an intensive monitoring survey programme, such as Angstrom, which will be able to detect events of durations upwards of a day, could detect around 30 events per season within ~5 arcmin of the M31 centre due to ordinary low-mass stars and remnants. This yield increases to more than 60 events for brown-dwarf dominated mass functions. The overall number of events and their average duration are sensitive diagnostics of the bulge mass, in particular the contribution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. The combination of an inclined disc, an offset bar-like bulge, and differences in the bulge and disc luminosity functions results in a four-way asymmetry in the number of events expected in each quadrant defined by the M31 disc axes. The asymmetry is sensitive to the bar prolongation, orientation and mass.

  9. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  10. Criteria for Sample Selection to Maximize Planet Sensitivity and Yield from Space-Based Microlens Parallax Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Nataf, David; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Zhu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Space-based microlens parallax measurements are a powerful tool for understanding planet populations, especially their distribution throughout the Galaxy. However, if space-based observations of the microlensing events must be specifically targeted, it is crucial that microlensing events enter the parallax sample without reference to the known presence or absence of planets. Hence, it is vital to define objective criteria for selecting events where possible and to carefully consider and minimize the selection biases where not possible so that the final sample represents a controlled experiment. We present objective criteria for initiating observations and determining their cadence for a subset of events, and we define procedures for isolating subjective decision making from information about detected planets for the remainder of events. We also define procedures to resolve conflicts between subjective and objective selections. These procedures maximize the planet sensitivity of the sample as a whole by allowing for planet detections even if they occur before satellite observations for objectively selected events and by helping to trigger fruitful follow-up observations for subjectively chosen events. This paper represents our public commitment to these procedures, which is a necessary component of enforcing objectivity on the experimental protocol. They will be implemented for the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign.

  11. Statistical searches for microlensing events in large, non-uniformly sampled time-domain surveys: A test using palomar transient factory data

    SciTech Connect

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-20

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20,000 deg{sup 2} footprint. While the median 7.26 deg{sup 2} PTF field has been imaged ∼40 times in the R band, ∼2300 deg{sup 2} have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 10{sup 9} light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Statistical Searches for Microlensing Events in Large, Non-uniformly Sampled Time-Domain Surveys: A Test Using Palomar Transient Factory Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Laher, Russ R.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ~20,000 deg2 footprint. While the median 7.26 deg2 PTF field has been imaged ~40 times in the R band, ~2300 deg2 have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 109 light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  13. Quasar microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.

    2010-09-01

    Quasar microlensing deals with the effect of compact objects along the line of sight on the apparent brightness of the background quasars. Due to the relative motion between quasar, lenses and observer, the microlensing magnification changes with time which results in uncorrelated brightness variations in the various images of multiple quasar systems. The amplitudes of the signal can be more than a magnitude with time scales of weeks to months to years. The effect is due to the “granular” nature of the gravitational microlenses—stars or other compact objects in the stellar mass range. Quasar microlensing allows to study the quasar accretion disk with a resolution of tens of microarcseconds, hence quasar microlensing can be used to explore an astrophysical field that is hardly accessible by any other means. Quasar microlensing can also be used to study the lensing objects in a statistical sense, their nature (compact or smoothly distributed, normal stars or dark matter) as well as transverse velocities. Quasar microlensing light curves are now being obtained from monitoring programs across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio through the infrared and optical range to the X-ray regime. Recently, spectroscopic microlensing was successfully applied, it provides quantitative comparisons with quasar/accretion disk models. There are now more than a handful of systems with several-year long light curves and significant microlensing signal, lending to detailed analysis. This review summarizes the current state of the art of quasar microlensing and shows that at this point in time, observational monitoring programs and complementary intense simulations provide a scenario where some of the early promises of quasar microlensing can be quantitatively applied. It has been shown, e.g., that smaller sources display more violent microlensing variability, first quantitative comparison with accretion disk models has been achieved, and quasar microlensing has been used to

  14. Microlensing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    The theory and practice of microlensing planet searches is developed in a systematic way, from an elementary treatment of the deflection of light by a massive body to a thorough discussion of the most recent results. The main concepts of planetary microlensing, including microlensing events, finite-source effects, and microlens parallax, are first introduced within the simpler context of point-lens events. These ideas are then applied to binary (and hence planetary) lenses and are integrated with concepts specific to binaries, including caustic topologies, orbital motion, and degeneracies, with an emphasis on analytic understanding. The most important results from microlensing planet searches are then reviewed, with emphasis both on understanding the historical process of discovery and the means by which scientific conclusions were drawn from light-curve analysis. Finally, the future prospects of microlensing planets searches are critically evaluated. Citations to original works provide the reader with multiple entry points into the literature.

  15. Optimal Survey Strategies and Predicted Planet Yields for the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Han, Cheongho; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T.; Nataf, David; Gould, Andrew P.

    2014-10-01

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg2 field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t exp = 120 s, leading to the detection of ~2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 <= Mp /M ⊕ <= 1000 and 0.4 <= a/AU <= 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 <= Mp /M ⊕ <= 1000 and will detect ~20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 <= Mp /M ⊕ < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ~10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ~1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  16. Optimal survey strategies and predicted planet yields for the Korean microlensing telescope network

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T.; Gould, Andrew P.; Han, Cheongho; Nataf, David

    2014-10-10

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg{sup 2} field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t {sub exp} = 120 s, leading to the detection of ∼2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and will detect ∼20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ∼10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ∼1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  17. Microlensing towards the Small Magellanic Cloud EROS 2 first year survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Afonso, C.; Albert, J. N.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, E.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Bouquet, A.; Char, S.; Charlot, X.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Derue, F.; Ferlet, R.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros, M.; Haissinski, J.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hardin, D.; de Kat, J.; Lesquoy, E.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J. B.; Maurice, E.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Perdereau, O.; Prevot, L.; Renault, C.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.; EROS Collaboration

    1998-04-01

    We present here an analysis of the light curves of 5.3 million stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud observed by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres). One star exhibits a variation that is best interpreted as due to gravitational microlensing by an unseen object. This candidate was also reported by the MACHO collaboration. Once corrected for blending, the Einstein radius crossing time is 123 days, corresponding to lensing by a Halo object of 2.6(+8.2}_{-2.3) ;Msun. The maximum magnification is a factor of 2.6. The light curve also displays a periodic modulation with a 2.5% amplitude and a period of 5.1 days. Parallax analysis of the candidate indicates that a Halo lens would need to have a mass of at least 0.3 ; Msun, although a lens in the SMC could have a mass as low as 0.07 ; Msun. We estimate the optical depth for microlensing towards the SMC due to this event to be ~ 3.3 x 10(-7) , with an uncertainty dominated by Poisson statistics. We show that this optical depth corresponds to about half that expected for a spherical isothermal Galactic Halo comprised solely of such objects, and that it is consistent with SMC self-lensing if the SMC is elongated along the line-of-sight by at least 5 kpc. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  18. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  19. Observation of microlensing toward the galactic spiral arms. EROS II 3 year survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derue, F.; Afonso, C.; Alard, C.; Albert, J.-N.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Blanc, G.; Bouquet, A.; Char, S.; Charlot, X.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Fouqué, P.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros, M.; Haïssinski, J.; Hamilton, J.-C.; Hardin, D.; de Kat, J.; Kim, A.; Lasserre, T.; Le Guillou, L.; Lesquoy, É.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J.-B.; Maurice, É.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Prévot, L.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.

    2001-07-01

    We present an analysis of the light curves of 9.1 million stars observed during three seasons by EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), in the Galactic plane away from the bulge. Seven stars exhibit luminosity variations compatible with gravitational microlensing effects due to unseen objects. The corresponding optical depth, averaged over four directions, is bar tau = 0.43 +/- 0.2\\ x\\ 10-6. While this value is compatible with expectations from simple Galactic models under reasonable assumptions on the target star distances, we find an excess of events with short timescales toward the direction closest to the Galactic centre. We discuss a possible interpretation involving the contribution of an elongated bar. This work is based on observations made with the MARLY telescope at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  20. Observation of microlensing towards the galactic spiral arms. EROS II. 2 year survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EROS Collaboration; Derue, F.; Afonso, C.; Alard, C.; Albert, J.-N.; Amadon, A.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bouquet, A.; Char, S.; Charlot, X.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros, M.; Haissinski, J.; Hamilton, J.-C.; Hardin, D.; de Kat, J.; Kim, A.; Lasserre, T.; Lesquoy, É.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J.-B.; Maurice, É.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Prévot, L.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.

    1999-11-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of 8.5 million stars observed during two seasons by EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), in the Galactic plane away from the bulge. Three stars have been found that exhibit luminosity variations compatible with gravitational microlensing effects due to unseen objects. The corresponding optical depth, averaged over four directions, is bar tau = 0.38+0.53_-0.15 x 10-6. All three candidates have long Einstein radius crossing times ( ~ 70 to 100 days). For one of them, the lack of evidence for a parallax or a source size effect enabled us to constrain the lens-source configuration. Another candidate displays a modulation of the magnification, which is compatible with the lensing of a binary source. The interpretation of the optical depths inferred from these observations is hindered by the imperfect knowledge of the distance to the target stars. Our measurements are compatible with expectations from simple galactic models under reasonable assumptions on the target distances. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  1. OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048Lb: A Giant Planet Orbiting a Low-mass Bulge Star Discovered by High-cadence Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Jung, Y. K.; Albrow, M. D.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; Shin, I.-G.; KMTNet Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of an extrasolar planet detected from the combined data of a microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048 acquired by two microlensing surveys. Despite the fact that the short planetary signal occurred in the very early Bulge season during which the lensing event could be seen for just about an hour, the signal was continuously and densely covered. From the Bayesian analysis using models of the mass function, and matter and velocity distributions, combined with information on the angular Einstein radius, it is found that the host of the planet is located in the Galactic bulge. The planet has a mass {0.72}-0.07+0.65 {M}{{J}} and it is orbiting a low-mass M-dwarf host with a projected separation {d}\\perp =0.73+/- 0.08 {{au}}. The discovery of the planet demonstrates the capability of the current high-cadence microlensing lensing surveys in detecting and characterizing planets.

  2. The microlensing rate and distribution of free-floating planets towards the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, M.; Kerins, E.; Robin, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Ground-based optical microlensing surveys have provided tantalising, if inconclusive, evidence for a significant population of free-floating planets (FFPs). Both ground- and space-based facilities are being used and developed which will be able to probe the distrubution of FFPs with much better sensitivity. It is also vital to develop a high-precision microlensing simulation framework to evaluate the completeness of such surveys. Aims: We present the first signal-to-noise limited calculations of the FFP microlensing rate using the Besançon Galactic model. The microlensing distribution towards the Galactic centre is simulated for wide-area ground-based optical surveys (I-band) such as OGLE or MOA, a wide-area ground-based near-infrared survey (K-band), and a targeted space-based near-infrared survey (H-band) which could be undertaken with Euclid or WFIRST. Methods: We present a calculation framework for the computation of the optical and near-infrared microlensing rate and optical depth for simulated stellar catalogues which are signal-to-noise limited, and take account of extinction, unresolved stellar background light, and finite source size effects, which can be significant for FFPs. Results: We find that the global ground-based I-band yield over a central 200 deg2 region covering the Galactic centre ranges from 20 Earth-mass FFPs yr-1 up to 3500 yr-1 for Jupiter FFPs in the limit of 100% detection efficiency, and almost an order of magnitude larger for a K-band survey. For ground-based surveys we find that the inclusion of finite source and the unresolved background reveals a mass-dependent variation in the spatial distribution of FFPs. For a targeted space-based H-band covering 2 deg2, the yield depends on the target field but maximises close to the Galactic centre with around 76 Earth to 1700 Jupiter FFPs per year. For near-IR space-based surveys like Euclid or WFIRST the spatial distribution of FFPs is found to be largely insensitive to the FFP mass

  3. Detecting Extrasolar Asteroid Belts Through Their Microlensing Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan; Zheng, Zheng; Dong, Subo

    2016-03-01

    We propose that extrasolar asteroid belts can be detected through their gravitational microlensing signatures and present a simple theoretical understanding of how asteroid belts behave as gravitational lenses. Asteroid belt + star lens systems create so-called ``pseudo-caustics'', which are regions in the source plane where the magnification of the source exhibits a discontinuous jump. Such a magnification change can be associated with either a change in image multiplicity or with a sudden change in the size of an image. The existence of pseudo-caustics and the complex interplay between them and the formal caustics (which possess formally infinite magnification) lead to several interesting consequences, such as the presence of open caustics and the violation of Burke's theorem. These features allow such systems to generate very distinctive microlensing light curves across a wide region of asteroid belt parameter space and possess remarkably large lensing cross-sections. By constructing simulated light curves for a range of asteroid belt parameters, we demonstrate that upcoming space-based microlensing surveys like WFIRST are well-poised to discover extrasolar asteroid belts with masses on the order of 0 . 1M⊕ .

  4. Interferometric observation of microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, Arnaud; Ranc, Clément

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric observations of microlensing events have the potential to provide unique constraints on the physical properties of the lensing systems. In this work, we first present a formalism that closely combines interferometric and microlensing observable quantities, which lead us to define an original microlensing (u, v) plane. We run simulations of long-baseline interferometric observations and photometric light curves to decide which observational strategy is required to obtain a precise measurement on vector Einstein radius. We finally perform a detailed analysis of the expected number of targets in the light of new microlensing surveys (2011+) which currently deliver 2000 alerts per year. We find that a few events are already at reach of long-baseline interferometers (CHARA, VLTI), and a rate of about six events per year is expected with a limiting magnitude of K ≃ 10. This number would increase by an order of magnitude by raising it to K ≃ 11. We thus expect that a new route for characterizing microlensing events will be opened by the upcoming generations of interferometers.

  5. Rapidly rotating lenses: repeating features in the light curves of short-period binary microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew T.; Kerins, Eamonn; Mao, Shude

    2011-11-01

    Microlensing is most sensitive to binary lenses with relatively large orbital separations, and as such, typical binary microlensing events show little or no orbital motion during the event. However, despite the strength of binary microlensing features falling off rapidly as the lens separation decreases, we show that it is possible to detect repeating features in the light curve of binary microlenses that complete several orbits during the microlensing event. We investigate the light-curve features of such rapidly rotating lens (RRL) events. We derive analytical limits on the range of parameters where these effects are detectable, and confirm these numerically. Using a population synthesis Galactic model, we estimate the RRL event rate for a ground-based and a space-based microlensing survey to be 0.32fb and 7.8fb events per year, respectively, assuming year-round monitoring, where fb is the binary fraction. We detail how RRL event parameters can be quickly estimated from their light curves, and suggest a method to model RRL events using timing measurements of light-curve features. Modelling RRL light curves will yield the lens orbital period and possibly measurements of all orbital elements, including the inclination and eccentricity. Measurement of the period from the light curve allows a mass-distance relation to be defined, which when combined with a measurement of microlens parallax or finite-source effects can yield a mass measurement to a twofold degeneracy. With sub-per cent accuracy photometry, it is possible to detect planetary companions, but the likelihood of this is very small.

  6. Microlensing, brown dwarfs and Gaia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    The GAIA satellite can precisely measure the masses of nearby brown dwarfs and lower main sequence stars by the microlensing effect. The scientific yield is maximised if the microlensing event is also followed with ground-based telesecopes to provide densely sampled photometry. There are two possible strategies. First, ongoing events can be triggered by photometric or astrometric alerts by GAIA. Second, events can be predicted using known high proper motion stars as lenses. This is much easier, as the location and time of an event can be forecast. Using the GAIA source density, we estimate that the sample size of high proper motion (>300 mas yr-1) brown dwarfs needed to provide predictable events during the 5 year mission lifetime is surprisingly small, only of the order of tens. This is comparable to the number of high proper motion brown dwarfs already known from the work of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and the all-sky WISE satellite. Provided the relative parallax of the lens and the angular Einstein radius can be recovered from astrometric data, then the mass of the lens can be found. Microlensing provides the only way of measuring the masses of individual objects irrespective of their luminosity. So, microlensing with GAIA is the best way to carry out an inventory of masses in the solar neighbourhood in the brown dwarf regime.

  7. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-03-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (≳2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form {d}2{N}{{pl}}/(d{log} {m}p d{log} a)={ A }{({m}p/{M}{{Sat}})}α {(a/2.5{{AU}})}β with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of aout. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters \\{α ,β ,{ A },{a}{{out}}\\} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent with the results of microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find median and 68% confindence intervals of α =-{0.86}-0.19+0.21 (-{0.85}-0.19+0.21), β ={1.1}-1.4+1.9 ({1.1}-1.3+1.9), { A }={0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2 ({0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2), and {a}{{out}}={10}-4.7+26 AU ({12}-6.2+50 AU) assuming “hot-start” (“cold-start”) planet evolutionary models. These values are consistent with all current knowledge of planets on orbits beyond ∼2 AU around single M dwarfs.

  8. Searching for Frozen Super Earth via Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    Microlensing planet hunt is a unique method to probe efficiently for frozen Super Earth orbiting the most common stars of our galaxy. It is nicely complementing the parameter space probed by very high accuracy radial velocity measurements and future space based detections of low mass transiting planets. In order to maximize the planet catch, the microlensing community is engaged in a total cooperation among the different groups (OGLE, MicroFUN, MOA, PLANET/RoboNET) by making the real time data available, and mutual informing/reporting about modeling efforts. Eight planets have been published so far by combinations of the different groups, 4 Jovian analogues, one Neptune and two Super Earth. Given the microlensing detection efficiency, it suggests that these Neptunes/Super Earths may be quite common. Using networks of dedicated 1-2m class telescopes, the microlensing community has entered a new phase of planet discoveries, and will be able to provide constraints on the abundance of frozen Super-Earths in the near future. Statistics about Mars to Earth mass planets, extending to the habitable zone will be achieved with space based wide field imagers (EUCLID) at the horizon 2017.

  9. Predicting Future Space-Based Slitless Spectroscopic Surveys Using the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, James W.; Teplitz, H.; Malkan, M.; Atek, H.; Ross, N.; Siana, B.; Henry, A.; McCarthy, P.; Bunker, A.; Scarlata, C.

    2012-01-01

    Future space telescopes are likely to make extensive use of slitless grism spectroscopy in the near-IR over large areas of sky. Both ESA's recently selected Euclid mission and the WFIRST mission being studied by NASA plan slitless spectroscopic surveys to obtain redshifts over thousands of square degrees. The HST WFC3 camera has two near-infrared grisms, G102 and G141, covering 0.8-1.6 microns, making it perfect the perfect laboratory for predicting what these future missions will find. We present results from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program, which has been taking deep WFC3 observations using both grisms at random locations across the sky in parallel with primary COS observations. The WISP survey presently consists of more than 150 fields, covering 700 square arcminutes, reaching fluxes of 5 x 10-17 ergs/s/cm2. We will present completeness corrected number counts, luminosity functions, and predicted counts for the proposed future missions. We will also discuss the issue of line identification of the emission lines, particularly H-alpha and [OIII]5007 which often have similar fluxes and equivalent widths.

  10. Dynamics and Origin of Extra-solar Planetary Systems and Microlensing Detection of Extra-solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    We compare a space-based microlensing search for planets, with a ground based microlensing search originally proposed by D. Tytler (Beichman, et al. 1996). Perturbations of microlensing light curves when the lens star has a planetary companion are sought by one wide angle survey telescope and an array of three or four followup narrow angle telescopes distributed in longitude that follow events with high precision, high time resolution photometry. Alternative ground based programs are considered briefly. With the four 2 meter telescopes distributed in longitude in the southern hemisphere in the Tytler proposal, observational constraints on a ground-based search for planets during microlensing events toward the center of the galaxy are severe. Probably less than 100 events could be monitored per year with high precision, high time resolution photometry with only about 42% coverage on the average regardless of how many events were discovered by the survey telescope. Statistics for the occurrence and properties for Jupiter-mass planets would be meaningful but relatively meager four years after the program was started, and meaningful statistics for Earth-mass planets would be non existent. In contrast, the 14,500 events in a proposed 4 year space based program (GEST = Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope) would yield very sound statistics on the occurrence, masses and separations of Jupiter-mass planets, and significant constraints on similar properties for Earth-mass planets. The significance of the Jupiter statistics would be to establish the frequency of planetary systems like our own, where terrestrial planets could exist inside the orbits of the giants.

  11. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  12. Planetesimal Disk Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  13. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  14. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-04-20

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M {sub E} planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M {sub E} planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  15. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for the SETI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-09-01

    The detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the most challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet that harbors Extraterrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. Currently, gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of the Galactic bulge to search for microlensing events, finding more than 2000 events per year. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes, and, in some instances, they can magnify radio band signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that the frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the Low Frequency Demonstrators, and the Mileura Wide-Field Array. Amplifying signals from the leakage of broadcasting by an Earth-like civilization will allow us to detect them as far as the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Our analysis shows that in binary microlensing systems, the probability of amplification of signals from ETIs is more than that in single microlensing events. Finally, we propose the use of the target of opportunity mode for follow-up observations of binary microlensing events with SKA as a new observational program for searching ETIs. Using optimistic values for the factors of the Drake equation provides detection of about one event per year.

  16. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  17. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  18. THE MICROLENSING PROPERTIES OF A SAMPLE OF 87 LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, A. M.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing is a powerful tool for probing the physical properties of quasar accretion disks and properties of the lens galaxy such as its dark matter fraction and mean stellar mass. Unfortunately, the number of lensed quasars ({approx}90) exceeds our monitoring capabilities. Thus, estimating their microlensing properties is important for identifying good microlensing candidates as well as for the expectations of future surveys. In this work, we estimate the microlensing properties of a sample of 87 lensed quasars. While the median Einstein radius crossing timescale is 20.6 years, the median source crossing timescale is 7.3 months. Broadly speaking, this means that on {approx}10 year timescales roughly half the lenses will be quiescent, with the source in a broad demagnified valley, and roughly half will be active with the source lying in the caustic ridges. We also found that the location of the lens system relative to the cosmic microwave background dipole has a modest effect on microlensing timescales, and in theory microlensing could be used to confirm the kinematic origin of the dipole. As a corollary of our study we analyzed the accretion rate parameters in a sub-sample of 32 lensed quasars. At fixed black hole mass, it is possible to sample a broad range of luminosities (i.e., Eddington factors) if it becomes feasible to monitor fainter lenses.

  19. Extrasolar planets detections and statistics through gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, A.

    2014-10-01

    -mass objects, including free-floating planets of about Jupiter's mass, were also detected trough microlensing. Detections and non-detections inform us on the abundance of planets as a function of planetary mass and orbital distance. Recent microlensing studies imply that low-mass planets, in particular super-Earths, are far more abundant than giant planets, and reveal that there are, on average, one or more bound planets per Milky Way star. Future microlensing surveys will dramatically increase the number of microlensing alerts, thus providing unprecedented constraints on the planetary mass function, down to the mass of the Earth.

  20. Difference Image Analysis of Galactic Microlensing. II. Microlensing Events

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.

    1999-09-01

    The MACHO collaboration has been carrying out difference image analysis (DIA) since 1996 with the aim of increasing the sensitivity to the detection of gravitational microlensing. This is a preliminary report on the application of DIA to galactic bulge images in one field. We show how the DIA technique significantly increases the number of detected lensing events, by removing the positional dependence of traditional photometry schemes and lowering the microlensing event detection threshold. This technique, unlike PSF photometry, gives the unblended colors and positions of the microlensing source stars. We present a set of criteria for selecting microlensing events from objects discovered with this technique. The 16 pixel and classical microlensing events discovered with the DIA technique are presented. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  1. a Theoretical Calculation of Microlensing Signatures Caused by Free-Floating Planets Towards the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamolli, L.; Hafizi, M.; Nucita, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    Free-floating planets (FFPs) are recently drawing a special interest of the scientific community. Gravitational microlensing is up to now the exclusive method for the investigation of FFPs, including their spatial distribution function and mass function. In this paper, we examine the possibility that the future Euclid space-based observatory may allow to discover a substantial number of microlensing events caused by FFPs. Based on latest results about the free-floating planet (FFP) mass function in the mass range [10-5, 10-2]M⊙, we calculate the optical depth towards the Galactic bulge as well as the expected microlensing rate and find that Euclid may be able to detect hundreds to thousands of these events per month. Making use of a synthetic population, we also investigate the possibility of detecting parallax effect in simulated microlensing events due to FFPs and find a significant efficiency for the parallax detection that turns out to be around 30%.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE microlensing events in Galactic Bulge (Udalski+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Zebrun, K.; Szymanski, M.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Wozniak, P.

    2006-09-01

    We present the Catalog of microlensing events detected toward the Galactic bulge in three observing seasons, 1997-1999, during the OGLE-II microlensing survey. The search for microlensing events was performed using a database of about 4x109 photometric measurements of about 20.5 million stars from the Galactic bulge. The Catalog comprises 214 microlensing events found in the fields covering about 11 square degrees on the sky and distributed in different parts of the Galactic bulge. The sample includes 20 binary microlensing events, 14 of them are caustic crossing. In one case a double star is likely lensed. We present distribution of the basic parameters of microlensing events and show preliminary rate of microlensing in different regions of the Galactic bulge. The latter reveals clear dependence on the Galactic coordinates. The dependence on l indicates that the majority of lenses toward the Galactic bulge are located in the Galactic bar. Models of the Galactic bar seem to reasonably predict the observed spatial distribution of microlensing events in the Galactic bulge. All data presented in the Catalog and photometry of all events are available from the OGLE Internet archive. (3 data files).

  3. A Space-Based Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope in Support of Human Exploration, Solar System Science, and Planetary Defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of near-Earth objects (NEOs) beginning in 2025 is one of the stated objectives of U.S. National Space Policy. Piloted missions to these bodies would further development of deep space mission systems and technologies, obtain better understanding of the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and support research for asteroid deflection and hazard mitigation strategies. As such, mission concepts have received much interest from the exploration, science, and planetary defense communities. One particular system that has been suggested by all three of these communities is a space-based NEO survey telescope. Such an asset is crucial for enabling affordable human missions to NEOs circa 2025 and learning about the primordial population of objects that could present a hazard to the Earth in the future.

  4. A new parameter space study of cosmological microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing is a useful technique for understanding the structure of the inner parts of a quasar, especially the accretion disc and the central supermassive black hole. So far, most of the cosmological microlensing studies have focused on single objects from ˜90 currently known lensed quasars. However, present and planned all-sky surveys are expected to discover thousands of new lensed systems. Using a graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated ray-shooting code, we have generated 2550 magnification maps uniformly across the convergence (κ) and shear (γ) parameter space of interest to microlensing. We examine the effect of random realizations of the microlens positions on map properties such as the magnification probability distribution (MPD). It is shown that for most of the parameter space a single map is representative of an average behaviour. All of the simulations have been carried out on the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysics Research.

  5. BINARY ASTROMETRIC MICROLENSING WITH GAIA

    SciTech Connect

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-04-15

    We investigate whether or not Gaia can specify the binary fractions of massive stellar populations in the Galactic disk through astrometric microlensing. Furthermore, we study whether or not some information about their mass distributions can be inferred via this method. In this regard, we simulate the binary astrometric microlensing events due to massive stellar populations according to the Gaia observing strategy by considering (i) stellar-mass black holes, (ii) neutron stars, (iii) white dwarfs, and (iv) main-sequence stars as microlenses. The Gaia efficiency for detecting the binary signatures in binary astrometric microlensing events is ∼10%–20%. By calculating the optical depth due to the mentioned stellar populations, the numbers of the binary astrometric microlensing events being observed with Gaia with detectable binary signatures, for the binary fraction of about 0.1, are estimated to be 6, 11, 77, and 1316, respectively. Consequently, Gaia can potentially specify the binary fractions of these massive stellar populations. However, the binary fraction of black holes measured with this method has a large uncertainty owing to a low number of the estimated events. Knowing the binary fractions in massive stellar populations helps with studying the gravitational waves. Moreover, we investigate the number of massive microlenses for which Gaia specifies masses through astrometric microlensing of single lenses toward the Galactic bulge. The resulting efficiencies of measuring the mass of mentioned populations are 9.8%, 2.9%, 1.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. The numbers of their astrometric microlensing events being observed in the Gaia era in which the lens mass can be inferred with the relative error less than 0.5 toward the Galactic bulge are estimated as 45, 34, 76, and 786, respectively. Hence, Gaia potentially gives us some information about the mass distribution of these massive stellar populations.

  6. The MACHO Project HST Follow-Up: The Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Source Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Drake, A.J.; Cook, K.H.; Bennett, D.P.; Popowski, P.; Dalal, N.; Nikolaev, S.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, A.C. Freeman, K.C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Keller, S.C.; Lehner, M.J.; Marshall, S.L.; Minniti, D.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Stubbs, C.W.; Sutherland, W.; /Oxford U. /Oran, Sci. Tech. U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /McMaster U.

    2009-06-25

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at {approx}> 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.

  7. Liquid Tunable Microlenses based on MEMS techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-01-01

    The recent rapid development in microlens technology has provided many opportunities for miniaturized optical systems, and has found a wide range of applications. Of these microlenses, tunable-focus microlenses are of special interest as their focal lengths can be tuned using micro-scale actuators integrated with the lens structure. Realization of such tunable microlens generally relies on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in tunable liquid microlenses. The underlying physics relevant to these microlenses are first discussed, followed by description of three main categories of tunable microlenses involving MEMS techniques, mechanically driven, electrically driven, and those integrated within microfluidic systems. PMID:24163480

  8. Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forthcoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order au. For the case of observers at rest, we discuss the well-known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account themotion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. In particular, we discuss the cases of the amplitude of the microlensing parallax and that of the difference of the timescales between the observed microlensing events, which are key to understand the breaking of the microlensing parallax degeneracy. Finally, we consider the case of the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from the ground and two satellites, a case relevant for the expected joint K2 and Spitzer observational programs in 2016.

  9. Bohdan Paczyński, Cosmic Dark Matter, and Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.

    2009-03-01

    Bohdan Paczyński set in motion a dramatic series of investigations with his deceptively simple paper \\citep{1986ApJ...304....1P} on gravitational microlensing and dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way. Several major survey projects were direct consequences of this seminal paper, in particular MACHO, EROS, and OGLE. These surveys led to the discovery of gravitational microlensing and to the first useful limits on any proposed candidate for the elusive dark matter. The surveys were the first massive photometric surveys in our field and have revolutionized temporal studies of astronomical objects, ranging from variable stars to quasars and AGNs.

  10. Brown dwarfs detections through microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, C.; Cassan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational microlensing is known to be a powerful method to hunt for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Recently, several brown dwarfs companions to stars have been detected through microlensing, as well as brown dwarfs binaries. We present the discovery of a new ˜ 40 M_{J} brown dwarf orbiting a K-dwarf at ˜ 4 AU, located at ˜ 4 kpc from the Earth. Besides using the standard photometric light curves gathered from different round-the-world observatories, its characterization involved high-resolution adaptative optics measurements from NaCo at VLT which allowed to break the degeneracies between the physical parameters and provide the exact mass and projected separation of the system.

  11. HST imaging of MEGA Microlensing Candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Cseresnjes, Patrick; Crotts, Arlin P.S.; de Jong, Jelte T.A.; Bergier, Alex; Baltz, Edward A.; Gyuk, Geza; Kuijken, Konrad; Widrow, Lawrence M.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Leiden Observ. /Queen's U., Kingston

    2005-07-14

    We investigate HST/ACS and WFPC2 images at the positions of five candidate microlensing events from a large survey of variability in M31 (MEGA). Three closely match unresolved sources, and two produce only flux upper limits. All are confined to regions of the color-magnitude diagram where stellar variability is unlikely to be easily confused with microlensing. Red variable stars cannot explain these events (although background supernova are possible for two). If these lenses arise in M31's halo, they are due to masses 0.08 < m/M{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.85 (95% certainty, for a {delta}-function mass distribution), brown dwarfs for disk/disk, and stellar masses for disk/bulge ''self-lensing''.

  12. Microlensing by Kuiper, Oort, and Free-Floating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing is generally thought to probe planetary systems only out to a few Einstein radii. Microlensing events generated by bound planets beyond about 10 Einstein radii generally do not yield any trace of their hosts, and so would be classified as free floating planets (FFPs). I show that it is already possible, using adaptive optics (AO), to constrain the presence of potential hosts to FFP candidates at separations comparable to the Oort Cloud. With next-generation telescopes, planets at Kuiper-Belt separations can be probed. Next generation telescopes will also permit routine vetting for all FFP candidates, simply by obtaining second epochs 4-8 years after the event.At present, the search for such hosts is restricted to within the ``confusion limit'' of θ_\\confus ˜ 0.25'' but future WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) observations will allow one to probe beyond this confusion limit as well.

  13. Space based OTV servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Space based servicing of an orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) was previously outlined in sufficient detail to arrive at OTV and support system servicing requirements. Needed space station facilities and their functional requirements were identified. The impact of logistics and space serviceable design on the OTV design is detailed herein. RL10 derivative rocket engine inspection task times are enumerated.

  14. Space base antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1971-01-01

    The field of view required of the space base antenna is defined for both the tracking and data relay satellite link and detached module links. The gain requirements are established and the feasibility of alternative antenna configurations using phased arrays and reflectors are considered. One recommended and one alternative configuration are presented for each of the required links.

  15. Detection of extrasolar planets via microlensing and occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safizadeh, Neda

    2001-07-01

    As recently as five years ago, no extrasolar planetary companions of main sequence stars had been identified. The discovery 51 Peg b by Mayor & Queloz [49], was the first of many planetary detections. Since then, over fifty other planets have been found, all with the radial velocity technique. Here, we give an overview of various detection strategies for planets. We discuss studies in three separate areas of searching for extrasolar planets; high magnification and astrometric deviations during a microlensing event given a lens with a planetary companion, and the observational progress of a planet transit survey. We study the effects of a planetary companion to the lens during a microlensing event with numerical methods. By studying the photometric light curve of a microlensing event during its peak amplification, we find that a planetary signature can be definitively detected in the lensing zone (0.6-1.6 Einstein Ring Radii or RE) for masses greater than Jupiter's. The probability remains substantial for Saturn and even 10 Earth masses. The peak of the event can be predicted in advance, allowing for extrasolar planet detection with a relatively small use of resources over a short period of time. We introduce a new method of searching for extrasolar planets by monitoring the astrometric deviations of the source star during a microlensing event. We show that astrometric deviation curves can give information about the presence of a planet and allow for parameter extraction. By monitoring the center-of-light motion of microlensing alerts using high precision astrometric instruments, the probability of detecting a planet orbiting the lens is high. The addition of astrometric information to the photometric microlensing light curve greatly helps in determining the planetary mass and projected separation. We introduce a new numerical method for calculating astrometric motion and detecting probabilities. Lastly, we search for planet transits in old, relatively metal rich

  16. The nature of parallax microlensing events towards the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin C.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn; Mao, Shude; An, Jin H.

    2005-07-01

    Perhaps as many as 30 parallax microlensing events are known, thanks to the efforts of the Massive Compact Halo Object (MACHO), Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE), Experience pour la Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) and Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) experiments monitoring the bulge. Using Galactic models, we construct mock catalogues of microlensing light curves towards the bulge, allowing for the uneven sampling and observational error bars of the OGLE-II experiment. As a working definition of a parallax event, we require the improvement Δχ2 on incorporating parallax effects in the microlensing light curve to exceed 50. This enables us to carry out a fair comparison between our theoretical predictions and the observations. The fraction of parallax events in the OGLE-II data base is ~1 per cent, though higher fractions are reported by some other surveys. This is in accord with expectations from standard Galactic models. The fraction of parallax events depends strongly on the Einstein crossing time tE, being less than 5 per cent at tE~ 50 d but rising to 50 per cent at tE>~ 1 yr. We find that the existence of parallax signatures is essentially controlled by the acceleration of the observer normalized to the projected Einstein radius on the observer plane divided by t2E. The properties of the parallax events - time-scales, projected velocities, source and lens locations - in our mock catalogues are analysed. Typically, ~38 per cent of parallax events are caused by a disc star microlensing a bulge source, while ~33 per cent are caused by a disc star microlensing a disc source (of these disc sources, one sixth are at a distance of 5 kpc or less). There is a significant shift in mean time-scale from 32 d for all events to ~130 d for our parallax events. There are corresponding shifts for other parameters, such as the lens-source velocity projected on to the observer plane (~1110 km s-1 for all events versus ~80 km s-1 for parallax

  17. The frequency of snowline-region planets from four years of OGLE-MOA-Wise second-generation microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Fukui, A.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a `second-generation' microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg2 of the Galactic bulge by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE), Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA), and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12 per cent of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for ˜one-third of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events, we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that 55^{+34}_{-22} per cent of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptune-mass planets are ˜10 times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass-ratio distribution shows a deficit at q ˜ 10-2, separating the distribution into two companion populations, analogous to the stellar-companion and planet populations, seen in radial-velocity surveys around solar-like stars. Our survey, however, which probes mainly lower mass stars, suggests a minimum in the distribution in the super-Jupiter mass range, and a relatively high occurrence of brown-dwarf companions.

  18. The OGLE-III planet detection efficiency from six years of microlensing observations (2003-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Horne, K.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Street, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bozza, V.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.

    2016-04-01

    We use six years (2003-2008) of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment-III microlensing observations to derive the survey detection efficiency for a range of planetary masses and projected distances from the host star. We perform an independent analysis of the microlensing light curves to extract the event parameters and compute the planet detection probability given the data. 2433 light curves satisfy our quality selection criteria and are retained for further processing. The aggregate of the detection probabilities over the range explored yields the expected number of microlensing planet detections. We employ a Galactic model to convert this distribution from dimensionless to physical units, α/au and M⊕. The survey sensitivity to small planets is highest in the range 1-4 au, shifting to slightly larger separations for more massive ones.

  19. GERLUMPH DATA RELEASE 1: HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS AND eResearch TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Croton, D.; Bate, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    As synoptic all-sky surveys begin to discover new multiply lensed quasars, the flow of data will enable statistical cosmological microlensing studies of sufficient size to constrain quasar accretion disk and supermassive black hole properties. In preparation for this new era, we are undertaking the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). We present here the GERLUMPH Data Release 1, which consists of 12,342 high resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and provides the first uniform coverage of the convergence, shear, and smooth matter fraction parameter space. We use these maps to perform a comprehensive numerical investigation of the mass-sheet degeneracy, finding excellent agreement with its predictions. We study the effect of smooth matter on microlensing induced magnification fluctuations. In particular, in the minima and saddle-point regions, fluctuations are enhanced only along the critical line, while in the maxima region they are always enhanced for high smooth matter fractions (≈0.9). We describe our approach to data management, including the use of an SQL database with a Web interface for data access and online analysis, obviating the need for individuals to download large volumes of data. In combination with existing observational databases and online applications, the GERLUMPH archive represents a fundamental component of a new microlensing eResearch cloud. Our maps and tools are publicly available at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au/.

  20. Unbound or distant planetary mass population detected by gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    2011-05-19

    Since 1995, more than 500 exoplanets have been detected using different techniques, of which 12 were detected with gravitational microlensing. Most of these are gravitationally bound to their host stars. There is some evidence of free-floating planetary-mass objects in young star-forming regions, but these objects are limited to massive objects of 3 to 15 Jupiter masses with large uncertainties in photometric mass estimates and their abundance. Here, we report the discovery of a population of unbound or distant Jupiter-mass objects, which are almost twice (1.8(+1.7)(-0.8)) as common as main-sequence stars, based on two years of gravitational microlensing survey observations towards the Galactic Bulge. These planetary-mass objects have no host stars that can be detected within about ten astronomical units by gravitational microlensing. However, a comparison with constraints from direct imaging suggests that most of these planetary-mass objects are not bound to any host star. An abrupt change in the mass function at about one Jupiter mass favours the idea that their formation process is different from that of stars and brown dwarfs. They may have formed in proto-planetary disks and subsequently scattered into unbound or very distant orbits.

  1. Recent developments in gravitational microlensing and the latest MACHO results: Microlensing towards the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P. |; Alcock, C. |; Allsman, R.A.; Axelrod, T.S.; Cook, K.H. |; Freeman, K.C.; Griest, K. |; Marshall, S.L. |; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B.A.; Pratt, M.R. |; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Stubbs, C.W.

    1995-07-01

    We review recent gravitational microlensing results from the EROS, MACHO, and OGLE collaborations, and present some details of the very latest MACHO results toward the Galactic Bulge, The MACHO collaboration has now discovered in excess of 40 microlensing events toward the Galactic Bulge during the 1993 observing season. A preliminary analysis of this data suggests a much higher microlensing optical depth than predicted by standard galactic models suggesting that these models will have to be revised. This may have important implications for the structure of the Galaxy and its dark halo. Also shown are MACHO data of the first microlensing event ever detected substantially before peak amplification, the first detection of parallax effects in a microlensing event, and the first caustic crossing to be resolved in a microlensing event. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Eclipsing negative-parity image of gravitational microlensing by a giant-lens star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational microlensing has been used as a powerful tool for astrophysical studies and exoplanet detections. In the gravitational microlensing, we have two images with negative and positive parities. The negative-parity image is a fainter image and is produced at a closer angular separation with respect to the lens star. In the case of a red-giant lens star and large impact parameter of lensing, this image can be eclipsed by the lens star. The result would be dimming the flux receiving from the combination of the source and the lens stars and the light curve resembles to an eclipsing binary system. In this work, we introduce this phenomenon and propose an observational procedure for detecting this eclipse. The follow-up microlensing telescopes with lucky imaging camera or space-based telescopes can produce high-resolution images from the events with reddish sources and confirm the possibility of blending due to the lens star. After conforming a red-giant lens star and source star, we can use the advance photometric methods and detect the relative flux change during the eclipse in the order of 10-4-10-3. Observation of the eclipse provides the angular size of source star in the unit of Einstein angle and combination of this observation with the parallax observation enable us to calculate the mass of lens star. Finally, we analysed seven microlensing event and show the feasibility of observation of this effect in future observations.

  3. Space Based Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Denson, Erik; Valencia, Lisa; Birr, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Current space lift launches on the Eastern and Western Range require extensive ground-based real-time tracking, communications and command/control systems. These are expensive to maintain and operate and cover only limited geographical areas. Future spaceports will require new technologies to provide greater launch and landing opportunities, support simultaneous missions, and offer enhanced decision support models and simulation capabilities. These ranges must also have lower costs and reduced complexity while continuing to provide unsurpassed safety to the public, flight crew, personnel, vehicles and facilities. Commercial and government space-based assets for tracking and communications offer many attractive possibilities to help achieve these goals. This paper describes two NASA proof-of-concept projects that seek-to exploit the advantages of a space-based range: Iridium Flight Modem and Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS). Iridium Flight Modem uses the commercial satellite system Iridium for extremely low cost, low rate two-way communications and has been successfully tested on four aircraft flights. A sister project at Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) using the Globalstar system has been tested on one rocket. The basic Iridium Flight Modem system consists of a L1 carrier Coarse/Acquisition (C/A)-Code Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an on-board computer, and a standard commercial satellite modem and antennas. STARS uses the much higher data rate NASA owned Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), a C/A-Code GPS receiver, an experimental low-power transceiver, custom built command and data handler processor, and digitized flight termination system (FTS) commands. STARS is scheduled to fly on an F-15 at Dryden Flight Research Center in the spring of 2003, with follow-on tests over the next several years.

  4. Looking for dark matter via gravitational microlensing: A report from the MACHO collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.R. |; Alcock, C. |; Allsman, R.A.; Axelrod, T.S. |; Bennett, D.P. |; Chan, S.; Cook, K.H.; Freeman, K.C.; Griest, K. |; Marshall, S.L. |; Peterson, B.A.; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Stubbs, C.W. |

    1995-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that the mass of ordinary galaxies, like our own, is much greater than that measured in the form of stars, gas, and dust. If this dark matter is in the form of compact objects it can be detected via gravitational microlensing of background stars. The MACHO project is in its second year of a time resolved photometric survey of the Magellanic Clouds and galactic bulge to search for the rare microlensing signature of compact objects in the halo and disk of our galaxy. We are using a dedicated 1.3-m telescope at Mt. Stromlo Observatory and a dual focal plane CCD mosaic camera with a 0.5 square degree field to image up to 10 million stars per night simultaneously in two passbands. As of October 1994, 26,000 images have been taken with this system. A preliminary analysis of more than 8 million stars in the LMC for one year has yielded three stars which undergo time-symmetric achromatic photometric excursions consistent with gravitational microlensing. In a similar analysis of {approximately}10 million stars in the galactic bulge we have also found more than 40 likely microlensing candidates, several of which reach peak amplifications of greater than ten. The relatively high rate toward the bulge is consistent with a {open_quote}{open_quote}maximal{close_quote}{close_quote} disk that accounts for most of the galactic mass interior to the solar radius or microlensing by a galactic bar.

  5. The advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for observations of microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for the observations of potential planetary microlensing events. Our aim is to reduce the blending effect and enhance exoplanet signals in binary lensing systems composed of an exoplanet and the corresponding parent star. We simulate planetary microlensing light curves based on present microlensing surveys and follow-up telescopes where one of them is equipped with a Lucky Imaging camera. This camera is used at the Danish 1.54-m follow-up telescope. Using a specific observational strategy, for an Earth-mass planet in the resonance regime, where the detection probability in crowded fields is smaller, Lucky Imaging observations improve the detection efficiency which reaches 2 per cent. Given the difficulty of detecting the signal of an Earth-mass planet in crowded-field imaging even in the resonance regime with conventional cameras, we show that Lucky Imaging can substantially improve the detection efficiency.

  6. Influence of chemical processing on the imaging properties of microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljević, Darko; Murić, Branka; Pantelić, Dejan; Panić, Bratimir

    2009-07-01

    Microlenses are produced by irradiation of a layer of tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) by using a laser beam (Nd:YAG 2nd harmonic; 532 nm). All the microlenses obtained are concave with a parabolic profile. After the production, the microlenses are chemically processed with various concentrations of alum. The following imaging properties of microlenses were calculated and analyzed: the root mean square (rms) wavefront aberration, the geometric encircled energy and the spot diagram. The microlenses with higher concentrations of alum in solution had a greater effective focal length and better image quality. The microlenses chemically processed with 10% alum solution had near-diffraction-limited performance.

  7. Discretely tunable optofluidic compound microlenses.

    PubMed

    Fei, Peng; He, Zi; Zheng, Chunhong; Chen, Tao; Men, Yongfan; Huang, Yanyi

    2011-09-01

    We report a novel method to fabricate high zoom-ratio optofluidic compound microlenses using poly(dimethylsiloxane) with multi-layer architecture. The layered structure of deformable lenses, biconvex and plano-concave, are self-aligned as a group. The refractive index contrast of each lens, which is controlled by filling the chambers with a specific medium, is the key factor for determining the device's numerical aperture. The chip has multiple independent pneumatic valves that can be digitally switched on and off, pushing the liquid into the lens chambers with great accuracy and consistency. This quickly and precisely tunes the focal length of the microlens device from centimetres to sub-millimetre. The system has great potential for applications in portable microscopic imaging, bio-sensing, and laser beam configuration.

  8. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  9. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  10. SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

    SciTech Connect

    G. CANAVAN

    2001-02-01

    Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

  11. Stochastic Microlensing: Mathematical Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teguia, Alberto Mokak

    Stochastic microlensing is a central tool in probing dark matter on galactic scales. From first principles, we initiate the development of a mathematical theory of stochastic microlensing. We first construct a natural probability space for stochastic microlensing and characterize the general behaviour of the random time delay functions' random critical sets. Next we study stochastic microlensing in two distinct random microlensing scenarios: The uniform stars' distribution with constant mass spectrum and the spatial stars' distribution with general mass spectrum. For each scenario, we determine exact and asymptotic (in the large number of point masses limit) stochastic properties of the random time delay functions and associated random lensing maps and random shear tensors, including their moments and asymptotic density functions. We use these results to study certain random observables, such as random fixed lensed images, random bending angles, and random magnifications. These results are relevant to the theory of random fields and provide a platform for further generalizations as well as analytical limits for checking astrophysical studies of stochastic microlensing. Continuing our development of a mathematical theory of stochastic microlensing, we study the stochastic version of the Image Counting Problem, first considered in the non-random setting by Einstein and generalized by Petters. In particular, we employ the Kac-Rice formula and Morse theory to deduce general formulas for the expected total number of images and the expected number of saddle images for a general random lensing scenario. We further generalize these results by considering random sources defined on a countable compact covering of the light source plane. This is done to introduce the notion of global expected number of positive parity images due to a general lensing map. Applying the result to the uniform stars' distribution random microlensing scenario, we calculate the asymptotic global

  12. Space-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  13. Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. B.; Park, H.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Friedmann, M.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ >~ 8 mas yr-1. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In lsim12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  14. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  15. Robotic Follow-up of Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Rachel; Microlensing Project, RoboNet

    2009-05-01

    Several hundred galactic microlensing events are now routinely discovered every year, of which a few exhibit anomalous behavior due to the presence of an exoplanet orbiting the lensing body. Ground based follow-up of these events requires a co-ordinated observing program using network of telescopes observing around the clock. The RoboNet microlensing project is taking advantage of the robotic scheduling capabilities of LCOGT and the Liverpool Telescope to provide responsive photometric follow-up of carefully selected events. Currently LCOGT has two, 2m telescopes available via our network and are in the process of building and deploying networks of 1m and 0.4m telescopes. Once online, these facilities will provide 24hr coverage of microlensing events. Here we highlight results from the RoboNet Project to date and describe the software we have developed to optimize our response to planetary events.

  16. Microlensing candidate selection and detection efficiency for the SuperMACHO Dark Matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Arti

    One of the outstanding questions in modern cosmology is understanding the composition of the Dark Matter within our own Galaxy. The 5.7 year MACHO project which was completed in 2000, provided a rather vexing answer to this question. The MACHO project sought to place constraints on the fraction of the Galactic Dark Matter composed of MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs), or sub- stellar mass objects in the Milky Way halo. To accomplish this goal, the MACHO team measured the rate of gravitational microlensing toward the Magellanic Clouds to infer the MACHO concentration along the line-of-sight. The project's finding was vexing in that while the largest Milky Way halo mass fraction consistent with the results was not sufficient to explain all the "missing" matter in the Galaxy, the rate of microlensing observed could not be explained by known populations of objects. The SuperMACHO project seeks to independently verify the optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and also provide additional clues regarding the location of the lens. By determining the differential rate of microlensing across the face of the LMC, SuperMACHO distinguishes between "screen-" and "self-" lensing scenarios. This thesis describes the selection criteria used to arrive at a candidate set of microlensing events from the SuperMACHO survey and the efficiency with which the SuperMACHO project detects microlensing. The efficiency analysis is accomplished by simulating light curves over a spatial and temporal subset of the survey data. Assuming the optical depth observed by the MACHO project, we expect 14 microlensing events to pass our tighter set of selection criteria in this subset of data. Because type Ia supernovae remain a persistent contaminant in the SuperMACHO candidate set, this thesis also describes a method for determining the expected number of supernova contaminants in the SuperMACHO candidate set. We expect between 6 and 12 type Ia supernovae depending on which supernova rate

  17. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  18. Dark matter implications of the microlensing results

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.

    1999-07-01

    While gravitational microlensing is well established as an important method of discovering dark objects, the dark matter contribution of the objects thus discovered is still uncertain. We discuss the data, the problems, and the way to resolve the issues. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Microlensing search towards SMC using DIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, L.; EROS Collaboration

    2002-05-01

    The discrepancy between the estimation of the mass of our Galaxy obtained from its visible components and the mass inferred from dynamical studies of its rotation seems to indicate the existence of a large amount of Galactic dark matter. By searching for gravitational microlensing events towards stars in the Magellanic Clouds, the EROS collaboration (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), amongst other groups, probes the content of the Galactic Halo and tests the hypothesis that halo dark matter is in the form of compact dark objects. We have built a new pipeline based on Difference Image Analysis (DIA), and use it to process 5 years of data (1996-2001) towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The use of DIA techniques improves the quality of photometric measurements in crowded fields such as the SMC. Furthermore, with our DIA pipeline we are no longer restricted to searching for microlensing on stars in our catalog, which allows to detect microlensing events on very faint source stars, thus increasing the sensitivity. This search is sensitive to time scales between a few days and around 500 days corresponding to Halo objects in the mass range [0.01, 40] {M}sun. We present lightcurves and fitted parameters of detected microlensing events. Very preliminary estimates of the detection efficiency and of the optical depth towards the SMC are also presented.

  20. Chalcogenide glass microlenses by inkjet printing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Eric A.; Waldmann, Maike; Arnold, Craig B.

    2011-05-10

    We demonstrate micrometer scale mid-IR lenses for integrated optics, using solution-based inkjet printing techniques and subsequent processing. Arsenic sulfide spherical microlenses with diameters of 10-350 {mu}m and focal lengths of 10-700 {mu}m have been fabricated. The baking conditions can be used to tune the precise focal length.

  1. Empirical microlensing event rates predicted by a phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, Radosław

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the number of microlensing events observed in different parts of the Galactic bulge is a crucial point in planning microlensing experiments. Reliable estimates are especially important if observing resources are scarce, as is the case for space missions: K2, WFIRST, and Euclid. Here we show that the number of detected events can be reliably estimated based on statistics of stars observed in targeted fields. The statistics can be estimated relatively easily, which makes presented method suitable for planning future microlensing experiments.

  2. The Next Generation Microlensing Search: SuperMacho

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A; Cook, K; Hiriart, R; Keller, S; Miknaitis, G; Nilolaev, S; Olsen, K; Prochter, G; Rest, A; Schmidt, B; Smith, C; Stubbs, C; Suntzeff, N; Welch, D; Becker, A; Clocchiati, A; Covarrubias, R

    2003-10-27

    Past microlensing experiments such as the MACHO project have discovered the presence of a larger than expected number of microlensing events toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These events could represent a large fraction of the dark matter in the halo of our Galaxy, if they are indeed due to halo lenses. However the locations of most of the lenses are poorly defined. The SuperMacho project will detect and follow up {approx}60 microlensing events exhibiting special properties due to binarity, etc., will allow us to better determine the location and nature of the lenses causing the LMC microlensing events.

  3. Direct Laser Printing of Tailored Polymeric Microlenses.

    PubMed

    Florian, Camilo; Piazza, Simonluca; Diaspro, Alberto; Serra, Pere; Duocastella, Martí

    2016-07-13

    We report a laser-based approach for the fast fabrication of high-optical-quality polymeric microlenses and microlens arrays with controllable geometry and size. Our strategy consists of the direct laser printing of microdroplets of a highly viscous UV prepolymer at targeted positions, followed by photocuring. We study the morphological characteristics and imaging performance of the microlenses as a function of the substrate and laser parameters and investigate optimal printing conditions and printing mechanisms. We show that the microlens size and focusing properties can be easily tuned by the laser pulse energy, with minimum volumes below 20 fL and focal lengths ranging from 7 to 50 μm. PMID:27336194

  4. The MACHO project: Microlensing and variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.

    1996-10-01

    The MACHO Project monitors millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the bulge of the Milky Way searching for the gravitational microlensing signature of baryonic dark matter. This Project has yielded surprising results. An analysis of two years of data monitoring the Large Magellanic Cloud points to {approximately} 50% of the mass of the Milky Way`s halo in compact objects of {approximately} 0.5 solar mass. An analysis of one year of monitoring the bulge has yielded more microlensing than predicted without invocation of a massive bar or significant disk dark matter. The huge database of light curves created by this search is yielding information on extremely rare types of astrophysical variability as well as providing temporal detail for the study of well known variable astrophysical phenomena. The variable star catalog created from this database is previewed and example light curves are presented. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Studying planet populations by gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, Martin

    2010-09-01

    The ‘most curious’ effect of the bending of light by the gravity of stars has evolved into a successful technique unlike any other for studying planets within the Milky Way and even other galaxies. With a sensitivity to cool planets around low-mass stars even below the mass of Earth, gravitational microlensing fits in between other planet search techniques to form a complete picture of planet parameter space, which is required to understand their origin in general, that of habitable planets more particularly, and that of planet Earth especially. Current campaigns need to evolve from first detections to obtaining a sample with well-understood selection bias that allows to draw firm conclusions about the planet populations. With planetary signals being a transient phenomenon, gravitational microlensing is a driver for new technologies in scheduling and management of non-proprietary heterogeneous telescope networks, and can serve to demonstrate forefront science live to the general public.

  6. Microlensing of quasar ultraviolet iron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.; Rojas, K.

    2013-12-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in four cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications, we infer a typical size of r{sub s}∼4√(M/M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the Fe line-emitting regions, which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (∼3-7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  7. Halo cold dark matter and microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    There is good evidence that most of the baryons in the Universe are dark and some evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is nonbaryonic with cold dark matter (cdm) being a promising possibility. We discuss expectations for the abundance of baryons and cdm in the halo of our galaxy and locally. We show that in plausible cdm models the local density of cdm is at least $10^{-25}\\gcmm3$. We also discuss what one can learn about the the local cdm density from microlensing of stars in the LMC by dark stars in the halo and, based upon a suite of reasonable two-component halo models, conclude that microlensing is not a sensitive probe of the local cdm density.

  8. Constraints from microlensing on the COBE bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. S.

    Since the first review of converging evidences for a bar in the center of the Galaxy by de Zeeuw (1992) at the IAU Sym. 153 in Gent five years ago, the Galactic bar idea has been put on a solid footing by an influx of new data (COBE/DIRBE maps, star count data of bulge red clump giants, microlensing optical depth, and bulge stellar proper motions, etc.) and a burst of increasingly sophisticated theoretical models (triaxial luminosity models of Dwek et al. 1994, and Binney, Gerhard & Spergel 1997, steady state stellar bar dynamical model of Zhao 1996, combined luminosity, microlensing and gas kinematics models of Zhao, Rich & Spergel 1996, and Bissantz et al. 1997, etc.), which fit new data and improve upon earlier simple bulge/bar models (Kent 1992, Binney et al. 1991, Blitz & Spergel 1991). While research in this field shifts more and more to constraining the exact phase space and parameter space of the bar, both the non-uniqueness of and the mismatches among bars from different datasets start to show up. I compare the bar from microlensing data with the COBE bar and point out the effects the non-uniqueness.

  9. MICROLENSING DISCOVERY OF A POPULATION OF VERY TIGHT, VERY LOW MASS BINARY BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-05-10

    Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs (BDs) are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the BD mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 M{sub Sun} and 0.034 M{sub Sun }, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field BD binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that BD binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of {approx}0.02 M{sub Sun }. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of BD binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.

  10. IMPROVED THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS OF MICROLENSING RATES FOR THE DETECTION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Griest, Kim

    2013-04-20

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain a dark matter (DM) candidate of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Previously, we proposed a new method of constraining the remaining PBH DM mass range using microlensing of stars monitored by NASA's Kepler mission. We improve this analysis using a more accurate treatment of the population of the Kepler source stars, their variability, and limb darkening. We extend the theoretically detectable PBH DM mass range down to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun }, two orders of magnitude below current limits and one-third order of magnitude below our previous estimate. We address how to extract the DM properties, such as mass and spatial distribution, if PBH microlensing events were detected. We correct an error in a well-known finite-source limb-darkening microlensing formula and also examine the effects of varying the light curve cadence on PBH DM detectability. We also introduce an approximation for estimating the predicted rate of detection per star as a function of the star's properties, thus allowing for selection of source stars in future missions, and extend our analysis to planned surveys, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope.

  11. Adventures in the microlensing cloud: Large datasets, eResearch tools, and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    As astronomy enters the petascale data era, astronomers are faced with new challenges relating to storage, access and management of data. A shift from the traditional approach of combining data and analysis at the desktop to the use of remote services, pushing the computation to the data, is now underway. In the field of cosmological gravitational microlensing, future synoptic all-sky surveys are expected to bring the number of multiply imaged quasars from the few tens that are currently known to a few thousands. This inflow of observational data, together with computationally demanding theoretical modeling via the production of microlensing magnification maps, requires a new approach. We present our technical solutions to supporting the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). This extensive dataset for cosmological microlensing modeling comprises over 70 000 individual magnification maps and ˜106 related results. We describe our approaches to hosting, organizing, and serving ˜ 30 TB of data and metadata products. We present a set of online analysis tools developed with PHP, JavaScript and WebGL to support access and analysis of GELRUMPH data in a Web browser. We discuss our use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate data production, and we release the core of the GPU-D direct inverse ray-shooting code (Thompson et al., 2010, 2014) used to generate the magnification maps. All of the GERLUMPH data and tools are available online from http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au. This project made use of gSTAR, the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysical Research.

  12. Microlensing results toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and implications for galactic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandehei, Thor

    2000-11-01

    Dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) may make a non-trivial contribution to the total mass of the Galaxy. The presence of MACHOs in the halo of the Galaxy can be probed for with the technique of microlensing. Microlensing is characterized by the transient, achromatic brightening of a background star due to gravitational deflection of its light by a massive ``lens'' (the MACHO) passing near our line of sight to the source. By monitoring the luminosity of millions of stars nightly it is possible to observe these chance alignments and to estimate the MACHO contribution to the Galaxy. Data are presented on a search for microlensing towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Analysis of 5.7-years of photometry on 11.9 million stars in the LMC reveals 13-17 microlensing events. A detailed treatment of the survey's detection efficiency shows that this is significantly more than the ~2 to 4 events expected from lensing by known stellar populations. The timescales (t̂) of the events range from 34 to 230 days. The microlensing optical depth towards the LMC is estimated for events with 2 < t̂ < 400 days to be t4002=1.2+0.4- 0. 3×10-7 , with an additional 20% to 30% of systematic error. The spatial distribution of events is mildly inconsistent with LMC/LMC disk self-lensing, but is consistent with an extended lens distribution such as a Milky Way or LMC halo. Interpreted in the context of a Galactic dark matter halo, consisting partially of compact objects, a maximum likelihood analysis gives a MACHO halo fraction of 20% for a typical halo model with a 95% confidence interval of 8% to 50%. A 100% MACHO halo is ruled out at the 95% C.L. for all halo models except the most extreme. The most likely MACHO mass is between 0.15 Msolar and 0.9 Msolar ), depending on the halo model, and the total mass in MACHOs out to 50 kpc is found to be 9+4- 3×1010 Msolar , independent of the halo model. A detailed treatment of potential backgrounds to microlensing is

  13. Is Space-based Interferometry Dead?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Carr, J.; Fich, M.; Fischer, J.; Goldsmith, P.; Greaves, J.; Griffin, M.; Helou, G.; Ivison, R.; Kuchner, M.; Lyon, R.; Matsuo, H.; Rinehart, S. A.; Serabyn, E.; Shibai, H.; Silverberg, R.; Staguhn, J.; Unwin, S.; Wilner, D.; Wootten, A.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of the Decadal Survey and a January 2011 meeting of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG), one might be tempted to conclude that space interferometry is dead. We explain why this slogan is hyperbole, summarize the steps currently being taken to prepare for a space-based far-IR interferometer, and reiterate the science case for an imaging and spectroscopic interferometer - SPIRIT - that would operate in space at long infrared wavelengths. Space-based interferometry is alive and well, but the center of activity has shifted to a spectral region (25 to 400 microns) in which no alternative measurement technique can provide information essential to answering several scientific questions deemed compelling by the Decadal Survey. Astrophysicists will use SPIRIT to: discover how the conditions for habitability arise during planetary system formation; find and characterize exoplanets by measuring their sculpting effects on protoplanetary and debris disks; and study the formation, merger history, and star formation history of galaxies.

  14. Comparison of the Two Follow-up Observation Strategies for Gravitational Microlensing Planet Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Kim, Yong-Gi

    2001-01-01

    There are two different strategies of follow-up observations for the detection of planets by using microlensing. One is detecting the light-curve anomalies affected by the planetary caustic from continuous monitoring of all events detected by microlensing survey programs (type I strategy), and the other is detecting anomalies near the peak amplification affected by the central caustic from intensive monitoring of high-amplification events (type II strategy). It was shown by Griest & Safizadeh that the type II strategy yields high planet detection efficiency per event. However, it is not known whether the planet detection rate by this strategy can make up a substantial fraction of the total rate. In this paper, we estimate the relative planet detection rates expected under the two follow-up observation strategies. From this estimation, we find that the rate under the type II strategy is substantial and will comprise ~1/4-1/2 of the total rate. We also find that compared to the type I strategy the type II strategy is more efficient in detecting planets located outside of the lensing zone. We determine the optimal monitoring frequency of the type II strategy to be ~20 times per night, which can be easily achieved by the current microlensing follow-up programs even with a single telescope.

  15. Planetary Caustic Perturbations of a Close-separation Planet on Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Kim, Han-Seek; Chung, Sun-Ju; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Most planetary events discovered up to date by the planetary caustic of close-separation planets have low-mass ratios. In next-generation microlensing experiments with a wider field of view and a higher cadence, it is possible to obtain densely covered planetary signals induced by the planetary caustic of close-separation planets without missing events. Therefore, the planetary caustic perturbation of close-separation planets would be the more important channel to detect low-mass exoplanets in the next generation of microlensing surveys. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical properties and detection conditions for the planetary caustic perturbation of close-separation planets. To find the properties of the planetary caustic perturbation, we construct deviation maps by subtracting the single-lensing magnification of the lens star from the planetary lensing magnification for various lensing parameters. We find that each deviation area of the positive and negative perturbations disappears at the same normalized source radius according to a given deviation threshold regardless of mass ratio but disappears at a different normalized source radius according to the separation. We also estimate the upper limit of the normalized source radius to detect the planetary caustic perturbation. We find simple relations between the upper limit of the normalized source radius and the lensing parameters. From the relations, we obtain an analytic condition for the theoretical detection limit of the planet, which shows that we can sufficiently discover a planet with a sub-Earth-mass for typical microlensing events. Therefore, we conclude that our planet-detection condition of can be used as an important criteria for maximal planet detections, considering the source type and the photometric accuracy and expect that a number of low-mass planets will be added from the next-generation microlensing experiments.

  16. Searches for Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    There are different methods for finding exoplanets such as radial spectral shifts, astrometrical measurements, transits, timing etc. Gravitational microlensing (including pixel-lensing) is among the most promising techniques with the potentiality of detecting Earth-like planets at distances about a few astronomical units from their host star. We emphasize the importance of polarization measurements which can help to resolve degeneracies in theoretical models. In particular, the polarization angle could give additional information about the relative position of the lens with respect to the source.

  17. An anomaly detector with immediate feedback to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below by microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Allan, A.; Mao, S.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Tsapras, Y.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2007-09-01

    within the reach of high-cadence monitoring with a network of wide-field telescopes or a space-based telescope.

  18. Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Optical Depth with Imperfect Event Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.

    2005-11-01

    I present a new analysis of the MACHO Project 5.7 yr Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing data set that incorporates the effects of contamination of the microlensing event sample by variable stars. Photometric monitoring of MACHO LMC microlensing event candidates by the EROS and OGLE groups has revealed that one of these events is likely to be a variable star, while additional data have confirmed that many of the other events are very likely to be microlensing. These additional data on the nature of the MACHO microlensing candidates are incorporated into a simple likelihood analysis to derive a probability distribution for the number of MACHO microlens candidates that are true microlensing events. This analysis shows that 10-12 of the 13 events that passed the MACHO selection criteria are likely to be microlensing events, with the other 1-3 being variable stars. This likelihood analysis is also used to show that the main conclusions of the MACHO LMC analysis are unchanged by the variable star contamination. The microlensing optical depth toward the LMC is τ=(1.0+/-0.3)×10-7. If this is due to microlensing by known stellar populations plus an additional population of lens objects in the Galactic halo, then the new halo population would account for 16% of the mass of a standard Galactic halo. The MACHO detection exceeds the expected background of two events expected from ordinary stars in standard models of the Milky Way and LMC at the 99.98% confidence level. The background prediction is increased to three events if maximal disk models are assumed for both the Milky Way and LMC, but this model fails to account for the full signal seen by MACHO at the 99.8% confidence level.

  19. Microlenses with focal length controlled by chemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muric, B. D.; Panic, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    The influence of chemical processing on the optical properties of microlenses formed on a gelatin-sensitized layer was investigated. The gelatin is sensitized with tot'hema and eosin, irradiated with a Gaussian profile laser beam and subsequently chemically processed. Microlenses with a focal length of 400 μm were obtained after alcohol processing. Additionally, focal lengths could be controlled by varying the alum concentration, and lenses with focal length up to 1.2 mm were obtained. The microlenses become stable after alum processing. Their optical properties remain unchanged.

  20. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  1. Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    An overview of space-based lidar systems is presented. from the first laser altimeter on APOLLO 15 mission in 1971 to the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER mission currently in orbit, and those currently under development. Lidar, which stands for Light Detection And Ranging, is a powerful tool in remote sensing from space. Compared to radars, lidars operate at a much shorter wavelength with a much narrower beam and much smaller transmitter and receiver. Compared to passive remote sensing instruments. lidars carry their own light sources and can continue measuring day and night. and over polar regions. There are mainly two types of lidars depending on the types of measurements. lidars that are designed to measure the distance and properties of hard targets are often called laser rangers or laser altimeters. They are used to obtain the surface elevation and global shape of a planet from the laser pulse time-of-night and the spacecraft orbit position. lidars that are designed to measure the backscattering and absorption of a volume scatter, such as clouds and aerosols, are often just called lidars and categorized by their measurements. such as cloud and aerosol lidar, wind lidar, CO2 lidar, and so on. The advantages of space-based lidar systems over ground based lidars are the abilities of global coverage and continuous measurements.

  2. Space based astronomy: Teacher's guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Carla B. (Editor); Weiler, Edward; Morrow, Cherilyn; Bacon, Pamela M.; Thorne, Muriel; Blanchard, Paul A.; Howard, Sethane; Pengra, Patricia R.; Brown, Deborah A.; Winrich, Ralph

    1994-01-01

    This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy - astronomical observations made from outer space. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. Instead, it tells the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The guide begins with a survey of astronomy related NASA spacecraft. This is followed by a collection of activities in four units: (1) the atmospheric filter; (2) the electromagnetic spectrum; (3) collecting electromagnetic radiation; and (4) down to Earth. A curriculum index identifies the curriculum areas each activity addresses. The guide concludes with a glossary, reference list, a NASA Resources list, and an evaluation card. It is designed for students in grades 5 through 8.

  3. MOA-II Galactic Microlensing Constraints: The Inner Milky Way has a Low Dark Matter Fraction and a Near Maximal Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disk models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disk with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12%, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  4. MOA-II Galactic microlensing constraints: the inner Milky Way has a low dark matter fraction and a near maximal disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disc models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disc with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12 per cent, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  5. Space-Based Astronomy: A Teacher's Guide with Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help grade 5-8 students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy--astronomical observations made from outside the Earth's atmosphere. The guide begins with a survey of astronomy-related spacecraft that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has sent into…

  6. On space-based SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuiver, Willem

    1990-01-01

    Space-based antenna systems for the search of signals from extra-terrestrial intelligence are discussed. Independent studies of the ecliptic solar-sailing transfer problem from the geosynchronous departure orbit to Sun-Earth collinear transterrestrial liberation point were conducted. They were based on a relatively simple mathematical model describing attitude-controlled spacecraft motion in the ecliptic plane as governed by solar and terrestrial gravitational attraction together with the solar radiation pressure. The resulting equations of motion were integrated numerically for a relevant range of values of spacecraft area-to-mass ratio and for an appropriate spacecraft attitude-control law known to lead to Earth escape. Experimentation with varying initial conditions in the departure orbit, and with attitude-control law modification after having achieved Earth escape, established the feasibility of component deployment by means of solar sailing. Details are presented.

  7. Thermal and chemical stability of reflowed-photoresist microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Myung-Geun; Park, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Seoung-Hoe; Yoo, Byueng-Su; Park, Hyo-Hoon

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of heat treatment on the thermal and chemical stability of photoresist microlenses which were made by a reflow method. The microlenses were formed by patterning a novolac-based photoresist (PR) to pillar shapes and by reflowing it at 140 °C. After reflowing, the microlenses were heat treated at a relatively high temperature between 250 °C and 350 °C. After the heat treatment, the fundamental functions as a lens were maintained for infrared laser beams with wavelengths above 800 nm, except volume shrinkage and increment of the refractive index. The heat-treated microlenses also were not attacked by methanol and acetone. Our results suggest wide application of the PR as a simple, cost effective and stable lens medium.

  8. Microlensing observations rapid search for exoplanets: MORSE code for GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, Alistair; Albrow, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The rapid analysis of ongoing gravitational microlensing events has been integral to the successful detection and characterization of cool planets orbiting low-mass stars in the Galaxy. In this paper, we present an implementation of search and fit techniques on graphical processing unit (GPU) hardware. The method allows for the rapid identification of candidate planetary microlensing events and their subsequent follow-up for detailed characterization.

  9. Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear is considered. It is shown that for a general cusp the magnification probability distribution follows pc(A)dA of about (A exp -7/2)dA for sufficiently large magnifications. An adaptive grid technique is developed to calculate the magnification probability distributions. The results could be useful for cases of microlensing where the surface-mass density is low.

  10. Difference Image Analysis of Galactic Microlensing. I. Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.

    1999-08-20

    This is a preliminary report on the application of Difference Image Analysis (DIA) to Galactic bulge images. The aim of this analysis is to increase the sensitivity to the detection of gravitational microlensing. We discuss how the DIA technique simplifies the process of discovering microlensing events by detecting only objects that have variable flux. We illustrate how the DIA technique is not limited to detection of so-called ''pixel lensing'' events but can also be used to improve photometry for classical microlensing events by removing the effects of blending. We will present a method whereby DIA can be used to reveal the true unblended colors, positions, and light curves of microlensing events. We discuss the need for a technique to obtain the accurate microlensing timescales from blended sources and present a possible solution to this problem using the existing Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams of the Galactic bulge and LMC. The use of such a solution with both classical and pixel microlensing searches is discussed. We show that one of the major causes of systematic noise in DIA is differential refraction. A technique for removing this systematic by effectively registering images to a common air mass is presented. Improvements to commonly used image differencing techniques are discussed. (c) 1999 The American Astronomical Society.

  11. Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-01

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 1011 km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 107 km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  12. NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING AND MESOLENSING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2014-06-01

    It took more than fifty years and the development of computer technology to transform Einstein's theoretical work on what we now call "gravitational microlensing" into an active and successful field of observational research. The first microlensing events were announced in 1993, and today's monitoring teams discover roughly 2000 candidate events each year. Binaries and planets have been discovered, and the masses of nearby stars and brown dwarfs have been measured. The total numbers of planets discovered through lensing is still small, but the field is young, and new methods and techniques are being developed. I will summarize the successes to date, and will then focus on some intriguing new opportunities. One of these opportunities is suggested by theoretical work that will allow observers to search for planets in a wider range of orbits, thereby increasing the discovery rate. Another opportunity is provided by counterpart searches and parallax signatures in the lensing light curves, which are helping us to identify those events caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses), located within about a kiloparsec. We can learn a great deal more about mesolenses, and therefore expect to systematically discover and measure masses of nearby brown dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, and also to find nearby planets that can be be studied with other techniques as well. Finally, mesolensing events can be predicted in advance, providing a new avenue to measure the masses and multiplicity of nearby stars. Gravitational lensing events have a rich potential to contribute to astronomy, and we are presently exploring new possibilities and establishing the framework that will allow more of this potential to be realized.

  13. Speeding up low-mass planetary microlensing simulations and modeling: The caustic region of influence

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, Matthew T.

    2014-08-01

    Extensive simulations of planetary microlensing are necessary both before and after a survey is conducted: before to design and optimize the survey and after to understand its detection efficiency. The major bottleneck in such computations is the computation of light curves. However, for low-mass planets, most of these computations are wasteful, as most light curves do not contain detectable planetary signatures. In this paper, I develop a parameterization of the binary microlens that is conducive to avoiding light curve computations. I empirically find analytic expressions describing the limits of the parameter space that contain the vast majority of low-mass planet detections. Through a large-scale simulation, I measure the (in)completeness of the parameterization and the speed-up it is possible to achieve. For Earth-mass planets in a wide range of orbits, it is possible to speed up simulations by a factor of ∼30-125 (depending on the survey's annual duty-cycle) at the cost of missing ∼1% of detections (which is actually a smaller loss than for the arbitrary parameter limits typically applied in microlensing simulations). The benefits of the parameterization probably outweigh the costs for planets below 100 M{sub ⊕}. For planets at the sensitivity limit of AFTA-WFIRST, simulation speed-ups of a factor ∼1000 or more are possible.

  14. Microlensing of the broad line region in 17 lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Hutsemékers, D.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.; Wambsganss, J.

    2012-08-01

    When an image of a strongly lensed quasar is microlensed, the different components of its spectrum are expected to be differentially magnified owing to the different sizes of the corresponding emitting region. Chromatic changes are expected to be observed in the continuum while the emission lines should be deformed as a function of the size, geometry and kinematics of the regions from which they originate. Microlensing of the emission lines has been reported only in a handful of systems so far. In this paper we search for microlensing deformations of the optical spectra of pairs of images in 17 lensed quasars with bolometric luminosities between 1044.7 - 47.4 erg/s and black hole masses 107.6 - 9.8 M⊙. This sample is composed of 13 pairs of previously unpublished spectra and four pairs of spectra from literature. Our analysis is based on a simple spectral decomposition technique which allows us to isolate the microlensed fraction of the flux independently of a detailed modeling of the quasar emission lines. Using this technique, we detect microlensing of the continuum in 85% of the systems. Among them, 80% show microlensing of the broad emission lines. Focusing on the most common emission lines in our spectra (C III] and Mg II) we detect microlensing of either the blue or the red wing, or of both wings with the same amplitude. This observation implies that the broad line region is not in general spherically symmetric. In addition, the frequent detection of microlensing of the blue and red wings independently but not simultaneously with a different amplitude, does not support existing microlensing simulations of a biconical outflow. Our analysis also provides the intrinsic flux ratio between the lensed images and the magnitude of the microlensing affecting the continuum. These two quantities are particularly relevant for the determination of the fraction of matter in clumpy form in galaxies and for the detection of dark matter substructures via the identification

  15. Stellar, remnant, planetary, and dark-object masses from astrometric microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boden, A.; Gould, A. P.; Bennett, D. P.; Depoy, D. L.; Gaudi, S. B.; Griest, K.; Han, C.; Paczynski, B.; Reid, I. N.

    2002-01-01

    With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We will thus develop a detailed census of the dark and luminous stellar population of the Galaxy.

  16. Microlensing of Gamma Ray Bursts by Stars and Machos

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E

    2003-12-17

    The microlensing interpretation of the optical afterglow of GRB 000301C seems naively surprising, since a simple estimate of the stellar microlensing rate gives less than one in four hundred for a flat {Omega}{sub {lambda}} = 0.7 cosmology, whereas one event was seen in about thirty afterglows. Considering baryonic MACHOs making up half of the baryons in the universe, the microlensing probability per burst can be roughly 5% for a GRB at redshift z = 2. We explore two effects that may enhance the probability of observing microlensed gamma-ray burst afterglows: binary lenses and double magnification bias. We find that the consideration of binary lenses can increase the rate only at the {approx} 15% level. On the other hand, because gamma-ray bursts for which afterglow observations exist are typically selected based on fluxes at widely separated wavebands which are not necessarily well correlated (e.g. localization in X-ray, afterglow in optical/infrared), magnification bias can operate at an enhanced level compared to the usual single-bias case. Using a simple model for the selection process in two bands, we compute the enhancement to microlensing rate due to magnification bias in two cases: perfect correlation and complete independence of the flux in the two bands. We find that existing estimates of the slope of the luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts, while as yet quite uncertain, point to enhancement factors of more than three above the simple estimates of the microlensing rate. We find that the probability to observe at least one microlensing event in the sample of 27 measured afterglows can be 3-4% for stellar lenses, or as much as 25 {Omega}{sub lens} for baryonic MACHOs. We note that the probability to observe at least one event over the available sample of afterglows is significant only if a large fraction of the baryons in the universe are condensed in stellar-mass objects.

  17. CHEAP SPACE-BASED MICROLENS PARALLAXES FOR HIGH-MAGNIFICATION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C. E-mail: jyee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-08-10

    We show that for high-magnification (A{sub max} {approx}> 100) microlensing events, accurate microlens parallaxes can be obtained from three or fewer photometric measurements from a small telescope on a satellite in solar orbit at O(AU) from Earth. This is 1-2 orders of magnitude less observing resources than are required for standard space-based parallaxes. Such microlens parallax measurements would yield accurate mass and distance measurements to the lens for all cases in which finite-source effects were observed from the ground over peak. This would include virtually all high-magnification events with detected planets and a substantial fraction of those without. Hence, it would permit accurate estimates of the Galactic distribution of planets.

  18. MEASURING MICROLENSING USING SPECTRA OF MULTIPLY LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Munoz, J. A. E-mail: emg@iac.es E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2012-08-10

    We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.6 and 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.4 mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source (I{proportional_to}exp (- R{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s})) of size r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p} and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing, we find r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 7 {+-} 3 lt-day(18.1 {+-} 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.4 for SDSS1004+4112, and r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 6 {+-} 2 lt-day(15.5 {+-} 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623, we find strong chromaticity of {approx}0.4 mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing, although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561, we measure B - A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the {approx}0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from light-curve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield possible evidence of microlensing.

  19. Free-floating planets from core accretion theory: microlensing predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sizheng; Mao, Shude; Ida, Shigeru; Zhu, Wei; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the microlensing event rate and typical time-scales for the free-floating planet (FFP) population that is predicted by the core accretion theory of planet formation. The event rate is found to be ˜1.8 × 10-3 of that for the stellar population. While the stellar microlensing event time-scale peaks at around 20 d, the median time-scale for FFP events (˜0.1 d) is much shorter. Our values for the event rate and the median time-scale are significantly smaller than those required to explain the Sumi et al. result, by factors of ˜13 and ˜16, respectively. The inclusion of planets at wide separations does not change the results significantly. This discrepancy may be too significant for standard versions of both the core accretion theory and the gravitational instability model to explain satisfactorily. Therefore, either a modification to the planet formation theory is required or other explanations to the excess of short-time-scale microlensing events are needed. Our predictions can be tested by ongoing microlensing experiment such as Korean Microlensing Telescope Network, and by future satellite missions such as WFIRST and Euclid.

  20. GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-10

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 10{sup 11} km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 10{sup 7} km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  1. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  2. Microlensing in Globular Clusters: the First Confirmed Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microlensing observations toward globular clusters could be very useful to probe their low mass star and brown dwarf content. Using the large set of microlensing events detected so far toward the Galactic centre we investigated whether for some of the observed events the lenses are located in the Galactic globular clusters. Indeed, we found that in four cases some events might be due to lenses located in the globular clusters themselves. Moreover, we discuss a microlensing event found in M22. Using the adaptive optics system NACO at ESO VLT it was possible to identify the lens, which turned out to be a low mass star of about 0.18 solar masses in the globular cluster M22 itself.

  3. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  4. Space-Based Research in Fundamental Physics and Quantum Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Shao, Michael; Yu, Nan; Kusenko, Alexander; Wright, Edward L.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Kasevich, Mark; Lipa, John A.; Mester, John C.; Reasenberg, Robert D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ashby, Neil; Gould, Harvey; Paik, Ho Jung

    Space offers unique experimental conditions and a wide range of opportunities to explore the foundations of modern physics with an accuracy far beyond that of ground-based experiments. Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research in fundamental physics as one of its focus areas. We recommend establishing an Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee's interagency "Fundamental Physics Task Force" to assess the status of both ground- and space-based efforts in the field, to identify the most important objectives, and to suggest the best ways to organize the work of several federal agencies involved. We also recommend establishing a new NASA-led interagency program in fundamental physics that will consolidate new technologies, prepare key instruments for future space missions, and build a strong scientific and engineering community. Our goal is to expand NASA's science objectives in space by including "laboratory research in fundamental physics" as an element in the agency's ongoing space research efforts.

  5. Effect of Binary Source Companions on the Microlensing Optical Depth Determination toward the Galactic Bulge Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho

    2005-11-01

    Currently, gravitational microlensing survey experiments toward the Galactic bulge field use two different methods of minimizing the blending effect for the accurate determination of the optical depth τ. One is measuring τ based on clump giant (CG) source stars, and the other is using ``difference image analysis'' (DIA) photometry to measure the unblended source flux variation. Despite the expectation that the two estimates should be the same assuming that blending is properly considered, the estimates based on CG stars systematically fall below the DIA results based on all events with source stars down to the detection limit. Prompted by the gap, we investigate the previously unconsidered effect of companion-associated events on τ determination. Although the image of a companion is blended with that of its primary star and thus not resolved, the event associated with the companion can be detected if the companion flux is highly magnified. Therefore, companions work effectively as source stars to microlensing, and thus the neglect of them in the source star count could result in a wrong τ estimation. By carrying out simulations based on the assumption that companions follow the same luminosity function as primary stars, we estimate that the contribution of the companion-associated events to the total event rate is ~5fbi% for current surveys and can reach up to ~6fbi% for future surveys monitoring fainter stars, where fbi is the binary frequency. Therefore, we conclude that the companion-associated events comprise a nonnegligible fraction of all events. However, their contribution to the optical depth is not large enough to explain the systematic difference between the optical depth estimates based on the two different methods.

  6. Microlensing of sub-parsec massive binary black holes in lensed QSOs: Light curves and size-wavelength relation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Chang-Shuo; Lu, Youjun; Mao, Shude; Yu, Qingjuan; Wambsganss, Joachim E-mail: luyj@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    Sub-parsec binary massive black holes (BBHs) have long been thought to exist in many QSOs but remain observationally elusive. In this paper, we propose a novel method to probe sub-parsec BBHs through microlensing of lensed QSOs. If a QSO hosts a sub-parsec BBH in its center, it is expected that the BBH is surrounded by a circumbinary disk, each component of the BBH is surrounded by a small accretion disk, and a gap is opened by the secondary component in between the circumbinary disk and the two small disks. Assuming such a BBH structure, we generate mock microlensing light curves for some QSO systems that host BBHs with typical physical parameters. We show that microlensing light curves of a BBH QSO system at the infrared-optical-UV bands can be significantly different from those of corresponding QSO system with a single massive black hole (MBH), mainly because of the existence of the gap and the rotation of the BBH (and its associated small disks) around the center of mass. We estimate the half-light radii of the emission region at different wavelengths from mock light curves and find that the obtained half-light radius versus wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be much flatter than those of single MBH QSO systems at a wavelength range determined by the BBH parameters, such as the total mass, mass ratio, separation, accretion rates, etc. The difference is primarily due to the existence of the gap. Such unique features on the light curves and half-light radius-wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be used to select and probe sub-parsec BBHs in a large number of lensed QSOs to be discovered by current and future surveys, including the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, the Large Synoptic Survey telescope, and Euclid.

  7. Seismology and space-based geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralli, David M.; Tajima, Fumiko

    1993-01-01

    The potential of space-based geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in the context of seismology is explored. The achievements of seismological source theory and data analyses, mechanical modeling of fault zone behavior, and advances in space-based geodesy are reviewed, with emphasis on realizable contributions of space-based geodetic measurements specifically to seismology. The fundamental relationships between crustal deformation associated with an earthquake and the geodetically observable data are summarized. The response and spatial and temporal resolution of the geodetic data necessary to understand deformation at various phases of the earthquake cycle is stressed. The use of VLBI, SLR, and GPS measurements for studying global geodynamics properties that can be investigated to some extent with seismic data is discussed. The potential contributions of continuously operating strain monitoring networks and globally distributed geodetic observatories to existing worldwide modern digital seismographic networks are evaluated in reference to mutually addressable problems in seismology, geophysics, and tectonics.

  8. Space-based optical image encryption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2010-12-20

    In this paper, we propose a new method based on a three-dimensional (3D) space-based strategy for the optical image encryption. The two-dimensional (2D) processing of a plaintext in the conventional optical encryption methods is extended to a 3D space-based processing. Each pixel of the plaintext is considered as one particle in the proposed space-based optical image encryption, and the diffraction of all particles forms an object wave in the phase-shifting digital holography. The effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new optical encryption strategy instead of the conventional 2D processing, and may open up a new research perspective for the optical image encryption.

  9. Fabrication of photomasks consisting microlenses for the production of polymeric microneedle array.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Himanshu; Fong, Michelle H M; Kang, Lifeng

    2015-08-01

    A photomask consisting plano-convex microlenses for the production of polymeric microneedles was fabricated from a microinjection array. The microinjection array was first fabricated using photolithographical approach and subsequently assembled onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp. Poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution was loaded into the microinjection stamp. The microinjection stamp was then applied onto a coverslip to dispense the polymer solution, producing liquid microdroplets. They were then irradiated to form plano-convex microlenses. These microlenses were evaluated for their geometric properties and were fabricated into photomasks. The photomask consisting microlenses was used to fabricate polymeric microneedles that were evaluated and tested for skin penetration efficiency. PMID:26208649

  10. Compact IR laser for calibration of space based sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kietrick, K.M.; Dezenberg, G.; Hamilton, C.; Vann, J.; LaSala, J.

    1996-04-17

    An Er:YAG laser, operating at 2.94 microns, has been developed for in-theater calibration of space based infrared sensors. The laser is used to illuminate a spaceborne sensor focal plane from a surveyed ground reference point. The known reference point is compared to the laser position reported by the sensor, and boresight corrections are made. The Er:YAG laser is side pumped by a InGaAs diode array and is tuned to an atmospheric microwindow with and intracavity etalon. This technology is being directly applied to meet Army requirements for enhanced deep strike targeting information supplied to theater weapons systems.

  11. Bulge microlensing optical depth from EROS 2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.; Albert, J. N.; Alard, C.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Blanc, G.; Bouquet, A.; Char, S.; Charlot, X.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Derue, F.; Ferlet, R.; Fouqué, P.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros, M.; Haissinski, J.; Hamadache, C.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hardin, D.; de Kat, J.; Kim, A.; Lasserre, T.; LeGuillou, L.; Lesquoy, É.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J. B.; Maurice, É.; Maury, A.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Prévot, L.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Tisserand, P.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.

    2003-06-01

    We present a measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic bulge based on the analysis of 15 contiguous 1 deg2 fields centered on (l=2.5o, b=-4.0o) and containing N_*=1.42x 106 clump-giant stars (belonging to the extended clump area) monitored during almost three bulge seasons by EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres). We find tau_bulge =0.94+/- 0.29x 10-6 averaged over all fields, based on 16 microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This value is substantially below several other determinations by the MACHO and OGLE groups and is more in agreement with what is expected from axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric bulge models. Based on observations made with the MARLY telescope at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  12. A method for the microlensed flux variance of QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jeremy; Sun, Ai-Lei

    2014-06-01

    A fast and practical method is described for calculating the microlensed flux variance of an arbitrary source by uncorrelated stars. The required inputs are the mean convergence and shear due to the smoothed potential of the lensing galaxy, the stellar mass function, and the absolute square of the Fourier transform of the surface brightness in the source plane. The mathematical approach follows previous authors but has been generalized, streamlined, and implemented in publicly available code. Examples of its application are given for Dexter and Agol's inhomogeneous-disc models as well as the usual Gaussian sources. Since the quantity calculated is a second moment of the magnification, it is only logarithmically sensitive to the sizes of very compact sources. However, for the inferred sizes of actual quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), it has some discriminatory power and may lend itself to simple statistical tests. At the very least, it should be useful for testing the convergence of microlensing simulations.

  13. Microlensing in the Q0957 + 561 gravitational mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, R.E.; Smith, R.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Analysis of the 10 yr record from monitoring the continuum brightness of Q0957 + 561 A, B shows a systematic increase of the B relative to the A component. The B brightness has leveled off in the last 2 yr at a value 32 percent higher than would be predicted from the ratio of Mg II 2798 A emission line strengths. This is taken to be the signature of microlensing by a star or stars in the lens galaxy. 11 refs.

  14. Predictions for microlensing planetary events from core accretion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Mao, Shude; Penny, Matthew; Gould, Andrew; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-06-10

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of a planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida and Lin core accretion model for 0.3 M {sub ☉} stars. With 6690 microlensing events, we find that for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet), the fraction of planetary events is 2.9%, out of which 5.5% show multiple-planet signatures. The numbers of super-Earths, super-Neptunes, and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our simulation shows that high-magnification events and massive planets are favored by planet detections, which is consistent with previous expectation. However, we notice that extremely high-magnification events are less sensitive to planets, which is possibly because the 10 minute sampling of KMTNet is not intensive enough to capture the subtle anomalies that occur near the peak. This suggests that while KMTNet observations can be systematically analyzed without reference to any follow-up data, follow-up observations will be essential in extracting the full science potential of very high magnification events. The uniformly high-cadence observations expected for KMTNet also result in ∼55% of all detected planets not being caustic crossing, and more low-mass planets even down to Mars mass being detected via planetary caustics. We also find that the distributions of orbital inclinations and planet mass ratios in multiple-planet events agree with the intrinsic distributions.

  15. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  16. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common. PMID:18276883

  17. Parallax and Orbital Effects in Astrometric Microlensing with Binary Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Giordano, M.; Manni, L.

    2016-06-01

    In gravitational microlensing, binary systems may act as lenses or sources. Identifying lens binarity is generally easy, in particular in events characterized by caustic crossing since the resulting light curve exhibits strong deviations from a smooth single-lensing light curve. In contrast, light curves with minor deviations from a Paczyński behavior do not allow one to identify the source binarity. A consequence of gravitational microlensing is the shift of the position of the multiple image centroid with respect to the source star location — the so-called astrometric microlensing signal. When the astrometric signal is considered, the presence of a binary source manifests with a path that largely differs from that expected for single source events. Here, we investigate the astrometric signatures of binary sources taking into account their orbital motion and the parallax effect due to the Earth’s motion, which turn out not to be negligible in most cases. We also show that considering the above-mentioned effects is important in the analysis of astrometric data in order to correctly estimate the lens-event parameters.

  18. The microlensing event rate and optical depth toward the galactic bulge from MOA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboratoin; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of the microlensing optical depth and event rate toward the Galactic Bulge (GB) based on two years of the MOA-II survey. This sample contains ∼1000 microlensing events, with an Einstein radius crossing time of t {sub E} ≤ 200 days in 22 bulge fields covering ∼42 deg{sup 2} between –5° < l < 10° and –7° < b < –1°. Our event rate and optical depth analysis uses 474 events with well-defined microlensing parameters. In the central fields with |l| < 5°, we find an event rate of Γ = [2.39 ± 1.1]e {sup [0.60±0.05](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and an optical depth (for events with t {sub E} ≤ 200 days) of τ{sub 200} = [2.35 ± 0.18]e {sup [0.51±0.07](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –6} for the 427 events, using all sources brighter than I{sub s} ≤ 20 mag. The distribution of observed fields is centered at (l, b) = (0.°38, –3.°72). We find that the event rate is maximized at low latitudes and a longitude of l ≈ 1°. For the 111 events in 3.2 deg{sup 2} of the central GB at |b| ≤ 3.°0 and 0.°0 ≤ l ≤ 2.°0, centered at (l, b) = (0.°97, –2.°26), we find Γ=4.57{sub −0.46}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and τ{sub 200}=3.64{sub −0.45}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −6}. We also consider a red clump giant (RCG) star sample with I{sub s} < 17.5, and we find that the event rate for the RCG sample is slightly lower than but consistent with the all-source event rate. The main difference is the lack of long duration events in the RCG sample due to a known selection effect. Our results are consistent with previous optical depth measurements, but they are somewhat lower than previous all-source measurements, and slightly higher than previous RCG optical depth measurements. This suggests that the previously observed difference in optical depth measurements between all-source and RCG samples may largely be due to statistical fluctuations. These event rate measurements toward the central GB

  19. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  20. A space-based microwave radar concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, D.

    1992-01-01

    A space-based microwave radar (SBR) concept is defined using a tether trans-receive antenna supported between two gravity gradient low earth-orbiting satellites. A cluster of four tether antennas each of 6 km maximum length and 1.5 km separation between tethers constitutes a radar. A system of eight to eleven such clusters constitutes the overall radar scheme which will cover approximately one third of the earth surface for detecting sea-based targets. Issues identified are the array structure, coherence of tethered arrays, grating lobe energy clamping, clutter effects, communications, system requirements and the overall radar system concept including stability considerations. This paper presents the base-line definition of an alternate space-based radar scheme.

  1. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  2. ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search): A possible expert-system based cooperative effort to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Allan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Tsapras, Y.; Snodgrass, C.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Fraser, S. N.; Kerins, E.; Mottram, C. J.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2008-03-01

    The technique of gravitational microlensing is currently unique in its ability to provide a sample of terrestrial exoplanets around both Galactic disk and bulge stars, allowing to measure their abundance and determine their distribution with respect to mass and orbital separation. Thus, valuable information for testing models of planet formation and orbital migration is gathered, constituting an important piece in the puzzle for the existence of life forms throughout the Universe. In order to achieve these goals in reasonable time, a well-coordinated effort involving a network of either 2m or 4×1m telescopes at each site is required. It could lead to the first detection of an Earth-mass planet outside the Solar system, and even planets less massive than Earth could be discovered. From April 2008, ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) is planned to provide a platform for a three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring. As an expert system embedded in eSTAR (e-Science Telescopes for Astronomical Research), ARTEMiS will give advice for follow-up based on a priority algorithm that selects targets to be observed in order to maximize the expected number of planet detections, and will also alert on deviations from ordinary microlensing light curves by means of the SIGNALMEN anomaly detector. While the use of the VOEvent (Virtual Observatory Event) protocol allows a direct interaction with the telescopes that are part of the HTN (Heterogeneous Telescope Networks) consortium, additional interfaces provide means of communication with all existing microlensing campaigns that rely on human observers. The success of discovering a planet by microlensing critically depends on the availability of a telescope in a suitable location at the right time, which can mean within 10 min. To encourage follow-up observations, microlensing campaigns are therefore releasing photometric data in real time. On ongoing planetary anomalies, world

  3. Broadband Metallic Planar Microlenses in an Array: the Focusing Coupling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiting; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yechuan; Diao, Jinshuai

    2016-02-01

    The microlens arrays (MLAs) are widely utilized for various applications. However, when the lens size and the spacing between two adjacent microlenses are of the length scale of the working wavelength, the diffraction effect plays a vital role in the final focusing performance. We suggest a kind of broadband metallic planar microlenses, based on which the ultra-compact microlens arrays are also constructed. The focusing coupling effect revealing for such devices is then investigated in detail by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with the emphasis on the changing spacing between adjacent microlenses, the working wavelength, the diameter of microlenses, and the array size. The results show that a larger spacing, a larger lens size, a shorter wavelength, or a smaller array scale can lead to a weaker focusing coupling effect. This research provides an important technological reference to design an array of metallic planar microlenses with the well-controlled focusing performance.

  4. Influence of TESG layer viscoelasticity on the imaging properties of microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljević, Darko; Murić, Branka; Pantelić, Dejan; Panić, Bratimir

    2012-05-01

    Microlenses were produced by the irradiation of a layer of tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) with laser light (second harmonic Nd:YAG, 532 nm). For this research, eight microlenses were written on a dog-bone-shaped TESG layer. After production, microlenses were uniaxially stretched on a tensile testing machine. Each microlens had different amounts of strain (0, 30, 60, 80, 120, 140, 180 and 240% strain). The influence of TESG layer extensibility on the imaging properties of microlenses was characterized by calculating the root mean square wavefront aberration, the modulation transfer function and the geometrical spot diagram. All microlenses had very good imaging properties and the microlens with 0% strain had diffraction-limited performance.

  5. The microlensing optical depth towards the Large Magellanic Cloud: is there a puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. Wyn; Belokurov, Vasily

    2007-01-01

    Using neural networks, Belokurov, Evans & Le Du showed that seven out of the 29 microlensing candidates towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) of the MACHO collaboration are consistent with blended microlensing and added Gaussian noise. We then estimated the microlensing optical depth to the LMC to be 0.3 × 10-7 <~ τ <~ 0.5 × 10-7, lower than the value τ = 1.2+0.4-0.3 × 10-7 claimed by the MACHO collaboration. There have been independent claims of a low optical depth to the LMC by the EROS collaboration, who have most recently reported τ < 0.36 × 10-7. Griest & Thomas have contested our calculations. Unfortunately, their paper contains a number of scientific misrepresentations of our work, which we clarify here. We stand by our application of the neural networks to microlensing searches, and believe it to be a technique of great promise. Rather, the main cause of the disparity between Griest & Thomas and Belokurov et al. lies in the very different data sets through which these investigators look for microlensing events. Whilst not everything is understood about the microlensing data sets towards the LMC, the latest downward revisions of the optical depth to (1.0 +/- 0.3) × 10-7 is within <~2σ of the theoretical prediction from stellar populations alone. Efficiency calculations can correct for the effects of false negatives, but they cannot correct for the effects of false positives (variable stars that are mistaken for microlensing). In our opinion, the best strategy in a microlensing experiment is to eschew a decision boundary altogether and so sidestep the vagaries of candidate selection and efficiency calculations. Rather, each lightcurve should be assigned a probability that it is a bona fide microlensing event and the microlensing rate calculated by summing over the probabilities of all such lightcurves.

  6. Space transfer vehicles and space basing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Joe

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) space basing agenda; (2) mission scenario 4E-5B, crew and Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) delivery; (3) final concept candidate, crew concept 4E-2B; (4) space transfer vehicle (STV) concept 4E-5B; (5) configuration summary for crew concept 4E-5B; (6) configuration definition for crew concept 4E-5B; (7) low earth orbit node assembly and checkout operations; (8) criteria for operation objectives; (9) LTV and STV main engines; (10) Space Station Freedom impacts; (11) aerobrakes; and (12) on orbit operations. This document is presented in viewgraph form.

  7. Space-based Tests of Relativistic Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Vyacheslav G.

    Since its initial publication, Einstein's general theory of relativity had been tested to a very high precision and presently is considered to be the standard theory of gravitation, especially when the phenomena in astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory has many practically important applications including spacecraft navigation, relativistic geodesy, time transfer, etc. Here we discuss the foundations of general relativity, present its current empirical status, and highlight the need for the new generation of high-accuracy tests. We present some space-based gravitational experiments and discuss anticipated advances in our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature.

  8. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Emission Regions: Athena's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique tool to study the emission regions of quasars from the smallest X-ray emission region to the larger BLR region. I will review the recent progress of the field focusing on the constraints on the non-thermal X-ray emission, based on our Chandra long-term monitoring results (over 3 Msec) of a sample of lenses. We discover for the first time chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands in the X-ray continuum emission. Our results indicate that the coronae above the accretion disk thought to generate X-rays have a non-uniform electron distribution, and the hard X-ray emission region is smaller than the soft region in two cases tracking the event horizon of black holes. We detect metal emission lines for almost all X-ray images in all lenses. We measure larger equivalent line widths in lensed quasars compared to a large sample of normal non-lensed AGNs of similar luminosities. We conclude that the iron line emission region is smaller than that of the X-ray continuum, possibly resulting from strong gravitational lensing near the black hole. Both the X-ray and optical emission region sizes scale with the black hole mass with similar slopes, but with a much smaller normalization for the X-ray emission. With the order of magnitude increase of effective area by Athena, I will discuss the perspective of quasar microlensing in the Athena era.

  9. Gravitational microlensing by double stars and planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shunde; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Almost all stars are in binary systems. When the separation between the two components is comparable to the Einstein ring radius corresponding to the combined mass of the binary acting as a gravitational lens, then an extra pair of images can be created, and the light curve of a lensed source becomes complicated. It is estimated that about 10 percent of all lensing episodes of the Galactic bulge stars will strongly display the binary nature of the lens. The effect is strong even if the companion is a planet. A massive search for microlensing of the Galactic bulge stars may lead to a discovery of the first extrasolar planetary systems.

  10. Space-based Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space based Operations Grid is intended to integrate the "high end" network services and compute resources that a remote payload investigator needs. This includes integrating and enhancing existing services such as access to telemetry, payload commanding, payload planning and internet voice distribution as well as the addition of services such as video conferencing, collaborative design, modeling or visualization, text messaging, application sharing, and access to existing compute or data grids. Grid technology addresses some of the greatest challenges and opportunities presented by the current trends in technology, i.e. how to take advantage of ever increasing bandwidth, how to manage virtual organizations and how to deal with the increasing threats to information technology security. We will discuss the pros and cons of using grid technology in space-based operations and share current plans for the prototype. It is hoped that early on the prototype can incorporate many of the existing as well as future services that are discussed in the first paragraph above to cooperating International Space Station Principle Investigators both nationally and internationally.

  11. Space-based Science Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.; Redman, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Grid technology is the up and coming technology that is enabling widely disparate services to be offered to users that is very economical, easy to use and not available on a wide basis. Under the Grid concept disparate organizations generally defined as "virtual organizations" can share services i.e. sharing discipline specific computer applications, required to accomplish the specific scientific and engineering organizational goals and objectives. Grids are emerging as the new technology of the future. Grid technology has been enabled by the evolution of increasingly high speed networking. Without the evolution of high speed networking Grid technology would not have emerged. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Flight Projects Directorate, Ground Systems Department is developing a Space-based Science Operations Grid prototype to provide to scientists and engineers the tools necessary to operate space-based science payloads/experiments and for scientists to conduct public and educational outreach. In addition Grid technology can provide new services not currently available to users. These services include mission voice and video, application sharing, telemetry management and display, payload and experiment commanding, data mining, high order data processing, discipline specific application sharing and data storage, all from a single grid portal. The Prototype will provide most of these services in a first step demonstration of integrated Grid and space-based science operations technologies. It will initially be based on the International Space Station science operational services located at the Payload Operations Integration Center at MSFC, but can be applied to many NASA projects including free flying satellites and future projects. The Prototype will use the Internet2 Abilene Research and Education Network that is currently a 10 Gb backbone network to reach the University of Alabama at Huntsville and several other, as yet unidentified, Space Station based

  12. Theory of Exploring the Dark Halo with Microlensing. I. Power-Law Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Evans, N. W.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Jijina, J.; Lehner, M.; Marshall, S. L.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. A.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Rodgers, A. W.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; MACHO Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    If microlensing of stars by dark matter has been detected, then the way is open for the development of new methods in galactic astronomy. This series of papers investigates what microlensing can teach us about the structure and shape of the dark halo. In this paper we present formulae for the microlensing rate, optical depth, and event duration distributions for a simple set of axisymmetric disk-halo models. The halos are based on the "power-law models" of Evans which have simple velocity distributions. Using these models, we show that there is a large uncertainty in the predicted microlensing rate because of uncertainty in the halo parameters. For example, models which reproduce the measured galactic observables to within their errors still differ in microlensing rate toward the Magellanic Clouds by more than a factor of 10. We find that while the more easily computed optical depth correlates well with microlensing rate, the ratio of optical depth to rate can vary by a factor of 2 (or greater if the disk is maximal). Comparison of microlensing rates toward the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) and M31 can be used to aid determinations of the halo flattening and rotation curve slope. For example, the ratio of microlensing rates toward the LMC and SMC is ˜0.7-0.8 for E0 halos and ˜1.0-1.2 for E7 halos. Once the flattening has been established, the ratio of microlensing rates toward M3 1 and the LMC may help to distinguish between models with rising, flat, or falling rotation curves. Comparison of rates along LMC and galactic bulge lines of sight gives useful information on the halo core radius, although this may not be so easy to extract in practice. Maximal disk models provide substantially smaller halo optical depths, shorter event durations, and even larger model uncertainties.

  13. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%-50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1-0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  14. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C L; Griest, K; Popowski, P; Cook, K H; Drake, A J; Minniti, D; Myer, D G; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    2005-06-16

    The authors present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout the fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and they find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper they give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. They also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.

  15. Microlensing by Multiple Planets in High-Magnification Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Naber, Richard M.; Sackett, Penny D.

    1998-07-01

    Microlensing is increasingly gaining recognition as a powerful method for the detection and characterization of extrasolar planetary systems. Naively, one might expect that the probability of detecting the influence of more than one planet on any single microlensing light curve would be small. Recently, however, Griest & Safizadeh have shown that, for a subset of events, those with minimum-impact parameter umin<~0.1 (high-magnification events), the detection probability is nearly 100% for Jovian-mass planets with projected separations in the range 0.6-1.6 of the primary Einstein ring radius RE and remains substantial outside this zone. In this Letter, we point out that this result implies that, regardless of orientation, all Jovian-mass planets with separations near 0.6-1.6RE dramatically affect the central region of the magnification pattern and thus have a significant probability of being detected (or ruled out) in high-magnification events. The joint probability, averaged over all inclinations and phases, of two planets having projected separations within 0.6-1.6RE is substantial: 1%-15% for two planets with the intrinsic separations of Jupiter and Saturn orbiting around 0.3-1.0 Msolar parent stars. We illustrate by example the complicated magnification patterns and light curves that can result when two planets are present, and we discuss the possible implications of our result on detection efficiencies and the ability to discriminate between multiple and single planets in high-magnification events.

  16. VCSEL collimation using self-aligned integrated polymer microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levallois, Christophe; Bardinal, Véronique; Vergnenègre, Corinne; Leïchlé, Thierry; Camps, Thierry; Daran, Emmanuelle; Doucet, Jean-Baptiste

    2008-04-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of polymer microlenses fabricated on patterned SU-8 layers in view of integrating microlenses on VCSEL arrays for laser beam shaping. For a standard top-emitting VCSEL, the lens has to be fabricated on a thick intermediate layer (pedestal) whose optimal thickness can be modelled as a function of the initial and of the aimed optical properties of the VCSEL beam. In this work, pedestals are fabricated with SU-8, which is a negative-tone photoresist transparent at the lasing wavelength. Lens deposition is realized using a robotized silicon microcantilever spotter technique after a simple SU-8 photolithography step in order to define high aspect ratio cylindrical pedestals with wide range diameters [30-140μm]. The effect of pedestal diameter on the final contact angle and curvature radius has been investigated using non contact optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. We show that this technique leads to a complete delimitation of the polymer droplets and to a better control of the final lens size. Moreover, lens positioning is fully ensured by the self-alignment of the droplet with the pillar center and consequently with the VCSEL source, and allows for meeting the stringent requirements on alignments.

  17. Gravitational microlensing as a probe for dark matter clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, E.; Sliusar, V. M.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Del Popolo, A.; Surdej, J.

    2016-04-01

    Extended dark matter (DM) substructures may play the role of microlenses in the Milky Way and in extragalactic gravitational lens systems (GLSs). We compare microlensing effects caused by point masses (Schwarzschild lenses) and extended clumps of matter using a simple model for the lens mapping. A superposition of the point mass and the extended clump is also considered. For special choices of the parameters, this model may represent a cusped clump of cold DM, a cored clump of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) or an ultra-compact minihalo of DM surrounding a massive point-like object. We built the resulting micro-amplification curves for various parameters of one clump moving with respect to the source in order to estimate differences between the light curves caused by clumps and by point lenses. The results show that it may be difficult to distinguish between these models. However, some region of the clump parameters can be restricted by considering the high amplification events at the present level of photometric accuracy. Then we estimate the statistical properties of the amplification curves in extragalactic GLSs. For this purpose, an ensemble of amplification curves is generated yielding the autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of the curves for different choices of the system parameters. We find that there can be a significant difference between these ACFs if the clump size is comparable with typical Einstein radii; as a rule, the contribution of clumps makes the ACFs less steep.

  18. Microlensing planet detection via geosynchronous and low Earth orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogavero, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Planet detection through microlensing is usually limited by a well-known degeneracy in the Einstein timescale tE, which prevents mass and distance of the lens to be univocally determined. It has been shown that a satellite in geosynchronous orbit could provide masses and distances for most standard planetary events (tE ≈ 20 days) via a microlens parallax measurement. This paper extends the analysis to shorter Einstein timescales, tE ≈ 1 day, when dealing with the case of Jupiter-mass lenses. We then study the capabilities of a low Earth orbit satellite on even shorter timescales, tE ≈ 0.1 days. A Fisher matrix analysis is employed to predict how the 1-σ error on parallax depends on tE and the peak magnification of the microlensing event. It is shown that a geosynchronous satellite could detect parallaxes for Jupiter-mass free floaters and discover planetary systems around very low-mass brown dwarfs. Moreover, a low Earth orbit satellite could lead to the discovery of Earth-mass free-floating planets. Limitations to these results can be the strong requirements on the photometry, the effects of blending, and in the case of the low orbit, the Earth's umbra.

  19. Empirical study of simulated two-planet microlensing events

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Penny, Matthew; Mao, Shude; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-10-10

    We undertake the first study of two-planet microlensing models recovered from simulations of microlensing events generated by realistic multiplanet systems in which 292 planetary events, including 16 two-planet events, were detected from 6690 simulated light curves. We find that when two planets are recovered, their parameters are usually close to those of the two planets in the system most responsible for the perturbations. However, in 1 of the 16 examples, the apparent mass of both detected planets was more than doubled by the unmodeled influence of a third, massive planet. This fraction is larger than but statistically consistent with the roughly 1.5% rate of serious mass errors due to unmodeled planetary companions for the 274 cases from the same simulation in which a single planet is recovered. We conjecture that an analogous effect due to unmodeled stellar companions may occur more frequently. For 7 out of 23 cases in which two planets in the system would have been detected separately, only one planet was recovered because the perturbations due to the two planets had similar forms. This is a small fraction (7/274) of all recovered single-planet models, but almost a third of all events that might plausibly have led to two-planet models. Still, in these cases, the recovered planet tends to have parameters similar to one of the two real planets most responsible for the anomaly.

  20. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  1. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  2. Galactic microlensing as a method of detecting massive compact halo objects

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The dark matter of the Galaxy may well consist of Jupiters, brown dwarfs, or the remnants of an early generation of stars. In 1986, Paczynski suggested that a population of such objects could be detected by watching for microlensing of stars in the LMC. Using a more realistic model of the halo density and velocity structure this paper recalculates the microlensing optical depth, the microlensing event rate, and the average duration of an event, correcting an error, but finding rough agreement with Paczynski's estimates. Also calculated is the distribution of microlensing events as a function of their duration and amplitude, finding that photometric measurements more frequent than the average event duration are needed to detect a substantial fraction of the events. 24 refs.

  3. The optimization of zero-spaced microlenses for 2.2um pixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyun hee; Park, Jeong Lyeol; Choi, Jea Sung; Lee, Jeong Gun

    2007-03-01

    In CMOS image sensor, microlens arrays are generally used as light propagation carrier onto photo diode to increase collection efficiency and reduce optical cross-talk. Today, the scaling trend of CMOS technology drives reduction of the pixel size for higher integration density and resolution improvement. Microlenses are typically formed by photo resist patterning and thermal reflowing, and the space between photo resist is necessary to avoid merging of microlenses during thermal reflow process. With the shrinking sizes, microlenses become more and more difficult to manufacture without their merging. Hence, the key of light loss free microlens fabrication is still zero-space between microlenses. In this paper, we report the selection of the optimum shape of microlens by the dead space and the curvature of radius. The improvements of critical dimension and thickness uniformities of microlens are also reported.

  4. Space-based radar antenna thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrable, Daniel L.; Vrable, Michael D.

    2001-02-01

    Improved thermal management for large planar phased array antennas proposed for future spaced-based radar applications in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is a critical issue. Effective and lightweight thermal management concepts are required to enhance thermal control and provide near isothermal operation during transit between daylight and eclipse periods and radar electronic power-on and off operation. Due to the planar array's large area the antenna has sufficient area to radiate the deposited power during both eclipse and daylight periods. The critical issue is keeping the antenna warm during the eclipse period, thereby maintaining the structure and sensitive electronic components near an isothermal condition. The thermal concept discussed provides a totally passive, lightweight and highly effective thermal control approach. The concept utilizes a phase change material (PCM), which exploits the large latent heat capacity for effective energy storage. In addition, the concept utilizes a new lightweight and high thermal conductivity carbon foam material to integrally contain or encapsulate the PCM. The carbon foam thermal conductivity and cell geometric characteristics result in effective thermal transfer during both thermal energy storage and extraction. The overall design concept provides a weight efficient and highly effective thermal control approach that requires no additional parasitic power. High payoff includes improved temperature control for near isothermal operation of the antenna array during the entire orbit. .

  5. Space-based ballistic-missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Bethe, H.A.; Garwin, R.L.; Gottfried, K.; Kendall, H.W.

    1984-10-01

    This article, based on a forthcoming book by the Union for Concerned Scientists, focuses on the technical aspects of the issue of space-based ballistic-missile defense. After analysis, the authors conclude that the questionable performance of the proposed defense, the ease with which it could be overwhelmed or circumvented, and its potential as an antisatellite system would cause grievous damage to the security of the US if the Strategic Defense Initiative were to be pursued. The path toward greater security lies in quite another direction, they feel. Although research on ballistic-missile defense should continue at the traditional level of expenditure and within the constraints of the ABM Treaty, every effort should be made to negotiate a bilateral ban on the testing and use of space weapons. The authors think it is essential that such an agreement cover all altitudes, because a ban on high-altitude antisatellite weapons alone would not viable if directed energy weapons were developed for ballistic-missile defense. Further, the Star Wars program, unlikely ever to protect the entire nation against a nuclear attack, would nonetheless trigger a major expansion of the arms race.

  6. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models.

  7. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  8. Transferring resist microlenses into silicon by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Martin; Schwider, Johannes

    1996-10-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is known as an effective technique for high precision anisotropic etching with a minimum loss of the critical dimensions provided by the photoresist or other masking materials. RIE can also be used to transfer continuous forms such as spherical resist microlenses into substrate materials (e.g., quartz glass or silicon). The form of the lenses can be considerably controlled by changing the etch rate ratio between resist and the substrate. This was achieved by varying the etch gas compound, especially the amount of oxygen, during the etching or by changing the applied power. Measured etch rates for silicon are given to demonstrate the possibilities of lens shaping. The surface roughness of the etched lenses was one of the main problems. The roughness could be minimized by adding helium to the etch gases for heat removal and by increasing the resist rinse time after the wet chemical development.

  9. Optical Depth from Realistic Microlensing Models of M31

    SciTech Connect

    Gyuk, Geza; Crotts, Arlin

    2000-06-01

    We provide a set of microlensing optical depth maps for M31. Optical depths toward Andromeda were calculated on the basis of a four-component model of the lens and source populations: disk and bulge sources lensed by bulge, M31 halo, and Galactic halo lenses. We confirm the high optical depth and the strong optical depth gradient along the M31 minor axis due to a dark halo of lenses and also discuss the magnitude of the self-lensing due to the bulge. We explore how the shape of the optical depth maps to M31 vary with the halo parameters core radius and flattening. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  10. Liquid microlenses and waveguides from bulk nematic birefringent profiles.

    PubMed

    Čančula, Miha; Ravnik, Miha; Muševič, Igor; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-09-19

    We demonstrate polarization-selective microlensing and waveguiding of laser beams by birefringent profiles in bulk nematic fluids using numerical modelling. Specifically, we show that radial escaped nematic director profiles with negative birefringence focus and guide light with radial polarization, whereas the opposite - azimuthal - polarization passes through unaffected. A converging lens is realized in a nematic with negative birefringence, and a diverging lens in a positive birefringence material. Tuning of such single-liquid lenses by an external low-frequency electric field and by adjusting the profile and intensity of the beam itself is demonstrated, combining external control with intrinsic self-adaptive focusing. Escaped radial profiles of birefringence are shown to act as single-liquid waveguides with a single distinct eigenmode and low attenuation. Finally, this work is an approach towards creating liquid photonic elements for all-soft matter photonics. PMID:27661952

  11. Analytical relations for time-dependent statistical microlensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. I.; Zhdanova, V. V.

    1995-07-01

    Gravitational field of randomly distributed point masses produces a stochastic angular shift {vec}({PSI}) of the positions of a remote object image. We obtain characteristic functions and probability distributions of apparent proper motions {vec}(u)=d{vec}({PSI})/dt and angular accelerations {vec}(a)=d^2vec({PSI})/dt^2^ under the assumptions that the gravitator velocities are constant, the gravitator volume density is uniform in the directions orthogonal to the line of sight, and the microlensing process is linear. The nonuniformity corrections to the characteristic functions due to spatial variations of the gravitator density are estimated. These corrections appear to be essential for the {vec}(u)-distribution in the presence of bulk motions of gravitators; for the {vec}(a)-distribution they may be neglected.

  12. Observational limits on Omega in stars, brown dwarfs, and stellar remnants from gravitational microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Canizares, Claude R.; Granados, Arno; Steidel, Charles C.; Stocke, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Microlensing by compact objects with masses between approximately 0.001 solar masses and approximately 300 solar masses will amplify the continuum emission of a quasar, without significantly changing its line emission. Thus, compact objects with masses associated with stars, subdwarfs, and stellar remnants will reduce the apparent equivalent widths of quasar emission lines. It is possible to detect this population of lenses by searching for an increase in the number of small equivalent width quasars with redshift. This increase was looked for, but not found, in quasar samples taken from the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey and the Steidel & Sargent absorption-line studies. Thus, Omega(sub c), the cosmological density of compact objects relative to the critical density, is less than or approximately equal to 0.1 in the mass range 0.01 solar masses-20 solar masses (for Omega less than 0.6). For any value of Omega, Omega(sub c) less than or approximately equal to 0.2 in the larger mass range 0.001 solar masses-60 solar masses, and Omega(sub c) less than 1 for 0.001 solar masses-300 solar masses. Subdwarfs, stellar objects, or their remnants (e.g., MACHOS) cannot close the universe.

  13. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  14. Adaptive liquid microlenses activated by stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Agarwal, Abhishek K.; Beebe, David J.; Jiang, Hongrui

    2006-08-01

    Despite its compactness, the human eye can easily focus on different distances by adjusting the shape of its lens with the help of ciliary muscles. In contrast, traditional man-made optical systems achieve focusing by physical displacement of the lenses used. But in recent years, advances in miniaturization technology have led to optical systems that no longer require complicated mechanical systems to tune and adjust optical performance. These systems have found wide use in photonics, displays and biomedical systems. They are either based on arrays of microlenses with fixed focal lengths, or use external control to adjust the microlens focal length. An intriguing example is the tunable liquid lens, where electrowetting or external pressure manipulates the shape of a liquid droplet and thereby adjusts its optical properties. Here we demonstrate a liquid lens system that allows for autonomous focusing. The central component is a stimuli-responsive hydrogel integrated into a microfluidic system and serving as the container for a liquid droplet, with the hydrogel simultaneously sensing the presence of stimuli and actuating adjustments to the shape-and hence focal length-of the droplet. By working at the micrometre scale where ionic diffusion and surface tension scale favourably, we can use pinned liquid-liquid interfaces to obtain stable devices and realize response times of ten to a few tens of seconds. The microlenses, which can have a focal length ranging from -∞ to +∞ (divergent and convergent), are also readily integrated into arrays that may find use in applications such as sensing, medical diagnostics and lab-on-a-chip technologies.

  15. M dwarfs, microlensing, and the mass budget of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Kirhakos, Sofia

    1994-01-01

    We show that faint red stars do not contribute significantly to the mass budget of the Galaxy or to microlensing statistics. Our results are obtained by analyzing two long exposures of a high-latitude field taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Stars are easily distinguished from galaxies essentially to the limiting magnitudes of the images. We find five stars with 2.0 less than V - I less than 3.0 and I less than 25.3 and no stars with V - I greater than 3.0. Therefore, main-sequence stars with M(sub I) greater than 10 that are above the hydrogen-burning limit in the dark halo or the spheroid contribute less than 6% of the unseen matter. Faint red disk stars, M-dwarfs, contribute at most 15% to the mass of the disk. We parameterize the faint end of the cumulative distribution of stars, Phi, as a function of luminosity L(sub V), d Phi/d ln L(sub V) proportional to L(sub V exp -gamma). For spheroid stars, gamma less than 0.32 over the range 6 less than M(sub V) less than 17, with 98% confidence. The disk luminosity function falls, gamma less than 0, for 15 approximately less than M(sub V) approximately less than 19. Faint red stars in the disk or thick disk, and stars with M(sub V) less than 16 in the spheroid contribute tau less than 10(exp -8) to the optical depth to microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  16. Flat Panel Space Based Space Surveillance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Duncan, A.; Wilm, J.; Thurman, S. T.; Stubbs, D. M.; Ogden, C.

    2013-09-01

    limited telescope is, therefore, replaced by in-process integration and test as part of the PIC fabrication that substantially reduces associated schedule and cost. The low profile and low SWaP of a SPIDER system enables high resolution imaging with a payload that is similar in size and aspect ratio to a solar panel. This allows high resolution low cost options for space based space surveillance telescopes. The low SWaP design enables hosted payloads, cubesat designs as well as traditional bus options that are lower cost. We present a description of the concept and preliminary simulation and experimental data that demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the SPIDER technique.

  17. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    . Based on the expected revenues from about 300 customers, SPoTS needs a significant contribution from public funding to be commercial viable. However, even though the system might seem to be a huge investment first, it provides a unique steppingstone for future space based wireless transfer of energy to the Earth. Also the public funding is considered as an interest free loan and is due to be paid back over de lifetime period of SPoTS. These features make the SPoTS very attractive in comparison to other space projects of the same science field.

  18. Effects of Kerr strong gravity on quasar x-ray microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.; Kantowski, R.

    2013-06-01

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the sizes of X-ray emission regions to be within about 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. Therefore, the X-ray emission from lensed quasars is first strongly lensed by the black hole before it is lensed by the foreground galaxy and star fields. We present a scheme that combines the initial strong lensing of a Kerr black hole with standard linearized microlensing by intervening stars. We find that X-ray microlensed light curves incorporating Kerr strong gravity can differ significantly from standard curves. The amplitude of the fluctuations in the light curves can increase or decrease by ∼0.65-0.75 mag by including Kerr strong gravity. Larger inclination angles give larger amplitude fluctuations in the microlensing light curves. Consequently, current X-ray microlensing observations can under or overestimate the sizes of the X-ray emission regions. We estimate this bias using a simple metric based on the amplitude of magnitude fluctuations. The half-light radius of the X-ray emission region can be underestimated by up to ∼50% or overestimated by up to ∼20% depending on the spin of the black hole, the emission profile, and the inclination angle of the observer. Underestimates were found in most situations we investigated. The only exception was for a disk with large spin and a radially flat emission profile, observed nearly face-on. We thus conclude that more accurate microlensing size constraints should be obtainable by including Kerr lensing. We also find that the caustic crossing time can differ by months when Kerr strong gravity is included. A simultaneous monitoring of gravitational lensed quasars in both X-ray and optical bands with densely sampled X-ray light curves should reveal this feature. We conclude that it should be possible to constrain important parameters such as inclination angles and black hole spins from combined Kerr and microlensing effects.

  19. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  20. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  1. Research on Galactic Dark Matter Implied by Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque, Nathalie Katya

    1998-07-01

    One of the most compelling pieces of evidence for dark matter comes from the observation of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. The dynamical mass implied exceeds that in visible components by about a factor of three. We will place this problem in the general context of dark matter in the Universe and see that galactic halos could be composed of compact baryonic objects. Using the effect of gravitational microlensing, the French experiment EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) monitored stars in the Magellanic clouds for four years to search for dark halo objects. It excluded that objects in the mass range 5e-7 to 0.02 solar mass made up more than 20% of a standard halo. With a new set-up, EROS2 probes the high mass range, where a different line-of-sight is investigated: the Small Magellanic Cloud. The EROS2 scientific objectives, set-up and data acquisition pipeline are explained. We present a new stellar detection algorithm which increases the number of stars we are able to monitor. The analysis of the first year SMC data (5 million light curves) is described in detail, and one event compatible with microlensing is identified. Assuming a standard halo, a likelihood analysis allows the estimate of its most probable mass to about 1.7 solar masses. One of the main sources of systematics in crowded fields, blending, is studied thoroughly with the help of simulated images, and its impact on the efficiency quantified. Finally, a variety of realistic Galactic models are presented. For each of them, the optical depth and event rate are calculated and compared to the values derived from the detection of one candidate. The lack of statistics (and temporal baseline) calls for a second year of data, but we are already sensitive to objects in the mass range 0.01 to 1 solar mass. Because they probe different regions of the halo, the comparison of the LMC and SMC results will soon allow us to better constrain the shape and nature of our Halo.

  2. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  3. BINARY MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2009-BLG-020 GIVES VERIFIABLE MASS, DISTANCE, AND ORBIT PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.; Nelson, C. R.; Kozlowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Dong, Subo; Monard, L. A. G.; Han, C.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Maury, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Greenhill, J.; Bond, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2011-09-01

    We present the first example of binary microlensing for which the parameter measurements can be verified (or contradicted) by future Doppler observations. This test is made possible by a confluence of two relatively unusual circumstances. First, the binary lens is bright enough (I = 15.6) to permit Doppler measurements. Second, we measure not only the usual seven binary-lens parameters, but also the 'microlens parallax' (which yields the binary mass) and two components of the instantaneous orbital velocity. Thus, we measure, effectively, six 'Kepler+1' parameters (two instantaneous positions, two instantaneous velocities, the binary total mass, and the mass ratio). Since Doppler observations of the brighter binary component determine five Kepler parameters (period, velocity amplitude, eccentricity, phase, and position of periapsis), while the same spectroscopy yields the mass of the primary, the combined Doppler + microlensing observations would be overconstrained by 6 + (5 + 1) - (7 + 1) = 4 degrees of freedom. This makes possible an extremely strong test of the microlensing solution. We also introduce a uniform microlensing notation for single and binary lenses, define conventions, summarize all known microlensing degeneracies, and extend a set of parameters to describe full Keplerian motion of the binary lenses.

  4. DISCOVERY OF ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING IN Q2237+0305

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu; Kochanek, C. S.; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Chartas, George; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2011-10-20

    We present our long-term Chandra X-ray monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 with 20 epochs spanning 10 years. We easily detect microlensing variability between the images in the full (0.2-8 keV), soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-8 keV) bands at very high confidence. We also detect, for the first time, chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands. The hard X-ray band is more strongly microlensed than the soft band, suggesting that the corona above the accretion disk thought to generate the X-rays has a non-uniform electron distribution, in which the hotter and more energetic electrons occupy more compact regions surrounding the black holes. Both the hard and soft X-ray bands are more strongly microlensed than the optical (rest-frame UV) emission, indicating that the X-ray emission is more compact than the optical, confirming the microlensing results from other lenses.

  5. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission. PMID:26574051

  6. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin

    2015-11-17

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission.

  7. Gravitational microlensing as a method of detecting disk dark matter and faint disk stars

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.S.; Bennett, D.P.; Cook, K.H. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-05-01

    Gravitational microlensing of stars in the Galactic bulge is proposed as a method of probing the mass density of disk objects in the 0.001 to 0.1 solar mass range. A substantial rate is found if disk dark matter of this form exists, and even without any dark matter, a significant microlensing rate is found, owing to the faint low-mass disk stars which are known to exist. Such a search would provide new information on the disk dark matter question, probe the low-end stellar mass function, and also search for halo dark matter, all with rates comparable to those expected for the ongoing LMC microlensing halo dark matter searches. 17 refs.

  8. New limits on primordial black hole dark matter from an analysis of Kepler source microlensing data.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Lehner, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    We present new limits on the allowed masses of a dark matter (DM) halo consisting of primordial black holes (PBH) (or any other massive compact halo object). We analyze two years of data from the Kepler satellite, searching for short-duration bumps caused by gravitational microlensing. After removing background events consisting of variable stars, flare events, and comets or asteroids moving through the Kepler field, we find no microlensing candidates. We measure the efficiency of our selection criteria by adding millions of simulated microlensing lensing events into the Kepler light curves. We find that PBH DM with masses in the range 2 × 10(-9) M[Symbol: see text] to 10(-7)M[Symbol: see text] cannot make up the entirety of the DM in the Milky Way. At the low-mass end, this decreases the allowed mass range by more than an order of magnititude. PMID:24237504

  9. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission. PMID:26574051

  10. Microlensing of Kepler stars as a method of detecting primordial black hole dark matter.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Lehner, Matthew J; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-01

    If the dark matter consists of primordial black holes (PBHs), we show that gravitational lensing of stars being monitored by NASA's Kepler search for extrasolar planets can cause significant numbers of detectable microlensing events. A search through the roughly 150,000 light curves would result in large numbers of detectable events for PBHs in the mass range 5×10(-10) M(⊙) to 10(-4) M(⊙). Nondetection of these events would close almost 2 orders of magnitude of the mass window for PBH dark matter. The microlensing rate is higher than previously noticed due to a combination of the exceptional photometric precision of the Kepler mission and the increase in cross section due to the large angular sizes of the relatively nearby Kepler field stars. We also present a new formalism for calculating optical depth and microlensing rates in the presence of large finite-source effects. PMID:22182077

  11. New limits on primordial black hole dark matter from an analysis of Kepler source microlensing data.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Lehner, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    We present new limits on the allowed masses of a dark matter (DM) halo consisting of primordial black holes (PBH) (or any other massive compact halo object). We analyze two years of data from the Kepler satellite, searching for short-duration bumps caused by gravitational microlensing. After removing background events consisting of variable stars, flare events, and comets or asteroids moving through the Kepler field, we find no microlensing candidates. We measure the efficiency of our selection criteria by adding millions of simulated microlensing lensing events into the Kepler light curves. We find that PBH DM with masses in the range 2 × 10(-9) M[Symbol: see text] to 10(-7)M[Symbol: see text] cannot make up the entirety of the DM in the Milky Way. At the low-mass end, this decreases the allowed mass range by more than an order of magnititude.

  12. Note: Electrical modeling and characterization of voltage gradient in liquid crystal microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urruchi, V.; Algorri, J. F.; Marcos, C.; Sánchez-Pena, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a novel equivalent electric circuit for modeling liquid crystal microlenses is proposed. This model is focused on explaining a lens behavior at the micrometric scale, using its manufacturing parameters. It suggests an approach to predict the solution of the voltage gradient distribution across a microlens. An interesting feature of the model is that it provides an analytical solution for microlenses with modal and hole-patterned electrode schemes, by a simple software tool. The model flexibility allows lens designers to apply complex waveform signals with different harmonics. The voltage distribution has been tested. The simulated and measured voltage profiles are fairly in agreement.

  13. An expert systems application to space base data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The advent of space vehicles with their increased data requirements are reflected in the complexity of future telemetry systems. Space based operations with its immense operating costs will shift the burden of data processing and routine analysis from the space station to the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). A research and development project is described which addresses the real time onboard data processing tasks associated with a space based vehicle, specifically focusing on an implementation of an expert system.

  14. Galactic Distribution of Planets From High-Magnification Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer; Carey, Sean

    2015-10-01

    We will use Spitzer to measure microlens parallaxes for ~14 microlensing events that are high-magnification (as seen from Earth), in order to determine the Galactic distribution of planets. Simultaneous observations from Spitzer and Earth yield parallaxes because they are separated by ~1 AU, which is of order the size of the Einstein radius projected on the observer plane. Hence, Earth and Spitzer see substantially different lightcurves for the same event. These Spitzer parallaxes enable measurements of the distances to the lenses (and their masses), which is a crucial element for measuring the Galactic distribution of planets. High-mag events are exceptionally sensitive to planets: Gould+ (2010) detected 6 planets from 13 high-mag events. However, previously it was believed impossible to measure their parallaxes using Spitzer: scheduling constraints imply a 3-10 day delay from event recognition to first observation, while high-mag events are typically recognized only 1-2 days before peak. By combining aggressive observing protocols, a completely new photometry pipeline, and new mathematical techniques, we successfully measured parallaxes for 7 events with peak magnification A>100 and another ~7 with 50

  15. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 (impact parameter 1.5 arcsec), and the second in June 2015 (impact parameter 1.4 arcsec). As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by ~0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens (Proxima). Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  16. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2013-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 {impact parameter 1.5 arcsec}, and the second in June 2015 {impact parameter 1.4 arcsec}. As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by 0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens {Proxima}. Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  17. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2012-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 {impact parameter 1.5 arcsec}, and the second in June 2015 {impact parameter 1.4 arcsec}. As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by 0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens {Proxima}. Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  18. Prospects for observing ultracompact binaries with space-based gravitational wave interferometers and optical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, T. B.; Larson, S. L.; Nelemans, G.; Cornish, N. J.

    2013-03-01

    Space-based gravitational wave interferometers are sensitive to the galactic population of ultracompact binaries. An important subset of the ultracompact binary population are those stars that can be individually resolved by both gravitational wave interferometers and electromagnetic telescopes. The aim of this paper is to quantify the multimessenger potential of space-based interferometers with arm-lengths between 1 and 5 Gm. The Fisher information matrix is used to estimate the number of binaries from a model of the Milky Way which are localized on the sky by the gravitational wave detector to within 1 and 10 deg2 and bright enough to be detected by a magnitude-limited survey. We find, depending on the choice of GW detector characteristics, limiting magnitude and observing strategy, that up to several hundred gravitational wave sources could be detected in electromagnetic follow-up observations.

  19. Prospects for Observing Ultracompact Binaries with Space-Based Gravitational Wave Interferometers and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, T. B.; Larson, S. L.; Nelemans, G.; Cornish, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave interferometers are sensitive to the galactic population of ultracompact binaries. An important subset of the ultracompact binary population are those stars that can be individually resolved by both gravitational wave interferometers and electromagnetic telescopes. The aim of this paper is to quantify the multimessenger potential of space-based interferometers with arm-lengths between 1 and 5 Gm. The Fisher information matrix is used to estimate the number of binaries from a model of the Milky Way which are localized on the sky by the gravitational wave detector to within 1 and 10 deg(exp 2) and bright enough to be detected by a magnitude-limited survey.We find, depending on the choice ofGW detector characteristics, limiting magnitude and observing strategy, that up to several hundred gravitational wave sources could be detected in electromagnetic follow-up observations.

  20. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Munoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  1. Exoplanet detection via microlensing with RoboNet-1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bode, M. F.; Horne, K. D.; Steele, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Tsapras, Y.

    2007-04-01

    RoboNet-1.0 is a prototype global network of three two-meter robotic telescopes, placed in La Palma (Canary Islands), Maui (Hawaii), and Siding Spring (Australia). In April 2004, funding for RoboNet-1.0 until July 2007 was approved by PPARC's Science Committee, and the project commenced in earnest in August 2004. The search for cool extra-solar planets by optimised robotic monitoring of Galactic microlensing events is one of the two core elements of its scientific programme - observations of gamma-ray bursts is the other. During the 2005 observing season, light curves of more than 60 microlensing events have been sampled at regular intervals. One particular event, OGLE-2005-BLG-71, showed an anomaly caused by an extrasolar planet, which constituted the second detection of a planet by microlensing. As a by-product, our dense monitoring during caustic crossing events can resolve the brightness profile of observed source stars, providing an observational test of stellar atmosphere models. Current development work uses e-science to create a fully automated chain linking event monitoring to the detection of anomalies in the microlensing lightcurves that could be indications of planetary companions and on to the triggering of follow-up observations. In order to fully exploit the potential of such a network for detecting exoplanets, it will be necessary to complement the existing RoboNet with additional telescopes in the southern hemisphere.

  2. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  3. The first radial velocity measurements of a microlensing event: no evidence for the predicted binary⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Fakhardji, W.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Ranc, C.

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique allows the discovery of exoplanets around stars distributed in the disk of the galaxy towards the bulge. The alignment of two stars that led to the discovery is unique over the timescale of a human life, however, and cannot be re-observed. Moreover, the target host is often very faint and located in a crowded region. These difficulties hamper and often make impossible the follow up of the target and study of its possible companions. A radial-velocity curve was predicted for the binary system, OGLE-2011-BLG-0417, discovered and characterised from a microlensing event. We used the UVES spectrograph mounted at the VLT, ESO to derive precise radial-velocity measurements of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. To gather high-precision radial velocities on faint targets of microlensing events, we proposed to use the source star as a reference to measure the lens radial velocities. We obtained ten radial velocities on the putative V = 18 lens with a dispersion of ~100 m s-1, spread over one year. Our measurements do not confirm the microlensing prediction for this binary system. The most likely scenario is that the putative V = 18 mag lens is actually a blend and not the primary lens which is 2 mag fainter. Further observations and analyses are needed to understand the microlensing observation and infer on the nature and characteristics of the lens itself. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Contamination in the MACHO data set and the puzzle of Large Magellanic Cloud microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griest, Kim; Thomas, Christian L.

    2005-05-01

    In a recent series of three papers, Belokurov, Evans & Le Du and Evans & Belokurov reanalysed the MACHO collaboration data and gave alternative sets of microlensing events and an alternative optical depth to microlensing towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Although these authors examined less than 0.2 per cent of the data, they reported that by using a neural net program they had reliably selected a better (and smaller) set of microlensing candidates. Estimating the optical depth from this smaller set, they claimed that the MACHO collaboration overestimated the optical depth by a significant factor and that the MACHO microlensing experiment is consistent with lensing by known stars in the Milky Way and LMC. As we show below, the analysis by these authors contains several errors, and as a result their conclusions are incorrect. Their efficiency analysis is in error, and since they did not search through the entire MACHO data set, they do not know how many microlensing events their neural net would find in the data nor what optical depth their method would give. Examination of their selected events suggests that their method misses low signal-to-noise ratio events and thus would have lower efficiency than the MACHO selection criteria. In addition, their method is likely to give many more false positives (non-lensing events identified as lensing). Both effects would increase their estimated optical depth. Finally, we note that the EROS discovery that LMC event 23 is a variable star reduces the MACHO collaboration estimates of optical depth and the Macho halo fraction by around 8 per cent, and does open the question of additional contamination.

  5. Self-aligned process for forming microlenses at the tips of vertical silicon nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Yaping Chen, Kaixiang; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    The microlens is a key enabling technology in optoelectronics, permitting light to be efficiently coupled to and from devices such as image sensors and light-emitting diodes. Their ubiquitous nature motivates the development of new fabrication techniques, since existing methods face challenges as microlenses are scaled to smaller dimensions. Here, the authors demonstrate the formation of microlenses at the tips of vertically oriented silicon nanowires via a rapid atomic layer deposition process. The nature of the process is such that the microlenses are centered on the nanowires, and there is a self-limiting effect on the final sizes of the microlenses arising from the nanowire spacing. Finite difference time domain electromagnetic simulations are performed of microlens focusing properties, including showing their ability to enhance visible-wavelength absorption in silicon nanowires.

  6. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Gschrey, M; Thoma, A; Schnauber, P; Seifried, M; Schmidt, R; Wohlfeil, B; Krüger, L; Schulze, J-H; Heindel, T; Burger, S; Schmidt, F; Strittmatter, A; Rodt, S; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23±3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80±7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter.

  7. Space-Based Space Surveillance Operational and Demonstration Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escorial Olmos, Diego; Aleman Roda, Fernando E.; Middleton, Kevin; Naudet, Joris

    2013-08-01

    GMV is currently leading, under ESA contract, an assessment study to define a demonstration mission for space-based space surveillance. The project team includes QinetiQ Space as responsible for the platform and RAL Space for the payload activities. During the first phase of the study a high-level definition of a future operational mission has been carried out including the definition of user requirements for a future Space Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) service. During the second phase of the study a precursor mission to demonstrate the SBSS operational needs has been defined. The present paper presents the results of both phases, including architectures definition and expected performances.

  8. Control of Space-Based Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifzer. W. J.; Taminger, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Engineering a closed-loop control system for an electron beam welder for space-based additive manufacturing is challenging. For earth and space based applications, components must work in a vacuum and optical components become occluded with metal vapor deposition. For extraterrestrial applications added components increase launch weight, increase complexity, and increase space flight certification efforts. Here we present a software tool that closely couples path planning and E-beam parameter controls into the build process to increase flexibility. In an environment where data collection hinders real-time control, another approach is considered that will still yield a high quality build.

  9. Intelligibility and Space-based Voice with Relaxed Delay Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Sam; Okino, Clayton; Cheng, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The inherent aspects and flaws surrounding space based communication is technically described and the math surrounding encoding and decoding LT Codes is examined. Utilizing LT codes as a means of reducing packet erasures due to corrupted packets on an RF link can result in higher voice quality. PESQ-MOS measure was used to analyze voice degradation over space links tested for LT codec size and number of 10ms per packet.Extensions utilizing LT codes to improve the packet erasure performance and combining the use of ASR could provide for a solid means of identifying the benefit in terms of intelligibility of voice communications in space-based networks

  10. Technology for a NASA Space-Based Science Operations Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Redman, Sandra H.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of a proposal to develop a space-based operations grid in support of space-based science experiments. The development of such a grid would provide a dynamic, secure and scalable architecture based on standards and next-generation reusable software and would enable greater science collaboration and productivity through the use of shared resources and distributed computing. The authors propose developing this concept for use on payload experiments carried aboard the International Space Station. Topics covered include: grid definitions, portals, grid development and coordination, grid technology and potential uses of such a grid.

  11. Space-based aperture array for ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has seen the advent of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100 MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21 cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy observations at frequencies below 30 MHz are severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10 MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. In the past, such space-based radio astronomy studies were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. Furthermore, successful space-based missions which mapped the sky in this frequency regime, such as the lunar orbiter RAE-2, were restricted by very poor spatial resolution. Recently concluded studies, such as DARIS (Disturbuted Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy In Space) have shown the ready feasibility of a 9 satellite constellation using off the shelf components. The aim of this article is to discuss the current trends and technologies towards the feasibility of a space-based aperture array for astronomical observations in the Ultra-Long Wavelength (ULW) regime of greater than 10 m i.e., below 30 MHz. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and discuss the system design for selected scenarios such as extra-galactic surveys. An extensive discussion is presented on various sub-systems of the potential satellite array, such as radio astronomical antenna design, the on-board signal processing, communication architectures and joint space-time estimation of the

  12. National Coordination Office for Space-Based PNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    In December 2004, President Bush issued the US Policy on space-based positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), providing guidance on the management of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other space- based PNT systems. The policy established the National Executive Committee (EXCOM) to advise and coordinate federal agencies on matters related to space-based PNT. Chaired jointly by the deputy secretaries of defense and transportation, the EXCOM includes equivalent level officials from the Departments of State, the Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, and Homeland Security, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A National Coordination Office (NCO) supports the EXCOM through an interagency staff. Since establishing the EXCOM and NCO in 2005, the organizations have quickly grown in influence and effectiveness, leading or managing many interagency initiatives including the development of a Five-Year National Space-Based PNT Plan, the Space-Based PNT Interference Detection and Mitigation (IDM) Plan, and other strategic documents. The NCO has also facilitated interagency coordination on numerous policy issues and on external communications intended to spread a consistent, positive US message about space-based PNT. Role of the NCO - The purpose of the EXCOM is to provide top-level guidance to US agencies regarding space-based PNT infrastructure. The president established it at the deputy secretary level to ensure its strategic recommendations effect real change in agency budgets. Recognizing such high-level officials could only meet every few months, the president directed the EXCOM to establish an NCO to carry out its day-to-day business, including overseeing the implementation of EXCOM action items across the member agencies. These range from the resolution of funding issues to the assessment of strategic policy options. They also include the completion of specific tasks and documents requested by the EXCOM co

  13. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  14. Stellar, Remnant, Planetary, and Dark-Object Masses from Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew P.; Bennett, David P.; Boden, Andrew; Depoy, Darren L.; Gaudi, Scott B.; Griest, Kim; Han, Cheongho; Paczynski, Bohdan; Reid, I. Neill

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our project is to make a complete census of the stellar population of the Galaxy. We are broadening the term stellar here to include both ordinary stars and dark stars. Ordinary stars, burning their nuclear fuel and shining, can perhaps best be studied with traditional astronomical techniques, but dark stars, by which we include old brown dwarfs, black holes, old white dwarfs, neutron stars, and perhaps exotic objects such as mirror matter stars or primordial black holes, can only be studied by their gravitational effects. Traditionally, these objects have been probed in binaries, and thus selected in a way that may or may not be representative of their respective field populations. The only way to examine the field population of these stars is through microlensing, the deflection of light from a visible star in the background by an object (dark or not) in the foreground. When lensed, there are two images of the background star. Although these images cannot be resolved when the lens has a stellar mass, the lensing effect can be detected in two ways: photometrically, i.e. by measuring the magnification of the source by the lens, and astrometrically, i.e. by measuring the shift in the centroid of the two images. Photometric microlensing experiments have detected hundreds of microlensing events over the past decade. Despite its successes, photometric microlensing has so far been somewhat frustrating because these events are difficult to interpret. Almost nothing is known about the masses of individual lenses and very little is known about the statistical properties of the lenses treated as a whole, such as their average mass. Although probably over 100 of the lenses are in fact dark objects, we can't determine which they are, let alone investigate finer details such as what their masses are, and where they are in the Galaxy. With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We

  15. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Kains, N.; Ipatov, S.; Alsubai, K. A.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Collaboration: RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-02-10

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M {sub J} planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉} early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  16. Besançon Galactic model analysis of MOA-II microlensing: evidence for a mass deficit in the inner bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awiphan, S.; Kerins, E.; Robin, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Galactic bulge microlensing surveys provide a probe of Galactic structure. We present the first field-by-field comparison between microlensing observations and the Besançon population synthesis Galactic model. Using an updated version of the model we provide maps of optical depth, average event duration and event rate for resolved source populations and for difference imaging analysis (DIA) events. We also compare the predicted event time-scale distribution to that observed. The simulation follows the selection criteria of the MOA-II survey. We modify the Besançon model to include M dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Our best-fitting model requires a brown dwarf mass function slope of -0.4. The model provides good agreement with the observed average duration, and respectable consistency with the shape of the time-scale distribution (reduced χ2 ≃ 2.2). The DIA and resolved source limiting yields bracket the observed number of events by MOA-II (2.17 × and 0.83 × the number observed, respectively). We perform a two-dimensional fit to the event spatial distribution to predict the optical depth and event rate across the Galactic bulge. The most serious difficulty for the model is that it provides only ˜50 per cent of the measured optical depth and event rate per star at low Galactic latitude around the inner bulge (|b| < 3°). This discrepancy most likely is associated with known underestimated extinction and star counts in the innermost regions and therefore provides additional support for a missing inner stellar population.

  17. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  18. OGLE-2005-BLG-153: MICROLENSING DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A VERY LOW MASS BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.-H.; Han, C.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Bond, I. A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of 0.10 {+-} 0.01 M{sub sun} and 0.09 {+-} 0.01 M{sub sun}. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.

  19. RED NOISE VERSUS PLANETARY INTERPRETATIONS IN THE MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2013-BLG-446

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; AlSubai, K.; Han, C.; Greenhill, J.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Gould, A.; Batista, V.; D’Ago, G.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Albrow, M. D.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P. E-mail: p.yock@auckland.ac.nz E-mail: abe@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: itow@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Collaboration: RoboNet collaboration; PLANET collaboration; μFUN collaboration; MOA collaboration; MiNDSTEp collaboration; and others

    2015-10-20

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A{sub max} ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M{sub ⨁}) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  20. A NEW MICROLENSING EVENT IN THE DOUBLY IMAGED QUASAR Q 0957+561

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; Beach, Joseph N.; Le, Truong X.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Fadely, Ross; Falco, Emilio E. E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu E-mail: m113678@usna.edu E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil E-mail: rfadely@haverford.edu

    2012-01-10

    We present evidence for ultraviolet/optical microlensing in the gravitationally lensed quasar Q 0957+561. We combine new measurements from our optical monitoring campaign at the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff, with measurements from the literature and find that the time-delay-corrected r-band flux ratio m{sub A} - m{sub B} has increased by {approx}0.1 mag over a period of five years beginning in the fall of 2005. We apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis procedure to the composite light curves, obtaining a measurement of the optical accretion disk size, log ((r{sub s} /cm)[cos (i)/0.5]{sup 1/2}) = 16.2 {+-} 0.5, that is consistent with the quasar accretion disk size-black hole mass relation.

  1. Precision compression molding of glass microlenses and microlens arrays--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Firestone, G C; Yi, A Y

    2005-10-10

    An innovative manufacturing process utilizing high-temperature compression molding to fabricate aspherical microlenses by using optical glasses, such as BK7, K-PG325, and soda-lime glass, is investigated. In a departure from conventional approaches, a unique hollow contactless mold design is adopted. Polished glass substrates and the mold assembly are heated above the glass transition temperature first, followed by initial forming, then annealing. The forming rate is controlled in real time to ensure mold position accuracy. Mold materials used include tungsten carbides, 316 stainless steel, 715 copper nickel, and aluminum alloys. The geometric control of the microlenses or microlens arrays can be precisely controlled by the forming temperature, forming speed, mold design, and annealing time.

  2. Design and fabrication of polymer microlenses arrays for VCSELs using a cantilever based microsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardinal, Véronique; Daran, Emmanuelle; Vergnenègre, Corinne; Leïchlé, Thierry; Segui, Yvan; Camps, Thierry; Pourciel, Jean-Bernard; Conedera, Véronique; Gavin-Djidina, Léonard; Guirardel, Mathieu

    2006-04-01

    We report on the design and the fabrication of refractive microlenses using a polymer droplet deposition microsystem. The principle of this original technique consists in monomer droplets deposition using a robotized silicon-microcantilevers array. The advantages of this technique rely on the control of droplets dimensions and the positioning accuracy. Microlenses have been first modelled to optimize their geometrical parameters for VCSEL collimation. Results of lens optimization as well as the influence of the fabrication parameters fluctuations on the final divergence are detailed. First results on droplets deposition are presented, demonstrating the technique feasibility. Finally, the possibility of the modification of the surface energy to obtain the most suited contact angle before deposition is also discussed.

  3. Fabrication of axicon microlenses on capillaries and microstructured fibers by wet etching.

    PubMed

    Bachus, Kyle; Filho, Elton Soares de Lima; Wlodarczyk, Kamila; Oleschuk, Richard; Messaddeq, Younes; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2016-09-01

    A facile method is presented for the fabrication of microlenses at the facet of fused silica capillaries and microstructured fibers. After submersion in hydrogen fluoride solution water is pumped slowly through the center hole of the capillary microchannel to create an etchant gradient extending from the capillary axis. The desired axicon angle is generated by adjusting the etching time and/or concentration of the etchant. Similarly, flow- assisted HF etching of a custom microstructured fiber containing nine microchannels produces nine individual microlenses simultaneously at the fiber facet, where each microaxicon lens shows a similar focusing pattern. A theoretical model of the flow-assisted etching process is used to determine the axicon angle and post angle. Also, a simple ray-based model was applied to characterize the focusing properties of the microaxicons in good agreement with experimental observations. PMID:27607641

  4. The impact of gravitational microlensing on searches for extraterrestrial intelligence at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2004-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) at optical wavelengths counts photons from target stars. The rationale is that the number of photons received from a solar-type star in a nanosecond is typically much less than unity and that an excess number of photons may be indicative of a laser pulse from a technological civilization. Extreme magnification gravitational microlensing is a possible contaminant to optical SETI programs as it would increase the photon rate and could masquerade as an optical pulse. We show that extreme magnification gravitational microlensing is unimportant, both because the required amplifications are difficult to obtain and because the time scales are too large. This conclusion holds both for the case of background stars in the field of view of the target star and from objects (such as planets) orbiting the target star.

  5. A ROBUST DETERMINATION OF THE SIZE OF QUASAR ACCRETION DISKS USING GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using microlensing measurements for a sample of 27 image pairs of 19 lensed quasars we determine a maximum likelihood estimate for the accretion disk size of an average quasar of r{sub s} = 4.0{sup +2.4}{sub -3.1} lt-day at rest frame ({lambda}) = 1736 Angstrom-Sign for microlenses with a mean mass of (M) = 0.3 M{sub Sun }. This value, in good agreement with previous results from smaller samples, is roughly a factor of five greater than the predictions of the standard thin disk model. The individual size estimates for the 19 quasars in our sample are also in excellent agreement with the results of the joint maximum likelihood analysis.

  6. Red Noise Versus Planetary Interpretations in the Microlensing Event Ogle-2013-BLG-446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Han, C.; Greenhill, J.; Street, R. A.; Gould, A.; D'Ago, G.; AlSubai, K.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Hill, K.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pere, C.; Ranc, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Warren, D.; The PLANET Collaboration; de Almeida, L. Andrade; Choi, J.-Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Hung, L.-W.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Nataf, D.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shin, I.-G.; Shporer, A.; Yee, J. C.; The μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Melchiorre, C.; Popovas, A.; Postiglione, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, John; Stabile, An.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.; The MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (Amax ˜ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (˜3M⊕) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  7. Confirmation of the Planetary Origin of the Gravitational Microlensing Event OGLE-2006-BLG-0169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Bennett, David P.; Bhattacharya, Aparna; Anderson, Jay; Bond, Ian; Anderson, Nyki; Batista, Virgini; Beaulieu, Jean-philippe; Depoy, Darren L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gould, Andrew; Gilbert, Emily; Pfeifle, Ryan; Pogge, Richard W.; Terry, Sean; Udalski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system.

  8. Optical characterization method for very small microlenses (sub-50 micron) for industrial mass-production applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Sunarjo, Jonathan; Weible, Kenneth J.; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    We present several characterization techniques, which are suitable for small-size microlenses of lens diameters down to 5 μm. For an individual microlens, we apply full characterization for optical performance and surface characteristics. First, the optical performance is characterized by using a high-resolution interference microscope (HRIM). Second, a confocal microscope is applied to investigate the surface parameters. Third, the HRIM allows scanning the microlens array along the optical axis by using a piezo actuator. This leads to a measurement of the 3D intensity distribution near the focus of the lens. Such 3D intensity maps allow us to characterize the focal properties of each lens in an array. By studying those characterization techniques, we develop a new method to characterize a large number of microlenses, for instance, over one million lenses, which is already applied to wafer-based manufacturing in a cleanroom fab.

  9. An efficient method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources. This method has the general advantage that all microimages contributing to the light curve are found. While a source moves along a straight line, all micro images are located either on the primary image track or on the secondary image tracks (loops). The primary image track extends from - infinity to + infinity and is made of many sequents which are continuously connected. All the secondary image tracks (loops) begin and end on the lensing point masses. The method can be applied to any microlensing situation with point masses in the deflector plane, even for the overcritical case and surface densities close to the critical. Furthermore, we present general rules to evaluate the light curve for a straight track arbitrary placed in the caustic network of a sample of many point masses.

  10. Metallic nanowires can lead to wavelength-scale microlenses and microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Zaiba, Soraya; Kouriba, Timothe; Ziane, Omar; Stéphan, Olivier; Bosson, Jocelyne; Vitrant, Guy; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the diffraction of microstructures based on silver nanowires leads to very efficient microfocusing effects. Pairs of parallel nanowires act as ultrasmall cylindrical microlenses with diffraction-limited resolution in the Fresnel region. This is a new diffraction scheme to make micron-sized optical lenses with higher transmittance than plasmonic microlens based on nano-aperture arrays. Calculations based on the scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral highlights the pure scalar diffractive contribution. Thus, the plasmon contribution is negligible in such micron-sized metallic geometry. We demonstrate that two-dimensional grids of nanowires can be used to fabricate dense arrays of microlenses, i.e. 10000x10000 DPI (dots per inch).

  11. Distant Retrograde Orbits for space-based Near Earth Objects detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramacchia, Michele; Colombo, Camilla; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco

    2016-09-01

    We analyse a concept for the detection of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) from a space-based network of telescopes on retrograde Distant Periodic Orbits. Planar periodic orbits are designed in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem, starting from initial conditions in the Hill's problem available from the literature. A family of retrograde orbits centred at the Earth is selected as baseline, based on their maximum distance from Earth, larger than the Earth-L2 distance. Indeed, spacecraft on such orbits can detect PHAs incoming from the Sun direction, which could not otherwise be monitored from current Earth-based systems. A trade-off on the orbit amplitude, asteroid diameter to be detected, and the constellation size is performed considering current visible sensor telescope technology. The Chelyabinsk meteor scenario is studied and the potential warning time that could be gained with a space-based survey system with respect to an Earth based-survey system is shown.

  12. Microlensing towards the SMC: a new analysis of OGLE and EROS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Mirzoyan, S.; Jetzer, Ph.; Scarpetta, G.

    2013-10-01

    We present a new analysis of the results of the Expérience pour la Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS)-2, Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-II and OGLE-III microlensing campaigns towards the Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC). Through a statistical analysis we address the issue of the nature of the reported microlensing candidate events, whether to be attributed to lenses belonging to known population [the SMC luminous components or the Milky Way disc, to which we broadly refer to as `self-lensing'] or to the would be population of dark matter compact halo objects (MACHOs). To this purpose, we present profiles of the optical depth and, comparing to the observed quantities, we carry out analyses of the events position and duration. Finally, we evaluate and study the microlensing rate. Overall, we consider five reported microlensing events towards the SMC (one by EROS and four by OGLE). The analysis shows that in terms of number of events the expected self-lensing signal may indeed explain the observed rate. However, the characteristics of the events, spatial distribution and duration (and for one event, the projected velocity) rather suggest a non-self-lensing origin for a few of them. In particular, we evaluate, through a likelihood analysis, the resulting upper limit for the halo mass fraction in form of MACHOs given the expected self-lensing and MACHO lensing signal. At 95 per cent CL, the tighter upper limit, about 10 per cent, is found for MACHO mass of 10-2 M⊙, upper limit that reduces to above 20 per cent for 0.5 M⊙ MACHOs.

  13. A simple focal-length measurement technique for adaptive microlenses using z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziez, Yasser; Banerjee, Partha P.

    2004-10-01

    A simple technique for focal length measurements of adaptive micro-lenses using z-scan is reported. Focal length is one of the most important parameters of any lens. The effective focal length is measured with reference to the principal points that are not easy to find especially for micro-lenses. In addition, variable focal length microlenses pose a different challenge that makes the process of determining their exact focal length a tedious and difficult process. Classical methods such as nodal slide and magnification have been used for focal length determination. Also, advanced Interference techniques such as Talbot, Moire, Digital Speckle, Zygo and Joint Fourier Transform were used for focal length measurements. These techniques require more elaborate setups and difficult to implement, especially for microlenses. Recently a power meter was used to find the focal length of an unknown lens. Most of the techniques mentioned above proof to be not simple for microlens characterization. The z-scan technique has been implemented, for quite sometimes, to characterize the third-order effects of a nonlinear optical material. The z-scan provides information on both the sign and magnitude of the non-linear refractive index and offer advantage of simplicity. We have used a regular lens to collimate and focus light unto the lens under test. By scanning the lens under test and measuring the on-axis intensity, one can find the focal length. This is because the on-axis intensity is proportional to the phase of the lens and therefore the focal length. In the case of an adaptive lens with its focal length is a function of the applied voltage, the scanning occurs for each voltage value that will correspond to the on-axis refractive index change and therefore the far field on-axis intensity. This described technique above is easy to implement and can achieve good accuracy due to the inherent sensitivity of the z-scan.

  14. REVEALING THE STRUCTURE OF AN ACCRETION DISK THROUGH ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chartas, G.; Moore, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Mosquera, A. M.; Blackburne, J. A.; Dai, X.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from monitoring observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231 performed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The X-ray observations were planned with relatively long exposures that allowed a search for energy-dependent microlensing in the soft (0.2-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) light curves of the images of RX J1131-1231. We detect significant microlensing in the X-ray light curves of images A and D, and energy-dependent microlensing of image D. The magnification of the soft band appears to be larger than that in the hard band by a factor of {approx}1.3 when image D becomes more magnified. This can be explained by the difference between a compact, softer-spectrum corona that is producing a more extended, harder spectrum reflection component off the disk. This is supported by the evolution of the fluorescent iron line in image D over three consecutive time-averaged phases of the light curve. In the first period, an Fe line at E = 6.35{sup +0.14}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). In the second period, two Fe lines are detected, one at E = 5.50{sup +0.03}{sub -0.08} keV (detected at >99% confidence) and another at E = 6.04{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07} keV (marginally detected at >90% confidence), and in the third period, a broadened Fe line at 6.42{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). This evolution of the Fe line profile during the microlensing event is consistent with the line distortion expected when a caustic passes over the inner disk where the shape of the fluorescent Fe line is distorted by general relativistic and Doppler effects.

  15. 3D imaging and characterization of microlenses and microlens arrays using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Tserevelakis, George J.; Murić, Branka D.; Filippidis, George; Pantelić, Dejan V.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, nonlinear laser scanning microscopy was employed for the characterization and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microlenses and microlens arrays. Third-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) signals were recorded and the obtained data were further processed in order to generate 3D reconstructions of the examined samples. Femtosecond laser pulses (1028 nm) were utilized for excitation. Microlenses were manufactured on Tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin layers using a green (532 nm) continuous wave laser beam using the direct laser writing method. The profiles of the microlens surface were obtained from the radial cross-sections, using a triple-Gaussian fit. The analytical shapes of the profiles were also used for ray tracing. Furthermore, the volumes of the microlenses were determined with high precision. The TPEF signal arising from the volume of the material was recorded and the respective 3D spatial fluorescence distribution of the samples was mapped. Nonlinear microscopy modalities have been shown to be a powerful diagnostic tool for microlens characterization as they enable in-depth investigations of the structural properties of the samples, in a nondestructive manner.

  16. Black hole, neutron star and white dwarf candidates from microlensing with OGLE-III★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Iłkiewicz, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.

    2016-05-01

    Most stellar remnants so far have been found in binary systems, where they interact with matter from their companions. Isolated neutron stars and black holes are difficult to find as they are dark, yet they are predicted to exist in our Galaxy in vast numbers. We explored the OGLE-III data base of 150 million objects observed in years 2001-2009 and found 59 microlensing events exhibiting a parallax effect due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. Combining parallax and brightness measurements from microlensing light curves with expected proper motions in the Milky Way, we identified 13 microlensing events which are consistent with having a white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole lens and we estimated their masses and distances. The most massive of our black hole candidates has 9.3 M⊙ and is at a distance of 2.4 kpc. The distribution of masses of our candidates indicates a continuum in mass distribution with no mass gap between neutron stars and black holes. We also present predictions on how such events will be observed by the astrometric Gaia mission.

  17. Black hole, neutron star and white dwarf candidates from microlensing with OGLE-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Iłkiewicz, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.

    2016-05-01

    Most stellar remnants so far have been found in binary systems, where they interact with matter from their companions. Isolated neutron stars and black holes are difficult to find as they are dark, yet they are predicted to exist in our Galaxy in vast numbers. We explored the OGLE-III data base of 150 million objects observed in years 2001-2009 and found 59 microlensing events exhibiting a parallax effect due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. Combining parallax and brightness measurements from microlensing light curves with expected proper motions in the Milky Way, we identified 13 microlensing events which are consistent with having a white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole lens and we estimated their masses and distances. The most massive of our black hole candidates has 9.3 M⊙ and is at a distance of 2.4 kpc. The distribution of masses of our candidates indicates a continuum in mass distribution with no mass gap between neutron stars and black holes. We also present predictions on how such events will be observed by the astrometric Gaia mission.

  18. Axial focusing characteristics of diffractive micro-lenses based on a rigorous electromagnetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Di; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Fan, Shoushan

    2004-12-01

    In order to determine the assembling error at the receiving plane and to obtain the maximum energy efficiency, it is necessary to study the axial focusing characteristics of diffractive micro-lenses such as the focal depth and the focal shift. When the diffractive optical elements' features are of the order of or smaller than the wavelength of the incident illumination, their electromagnetic characteristics must be considered. By using a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we present a rigorous electromagnetic analysis of diffractive micro-lenses that are finite in extent, in the case of a normally incident light wave. Compared with the scalar theory, the axial intensity distributions of diffractive micro-lenses are analysed rigorously, for different incidence polarizations (TE polarization and TM polarization), different profile structures (continuous profile, 16-level profile, 8-level profile, and 2-level profile) and different f-numbers of lenses. The numerical results show that the focal shifts calculated by the electromagnetic theory are larger than those made by the scalar theory, and the focal depths calculated by these two methods are basically consistent. The focal depth and the focal shift will increase when the f-number increases, for both the rigorous electromagnetic theory and the scalar theory.

  19. One or more bound planets per Milky Way star from microlensing observations.

    PubMed

    Cassan, A; Kubas, D; Beaulieu, J-P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Greenhill, J; Wambsganss, J; Menzies, J; Williams, A; Jørgensen, U G; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Cook, K H; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Hill, K; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Warren, D; Watson, B; Zub, M; Sumi, T; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2012-01-12

    Most known extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been discovered using the radial velocity or transit methods. Both are biased towards planets that are relatively close to their parent stars, and studies find that around 17-30% (refs 4, 5) of solar-like stars host a planet. Gravitational microlensing, on the other hand, probes planets that are further away from their stars. Recently, a population of planets that are unbound or very far from their stars was discovered by microlensing. These planets are at least as numerous as the stars in the Milky Way. Here we report a statistical analysis of microlensing data (gathered in 2002-07) that reveals the fraction of bound planets 0.5-10 AU (Sun-Earth distance) from their stars. We find that 17(+6)(-9)% of stars host Jupiter-mass planets (0.3-10 M(J), where M(J) = 318 M(⊕) and M(⊕) is Earth's mass). Cool Neptunes (10-30 M(⊕)) and super-Earths (5-10 M(⊕)) are even more common: their respective abundances per star are 52(+22)(-29)% and 62(+35)(-37)%. We conclude that stars are orbited by planets as a rule, rather than the exception. PMID:22237108

  20. Gravitational microlensing by low-mass objects in the globular cluster M22.

    PubMed

    Sahu, K C; Casertano, S; Livio, M; Gilliland, R L; Panagia, N; Albrow, M D; Potter, M

    2001-06-28

    Gravitational microlensing offers a means of determining directly the masses of objects ranging from planets to stars, provided that the distances and motions of the lenses and sources can be determined. A globular cluster observed against the dense stellar field of the Galactic bulge presents ideal conditions for such observations because the probability of lensing is high and the distances and kinematics of the lenses and sources are well constrained. The abundance of low-mass objects in a globular cluster is of particular interest, because it may be representative of the very early stages of star formation in the Universe, and therefore indicative of the amount of dark baryonic matter in such clusters. Here we report a microlensing event associated with the globular cluster M22. We determine the mass of the lens to be 0.13(+0.03)(-0.02) solar masses. We have also detected six events that are unresolved in time. If these are also microlensing events, they imply that a non-negligible fraction of the cluster mass resides in the form of free-floating planetary-mass objects.

  1. Test of relativistic gravity using microlensing of relativistically broadened lines in gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, A.; Vovk, Ie.

    2016-01-01

    We show that observation of the time-dependent effect of microlensing of relativistically broadened emission lines (such as e.g. the Fe K α line in x rays) in strongly lensed quasars could provide data on celestial mechanics of circular orbits in the direct vicinity of the horizon of supermassive black holes. This information can be extracted from the observation of evolution of the red/blue edge of the magnified line just before and just after the period of crossing of the innermost stable circular orbit by the microlensing caustic. The functional form of this evolution is insensitive to numerous astrophysical parameters of the accreting black hole and of the microlensing caustics network system (as opposed to the evolution of the full line spectrum). Measurement of the temporal evolution of the red/blue edge could provide a precision measurement of the radial dependence of the gravitational redshift and of velocity of the circular orbits, down to the innermost stable circular orbit. These measurements could be used to discriminate between general relativity and alternative models of the relativistic gravity in which the dynamics of photons and massive bodies orbiting the gravitating center is different from that of the geodesics in the Schwarzschild or Kerr space-times.

  2. THE EFFECT OF A TIME-VARYING ACCRETION DISK SIZE ON QUASAR MICROLENSING LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-08-01

    Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting six seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculation in order to correctly model the strong correlations between the structure of the microlensing magnification patterns and the magnitude of the effect. We also comment briefly on the effect of this phenomenon for the stability of time-delay estimates.

  3. OGLE-III MICROLENSING EVENTS AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Rynkiewicz, Alicja E.; Skowron, Jan; Kozłowski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K.; Kubiak, Marcin; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radosław; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Pawlak, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We present and study the largest and most comprehensive catalog of microlensing events ever constructed. The sample of standard microlensing events comprises 3718 unique events from 2001-2009 with 1409 events that had not been detected before in real-time by the Early Warning System of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The search pipeline uses machine learning algorithms to help find rare phenomena among 150 million objects and to derive the detection efficiency. Applications of the catalog can be numerous, from analyzing individual events to large statistical studies of the Galactic mass, kinematics distributions, and planetary abundances. We derive maps of the mean Einstein ring crossing time of events spanning 31 deg{sup 2} toward the Galactic center and compare the observed distributions with the most recent models. We find good agreement within the observed region and we see the signature of the tilt of the bar in the microlensing data. However, the asymmetry of the mean timescales seems to rise more steeply than predicted, indicating either a somewhat different orientation of the bar or a larger bar width. The map of events with sources in the Galactic bulge shows a dependence of the mean timescale on the Galactic latitude, signaling an increasing contribution from disk lenses closer to the plane relative to the height of the disk. Our data present a perfect set for comparing and enhancing new models of the central parts of the Milky Way and creating a three-dimensional picture of the Galaxy.

  4. One or more bound planets per Milky Way star from microlensing observations.

    PubMed

    Cassan, A; Kubas, D; Beaulieu, J-P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Greenhill, J; Wambsganss, J; Menzies, J; Williams, A; Jørgensen, U G; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Cook, K H; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Hill, K; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Warren, D; Watson, B; Zub, M; Sumi, T; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2012-01-11

    Most known extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been discovered using the radial velocity or transit methods. Both are biased towards planets that are relatively close to their parent stars, and studies find that around 17-30% (refs 4, 5) of solar-like stars host a planet. Gravitational microlensing, on the other hand, probes planets that are further away from their stars. Recently, a population of planets that are unbound or very far from their stars was discovered by microlensing. These planets are at least as numerous as the stars in the Milky Way. Here we report a statistical analysis of microlensing data (gathered in 2002-07) that reveals the fraction of bound planets 0.5-10 AU (Sun-Earth distance) from their stars. We find that 17(+6)(-9)% of stars host Jupiter-mass planets (0.3-10 M(J), where M(J) = 318 M(⊕) and M(⊕) is Earth's mass). Cool Neptunes (10-30 M(⊕)) and super-Earths (5-10 M(⊕)) are even more common: their respective abundances per star are 52(+22)(-29)% and 62(+35)(-37)%. We conclude that stars are orbited by planets as a rule, rather than the exception.

  5. On the simulation of space based manipulators with contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Dionise, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    An efficient method of simulating the motion of space based manipulators is presented. Since the manipulators will come into contact with different objects in their environment while carrying out different tasks, an important part of the simulation is the modeling of those contacts. An inverse dynamics controller is used to control a two armed manipulator whose task is to grasp an object floating in space. Simulation results are presented and an evaluation is made of the performance of the controller.

  6. Technology for subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Corey, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    Technologies for different subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities are being developed at the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space. The technologies include concepts for water and nutrient delivery, for nutrient composition control, and for irradiation. Effort is being concentrated on these subsystems because available technologies cannot be effectively utilized for space applications.

  7. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  8. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  9. Coherent Doppler Lidar Data Products from Space-Based Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Coherent Doppler lidar is a promising technique for the global measurements of winds using a space-based platform. Doppler lidar produces estimates of the radial component of the velocity vector averaged over the resolution volume of the measurement. Profiles of the horizontal vector winds are produced by scanning the lidar beam or stepping the lidar beam through a sequence of different angles (step-stare). The first design for space-based measurements proposed a conical scan which requires a high power laser to produce acceptable signal levels for every laser pulse. Performance is improved by fixing the laser beam and accumulating the signal from many lidar pulses for each range-gate. This also improves the spatial averaging of the wind estimates and reduces the threshold signal energy required for a good estimate. Coherent Doppler lidar performance for space-based operation is determined using computer simulations and including the wind variability over the measurement volume as well as the variations of the atmospheric aerosol backscatter.

  10. Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Huber, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pitrou, C.; Pollard, K.; Sahu, K. C.; Vinter, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; PLANET Collaboration; Allen, W.; Bolt, G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C.-U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; Santallo, R.; Shin, I.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) lensing survey conducted during the 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of eight events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of five events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for six events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of three events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effects induced by the changes of the observer’s position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.

  11. PLANETARY AND OTHER SHORT BINARY MICROLENSING EVENTS FROM THE MOA SHORT-EVENT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Kamiya, K.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Botzler, C. S.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Korpela, A. V.; Sullivan, D. J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present the analysis of four candidate short-duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short-event analysis. These events were discovered as a by-product of an analysis designed to find short-timescale single-lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which the stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio and separation are q (4.9 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and s = 2.10 {+-} 0.05, respectively. A Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model indicates that the planet, MOA-bin-1Lb, has a mass of m{sub p} = 3.7 {+-} 2.1 M{sub Jup} and orbits a star of M{sub *} = 0.75{sub -0.41}{sup +}0{sup .33} M{sub Sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 8.3{sub -2.7}{sup +4.5} AU. This is one of the most massive and widest separation planets found by microlensing. The scarcity of such wide-separation planets also has implications for interpretation of the isolated planetary mass objects found by this analysis. If we assume that we have been able to detect wide-separation planets with an efficiency at least as high as that for isolated planets, then we can set limits on the distribution of planets in wide orbits. In particular, if the entire isolated planet sample found by Sumi et al. consists of planets bound in wide orbits around stars, we find that it is likely that the median orbital semimajor axis is >30 AU.

  12. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  13. Numerical Simulation of Refractive-Microlensed HgCdTe Infrared Focal Plane Arrays Operating in Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Wei-Da; Lei, Wen; Gao, Yan-Lin; He, Kai; Hua, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu; Lin, Chun; Hu, Xiao-Ning; Ding, Rui-Jun; He, Li

    2014-08-01

    The optoelectronic performance of the mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) with refractive microlenses integrated on its CdZnTe substrate has been numerically simulated. A reduced light-distribution model based on scalar Kirchhoff diffraction theory was adopted to reveal the true behavior of IRFPAs operating in an optical system under imaging conditions. The pixel crosstalk obtained and the energy-gathering characteristics demonstrated that the microlenses can delay the rise in crosstalk when the image point shifts toward pixel boundaries, and can restrict the major optical absorption process in any case within a narrow region around the pixel center. The dependence of the microlenses' effects on the system's properties was also analyzed; this showed that intermediate relative aperture and small microlens radius are required for optimized device performance. Simulation results also indicated that for detectors farther from the center of the field of view, the efficacy of microlenses in crosstalk suppression and energy gathering is still maintained, except for a negligible difference in the lateral magnification from an ordinary array without microlenses.

  14. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  15. Two Phase Flow and Space-Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    1999-01-01

    A reduced gravity environment offers the ability to remove the effect of buoyancy on two phase flows whereby density differences that normally would promote relative velocities between the phases and also alter the shape of the interface are removed. However, besides being a potent research tool, there are also many space-based technologies that will either utilize or encounter two-phase flow behavior, and as a consequence, several questions must be addressed. This paper presents some of these technologies missions. Finally, this paper gives a description of web-sites for some funding.

  16. Decomposability and scalability in space-based observatory scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Stephen F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues of problem and model decomposition within the HSTS scheduling framework. HSTS was developed and originally applied in the context of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) scheduling problem, motivated by the limitations of the current solution and, more generally, the insufficiency of classical planning and scheduling approaches in this problem context. We first summarize the salient architectural characteristics of HSTS and their relationship to previous scheduling and AI planning research. Then, we describe some key problem decomposition techniques supported by HSTS and underlying our integrated planning and scheduling approach, and we discuss the leverage they provide in solving space-based observatory scheduling problems.

  17. Space-based visible all-reflective stray light telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dexter; Gardner, Leo R.; Wong, Wallace K.; Hadfield, Peter

    1991-08-01

    A 6-inch diameter aperture space-based visible telescope has been optimized to perform surveillance against the space background with earth albedo as a primary source of straylight. A three mirror off-axis anastigmat has been designed to cover a 1.4 degree(s) by 6.6 degree(s) field- of-view with 60 (mu) radian spatial resolution. The telescope body and optics are constructed of 6061-T6 aluminum to provide a thermally stable optical system. The optical elements are 'superfinished' to minimize scatter. Extensive baffles and stops are utilized to further reduce straylight. The telescope will be used on the Midcourse Space Experiment platform.

  18. A space-based concept for a collision warning sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talent, David L.; Vilas, Faith

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a concept for a space-based collision warning sensor experiment, the Debris Collision Warning Sensor (DCWS) experiment, in which the sensor will rely on passive sensing of debris in optical and IR passband. The DCWS experiment will be carried out under various conditions of solar phase angle and pass geometry; debris from 1.5 m to 1 mm diam will be observable. The mission characteristics include inclination in the 55-60 deg range and an altitude of about 500 km. The results of the DCWS experiment will be used to generate collision warning scenarios for the Space Station Freedom.

  19. Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS): Preliminary Space-Based Concept and Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Antol, Jeffrey; Park, Sang-Young; Koons, Robert H.; Bremer, James C.; Murphy, Douglas G.; Hoffman, James A.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans

    2005-01-01

    There exists an infrequent, but significant hazard to life and property due to impacting asteroids and comets. There is currently no specific search for long-period comets, smaller near-Earth asteroids, or smaller short-period comets. These objects represent a threat with potentially little or no warning time using conventional ground-based telescopes. These planetary bodies also represent a significant resource for commercial exploitation, long-term sustained space exploration, and scientific research. The Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) is a future space-based system concept that provides permanent, continuous asteroid and comet monitoring, and rapid, controlled modification of the orbital trajectories of selected bodies. CAPS would expand the current detection effort to include long-period comets, as well as small asteroids and short-period comets capable of regional destruction. A space-based detection system, despite being more costly and complex than Earth-based initiatives, is the most promising way of expanding the range of detectable objects, and surveying the entire celestial sky on a regular basis. CAPS would provide an orbit modification system capable of diverting kilometer class objects, and modifying the orbits of smaller asteroids for impact defense and resource utilization. This Technical Memorandum provides a compilation of key related topics and analyses performed during the CAPS study, which was performed under the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) program, and discusses technologies that could enable the implementation of this future system.

  20. Two Stars Two Ways: Confirming a Microlensing Binary Lens Solution with a Spectroscopic Measurement of the Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Johnson, John Asher; Skowron, Jan; Gould, Andrew; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Eastman, Jason; Vanderburg, Andrew; Howard, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Light curves of microlensing events involving stellar binaries and planetary systems can provide information about the orbital elements of the system due to orbital modulations of the caustic structure. Accurately measuring the orbit in either the stellar or planetary case requires detailed modeling of subtle deviations in the light curve. At the same time, the natural, Cartesian parameterization of a microlensing binary is partially degenerate with the microlens parallax. Hence, it is desirable to perform independent tests of the predictions of microlens orbit models using radial velocity (RV) time series of the lens binary system. To this end, we present 3.5 years of RV monitoring of the binary lens system OGLE-2009-BLG-020 L, for which Skowron et al. constrained all internal parameters of the 200-700 day orbit. Our RV measurements reveal an orbit that is consistent with the predictions of the microlens light curve analysis, thereby providing the first confirmation of orbital elements inferred from microlensing events.

  1. Concept for lightweight spaced-based deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, Michael; Anders, Andre

    2006-02-28

    In this contribution we will describe a technology path to very high quality coatings fabricated in the vacuum of space. To accomplish the ambitious goals set out in NASA's Lunar-Mars proposal, advanced thin-film deposition technology will be required. The ability to deposit thin-film coatings in the vacuum of lunar-space could be extremely valuable for executing this new space mission. Developing lightweight space-based deposition technology (goal:<300 g, including power supply) will enable the future fabrication and repair of flexible large-area space antennae and fixed telescope mirrors for lunar-station observatories. Filtered Cathodic Arc (FCA) is a proven terrestrial energetic thin-film deposition technology that does not need any processing gas but is well suited for ultra-high vacuum operation. Recently, miniaturized cathodic arcs have already been developed and considered for space propulsion. It is proposed to combine miniaturized pulsed FCA technology and robotics to create a robust, enabling space-based deposition system for the fabrication, improvement, and repair of thin films, especially of silver and aluminum, on telescope mirrors and eventually on large area flexible substrates. Using miniature power supplies with inductive storage, the typical low-voltage supply systems used in space are adequate. It is shown that high-value, small area coatings are within the reach of existing technology, while medium and large area coatings are challenging in terms of lightweight technology and economics.

  2. Future Prospects for Space-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The gamma-ray sky offers a unique view into broad range of high energy astrophysical phenomena, from nearby solar flares, to galactic pulsars, to gamma-ray bursts at the furthest reaches of the Universe. In recent years, results from the Fermi mission have further demonstrated the broad range of topics that can be addressed by gamma-ray observations. The full range of gamma-ray energies is quite broad, from about 100 keV up to about 100 TeV. The energy range below several hundred GeV is the domain of space-based gamma-ray observatories, a range that is not completely covered by the Fermi LAT instrument. The gamma ray community has embarked on an effort to define the next steps for space-based gamma ray astronomy. These discussions are being facilitated through the Gamma-ray Science Interest Group (GammaSIG), which exists to provide community input to NASA in regards to current and future needs of the gamma-ray astrophysics community. Through a series of workshops and symposia, the GammaSIG is working to bring the community together with one common vision, a vision that will be expressed in the form of a community roadmap. This talk will summarize some of the latest results from active gamma ray observatories and will summarize the status of the community roadmap effort.

  3. Special Relativity Corrections for Space-Based Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RaoGudimetla, Venkata S.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The theory of special relativity is used to analyze some of the physical phenomena associated with space-based coherent Doppler lidars aimed at Earth and the atmosphere. Two important cases of diffuse scattering and retroreflection by lidar targets are treated. For the case of diffuse scattering, we show that for a coaligned transmitter and receiver on the moving satellite, there is no angle between transmitted and returned radiation. However, the ray that enters the receiver does not correspond to a retroreflected ray by the target. For the retroreflection case there is misalignment between the transmitted ray and the received ray. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency and the amount of tip for the receiver aperture when needed are calculated, The error in estimating wind because of the Doppler shift in the frequency due to special relativity effects is examined. The results are then applied to a proposed space-based pulsed coherent Doppler lidar at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for wind and aerosol backscatter measurements. The lidar uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and the received frequencies to determine the atmospheric wind velocities. We show that the special relativity effects are small for the proposed system.

  4. Special relativity corrections for space-based lidars.

    PubMed

    Gudimetla, V S; Kavaya, M J

    1999-10-20

    The theory of special relativity is used to analyze some of the physical phenomena associated with space-based coherent Doppler lidars aimed at Earth and the atmosphere. Two important cases of diffuse scattering and retroreflection by lidar targets are treated. For the case of diffuse scattering, we show that for a coaligned transmitter and receiver on the moving satellite, there is no angle between transmitted and returned radiation. However, the ray that enters the receiver does not correspond to a retroreflected ray by the target. For the retroreflection case there is misalignment between the transmitted ray and the received ray. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency and the amount of tip for the receiver aperture when needed are calculated. The error in estimating wind because of the Doppler shift in the frequency due to special relativity effects is examined. The results are then applied to a proposed space-based pulsed coherent Doppler lidar at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for wind and aerosol backscatter measurements. The lidar uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and the received frequencies to determine the atmospheric wind velocities. We show that the special relativity effects are small for the proposed system. PMID:18324167

  5. Quantifying the tracking capability of space-based AIS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skauen, Andreas Nordmo

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) has operated three Automatic Identification System (AIS) receivers in space. Two are on dedicated nano-satellites, AISSat-1 and AISSat-2. The third, the NORAIS Receiver, was installed on the International Space Station. A general method for calculating the upper bound on the tracking capability of a space-based AIS system has been developed and the results from the algorithm applied to AISSat-1 and the NORAIS Receiver individually. In addition, a constellation of AISSat-1 and AISSat-2 is presented. The tracking capability is defined as the probability of re-detecting ships as they move around the globe and is explained to represent and upper bound on a space-based AIS system performance. AISSat-1 and AISSat-2 operates on the nominal AIS1 and AIS2 channels, while the NORAIS Receiver data used are from operations on the dedicated space AIS channels, AIS3 and AIS4. The improved tracking capability of operations on the space AIS channels is presented.

  6. Future Prospects for Space-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The gamma-ray sky offers a unique view into broad range of astrophysical phenomena, from nearby solar flares, to galactic pulsars, to gamma-ray bursts at the furthest reaches of the Universe. The Fermi mission has dramatically demonstrated the broad range of topics that can be addressed by gamma-ray observations. The full range of gamma-ray energies is quite broad, covering the electromagnetic spectrum at energies above about 100 keV. The energy range below several hundred GeV is the domain of space-based gamma-ray observatories, a range that is not completely covered by the Fermi LAT instrument. The gamma ray community has recently embarked on an effort to define the next steps for space-based gamma ray astronomy. These discussions are being facilitated through the Gamma-ray Science Interest Group (GammaSIG), which exists to provide community input to NASA in regards to current and future needs of the gamma-ray astrophysics community. The GammaSIG, as a part of the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group, provides a forum open to all members of the gamma-ray community. The GammaSIG is currently working to bring the community together with a common vision that will be expressed in the form of a community roadmap. This talk will summarize some of the latest results from active gamma ray observatories, including both Fermi and INTEGRAL, and will summarize the status of the community roadmap effort.

  7. Special relativity corrections for space-based lidars.

    PubMed

    Gudimetla, V S; Kavaya, M J

    1999-10-20

    The theory of special relativity is used to analyze some of the physical phenomena associated with space-based coherent Doppler lidars aimed at Earth and the atmosphere. Two important cases of diffuse scattering and retroreflection by lidar targets are treated. For the case of diffuse scattering, we show that for a coaligned transmitter and receiver on the moving satellite, there is no angle between transmitted and returned radiation. However, the ray that enters the receiver does not correspond to a retroreflected ray by the target. For the retroreflection case there is misalignment between the transmitted ray and the received ray. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency and the amount of tip for the receiver aperture when needed are calculated. The error in estimating wind because of the Doppler shift in the frequency due to special relativity effects is examined. The results are then applied to a proposed space-based pulsed coherent Doppler lidar at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for wind and aerosol backscatter measurements. The lidar uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and the received frequencies to determine the atmospheric wind velocities. We show that the special relativity effects are small for the proposed system.

  8. OGLE-III Microlensing Events and the Structure of the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Rynkiewicz, Alicja E.; Skowron, Jan; Kozłowski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K.; Kubiak, Marcin; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radosław; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Pawlak, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We present and study the largest and most comprehensive catalog of microlensing events ever constructed. The sample of standard microlensing events comprises 3718 unique events from 2001-2009 with 1409 events that had not been detected before in real-time by the Early Warning System of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The search pipeline uses machine learning algorithms to help find rare phenomena among 150 million objects and to derive the detection efficiency. Applications of the catalog can be numerous, from analyzing individual events to large statistical studies of the Galactic mass, kinematics distributions, and planetary abundances. We derive maps of the mean Einstein ring crossing time of events spanning 31 deg2 toward the Galactic center and compare the observed distributions with the most recent models. We find good agreement within the observed region and we see the signature of the tilt of the bar in the microlensing data. However, the asymmetry of the mean timescales seems to rise more steeply than predicted, indicating either a somewhat different orientation of the bar or a larger bar width. The map of events with sources in the Galactic bulge shows a dependence of the mean timescale on the Galactic latitude, signaling an increasing contribution from disk lenses closer to the plane relative to the height of the disk. Our data present a perfect set for comparing and enhancing new models of the central parts of the Milky Way and creating a three-dimensional picture of the Galaxy. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution for Science.

  9. Astrometric Image Centroid Displacements due to Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 105 km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller

  10. ASTROMETRIC IMAGE CENTROID DISPLACEMENTS DUE TO GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-20

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 10{sup 5} km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is

  11. Strong Chromatic Microlensing in HE0047-1756 and SDSS1155+6346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, K.; Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Falco, E.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We use spectra of the double-lensed quasars HE0047-1756 and SDSS1155+6346 to study their unresolved structure through the impact of microlensing. There is no significant evidence of microlensing in the emission line profiles except for the Lyα line of SDSS1155+6346, which shows strong differences in the shapes for images A and B. However, the continuum of the B image spectrum in SDSS1155+6346 is strongly contaminated by the lens galaxy, and these differences should be considered with caution. Using the flux ratios of the emission lines for image pairs as a baseline to remove macro-magnification and extinction, we have detected strong chromatic microlensing in the continuum measured by CASTLES (www.cfa.harvard.edu/castles/) in both lens systems, with amplitudes 0.09(λ16000) <~ |Δm| <~ 0.8(λ5439) for HE0047-1756, and 0.2(λ16000) <~ |Δm| <~ 0.8(λ5439) for SDSS1155+6346. Using magnification maps to simulate microlensing and modeling the accretion disk as a Gaussian source (I vprop exp(-R 2/2r ^2_s)) of size r s vprop λ p , we find r s = 2.5-1.4+3.0 \\sqrt{M/0.3M⊙ } lt-day and p = 2.3 ± 0.8 at the rest frame for λ = 2045 for HE0047-1756 (log prior) and r s = 5.5-3.3+8.2 \\sqrt{M/0.3M⊙ } lt-day and p = 1.5 ± 0.6 at the rest frame of λ = 1398 for SDSS1155+6346 (log prior). Contrary to other studied lens systems, the chromaticity detected in HE0047-1756 and SDSS1155+6346 is large enough to fulfill the thin disk prediction. The inferred sizes, however, are very large compared to the predictions of this model, especially in the case of SDSS1155+6346.

  12. Focusing performance of the closed-boundary cylindrical microlenses analyzed by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Ye, Jiasheng; Liu, Shutian

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the focusing performance of closed-boundary cylindrical microlenses (CBCMs) based on rigorous electromagnetic theory and the boundary element method. The CBCMs with different incident angles, different quantization-level numbers, different microlens diameters, different f-numbers, and different polarizations of incidence are studied. Several focusing performance measures, such as the focal spot size, the diffraction efficiency, the real focal position, and the normalized transmitted power, are presented. It provides very useful information in designing the CBCMs in micro-optical systems.

  13. Strong chromatic microlensing in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, K.; Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A. E-mail: veronica.motta@uv.cl E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2014-12-10

    We use spectra of the double-lensed quasars HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 to study their unresolved structure through the impact of microlensing. There is no significant evidence of microlensing in the emission line profiles except for the Lyα line of SDSS1155+6346, which shows strong differences in the shapes for images A and B. However, the continuum of the B image spectrum in SDSS1155+6346 is strongly contaminated by the lens galaxy, and these differences should be considered with caution. Using the flux ratios of the emission lines for image pairs as a baseline to remove macro-magnification and extinction, we have detected strong chromatic microlensing in the continuum measured by CASTLES (www.cfa.harvard.edu/castles/) in both lens systems, with amplitudes 0.09(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for HE0047–1756, and 0.2(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for SDSS1155+6346. Using magnification maps to simulate microlensing and modeling the accretion disk as a Gaussian source (I ∝ exp(–R {sup 2}/2r {sub s}{sup 2})) of size r {sub s} ∝ λ {sup p}, we find r {sub s} = 2.5{sub −1.4}{sup +3.0} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 2.3 ± 0.8 at the rest frame for λ = 2045 for HE0047–1756 (log prior) and r {sub s} = 5.5{sub −3.3}{sup +8.2} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 1.5 ± 0.6 at the rest frame of λ = 1398 for SDSS1155+6346 (log prior). Contrary to other studied lens systems, the chromaticity detected in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 is large enough to fulfill the thin disk prediction. The inferred sizes, however, are very large compared to the predictions of this model, especially in the case of SDSS1155+6346.

  14. 76 FR 65540 - National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board...'s 2004 U.S. Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Policy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the National Space- Based Positioning, Navigation,...

  15. 77 FR 44288 - National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board... President's 2004 U.S. Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Policy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the National Space-Based...

  16. ISS Space-Based Science Operations Grid for the Ground Systems Architecture Workshop (GSAW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Clara; Bradford, Bob

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following:What is grid? Benefits of a grid to space-based science operations. Our approach. Score of prototype grid. The security question. Short term objectives. Long term objectives. Space-based services required for operations. The prototype. Score of prototype grid. Prototype service layout. Space-based science grid service components.

  17. Studying inflation with future space-based gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: moroi@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the B-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  18. Multi-Tethered Space-Based Interferometers: Particle System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Stephen S.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics models are presented for a class of space-based interferometers comprised of multiple component bodies, interconnected in various arrangements, by low-mass flexible tethers of variable length. The tethered constellations are to perform coordinated rotational scanning accompanied by baseline dimensional changes, as well as spin axis realignments and spin-up/spin-down maneuvers. The mechanical idealization is a system of N point masses interconnected by massless tethers of variable length. Both extensible and inextensible tethers are considered. Expressions for system angular and linear momenta are developed. The unrestricted nonlinear motion equations are derived via Lagranges equations. Rheonomic constraints are introduced to allow prescribed motion of any degrees of freedom, and the associated physical forces are determined. The linearized equations of motion are obtained for the steady rotation of a system with extensible tethers of constant unstrained length.

  19. Infrared Fibers for Use in Space-Based Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared optical fibers are finding a number of applications including laser surgery, remote sensing, and nuclear radiation resistant links. Utilizing these fibers in space-based structures is another application, which can be exploited. Acoustic and thermal sensing are two areas in which these fibers could be utilized. In particular, fibers could be embedded in IM7/8552 toughened epoxy and incorporated into space structures both external and internal. ZBLAN optical fibers are a candidate, which have been studied extensively over the past 20 years for terrestrial applications. For the past seven years the effects of gravity on the crystallization behavior of ZBLAN optical fiber has been studied. It has been found that ZBLAN crystallization is suppressed in microgravity. This lack of crystallization leads to a fiber with better transmission characteristics than its terrestrial counterpart.

  20. Space-Based Information Infrastructure Architecture for Broadband Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Inukai, Tom; Razdan, Rajendev; Lazeav, Yvonne M.

    1996-01-01

    This study addressed four tasks: (1) identify satellite-addressable information infrastructure markets; (2) perform network analysis for space-based information infrastructure; (3) develop conceptual architectures; and (4) economic assessment of architectures. The report concludes that satellites will have a major role in the national and global information infrastructure, requiring seamless integration between terrestrial and satellite networks. The proposed LEO, MEO, and GEO satellite systems have satellite characteristics that vary widely. They include delay, delay variations, poorer link quality and beam/satellite handover. The barriers against seamless interoperability between satellite and terrestrial networks are discussed. These barriers are the lack of compatible parameters, standards and protocols, which are presently being evaluated and reduced.

  1. Space-based sensor management and geostationary satellites tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fallah, A.; Zatezalo, A.; Mahler, R.; Mehra, R. K.; Donatelli, D.

    2007-04-01

    Sensor management for space situational awareness presents a daunting theoretical and practical challenge as it requires the use of multiple types of sensors on a variety of platforms to ensure that the space environment is continuously monitored. We demonstrate a new approach utilizing the Posterior Expected Number of Targets (PENT) as the sensor management objective function, an observation model for a space-based EO/IR sensor platform, and a Probability Hypothesis Density Particle Filter (PHD-PF) tracker. Simulation and results using actual Geostationary Satellites are presented. We also demonstrate enhanced performance by applying the ProgressiveWeighting Correction (PWC) method for regularization in the implementation of the PHD-PF tracker.

  2. One GHz digitizer for space based laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report for the research and development of the one GHz digitizer for space based laser altimeter. A feasibility model was designed, built, and tested. Only partial testing of essential functions of the digitizer was completed. Hybrid technology was incorporated which allows analog storage (memory) of the digitally sampled data. The actual sampling rate is 62.5 MHz, but executed in 16 parallel channels, to provide an effective sampling rate of one GHz. The average power consumption of the one GHz digitizer is not more than 1.5 Watts. A one GHz oscillator is incorporated for timing purposes. This signal is also made available externally for system timing. A software package was also developed for internal use (controls, commands, etc.) and for data communication with the host computer. The digitizer is equipped with an onboard microprocessor for this purpose.

  3. Space-based radar array system simulation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, H. K.; Pflug, D. R.; Thompson, L. D.

    1981-08-01

    The present status of the space-based radar phased array lens simulator is discussed. Huge arrays of thin wire radiating elements on either side of a ground screen are modeled by the simulator. Also modeled are amplitude and phase adjust modules connecting radiating elements between arrays, feedline to radiator mismatch, and lens warping. A successive approximation method is employed. The first approximation is based on a plane wave expansion (infinite array) moment method especially suited to large array analysis. the first approximation results then facilitate higher approximation computations that account for effects of nonuniform periodicities (lens edge, lens section interfaces, failed modules, etc.). The programming to date is discussed via flow diagrams. An improved theory is presented in a consolidated development. The use of the simulator is illustrated by computing active impedances and radiating element current distributions for infinite planar arrays of straight and 'swept back' dipoles (arms inclined with respect to the array plane) with feedline scattering taken into account.

  4. Phytoplankton photocompensation from space-based fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. Ruairidh; Goodwin, Deborah S.

    2010-03-01

    Recent satellite-derived observations linked global scale phytoplankton fluorescence variability with iron stress and hinted at photophysiological responses associated with changing light levels. These photocompensation reactions, the sum of photoacclimation and photoadaptation, were examined with climatological data for the Gulf of Maine. Significant seasonal variability was observed in the fluorescence quantum yield that was unrelated to patterns of biomass. Up to 89% of the variability in the fluorescence quantum yield was explained by a physiology-based photocompensation model. Spatial variability in seasonal patterns was associated with differing hydrodynamic regimes. This variability in the quantum yield demonstrates that satellite-based fluorescence is inappropriate for phytoplankton biomass determinations. More importantly, the work presented here provides the modeling foundation for fluorescence-based investigations of temporal and spatial variability in phytoplankton physiology associated with growth irradiance. These space-based physiological observations have the potential to decrease uncertainties in future ocean color derived primary productivity estimates.

  5. RF and laser space-based communication links - Another perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittel, R. H.; Casey, W. L.; Doughty, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., III

    1988-01-01

    The advanced technology required to achieve high data rate satellite-to-satellite communications is presently being investigated. A comparison of RF with direct detection laser communications (lasercom) for application to high data rate Strategic Defense System (SDS) low and medium earth orbit crosslinks is presented. This comparison is based on near term technology suitable for early deployment in the SDS. The RF system is a millimeter-wave system operating in the 60 GHz region; the lasercom system is considered to operate in the near infrared, from 0.8 to 1.1 microns. The trades consider operation in benign as well as the very stressing environments postulated for the SDS which include low and high altitude nuclear bursts as well as the threat of spaced-based jamming sources and directed energy weapons. Results of the trade are presented to show the advantages and disadvantages of each type of system.

  6. Space Based Ornithology: On the Wings of Migration and Biophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of bird migration on a global scale is one of the compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Migration and conservation efforts cross national boundaries and are subject to numerous international agreements and treaties. Space based technology offers new opportunities to shed understanding on the distribution and migration of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. Migration is an incredibly diverse and complex behavior. A broad outline of space based research must address three fundamental questions: (1) where could birds be, i.e. what is their fundamental niche constrained by their biophysical limits? (2) where do we actually find birds, i.e. what is their realizable niche as modified by local or regional abiotic and biotic factors, and (3) how do they get there (and how do we know?), that is what are their migration patterns and associated mechanisms? Our working hypothesis is that individual organism biophysical models of energy and water balance, driven by satellite measurements of spatio-temporal gradients in climate and habitat, will help us to explain the variability in avian species richness and distribution. Dynamic state variable modeling provides one tool for studying bird migration across multiple scales and can be linked to mechanistic models describing the time and energy budget states of migrating birds. Such models yield an understanding of how a migratory flyway and its component habitats function as a whole and link stop-over ecology with biological conservation and management. Further these models provide an ecological forecasting tool for science and application users to address what are the possible consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, drought or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration.

  7. Characterizing Exoplanets with 2-meter Class Space-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. D.; Marley, M. S.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several concepts now exist for small, space-based missions to directly characterize exoplanets in reflected light. In this presentation, we explore how instrumental and astrophysical parameters will affect the ability of such missions to obtain spectral and photometric observations that are useful for characterizing their planetary targets. We discuss the development of an instrument noise model suitable for studying the spectral characterization potential of a coronagraph-equipped, space-based telescope. To be consistent with near-future missions and technologies, we assume a baseline set of telescope and instrument parameters that include a 2 meter diameter primary aperture, an operational wavelength range of 0.4-1.0 μm, and an instrument spectral resolution of λ/Δλ=70. We present applications of our baseline noise simulator to a variety of spectral models of different planet types, emphasizing Earth-like planets. With our exoplanet spectral models, we explore wavelength-dependent planet-star flux ratios for main sequence stars of various effective temperatures, and discuss how coronagraph inner and outer working angle constraints will influence the potential to study different types of planets. For planets most favorable to spectroscopic characterization—including nearby Earth twins and super-Earths—we study the integration times required to achieve moderate signal-to-noise ratio spectra. We also explore the sensitivity of the integration times required to detect the base of key absorption bands (for water vapor and molecular oxygen) to coronagraph raw contrast performance, exozodiacal light levels, and the distance to the planetary system. We will also discuss prospects for detecting ocean glint, a habitability signature, from nearby Earth-like planets, as well as the extension of our models to a more distant future Large UV-Optical-InfraRed (LUVOIR) mission.

  8. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-10-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  9. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-06-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in Polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1 % over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  10. Searching for intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters with gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Sahu, K. C.; Calamida, A.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the potential of the gravitational microlensing method as a unique tool to detect unambiguous signals caused by intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters. We select clusters near the line of sight to the Galactic bulge and the Small Magellanic Cloud, estimate the density of background stars for each of them, and carry out simulations in order to estimate the probabilities of detecting the astrometric signatures caused by black hole lensing. We find that for several clusters, the probability of detecting such an event is significant with available archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Specifically, we find that M 22 is the cluster with the best chances of yielding an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) detection via astrometric microlensing. If M 22 hosts an IMBH of mass 105 M⊙, then the probability that at least one star will yield a detectable signal over an observational baseline of 20 years is ˜86 per cent, while the probability of a null result is around 14 per cent. For an IMBH of mass 106 M⊙, the detection probability rises to >99 per cent. Future observing facilities will also extend the available time baseline, improving the chance of detections for the clusters we consider.

  11. Large Magellanic Cloud self-lensing for OGLE-II microlensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Mancini, L.; Scarpetta, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of microlensing searches towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we discuss the results presented by the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) collaboration for their OGLE-II campaign (Wyrzykowski et al). We evaluate the optical depth, the duration and the expected rate of events for the different possible lens populations: both luminous, dominated by the LMC self-lensing, and `dark', the would be compact halo objects (massive compact halo objects) belonging to either the Galactic or the LMC halo. The OGLE-II observational results, two microlensing candidate events located in the LMC bar region with duration of 24.2 and 57.2 days, compare well with the expected signal from the luminous lens populations: nexp = 1.5, with typical duration, for LMC self-lensing, of about 50 days. Because of the small statistics at disposal, however, the conclusions that can be drawn as for the halo mass fraction, f, in the form of compact halo objects are not too severe. By means of a likelihood analysis we find an upper limit for f, at 95 per cent confidence level, of about 15 per cent in the mass range (10-2-10-1)Msolar and 26 per cent for 0.5Msolar.

  12. DARK MATTER MASS FRACTION IN LENS GALAXIES: NEW ESTIMATES FROM MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Mediavilla, E.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a joint estimate of the stellar/dark matter mass fraction in lens galaxies and the average size of the accretion disk of lensed quasars based on microlensing measurements of 27 quasar image pairs seen through 19 lens galaxies. The Bayesian estimate for the fraction of the surface mass density in the form of stars is α = 0.21 ± 0.14 near the Einstein radius of the lenses (∼1-2 effective radii). The estimate for the average accretion disk size is R{sub 1/2}=7.9{sub −2.6}{sup +3.8}√(M/0.3 M{sub ⊙}) light days. The fraction of mass in stars at these radii is significantly larger than previous estimates from microlensing studies assuming quasars were point-like. The corresponding local dark matter fraction of 79% is in good agreement with other estimates based on strong lensing or kinematics. The size of the accretion disk inferred in the present study is slightly larger than previous estimates.

  13. Interpretation of a short-term anomaly in the gravitational microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.-H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Harris, P.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-11-20

    A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive planetary signals.

  14. Experimental limits on the dark matter halo of the galaxy from gravitational microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.A.; Axelrod, T.S.; Bennett, D.P.; Cook, K.H.; Freeman, K.C.; Griest, K.; Guern, J.A.; Lehner, M.J.; Marshall, S.L.; Park, H.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B.A.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Stubbs, C.W.; Sutherland, W. |||||||

    1995-04-10

    We monitored 8.6{times}10{sup 6} stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud for 1.1 years and have found three events consistent with gravitational microlensing. We place strong constraints on Galactic halo lensing objects in the mass range 10{sup {minus}4}{ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} to 10{sup {minus}1}{ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}. Three events are fewer than expected for a standard spherical halo of objects in this mass range, but appear to exceed the number expected from known Galactic populations. Fitting a naive spherical halo model to our data yields a MACHO fraction {ital f} of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), {ital f}=0.19{sub {minus}0.10}{sup +0.16}, a total MACHO mass (inside 50 kpc) of 7.6{sub {minus}4}{sup +6}{times}10{sup 10}{ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}, and a microlensing optical depth 8.8{sub {minus}5}{sup +7}{times}10{sup {minus}8} (68% C.L.).

  15. Microlensed dual-fiber probe for depth-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Geon Hee; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Chang, Ki Soo

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact microlensed dual-fiber probe that has a good collection efficiency and a high depth-resolution ability for fluorescence measurements. The probe is formed with a conventional fusion splicer creating a common focusing lens on two fibers placed side by side. The collection efficiency of the fabricated probe was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence signal of a fresh ginkgo leaf. It was shown experimentally that the proposed probe could effectively collect the fluorescence signal with a six-fold increase compared to that of a general flat-tipped probe. The beam propagation method was used to design a probe with an optimized working distance and an improved resolving depth. It was found that the working distance depends mainly on the radius of curvature of the lens, whereas the resolving depth is determined by the core diameters of the illumination and collection fibers. The depth-resolved ability of probes with working distances of ~100 μm and 300 μm was validated by using a two-layer tissue phantom. The experimental results demonstrate that the microlensed dual-fiber probe has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence detection of epithelial tissue.

  16. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF FAINT (I approx 21 mag) MICROLENSED BULGE DWARF OGLE-2007-BLG-514S

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Dong, Subo; Gould, Andrew; Udalski, Andrzej; Becker, George E-mail: jaj@astronomy.ohio-state.ed E-mail: dong@ias.ed E-mail: gdb@ast.cam.ac.u

    2010-01-20

    We present a high-resolution spectrum of a microlensed G dwarf in the Galactic bulge with spectroscopic temperature T{sub eff} = 5600 +- 180 K. This I approx 21 mag star was magnified by a factor ranging from 1160 to 1300 at the time of observation. Its high metallicity ([Fe/H] = 0.33 +- 0.15 dex) places this star at the upper end of the bulge giant metallicity distribution. Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find a 1.6% probability that the published microlensed bulge dwarfs share an underlying distribution with bulge giants, properly accounting for a radial bulge metallicity gradient. We obtain abundance measurements for 15 elements and perform a rigorous error analysis that includes covariances between parameters. This star, like bulge giants with the same metallicity, shows no alpha enhancement. It confirms the chemical abundance trends observed in previously analyzed bulge dwarfs. At supersolar metallicities, we observe a discrepancy between bulge giant and bulge dwarf Na abundances.

  17. OGLE-2014-BLG-0257L: A Microlensing Brown Dwarf Orbiting a Low-mass M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report the discovery of a binary composed of a brown dwarf (BD) and a low-mass M dwarf from observation of the microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0257. The resolution of the very brief caustic crossing combined with the detection of subtle continuous deviation in the lensing light curve induced by the Earth’s orbital motion enable us to precisely measure both the Einstein radius {θ }{{E}} and the lens parallax {π }{{E}}, which are the two quantities needed to unambiguously determine the mass and distance to the lens. It is found that the companion is a substellar BD with a mass of 0.036+/- 0.005 {M}⊙ (37.7+/- 5.2 {M}{{J}}) and it is orbiting an M dwarf with a mass of 0.19+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ . The binary is located at a distance of 1.25 ± 0.13 kpc toward the Galactic bulge and the projected separation between the binary components is 0.61 ± 0.07 au. The separation scaled by the mass of the host is 3.2 {{au}}/{M}⊙ . Based on the assumption that separations scale with masses, the discovered BD is located in the BD desert. With the growing sample of BDs in various environments, microlensing will provide a powerful probe of BDs in the Galaxy.

  18. MOA-2011-BLG-028Lb: A Neptune-mass Microlensing Planet in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Dominik, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bozza, V.; Harpsøe, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Skottfelt, J.; The MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8+/- 0.3{M}⊙ star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio (1.2+/- 0.2)× {10}-4, which indicates that the mass of the planet is 12-60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 ± 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction of Baade’s Window. The projected separation of the planet at the time of the microlensing event was 3.1-5.2 au. Although the microlens parallax effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the inclusion of undetected parallax and orbital motion effects into the models and their influence onto the final physical parameters estimates. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory operated by the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  19. On the Possibility of An Astronomical Detection of Chromaticity Effects in Microlensing by Wormhole-Like Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Diego F.; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    We study the colour changes induced by blending in a wormhole-like microlensing scenario with extended sources. The results are compared with those obtained for limb darkening. We assess the possibility of an actual detection of the colour curve using the difference image analysis method.

  20. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography

    PubMed Central

    Gschrey, M.; Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Seifried, M.; Schmidt, R.; Wohlfeil, B.; Krüger, L.; Schulze, J. -H.; Heindel, T.; Burger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23±3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80±7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter. PMID:26179766

  1. Single Crystal DMs for Space-Based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierden, Paul

    We propose to demonstrate the feasibility of a new manufacturing process for large aperture, high-actuator count microelectromechanical deformable mirrors (MEMS-DMs). These DMs are designed to fill a critical technology gap in NASA s plan for high- contrast space-based exoplanet observatories. We will manufacture a prototype DM with a continuous mirror facesheet, having an active aperture of 50mm diameter, supported by 2040 electrostatic actuators (50 across the diameter of the active aperture), spaced at a pitch of 1mm. The DM will be manufactured using silicon microfabrication tools. The strategic motivation for the proposed project is to advance MEMS DMs as an enabling technology in NASA s rapidly emerging program for extrasolar planet exploration. That goal is supported by an Astro2010 white paper on Technologies for Direct Optical Imaging of Exoplanets, which concluded that DMs are a critical component for all proposed internal coronagraph instrument concepts. That white paper pointed to great strides made by DM developers in the past decade, and acknowledged the components made by Boston Micromachines Corporation to be the most notable MEMS-based technology option. The principal manufacturing innovation in this project will be assembly of the DM through fusion bonding of three separate single crystal silicon wafers comprising the device s substrate, actuator array, and facesheet. The most significant challenge of this project will be to develop processes that allow reliable fusion bonds between multiple compliant silicon layers while yielding an optically flat surface and a robust electromechanical system. The compliance of the DM, which is required for its electromechanical function, will make it challenging to achieve the intimate, planar contact that is generally needed for success in fusion bonding. The manufacturing approach will use photolithography and reactive ion etching to pattern structural layers. Three wafer-scale devices will be patterned and

  2. Special relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raogudimetla, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    There is a great need to develop a system that can measure accurately atmospheric wind profiles because an accurate data of wind profiles in the atmosphere constitutes single most input for reliable simulations of global climate numerical methods. Also such data helps us understand atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics better. Because of this need for accurate wind measurements, a space-based Laser Atmospheric Winds Sounder (LAWS) is being designed at MSFC to measure wind profiles in the lower atmosphere of the earth with an accuracy of 1 m/s at lower altitudes to 5m/s at higher altitudes. This system uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and received frequencies to estimate the atmospheric wind velocities. If a significant return from the ground (sea) is possible, the spacecraft speed and height are estimated from it and these results and the Doppler shift are then used to estimate the wind velocities in the atmosphere. It is expected that at the proposed wavelengths, there will be enough backscatter from the aerosols but there may no be significant return from the ground. So a coherent (heterodyne) detection system is being proposed for signal processing because it can provide high signal to noise ratio and sensitivity and thus make the best use of low ground return. However, for a heterodyne detection scheme to provide the best results, it is important that the receiving aperture be aligned properly for the proposed wind sounder, this amounts to only a few microradians tolerance in alignment. It is suspected that the satellite motion relative to the ground may introduce errors in the order of a few microradians because of special relativity. Hence, the problem of laser scattering off a moving fixed target when the source and receiver are moving, which was not treated in the past in the literature, was analyzed in the following, using relativistic electrodynamics and applied to the

  3. Productivity and Impact of Space-based Astronomical Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia; Zaich, Paul; Bosler, Tammy

    2006-04-01

    In 2001, 18 journals published about 1270 astronomical papers that reported and/or analyzed data gathered by space-based observatories and missions. These papers were cited 24,460 times in papers published in 2002-2004, an average of 19.26 citations per paper or 6.42 citations per paper per year (sometimes called impact or impact factor). About 60 satellites, rockets, balloons, and planetary missions were represented, including six ground-based Cerenkov detectors for ultra-high energy gamma rays, because we didn't know where else to put them. Of these facilities, 21 provided the data for at least five papers, when credit was divided equally among all contributing facilities. We analyze here distributions of papers, citations, and impact factors among the facilities and among subject areas and compare the results with studies of optical and radio telescopes (Trimble et al. and Trimble & Zaich). Some similarities include the rarity of completely uncited papers (only 41 of 1274, or 3.2%) and the concentrations of the most highly cited papers toward popular topics, high-profile journals, and the most successful telescopes of the year. Some important differences arise because many space-based observatories have lifetimes shorter than the typical time required to think of an interesting astronomical observation, propose for it, get the data, write the paper and publish it (including the fight with the referee), and have citations accumulate. The result is superstar status in citation numbers for XMM-Newton (whose first-light package appeared in 2001) and in paper numbers for Chandra (launched 5 months earlier), while aging satellites (RXTE, BeppoSAX, ASCA) and the archival-only ROSAT, ISO, IRAS, etc., were still important contributors, but with fewer papers and less highly cited papers. The impact factor of 6.42 for the totality of these gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, space infrared and optical, and planetary mission papers (6.42) was larger than the corresponding radio

  4. Planet Diversity Yields with Space-based Direct Imaging Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Hébrard, Eric; Stark, Chris; Robinson, Tyler D.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; McElwain, Michael W.; Clampin, Mark; Meadows, Victoria; Arney, Giada; Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope Science Team, Exoplanet Climate Group

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, we will estimate the yield for a diversity of planets from future space-based flagship telescopes. We first divvy up planets into categories that are based on current observables, and that should impact the spectra we hope to observe in the future. The two main classification parameters we use here are the size of a planet and the energy flux into the planet's atmosphere. These two parameters are measureable or inferable from present-day observations, and should have a strong influence on future spectroscopy observations from JWST, WFIRST (with a coronagraph and/or starshade), and concept flagship missions that would fly some time after WFIRST. This allows us to calculate "ηplanet" values for each kind of planet. These η values then allow calculations of the expected yields from direct imaging missions, by leveraging the models and prior work by Stark and colleagues (2014, 2015). That work estimated the yields for potentially Earth-like worlds (i.e. of a size and stellar irradiation consistent with definitions of the habitable zone) for telescopes with a variety of observational parameters. We will do the same thing here, but for a wider variety of planets. This will allow us to discuss the implications of architecture and instrument properties on the diversity of worlds that future direct imaging missions would observe.

  5. Design optimization for a space based, reusable orbit transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L.

    1985-01-01

    Future NASA and DOD missions will benefit from high performance, reusable orbit transfer vehicles. With the advent of a space station, advanced engine technology, and various new vehicle concepts, reusable orbit transfer vehicles that provide significant economic benefits and mission capability improvements will be realized. Engine and vehicle design criteria previously have lacked definition with regard to issues such as space basing and servicing, man-rating and reliability, performance, mission flexibility, and life cycle cost for a reusable vehicle. The design study described here has resulted in the definition of a reusable orbit transfer vehicle concept and subsequent recommendations for the design criteria of an advanced LO2/LH2 engine. These design criteria include number of engines per vehicle, nozzle design, etc. The major characteristics of the vehicle preliminary design include low lift to drag aerocapture capability, a main propulsion system failure criteria of fail operational/fail safe, and either two main engines with a high performance attitude control system for back-up or three main engines with which to meet this failure criteria. In addition, a maintenance approach has been established for the advanced vehicle concept.

  6. UV lifetime laser demonstrator for space-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Michael; Puffenburger, Kent; Schum, Tom; Fitzpatrick, Fran; Litvinovitch, Slava; Jones, Darrell; Rudd, Joseph; Hovis, Floyd

    2015-09-01

    A long-lived UV laser is an enabling technology for a number of high-priority, space-based lidar instruments. These include next generation cloud and aerosol lidars that incorporates a UV channel, direct detection 3-D wind lidars, and ozone DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system. In previous SBIR funded work we developed techniques for increasing the survivability of components in high power UV lasers and demonstrated improved operational lifetimes. In this Phase III ESTO funded effort we are designing and building a TRL (Technology Readiness Level) 6 demonstrator that will have increased output power and a space-qualifiable package that is mechanically robust and thermally-stable. For full space compatibility, thermal control will be through pure conductive cooling. Contamination control processes and optical coatings will be chosen that are compatible with lifetimes in excess of 1 billion shots. The 1064nm output will be frequency tripled to provide greater than 100mJ pulses of 355nm light at 150 Hz. After completing the laser module build in the third quarter of 2015 we will initiate lifetime testing, followed by thermal/vacuum (TVAC) and vibration testing to demonstrate that the design is at TRL 6.

  7. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Even at reduced rates of growth, the demand for electric power is expected to more than triple between now and 1995, and to triple again over the period 1995-2020. Without the development of new power sources and advanced transmission technologies, it may not be possible to supply electric energy at prices that are conductive to generalized economic welfare. Solar power is renewable and its conversion and transmission from space may be advantageous. The goal of this study is to assess the economic merit of space-based photovoltaic systems for power generation and a power relay satellite for power transmission. In this study, satellite solar power generation and transmission systems, as represented by current configurations of the Satellite Solar Station (SSPS) and the Power Relay Satellite (PRS), are compared with current and future terrestrial power generation and transmission systems to determine their technical and economic suitability for meeting power demands in the period of 1990 and beyond while meeting ever-increasing environmental and social constraints.

  8. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  9. Space-based lidar measurements of global ocean carbon stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris A.; Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Rodier, Sharon D.; Hair, John W.; Trepte, Charles R.

    2013-08-01

    Global ocean phytoplankton biomass (Cphyto) and total particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks have largely been characterized from space using passive ocean color measurements. A space-based light detection and ranging (lidar) system can provide valuable complementary observations for Cphyto and POC assessments, with benefits including day-night sampling, observations through absorbing aerosols and thin cloud layers, and capabilities for vertical profiling through the water column. Here we use measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to quantify global Cphyto and POC from retrievals of subsurface particulate backscatter coefficients (bbp). CALIOP bbp data compare favorably with airborne, ship-based, and passive ocean data and yield global average mixed-layer standing stocks of 0.44 Pg C for Cphyto and 1.9 Pg for POC. CALIOP-based Cphyto and POC data exhibit global distributions and seasonal variations consistent with ocean plankton ecology. Our findings support the use of spaceborne lidar measurements for advancing understanding of global plankton systems.

  10. Space-based observation of the extensive airshowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisuzaki, T.

    2013-06-01

    Space based observations of extensive air showers constitute the next experimental challenge for the study of the universe at extreme energy. Space observation will allow a "quantum jump" in the observational area available to detect the UV light tracks produced by particles with energies higher than 1020 eV. These are thought to reach the Earth almost undeflected by the cosmic magnetic field. This new technique will contribute to establish the new field of astronomy and astrophysics performed with charged particles and neutrinos at the highest energies. This idea was created by the incredible efforts of three outstanding comic ray physicists: John Linsley, Livio Scarsi, and Yoshiyuki Takahashi. This challenging technique has four significant merits in comparison with ground-based observations: 1) Very large observational area, 2) Well constrained distances of the showers, 3) Clear and stable atmospheric transmission in the above half troposphere, 4) Uniform Exposure across both the north and south skies. Four proposed and planned missions constitute the roadmap of the community: TUS, JEM-EUSO, KLPVE, and Super-EUSO will contribute step-by-step to establish this challenging field of research.

  11. Space-based laser-driven MHD generator: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of a laser-driven MHD generator, as a candidate receiver for a space-based laser power transmission system, was investigated. On the basis of reasonable parameters obtained in the literature, a model of the laser-driven MHD generator was developed with the assumptions of a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional flow. These assumptions were based on the continuous and steady generation of plasmas by the exposure of the continuous wave laser beam thus inducing a steady back pressure that enables the medium to flow steadily. The model considered here took the turbulent nature of plasmas into account in the two-dimensional geometry of the generator. For these conditions with the plasma parameters defining the thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity for the plasma flow, a generator efficiency of 53.3% was calculated. If turbulent effects and nonequilibrium ionization are taken into account, the efficiency is 43.2%. The study shows that the laser-driven MHD system has potential as a laser power receiver for space applications because of its high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density and relatively simple mechanism as compared to other energy conversion cycles.

  12. The Scientific Potential of Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.

    The millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space-based interferometer, but it is one of the richest in potential sources. Observations in this band have amazing scientific potential. The mergers between massive black holes with mass in the range 104-107M_{⊙}, which are expected to occur following the mergers of their host galaxies, produce strong millihertz gravitational radiation. Observations of these systems will trace the hierarchical assembly of structure in the Universe in a mass range that is very difficult to probe electromagnetically. Stellar mass compact objects falling into such black holes in the centres of galaxies generate detectable gravitational radiation for several years prior to the final plunge and merger with the central black hole. Measurements of these systems offer an unprecedented opportunity to probe the predictions of general relativity in the strong-field and dynamical regime. Millihertz gravitational waves are also generated by millions of ultra-compact binaries in the Milky Way, providing a new way to probe galactic stellar populations. ESA has recognised this great scientific potential by selecting The Gravitational Universe as its theme for the L3 large satellite mission, scheduled for launch in ˜ 2034. In this article we will review the likely sources for millihertz gravitational wave detectors and describe the wide applications that observations of these sources could have for astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics.

  13. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in strategic defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wildt, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has made significant progress in developing Space-Based chemical Laser (SBL) technologies and in studying the SBLs global defense capability. In this mission, a constellation of several orbiting laser platforms provides continuous global defense by intercepting threatening missiles in their boost phase, including short range ballistic missiles (SRBMs). An optional smaller constellation provides defense against launches from the low and midlatitude regions. In addition, SBLs have utility in other important related missions such as surveillance, air defense and discrimination. The hardware necessary to build such a system has been developed to the point where it is mature and ready for demonstration in space. Advances have been made in each of the following major areas of the SBL: laser device; optics/beam control; beam pointing; ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing); uncooled optics; and laser lethality. Integration of the key laser and beam control technologies is now occurring in the ground-based ALI experiment, and a space demonstration experiment, Star LITE, is in the planning and concept development phase.

  14. A space-based radio frequency transient event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Blain, C.P.; Caffrey, M.P.; Franz, R.C.; Henneke, K.M.; Jones, R.G.

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy is currently investigating economical and reliable techniques for space-based nuclear weapon treaty verification. Nuclear weapon detonations produce RF transients that are signatures of illegal nuclear weapons tests. However, there are many other sources of RF signals, both natural and man-made. Direct digitization of RF signals requires rates of 300 MSamples per second and produces 10{sup 13} samples per day of data to analyze. it is impractical to store and downlink all digitized RF data from such a satellite without a prohibitively expensive increase in the number and capacities of ground stations. Reliable and robust data processing and information extraction must be performed onboard the spacecraft in order to reduce downlinked data to a reasonable volume. The FORTE (Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events) satellite records RF transients in space. These transients will be classified onboard the spacecraft with an Event Classifier specialized hardware that performs signal preprocessing and neural network classification. The authors describe the Event Classifier requirements, scientific constraints, design and implementation.

  15. Beamed Energy and the Economics of Space Based Solar Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith Henson, H.

    2010-05-01

    For space based solar power to replace fossil fuel, it must sell for 1-2 cents per kWh. To reach this sales price requires a launch cost to GEO of ˜100/kg. Proposed to reach this cost figure at 100 tonne/hour are two stages to GEO where a Skylon-rocket-plane first stage provides five km/sec and a laser stage provides 6.64 km/sec. The combination appears to reduce the cost to GEO to under 100/kg at a materials flow rate of ˜1 million tonnes per year, enough to initially construct 200 GW per year of power satellites. An extended Pro Forma business case indicates that peak investment to profitability might be ˜65 B. Over a 25-year period, production rises to two TW per year to undercut and replace most other sources of energy. Energy on this scale solves other supply problems such as water and liquid fuels. It could even allow removal of CO2 from the air and storage of carbon as synthetic oil in empty oil fields.

  16. Utilization of commercial communications systems for space based research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overmyer, Carolyn; Thompson, Clark

    1998-01-01

    With the increase in utilization of space for research and development activities, the need for a communication system which improves the availability of payload uplink and downlink with the ground becomes increasingly more critical. At the same time, experiment developers are experiencing a tightening of their budgets for space based research. They don't have the capability to develop a unique communication interface that requires unique software and hardware packages. They would prefer to use commercial protocols and standards available through off-the-shelf components. Also, the need for secure communication is critical to keep proprietary data from being distributed to competing organizations. In order to meet the user community needs, SPACEHAB is currently in the process of developing and testing a system designed specifically for the user community called the SPACEHAB Universal Communication System (SHUCS). The purpose of this paper is to present customer requirements, the SHUCS design approach and top level operations, terrestrial test results, and flight testing scheduled for STS-91 and -95.

  17. Architectures for a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the ``Gravitational Universe,'' for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, thereby augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described.

  18. AN EFFICIENT METHOD FOR MODELING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION PLANETARY MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, David P.

    2010-06-20

    I present a previously unpublished method for calculating and modeling multiple lens microlensing events that is based on the image centered ray-shooting approach of Bennett and Rhie. It has been used to model a wide variety of binary and triple lens systems, but it is designed to efficiently model high-magnification planetary microlensing events, because these high-magnification events are, by far, the most challenging events to model. It is designed to be efficient enough to handle complicated microlensing events, which include more than two lens masses and lens orbital motion. This method uses a polar coordinate integration grid with a smaller grid spacing in the radial direction than in the angular direction, and it employs an integration scheme specifically designed to handle limb-darkened sources. I present tests that show that these features achieve second-order accuracy for the light curves of a number of high-magnification planetary events. They improve the precision of the calculations by a factor of >100 compared to first-order integration schemes with the same grid spacing in both directions (for a fixed number of grid points). This method also includes a {chi}{sup 2} minimization method, based on the Metropolis algorithm, that allows the jump function to vary in a way that allows quick convergence to {chi}{sup 2} minima. Finally, I introduce a global parameter space search strategy that allows a blind search of parameter space for light curve models without requiring {chi}{sup 2} minimization over a large grid of fixed parameters. Instead, the parameter space is explored on a grid of initial conditions for a set of {chi}{sup 2} minimizations using the full parameter space. While this method may be somewhat faster than methods that find the {chi}{sup 2} minima over a large grid of parameters, I argue that the main strength of this method is for events with the signals of multiple planets, where a much higher dimensional parameter space must be explored

  19. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    PubMed

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems. PMID:17748077

  20. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    PubMed

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems.

  1. Just in Time in Space or Space Based JIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanOrsdel, Kathleen G.

    1995-01-01

    Our satellite systems are mega-buck items. In today's cost conscious world, we need to reduce the overall costs of satellites if our space program is to survive. One way to accomplish this would be through on-orbit maintenance of parts on the orbiting craft. In order to accomplish maintenance at a low cost I advance the hypothesis of having parts and pieces (spares) waiting. Waiting in the sense of having something when you need it, or just-in-time. The JIT concept can actually be applied to space processes. Its definition has to be changed just enough to encompass the needs of space. Our space engineers tell us which parts and pieces the satellite systems might be needing once in orbit. These items are stored in space for the time of need and can be ready when they are needed -- or Space Based JIT. When a system has a problem, the repair facility is near by and through human or robotics intervention, it can be brought back into service. Through a JIT process, overall system costs could be reduced as standardization of parts is built into satellite systems to facilitate reduced numbers of parts being stored. Launch costs will be contained as fewer spare pieces need to be included in the launch vehicle and the space program will continue to thrive even in this era of reduced budgets. The concept of using an orbiting parts servicer and human or robotics maintenance/repair capabilities would extend satellite life-cycle and reduce system replacement launches. Reductions of this nature throughout the satellite program result in cost savings.

  2. Project SPARC: Space-Based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Future United States' space facilities include a Space Station in low Earth orbit (LEO) and a Geosynchronous Operations Support Center, or GeoShack, in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). One possible mode of transfer between the two orbits is an aerobraking vehicle. When traveling from GEO to LEO, the Earth's atmosphere can be used to aerodynamically reduce the velocity of the vehicle, which reduces the amount of propulsive change in velocity required for the mission. An aerobrake is added to the vehicle for this purpose, but the additional mass increases propellant requirements. This increase must not exceed the amount of propellant saved during the aeropass. The design and development of an aerobraking vehicle that will transfer crew and cargo between the Space Station and GeoShack is examined. The vehicle is referred to as Project SPARC, a SPace-based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft. SPARC consists of a removable 45 ft diameter aerobrake, two modified Pratt and Whitney Advanced Expander Engines with a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant, a removable crew module with a maximum capacity of five, and standard sized payload bays providing a maximum payload capacity of 28,000 lbm. The aerobrake, a rigid, ellipsoidally blunted elliptical cone, provides lift at zero angle-of-attack due to a 73 deg rake angle, and is covered with a flexible multi-layer thermal protection system. Maximum dry mass of the vehicle without payload is 20,535 lbm, and the maximum propellant requirement is 79,753 lbm at an oxidizer to fuel ratio of 6/1. Key advantages of SPARC include its capability to meet mission changes, and its removable aerobrake and crew module.

  3. Space-Based Visible End of Life Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, J.; Wiseman, A.; Sharma, J.

    The Space-Based Visible (SBV) sensor was launched to orbit on 24 April 1996 as part of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite. As the only optical space surveillance sensor in space, it has provided a unique space surveillance capability and has paved the way for future systems such as SBSS. After more than 12 years of operations, SBV and the MSX satellite are being permanently shut down by June 2008. This provides a unique opportunity to perform several experiments that were deemed too risky during SBV's operational lifetime. These experiments will be conducted through May 2008. Depending on spacecraft performance we plan to conduct several tests of advanced space situational awareness data collection modes including reduced target motion data collection for geosynchronous targets, high phase angle observations of geosynchronous targets, and discrimination of closely-spaced geosynchronous targets. We also plan several experiments for sensor characterization that will yield insight into how the instrument has been affected by 12 years in low altitude orbit. These include observing well calibrated star fields to assess CCD sensitivity and charge transfer efficiency degradation, and Earth and moon limb observations to assess stray light rejection and optical cleanliness. We will also attempt to close the telescope cover, a procedure that has not been performed since 1998 due to fears that the cover may not reopen. If the cover successfully closes, we will acquire dark current and flat field data to compare with historical values for this sensor and we will acquire data during transit through the South Atlantic Anomaly to characterize the interaction between the focal plane and high-energy particles. Finally, we will attempt to warm the focal plane to determine whether annealing will improve the charge transfer efficiency that has significantly degraded since launch due to damage from high-energy protons.

  4. Photon-counting detectors for space-based laser receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Yang, Guangning; Li, Steven X.; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Photon-counting detectors are required for numerous NASA future space-based laser receivers including science instruments and free-space optical communication terminals. Silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) launched in 2003, currently in orbit measuring the Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. To measure cloud and aerosol backscattering, the SPCMs detect the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength, with quantum efficiencies of 60 to 70% and maximum count rates greater than 13 million per second. The performance of the SPCMs has been monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, linearity or after-pulsing. The detector dark counts rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the Earth have increased linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. As the ICESat mission nears completion, we have proposed ground-to-space optical and quantum communication experiments to utilize the on-orbit 1-meter optical receiver telescope with multiple SPCMs in the focal plane. NASA is preparing a follow-on mission to ICESat, called ICESat-2, with a launch date of late 2014. The major candidate photon-counting detectors under evaluation for ICESat-2 include 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelength-sensitive photomultiplier tubes and Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays. Key specifications are high maximum count rate, detection efficiency, photon number resolution, radiation tolerance, power consumption, operating temperature and reliability. Future NASA science instruments and free-space laser communication terminals share a number of these requirements.

  5. Erratum: The MACHO Project: Microlensing Optical Depth toward the Galactic Bulge from Difference Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Nelson, C. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Popowski, P.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A. B.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D. L.

    2001-08-01

    In the paper ``The MACHO Project: Microlensing Optical Depth toward the Galactic Bulge from Difference Image Analysis'' by C. Alcock, R. A. Allsman, D. R. Alves, T. S. Axelrod, A. C. Becker, D. P. Bennett, K. H. Cook, A. J. Drake, K. C. Freeman, M. Geha, K. Griest, M. J. Lehner, S. L. Marshall, D. Minniti, C. A. Nelson, B. A. Peterson, P. Popowski, M. R. Pratt, P. J. Quinn, C. W. Stubbs, W. Sutherland, A. B. Tomaney, T. Vandehei, and D. L. Welch (ApJ, 541, 734 [2000]) an incorrect version of Table 3 was published. A second copy of Table 2 was given as Table 3. The correct version of Table 3 is available in the preprint version of the paper (astro-ph/0002510) and is printed below. This correction does not affect any of the results in the paper.

  6. Erratum: The MACHO Project: 45 Candidate Microlensing Events from the First Year Galactic Bulge Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Guern, J.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Park, H.-S.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. A.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Rodgers, A. W.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.

    1998-06-01

    In the paper ``The MACHO Project: 45 Candidate Microlensing Events from the First-Year Galactic Bulge Data'' by C. Alcock, R. A. Allsman, D. Alves, T. S. Axelrod, D. P. Bennett, K. H. Cook, K. C. Freeman, K. Griest, J. Guern, M. J. Lehner, S. L. Marshall, H.-S. Park, S. Perlmutter, B. A. Peterson, M. R. Pratt, P. J. Quinn, A. W. Rodgers, C. W. Stubbs, and W. Sutherland (ApJ, 479, 119 [1997]), an incorrect version of Table 1 was inadvertently sent to the Journal with the revised version of the paper. The incorrect table used a different event numbering scheme from the correct table, rendering much of the paper incomprehensible. The correct version of Table 1 is available in the preprint version of the paper (astro-ph/9512146) and is also printed below.

  7. Microlensing towards the Small Magellanic Cloud EROS 2 two-year analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.; Alard, C.; Albert, J. N.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Bouquet, A.; Char, S.; Charlot, X.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Derue, F.; Ferlet, R.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros, M.; Haissinski, J.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hardin, D.; de Kat, J.; Kim, A.; Lasserre, T.; Lesquoy, É.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J. B.; Maurice, É.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Prévot, L.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.; EROS Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    We present the analysis of the first two years of a search for microlensing of stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud with the eros (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) project. A single event is detected, already present in the first year analysis. This low event rate allows us to put new constraints on the fraction of the Galactic Halo mass due to compact objects in the mass range [10(-2) , 1]\\:Msun. These limits, along with the fact that the two smc events observed so far are probably due to smc deflectors, suggest that lmc and smc self-lensing may dominate the event rate. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  8. Diamond micro-optics: microlenses and antireflection structured surfaces for the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mikael; Nikolajeff, F.

    2003-03-01

    Fabrication and evaluation of a subwavelength grating in diamond, designed to reduce the Fresnel reflection, is demonstrated. The antireflection (AR) structures are designed to reduce the surface reflection at an illuminating wavelength of 10.6 µm. With this AR-treatment, where no other material is introduced (i.e., no thin film coating), the unique properties of diamond can be fully used. The fabricated AR structures were optically evaluated with a spectrophotometer. The transmission through a diamond substrate with AR structures on both sides was increased from 71% to 97%, with a theoretical value of 99%. Microlenses in diamond are also demonstrated. The lenses are evaluated with interferometers and show good performance. The micro-optical structures were fabricated by electron-beam lithography or photolithographic methods followed by plasma etching.

  9. Search for low-mass exoplanets by gravitational microlensing at high magnification.

    PubMed

    Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Eguchi, S; Furuta, Y; Hearnshaw, J B; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Kurata, Y; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Noda, S; Okajima, K; Rakich, A; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Sekiguchi, T; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Tristram, P J; Yanagisawa, T; Yock, P C M; Gal-Yam, A; Lipkin, Y; Maoz, D; Ofek, E O; Udalski, A; Szewczyk, O; Zebrun, K; Soszynski, I; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2004-08-27

    Observations of the gravitational microlensing event MOA 2003-BLG-32/OGLE 2003-BLG-219 are presented, for which the peak magnification was over 500, the highest yet reported. Continuous observations around the peak enabled a sensitive search for planets orbiting the lens star. No planets were detected. Planets 1.3 times heavier than Earth were excluded from more than 50% of the projected annular region from approximately 2.3 to 3.6 astronomical units surrounding the lens star, Uranus-mass planets were excluded from 0.9 to 8.7 astronomical units, and planets 1.3 times heavier than Saturn were excluded from 0.2 to 60 astronomical units. These are the largest regions of sensitivity yet achieved in searches for extrasolar planets orbiting any star. PMID:15333833

  10. OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; Street, R. A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, C.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; (The Spitzer Microlensing Team; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pawlak, M.; (The OGLE Collaboration; Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dominik, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Mao, S.; (The RoboNet Collaboration; Bozza, V.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Alsubai, K. A.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Haugbølle, T.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Wertz, O.; Zarucki, M.; MiNDSTEp Consortium, (The; Pogge, R. W.; DePoy, D. L.; (The μFUN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of ˜13 days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses of ˜1.0 M ⊙ and ˜0.9 M ⊙ located at a distance of ˜3 kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also observed by Spitzer, we find that the interpretation of OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 does not suffer from the degeneracy between (±, ±) and (±, ∓) solutions, confirming that the four-fold parallax degeneracy in single-lens events collapses into the two-fold degeneracy for the general case of binary-lens events. The location of the blend in the color-magnitude diagram is consistent with the lens properties, suggesting that the blend is the lens itself. The blend is bright enough for spectroscopy and thus this possibility can be checked from future follow-up observations.

  11. OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; Street, R. A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, C.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; (The Spitzer Microlensing Team; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pawlak, M.; (The OGLE Collaboration; Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dominik, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Mao, S.; (The RoboNet collaboration; Bozza, V.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Alsubai, K. A.; Ciceri, S.; D’Ago, G.; Haugbølle, T.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Wertz, O.; Zarucki, M.; MiNDSTEp Consortium, (The; Pogge, R. W.; DePoy, D. L.; (The μFUN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of ∼13 days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses of ∼1.0 M ⊙ and ∼0.9 M ⊙ located at a distance of ∼3 kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also observed by Spitzer, we find that the interpretation of OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 does not suffer from the degeneracy between (±, ±) and (±, ∓) solutions, confirming that the four-fold parallax degeneracy in single-lens events collapses into the two-fold degeneracy for the general case of binary-lens events. The location of the blend in the color–magnitude diagram is consistent with the lens properties, suggesting that the blend is the lens itself. The blend is bright enough for spectroscopy and thus this possibility can be checked from future follow-up observations.

  12. The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Rhie, S. H.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Kubas, D.; Bond, I. A.; Greenhill, J.; Cassan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Boyajian, T. S.; Luhn, J.; Penny, M. T.; Anderson, J.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Botzler, C. S.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Perrott, Y. C.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Yock, P. C. M.; (The MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; The OGLE Collaboration; Allen, W.; DePoy, D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Monard, I. A. G.; Ofek, E.; Pogge, R. W.; (The μFUN Collaboration; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; (The Robonet Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; (The PLANET Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of q ≈ 3.4 × 10‑4, but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light-curve fits with two classes of models: two-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constrains the mass of the lens system to be M L ≈ 0.7 {M}ȯ . Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the two-planet, one-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They indicate a planet of mass m c = 80 ± 13 {M}\\oplus , orbiting a pair of M dwarfs with masses of M A = 0.41 ± 0.07 and M B = 0.30 ± 0.07, which makes this the lowest-mass circumbinary planet system known. The ratio of the separation between the planet and the center of mass to the separation of the two stars is ∼40, so unlike most of the circumbinary planets found by Kepler, the planet does not orbit near the stability limit.

  13. MOA-2011-BLG-293LB: First microlensing planet possibly in the habitable zone

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, V.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Gaudi, B. S.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Fukui, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A. E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: beaulieu@iap.fr E-mail: afukui@oao.nao.ac.jp E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-01-01

    We used Keck adaptive optics observations to identify the first planet discovered by microlensing to lie in or near the habitable zone, i.e., at projected separation r = 1.1 ± 0.1 AU from its M{sub L} = 0.86 ± 0.06 M {sub ☉} host, being the highest microlensing mass definitely identified. The planet has a mass m{sub p} = 4.8 ± 0.3 M {sub Jup}, and could in principle have habitable moons. This is also the first planet to be identified as being in the Galactic bulge with good confidence: D{sub L} = 7.72 ± 0.44 kpc. The planet/host masses and distance were previously not known, but only estimated using Bayesian priors based on a Galactic model. These estimates had suggested that the planet might be a super-Jupiter orbiting an M dwarf, a very rare class of planets. We obtained high-resolution JHK images using Keck adaptive optics to detect the lens and so test this hypothesis. We clearly detect light from a G dwarf at the position of the event, and exclude all interpretations other than that this is the lens with high confidence (95%), using a new astrometric technique. The calibrated magnitude of the planet host star is H{sub L} = 19.16 ± 0.13. We infer the following probabilities for the three possible orbital configurations of the gas giant planet: 53% to be in the habitable zone, 35% to be near the habitable zone, and 12% to be beyond the snow line, depending on the atmospherical conditions and the uncertainties on the semimajor axis.

  14. Space-based societal applications—Relevance in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaranarayana, A.; Varadarajan, C.; Hegde, V. S.

    2009-11-01

    (ISRO) is already a part of the International initiative called Satellite Aided Search and Rescue System. The programme to set up satellite-based Village Resource Centres (VRCs) across India, for providing a variety of services relevant to the rural communities, is also a unique societal application of space technology. The VRCs are envisaged as single window delivery mechanism for a variety of space-based products and services, such as tele-education; telemedicine; information on natural resources for planning and development at local level; interactive advisories on agriculture, fisheries, land and water resources management, livestock management, etc.; interactive vocational training towards alternative livelihood; e-governance; weather information; etc. This paper describes the various possibilities and potentials of Satcom and Remote Sensing technologies for societal applications. The initiatives taken by Indian Space Research Organisation in this direction are highlighted.

  15. The proposal for new space-based gravitational experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Sazhin, Mikhail; Zharov, Vladimir

    The development of space technologies opens new perspectives in solving the fundamental problems of gravity. We propose the experimental investigation of General Relativity (GR) in space experiments in following: a) measurement of post-Newtonian parameters (PPN), b) gravity wave detection in the low frequency band. The accuracy, with which GR is currently confirmed, is fractions of percent: 2.3× 10(-5) . However, in spite of the remarkable success of GR in the weak-field approximation, there are many reasons to consider alternative relativistic theories of gravity that predict the existence of effects other than GR, thus motivating new fundamental gravitational experiments. In this connection, the experimental measurements of PPN of parameters play a special role. To improve the accuracy of measurement of geodetic effects in the gravitational field of the Earth the clusters of spacecrafts, connected by microwave radio links and optical links, are widely used. Such a scheme allows to suppress effectively a coherent noise acting on the spacecraft, and to measure the distance between the satellites within a fraction of a millimeter. This technology was already tested for GRACE and GRAIL NASA missions. Furthermore, there are technologies allowing to effectively compensate non-gravitational noise to the level of 10(-10) - 10(-12) \\ m/s(2/sqrt{Hz}) . The project, which assume the lunch of cluster of the spacecrafts intended to study fundamental processes in the Universe, including the measurement of the PPN parameters and low frequency gravitational waves, is proposed in this report. We study the space-based systems in a configuration of few spacecrafts on different orbits in the gravitational field of the Earth for measuring these effects. Measurements of distances between spacecrafts are performed using microwave radio links, laser interferometry and ultra stable frequency standards. Developed modern technologies for distant measurements allow to reach the accuracy

  16. Modeling space-based multispectral imaging systems with DIRSIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Scott D.; Sanders, Niek J.; Goodenough, Adam A.; Gartley, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) focuses on a next generation global coverage, imaging system to replace the aging Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 systems. The major difference in the new system is the migration from the multi-spectral whiskbroom design employed by the previous generation of sensors to modular focal plane, multi-spectral pushbroom architecture. Further complicating the design shift is that the reflective and thermal acquisition capability is split across two instruments spatially separated on the satellite bus. One of the focuses of the science and engineering teams prior to launch is the ability to provide seamless data continuity with the historic Landsat data archive. Specifically, the challenges of registering and calibrating data from the new system so that long-term science studies are minimally impacted by the change in the system design. In order to provide the science and engineering teams with simulated pre-launch data, an effort was undertaken to create a robust end-to-end model of the LDCM system. The modeling environment is intended to be flexible and incorporate measured data from the actual system components as they were completed and integrated. The output of the modeling environment needs to include not only radiometrically robust imagery, but also the meta-data necessary to exercise the processing pipeline. This paper describes how the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model has been utilized to model space-based, multi-spectral imaging (MSI) systems in support of systems engineering trade studies. A mechanism to incorporate measured focal plane projections through the forward optics is described. A hierarchal description of the satellite system is presented including the details of how a multiple instrument platform is described and modeled, including the hierarchical management of temporally correlated jitter that allows engineers to explore impacts of different jitter sources on instrument

  17. Using graphical and pictorial representations to teach introductory astronomy students about the detection of extrasolar planets via gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Chambers, Timothy G.; Prather, Edward E.; Brissenden, Gina

    2016-05-01

    The detection and study of extrasolar planets is an exciting and thriving field in modern astrophysics and an increasingly popular topic in introductory astronomy courses. One detection method relies on searching for stars whose light has been gravitationally microlensed by an extrasolar planet. In order to facilitate instructors' abilities to bring this interesting mix of general relativity and extrasolar planet detection into the introductory astronomy classroom, we have developed a new Lecture-Tutorial called "Detecting Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing." In this paper, we describe how this new Lecture-Tutorial's representations of astrophysical phenomena, which we selected and created based on theoretically motivated considerations of their pedagogical affordances, are used to help introductory astronomy students develop more expert-like reasoning abilities.

  18. Measurement and modeling of microlenses fabricated on single-photon avalanche diode arrays for fill factor recovery.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Juan Mata; Wolf, Martin; Charbon, Edoardo

    2014-02-24

    Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imagers typically have a relatively low fill factor, i.e. a low proportion of the pixel's surface is light sensitive, due to in-pixel circuitry. We present a microlens array fabricated on a 128×128 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager to enhance its sensitivity. The benefits and limitations of these light concentrators are studied for low light imaging applications. We present a new simulation software that can be used to simulate microlenses' performance under different conditions and a new non-destructive contact-less method to estimate the height of the microlenses. Results of experiments and simulations are in good agreement, indicating that a gain >10 can be achieved for this particular sensor.

  19. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  20. Searching for extra-solar planets and probing the atmosphere of Bulge giant stars through gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, Arnaud

    2005-12-01

    A galactic microlensing effect occurs when a luminous object (the source) located in the Bulge of the Milky Way is temporarily magnified by an intervening star (the "microlens'') passing close to its line of sight. This phenomenom is used for searching extra-solar planets and constraining their abundance, as well as probing the atmosphere of Bulge giant stars. The PLANET collaboration (Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) monitors carefully chosen ongoing microlensing events on a round-the-clock basis from observatories in the southern hemisphere. Mathematical and numerical methods are developed to deal with both the highly non-linear equations and the wide parameter space plagued with many local minima. Microlensing exoplanet detection is possible because planets can induce perturbations to the standard lensing light curves. Its sensitivity can go down to Earth-mass planets, thanks to gravitational caustics that arise from a binary lens. If crossed by the source, additional secondary magnification peaks in the light curve can occur. OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb is the third extra-solar planet detected by this method so far, and its discovery is reported here. It is the lightest exoplanet to date - about five Earth masses - located at a rather large distance of its star, that is about three astronomical units. A selection of microlensing events monitored during the 1995-2004 period was used to derive limits on exoplanets abundance around red dwarf stars. The method is described and detection efficiency diagrams are provided as a basis of the statistical analysis. Last, a differential magnification effect over the disk of the source star is used as a tool to probe Bulge giants stellar atmospheres. Limb-darkening parameters of a set of stars have been measured and compared to atmosphere models. Moreover, a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring of a Bulge G5III giant at 9 kpc made possible both the measurement of the individual lines equivalent width and the direct detection

  1. Commercial off the Shelf Ground Control Supports Calibration and Conflation from Ground to Space Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielová, M.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    The need for rapid deployment of aerial and satellite imagery in support of GIS and engineering integration projects require new sources of geodetic control to ensure the accuracy for geospatial projects. In the past, teams of surveyors would need to deploy to project areas to provide targeted or photo identifiable points that are used to provide data for orthorecificaion, QA/QC and calibration for multi-platform sensors. The challenge of integrating street view, UAS, airborne and Space based sensors to produce the common operational picture requires control to tie multiple sources together. Today commercial off the shelf delivery of existing photo identifiable control is increasing the speed of deployment of this data without having to revisit sites over and over again. The presentation will discuss the processes developed by CompassData to build a global library of 40,000 control points available today. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) based processes and initiatives ensure consistent quality of survey data, photo identifiable features selected and meta data to support photogrammetrist, engineers and GIS professionals to quickly deliver projects with better accuracy.

  2. 78 FR 65006 - National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY... President's 2004 U.S. Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Policy, the National...

  3. A Ten Year Record of Space Based Lightning Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Hardin, D. M.; Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Graves, S.; Jones, S.; Harrison, S.; Drewry, M.; Nair, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is a space based instrument used to detect the distribution and variability of total lightning (cloud-to-cloud, intracloud, and cloud-to-ground lightning) that occurs in the tropical regions of the globe. LIS was launched in November 1997 aboard NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The LIS sensor contains a staring imager which is optimized to locate and detect lightning with storm-scale resolution of 3-6 km (3 at nadir, 6 at limb) over a large region (550-550 km) of the Earth's surface. The field of view (FOV) is sufficient to observe a point on the Earth or a cloud for 80 seconds, adequate to estimate the flashing rate of many storms. The instrument records the time of occurrence of a lightning event, measures the radiant energy, and estimates the location. The excellent performance of LIS has lead to numerous scientific discoveries such as: The global lightning flash rate is on the order of 40 flashes per second as compared to the commonly accepted value of 100, an estimate that dates back to 1925. Seventy percent of all lightning activity occurs in the tropics, with the global distribution dominated by the summertime lightning activity over the N. Hemisphere land masses. A new understanding on the interplay among the intensification of updraft, lightning bursts, and the onset of severe weather lead to establishment of a validation campaign that further explored relationships between lightning and severe weather. Findings to date indicate that high flash rate storms have a high probability of becoming severe. A ten year global lightning data archive has been developed from the Lightning Imaging Sensor. This archive is maintained at the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) in Huntsville Alabama, one of NASA’s Earth science data centers, managed by the Information Technology and Systems Center of UAHuntsville. This is the most comprehensive global lightning data archive ever produced and is noteworthy for its

  4. Non Radiation Hardened Microprocessors in Spaced Based Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decoursey, Robert J.; Estes, Robert F.; Melton, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) mission is a comprehensive suite of active and passive sensors including a 20Hz 230mj Nd:YAG lidar, a visible wavelength Earth-looking camera and an imaging infrared radiometer. CALIPSO flies in formation with the Earth Observing System Post-Meridian (EOS PM) train, provides continuous, near-simultaneous measurements and is a planned 3 year mission. CALIPSO was launched into a 98 degree sun synchronous Earth orbit in April of 2006 to study clouds and aerosols and acquires over 5 gigabytes of data every 24 hours. The ground track of one CALIPSO orbit as well as high and low intensity South Atlantic Anomaly outlines is shown. CALIPSO passes through the SAA several times each day. Spaced based remote sensing systems that include multiple instruments and/or instruments such as lidar generate large volumes of data and require robust real-time hardware and software mechanisms and high throughput processors. Due to onboard storage restrictions and telemetry downlink limitations these systems must pre-process and reduce the data before sending it to the ground. This onboard processing and realtime requirement load may mean that newer more powerful processors are needed even though acceptable radiation-hardened versions have not yet been released. CALIPSO's single board computer payload controller processor is actually a set of four (4) voting non-radiation hardened COTS Power PC 603r's built on a single width VME card by General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems (GDAIS). Significant radiation concerns for CALIPSO and other Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites include the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the north and south poles and strong solar events. Over much of South America and extending into the South Atlantic Ocean the Van Allen radiation belts dip to just 200-800km and spacecraft entering this area are subjected to high energy protons and experience higher than normal Single Event Upset

  5. RoboNet-II: Follow-up observations of microlensing events with a robotic network of telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Dominik, M.; Allan, A.; Steele, I.; Bramich, D. M.; Saunders, E. S.; Rattenbury, N.; Mottram, C.; Fraser, S.; Clay, N.; Burgdorf, M.; Bode, M.; Lister, T. A.; Hawkins, E.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Fouqué, P.; Albrow, M.; Menzies, J.; Cassan, A.; Dominis-Prester, D.

    2009-01-01

    RoboNet-II uses a global network of robotic telescopes to perform follow-up observations of microlensing events in the Galactic Bulge. The current network consists of three 2 m telescopes located in Hawaii and Australia (owned by Las Cumbres Observatory) and the Canary Islands (owned by Liverpool John Moores University). In future years the network will be expanded by deploying clusters of 1 m telescopes in other suitable locations. A principal scientific aim of the RoboNet-II project is the detection of cool extra-solar planets by the method of gravitational microlensing. These detections will provide crucial constraints to models of planetary formation and orbital migration. RoboNet-II acts in coordination with the PLANET microlensing follow-up network and uses an optimization algorithm (``web-PLOP'') to select the targets and a distributed scheduling paradigm (eSTAR) to execute the observations. Continuous automated assessment of the observations and anomaly detection is provided by the ARTEMiS system.

  6. Confirmation of the Planetary Microlensing Signal and Star and Planet Mass Determinations for Event OGLE-2005-BLG-169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Anderson, J.; Bond, I. A.; Anderson, N.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Gilbert, E.; Gould, A.; Pfeifle, R.; Pogge, R. W.; Suzuki, D.; Terry, S.; Udalski, A.

    2015-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system. Combining the constraints from the microlensing light curve with the photometry and astrometry of the HST/WFC3 data, we find star and planet masses of {M}*=0.69+/- 0.02{M}⊙ and {m}{{p}}=14.1+/- 0.9{M}\\oplus . The planetary microlens system is located toward the Galactic bulge at a distance of {D}L=4.1+/- 0.4 kpc and the projected star-planet separation is {a}\\perp =3.5+/- 0.3 AU, corresponding to a semimajor axis of a={4.0}-0.6+2.2 AU.

  7. OGLE-2012-BLG-0455/MOA-2012-BLG-206: Microlensing event with ambiguity in planetary interpretations caused by incomplete coverage of planetary signal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Kavka, A.; Pogge, R. W.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Fouqué, P.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Lee, C.-U.; Monard, L. A. G.; Collaboration: μFUN Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-20

    Characterizing a microlensing planet is done by modeling an observed lensing light curve. In this process, it is often confronted that solutions of different lensing parameters result in similar light curves, causing difficulties in uniquely interpreting the lens system, and thus understanding the causes of different types of degeneracy is important. In this work, we show that incomplete coverage of a planetary perturbation can result in degenerate solutions even for events where the planetary signal is detected with a high level of statistical significance. We demonstrate the degeneracy for an actually observed event OGLE-2012-BLG-0455/MOA-2012-BLG-206. The peak of this high-magnification event (A {sub max} ∼ 400) exhibits very strong deviation from a point-lens model with Δχ{sup 2} ≳ 4000 for data sets with a total of 6963 measurements. From detailed modeling of the light curve, we find that the deviation can be explained by four distinct solutions, i.e., two very different sets of solutions, each with a twofold degeneracy. While the twofold (so-called close/wide) degeneracy is well understood, the degeneracy between the radically different solutions is not previously known. The model light curves of this degeneracy differ substantially in the parts that were not covered by observation, indicating that the degeneracy is caused by the incomplete coverage of the perturbation. It is expected that the frequency of the degeneracy introduced in this work will be greatly reduced with the improvement of the current lensing survey and follow-up experiments and the advent of new surveys.

  8. On the age of Galactic bulge microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Recent results by Bensby and collaborators on the ages of microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge have challenged the picture of an exclusively old stellar population, because ages significantly younger than 9 Gyr have been found. Aims: However, these age estimates have not been independently confirmed with different techniques and theoretical stellar models. One of the aims of this paper is to verify these results by means of a grid-based method. We also quantify the systematic biases that might be induced by some assumptions adopted to compute stellar models. In particular, we explore the impact of increasing the initial helium abundance, neglecting the element microscopic diffusion, and changing the mixing-length calibration in theoretical stellar track computations. Methods: We adopt the SCEPtER pipeline with a newly computed stellar model grid for metallicities [Fe/H] from - 2.00 dex to 0.55 dex, and masses in the range [0.60; 1.60] M⊙ from the zero-age main sequence to the helium flash at the red giant branch tip. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we show for the considered evolutionary phases that our technique provides unbiased age estimates. Results: Our age results are in good agreement with Bensby and collaborators findings and show 16 stars younger than 5 Gyr and 28 younger than 9 Gyr over a sample of 58. The effect of a helium enhancement as large as ΔY/ ΔZ = 5 is quite modest, resulting in a mean age increase of metal rich stars of 0.6 Gyr. Even simultaneously adopting a high helium content and the upper values of age estimates, there is evidence of 4 stars younger than 5 Gyr and 15 younger than 9 Gyr. For stars younger than 5 Gyr, the use of stellar models computed by neglecting microscopic diffusion or by assuming a super-solar mixing-length value leads to a mean increase in the age estimates of about 0.4 Gyr and 0.5 Gyr respectively. Even considering the upper values for the age estimates, there are four stars

  9. Properties of planet-induced deviations in the astrometric microlensing centroid shift trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Lee, Chunguk

    2002-01-01

    An extrasolar planet can be detected by microlensing because it can distort the smooth lensing light curve created by the primary lens. As a new method to search for and characterize extrasolar planets, Safizadeh, Dalal & Griest proposed to detect the planet-induced distortions in the trajectory of the microlensed source star's centroid motion (astrometric curve), which is observable by using the next generation of high-precision interferometers. In this paper we investigate the properties of the planet-induced deviations in the astrometric curves (excess centroid shifts Δδ) and the correlations of Δδ with the photometric deviations. For this, we construct vector field maps of Δδ, which represent the difference of the centroid shift from that expected in the absence of the planet as a function of source positions. From this investigation, we find that significant astrometric deviations occur not only in the region near the caustics but also in the region close to the planet-primary axis between the caustics. However, owing to the difference in the locations of the caustics between the two types of systems with the planet-primary separations (normalized by the angular Einstein ring radius) up>1.0 and up<1.0, the locations of the major deviation regions of the two systems are different from each other. For systems with up>1.0, the major deviation vectors have orientations, in most cases, pointing towards the planet, while they point away from the planet for systems with up<1.0. The major deviation region is surrounded by the region of moderate deviations, within which the orientation of Δδ is reversed compared with the orientation in the major deviation region. We also find that the astrometric deviation is closely correlated with the photometric one, as discussed by Safizadeh et al. The astrometric deviation increases as the photometric deviation increases, and Δδ is directed towards the planet when the light curve has positive deviation, and vice versa

  10. Integrated NASA Lidar System Strategy for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Heaps, William S.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent peer reviews of' NASA's space-based lidar missions and of the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. This paper presents a multi-Center efforts leading to formulation of an integrated NASA strategy to provide the technology and maturity of systems necessary to make Lidar/Laser systems viable for space-based study and monitoring of the earth's atmosphere.

  11. Alaska at the Crossroads of Migration: Space Based Ornithology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deppe, Jill; Wessels, Konrad; Smith, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding bird migration on a global scale is one of the most compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Revolutionary advances in remote sensing now provide us with near real-time measurements of atmospheric and land surface conditions at high spatial resolution over entire continents. We use spatially-explicit, individual based bird migration models driven by numerical weather prediction models of atmospheric conditions, dynamic habitat suitability maps derived from remotely sensed land surface conditions, biophysiological models, and biological field data to simulate migration routes, timing, energy budgets, and survival of individual birds and populations. Long-distance migratory birds travel annually between breeding grounds in Alaska and wintering grounds in Latin Amierica. Approximately 25% of these species are potential vectors of Avian Influenza. Alaska is at the crossroads of Asian and New World migratory flyways and is likely to be a point of introduction of Asian H5N1 AI into the western hemisphere. If/when an infected bird is detected, a pressing question will be where was this bird several days ago, and where is it likely to go after it was released from the survey site? Answers to such questions will increase effectiveness of AI surveillance and mitigation measures. From a conservation perspective, Alaska's diverse landscape provides breeding sites for many migrants, and climatic and land surface changes along migratory flyways in the western hemisphere may reduce bird survival and physical condition upon arrival at Alaskan breeding territories, success and migrant populations.

  12. Light micro-lensing effect in biosilica shells of diatoms microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Tommasi, E.; De Stefano, L.; Rea, I.; Moretti, L.; De Stefano, M.; Rendina, I.

    2008-04-01

    Diatoms are monocellular micro-algae provided with external valves, the frustules, made of amorphous hydrated silica. Frustules present patterns of regular arrays of holes, the areolae, characterized by sub-micrometric dimensions. In particular, frustules from centric diatoms are characterized by a radial disposition of areolae and exhibit several optical properties, such as photoluminescence variations in presence of organic vapors and photonic-crystal-like behaviour as long as propagation of electromagnetic field is concerned. We have studied the transmission of coherent light, at different wavelengths, through single frustules of Coscinodiscus Walesii diatoms, a centric species characterized by a diameter of about 150 μm. The frustules showed the ability to focalize the light in a spot of a few μm2, the focal length depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation. This focusing effect takes place at the centre of the frustule, where no areolae are present and, as it is confirmed by numerical simulations, it is probably due to coherent superposition of unfocused wave fronts coming from the surrounding areolae. Diatoms-based micro-lenses could be used in the production of lensed optical fibers without modifying the glass core and, in general, they could be exploited with success in most of the optical micro-arrays.

  13. MACHO Project Analysis of the Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events with Clump Giants as Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Vandehei, T; Griest, K; Alcock, C; Alves, D R; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Minniti, D; Nelson, C; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Welch, D L

    2002-03-06

    We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This class of events allows one to obtain robust conclusions because relatively bright clump stars are not strongly affected by blending. We discuss: (1) the selection of ''giant'' events, (2) the distribution of event durations, (3) the anomalous character of event durations and optical depth in the MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.1,-3{sup o}.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of {tau} = (2.0 {+-} 0.4) x10{sup -6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3{sup o}.9, -3{sup o}.8), and present a map of the spatial distribution of the optical depth. When field 104 is removed from the sample, the optical depth drops to {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, which is in excellent agreement with infrared-based models of the central Galactic region.

  14. The Use of High-Magnification Microlensing Events in Discovering Extrasolar Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Safizadeh, N.

    1998-06-01

    Hundreds of gravitational microlensing events have now been detected toward the Galactic bulge, with many more to come. The detection of fine structure in these events has been theorized as an excellent way to discover extrasolar planetary systems along the line of sight to the Galactic center. We show that by focusing on high-magnification events, the probability of detecting planets of Jupiter mass or greater in the lensing zone [(0.6{endash}1.6){ital R}{sub E}] is nearly 100{percent}, with the probability remaining high down to Saturn masses and substantial even at 10 Earth masses. This high probability allows a nearly definitive statement to be made about the existence of lensing-zone planets in each such system that undergoes high magnification. One might expect light-curve deviations caused by the source passing near the small primary-lens caustic to be small because of the large distance of the perturbing planet, but this effect is overcome by the high magnification. High-magnification events are relatively rare (e.g., {approximately}1/20 of events have peak magnifications greater than 20), but they occur regularly, and the peak can be predicted in advance, allowing extrasolar planet detection with a relatively small use of resources over a relatively small amount of time. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  15. MICROLENSING EVIDENCE THAT A TYPE 1 QUASAR IS VIEWED FACE-ON

    SciTech Connect

    Poindexter, Shawn; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-03-20

    Using a microlensing analysis of 11 years of OGLE V-band photometry of the four image gravitational lens Q2237+0305, we measure the inclination i of the accretion disk to be cos i > 0.66 at 68% confidence. Very edge on (cos i < 0.39) solutions are ruled out at 95% confidence. We measure the V-band radius of the accretion disk, defined by the radius where the temperature matches the monitoring band photon emission, to be R{sub V} = 5.8{sup +3.8}{sub -2.3} x 10{sup 15} cm assuming a simple thin disk model and including the uncertainties in its inclination. The projected radiating area of the disk remains too large to be consistent with the observed flux for a T {proportional_to} R {sup -3/4} thin disk temperature profile. There is no strong correlation between the direction of motion (peculiar velocity) of the lens galaxy and the orientation of the disk.

  16. Gravitational microlensing - Powerful combination of ray-shooting and parametric representation of caustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambsganss, J.; Witt, H. J.; Schneider, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a combination of two very different methods for numerically calculating the effects of gravitational microlensing: the backward-ray-tracing that results in two-dimensional magnification patterns, and the parametric representation of caustic lines; they are in a way complementary to each other. The combination of these methods is much more powerful than the sum of its parts. It allows to determine the total magnification and the number of microimages as a function of source position. The mean number of microimages is calculated analytically and compared to the numerical results. The peaks in the lightcurves, as obtained from one-dimensional tracks through the magnification pattern, can now be divided into two groups: those which correspond to a source crossing a caustic, and those which are due to sources passing outside cusps. We determine the frequencies of those two types of events as a function of the surface mass density, and the probability distributions of their magnitudes. We find that for low surface mass density as many as 40 percent of all events in a lightcurve are not due to caustic crossings, but rather due to passings outside cusps.

  17. Nano- and microlenses as concepts for enhanced performance of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Martina; Manley, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Both metallic nanoparticles exhibiting plasmonic effects and dielectric nanoparticles coupling the light into resonant modes have shown successful applications to photovoltaics. On a larger scale, microconcentrator optics promise to enhance solar cell efficiency and to reduce material consumption. Here, we want to create a link between the concentrators on the nano- and on the microscale. From metallic nanospheres, we turn to dielectric ones and then look at increasing radii to approach the microscale. The lenses are investigated with respect to their interaction with light using three-dimensional simulations with the finite-element method. Resulting maps of local electric field distributions reveal the focusing behavior of the dielectric spheres. For larger lens sizes, ray tracing calculations, which give ray distributions in agreement with electric field intensities, can be applied. Calculations of back focal lengths in geometrical optics coincide with ray tracing results and allow insight into how the focal length can be tuned as a function of particle size, substrate refractive index, and the shape of the microlens. Despite the similarities we find for the nano- and the microlenses, integration into solar cells needs to be carefully adjusted, depending on the goals of material saving, concentration level, focal distance, and lens size.

  18. A New Nonplanetary Interpretation of the Microlensing Event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Bennett, David P.; Udalski, Andrzej; Jung, Youn Kil

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the discovery of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown-dwarf host in a binary system was reported from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723. We reanalyze the event considering the possibility of other interpretations. From this, we find a new solution where the lens is composed of two bodies, in contrast to the three-body solution of the previous analysis. The new solution better explains the observed light curve than the previous solution with Δχ 2 ˜ 202, suggesting that the new solution is a correct model for the event. From the estimation of the physical parameters based on the new interpretation, we find that the lens system is composed of two low-mass stars with ˜0.2 M ⊙ and ˜0.1 M ⊙ and located at a distance of ˜3 kpc. The fact that the physical parameters correspond to those of the most common lens population located at a distance with a large lensing probability further supports the likelihood of the new interpretation. Considering that two dramatically different solutions can approximately explain the observed light curve, the event suggests the need for carefully testing all possible lens-system geometries.

  19. Targeting Planetary Anomalies in Microlensing Events with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Rachel; RoboNet Microlensing Team

    2007-12-01

    By the nature of these transient, non-repeating phenomena, observing microlensing events requires a fast, responsive system of telescopes distributed over a range of longitudes. The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network currently consists of the 2m Faulkes Telescopes North and South. Over the course of the next few years LCOGT will expand this network to a complement of 44, including 2x2m, 18x1m and 24x0.4m which will be sited in clusters of 3-4 telescopes such that at least one site is in the dark at any given time, enabling us to provide 24hr coverage of any transient event. The telescopes are controlled via a robotic scheduler, allowing a fast response to alerts from eStar or other robotic agents or to manual override. Both 2m telescopes have been engaged in robotically-controlled follow-up of 222 OGLE and MOA alerts during the 2007 Bulge season and intensive observations of 2 events displaying clear anomalies. We summarise here the results to date.

  20. Fabrication of polymer microlenses on single mode optical fibers for light coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaboub, Monsef; Guessoum, Assia; Demagh, Nacer-Eddine; Guermat, Abdelhak

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for producing fibers optics micro-collimators composed of polydimethylsiloxane PDMS microlenses of different radii of curvature. The waist and working distance values obtained enable the optimization of optical coupling between optical fibers, fibers and optical sources, and fibers and detectors. The principal is based on the injection of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into a conical micro-cavity chemically etched at the end of optical fibers. A spherical microlens is then formed that is self-centered with respect to the axis of the fiber. Typically, an optimal radius of curvature of 10.08 μm is obtained. This optimized micro-collimator is characterized by a working distance of 19.27 μm and a waist equal to 2.28 μm for an SMF 9/125 μm fiber. The simulation and experimental results reveal an optical coupling efficiency that can reach a value of 99.75%.

  1. Beyond the Wobbles: Teaching Students About Detecting Planets with the Transit and Gravitational Microlensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Edward E.; Wallace, Colin Scott; Chambers, Timothy G.; Brissenden, Gina; Traub, Wesley A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, Anya A.; Rodriguez, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory in collaboration with JPL scientists, visualization experts, and education and public outreach professionals with the Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) have recently completed classroom field-testing of a new suite of educational materials to help learners better understand how extrasolar planets are detected using the transit and gravitational microlensing techniques. This collaboration has created a set of evidence-based Think-Pair-Share questions, Lecture-Tutorials, animations, presentation slides, and instrucotrs guide that can be used together or separately to actively engage learners in reasoning about the data and scientific representations associated with these exciting new extrasolar planet detection methods. In this talk we present several of the conceptually challenging collaborative learning tasks that students encounter with this new suite of educational materials and some of the assessment questions we are using to assess the efficacy of their use in general education, college-level astronomy courses.

  2. What can we learn about quasars and unification scheme with the microlensing technique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Our understanding of the gravitational lensing phenomenon has deeply progressed since the discovery of the "first" gravitationally lensed object in 1979 by Walsh and collaborators. With more than hundreds of quasars known to be multiply imaged by a foreground galaxy, gravitational lensing is now a powerful astrophysical and cosmological tool. The stars located in lensing galaxies produce small deflections of the light rays coming from distant quasars which adds to the main deflection from the lensing galaxy. Because the deflection caused by the stars is small, the micro-images they produce remain unresolved. Only a flickering of the flux and spectral deformation of lensed quasars images are observed. I will explain how this micro-lensing effect, can be used to study the inner region of distant quasars. Specifically, I will zoom out from the inner accretion disc up to the torus, and give an overview of the information which can be retrieved at each of these scales. I will give a special emphasis on the constraint we can put on the orientation/geometry of the various emitting regions (i.e. disc, broad line region, torus) at each of these scales.

  3. Upcoming Microlensing by Proxima Centauri: A Rare Opportunity for Mass Determination and Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, H. E.; Anderson, J.; Dominik, M.

    2013-06-01

    Proxima Centauri will pass close to two background stars in 2014 and 2016, with impact parameters of about 1.6 and 0.5 arc seconds. Because Proxima is so nearby, its angular Einstein ring radius is large 28 milli arc sec) and will lead to detectable relativistic deflections of the images of the background stars even at those angular separations. Measurement of the astrometric shifts offers a unique opportunity for an accurate determination of the mass of Proxima. Although the background stars are >8.5 mag fainter than Proxima, the large contrast is mitigated by the relatively large separations at which the gravitational deflection is still detectable, and well within the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope. The upcoming events also offer the opportunity to detect and determine the masses of planetary companions, either through additional astrometric shifts, or in rare circumstances through a photometric microlensing event, leading to a brightening of the source star. These events would have durations of a few hours to several days.

  4. Discovery of a cool planet of 5.5 Earth masses through gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J-P; Bennett, D P; Fouqué, P; Williams, A; Dominik, M; Jørgensen, U G; Kubas, D; Cassan, A; Coutures, C; Greenhill, J; Hill, K; Menzies, J; Sackett, P D; Albrow, M; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Calitz, J J; Cook, K H; Corrales, E; Desort, M; Dieters, S; Dominis, D; Donatowicz, J; Hoffman, M; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Pollard, K; Sahu, K; Vinter, C; Wambsganss, J; Woller, K; Horne, K; Steele, I; Bramich, D M; Burgdorf, M; Snodgrass, C; Bode, M; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Wieckowski, T; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L; Paczyński, B; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Britton, T R; Gilmore, A C; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A V; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okada, C; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Sato, S; Sasaki, M; Sekiguchi, T; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Yoshioka, T

    2006-01-26

    In the favoured core-accretion model of formation of planetary systems, solid planetesimals accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas if they are sufficiently massive. Around M-dwarf stars (the most common stars in our Galaxy), this model favours the formation of Earth-mass (M(o)) to Neptune-mass planets with orbital radii of 1 to 10 astronomical units (au), which is consistent with the small number of gas giant planets known to orbit M-dwarf host stars. More than 170 extrasolar planets have been discovered with a wide range of masses and orbital periods, but planets of Neptune's mass or less have not hitherto been detected at separations of more than 0.15 au from normal stars. Here we report the discovery of a 5.5(+5.5)(-2.7) M(o) planetary companion at a separation of 2.6+1.5-0.6 au from a 0.22+0.21-0.11 M(o) M-dwarf star, where M(o) refers to a solar mass. (We propose to name it OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, indicating a planetary mass companion to the lens star of the microlensing event.) The mass is lower than that of GJ876d (ref. 5), although the error bars overlap. Our detection suggests that such cool, sub-Neptune-mass planets may be more common than gas giant planets, as predicted by the core accretion theory. PMID:16437108

  5. Transmission characteristics of a bidirectional transparent screen based on reflective microlenses.

    PubMed

    Hedili, M Kivanc; Freeman, Mark O; Urey, Hakan

    2013-10-21

    A microlens array (MLA) based see-through, front projection screen, which can be used in direct projection head-up displays (HUD), color teleprompters and bidirectional interactive smart windows, is evaluated for various performance metrics in transmission mode. The screen structure consists of a partially reflective coated MLA buried between refractive-index-matched layers of epoxy as reported in Ref [1]. The reflected light is expanded by the MLA to create an eyebox for the user. The brightness gain of the screen can be varied by changing the numerical aperture of the microlenses. Thus, using high gain designs, a low-power projector coupled with the screen can produce high-brightness and even 3D images as the polarization is maintained at the screen. The impact of the partially reflective coatings on the transmitted light in terms of resolution and modulation transfer function associated with the screen is studied. A condition similar to the Rayleigh criteria for diffraction-limited imaging is discussed for the microlens arrays and the associated coating layers. The optical path difference between the light transmitted from the center and the edges of each microlens caused by the reflective layer coatings should not exceed λ/4. Furthermore, the crosstalk between the front and rear projected images is found to be less than 1.3%. PMID:24150308

  6. 75 FR 59686 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space-Based Data Collection System (DCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space- Based Data Collection System (DCS) Agreements AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by...

  7. 78 FR 68816 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space-Based Data Collection System (DCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space- Based Data Collection System (DCS) Agreements AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by...

  8. Space-based radio telescopes and an orbiting deep-space relay station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    Foremost among the candidates for early utilization of the Shuttle-launched self-deployable structures are the space-based radio telescopes. Several space-based telescopes are examined including an orbiting VLBI terminal, an orbiting submillimeter telescope, and a large ambient deployable IR telescope. Particular consideration is given to the high-gain Orbiting Deep-Space Relay Station for communication with deep-space probes. Details of deployable antenna technology are discussed.

  9. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  10. Application of sunlight and lamps for plant irradiation in space bases.

    PubMed

    Sager, J C; Wheeler, R M

    1992-01-01

    The radiation sources used for plant growth on a space base must meet the biological requirements for photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. In addition the sources must be energy and volume efficient, while maintaining the required irradiance levels, spectral, spatial and temporal distribution. These requirements are not easily met, but as the biological and mission requirements are better defined, then specific facility designs can begin to accommodate both the biological requirements and the physical limitations of a space based plant growth system.

  11. Application of sunlight and lamps for plant irradiation in space bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, J. C.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation sources used for plant growth on a space base must meet the biological requirements for photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. In addition, the sources must be energy and volume efficient, while maintaining the required irradiance levels, spectral, spatial and temporal distribution. These requirements are not easily met, but as the biological and mission requirements are better defined, then specific facility designs can begin to accommodate both the biological requirements and the physical limitations of a space-based plant growth system.

  12. PROSPECTS FOR CHARACTERIZING HOST STARS OF THE PLANETARY SYSTEM DETECTIONS PREDICTED FOR THE KOREAN MICROLENSING TELESCOPE NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2015-02-10

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ{sub H{sub ℓ}}≤0.1 for ≳60% of planet detections ≥5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ∼28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for ≲ (16 · f {sub bin})% of planet detections, where f {sub bin} is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass ≲0.3 M {sub ☉}.

  13. Prospects for Characterizing Host Stars of the Planetary System Detections Predicted for the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2015-02-01

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ H_{\\ell } ≤ 0.1 for gsim60% of planet detections >=5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ~28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for <~ (16 · f bin)% of planet detections, where f bin is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass lsim0.3 M ⊙.

  14. Long-term monitoring, time delay, and microlensing in the gravitational lens system Q0142-100

    SciTech Connect

    Oscoz, A.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Mediavilla, E.

    2013-12-20

    We present 12 yr of monitoring of the gravitational lens Q0142-100 from the Teide Observatory. The data, taken from 1999 to 2010, comprise 105 observing nights with the IAC80 Telescope. The application of the δ{sup 2} method to the dataset leads to a value for the time delay between both components of the system of 72 ± 22 days (68% confidence level), consistent within uncertainties with the most recent results. With this value in mind a possible microlensing event is detected in Q0142-100.

  15. A Search For Stellar-mass Black Holes Via Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. R.; Sinukoff, E.; Ofek, E. O.; Udalski, A.; Kozlowski, S.

    2016-10-01

    While dozens of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) have been discovered in binary systems, isolated BHs have eluded detection. Their presence can be inferred when they lens light from a background star. We attempt to detect the astrometric lensing signatures of three photometrically identified microlensing events, OGLE-2011-BLG-0022, OGLE-2011-BLG-0125, and OGLE-2012-BLG-0169 (OB110022, OB110125, and OB120169), located toward the Galactic Bulge. These events were selected because of their long durations, which statistically favors more massive lenses. Astrometric measurements were made over one to two years using laser-guided adaptive optics observations from the W. M. Keck Observatory. Lens model parameters were first constrained by the photometric light curves. The OB120169 light curve is well fit by a single-lens model, while both OB110022 and OB110125 light curves favor binary lens models. Using the photometric fits as prior information, no significant astrometric lensing signal was detected and all targets were consistent with linear motion. The significant lack of astrometric signal constrains the lens mass of OB110022 to 0.05–1.79 M ⊙ in a 99.7% confidence interval, which disfavors a BH lens. Fits to OB110125 yielded a reduced Einstein crossing time and insufficient observations during the peak, so no mass limits were obtained. Two degenerate solutions exist for OB120169, which have a lens mass between 0.2–38.8 M ⊙ and 0.4–39.8 M ⊙ for a 99.7% confidence interval. Follow-up observations of OB120169 will further constrain the lens mass. Based on our experience, we use simulations to design optimal astrometric observing strategies and show that with more typical observing conditions the detection of BHs is feasible.

  16. A PLANETARY LENSING FEATURE IN CAUSTIC-CROSSING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: kyuha@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2012-05-20

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this investigation, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately distinguish between the planetary and binary companions. The planetary-lensing feature appears in the interpeak region between the two peaks of the caustic-crossings. The structure of the interpeak region for the planetary-lensing events is smooth and convex or boxy, whereas the structure for the binary-lensing events is smooth and concave. We also investigate the effect of a finite background source star on the planetary-lensing feature in the caustic-crossing high-magnification events. From this, we find that the convex-shaped interpeak structure appears in a certain range that changes with the mass ratio of the planet to the planet-hosting star.

  17. Discovery of a Gas Giant Planet in Microlensing Event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; MOA Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Mróz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; OGLE Collaboration; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; D’Ago, G.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; ROBONET Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light-curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with V-I=1.48+/- 0.08. This is marginally consistent with a source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star on the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at {D}L=6.9+/- 1.1 {kpc}. It also indicates a host-star mass of {M}* ={0.51}-0.28+0.44{M}ȯ , a planet mass of {m}{{p}}={0.56}-0.26+0.34{M}J, and a projected star–planet separation of {a}\\perp ={1.75}-0.33+0.34 au. The lens–source relative proper motion is {μ }{rel}=6.5+/- 1.1 mas yr‑1. The lens (and stellar host star) is estimated to be very faint compared to the source star, so it is most likely that it can be detected only when the lens and source stars start to separate. Due to the relatively high relative proper motion, the lens and source will be resolved to about ∼46 mas in 6–8 yr after the peak magnification. So, by 2020–2022, we can hope to detect the lens star with deep, high-resolution images.

  18. Properties of Microlensing Events by Wide-separation Planets with a Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of microlensing events caused by planetary systems where planets with a moon are widely separated from their host stars. From this investigation, we find that the moon feature generally appears as a very short-duration perturbation on the smooth asymmetric light curve of the lensing event induced by the wide-separation planet; thus it can be easily discriminated from the planet feature responsible for the overall asymmetric light curve. For typical Galactic lensing events with an Einstein radius of ˜2 au, the asymmetry of the light curves due to bound planets can be noticed up to ˜20 au. We also find that the perturbations of wide planetary systems become dominated by the moon as the projected star-planet separation increases, and eventually the light curves of events produced by such systems appear as the single lensing light curve of the planet itself with a very short-duration perturbation induced by the moon, which is a representative light curve of the event induced by a star and a planet, except on the Einstein timescale of the planet. We also study the effect of a finite source star on the moon feature in wide planetary lensing events. From this study, we find that when the lunar caustic is sufficiently separated from the planetary caustic, the lower limit on the ratio of the size of the lunar caustic to the source radius causing a ≥5% lunar deviation depends mostly on the projected planet-moon separation regardless of the moon/star mass ratio, and it decreases as the planet-moon separation becomes smaller or larger than the planetary Einstein radius.

  19. Planar micro-nano-coils for electrically driving liquid crystal microlenses based on wireless power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Hu, Wei; Luo, Jun; Lei, Yu; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the planar micro-nano-coils (PMNCs) with diverse planar spiral structures are designed for electrically driving and controlling liquid crystal microlenses (LCMs) based on wireless power transmission approaches. The PMNCs with different basic shapes are fabricated, including typical micro-triangle, micro-square, micro-pentagon, micro-hexagon, and micro-circle. According to the designed microstructures, using loop iterative approximation means based on Greenhouse algorithm, the inductance values of the microcoils can be calculated through combining self-inductance with mutual-inductance. In experiments, both the wet and dry etching technologies are adapted to obtain the desired PMNCs over aluminum-coated glass substrates. The etching technologies utilized by us are implemented on initial glass substrates spread by photoresist mask, which has been processed by common ultraviolet lithography. And the wet and dry etching technologies are different in the way of eroding aluminum film. Usually, the wet etching is a kind of the chemical reaction of alkali element in the developing liquid used, but the dry etching is a type of physical etching process such as the ion beam etching so as to fabricate microstructures with smaller size than that of wet etching. After the fabrication of the PMNCs, the electrical testing circuit for the inductance of the PMNCs is built to obtain their actual inductance values. By comparing inductances with theoretical prediction, the improved PMNCs are proposed for driving and controlling LCMs, which demonstrates enhanced light transmission efficiency of the PMNCs, and makes it more efficient to adjust LCMs developed by us.

  20. Properties of Microlensing Events by Wide-separation Planets with a Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of microlensing events caused by planetary systems where planets with a moon are widely separated from their host stars. From this investigation, we find that the moon feature generally appears as a very short-duration perturbation on the smooth asymmetric light curve of the lensing event induced by the wide-separation planet; thus it can be easily discriminated from the planet feature responsible for the overall asymmetric light curve. For typical Galactic lensing events with an Einstein radius of ˜2 au, the asymmetry of the light curves due to bound planets can be noticed up to ˜20 au. We also find that the perturbations of wide planetary systems become dominated by the moon as the projected star–planet separation increases, and eventually the light curves of events produced by such systems appear as the single lensing light curve of the planet itself with a very short-duration perturbation induced by the moon, which is a representative light curve of the event induced by a star and a planet, except on the Einstein timescale of the planet. We also study the effect of a finite source star on the moon feature in wide planetary lensing events. From this study, we find that when the lunar caustic is sufficiently separated from the planetary caustic, the lower limit on the ratio of the size of the lunar caustic to the source radius causing a ≥5% lunar deviation depends mostly on the projected planet–moon separation regardless of the moon/star mass ratio, and it decreases as the planet–moon separation becomes smaller or larger than the planetary Einstein radius.

  1. FREQUENCY OF SOLAR-LIKE SYSTEMS AND OF ICE AND GAS GIANTS BEYOND THE SNOW LINE FROM HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS IN 2005-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C. E-mail: gaudi@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-09-10

    We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the 'snow line', for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval -4.5 < log q < -2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We find (d{sup 2}N{sub pl})/(d log q d log s) = (0.36{+-}0.15) dex{sup -2} at the mean mass ratio q = 5 x 10{sup -4} with no discernible deviation from a flat (Oepik's law) distribution in log-projected separation s. The determination is based on a sample of six planets detected from intensive follow-up observations of high-magnification (A>200) microlensing events during 2005-2008. The sampled host stars have a typical mass M{sub host} {approx} 0.5 M {sub sun}, and detection is sensitive to planets over a range of planet-star-projected separations (s {sup -1}{sub max} R {sub E}, s{sub max} R {sub E}), where R {sub E} {approx} 3.5 AU(M{sub host}/M{sub sun}){sup 1/2} is the Einstein radius and s {sub max} {approx} (q/10{sup -4.3}){sup 1/3}. This corresponds to deprojected separations roughly three times the 'snow line'. We show that the observations of these events have the properties of a 'controlled experiment', which is what permits measurement of absolute planet frequency. High-magnification events are rare, but the survey-plus-follow-up high-magnification channel is very efficient: half of all high-mag events were successfully monitored and half of these yielded planet detections. The extremely high sensitivity of high-mag events leads to a policy of monitoring them as intensively as possible, independent of whether they show evidence of planets. This is what allows us to construct an unbiased sample. The planet frequency derived from microlensing is a factor 8 larger than the one derived from Doppler studies at factor {approx}25 smaller star-planet separations (i.e., periods 2-2000 days). However, this difference is basically consistent with the gradient derived from Doppler studies (when extrapolated well beyond the separations from which it is measured). This

  2. Probing the atmosphere of the bulge G5III star OGLE-2002-BUL-069 by analysis of microlensed Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, A.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Brillant, S.; Coutures, C.; Dominik, M.; Donatowicz, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kubas, D.; Albrow, M. D.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Horne, K.; Kane, S.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Vinter, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Watson, R.; Williams, A.; Fendt, C.; Hauschildt, P.; Heinmueller, J.; Marquette, J. B.; Thurl, C.

    2004-05-01

    We discuss high-resolution, time-resolved spectra of the caustic exit of the binary microlensing event OGLE 2002-BLG-069 obtained with UVES on the VLT. The source star is a G5III giant in the Galactic Bulge. During such events, the source star is highly magnified, and a strong differential magnification around the caustic resolves its surface. Using an appropriate model stellar atmosphere generated by the PHOENIX v2.6 code we obtain a model light curve for the caustic exit and compare it with a dense set of photometric observations obtained by the PLANET microlensing follow up network. We further compare predicted variations in the Hα equivalent width with those measured from our spectra. While the model and observations agree in the gross features, there are discrepancies suggesting shortcomings in the model, particularly for the Hα line core, where we have detected amplified emission from the stellar chromosphere after the source star's trailing limb exited the caustic. This achievement became possible by the provision of the very efficient OGLE-III Early Warning System, a network of small telescopes capable of nearly-continuous round-the-clock photometric monitoring, on-line data reduction, daily near-real-time modelling in order to predict caustic crossing parameters, and a fast and efficient response of a 8 m class telescope to a ``Target-of-Opportunity'' observation request. Based on observations made at ESO, 69.D-0261(A), 269.D-5042(A), 169.C-0510(A).

  3. The 1995 Pilot Campaign of PLANET: Searching for Microlensing Anomalies through Precise, Rapid, Round-the-Clock Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrow, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Birch, P.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Kane, S.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Naber, R. M.; Pel, J.-W.; Pollard, K.; Sackett, P. D.; Sahu, K. C.; Vreeswijk, P.; Williams, A.; Zwaan, M. A.; PLANET Collaboration

    1998-12-01

    PLANET (the Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) is a worldwide collaboration of astronomers whose primary goal is to monitor microlensing events densely and precisely in order to detect and study anomalies that contain information about Galactic lenses and sources that would otherwise be unobtainable. The results of PLANET's highly successful first year of operation are presented here. Details of the observational setup, observing procedures, and data-reduction procedures used to track the progress in real time at the three participating observing sites in 1995 are discussed. The ability to follow several events simultaneously with a median sampling interval of 1.6 hr and a photometric precision of better than 0.10 mag even at I = 19 has been clearly demonstrated. During PLANET's 1995 pilot campaign, ten microlensing events were monitored, resulting in the most precise and densely-sampled light curves to date; the binary nature of one of these, MACHO 95-BLG-12, was recognized by PLANET on the mountain. Another event, OGLE 95-BLG-04, displayed chromaticity that may betray the presence of blending with unresolved stars projected onto the same resolution element. Although lasting only about a month, the campaign may allow constraints to be placed on the number of planets with mass ratios to the parent star of 0.01 or greater.

  4. Automatic optical inspection system for 3D surface profile measurement of multi-microlenses using the optimal inspection path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Shir-Kuan

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an automatic optical inspection system is proposed for measuring the three-dimensional surface profile of multi-microlenses according to the optimal inspection path. The proposed system is applicable for full and sampling inspection of microlens arrays, and has the following contributions: (1) the optimal inspection path of sampling inspection is derived by a Genetic Algorithm considering the acceleration characteristic of the XY-table. (2) The incomplete microlens fringe is removed, and the center of each microlens can be automatically positioned. (3) The phase difference of each neighboring pixel is calculated through the concept of sign reversal in order to rebuild the surface profile. According to the experimental results, the lens sag of microlenses in different sizes can be correctly measured by the proposed system, and a relative error of 3.4% (max) can be achieved. Compared with other methods, the positioning time of the proposed method is shortened by 10% to 30%, validating the practicability of this system.

  5. Variability of GeV gamma-ray emission in QSO B0218+357 due to microlensing on intermediate size structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitarek, J.; Bednarek, W.

    2016-06-01

    Strong gravitational lensing leads to an occurrence of multiple images, with different magnifications, of a lensed source. Those magnifications can in turn be modified by microlensing on smaller mass scales within the lens. Recently, measurements of the changes in the magnification ratio of the individual images have been proposed as a powerful tool for estimation of the size and velocity of the emission region in the lensed source. The changes of the magnification ratios in blazars PKS1830-211 and QSO B0218+357, if interpreted as caused by a microlensing on individual stars, put strong constraints on those two variables. These constraints are difficult to accommodate with the current models of gamma-ray emission in blazars. In this paper we study if similar changes in the magnification ratio can be caused by microlensing on intermediate size structures in the lensing galaxy. We investigate in details three classes of possible lenses: globular clusters (GCs), open clusters (OCs) and giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We apply this scenario to the case of QSO B0218+357. Our numerical simulations show that changes in magnifications with similar time-scales can be obtained for relativistically moving emission regions with sizes up to 0.01 pc in the case of microlensing on the cores of GCs or clumps in GMCs. From the density of such structures in spiral galaxies we estimate however that lensing in GMCs would be more common.

  6. Preliminary design of reactor power systems for the manned space base.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckhann, G. G.; Coggi, J. V.; Diamond, S. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results of design integration studies of uranium-zirconium hydride (UZr-Hx) reactor power systems for the NASA space base study program are presented. The power conversion systems investigated include the Brayton cycle, the organic Rankine cycle, the SNAP-8 mercury Rankine cycle, and thermoelectric (PbTe). The proposed space base has a 10-year life and requires 100 kWe of power. Two 50-kWe power systems with a nominal replacement life of 5 years are utilized. Parametric design data such as life, weight, radiator area, reactor outlet-temperature, reactor thermal power, and power conversion system efficiency are presented and used for the design and integration of the system with the space base.

  7. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary Space Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of Space Base technologists.

  8. Retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining ground- and space-based elastic lidars.

    PubMed

    Feiyue, Mao; Wei, Gong; Yingying, Ma

    2012-02-15

    The aerosol lidar ratio is a key parameter for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties from elastic lidar, which changes largely for aerosols with different chemical and physical properties. We proposed a method for retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining simultaneous ground- and space-based elastic lidars. The method was tested by a simulated case and a real case at 532 nm wavelength. The results demonstrated that our method is robust and can obtain accurate lidar ratio and extinction coefficient profiles. Our method can be useful for determining the local and global lidar ratio and validating space-based lidar datasets.

  9. Statistics of Gravitational Microlensing Magnification. II. Three-dimensional Lens Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Babul, Arif; Kofman, Lev; Kaiser, Nick

    1997-11-01

    In the first paper of this series, we studied the theory of gravitational microlensing for a planar distribution of point masses. In this second paper, we extend the analysis to a three-dimensional lens distribution. First we study the lensing properties of three-dimensional lens distributions by considering in detail the critical curves, the caustics, the illumination patterns, and the magnification cross sections σ(A) of multiplane configurations with two, three, and four point masses. For N* point masses that are widely separated in Lagrangian space (i.e., in projection), we find that there are ~2N*-1 critical curves in total, but that only ~N* of these produce prominent caustic-induced features in σ(A) at moderate to high magnifications (A >~ 2). In the case of a random distribution of point masses at low optical depth, we show that the multiplane lens equation near a point mass can be reduced to the single-plane equation of a point mass perturbed by weak shear. This allows us to calculate the caustic-induced feature in the macroimage magnification distribution P(A) as a weighted sum of the semianalytic feature derived in Paper I for a planar lens distribution. The resulting semianalytic caustic-induced feature is similar to the feature in the planar case, but it does not have any simple scaling properties, and it is shifted to higher magnification. The semianalytic distribution is compared with the results of previous numerical simulations for optical depth τ ~ 0.1, and they are in better agreement than a similar comparison in the planar case. We explain this by estimating the fraction of caustics of individual lenses that merge with those of their neighbors. For τ = 0.1, the fraction is ~20%, much less than the ~55% for the planar case. In the three-dimensional case, a simple criterion for the low optical depth analysis to be valid is τ << 0.4, though the comparison with numerical simulations indicates that the semianalytic distribution is a reasonable

  10. X-Ray and Optical Microlensing in the Lensed Quasar PG 1115+080

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher. S.; Dai, Xinyu; Morgan, Nicholas D.; Falco, Emilio E.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed the microlensing of the X-ray and optical emission of the lensed quasar PG 1115+080. We find that the effective radius of the X-ray emission is 1.3+ 1.1-0.5 dex smaller than that of the optical emission. Viewed as a thin disk observed at inclination angle i, the optical accretion disk has a scale length, defined by the point where the disk temperature matches the rest-frame energy of the monitoring band (kT = hc/λrest with λrest = 0.3 μm), of log{(rs, opt/cm)[cos(i)/0.5]½} = 16.6 +/- 0.4. The X-ray emission region (1.4-21.8 keV in the rest frame) has an effective half-light radius of log (r1/2,X/cm) = 15.6+ 0.6-0.9. Given an estimated black hole mass of 1.2 × 109 M⊙, corresponding to a gravitational radius of log (rg/cm) = 14.3, the X-ray emission is generated near the inner edge of the disk, while the optical emission comes from scales slightly larger than those expected for an Eddington-limited thin disk. We find a weak trend supporting models with low stellar mass fractions near the lensed images, in mild contradiction to inferences from the stellar velocity dispersion and the time delays. Based on observations obtained with the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) 1.3 m, which is operated by the SMARTS Consortium; the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 meter telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the WIYN Observatory, which is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO); the 6.5 m Magellan Baade telescope, which is a collaboration between the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (OCIW), the University of Arizona, Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope for program HST-GO-9744 of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  11. A digital beamforming processor for the joint DoD/NASA space based radar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischman, Mark A.; Le, Charles; Rosen, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Based Radar (SBR) program includes a joint technology demonstration between NASA and the Air Force to design a low-earth orbiting, 2x50 m L-band radar system for both Earth science and intelligence related observations.

  12. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft are examined to determine system requirements for a 300 kWe space nuclear reactor power system. The spacecraft configuration and its orbit, launch vehicle, and propulsion are described. Mission profiles are addressed, and storage in assembly orbit is considered. Dynamics and attitude control and the problems of nuclear and thermal radiation are examined.

  13. Ground-Based and Space-Based Laser Beam Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozek, John M.

    1995-01-01

    A space power system based on laser beam power is sized to reduce mass, increase operational capabilities, and reduce complexity. The advantages of laser systems over solar-based systems are compared as a function of application. Power produced from the conversion of a laser beam that has been generated on the Earth's surface and beamed into cislunar space resulted in decreased round-trip time for Earth satellite electric propulsion tugs and a substantial landed mass savings for a lunar surface mission. The mass of a space-based laser system (generator in space and receiver near user) that beams down to an extraterrestrial airplane, orbiting spacecraft, surface outpost, or rover is calculated and compared to a solar system. In general, the advantage of low mass for these space-based laser systems is limited to high solar eclipse time missions at distances inside Jupiter. The power system mass is less in a continuously moving Mars rover or surface outpost using space-based laser technology than in a comparable solar-based power system, but only during dust storm conditions. Even at large distances for the Sun, the user-site portion of a space-based laser power system (e.g., the laser receiver component) is substantially less massive than a solar-based system with requisite on-board electrochemical energy storage.

  14. Quantifying Spatial and Seasonal Variability in Atmospheric Ammonia with In Situ and Space-Based Observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia plays an important role in many biogeochemical processes, yet atmospheric mixing ratios arc not well known. Recently, methods have been developed for retrieving NH3 from space-based observations, but they have not been compared to in situ measurements. We have ...

  15. Space-based infrared scanning sensor LOS determination and calibration using star observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Zhan; An, Wei; Deng, Xin-Pu; Yang, Jun-Gang

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology for removing sensor bias from a space based infrared (IR) system (SBIRS) through the use of stars detected in the background field of the sensor. Space based IR system uses the LOS (line of sight) of target for target location. LOS determination and calibration is the key precondition of accurate location and tracking of targets in Space based IR system and the LOS calibration of scanning sensor is one of the difficulties. The subsequent changes of sensor bias are not been taking into account in the conventional LOS determination and calibration process. Based on the analysis of the imaging process of scanning sensor, a theoretical model based on the estimation of bias angles using star observation is proposed. By establishing the process model of the bias angles and the observation model of stars, using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the bias angles, and then calibrating the sensor LOS. Time domain simulations results indicate that the proposed method has a high precision and smooth performance for sensor LOS determination and calibration. The timeliness and precision of target tracking process in the space based infrared (IR) tracking system could be met with the proposed algorithm.

  16. The Astrometric Imaging Telescope - A space-based observatory for extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the objectives, techniques, instrumentation, and mission of the planned Astrometric Imaging Telescope. This space-based observatory is designed to detect and characterize extra-solar planetary systems. Results will contribute to the understanding of the astrophysics of stellar and planetary formation and provide an impetus for the study of exobiology.

  17. Ground-based and space-based laser beam power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    A space power system based on laser beam power is sized to reduce mass, increase operational capabilities, and reduce complexity. The advantages of laser systems over solar-based systems are compared as a function of application. Power produced from the conversion of a laser beam that has been generated on the Earth`s surface and beamed into cislunar space resulted in decreased round-trip time for Earth satellite electric propulsion tugs and a substantial landed mass savings for a lunar surface mission. The mass of a space-based laser system (generator in space and receiver near user) that beams down to an extraterrestrial airplane, orbiting spacecraft, surface outpost, or rover is calculated and compared to a solar system. In general, the advantage of low mass for these space-based laser systems is limited to high solar eclipse time missions at distances inside Jupiter. The power system mass is less in a continuously moving Mars rover or surface outpost using space-based laser technology than in a comparable solar-based power system, but only during dust storm conditions. Even at large distances from the Sun, the user-site portion of a space-based laser power system (e.g., the laser receiver component) is substantially less massive than a solar-based system with requisite on-board electrochemical energy storage.

  18. 78 FR 23598 - National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND...; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY... President's 2004 U.S. Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Policy, the National...

  19. 76 FR 30202 - National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    .... ADDRESSES: Sheraton Crystal City Hotel, 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Crystal V and VI, Arlington, Virginia... following topics: Update on U.S. Space-Based PNT Policy and Global Positioning System (GPS) modernization. Explore opportunities for enhancing the interoperability of GPS with other emerging international...

  20. Antenna Autocalibration and Metrology Approach for the AFR/JPL Space-Based Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Michel, Thierry; Freedman, Adam; Cable, Vaughn

    2003-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are collaborating in the technology development for a space based radar (SBR) system that would feature a large aperture lightweight antenna for a joint mission later in this decade.

  1. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Sumi, T.; Gerhels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Grady, K; Jackson, C.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Rioux, N.

    2011-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons (NWNH) in Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey prioritized the community consensus for ground-based and space-based observatories. Recognizing that many of the community s key questions could be answered with a wide-field infrared survey telescope in space, and that the decade would be one of budget austerity, WFIRST was top ranked in the large space mission category. In addition to the powerful new science that could be accomplished with a wide-field infrared telescope, the WFIRST mission was determined to be both technologically ready and only a small fraction of the cost of previous flagship missions, such as HST or JWST. In response to the top ranking by the community, NASA formed the WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) and Project Office. The SDT was charged with fleshing out the NWNH scientific requirements to a greater level of detail. NWNH evaluated the risk and cost of the JDEM-Omega mission design, as submitted by NASA, and stated that it should serve as the basis for the WFIRST mission. The SDT and Project Office were charged with developing a mission optimized for achieving the science goals laid out by the NWNH re-port. The SDT and Project Office opted to use the JDEM-Omega hardware configuration as an initial start-ing point for the hardware implementation. JDEM-Omega and WFIRST both have an infrared imager with a filter wheel, as well as counter-dispersed moderate resolution spectrometers. The primary advantage of space observations is being above the Earth's atmosphere, which absorbs, scatters, warps and emits light. Observing from above the atmosphere enables WFIRST to obtain precision infrared measurements of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing, infrared light-curves of supernovae and exoplanet microlensing events with low systematic errors, and infrared measurements of the H hydrogen line to be cleanly detected in the 1

  2. Space-based and object-based visual attention: shared and specific neural domains.

    PubMed

    Fink, G R; Dolan, R J; Halligan, P W; Marshall, J C; Frith, C D

    1997-11-01

    Visual attention can be primarily allocated to either where an object is in space (with little emphasis on the structure of the object itself) or to the structure of the object (with little emphasis on where in space the object is located). Using PET measures of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to index neural activity, we investigated the shared and specific functional anatomy underlying both of these types of visual attention in a controlled non-cueing non-blocked paradigm that involved identical stimuli across the conditions of interest. The interaction of eye movements with these attentional systems was studied by introducing fixation or free vision as an additional factor. Relative to the control condition, object-based and space-based attention showed significant activations of the left and right medial superior parietal cortex and the left lateral inferior parietal cortex, the left prefrontal cortex and the cerebellar vermis. Significant differential activations were observed during object-based attention in the left striate and prestriate cortex. Space-based attention activated the right prefrontal cortex and the right inferior temporal-occipital cortex. Differential neural activity due to free vision or fixation was observed in occipital areas only. Significant interactions of free vision/fixation on activations due to object-based and space-based attention were observed in the right medial superior parietal cortex and left lateral inferior parietal cortex, respectively. The study provides direct evidence for the importance of the parietal cortex in the control of object-based and space-based visual attention. The results show that object-based and space-based attention share common neural mechanisms in the parietal lobes, in addition to task specific mechanisms in early visual processing areas of temporal and occipital cortices. PMID:9397018

  3. Localization of nonlinear damage using state-space-based predictions under stochastic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael; Huang, Zongming

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a study on localizing damage under stochastic excitation by state-space-based methods, where the damaged response contains some nonlinearity. Two state-space-based modeling algorithms, namely auto- and cross-predictions, are employed in this paper, and the greatest prediction error will be achieved at the sensor pair closest to the actual damage, in terms of localization. To quantify the distinction of prediction error distributions obtained at different sensor locations, the Bhattacharyya distance is adopted as the quantification metric. There are two lab-scale test-beds adopted as validation platforms, including a two-story plane steel frame with bolt loosening damage and a three-story benchmark aluminum frame with a simulated tunable crack. Band-limited Gaussian noise is applied through an electrodynamic shaker to the systems. Testing results indicate that the damage detection capability of the state-space-based method depends on the nonlinearity-induced high frequency responses. Since those high frequency components attenuate quickly in time and space, the results show great capability for damage localization, i.e., the highest deviation of Bhattacharyya distance is coincident with the sensors close to the physical damage location. This work extends the state-space-based damage detection method for localizing damage to a stochastically excited scenario, which provides the advantage of compatibility with ambient excitations. Moreover, results from both experiments indicate that the state-space-based method is only sensitive to nonlinearity-induced damage, thus it can be utilized in parallel with linear classifiers or normalization strategies to insulate the operational and environmental variability, which often affects the system response in a linear fashion.

  4. Infrared Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2009-02-01

    A retrospective is given on infrared sky surveys from Thomas Edison’s proposal in the late 1870s to IRAS, the first sensitive mid- to far-infrared all-sky survey, and the mid-1990s experiments that filled in the IRAS deficiencies. The emerging technology for space-based surveys is highlighted, as is the prominent role the US Defense Department, particularly the Air Force, played in developing and applying detector and cryogenic sensor advances to early mid-infrared probe-rocket and satellite-based surveys. This technology was transitioned to the infrared astronomical community in relatively short order and was essential to the success of IRAS, COBE and ISO. Mention is made of several of the little known early observational programs that were superseded by more successful efforts.

  5. The Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets: Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, Radosław; Zhu, Wei; Christie, Grant W.; Udalski, Andrzej; Gould, Andrew; Bachelet, Etienne; Skottfelt, Jesper; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Group; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; Spitzer Team; Beatty, T. G.; Eastman, J. D.; Drummond, J.; Friedmann, M.; Henderson, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McCrady, N.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Porritt, I.; Relles, H. M.; Sliski, D. H.; Tan, T.-G.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Wright, J. T.; μFUN Group; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Wambsganss, J.; Schmidt, R.; Cassan, A.; Ranc, C.; Mao, S.; project, RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Rasmussen, R. T.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Verma, P.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp Group

    2016-05-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ({{\\boldsymbol{μ }}}{cl}(N,E)=(+0.36+/- 0.10,+1.42+/- 0.10) {{mas}} {{{yr}}}-1) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE) photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between the Earth and Spitzer.

  6. Lens sag and diameter measurement of large-size microlenses using sub-pixel algorithm and optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shir-Kuan; Yang, Shih-Wei

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, an automatic optical inspection system is designed specifically to measure the diameter and lens sag of large-size microlenses: 1. The proposed algorithm of measuring lens diameter locates the lens center through the Euclidean distance array, and determines the lens edge along an initiated ray using linear interpolation with sub-pixel accuracy. 2. The lens sag is calculated from a single fringe pattern of large-size microlens, in combination with the measured lens diameter. 3. According to the experiment results, the proposed system has advantages of high applicability, rapid processing speed, and good accuracy with the RMS error≤1% of measuring a large-size microlens, but without the requirement of prior training. The system architecture of non-contact measurement would not cause scratches on the lens surface and is inexpensive, thus, which is particularly suitable for the in-line inspection of industry field.

  7. Statistics of Microlensing Caustic Crossings in Q 2237+0305: Peculiar Velocity of the Lens Galaxy and Accretion Disk Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O.

    2015-01-01

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, < n > \\propto {veff / \\sqrt{< m > }}, equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v eff using the ~12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v eff, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining veff ≳ 240\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1 at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of rs ≳ 1.4 \\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } light-days for the radius of the source (rs = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of veff≃ (493+/- 246)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1 for the effective transverse velocity and of rs ≃ (2.7+/- 1.3)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is vt ≃ (429+/- 246)\\sqrt{< m > /0.17 M_⊙ } km s-1.

  8. Microlensing events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for mass determination and possible planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: md35@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-02-20

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ∼0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass.

  9. Possible Solution of the Long-standing Discrepancy in the Microlensing Optical Depth toward the Galactic Bulge by Correcting the Stellar Number Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, T.; Penny, M. T.

    2016-08-01

    We find that significant incompleteness in stellar number counts results in a significant overestimate of the microlensing optical depth τ and event rate per star per year Γ toward the Galactic bulge from the first two years of the MOA-II survey. We find that the completeness in red clump giant (RCG) counts {f}{{RC}} decreases proportional to the galactic latitude b, as {f}{{RC}}=(0.63+/- 0.11)-(0.052+/- 0.028)× b, ranging between 1 and 0.7 at b=-6^\\circ ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 5. The previous measurements using all sources by difference image analysis (DIA) by MACHO and MOA-I suffer the same bias. On the other hand, the measurements using an RCG sample by OGLE-II, MACHO, and EROS were free from this bias because they selected only the events associated with the resolved stars. Thus, the incompleteness both in the number of events and stellar number count cancel out. We estimate τ and Γ by correcting this incompleteness. In the central fields with | l| \\lt 5^\\circ , we find {{Γ }}=[18.74+/- 0.91]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.53+/- 0.05)(3-| b| )] star‑1 yr‑1 and {τ }200=[1.84+/- 0.14]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.44+/- 0.07)(3-| b| )] for the 427 events with {t}{{E}}≤slant 200 days using all sources brighter than {I}s≤slant 20 mag. Our revised all-source τ measurements are about 2σ smaller than the other all-source measurements and are consistent with the RCG measurements within 1σ. We conclude that the long-standing problem on discrepancy between the high τ with all-source samples by DIA and low τ with RCG samples can probably be explained by the incompleteness of the stellar number count. A model fit to these measurements predicts {{Γ }}=4.60+/- 0.25× {10}-5 star‑1 yr‑1 at | b| ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 and -2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 25\\lt l\\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 75 for sources with I\\lt 20, where the future space mission, Wide Field Infrared Space Telescope, will observe.

  10. Possible Solution of the Long-standing Discrepancy in the Microlensing Optical Depth toward the Galactic Bulge by Correcting the Stellar Number Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, T.; Penny, M. T.

    2016-08-01

    We find that significant incompleteness in stellar number counts results in a significant overestimate of the microlensing optical depth τ and event rate per star per year Γ toward the Galactic bulge from the first two years of the MOA-II survey. We find that the completeness in red clump giant (RCG) counts {f}{{RC}} decreases proportional to the galactic latitude b, as {f}{{RC}}=(0.63+/- 0.11)-(0.052+/- 0.028)× b, ranging between 1 and 0.7 at b=-6^\\circ ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 5. The previous measurements using all sources by difference image analysis (DIA) by MACHO and MOA-I suffer the same bias. On the other hand, the measurements using an RCG sample by OGLE-II, MACHO, and EROS were free from this bias because they selected only the events associated with the resolved stars. Thus, the incompleteness both in the number of events and stellar number count cancel out. We estimate τ and Γ by correcting this incompleteness. In the central fields with | l| \\lt 5^\\circ , we find {{Γ }}=[18.74+/- 0.91]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.53+/- 0.05)(3-| b| )] star-1 yr-1 and {τ }200=[1.84+/- 0.14]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.44+/- 0.07)(3-| b| )] for the 427 events with {t}{{E}}≤slant 200 days using all sources brighter than {I}s≤slant 20 mag. Our revised all-source τ measurements are about 2σ smaller than the other all-source measurements and are consistent with the RCG measurements within 1σ. We conclude that the long-standing problem on discrepancy between the high τ with all-source samples by DIA and low τ with RCG samples can probably be explained by the incompleteness of the stellar number count. A model fit to these measurements predicts {{Γ }}=4.60+/- 0.25× {10}-5 star-1 yr-1 at | b| ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 and -2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 25\\lt l\\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 75 for sources with I\\lt 20, where the future space mission, Wide Field Infrared Space Telescope, will observe.

  11. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 3: Economic analysis of space-based solar power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of economic and programmatic issues are discussed concerning the development and deployment of a fleet of space-based solar power satellites (SSPS). The costs, uncertainties and risks associated with the current photovoltaic SSPS configuration, and with issues affecting the development of an economically viable SSPS development program are analyzed. The desirability of a low earth orbit (LEO) demonstration satellite and a geosynchronous (GEO) pilot satellite is examined and critical technology areas are identified. In addition, a preliminary examination of utility interface issues is reported. The main focus of the effort reported is the development of SSPS unit production, and operation and maintenance cost models suitable for incorporation into a risk assessment (Monte Carlo) model (RAM). It is shown that the key technology area deals with the productivity of man in space, not, as might be expected, with some hardware component technology.

  12. The space exploration initiative. Operational efficiency panel space-basing technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Luis R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) space basing technology requirements sources; (2) orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) processing heritage; (3) ground processing progression to space processing; (4) technology requirements for space based OTV servicing and maintenance; (5) design and development schedule for OTV's and OTV accommodations/ support hardware; (6) cryogenic technology test program development; (7) cryogenic propellant transfer, storage, and reliquefaction management summary; (8) propellant transfer technology analysis and ground testing; (8) OTV propellant storage depot development critical scaling relationships; (9) flight experiment options; (10) OTV maintenance; (11) automated fault detection/ isolation and system checkout summary; (12) engine replacement; (13) alternative docking operation; (14) OTV/payload integration; and (15) technology criticality and capability assessment. This document is presented in viewgraph form.

  13. The Platform Design of Space-based Optical Observations of Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. R.; Xiong, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    The basic design method of the platform for the space-based optical observations of space debris is introduced. The observation schemes of GEO (geosynchronous equatorial orbit) and LEO (low Earth orbit) debris are given respectively, including orbital parameters of platforms and pointing of telescopes, etc. Debris studied here is all from foreign catalog. According to the real orbit of space debris, the observational results of different schemes are simulated. By studying single platform, the optimal observing altitude for GEO debris and the optimal telescope's deflection angles at different altitudes for LEO debris are given. According to these, multi-platforms observation networks are designed. By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each scheme, it can provide reference for the application of space-based optical debris observation.

  14. Space-based application of the CAN laser to LIDAR and orbital debris remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, M. N.; Jukna, V.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Dicaire, I.; Soulard, R.; Summerer, L.; Couairon, A.; Mourou, G.

    2015-10-01

    Development of pulsed lasers for space-based science missions entail many additional challenges compared to terrestrial experiments. For systems requiring short pulses ≪1 ns with energies >100 mJ and fast repetition rates >10 kHz there are currently few if no laser architectures capable of operating with high electrical efficiency >20% and have good system stability. The emergence of a mulit-channel fiber-based Coherent-Amplifying-Network or CAN laser potentially enables such capability for space based missions. Here in this article we present an analysis of two such missions scaling up in pulse energy from ≈100 mJ for a supercontinuum LIDAR application utilising atmospheric filamentation to the higher energy demands needed for space debris remediation requiring ≈10 J pulses. This scalability of the CAN laser provides pathways for development of the core science and technology where many new novel space applications can be made possible.

  15. Measurements of strain at plate boundaries using space based geodetic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robaudo, Stefano; Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the space based geodetic techniques of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and VLBI to study strain along subduction and transform plate boundaries and have interpreted the results using a simple elastic dislocation model. Six stations located behind island arcs were analyzed as representative of subduction zones while 13 sites located on either side of the San Andreas fault were used for the transcurrent zones. The length deformation scale was then calculated for both tectonic margins by fitting the relative strain to an exponentially decreasing function of distance from the plate boundary. Results show that space-based data for the transcurrent boundary along the San Andreas fault help to define better the deformation length scale in the area while fitting nicely the elastic half-space earth model. For subduction type bonndaries the analysis indicates that there is no single scale length which uniquely describes the deformation. This is mainly due to the difference in subduction characteristics for the different areas.

  16. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L.; Baker, John G.

    2013-09-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ˜ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  17. Large space-based systems for dealing with global environment change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1992-01-01

    Increased concern over the effects of global climate change and depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in support for the Global Change Research Program and the Mission to Planet Earth. Research to understand Earth system processes is critical, but it falls short of providing ways of mitigating the effects of change. Geoengineering options and alternatives to interactively manage change need to be developed. Space-based concepts for dealing with changes to the environment should be considered in addition to Earth-based actions. 'Mission for Planet Earth' describes those space-based geoengineering solutions that may combine with an international global change program to stabilize the Global environment. Large space systems that may be needed for this response challenge guidance and control engineering and technology. Definition, analysis, demonstration, and preparation of geoengineering technology will provide a basis for policy response if global change consequences are severe.

  18. Ship Detection Using High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Space-Based AIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannevik, Tonje Nanette; Skauen, Andreas N.; Olsen, R. B.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a trial carried out in the Malangen area close to Tromsø city in the north of Norway in September 2010. High resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from RADARSAT-2 were used to analyse how SAR images and cooperative reporting can be combined. Data from the Automatic Identification System, both land-based and space-based, have been used to identify detected vessels in the SAR images. The paper presents results of ship detection in high resolution RADARSAT-2 Standard Quad-Pol images, and how these results together with land-based and space-based AIS can be used. Some examples of tracking of vessels are also shown.

  19. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  20. Space Based Observations of Coronal Cavities in Conjunction with the Total Solar Eclipse of July 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, T. A.; Berger, T. E.; Druckmuller, M.; Dietzel, M.; Gibson, S. E.; Habbal, S. R.; Morgan, H.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In conjunction with the total solar eclipse on July 11, 2010 we coordinated a campaign between ground and space based observations. Our specific goal was to augment the ground based measurement of corona) prominence cavity temperatures made using iron lines in the IR (Habbal et al. 2010 ApJ 719 1362) with measurements performed by space based instruments. Included in the campaign were Hinode/EIS, XRT and SOT, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA, SOHO/CDS and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI, in addition to the ground based IR measurements. We plan to use a combination of line ratio and forward modeling techniques to investigate the density and temperature structure of the cavities at that time.

  1. Enabling technologies for transition to utilization of space-based resources and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, S. R.; Litty, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    This article explores a potential scenario for the further development of space infrastructure resources and operations management. It is a scenario that transitions from the current ground-based system to an architecture that is predominantly space-based by exploiting key mission systems in an operational support role. If this view is accurate, an examination of the range of potential infrastructure elements and how they might interact in a maximally productive space-based operations complex is needed, innovative technologies beyond the current Shuttle and Space Station legacy need to be identified, and research programs pursued. Development of technologies within the areas of telerobotics, machine autonomy, human autonomy, in-space manufacturing and construction, propulsion and energy is discussed.

  2. Unmanned, space-based, reusable orbital transfer vehicle, DARVES. Volume 1: Trade analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The design of an unmanned, space-based, reusable Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is presented. This OTV will be utilized for the delivery and retrieval of satellites from geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) in conjunction with a space station assumed to be in existence in low Earth orbit (LEO). The trade analysis used to determine the vehicle design is presented, and from this study a vehicle definition is given.

  3. SPRITE - A computer code for the optimization of space based heat pipe radiator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buksa, John J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated analytical tool has been developed for use in designing optimized space-based heat pipe radiator systems. This code, SPRITE-1, incorporates the thermal, structural, and reliability aspects of the radiator into a single framework from which a physically consistent design can be obtained. A parametric study of the integral heat pipe panel radiator was performed using SPRITE-1, and a preliminary minimum mass design was obtained. The radiator design is summarized, and the mass minimization method and results are presented.

  4. Progress in DND's space-based radar R&D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatock, Brian C.

    DND's Space-based Radar (SBR) Project is reaching the midpoint of its planned life. A series of technology definition contracts has been completed, involving many of Canada's premier space companies. A second series of technology development contracts has begun. This paper highlights the technical results of the contracts to date. The topics reviewed include antenna feeds, electric power systems, large space structures, signal processing, MMIC devices, communications, and simulation. An update on SBR Project Plans is provided.

  5. A preliminary structural analysis of space-base living quarters modules to verify a weight-estimating technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, D. S.; Schneider, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    The determination of a base line (minimum weight) design for the primary structure of the living quarters modules in an earth-orbiting space base was investigated. Although the design is preliminary in nature, the supporting analysis is sufficiently thorough to provide a reasonably accurate weight estimate of the major components that are considered to comprise the structural weight of the space base.

  6. Balloon-borne air traffic management (ATM) as a precursor to space-based ATM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Yuval; Rieber, Richard; Nordheim, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The International Space University—Balloon Air traffic control Technology Experiment (I-BATE ) has flown on board two stratospheric balloons and has tracked nearby aircraft by receiving their Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) transmissions. Air traffic worldwide is facing increasing congestion. It is predicted that daily European flight volumes will more than double by 2030 compared to 2009 volumes. ADS-B is an air traffic management system being used to mitigate air traffic congestion. Each aircraft is equipped with both a GPS receiver and an ADS-B transponder. The transponder transmits an equipped aircraft's unique identifier, position, heading, and velocity once per second. The ADS-B transmissions can then be received by ground stations for use in traditional air traffic management. Airspace not monitored by these ground stations or other traditional means remains uncontrolled and poorly monitored. A constellation of space-based ADS-B receivers could close these gaps and provide global air traffic monitoring. By flying an ADS-B receiver on a stratospheric balloon, I-BATE has served as a precursor to a constellation of ADS-B-equipped Earth-orbiting satellites. From the ˜30 km balloon altitude, I-BATE tracked aircraft ranging up to 850 km. The experiment has served as a proof of concept for space-based air traffic management and supports a technology readiness level 6 of space-based ADS-B reception. I-BATE: International Space University—Balloon Air traffic control Technology Experiment.

  7. Cyber Security Threats to Safety-Critical, Space-Based Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Atencia Yepez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based systems play an important role within national critical infrastructures. They are being integrated into advanced air-traffic management applications, rail signalling systems, energy distribution software etc. Unfortunately, the end users of communications, location sensing and timing applications often fail to understand that these infrastructures are vulnerable to a wide range of security threats. The following pages focus on concerns associated with potential cyber-attacks. These are important because future attacks may invalidate many of the safety assumptions that support the provision of critical space-based services. These safety assumptions are based on standard forms of hazard analysis that ignore cyber-security considerations This is a significant limitation when, for instance, security attacks can simultaneously exploit multiple vulnerabilities in a manner that would never occur without a deliberate enemy seeking to damage space based systems and ground infrastructures. We address this concern through the development of a combined safety and security risk assessment methodology. The aim is to identify attack scenarios that justify the allocation of additional design resources so that safety barriers can be strengthened to increase our resilience against security threats.

  8. FURTHER EVIDENCE THAT QUASAR X-RAY EMITTING REGIONS ARE COMPACT: X-RAY AND OPTICAL MICROLENSING IN THE LENSED QUASAR Q J0158-4325

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Christopher W.; Hainline, Laura J.; Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu; Tewes, Malte; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Kozlowski, Szymon; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Chartas, G.

    2012-09-01

    We present four new seasons of optical monitoring data and six epochs of X-ray photometry for the doubly imaged lensed quasar Q J0158-4325. The high-amplitude, short-period microlensing variability for which this system is known has historically precluded a time delay measurement by conventional methods. We attempt to circumvent this limitation by the application of a Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique, but we are only able to prove that the delay must have the expected sign (image A leads image B). Despite our failure to robustly measure the time delay, we successfully model the microlensing at optical and X-ray wavelengths to find a half-light radius for soft X-ray emission log (r{sub 1/2,X,soft}/cm) = 14.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.5}, an upper limit on the half-light radius for hard X-ray emission log (r{sub 1/2,X,hard}/cm) {<=} 14.6, and a refined estimate of the inclination-corrected scale radius of the optical R-band (rest frame 3100 A) continuum emission region of log (r{sub s} /cm) = 15.6 {+-} 0.3.

  9. The Role Played by Space-based Probes in our Understanding of the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchetto, Ferdinando Duccio

    Over the last fifteen years a growing fleet of modern space-based astronomical telescopes has changed drastically our view of the universe. Most of these accomplishments build upon the work of ground-based astronomers over many decades, or even centuries. The combination of telescopes observing the universe at many different wavelengths has converted many prior hypotheses, for which supporting empirical data were scant, ambiguous and painfully difficult to obtain, into clearly and decisively demonstrated truth. But space observatories have gone well beyond that. In particular the Hubble Space Telescope with its combination of sharp images and deep dynamic range, has provided a detailed view of the unimagined complexity and diversity of the universe, as well as its startling beauty. It has yielded numerous surprises and raised new fundamental questions on the basic structure and laws that govern the universe. To answer these questions will require the efforts of ground-based and new space-based observatories working in combined programs over many years. In my talk I will illustrate some of the key discoveries that these space-based observatories have made such as: the deep imaging the distant universe; the calibration of the distance scale and the determination of the age of the universe; the discovery of the acceleration of the expansion rate of the universe, which requires a "dark energy" or new physics to explain it; the detection and measurement of supermassive black holes and the solution to the long standing problem of the nature of Quasars; the solution to the problem of whether Gamma Ray sources originated in our galaxy or at cosmological distances; the renewed interest in the problem of the birth of Stars and the formation of Planetary Systems; the death of Stars and the formation of supernovae, black holes and neutron stars and last but not least the exciting studies of the planets and satellites in our own dynamic solar system

  10. Space-based Scintillation Nowcasting with the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, K.; Starks, M.; Beach, T.; Basu, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory's Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) fuses ground- and space-based data in a near real-time physics-based model aimed at forecasting and nowcasting equatorial scintillations and their impacts on satellite communications and navigation. A key component of the system is the C/NOFS satellite that was launched into a low-inclination (13°) elliptical orbit (400 km x 850 km) in April 2008. The satellite contains six sensors to measure space environment parameters including electron density and temperature, ion density and drift, electric and magnetic fields and neutral wind, as well as a tri-band radio beacon transmitting at 150 MHz, 400 MHz and 1067 MHz. Scintillation nowcasts are derived from measuring the one-dimensional in situ electron density fluctuations and subsequently modeling the propagation environment for satellite-to-ground radio links. The modeling process requires a number of simplifying assumptions regarding the three-dimensional structure of the ionosphere and the results are readily validated by comparisons with ground-based measurements of the satellite's tri-band beacon signals. In mid-September 2008 a campaign to perform detailed analyses of space-based scintillation nowcasts with numerous ground observations was conducted in the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands. To maximize the collection of ground-truth data, the ALTAIR radar was employed to obtain detailed information on the spatial structure of the ionosphere during the campaign and to aid the improvement of space-based nowcasting algorithms. A comparison of these results will be presented; it appears that detailed information on the electron density structure is a limiting factor in modeling the scintillation environment from in situ observations.

  11. System and technology considerations for space-based air traffic surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisnys, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the system trade-offs examined in a recent study of space-based air traffic surveillance. Three system options, each satisfying a set of different constraints, were considered. The main difference in the technology needed to implement the three systems was determined to be the size of the spacecraft antenna aperture. It was found that essentially equivalent position location accuracy could be achieved with apertures from 50 meters down to less than a meter in diameter, depending on the choice of signal structure and on the desired user update rate.

  12. Recent New Ideas and Directions for Space-Based Nulling Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, Eugene (Gene)

    2004-01-01

    This document is composed of two viewgraph presentations. The first is entitled "Recent New Ideas and Directions for Space-Based Nulling Interferometry." It reviews our understanding of interferometry compared to a year or so ago: (1) Simpler options identified, (2) A degree of flexibility is possible, allowing switching (or degradation) between some options, (3) Not necessary to define every component to the exclusion of all other possibilities and (4) MIR fibers are becoming a reality. The second, entitled "The Fiber Nuller," reviews the idea of Combining beams in a fiber instead of at a beamsplitter.

  13. Working fluid selection for space-based two-phase heat transport systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclinden, Mark O.

    1988-01-01

    The working fluid for externally-mounted, space-based two-phase heat transport systems is considered. A sequence of screening criteria involving freezing and critical point temperatures and latent heat of vaporization and vapor density are applied to a data base of 860 fluids. The thermal performance of the 52 fluids which pass this preliminary screening are then ranked according to their impact on the weight of a reference system. Upon considering other nonthermal criteria (flammability, toxicity, and chemical stability) a final set of 10 preferred fluids is obtained. The effects of variations in system parameters is investigated for these 10 fluids by means of a factorial design.

  14. Progress and Prospects toward a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been much activity in the effort to produce a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. These efforts have enriched the understanding of the scientific capabilities of such an observatory leading to broad recognition of its value as an astronomical instrument. At the same time, rapidly developing events in the US and Europe have lead to a more complicated outlook than the baseline Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project plan of a few years ago. I will discuss recent progress and developments resulting from the European eLISA study and the SGO study in the US and prospects looking forward.

  15. Progress in DND's space-based radar R/D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatock, Brian C.

    The Department of National Defense (Canada) has undertaken a program to study technology requirements of space based radar (SBR) because of its potential to provide wide area surveillance of the airspace over North America and its approaches. This project has reached the midpoint of its planned life; a series of technology definition contracts has been completed; and a series of technology development contracts has begun. This paper highlights the technical results of the contracts to date. The topics reviewed include antenna feeds, electric power systems, modelling and testing of large space structures, signal processing and target detection and tracking, monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) devices, communications links, and simulation of alternative SBR configurations.

  16. An improved space-based algorithm for recognizing vehicle models from the side view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ding, Youdong; Zhang, Li; Li, Rong; Zhu, Jiang; Xie, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle model matching problem from the side view is a problem meets the practical needs of actual users, but less focus by researchers. We propose a improved feature space-based algorithm for this problem. The algorithm combines the various advantages of some classic algorithms, and effectively combining global and local feature, eliminate data redundancy and improve data divisibility. And finally complete the classification by quick and efficient KNN. The real scene test results show that the proposed method is robust, accurate, insensitive to external factors, adaptable to large angle deviations, and can be applied to a formal application.

  17. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; McNamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a space-based gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return.

  18. Orbits and Pointing Strategies for Space-Based Telescopes into a European Space Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Ramos-Lerate, Mercedes

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the inclusion of optical images acquired from orbiting telescopes into an autonomous European space surveillance system via the Advance Space Surveillance System Simulator (AS4). Special interest on space-based observation of GEO objects exists since it avoids the weather dependence and longitudinal restrictions of ground-based observations of those objects. Furthermore, space-based observations allow the detection of small objects that are not detected from ground-based sensors.In order to analyze the impact of space-based telescopes images, several aspects have to be studied. The first consideration is the selection of the appropriate orbits to locate the telescopes. A description of the most suitable orbits and strategies for the observation of space debris population will be provided.Once an appropriated orbit has been selected, the next important consideration is the analysis of an optimized pointing strategy and its associated requirements for feasibility. Several pointing strategies will be exposed by analyzing, among other factors, the impact of luminosity conditions in the most populated regions to be observed. Numerical results are presented in the form of statistics, which reflect the compromise between the density of detected objects, and other important parameters for orbit determination and cataloguing purposes as re-acquisition times or measurement track duration.Finally, overall analyses of possible space-based constellations are presented. Such constellations are aimed to solve the main drawbacks in considering only one satellite at the selected orbit. This is for example the case of revisit times when considering a sub GEO orbiting telescope which can be solve by re-distributing several sensors in the orbit. It will also allow carrying on more complex pointing strategies by the definition of several sensors located at same orbit pointed at two different regions.The AS4 was developed by DEIMOS Space ([1], [2] and also [5]). The

  19. Ground and space based optical analysis of materials degradation in low-Earth-orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, John A.; Synowicki, Ron; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Peterkin, Jane; Machlab, Hassanayn; De, Bhola N.; Johs, Blaine

    1991-01-01

    There is strong interest in being able to accurately and sensitively monitor materials degradation in both ground-based and space-based environments. Two optical techniques for sensitive degradation monitoring are reviewed: spectroscopic ellipsometry and photothermal spectroscopy. These techniques complement each other in that ellipsometry is sensitive to atomically thin surface and subsurface changes, and photothermal spectroscopy is sensitive to local defects, pin-holes, subsurface defects, and delamination. Progress in applying these spectroscopies (both ex situ and in situ) to atomic oxygen degradation of space materials is reviewed.

  20. Innovative Approaches to Space-Based Manufacturing and Rapid Prototyping of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to deploy large habitable structures, construct, and service exploration vehicles in low earth orbit will be an enabling capability for continued human exploration of the solar system. It is evident that advanced manufacturing methods to fabricate replacement parts and re-utilize launch vehicle structural mass by converting it to different uses will be necessary to minimize costs and allow flexibility to remote crews engaged in space travel. Recent conceptual developments and the combination of inter-related approaches to low-cost manufacturing of composite materials and structures are described in context leading to the possibility of on-orbit and space-based manufacturing.

  1. Solid-State, High Energy 2-Micron Laser Development for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) remote sensing enjoys the advantages of excellent vertical and horizontal resolution; pointing capability; a signal source independent from natural light; and control and knowledge of transmitted wavelength, pulse shape, and polarization and received polarization. Lidar in space is an emerging technology now being developing to fit applications where passive sensors cannot meet current measurement requirements. Technical requirements for space lidar are more demanding than for ground-based or airborne systems. Perhaps the most distinguishing characteristics of space lidars are the environmental requirements. Space lidar systems must be specially designed to survive the mechanical vibration loads of launch and operate in the vacuum of space where exposure to ionizing radiation limits the electronic components available. Finally, space lidars must be designed to be highly reliable because they must operate without the need for repair or adjustment. Lifetime requirements tend to be important drivers of the overall system design. The maturity of the required technologies is a key to the development of any space lidar system. NASA entered a new era in the 1990 s with the approval of several space-based remote sensing missions employing laser radar (lidar) techniques. Following the steps of passive remote sensing and then active radar remote sensing, lidar sensors were a logical next step, providing independence from natural light sources, and better spatial resolution and smaller sensor size than radar sensors. The shorter electromagnetic wavelengths of laser light also allowed signal reflectance from air molecules and aerosol particles. The smaller receiver apertures allowed the concept of scanning the sensor field of view. However, technical problems with several space-based lidar missions during that decade led to concern at NASA about the risk of lidar missions. An external panel was convened to make recommendations to NASA. Their

  2. The SAMEX Vector Magnetograph: A Design Study for a Space-Based Solar Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gary, G. A.; West, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a pre-phase A study performed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL) to develop a design concept for a space-based solar vector magnetograph and hydrogen-alpha telescope. These are two of the core instruments for a proposed Air Force mission, the Solar Activities Measurement Experiments (SAMEX). This mission is designed to study the processes which give rise to activity in the solar atmosphere and to develop techniques for predicting solar activity and its effects on the terrestrial environment.

  3. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  4. Configurable adaptive optics for the correction of space-based optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, Brian Keith

    Space-based, high resolution, Earth remote sensing systems, that employ large, flexible, lightweight primary mirrors, will require active wavefront correction, in the form of active and adaptive optics, to correct for thermally and vibrationally induced deformations in the optics. These remote sensing systems typically have a large field-of-view. Unlike the adaptive optics on ground-based astronomical telescopes, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct the wavefront over the entire field-of-view, which can be several degrees. The error functions for astronomical adaptive optics have been developed for the narrow field-of-view correction of atmospheric turbulence and do not address the needs of wide field space-based systems. To address these needs, a new wide field adaptive optics theory and a new error function are developed. This new error function, which is a new extension of conventional adaptive optics, leads to the development of three new types of imaging systems: wide field-of-view, selectable field-of-view, and steerable field-of-view. These new systems can have nearly diffraction-limited performance across the entire field-of-view or a narrow movable region of high-resolution imaging. The factors limiting system performance are determined and analyzed. The range of applicability of the wide field adaptive optics theory is shown. The range of applicability is used to avoid limitations in system performance and to estimate the optical systems parameters, which will meet the system's performance requirements. Experimental results demonstrate the wide field adaptive optics theory. Finally, it will be shown that a synthetic guide star stimulated from above the atmosphere can be used as a beacon for the wavefront sensors of space-based systems. These wavefront sensors must be optimized such that error in the reconstructed wavefront is minimized. The key equations that

  5. Space-Based Remote Sensing of the Earth: A Report to the Congress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The commercialization of the LANDSAT Satellites, remote sensing research and development as applied to the Earth and its atmosphere as studied by NASA and NOAA is presented. Major gaps in the knowledge of the Earth and its atmosphere are identified and a series of space based measurement objectives are derived. The near-term space observations programs of the United States and other countries are detailed. The start is presented of the planning process to develop an integrated national program for research and development in Earth remote sensing for the remainder of this century and the many existing and proposed satellite and sensor systems that the program may include are described.

  6. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using electrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  7. Pointing and figure control system for a space-based far-IR segmented telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    A pointing and figure control system for two space-based far-IR telescopes, the 10-20 m Large Deployable Reflector and the 3.6 m Submillimeter Intermediate Mission, is described. The figure maintenance control system is designed to counter the optical elements translational and rotational changes induced by long-term thermal drifts that the support structure may experience. The pointing system applies optical truss to telescope pointing; a laser metrology system is used to transfer pointing informaton from an external fine guidance sensor to the telescope optical boresight, defined by the primary mirror, secondary mirror, and focal plane assembly.

  8. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion, and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.-Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using eiectrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  9. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1988-01-01

    The SP-100 Project was established to develop and demonstrate feasibility of a space reactor power system (SRPS) at power levels of 10's of kilowatts to a megawatt. To help determine systems requirements for the SRPS, a mission and spacecraft were examined which utilize this power system for a space-based radar to observe moving objects. Aspects of the mission and spacecraft bearing on the power system were the primary objectives of this study; performance of the radar itself was not within the scope. The study was carried out by the Systems Design Audit Team of the SP-100 Project.

  10. Taking the Politics Out of Satellite and Space-Based Communications Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2006-01-01

    After many years of studies, experimentation, and deployment, large amounts of misinformation and misconceptions remain regarding applicability of various communications protocols for use in satellite and space-based networks. This paper attempts to remove much of the politics, misconceptions, and misinformation that have plagued spacebased communications protocol development and deployment. This paper provides a common vocabulary for communications; a general discussion of the requirements for various communication environments; an evaluation of tradeoffs between circuit and packet-switching technologies, and the pros and cons of various link, network, transport, application, and security protocols. Included is the applicability of protocol enhancing proxies to NASA, Department of Defense (DOD), and commercial space communication systems.

  11. Cancellation of Laser Noise in Space-Based Interferometer Detectors of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1999-01-01

    We presented a time-domain procedure for accurately cancelling laser noise fluctuations in an unequal-arm Michelson interferometer. The method involves separately measuring the phase of the returning light relative to the phase of the transmitted light in each arm. By suitable offsetting and differencing of these two time series, the common laser noise is cancelled exactly. The technique presented in this paper is general, in such that it can be implemented with any (Earth as well as space-based) unequal-arms Michelson interferometers,

  12. Microlensing results toward the galactic bulge, theory of fitting blended light curves, and discussion of weak lensing corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christian L.

    2006-06-01

    Analysis and results (Chapters 2-5) of the full 7 year Macho Project dataset toward the Galactic bulge are presented. A total of 450 high quality, relatively large signal-to-noise ratio, events are found, including several events exhibiting exotic effects, and lensing events on possible Sagittarius dwarf galaxy stars. We examine the problem of blending in our sample and conclude that the subset of red clump giants are minimally blended. Using 42 red clump giant events near the Galactic center we calculate the optical depth toward the Galactic bulge to be t = [Special characters omitted.] × 10 -6 at ( l, b ) = ([Special characters omitted.] ) with a gradient of (1.06 ± 0.71) × 10 -6 deg -1 in latitude, and (0.29±0.43) × 10 -6 deg -1 in longitude, bringing measurements into consistency with the models for the first time. In Chapter 6 we reexamine the usefulness of fitting blended light-curve models to microlensing photometric data. We find agreement with previous workers (e.g. Wozniak & Paczynski) that this is a difficult proposition because of the degeneracy of blend fraction with other fit parameters. We show that follow-up observations at specific points along the light curve (peak region and wings) of high magnification events are the most helpful in removing degeneracies. We also show that very small errors in the baseline magnitude can result in problems in measuring the blend fraction, and study the importance of non- Gaussian errors in the fit results. The biases and skewness in the distribution of the recovered blend fraction is discussed. We also find a new approximation formula relating the blend fraction and the unblended fit parameters to the underlying event duration needed to estimate microlensing optical depth. In Chapter 7 we present work-in-progress on the possibility of correcting standard candle luminosities for the magnification due to weak lensing. We consider the importance of lenses in different mass ranges and look at the contribution

  13. STATISTICS OF MICROLENSING CAUSTIC CROSSINGS IN Q 2237+0305: PECULIAR VELOCITY OF THE LENS GALAXY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Mediavilla, E.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O.

    2015-01-10

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, 〈n〉∝v{sub eff}/√(〈m〉), equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v {sub eff} using the ∼12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v {sub eff}, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining v{sub eff}≳240√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of r{sub s}≳1.4√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the radius of the source (r{sub s} = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of v{sub eff}≃(493±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} for the effective transverse velocity and of r{sub s}≃(2.7±1.3)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is v{sub t}≃(429±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1}.

  14. Microlensing Events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for Mass Determination and Possible Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ~0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. Point source detection in infrared astronomical surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelzmann, R. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Data processing techniques useful for infrared astronomy data analysis systems are reported. This investigation is restricted to consideration of data from space-based telescope systems operating as survey instruments. In this report the theoretical background for specific point-source detection schemes is completed, and the development of specific algorithms and software for the broad range of requirements is begun.

  16. Mission planning for space based satellite surveillance experiments with the MSX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Fishman, T.; Robinson, E.; Viggh, H.; Wiseman, A.

    1994-01-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment is a BMDO-sponsored scientific satellite set for launch within the year. The satellite will collect phenomenology data on missile targets, plumes, earth limb backgrounds and deep space backgrounds in the LWIR, visible and ultra-violet spectral bands. It will also conduct functional demonstrations for space-based space surveillance. The Space-Based Visible sensor, built by Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the primary sensor on board the MSX for demonstration of space surveillance. The SBV Processing, Operations and Control Center (SPOCC) is the mission planning and commanding center for all space surveillance experiments using the SBV and other MSX instruments. The guiding principle in the SPOCC Mission Planning System was that all routine functions be automated. Manual analyst input should be minimal. Major concepts are: (I) A high level language, called SLED, for user interface to the system; (2) A group of independent software processes which would generally be run in a pipe-line mode for experiment commanding but can be run independently for analyst assessment; (3) An integrated experiment cost computation function that permits assessment of the feasibility of the experiment. This paper will report on the design, implementation and testing of the Mission Planning System.

  17. Multicomponent composites and their application in replica mirrors for lightweight space-based optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vining, Stephen D.; Hood, Patrick J.

    2004-02-01

    Research and development in multi-component composites demonstrated new material and fabrication concepts for mirrors for space-based optics. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., effort, conducted under contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory, developed new organic and inorganic composite materials and investigated their potential for application as light-weight, low-cost alternatives mitigating the drawbacks of conventional materials (glass and metals) and fabrication processes for space-based mirrors. This development demonstrated the feasibility of multi-component organic composites integrating cyanate ester resin with several reinforcements, especially carbon fabric and nanofibers. It demonstrated feasibility of high-quality cyanate ester-based syntactic composite (structural foam composed of microspheres embedded in resin). The development also demonstrated initial feasibility of multi-component inorganic composites integrating a proprietary inorganic resin with particulate and nanofiber reinforcements. These new materials (both organic and inorganic composites) show strong potential for achieving major reduction in mirror areal density (compared with current operational mirrors) while achieving strength, stiffness, and thermal properties required for space applications. Finally, this project demonstrated feasibility of a replication approach to mirror fabrication. With this fabrication technology, a composite mirror is cast directly to net figure and finish. This dramatically simplifies the mirror fabrication process, thereby enabling less expensive tooling than conventional practice for glass or metal mirrors. In production lots of identical mirrors (e.g., spacecraft constellations), the replication approach will provide radical reduction in mirror costs by eliminating the lengthy, expensive grinding and polishing processes for individual units.

  18. The PLATO Simulator: modelling of high-precision high-cadence space-based imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, P.; Zima, W.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Huygen, R.; Samadi, R.; Green, J.; Piotto, G.; Salmon, S.; Catala, C.; Rauer, H.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Many aspects of the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations make such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment and design study of any space-based mission. Aims: We present a formalism to model and simulate photometric time series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all of the important natural noise sources. Methods: This formalism has been implemented in a versatile end-to-end simulation software tool, specifically designed for the PLATO (Planetary Transists and Oscillations of Stars) space mission to be operated from L2, but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. We call this tool Plato Simulator. Results: We provide a detailed description of several noise sources and discuss their properties in connection with the optical design, the allowable level of jitter, the quantum efficiency of the detectors, etc. The expected overall noise budget of generated light curves is computed, as a function of the stellar magnitude, for different sets of input parameters describing the instrument properties. The simulator is offered to the scientific community for future use. Software package available at the Plato Simulator web site (http://https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/Software/PlatoSimulator/).

  19. Constraint-based integration of planning and scheduling for space-based observatory management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Steven F.

    1994-01-01

    Progress toward the development of effective, practical solutions to space-based observatory scheduling problems within the HSTS scheduling framework is reported. HSTS was developed and originally applied in the context of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) short-term observation scheduling problem. The work was motivated by the limitations of the current solution and, more generally, by the insufficiency of classical planning and scheduling approaches in this problem context. HSTS has subsequently been used to develop improved heuristic solution techniques in related scheduling domains and is currently being applied to develop a scheduling tool for the upcoming Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) mission. The salient architectural characteristics of HSTS and their relationship to previous scheduling and AI planning research are summarized. Then, some key problem decomposition techniques underlying the integrated planning and scheduling approach to the HST problem are described; research results indicate that these techniques provide leverage in solving space-based observatory scheduling problems. Finally, more recently developed constraint-posting scheduling procedures and the current SWAS application focus are summarized.

  20. Modeling and validation of photometric characteristics of space targets oriented to space-based observation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Aotuo

    2012-11-10

    A modeling and validation method of photometric characteristics of the space target was presented in order to track and identify different satellites effectively. The background radiation characteristics models of the target were built based on blackbody radiation theory. The geometry characteristics of the target were illustrated by the surface equations based on its body coordinate system. The material characteristics of the target surface were described by a bidirectional reflectance distribution function model, which considers the character of surface Gauss statistics and microscale self-shadow and is obtained by measurement and modeling in advance. The contributing surfaces of the target to observation system were determined by coordinate transformation according to the relative position of the space-based target, the background radiation sources, and the observation platform. Then a mathematical model on photometric characteristics of the space target was built by summing reflection components of all the surfaces. Photometric characteristics simulation of the space-based target was achieved according to its given geometrical dimensions, physical parameters, and orbital parameters. Experimental validation was made based on the scale model of the satellite. The calculated results fit well with the measured results, which indicates the modeling method of photometric characteristics of the space target is correct.

  1. CEOS Contributions to Informing Energy Management and Policy Decision Making Using Space-Based Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Earth observations are playing an increasingly significant role in informing decision making in the energy sector. In renewable energy applications, space-based observations now routinely augment sparse ground-based observations used as input for renewable energy resource assessment applications. As one of the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) societal benefit areas, the enhancement of management and policy decision making in the energy sector is receiving attention in activities conducted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). CEOS has become the "space arm" for the implementation of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) vision. It is directly supporting the space-based, near-term tasks articulated in the GEO three-year work plan. This paper describes a coordinated program of demonstration projects conducted by CEOS member agencies and partners to utilize Earth observations to enhance energy management end-user decision support systems. I discuss the importance of engagement with stakeholders and understanding their decision support needs in successfully increasing the uptake of Earth observation products for societal benefit. Several case studies are presented, demonstrating the importance of providing data sets in formats and units familiar and immediately usable by decision makers. These projects show the utility of Earth observations to enhance renewable energy resource assessment in the developing world, forecast space-weather impacts on the power grid, and improve energy efficiency in the built environment.

  2. FalconSAT-7: Towards Rapidly Deployable Space-Based Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; McHarg, M.; Asmolova, O.; Dearborn, M.

    2013-09-01

    The USAF Academy Department of Physics is building FalconSAT-7, a membrane solar telescope to be deployed from a 3U CubeSat in LEO. The primary optic is a 0.2m photon sieve - a diffractive element consisting of billions of tiny holes in an otherwise opaque polymer sheet. The membrane, its support structure, secondary optics, two imaging cameras and associated control/recording electronics are all packaged within half the CubeSat volume. Once in space the supporting pantograph structure is deployed to pulling the membrane flat under tension. The telescope will then be steered towards the Sun to gather images at H-alpha for transmission to the ground. Due for launch in 2015, FalconSAT-7 will serve as a pathfinder for future mission in lightweight, high-resolution space-based surveillance. We are currently investigating two possible options optimized for Earth observing and SSA. Our preliminary designs have a 0.3m aperture deployed from a 6-12U satellite. Such a telescope would be capable of providing sub-meter resolution of ground or space-based objects depending on the orbital characteristics.

  3. Maintaining and servicing a space-based Orbital Transfer vehicle (OTV) at the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. W.; Pena, L. R.

    1986-09-01

    A candidate space-based OTV (SBOTV) is described as well as the advantages inherent to space basing, the requirements for accommodating an SBOTV, candidate hangar/support equipment, turnaround operations options, selection and definition of the most economical turnaround operations at the Space Station and maintenance of an OTV at the Space Station (SS). OTV launching, servicing/maintenance, payload integration and retrieval comprise the various space operations to be performed. Alternative methods for performing the turnaround operations (i.e. EVA with teleoperations or teleoperations only) are investigated and it is shown that the 'teleoperation only' option fulfills the need for reducing the amount of EVA manhours while simultaneously reducing the total manhours for SBOTV turnaround at the Space Station. It is concluded that modularity, accessibility, standardization of interfaces, lightweight construction, and a proper balance between EVA and teleoperations/robotics activities are key to the successful performance of an OTV at the SS in the 1990s. Man's ability to react to unexpected situations, interpret results and modify operations in real time must also be taken advantage of.

  4. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronic system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, C. L.; Johnson, J. O.

    Rapidly changing world events, the increased number of nations with inter-continental ballistic missile capability, and the proliferation of nuclear weapon technology will increase the number of nuclear threats facing the world today. Monitoring these nation's activities and providing an early warning and/or intercept system via reconnaissance and surveillance satellites and space based weapon platforms is a viable deterrent against a surprise nuclear attack. However, the deployment of satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; and neutrons, gamma rays, and x-rays from intentionally detonated fission and fusion weapons. In this paper, the MASH vl.0 code system is used to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized space based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from a thermonuclear weapon detonation in space. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the platform fully loaded, and in several stages representing limited engagement scenarios. The results indicate vulnerabilities to the Command, Control, and Communication bay instruments from radiation damage for a nuclear weapon detonation for certain source/platform orientations. The distance at which damage occurs will depend on the weapon yield (n,(gamma)/kiloton) and size (kilotons).

  5. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  6. Solid-state coherent LIDAR technology for space-based wind measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark W.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Gatt, Philip; Huffaker, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed coherent solid-state 2 micron laser radar systems have been developed at Coherent Technologies, Inc. for ground- and airborne-based applications. Ground-based measurements of wind profiles and aerosol backscatter have been performed for several years. Examples of wind and aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements will be presented which cover a variety of weather conditions. Airborne measurements of wind profiles below the aircraft have been performed by Wright Laboratories, operating in a VAD measurement mode and will be reviewed. An engineered flight-worthy coherent lidar system is under development at CTI for flight on the SR-71 aircraft, in support of the High Speed Civil Transport program. Flights will be conducted by NASA-Dryden Flight Research Center at altitudes above 60,000 feet for the measurement of atmospheric turbulence ahead of the aircraft. Efforts are also underway at CTI for the development of high power coherent laser radar systems. Extensive detailed physical optics models of diode-pumped solid-state laser performance have been developed to characterize transient thermo-optic aberrations and the overall efficiency of lasers intended for space-based applications. We are currently developing a 2 micron 0.5 J/pulse transmitter with a 10 Hz PRF and a pulse duration of 400 - 500 ns. The status and expected space-based wind measuring performance for this system will be presented.

  7. Altitudinal variation of midlatitude localized TEC enhancement from ground- and space-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Barua, S.; Mannucci, A. J.; Walter, T.; Enge, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present terrestrial and space-based dual-frequency observations of a region of enhanced total electron content (TEC) over the southeastern United States at local nighttime during the geomagnetic storm of 29-31 October 2003. The apparently localized, large-amplitude, and nearly Earth-fixed midlatitude ionosphere disturbance contained about 10 m higher delay at Global Positioning System (GPS) L1 frequency than the nighttime background ionosphere TEC. Using the dual-frequency altimeter on board the Jason satellite, we show evidence that nearly all of the electron content was below its orbital altitude of 1300 km at 0000 local time on 31 October 2003. Dual frequency GPS measurements from the receiver on board the SAC-C satellite indicate that some portion of the electron content existed above the 700 km orbit altitude of SAC-C. We develop a horizontally piecewise constant regional model of the enhancement. We compare the model prediction of TEC with the SAC-C satellite GPS data to constrain the altitude of this enhanced TEC region. Our model indicates that the peak density of the anomalous region is at slightly higher altitude and greater in amplitude than that of the background. The TEC enhancement provides a concrete case study of an extreme scenario that both space-based and ground-based GPS augmentation systems must take into account in order to offer high-accuracy, high-integrity corrections to GPS for safety-of-life applications.

  8. Effect of Clouds on Apertures of Space-based Air Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolsky, P.; Krizmanic, J.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based ultra-high-energy cosmic ray detectors observe fluorescence light from extensive air showers produced by these particles in the troposphere. Clouds can scatter and absorb this light and produce systematic errors in energy determination and spectrum normalization. We study the possibility of using IR remote sensing data from MODIS and GOES satellites to delimit clear areas of the atmosphere. The efficiency for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays whose showers do not intersect clouds is determined for real, night-time cloud scenes. We use the MODIS SST cloud mask product to define clear pixels for cloud scenes along the equator and use the OWL Monte Carlo to generate showers in the cloud scenes. We find the efficiency for cloud-free showers with closest approach of three pixels to a cloudy pixel is 6.5% exclusive of other factors. We conclude that defining a totally cloud-free aperture reduces the sensitivity of space-based fluorescence detectors to unacceptably small levels.

  9. Microlensing discovery of a tight, low-mass-ratio planetary-mass object around an old field brown dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Han, C.; Jung, Y. K.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-11-20

    Observations of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs (BDs) have led to the speculation that they may form planetary systems similar to normal stars. While there have been several detections of planetary-mass objects around BDs (2MASS 1207-3932 and 2MASS 0441-2301), these companions have relatively large mass ratios and projected separations, suggesting that they formed in a manner analogous to stellar binaries. We present the discovery of a planetary-mass object orbiting a field BD via gravitational microlensing, OGLE-2012-BLG-0358Lb. The system is a low secondary/primary mass ratio (0.080 ± 0.001), relatively tightly separated (∼0.87 AU) binary composed of a planetary-mass object with 1.9 ± 0.2 Jupiter masses orbiting a BD with a mass 0.022 M {sub ☉}. The relatively small mass ratio and separation suggest that the companion may have formed in a protoplanetary disk around the BD host in a manner analogous to planets.

  10. Opto-mechanical analysis of nonlinear elastomer membrane deformation under hydraulic pressure for variable-focus liquid-filled microlenses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Tae; Son, Byeong Soo; Seo, Gye Won; Park, Si-Young; Lee, Kyung-Sick

    2014-03-10

    Nonlinear large deformation of a transparent elastomer membrane under hydraulic pressure was analyzed to investigate its optical performance for a variable-focus liquid-filled membrane microlens. In most membrane microlenses, actuators control the hydraulic pressure of optical fluid so that the elastomer membrane together with the internal optical fluid changes its shape, which alters the light path of the microlens to adapt its optical power. A fluid-structure interaction simulation was performed to estimate the transient behavior of the microlens under the operation of electroactive polymer actuators, demonstrating that the viscosity of the optical fluid successfully stabilizes the fluctuations within a fairly short period of time during dynamic operations. Axisymmetric nonlinear plate theory was used to calculate the deformation profile of the membrane under hydrostatic pressure, with which optical characteristics of the membrane microlens were estimated. The effects of gravitation and viscoelastic behavior of the elastomer membrane on the optical performance of the membrane microlens were also evaluated with finite element analysis. PMID:24663947

  11. A survey of surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    A new era for the field of Galactic structure is about to be opened with the advent of wide-area digital sky surveys. In this article, the author reviews the status and prospects for research for 3 new ground-based surveys: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) and the Two Micron AU Sky Survey (2MASS). These surveys will permit detailed studies of Galactic structure and stellar populations in the Galaxy with unprecedented detail. Extracting the information, however, will be challenging.

  12. Development Towards a Space Qualified Laser Stabilization System in Support of Space-Based Optical Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, David J.; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2000-01-01

    We report on the development, functional performance and space-qualification status of a laser stabilization system supporting a space-based metrology source used to measure changes in optical path lengths in space-based stellar interferometers. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) and Deep Space 3 (DS-3) are two missions currently funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that are space-based optical interferometers. In order to properly recombine the starlight received at each telescope of the interferometer it is necessary to perform high resolution laser metrology to stabilize the interferometer. A potentially significant error source in performing high resolution metrology length measurements is the potential for fluctuations in the laser gauge itself. If the laser frequency or wavelength is changing over time it will be misinterpreted as a length change in one of the legs of the interferometer. An analysis of the frequency stability requirement for SIM resulted in a fractional frequency stability requirement of square root (S(sub y)(f)) = <2 x 10(exp -12)/square root(Hz) at Fourier frequencies between 10 Hz and 1000 Hz. The DS-3 mission stability requirement is further increased to square root (S(sub y)(f)) = <5 x 10(exp -14)/Square root(Hz) at Fourier frequencies between 0.2 Hz and 10 kHz with a goal of extending the low frequency range to 0.05 Hz. The free running performance of the Lightwave Electronics NPRO lasers, which are the baseline laser for both SIM and DS-3 vary in stability and we have measured them to perform as follows (9 x l0(exp -11)/ f(Hz))(Hz)/square root(Hz)) = <( square root (S(sub y)(f)) = <(1.3 x l0(exp -8)/ f(Hz))/Square root(Hz). In order to improve the frequency stability of the laser we stabilize the laser to a high finesse optical cavity by locking the optical frequency of the laser to one of the transmission modes of the cavity. At JPL we have built a prototype space-qualifiable system meeting the

  13. Advanced Technologies for Future Spacecraft Cockpits and Space-based Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Galan, Carlos; Uckun, Serdar; Gregory, William; Williams, Kerry

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a new era of Space Exploration, aimed at sending crewed spacecraft beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), in medium and long duration missions to the Lunar surface, Mars and beyond. The challenges of such missions are significant and will require new technologies and paradigms in vehicle design and mission operations. Current roles and responsibilities of spacecraft systems, crew and the flight control team, for example, may not be sustainable when real-time support is not assured due to distance-induced communication lags, radio blackouts, equipment failures, or other unexpected factors. Therefore, technologies and applications that enable greater Systems and Mission Management capabilities on-board the space-based system will be necessary to reduce the dependency on real-time critical Earth-based support. The focus of this paper is in such technologies that will be required to bring advance Systems and Mission Management capabilities to space-based environments where the crew will be required to manage both the systems performance and mission execution without dependence on the ground. We refer to this concept as autonomy. Environments that require high levels of autonomy include the cockpits of future spacecraft such as the Mars Exploration Vehicle, and space-based control centers such as a Lunar Base Command and Control Center. Furthermore, this paper will evaluate the requirements, available technology, and roadmap to enable full operational implementation of onboard System Health Management, Mission Planning/re-planning, Autonomous Task/Command Execution, and Human Computer Interface applications. The technology topics covered by the paper include enabling technology to perform Intelligent Caution and Warning, where the systems provides directly actionable data for human understanding and response to failures, task automation applications that automate nominal and Off-nominal task execution based

  14. An Analysis for an Internet Grid to Support Space Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements have been used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate other approaches to providing mission services for space ground and flight operations. In various scientific disciplines, effort is under way to develop network/komputing grids. These grids consisting of networks and computing equipment are enabling lower cost science. Specifically, earthquake research is headed in this direction. With a standard for network and computing interfaces using a grid, a researcher would not be required to develop and engineer NASA/DoD specific interfaces with the attendant increased cost. Use of the Internet Protocol (IP), CCSDS packet spec, and reed-solomon for satellite error correction etc. can be adopted/standardized to provide these interfaces. Generally most interfaces are developed at least to some degree end to end. This study would investigate the feasibility of using existing standards and protocols necessary to implement a SpaceOps Grid. New interface definitions or adoption/modification of existing ones for the various space operational services is required for voice both space based and ground, video, telemetry, commanding and planning may play a role to some undefined level. Security will be a separate focus in the study since security is such a large issue in using public networks. This SpaceOps Grid would be transparent to users. It would be anagulous to the Ethernet protocol's ease of use in that a researcher would plug in their experiment or instrument at one end and would be connected to the appropriate host or server without further intervention. Free flyers would be in this category as well. They would be launched and would transmit without any further intervention with the researcher or

  15. Telescope Technology Development Results for a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories will enable the systematic study of the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. Optical telescopes play an important role in these observatories by enabling displacement measurements between pairs of freely falling proof masses. The telescopes deliver laser light efficiently from one sciencecraft to another over million-kilometer scale separations and must transmit and receive light simultaneously. Transmitting and receiving at the same time puts tight constraints on the scattered light performance. In addition, the required displacement measurement accuracy requires ~ 1 pm/√Hz pathlength stability through the telescope in the measurement band. We report preliminary measurements on a prototype telescope.This work was funded in part by NASA SAT grant 11-SAT11-0027.

  16. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  17. Space-Based Diagnosis of Surface Ozone Sensitivity to Anthropogenic Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Fiore, Arlene M.; VanDonkelaar, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    We present a novel capability in satellite remote sensing with implications for air pollution control strategy. We show that the ratio of formaldehyde columns to tropospheric nitrogen dioxide columns is an indicator of the relative sensitivity of surface ozone to emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The diagnosis from these space-based observations is highly consistent with current understanding of surface ozone chemistry based on in situ observations. The satellite-derived ratios indicate that surface ozone is more sensitive to emissions of NO(x) than of VOCs throughout most continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere during summer. Exceptions include Los Angeles and industrial areas of Germany. A seasonal transition occurs in the fall when surface ozone becomes less sensitive to NOx and more sensitive to VOCs.

  18. Architecture and System Engineering Development Study of Space-Based Satellite Networks for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Traditional NASA missions, both near Earth and deep space, have been stovepipe in nature and point-to-point in architecture. Recently, NASA and others have conceptualized missions that required space-based networking. The notion of networks in space is a drastic shift in thinking and requires entirely new architectures, radio systems (antennas, modems, and media access), and possibly even new protocols. A full system engineering approach for some key mission architectures will occur that considers issues such as the science being performed, stationkeeping, antenna size, contact time, data rates, radio-link power requirements, media access techniques, and appropriate networking and transport protocols. This report highlights preliminary architecture concepts and key technologies that will be investigated.

  19. Multi-wavelength Solar Flare Observations with Ground- and Space-based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares affect a wide range of atmospheric heights from the corona to the photosphere. Solar instruments are generally designed for high-resolution observations in limited spectral windows and therefore only capture part of the flare. To obtain a more complete flare picture from coronal reconnection to the atmospheric response of the chromosphere and photosphere, it is necessary to combine data from multiple instruments. I will review multi-wavelength flare observations with ground- and space-based observatories. By taking the X1 flare on March 29, 2014 as an example, which was observed with an unprecedented number of telescopes, I will demonstrate how to investigate the origin of the flare by looking at a filament eruption, the chromospheric evaporation by means of spectroscopy, the flare heating by analyzing continuum emission, and the changes of chromospheric magnetic fields using polarimetric data.

  20. Research on space-based optical surveillance's observation strategy of geostationary-orbit's pitch point region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-ying; An, Wei; Wu, Yu-hao; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    In order to surveillance the geostationary (GEO) objects, including man-made satellites and space debris, more efficiently, a space-based optical surveillance system was designed in this paper. A strategy to observe the pinch point region was selected because of the GEO objects' dynamics features. That strategy affects the surveillance satellites orbital type and sensor pointing strategy. In order to minimize total surveillance satellites and the revisit time for GEO objects, a equation was set. More than 700 GEO objects' TLE from NASA's website are used for simulation. Results indicate that the revisit time of the surveillance system designed in this paper is less than 24 hours, more than 95% GEO objects can be observed by the designed system.