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Sample records for spacecraft atmospheres applications

  1. Calculations of atmospheric refraction for spacecraft remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the refraction integrals appropriate for ray trajectories along slant paths through the atmosphere are derived in this paper. This type of geometry is commonly encountered in remote-sensing applications utilizing an occultation technique. The solutions are obtained by evaluating higher-order terms from expansion of the refraction integral and are dependent on the vertical temperature distributions. Refraction parameters such as total refraction angles, air masses, and path lengths can be accurately computed. It is also shown that the method can be used for computing refraction parameters in astronomical refraction geometry for large zenith angles.

  2. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  3. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  4. The application of Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) for the sterilisation of spacecraft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Morfill, Gregor; Thomas, Hubertus; Satoshi Shimizu, .; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Plasma, oft called the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas, is defined by its ionized state. Ionization can be induced by different means, such as a strong electromagnetic field applied with a microwave generator. The concentration and composition of reactive atoms and molecules produced in Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) depends on the gases used, the gas flow, the power applied, the humidity level etc.. In medicine, low-temperature plasma is already used for the sterilization of surgical instruments, implants and packaging materials as plasma works at the atomic level and is able to reach all surfaces, even the interior of small hollow items like needles. Its ability to sterilise is due to the generation of biologically active bactericidal agents, such as free radicals and UV radiation. In the project PLASMA-DECON (DLR/BMWi support code 50JR1005) a prototype of a device for sterilising spacecraft material and components was built based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) plasma technology. The produced plasma species are directed into a closed chamber which contains the parts that need to be sterilised. To test the inactivation efficiency of this new device bacterial spores were used as model organisms because in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy all bioburden constraints are defined with respect to the number of spores (and other heat-tolerant aerobic microorganisms). Spores from different Bacillus species and strains, i.e. wildtype strains from culture collections and isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms, were dried on three different spacecraft relevant materials and exposed to CAP. The specificity, linearity, precision, and effective range of the device was investigated. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the application of CAP proved to be a suitable method for bioburden reduction / sterilisation in the frame of planetary protection measures and the design of a larger plasma device is planned in the future.

  5. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  6. Electro-optic and holographic measurement techniques for the atmospheric sciences. [considering spacecraft simulation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.; Lemons, J. F.; Kurtz, R. L.; Liu, H.-K.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive examination is made of recent advanced research directions in the applications of electro-optical and holographic instrumentations and methods to atmospheric sciences problems. In addition, an overview is given of the in-house research program for environmental and atmospheric measurements with emphasis on particulates systems. Special treatment is made of the instrument methods and applications work in the areas of laser scattering spectrometers and pulsed holography sizing systems. Selected engineering tests data on space simulation chamber programs are discussed.

  7. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  8. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Howard, D.

    2007-01-01

    In NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (Bush, 2004), (Griffin, 2007), humans will once again travel beyond the confines of earth's gravity, this time to remain there for extended periods. These forays will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also liftoff the supplies needed to sustain a larger crew over much longer periods. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. For short-term phases of manned space exploration, such as transit from the earth to the moon, venting of metabolic carbon dioxide and water to space is more efficient than the inclusion of large recycling systems on the spacecraft. The baseline system for the Orion spacecraft is an amine-based vacuum swing system (Smith, Perry et aI., 2006). As part of the development of an alternative approach, a sorbent-based CO2 and H2O removal system (Knox, Adams et aI., 2006), subscale testing was conducted to evaluate potential performance improvements obtainable by recuperating the heat of adsorption to aid in vacuum desorption. This bed design is shown in Figure 1, is depicted here with a lattice structure instead of reticulated foam for heat transfer. The slot widths are approximately 1.2 mm wide and 8.5 mm long. Bed depth is approximately 4.7 mm. Headers (not shown) were produced by the stereo lithography apparatus at MSFC.

  9. Atmosphere Explorer (AE) spacecraft system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The principal design and performance characteristics of the AE spacecraft system designed to support the Atmosphere Explorer C, D, and E missions are summarized. It has been prepared for the information of experimenters and other participants in the Atmosphere Explorer program as a general guide for design and operational planning. The description represents the spacecraft system as defined at the conclusion of the interface definition study.

  10. Fire safety applications for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Olson, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    Fire safety for spacecraft is reviewed by first describing current practices, many of which are adapted directly from aircraft. Then, current analyses and experimental knowledge in low-gravity combustion, with implications for fire safety are discussed. In orbiting spacecraft, the detection and suppression of flames are strongly affected by the large reduction in buoyant flows under low gravity. Generally, combustion intensity is reduced in low gravity. There are some notable exceptions, however, one example being the strong enhancement of flames by low-velocity ventilation flows in space. Finally, the future requirements in fire safety, particularly the needs of long-duration space stations in fire prevention, detection, extinguishment, and atmospheric control are examined. The goal of spacecraft fire-safety investigations is the establishment of trade-offs that promote maximum safety without hampering the useful human and scientific activities in space.

  11. Analysis of spacecraft entry into Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Ken; Nagano, Koutarou

    1991-07-01

    The effects on a spacecraft body while entering the Martian atmosphere and the resulting design constraints are analyzed. The analyses are conducted using the Viking entry phase restriction conditions and a Mars atmosphere model. Results from analysis conducted by the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) are described. Results obtained from the analysis are as follows: (1) flight times depend greatly on lift-to-drag ratio and less on ballistic coefficients; (2) terminal landing speeds depend greatly on ballistic coefficients and less on lift-to-drag ratios; (3) the dependence of the flight path angles on ballistic coefficients is slightly larger than their dependence on lift-to-drag ratios; (4) as the ballistic coefficients become smaller and the lift-to-drag ratios become larger, the deceleration at high altitude becomes larger; (5) small ballistic coefficients and low lift-to-drag ratios are required to meet the constraints of Mach number at parachute deployment and deployment altitude; and (6) heating rates at stagnation points are dependent on ballistic coefficients. It is presumed that the aerodynamic characteristics will be 0.2 for the lift-to-drag ratio and 75 kg/sq m for the ballistic coefficient for the case of a Mars landing using capsules similar to those used in the Viking program.

  12. Bounding the Spacecraft Atmosphere Design Space for Future Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Perka, Alan T.; Duffield, Bruce E.; Jeng, Frank F.

    2005-01-01

    The selection of spacecraft and space suit atmospheres for future human space exploration missions will play an important, if not critical, role in the ultimate safety, productivity, and cost of such missions. Internal atmosphere pressure and composition (particularly oxygen concentration) influence many aspects of spacecraft and space suit design, operation, and technology development. Optimal atmosphere solutions must be determined by iterative process involving research, design, development, testing, and systems analysis. A necessary first step in this process is the establishment of working bounds on the atmosphere design space.

  13. Measured Spacecraft Dynamic Effects on Atmospheric Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Gell, David A.; Lay, Richard R.

    1997-01-01

    On September 1991, NASA launched the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. In addition to its atmospheric science mission, spacecraft dynamic effects on science measurements were analyzed. The investigation included two in-flight experiments to determine how each on-board instrument, subsystem and environmental disturbance contributed to the spacecraft dynamic response and how these disturbances affected science measurements. Three case studies are presented which show the impact of spacecraft dynamic response on science measurements. In the first case, correlation of independent atmospheric meridional wind measurements taken by two instruments with the spacecraft dynamic response demonstrated that excessive vibration (exceeding instrument pointing requirements) resulted in wind measurement disagreement. In the second case, solar array disturbances produced a spacecraft response signature on radiometer measurements. The signature explicitly demonstrated that if an instrument has sufficient spatial and temporal resolution, spacecraft dynamic response could impact measurements. In the final case, correlation of an instrument's fine sun sensor data and CO2 measurements demonstrated the effect of temporal and spatial sampling resolution and active pointing control on science measurements. The sun sensor had a frequency modulated characteristic due to spacecraft vibration and the periodic scanning of another instrument which was not present on the CO2 measurements.

  14. Advances in spacecraft atmospheric entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito Manrique, Joel

    In order to advance entry guidance technology two different research areas have been explored with the objective of increasing the reachable landing area and the landing accuracy for future Mars missions. Currently only the northern hemisphere of Mars is available for landing due to its low elevation. Only low elevation landing sites have the necessary atmospheric density to allow landing using current Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology. In order to reach most of the Ancient Highlands, the majority of the southern hemisphere, advanced EDL technology is needed in multiple fields, including entry guidance. The first research area is the definition and applications of reachable and controllable sets for entry. The definition of the reachable and controllable sets provides a framework for the study of the capabilities of an entry vehicle in a given planet. Reachable and controllable sets can be used to comprehensively characterize the envelope of trajectories that a vehicle can fly, the sites it can reach and the entry states that can be accommodated. The sets can also be used for the evaluation of trajectory planning algorithms and to assist in the selection of the entry or landing sites. In essence, the reachable and controllable sets offer a powerful vehicle and trajectory analysis and design framework that allows for better mission design choices. In order to illustrate the use of the sets, they are computed for a representative Mars mission using two different vehicle configurations. The sets characterize the impact of the vehicle configuration on the entry capability. Furthermore, the sets are used to find the best skip-entry trajectory for a return from the Moon mission, highlighting the utility of the sets in atmospheric maneuvers other than entry. The second research area is the development of the components of an entry guidance algorithm that allow high elevation landing and provide as well high landing accuracy. The approach taken follows the

  15. Performance Testing of a Photocatalytic Oxidation Module for Spacecraft Cabin Atmosphere Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Scott, Joseph P.; Kaiser, Mark; Seminara, Gary; Bershitsky, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is a candidate process technology for use in high volumetric flow rate trace contaminant control applications in sealed environments. The targeted application for PCO as applied to crewed spacecraft life support system architectures is summarized. Technical challenges characteristic of PCO are considered. Performance testing of a breadboard PCO reactor design for mineralizing polar organic compounds in a spacecraft cabin atmosphere is described. Test results are analyzed and compared to results reported in the literature for comparable PCO reactor designs.

  16. Plasma Sterilization Technology for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, S. J.; Olson, R. L.; Leavens, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of plasma gas technology to sterilization and decontamination of spacecraft components is considered. Areas investigated include: effective sterilizing ranges of four separate gases; lethal constituents of a plasma environment; effectiveness of plasma against a diverse group of microorganisms; penetrating efficiency of plasmas for sterilization; and compatibility of spacecraft materials with plasma environments. Results demonstrated that plasma gas, specifically helium plasma, is a highly effective sterilant and is compatible with spacecraft materials.

  17. Saturn Uranus atmospheric entry probe mission spacecraft system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The modifications required of the Pioneer F/G spacecraft design for it to deliver an atmospheric entry probe to the planets Saturn and Uranus are investigated. It is concluded that it is feasible to conduct such a mission within the constraints and interfaces defined. The spacecraft required to perform the mission is derived from the Pioneer F/G design, and the modifications required are generally routinely conceived and executed. The entry probe is necessarily a new design, although it draws on the technology of past, present, and imminent programs of planetary atmospheric investigations.

  18. Spacecraft design applications of QUICK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The interactive space mission trajectory design environment software QUICK, which is currently available on 14 different machine architectures, furnishes a programmable FORTRAN-like interface for a wide range of both built-in and user-defined functions. Since its inception at JPL in 1971, QUICK has evolved from a specialized calculator into a general-purpose engineering tool which also facilitates spacecraft conceptual design by treating spacecraft as collections of data records describing individual components of instruments.

  19. Modelling Atmospheric Scattering Using Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rages, Kathy A.

    1999-01-01

    The period covered by this cooperative agreement included the analysis of data from the Voyager encounter with Neptune and Triton and the primary Galileo mission to Jupiter (including the Galileo Probe entry into Jupiter's atmosphere), as well as continued work on Uranus' seasonal variability using the Voyager encounter data as a baseline.

  20. Kinematics effects of atmospheric friction in spacecraft flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.

    2017-04-01

    Gravity assist manoeuvres are one of the most successful techniques in astrodynamics. In these trajectories the spacecraft comes very close to the surface of the Earth, or other Solar system planets or moons, and, as a consequence, it experiences the effect of atmospheric friction by the outer layers of the Earth's atmosphere or ionosphere. In this paper we analyze a standard atmospheric model to estimate the density profile during the two Galileo flybys, the NEAR and the Juno flyby. We show that, even allowing for a margin of uncertainty in the spacecraft cross-section and the drag coefficient, the observed - 8 mm/s anomalous velocity decrease during the second Galileo flyby of December 8th 1992 cannot be attributed only to atmospheric friction. On the other hand, for perigees on the border between the thermosphere and the exosphere the friction only accounts for a fraction of a millimeter per second in the final asymptotic velocity.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma - A new technology for spacecraft component decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Barczyk, Simon; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Hoeschen, Till; Linsmeier, Christian; Weber, Peter; Morfill, Gregor E.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2014-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) based on the Surface Micro-Discharge (SMD) technology was investigated for inactivation of different bacteria and endospores. The used technique was developed to serve as an alternative method for the decontamination of spacecraft components based on the COSPAR planetary protection policy where currently the dry heat microbial reduction method is the only applicable way to satisfy the required demands. However it is known, that dry heat can thermally damage sophisticated components installed on the device. Therefore, the development of a low temperature sterilization system is one of the high priority issues for upcoming space missions in the extraterrestrial field. In the study presented here, the vegetative bacteria Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans and several types of bacterial endospores - including Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus megaterium 2c1 and Bacillus thuringiensis E24 - were inactivated by exposing them indirectly i.e. only to the reactive gases produced by the SMD electrode at room temperature. The results showed a 5 log inactivation for E. coli after 10 min of exposure. In contrast D. radiodurans proved to be more resistant resulting in a reduction of 3 log after exposure of 30 min. More than 6 log reductions were achieved for B. safensis, B. megaterium and B. megaterium 2c1 after 90 min of exposure. Furthermore the applicability of the used CAP system for spacecraft decontamination according to the planetary protection policy was investigated. This included also the investigation of the inactivation homogeneity by the plasma gas, the control of the temperature at the area of interest, the measurement of the O3 density in the treatment region and the detailed investigation of the effects of the exposure on different materials.

  2. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  3. The physiology of spacecraft and space suit atmosphere selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J.; Nicogossian, A.

    1991-01-01

    Factors which are considered in arriving at control values and control ranges of the parameters established for spacecraft and space suit environments include physiological, engineering, operational cost, and safety considerations. A number of physiological considerations are discussed, including hypoxia and hyperoxia, hypercapnia, temperature regulation, and decompression sickness. The impact of these considerations on space craft and space suit atmosphere selection is considered. The past experience in controlling these parameters in the U.S. and Soviet spacecraft and space suits and the associated physical responses are also reviewed. Physiological factors currently under investigation are discussed, including decompression sickness.

  4. Simulation Helps Improve Atmosphere Revitalization Systems for Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Coker, RObert

    2014-01-01

    Life support systems for manned spacecraft must provide breathable air and drinkable water for the astronauts. Through the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project, engineers at NASA are developing atmosphere control devices for the safety of the onboard crew. The atmosphere in a manned spacecraft needs to be regularly revitalized in order to ensure the safety of the astronauts and the success of the space mission. For missions lasting a few months, this means air is continuously dehumidified, water collected for re-use, and carbon dioxide (CO2) ejected. One component of the onboard atmosphere control system is a water-saving device that Jim Knox, aerospace engineer at NASA, is optimizing through the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project. He is leading a team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (Huntsville, Alabama) that is aiming to make the assembly more cost-effective and efficient by reducing its power usage and maximizing the water saved; their goal is to save 80-90% of the water in the air. They hope to offer flight system developers at NASA an integrated approach to atmosphere revitalization and water collection that will ultimately increase the time and distance space missions can travel.

  5. Electrolysis Propulsion for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; McElroy, James F.; Mitlitsky, Fred; Weisberg, Andrew H.; Carter, Preston H., II; Myers, Blake; Reed, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrolysis propulsion has been recognized over the last several decades as a viable option to meet many satellite and spacecraft propulsion requirements. This technology, however, was never used for in-space missions. In the same time frame, water based fuel cells have flown in a number of missions. These systems have many components similar to electrolysis propulsion systems. Recent advances in component technology include: lightweight tankage, water vapor feed electrolysis, fuel cell technology, and thrust chamber materials for propulsion. Taken together, these developments make propulsion and/or power using electrolysis/fuel cell technology very attractive as separate or integrated systems. A water electrolysis propulsion testbed was constructed and tested in a joint NASA/Hamilton Standard/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories program to demonstrate these technology developments for propulsion. The results from these testbed experiments using a I-N thruster are presented. A concept to integrate a propulsion system and a fuel cell system into a unitized spacecraft propulsion and power system is outlined.

  6. Exploration Spacecraft and Space Suit Internal Atmosphere Pressure and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin; Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Campbell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The design of habitat atmospheres for future space missions is heavily driven by physiological and safety requirements. Lower EVA prebreathe time and reduced risk of decompression sickness must be balanced against the increased risk of fire and higher cost and mass of materials associated with higher oxygen concentrations. Any proposed increase in space suit pressure must consider impacts on space suit mass and mobility. Future spacecraft designs will likely incorporate more composite and polymeric materials both to reduce structural mass and to optimize crew radiation protection. Narrowed atmosphere design spaces have been identified that can be used as starting points for more detailed design studies and risk assessments.

  7. A Comparison of Photocatalytic Oxidation Reactor Performance for Spacecraft Cabin Trace Contaminant Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Scott, Joseph P.; Reinermann, Dana N.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is a maturing process technology that shows potential for spacecraft life support system application. Incorporating PCO into a spacecraft cabin atmosphere revitalization system requires an understanding of basic performance, particularly with regard to partial oxidation product production. Four PCO reactor design concepts have been evaluated for their effectiveness for mineralizing key trace volatile organic com-pounds (VOC) typically observed in crewed spacecraft cabin atmospheres. Mineralization efficiency and selectivity for partial oxidation products are compared for the reactor design concepts. The role of PCO in a spacecraft s life support system architecture is discussed.

  8. Trade Spaces in Crewed Spacecraft Atmosphere Revitalization System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.

    2010-01-01

    Developing the technological response to realizing an efficient atmosphere revitalization system for future crewed spacecraft and space habitats requires identifying and describing functional trade spaces. Mission concepts and requirements dictate the necessary functions; however, the combination and sequence of those functions possess significant flexibility. Us-ing a closed loop environmental control and life support (ECLS) system architecture as a starting basis, a functional unit operations approach is developed to identify trade spaces. Generalized technological responses to each trade space are discussed. Key performance parameters that apply to functional areas are described.

  9. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  10. Additive Manufacturing: Ensuring Quality for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore; Stephenson, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Reliable manufacturing requires that material properties and fabrication processes be well defined in order to insure that the manufactured parts meet specified requirements. While this issue is now relatively straightforward for traditional processes such as subtractive manufacturing and injection molding, this capability is still evolving for AM products. Hence, one of the principal challenges within AM is in qualifying and verifying source material properties and process control. This issue is particularly critical for applications in harsh environments and demanding applications, such as spacecraft.

  11. Spacecraft Applications of Compact Optical and Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davinic, N. M.; Nagel, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical spectrometers, and mass spectrometers to a lesser extent, have a long and rich history of use aboard spacecraft. Space mission applications include deep space science spacecraft, earth orbiting satellites, atmospheric probes, and surface landers, rovers, and penetrators. The large size of capable instruments limited their use to large, expensive spacecraft. Because of the novel application of micro-fabrication technologies, compact optical and mass spectrometers are now available. The new compact devices are especially attractive for spacecraft because of their small mass and volume, as well as their low power consumption. Dispersive optical multi-channel analyzers which cover the 0.4-1.1 micrometer wavelength are now commercially available in packages as small as 3 x 6 x 18 mm exclusive of drive and recording electronics. Mass spectrometers as small as 3 x 3 mm, again without electronics, are under development. A variety of compact optical and mass spectrometers are reviewed in this paper. A number of past space applications are described, along with some upcoming opportunities that are likely candidate missions to fly this new class of compact spectrometers.

  12. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Roth, C. J.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B- 7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  13. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Tautz, M.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B-7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters and testing will cover an extended period of up to several months. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  14. Redundancy for electric motors in spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert J.; Flew, Alastair R.

    1986-01-01

    The parts of electric motors which should be duplicated in order to provide maximum reliability in spacecraft application are identified. Various common types of redundancy are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each are noted. The principal types are illustrated by reference to specific examples. For each example, constructional details, basic performance data and failure modes are described, together with a discussion of the suitability of particular redundancy techniques to motor types.

  15. Optical fiber sensors for spacecraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebele, E. J.; Askins, C. G.; Bosse, A. B.; Kersey, A. D.; Patrick, H. J.; Pogue, W. R.; Putnam, M. A.; Simon, W. R.; Tasker, F. A.; Vincent, W. S.; Vohra, S. T.

    1999-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors offer a number of advantages for spacecraft applications. A principal application is strain sensing for structural health monitoring, shape determination, and spacecraft qualification testing. This paper will review the results of recent work at the Naval Research Laboratory where optical fiber strain sensors have been used on spacecraft structures and ground test hardware. The sensors have been both surface mounted to the structure and embedded in fiber-reinforced polymer composites. The issue of potential strength reduction of high-performance composites due to embedded optical fiber sensors and leads has been studied, low-cost fabrication of tubular struts with embedded sensors has been demonstrated, and a novel technique for fiber ingress-egress from composite parts has been developed. Applications of fiber sensors discussed in this paper include distributed dynamic strain monitoring of a honeycomb composite plate and a lightweight reflector during acoustic qualification tests, ultrahigh-sensitivity static strain and temperature measurements for precision structures, and on-line system identification of a lightweight laboratory truss.

  16. Flammability Configuration Analysis for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedley, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Fire is one of the many potentially catastrophic hazards associated with the operation of crewed spacecraft. A major lesson learned by NASA from the Apollo 204 fire in 1966 was that ignition sources in an electrically powered vehicle should and can be minimized, but can never be eliminated completely. For this reason, spacecraft fire control is based on minimizing potential ignition sources and eliminating materials that can propagate fire. Fire extinguishers are always provided on crewed spacecraft, but are not considered as part of the fire control process. "Eliminating materials that can propagate fire" does not mean eliminating all flammable materials - the cost of designing and building spacecraft using only nonflammable materials is extraordinary and unnecessary. It means controlling the quantity and configuration of such materials to eliminate potential fire propagation paths and thus ensure that any fire would be small, localized, and isolated, and would self-extinguish without harm to the crew. Over the years, NASA has developed many solutions for controlling the configuration of flammable materials (and potentially flammable materials in commercial "off-the-shelf" hardware) so that they can be used safely in air and oxygen-enriched environments in crewed spacecraft. This document describes and explains these design solutions so payload customers and other organizations can use them in designing safe and cost-effective flight hardware. Proper application of these guidelines will produce acceptable flammability configurations for hardware located in any compartment of the International Space Station or other program crewed vehicles and habitats. However, use of these guidelines does not exempt hardware organizations of the responsibility for safety of the hardware under their control.

  17. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Parnell, T. A.; Herzog, G.; Klein, J.; Jull, A. J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has opened new opportunities to study several unexplored regions of space science. The experiments have shown that the Be-7 found was concentrated in a thin surface layer of spacecraft material. The only reasonable source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. It is expected that the uptake of Be in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (Teflon). It is noted however, that (1) organic surfaces are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km/s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. Be-7 is formed by disintegration of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry.

  18. Handling Qualities of a Capsule Spacecraft During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    A piloted simulation was conducted to study handling qualities for capsule spacecraft entering the Earth s atmosphere. Eight evaluation pilots, including six pilot astronauts, provided Cooper-Harper ratings, workload ratings, and qualitative comments. The simulation began after descending through the atmospheric entry interface point and continued until the drogue parachutes deployed. There were two categories of piloting tasks, both of which required bank angle control. In one task category, the pilot followed a closed-loop bank angle command computed by the backup guidance system to manage g-loads during entry. In the other task category, the pilot used intuitive rules to determine the desired bank angle independently, based on an open-loop schedule of vertical speed, Mach, and total energy specified at several range-to-target gates along the entry trajectory. Pilots were able to accurately track the bank angle guidance commands and steered the capsule toward the recovery site with essentially the same range error as the benchmark autopilot trajectory albeit with substantially higher propellant usage, and the handling qualities for this task were satisfactory. Another key result was that the complex piloting task of atmospheric entry could be performed satisfactorily, even in the presence of large dispersions, by controlling bank angle to follow a simple open-loop schedule.

  19. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Parnell, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft has opened opportunities to investigate new phenomena in several disciplines of space science. The experiments performed for this work show that the Be-7 results only if the source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. We should expect that the uptake of beryllium in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does, in fact, differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (teflon). It is noted, however, that: (1) organic surfaces, even PTFE, are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km(exp -1)s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. The Be-7 is formed by spallation of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. The principal source region is at altitudes of 12-15 km. While very small quantities are produced above 300 km, the amount measured on the LDEF was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than expected from production at orbital altitude. The most reasonable explanation is that Be-7 is rapidly transported from low altitudes by some unknown mechanism. The process must take place on a time scale similar to the half-life of the isotope (53 days). Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry. A program was initiated to search for these isotopes and it is hoped that such studies will provide new methods for studying mixing in the upper atmosphere.

  20. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Parnell, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface (and the front surface only) of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft has opened opportunities to investigate new phenomena in several disciplines of space science. The experiments performed for this work show that the Be-7 results only if the source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. We should expect that the uptake of beryllium in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does, in fact, differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (teflon). It is noted, however, that: (1) organic surfaces, even PTFE, are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km(exp -1)s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. The Be-7 is formed by spallation of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. The principal source region is at altitudes of 12-15 km. While very small quantities are produced above 300 km, the amount measured on the LDEF was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than expected from production at orbital attitude. The most reasonable explanation is that Be-7 is rapidly transported from low altitudes by some unknown mechanism. The process must take place on a time scale similar to the half-life of the isotope (53 days). Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry. A program was initiated to search for these isotopes and it is hoped that such studies will provide new methods for studying mixing in the upper atmosphere.

  1. Computerized atmospheric trace contaminant control simulation for manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Buildup of atmospheric trace contaminants in enclosed volumes such as a spacecraft may lead to potentially serious health problems for the crew members. For this reason, active control methods must be implemented to minimize the concentration of atmospheric contaminants to levels that are considered safe for prolonged, continuous exposure. Designing hardware to accomplish this has traditionally required extensive testing to characterize and select appropriate control technologies. Data collected since the Apollo project can now be used in a computerized performance simulation to predict the performance and life of contamination control hardware to allow for initial technology screening, performance prediction, and operations and contingency studies to determine the most suitable hardware approach before specific design and testing activities begin. The program, written in FORTRAN 77, provides contaminant removal rate, total mass removed, and per pass efficiency for each control device for discrete time intervals. In addition, projected cabin concentration is provided. Input and output data are manipulated using commercial spreadsheet and data graphing software. These results can then be used in analyzing hardware design parameters such as sizing and flow rate, overall process performance and program economics. Test performance may also be predicted to aid test design.

  2. Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feoktistov, K. P.

    1974-01-01

    The task of building a spacecraft is compared to the construction of an artificial cybernetic system able to acquire and process information. Typical features for future spacecraft are outlined and the assignment of duties in spacecraft control between automatic devices and the crew is analyzed.

  3. Engineered Structured Sorbents for the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres: Applications and Modeling 2007/2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.

    2007-01-01

    In NASA s Vision for Space Exploration, humans will once again travel beyond the confines of earth s gravity, this time to remain there for extended periods. These forays will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth s gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a larger crew over much longer periods. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. This paper describes efforts to improve on typical packed beds of sorbent pellets by making use of structured sorbents and alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. The development efforts described offer a complimentary approach combining testing of subscale systems and multiphysics computer simulations to characterize the regenerative heating substrates and evaluation of engineered structured sorbent geometries. Mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics are included in the transient simulations.

  4. Spacecraft receiving antenna study: Outer planets atmospheric entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A quadrifilar helix antenna was selected for the Pioneer spacecraft receiving antenna. A model was constructed for radiation pattern measurement at 2.2 GHz. Radiation patterns were measured with the model quadrifilar helix antenna mounted on a Pioneer spacecraft model and four different configurations were tested. The results show that the antenna location does not have a major effect on its patterns over the aft hemisphere but moving the antenna away from the spacecraft improves the antenna performance.

  5. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-09-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  6. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  7. Spacecraft Electrical Connector Selection and Application Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannello, Chris; Davis, Mitchell I; Kichak, Robert A.; Slenski, George

    2009-01-01

    This assessment was initiated by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) after a number of recent "high profile" connector problems, the most visible and publicized of these being the problem with the Space Shuttle's Engine Cut-Off System cryogenic feed-thru connector. The NESC commissioned a review of NASA's connector selection and application processes for space flight applications, including how lessons learned and past problem records are fed back into the processes to avoid recurring issues. Team members were primarily from the various NASA Centers and included connector and electrical parts specialists. The commissioned study was conducted on spacecraft connector selection and application processes at NASA Centers. The team also compared the NASA spacecraft connector selection and application process to the military process, identified recent high profile connector failures, and analyzed problem report data looking for trends and common occurrences. The team characterized NASA's connector problem experience into a list of top connector issues based on anecdotal evidence of a system's impact and commonality between Centers. These top issues are as follows, in no particular rank order: electrically shorted, bent and/or recessed contact pins, contact pin/socket contamination leading to electrically open or intermittencies, connector plating corrosion or corrosion of connector components, low or inadequate contact pin retention forces, contact crimp failures, unmated connectors and mis-wiring due to workmanship errors during installation or maintenance, loose connectors due to manufacturing defects such as wavy washer and worn bayonet retention, damaged connector elastomeric seals and cryogenic connector failure. A survey was also conducted of SAE Connector AE-8C1 committee members regarding their experience relative to the NASA concerns on connectors. The most common responses in order of occurrence were contact retention, plating issues, worn-out or damaged

  8. Formation Flying Spacecraft Concept for Heliophysics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Davila, Joseph; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Shah, Neerav; Li, Steven X.

    2016-05-01

    A number of space-based heliophysics instruments would benefit from formation flying spacecraft. An occulter or a focusing optic such as a photon sieve could be mounted on a separate spacecraft rather than at the end of a boom. This would enable science measurements to be made on smaller, less expensive spacecraft. To accomplish this goal, the relative position of the spacecraft must be monitored and controlled to high precision. We describe two separate optical sensing systems that monitor relative position of the spacecraft to the level required for a photon sieve mission concept wherein the photon sieve is mounted on one spacecraft while the imaging detector is mounted on another. The first system employs a novel time of flight measurement of a laser beam that includes imbedded optical data packets. The contents of the returning data packet can be compared to the departing data packet to provide an extremely high resolution distance measurement. Employing three such systems allows measurement of pitch and yaw in addition to longitudinal separation. The second optical system monitors lateral motion. A mildy divergent laser beam is transmitted from one spacecraft to a sensor array on the second spacecraft. Monitoring the position of the brightest portion of the beam on the sensor array provides a direct measurement of lateral relative motion. Employing at least two such systems enables monitoring roll of the spacecraft as well as centration. We will also discuss low force thruster systems required for high precision station keeping.

  9. Numerical Predictions for Convective and Radiative Heating of a Spacecraft Entering a Planetary Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, M.-C.; Boubert, P.

    During atmospheric entry, a spacecraft encounters more and more dense gas layers, leading to its aerodynamic deceleration. For super- and hypersonic velocity entries, a strong bow shock wave develops in front of the spacecraft, through which dynamic energy gets transformed into thermal energy.

  10. Application of Least Mean Square Algorithms to Spacecraft Vibration Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard , Stanley E.; Nagchaudhuri, Abhijit

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm in tandem with the Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm for controlling a science instrument's line-of-sight pointing. Pointing error is caused by a periodic disturbance and spacecraft vibration. A least mean square algorithm is used on-orbit to produce the transfer function between the instrument's servo-mechanism and error sensor. The result is a set of adaptive transversal filter weights tuned to the transfer function. The Filtered-X LMS algorithm, which is an extension of the LMS, tunes a set of transversal filter weights to the transfer function between the disturbance source and the servo-mechanism's actuation signal. The servo-mechanism's resulting actuation counters the disturbance response and thus maintains accurate science instrumental pointing. A simulation model of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is used to demonstrate the algorithms.

  11. Magnetic suspension options for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Design criteria for spacecraft inertia-wheel suspensions are listed. The advantages of magnetic suspensions over other suspension types for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications are cited along with the functions performed by magnetic suspension. The common designs for magnetic suspensions are enumerated. Materials selection of permanent magnets and core materials is considered.

  12. Practical experiences with worm gearing for spacecraft power transmission applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, William; Mccown, William

    1989-01-01

    Experiences of several organizations using worm gearing for spacecraft are discussed. Practical aspects and subtleties of using worm gearing for design and operation is included. Knowledge gained from these applications is analyzed, and guidelines for usage are proposed.

  13. Applicability of ISO 16697 Data to Spacecraft Fire Fighting Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation Agenda: (1) Selected variables affecting oxygen consumption during spacecraft fires, (2) General overview of ISO 16697, (3) Estimated amounts of material consumed during combustion in typical ISS enclosures, (4) Discussion on potential applications.

  14. Spacecraft applications of advanced global positioning system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, Gaylord; Dodds, James; Udalov, Sergei; Austin, Richard; Loomis, Peter; Duboraw, I. Newton, III

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential uses of Global Positioning System (GPS) in spacecraft applications in the following areas: attitude control and tracking; structural control; traffic control; and time base definition (synchronization). Each of these functions are addressed. Also addressed are the hardware related issues concerning the application of GPS technology and comparisons are provided with alternative instrumentation methods for specific functions required for an advanced low earth orbit spacecraft.

  15. Atmosphere explorer missions C, D, and E. Spacecraft experiment interface definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer Missions C, D, & E Spacecraft/Experiment Interface Definition Study is discussed. The objectives of the study included an analysis of the accommodation requirements of the experiments for the three missions, an assessment of the overall effect of these requirements on the spacecraft system design and performance, and the detailed definition of all experiment/spacecraft electrical, mechanical, and environmental interfaces. In addition, the study included the identification and definition of system characteristics required to ensure compatibility with the consolidated STADAN and MSFN communications networks.

  16. Correlation of solar irradiance and atmospheric temperature variations derived from spacecraft radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Bolden, William C.; Gibson, M. A.; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Long-term changes in the mean global atmospheric temperature and the total solar irradiance were examined utilizing 1979-1989 spacecraft measurements. Outgoing longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere was employed to infer global atmospheric temperatures. Evidence was determined that indicates the global temperatures should decline in the 1990-1997 period as the magnitude of the incoming solar irradiance declines with decreasing solar magnetic activity.

  17. Application of fiber optics in spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Bergman, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    The unique requirements placed on an optical fiber data system in space are briefly reviewed in this paper. These include temperature extremes, particle radiation, and, in some cases, a stringent electrical power budget. An overriding need is for the best possible reliability. Results related to the power consumption of a fiber terminal pair are reported, with the conclusion that a 32-port transmission star bus configuration could be operated error-free at 10 Mbits/s on 1/8 watt per transmitting terminal. The design of a transmitter terminal optimized for low idling power consumption is discussed. Although the electronic elements on a spacecraft are protected, the fiber cable may be subjected to large temperature extremes. Measured effects of temperature on fibers and cables are discussed and related to bus design. Radiation effects are briefly reviewed, with special reference to the long-duration low dose rate environment of a spacecraft.

  18. Application of DSN spacecraft tracking technology to experimental gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1978-01-01

    Spacecraft tracking technology of the Deep Space Net (DSN) has been used in the past to measure the general-relativistic increase in round-trip group delay between earth and a spacecraft. As the DSN technology continues to improve, other gravitational experiments will become possible. Two possibilities are discussed in this paper. The first concerns the application of solar-system dynamics to the testing of general relativity. The second involves the detection of VLF gravitational radiation (0.1 to 0.0001 Hz) by means of Doppler tracking of spacecraft.

  19. Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John F.; Haggerty, James J.; Woodburn, John H.

    1961-01-01

    In this twentieth century, we are privileged to witness the first steps toward realization of an age-old dream: the exploration of space. Already, in the first few years of the Space Age, man has been able to penetrate the layer of atmosphere which surrounds his planet and to venture briefly into space. Scores of man-made objects have been thrust into space, some of them to roam the solar system forever. Behind each space mission are years of patient research, thousands of man-hours of labor, and large sums of money. Because the sums involved are so enormous, the question is frequently asked, "Is it worth it?" Many people want to know what return this huge investment will bring to mankind. The return on the investment is knowledge. The accumulation of knowledge over the centuries has made possible our advanced way of life. As we unlock more and more of the secrets of the universe through space exploration, we add new volumes to the encyclopedia of man's knowledge. This will be applied to the benefit of mankind. For the practical-minded, there are concrete benefits to our way of life. Although we are still in the Stone Age of space exploration, a number of immediate applications of space technology are already apparent. For instance, imagine the benefits of an absolutely perfect system of predicting the weather. Or, going a step further, even changing the weather. And wouldn't it be fascinating to watch the next Olympic games, telecast from Tokyo, on your TV set? These are just a few of the practical benefits made possible by space technology.

  20. Atmospheric electricity. [lightning protection criteria in spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Atmospheric electricity must be considered in the design, transportation, and operation of aerospace vehicles. The effect of the atmosphere as an insulator and conductor of high voltage electricity, at various atmospheric pressures, must also be considered. The vehicle can be protected as follows: (1) By insuring that all metallic sections are connected by electrical bonding so that the current flow from a lightning stroke is conducted over the skin without any gaps where sparking would occur or current would be carried inside; (2) by protecting buildings and other structures on the ground with a system of lightning rods and wires over the outside to carry the lightning stroke into the ground; (3) by providing a zone of protection for launch complexes; (4) by providing protection devices in critical circuits; (5) by using systems which have no single failure mode; and (6) by appropriate shielding of units sensitive to electromagnetic radiation.

  1. [Dynamic control of the atmospheric parameters of spacecraft].

    PubMed

    Breslav, I S; Salazkin, V N

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of experimental data a mathematical model of relationships between physiological parameters, oxygen content in the atmosphere and exercises has been developed. Using the model, it has been demonstrated that circulation and respiration reactions to exercises can be optimized by increasing the partial pressure of oxygen as related to the exercise level. A probable law of the dynamic and physiologically optimal control of the oxygen content in the space cabin atmosphere has been advanced. In cases of an uncontrolled decrease of PO2 the oxygen supply of crewmembers can be optimized by the dynamic control of the ambient CO2 content.

  2. The Prospect of Responsive Spacecraft Using Aeroassisted, Trans-Atmospheric Maneuvers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    to the ellipticity of the Earth , however, the distance between lines of latitude increases towards the poles and, as a result, cannot be assumed...life for low- Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft, both manned and unmanned. Transcending this paradigm, atmospheric re-entry can be employed as a means of...Properties ........................................................................................................40 Earth -Based Constants

  3. Disinfectants for spacecraft applications - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David W.; Mallary, Laura L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    The review of disinfectants for use on manned missions emphasizes the need for contamination control to prevent the detrimental effects of bacteria growth on crew health. Microbial control is possible by means of biocides, but the selected product has to meet stringent toxicity requirements for the small environments in spacecraft. The testing and evaluation is described of four biocide candidates: hydrogen peroxide, quaternary ammonium compounds, iodine, and glutaraldehyde. The effectiveness of the disinfectants are analyzed in terms of the ability to treat typical microbial counts from Skylab missions in a closed environment. It is shown that many biocide candidates are not compatible with the ECLSS, water-recovery management, and air-revitalization subsystems of the Space Station Freedom. The use of hydrogen peroxide is proposed with a secondary stronger agent for microbial spills from biological experiments.

  4. Atmospheric Models for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Justus, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will review the historical development of reference and standard atmosphere models and their applications. The evolution of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere will be addressed, along with the Range Reference Atmospheres and, in particular, the NASA Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM). The extensive scope and content of the GRAM will be addressed since it represents the most extensive and complete 'Reference' atmosphere model in use today. Its origin was for engineering applications and that remains today as its principal use.

  5. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  6. Spacecraft relative guidance via spatio-temporal resolution in atmospheric density forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, David; Pérez, David; Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Mazal, Leonel

    2016-12-01

    Spacecraft equipped with the capability to vary their ballistic coefficient can use differential drag as the control force to perform propellant-less relative maneuvers. Because atmospheric drag is proportional to atmospheric density, uncertainty in atmospheric density makes the generation and tracking of drag-based guidances difficult. Spatio-temporal resolution, or the mapping of density information to altitude and time, is shown in this work to improve atmospheric density estimation from forecasted density for spacecraft in LEO. This is achieved by propagating simulated orbits for two spacecraft using forecasted density. Additionally, a receding-horizon control algorithm is introduced, with the goal of improving the tracking of guidances. Using a simulated perfect forecast of the atmospheric density for propagation of the orbits, relative guidance trajectories are generated and tracked, establishing the benefit of adding spatio-temporal resolution. Next, imperfect density forecasting is added, indicating that the benefit of spatio-temporal resolution is retained in the presence of imperfect forecasting. Finally, a receding-horizon control algorithm is used with imperfect forecasting, demonstrating that receding-horizon control improves the tracking of guidances compared to single-horizon control.

  7. LDEF materials results for spacecraft applications: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Compiler); Dooling, D. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    To address the challenges of space environmental effects, NASA designed the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for an 18-month mission to expose thousands of samples of candidate materials that might be used on a space station or other orbital spacecraft. LDEF was launched in April 1984 and was to have been returned to Earth in 1985. Changes in mission schedules postponed retrieval until January 1990, after 69 months in orbit. Analyses of the samples recovered from LDEF have provided spacecraft designers and managers with the most extensive data base on space materials phenomena. Many LDEF samples were greatly changed by extended space exposure. Among even the most radially altered samples, NASA and its science teams are finding a wealth of surprising conclusions and tantalizing clues about the effects of space on materials. Many were discussed at the first two LDEF results conferences and subsequent professional papers. The LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications Conference was convened in Huntsville to discuss implications for spacecraft design. Already, paint and thermal blanket selections for space station and other spacecraft have been affected by LDEF data. This volume synopsizes those results.

  8. Analytical theories for spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres and design of planetary probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Sarag J.

    This dissertation deals with the development of analytical theories for spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres and the design of entry spacecraft or probes for planetary science and human exploration missions. Poincare's method of small parameters is used to develop an improved approximate analytical solution for Yaroshevskii's classical planetary entry equation for the ballistic entry of a spacecraft into planetary atmospheres. From this solution, other important expressions are developed including deceleration, stagnation-point heat rate, and stagnation-point integrated heat load. The accuracy of the solution is assessed via numerical integration of the exact equations of motion. The solution is also compared to the classical solutions of Yaroshevskii and Allen and Eggers. The new second-order analytical solution is more accurate than Yaroshevskii's fifth-order solution for a range of shallow (-3 deg) to steep (up to -90 deg) entry flight path angles, thereby extending the range of applicability of the solution as compared to the classical Yaroshevskii solution, which is restricted to an entry flight path of approximately -40 deg. Universal planetary entry equations are used to develop a new analytical theory for ballistic entry of spacecraft for moderate to large initial flight path angles. Chapman's altitude variable is used as the independent variable. Poincare's method of small parameters is used to develop an analytical solution for the velocity and the flight path angle. The new solution is used to formulate key expressions for range, time-of-flight, deceleration, and aerodynamic heating parameters (e.g., stagnation-point heat rate, total stagnation-point heat load, and average heat input). The classical approximate solution of Chapman's entry equation appears as the zero-order term in the new solution. The new solution represents an order of magnitude enhancement in the accuracy compared to existing analytical solutions for moderate to large entry

  9. Saturn Deep Atmospheric Entry Probes Delivered by INSIDE Jupiter Derivative Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    In situ probes are the most reliable means for sampling composition and conditions deep in giant planet atmospheres. Deep constituent abundances at the giant planets offer clues to conditions in the solar systems protoplanetary disk and variations with heliocentric distance. Currently in situ atmospheric data are available from only one giant planet, Jupiter, and probes that penetrate deeper than the Galileo probe are needed there to measure the deep abundances of such important species as H2O and H2S. Deep probes at Saturn would extend the sampled heliocentric range to Saturn, providing important constraints on the conditions and variability of the protoplanetary disk, and would provide significant new information about Saturn and its evolutionary processes. Such a probe mission could be implemented using a derivative of the INSIDE Jupiter mission's spacecraft as the Carrier/Relay Spacecraft (CRSC), with probes per JPL/Team X and other design studies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. New materials for manned spacecraft, aircraft, and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnofsky, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    The application of fire resistant spacecraft materials to the interior design of commercial aircraft is discussed. The use of such materials for curtains, upholstery, carpets, decorative panels, cabinets, paper products, and oxygen lines is examined. It is concluded that the highest degree of nonflammability can be obtained with inorganic fibers such as asbestos and fiber glass. The application of various chemical compounds for specific purposes is presented.

  11. Precision cleaning methods for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, L. E.; Lindewall, H.

    1988-01-01

    A small CO2 snow cleaning apparatus to clean both molecular films and particles from small and large components and surfaces was constructed. Various types of surfaces were cleaned using the CO2 technique. Vacuum deposited and sputtered metallic coatings such as germanium, aluminum, and silver and silicon wafers, and polished copper conical mirrors were purposely contaminated with everyday aerospace contaminants, including particle fallout and fingerprints. Precleaning characterization by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), ellipsometry, nonvolatile residue, and microscopic particle evaluation served as evaluation of cleaning efficiency. Good results were obtained in trial application.

  12. Atmospheric oxidants. [ozone concentration and combustion product aspects in spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The ingredients which cause the air pollution are a mixture of oxides of organic matter (mostly nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons) and ozone. Ozone, although considered one of the rare atmospheric gases, needs consideration in spacecraft design because of its chemical reaction (oxidation) with organic materials, especially rubber, which becomes hard and brittle under tension in a few minutes time. At the earth surface, a maximum of 60 parts per hundred million of oxidants composed of nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, sulphur dioxide, sulphur trioxides, peroxides, and ozone can be expected for 72 hours when smog occurs. A table representing distribution of ozone concentration with atmospheric altitude is included.

  13. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Malave-Sanabria, T.; Hambourger, P.; Rutledge, S.K.; Roig, D.; Degroh, K.K.; Hung, C.

    1994-01-01

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10[sup 2] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10[sup 7] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  14. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Malave-Sanabria, Tania; Hambourger, Paul; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Roig, David; Degroh, Kim K.; Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 11) ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 11) ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  15. Bubble memory module for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P. J.; Looney, K. T.; Nichols, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Bubble domain technology offers an all-solid-state alternative for data storage in onboard data systems. A versatile modular bubble memory concept was developed. The key module is the bubble memory module which contains all of the storage devices and circuitry for accessing these devices. This report documents the bubble memory module design and preliminary hardware designs aimed at memory module functional demonstration with available commercial bubble devices. The system architecture provides simultaneous operation of bubble devices to attain high data rates. Banks of bubble devices are accessed by a given bubble controller to minimize controller parts. A power strobing technique is discussed which could minimize the average system power dissipation. A fast initialization method using EEPROM (electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory) devices promotes fast access. Noise and crosstalk problems and implementations to minimize these are discussed. Flight memory systems which incorporate the concepts and techniques of this work could now be developed for applications.

  16. Performance of Off-the-Shelf Technologies for Spacecraft Cabin Atmospheric Major Constituent Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatara, J. D.; Perry, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring the atmospheric composition of a crewed spacecraft cabin is central to successfully expanding the breadth and depth of first-hand human knowledge and understanding of space. Highly reliable technologies must be identified and developed to monitor atmospheric composition. This will enable crewed space missions that last weeks, months, and eventually years. Atmospheric composition monitoring is a primary component of any environmental control and life support system. Instrumentation employed to monitor atmospheric composition must be inexpensive, simple, and lightweight and provide robust performance. Such a system will ensure an environment that promotes human safety and health, and that the environment can be maintained with a high degree of confidence. Key to this confidence is the capability for any technology to operate autonomously, with little intervention from the crew or mission control personnel. A study has been conducted using technologies that, with further development, may reach these goals.

  17. Modeling of atmospherically induced gas phase optical contamination from orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, J. B.; Cooke, D. C.; Tautz, M. F.; Murad, Edmond

    1990-08-01

    We present in this paper results of a predictive code (SOCRATES: spacecraft/orbiter contamination representation accounting for transiently emitted species) which has been developed to assess the effects of contamination on measurements aboard spacecraft in low Earth orbit. SOCRATES is a Monte Carlo code which includes in its present version scattering, collisions leading to kinetic-to-vibrational energy transfer, and reactive collisions. The application of this code to actual measurements aboard spacecraft in low Earth orbit makes it possible to evaluate data obtained on these platforms with a view toward extracting the data of interest from contaminated signals. Molecules considered in the present study include CO2, H2O, OH, H2, and CO.

  18. A new battery charger/discharger converter. [for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, R. D.; Cuk, S.; Behen, W.

    1978-01-01

    A new optimum topology dc-to-dc switching converter is extended to provide bidirectional current flow. The resulting two-quadrant converter can be employed to eliminate the discontinuous current mode in normal unidirectional applications, but is especially suited for spacecraft battery conditioning as a charge-discharge regulator in place of the conventional separate converters. Implementation of the control features and the battery charge current and voltage limits are discussed.

  19. Dynamics of Space Particles and Spacecrafts Passing by the Atmosphere of the Earth

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida; Golebiewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The present research studies the motion of a particle or a spacecraft that comes from an orbit around the Sun, which can be elliptic or hyperbolic, and that makes a passage close enough to the Earth such that it crosses its atmosphere. The idea is to measure the Sun-particle two-body energy before and after this passage in order to verify its variation as a function of the periapsis distance, angle of approach, and velocity at the periapsis of the particle. The full system is formed by the Sun, the Earth, and the particle or the spacecraft. The Sun and the Earth are in circular orbits around their center of mass and the motion is planar for all the bodies involved. The equations of motion consider the restricted circular planar three-body problem with the addition of the atmospheric drag. The initial conditions of the particle or spacecraft (position and velocity) are given at the periapsis of its trajectory around the Earth. PMID:24396298

  20. Dynamics of space particles and spacecrafts passing by the atmosphere of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Vivian Martins; Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida; Golebiewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The present research studies the motion of a particle or a spacecraft that comes from an orbit around the Sun, which can be elliptic or hyperbolic, and that makes a passage close enough to the Earth such that it crosses its atmosphere. The idea is to measure the Sun-particle two-body energy before and after this passage in order to verify its variation as a function of the periapsis distance, angle of approach, and velocity at the periapsis of the particle. The full system is formed by the Sun, the Earth, and the particle or the spacecraft. The Sun and the Earth are in circular orbits around their center of mass and the motion is planar for all the bodies involved. The equations of motion consider the restricted circular planar three-body problem with the addition of the atmospheric drag. The initial conditions of the particle or spacecraft (position and velocity) are given at the periapsis of its trajectory around the Earth.

  1. The Interaction of Spacecraft Cabin Atmospheric Quality and Water Processing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Croomes, Scott D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Although designed to remove organic contaminants from a variety of waste water streams, the planned U.S.- and present Russian-provided water processing systems onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have capacity limits for some of the more common volatile cleaning solvents used for housekeeping purposes. Using large quantities of volatile cleaning solvents during the ground processing and in-flight operational phases of a crewed spacecraft such as the ISS can lead to significant challenges to the water processing systems. To understand the challenges facing the management of water processing capacity, the relationship between cabin atmospheric quality and humidity condensate loading is presented. This relationship is developed as a tool to determine the cabin atmospheric loading that may compromise water processing system performance. A comparison of cabin atmospheric loading with volatile cleaning solvents from ISS, Mir, and Shuttle are presented to predict acceptable limits to maintain optimal water processing system performance.

  2. Upper and Middle Atmospheric Density Modeling Requirements for Spacecraft Design and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H. (Editor); Smith, R. E. (Editor); Johnson, D. L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Presented and discussed are concerns with applications of neutral atmospheric density models to space vehicle engineering design and operational problems. The area of concern which the atmospheric model developers and the model users considered, involved middle atmosphere (50 to 90 km altitude) and thermospheric (above 90 km) models and their engineering application. Engineering emphasis involved areas such as orbital decay and lifetime prediction along with attitude and control studies for different types of space and reentry vehicles.

  3. Development of a Test Protocol for Spacecraft Post-Fire Atmospheric Cleanup and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, David; Hornung, Steven D.; Haas, Jon P.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Detecting and extinguishing fires, along with post-fire atmospheric cleaning and monitoring, are vital components of a spacecraft fire response system. Preliminary efforts focused on the technology evaluation of these systems under realistic conditions are described in this paper. While the primary objective of testing is to determine a smoke mitigation filter s performance, supplemental evaluations measuring the smoke-filled chamber handheld commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) atmospheric monitoring devices (combustion product monitors) are also conducted. The test chamber consists of a 1.4 cubic meter (50 cu. ft.) volume containing a smoke generator. The fuel used to generate the smoke is a mixture of polymers in quantities representative of materials involved in a circuit board fire as a typical spacecraft fire. Two fire conditions were examined: no flame and flame. No flame events are produced by pyrolyzing the fuel mixture in a quartz tube furnace with forced ventilation to produce a white, lingering-type smoke. Flame events ignite the smoke at the outlet of the tube furnace producing combustion characterized by a less opaque smoke with black soot. Electrochemical sensor measurements showed carbon monoxide is a major indicator of each fire. Acid gas measurements were recorded, but cross interferents are currently uncharacterized. Electrochemical sensor measurements and sample acquisition techniques from photoacoustic sensors are being improved. Overall, this research shows fire characterization using traditional analytical chemistry techniques is required to verify measurements recorded using COTS atmospheric monitoring devices.

  4. Applications of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Christopher John

    Surface modification techniques using plasmas have historically been completed in a low pressure environment due to Pd (pressure x gap distance) considerations influencing the behavior of plasma generation. Generally, plasmas produced in a low pressure environment are of a non-thermal or cold nature. The basic feature of non-thermal plasmas is the majority of electrical energy used to generate the plasma is primarily used to produce energetic electrons for generating chemical species. Low pressure plasmas serve many purposes for materials processing. Since the plasma environment is contained within a closed vessel, the plasma can be controlled very easily. Low pressure plasmas have been used in many industries but the complexity associated with the large pumping stations and limitation to batch processing has motivated new work in the area of atmospheric plasmas. Atmospheric plasmas offer both economic and technical justification for use over low pressure plasmas. Since atmospheric plasmas can be operated at ambient conditions, lower costs associated with continuous processing and a decrease in the complexity of equipment validate atmospheric plasma processing as a next generation plasma-aided manufacturing process. In an effort to advance acceptance of atmospheric plasma processing into industry, a process was developed, the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), in order to generate a homogeneous and non-thermal plasma discharge at ambient conditions. The discharge was applied to the reduction of known food borne pathogens, deposition of thin film materials, and modification of lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4A: Descriptions of meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. Y. (Editor); Sheu, Y. T. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) provides data from and information about space science and applications flight investigations in support of additional studies beyond those performed as the principal part of any flight mission. The Earth-orbiting spacecraft for investigations of the earth and its atmosphere is discussed. Geodetic tracking data are included in this category. The principal subject areas presented are meteorology and earth resources survey, and the spacecraft selection is made according to those subjects. All experiments on board the spacecraft are described. No attempt is made to reference investigations that are related to the above disciplines, but that are described in other volumes of this series.

  6. Comparing Meteorite and Spacecraft Noble Gas Measurements to Trace Processes in the Martian Crust and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    Our knowledge of the noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions in the Martian crust and atmosphere come from two sources, measurements of meteorites from Mars and in situ measurements by spacecraft. Measurements by the Viking landers had large uncertainties, but were precise enough to tie the meteorites to Mars. Hence most of the questions we have are currently defined by meteorite measurements. Curiosity's SAM has confirmed that the Ar isotopic composition of the atmosphere is highly fractionated, presumably representing atmospheric loss that can now be modeled with more confidence. What turns out to be a more difficult trait to explain is the fact that the ratio of Kr/Xe in nakhlites, chassignites and ALH84001 is distinct from the atmospheric ratio, as defined by measurements from shergottites. This discrepancy has been suggested to be a result of atmosphere/groundwater/rock interaction, polar clathrate formation, or perhaps local temperature conditions. More detailed atmospheric measurements, along with targeted simulation experiments, will be needed to make full use of this anomaly.

  7. Radio scintillations during occultations by turbulent planetary atmospheres. [remote sensing via flyby spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Ishimaru, A.; Yang, F.-C.

    1980-01-01

    The radio occultation experiment which uses the radio link between the earth and spacecraft passing behind planets has proven to be an important method for remote sensing turbulence in planetary atmospheres. The effects of defocusing and anisotropic irregularities on the turbulence-induced fluctuations of the radio occultation signal are examined. Rytov's method along with geometrical optics is employed to study the frequency spectra and coherences of the log amplitude and phase fluctuations of spherical waves operating at one as well as two frequencies. Comparison with the Mariner 5 2.3-GHz measurements shows good agreement with the theoretical results.

  8. Embedded Thermal Control for Subsystems for Next Generation Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. NASA, the Defense Department and commercial interests are actively engaged in developing miniaturized spacecraft systems and scientific instruments to leverage smaller cheaper spacecraft form factors such as CubeSats. This paper outlines research and development efforts among Goddard Space Flight Center personnel and its several partners to develop innovative embedded thermal control subsystems. Embedded thermal control subsystems is a cross cutting enabling technology integrating advanced manufacturing techniques to develop multifunctional intelligent structures to reduce Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) consumption of both the thermal control subsystem and overall spacecraft. Embedded thermal control subsystems permit heat acquisition and rejection at higher temperatures than state of the art systems by employing both advanced heat transfer equipment (integrated heat exchangers) and high heat transfer phenomena. The Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Engineering Branch has active investigations seeking to characterize advanced thermal control systems for near term spacecraft missions. The embedded thermal control subsystem development effort consists of fundamental research as well as development of breadboard and prototype hardware and spaceflight validation efforts. This paper will outline relevant fundamental investigations of micro-scale heat transfer and electrically driven liquid film boiling. The hardware development efforts focus upon silicon based high heat flux applications (electronic chips, power electronics etc.) and multifunctional structures. Flight validation efforts include variable gravity campaigns and a proposed CubeSat based flight demonstration of a breadboard embedded thermal control system. The CubeSat investigation is technology demonstration will characterize in long-term low earth orbit a breadboard embedded thermal subsystem and its individual components to develop

  9. Technology forecasting for space communication. [analysis of systems for application to Spacecraft Data and Tracking Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine techniques for application to space communication. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) optical communication systems, (2) laser communications for data acquisition networks, (3) spacecraft data rate requirements, (4) telemetry, command, and data handling, (5) spacecraft tracking and data network antenna and preamplifier cost tradeoff study, and (6) spacecraft communication terminal evaluation.

  10. External stability of a resonance during the descent of a spacecraft with a small variable asymmetry in the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimov, V. V.; Lashin, V. S.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the problem of a spacecraft's descent with a small asymmetry in the rarefied martian atmosphere at low values of the angle of attack. The use of the method of averaging and conditions of external stability of the main resonance make it possible for us to determine several characteristic cases of occurrence of external stability and instability during rotation of the spacecraft. It is shown, that control of the asymmetry in the above-described problem can provide stabilization of rotation of the spacecraft.

  11. Application of Space Environmental Observations to Spacecraft Pre-Launch Engineering and Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems and applying this knowledge to spacecraft pre-launch engineering and operations. Particle radiation, neutral gas particles, ultraviolet and x-rays, as well as micrometeoroids and orbital debris in the space environment have various effects on spacecraft systems, including degradation of microelectronic and optical components, physical damage, orbital decay, biasing of instrument readings, and system shutdowns. Space climate and weather must be considered during the mission life cycle (mission concept, mission planning, systems design, and launch and operations) to minimize and manage risk to both the spacecraft and its systems. A space environment model for use in the mission life cycle is presented.

  12. Application of GPS attitude determination to gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. G.; Cohen, Clark E.; Parkinson, Bradford W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS) technology have initiated a new era in aerospace navigation and control. GPS receivers have become increasingly compact and affordable, and new developments have made attitude determination using subcentimeter positioning among two or more antennas feasible for real-time applications. GPS-based attitude control systems will become highly portable packages which provide time, navigation, and attitude information of sufficient accuracy for many aerospace needs. A typical spacecraft application of GPS attitude determination is a gravity gradient stabilized satellite in low Earth orbit that employs a GPS receiver and four body mounted patch antennas. The coupled, linearized equations of motion enable complete position and attitude information to be extracted from only two antennas. A discussion of the various error sources for spaceborne GPS attitude measurement systems is included. Attitude determination of better than 0.3 degrees is possible for 1 meter antenna separation. Suggestions are provided to improve the accuracy of the attitude solution.

  13. Spacecraft-spacecraft radio-metric tracking: Signal acquisition requirements and application to Mars approach navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R. D.; Thurman, S.; Edwards, C.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler and ranging measurements between spacecraft can be obtained only when the ratio of the total received signal power to noise power density (P(sub t)/N(sub 0)) at the receiving spacecraft is sufficiently large that reliable signal detection can be achieved within a reasonable time period. In this article, the requirement on P(sub t)/N(sub 0) for reliable carrier signal detection is calculated as a function of various system parameters, including characteristics of the spacecraft computing hardware and a priori uncertainty in spacecraft-spacecraft relative velocity and acceleration. Also calculated is the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirements for reliable detection of a ranging signal, consisting of a carrier with pseudonoise (PN) phase modulation. Once the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirement is determined, then for a given set of assumed spacecraft telecommunication characteristics (transmitted signal power, antenna gains, and receiver noise temperatures) it is possible to calculate the maximum range at which a carrier signal or ranging signal may be acquired. For example, if a Mars lander and a spacecraft approaching Mars are each equipped with 1-m-diameter antennas, the transmitted power is 5 W, and the receiver noise temperatures are 350 K, then S-band carrier signal acquisition can be achieved at ranges exceeding 10 million km. An error covariance analysis illustrates the utility of in situ Doppler and ranging measurements for Mars approach navigation. Covariance analysis results indicate that navigation accuracies of a few km can be achieved with either data type. The analysis also illustrates dependency of the achievable accuracy on the approach trajectory velocity.

  14. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    In evaluating the effects of spacecraft motions on atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) experimentation, the motions of concern are those which will result in the movement of the fluid or cloud particles within the experiment chambers. Of the various vehicle motions and residual forces which can and will occur, three types appear most likely to damage the experimental results: non-steady rotations through a large angle, long-duration accelerations in a constant direction, and vibrations. During the ACPL ice crystal growth experiments, the crystals are suspended near the end of a long fiber (20 cm long by 200 micron diameter) of glass or similar material. Small vibrations of the supported end of the fiber could cause extensive motions of the ice crystal, if care is not taken to avoid this problem.

  15. In vitro cytogenetic studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, J.

    1986-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short-term assay technique to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA-damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) was chosen for this study since it occurred as an atmospheric contaminant in ten of the first 12 STS flights, and has been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because relatively few data are available on the toxicity or mutagenicity of this common biological fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used in this study. Neither dichloromethane (10 ppm to 500 ppm) nor glutaraldehyde (1 ppm to 10 ppm) increased SCE levels following 20-hour exposure of BHK-21 cells to the test chemicals.

  16. Genetic toxicity studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Joseph, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short term assay techinque to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used. Test organics were added to the culture media for 18 hrs, in concentrations ranging from one to 20 ppm. Acetaldehyde and carbon disulfide were chosen for this study since they have occurred as atmospheric contaminants in many of the STS flights, and have been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because few data are available on the mutagenicity of this common fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. Acetaldehyde was a very strong inducer of SCE at concentrations of 2 ppm and above. Glutaraldehyde and carbon disulfide failed to induce SCE.

  17. Flow Cooling of Superconducting Magnets for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, A. J.; Audette, W. E.; Barton, M. D.; Hilderbrand, J. K.; Marshall, W. S.; Rey, C. M.; Winter, D. S.; Petro, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The development and testing of a flow cooling system for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets is described. The system includes a turbo-Brayton cryocooler, a magnet thermal interface, and a magnet thermal isolation and support system. The target application is the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). Turbo-Brayton coolers are well suited to such spacecraft applications, as they are compact, modular, lightweight, and efficient, with long maintenance-free lifetimes. Furthermore, the technology scales well to high-cooling capacities. The feasibility of using turbo-Brayton coolers in this application was proven in a design exercise in which existing cooler designs were scaled to provide cooling for the magnet sets required by 200 kW and 1 MW VASIMR engines. The performance of the concepts for the thermal interface and the thermal isolation and support system were measured in separate laboratory tests with a demonstration system built about a representative HTS magnet. Cooling for these tests was provided by a flow cooling loop comprising a compressor, recuperator and GM cryocooler, with the flow pressure, temperature, and mass flow rate selected to effectively simulate the turbo-Brayton operating condition. During system testing, the magnet was cooled below its design operating temperature of 35 K, and good thermal uniformity (<0.4 K) and low thermal loads (<0.5 W) were demonstrated.

  18. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  19. Maneuvering of flexible spacecraft with application to SCOLE. [Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Quinn, R. D.; Norris, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the derivation of the equations of motion for the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE). For future reference, the equations of motion of a similar structure orbiting the earth are also derived. The structure is assumed to undergo large rigid-body maneuvers and small elastic deformations. A perturbation approach is presented where the quantities defining the rigid-body maneuver are assumed to be relatively large, with the elastic deformations and deviations from the rigid-body maneuver being relatively small. The perturbation equations have the form of linear, non-self-adjoint equations with time-dependent coefficients. An active control technique can then be formulated to permit maneuvering of the spacecraft and simultaneously suppressing the elastic vibration.

  20. Autonomous spacecraft executive and its application to rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komura, Fuminobu; Furuya, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Toshiro; Anderson, Robert L.; Tsugawa, Roy K.

    1994-01-01

    Autonomy is needed for future spacecraft to solve the problems of human operator overload and transmission delay. This paper describes the autonomous spacecraft executive for rendezvous and docking. It is an onboard expert system and has decision making capability for mission planning of nominal and contingency cases. The executive has been developed and verified using a hardware motion based simulator.

  1. Cooper-Harper Experience Report for Spacecraft Handling Qualities Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric R.; Frost, Chad R.; Alderete, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    A synopsis of experience from the fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft communities in handling qualities development and the use of the Cooper-Harper pilot rating scale is presented as background for spacecraft handling qualities research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E). In addition, handling qualities experiences and lessons-learned from previous United States (US) spacecraft developments are reviewed. This report is intended to provide a central location for references, best practices, and lessons-learned to guide current and future spacecraft handling qualities RDT&E.

  2. New Platforms for Suborbital Astronomical Observations and In Situ Atmospheric Measurements: Spacecraft, Instruments, and Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodway, K.; DeForest, C. E.; Diller, J.; Vilas, F.; Sollitt, L. S.; Reyes, M. F.; Filo, A. S.; Anderson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Suborbital astronomical observations have over 50 years' history using NASA's sounding rockets and experimental space planes. The new commercial space industry is developing suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV's) to provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space at ~100 km altitude. In the case of XCOR Aerospace's Lynx spacecraft, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a customized mission. Some of the first-generation instruments and facilities that will conduct solar observations on dedicated Lynx science missions include the SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP) and Atsa Suborbital Observatory, as well as KickSat sprites, which are picosatellites for in situ atmospheric and solar phenomena measurements. The SSIPP is a demonstration two-stage pointed solar observatory that operates inside the Lynx cockpit. The coarse pointing stage includes the pilot in the feedback loop, and the fine stage stabilizes the solar image to achieve arcsecond class pointing. SSIPP is a stepping-stone to future external instruments that can operate with larger apertures and shorter wavelengths in the solar atmosphere. The Planetary Science Institute's Atsa Suborbital Observatory combines the strengths of ground-based observatories and space-based observing to create a facility where a telescope is maintained and used interchangeably with either in-house facility instruments or user-provided instruments. The Atsa prototype is a proof of concept, hand-guided camera that mounts on the interior of the Lynx cockpit to test target acquisition and tracking for human-operated suborbital astronomy. KickSat sprites are mass-producible, one inch printed circuit boards (PCBs) populated by programmable off the shelf microprocessors and radios for real time data transmission. The sprite PCBs can integrate chip-based radiometers, magnetometers

  3. Application of partial differential equation modeling of the control/structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Rajiyah, H.

    1991-01-01

    Partial differential equations for modeling the structural dynamics and control systems of flexible spacecraft are applied here in order to facilitate systems analysis and optimization of these spacecraft. Example applications are given, including the structural dynamics of SCOLE, the Solar Array Flight Experiment, the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. The development of related software is briefly addressed.

  4. Application of partial differential equation modeling of the control/structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Rajiyah, H.

    Partial differential equations for modeling the structural dynamics and control systems of flexible spacecraft are applied here in order to facilitate systems analysis and optimization of these spacecraft. Example applications are given, including the structural dynamics of SCOLE, the Solar Array Flight Experiment, the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. The development of related software is briefly addressed.

  5. Use of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Trigwell, Steven; Calle, Carlos I.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APGD) plasmas have been proposed for sterilizing spacecraft surfaces prior to launch. The advantages of APGD plasmas for the sterilization of spacecraft surfaces include low temperatures at treatment sites, rapid inactivation kinetics of exposed microbial cells, physical degradation and removal of microbial cells, physical removal of organic biosignature molecules, and short exposure times for the materials. However, few studies have tested APGD plasmas on spacecraft materials for their effectiveness in both sterilizing surfaces and removal of microbial cells or spores. A helium (He)+oxygen (O2) APGD plasma was used to expose six spacecraft materials (aluminum 6061, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polycarbonate, Saf-T-Vu, Rastex, and Herculite 20) doped with spores of the common spacecraft contaminant, Bacillus subtilis, for periods of time up to 6 min. Results indicated that greater than six orders of magnitude reductions in viability were observed for B. subtilis spores in as short of time as 40 s exposure to the APGD plasmas. Spacecraft materials were not affected by exposures to the APGD plasmas. However, Saf-T-Vu was the only material in which spores of B. subtilis adhered more aggressively to plasma-treated coupons when compared to non-plasma treated coupons; all other materials exhibited no significant differences between plasma and non-plasma treated coupons. In addition, spores of B. subtilis were physically degraded by exposures to the plasmas beginning at the terminal ends of spores, which appeared to be ruptured after only 30 s. After 300 s, most bacteria were removed from aluminium coupons, and only subtle residues of bacterial secretions or biofilms remained. Results support the conclusion that APGD plasmas can be used as a prelaunch cleaning and sterilization treatment on spacecraft materials provided that the biocidal and cleaning times are shorter than those required to alter surface properties of materials.

  6. Research to Support the Determination of Spacecraft Maximum Acceptable Concentrations of Potential Atmospheric Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, John L.

    1997-01-01

    In many ways, the typical approach to the handling of bibliographic material for generating review articles and similar manuscripts has changed little since the use of xerographic reproduction has become widespread. The basic approach is to collect reprints of the relevant material and place it in folders or stacks based on its dominant content. As the amount of information available increases with the passage of time, the viability of this mechanical approach to bibliographic management decreases. The personal computer revolution has changed the way we deal with many familiar tasks. For example, word processing on personal computers has supplanted the typewriter for many applications. Similarly, spreadsheets have not only replaced many routine uses of calculators but have also made possible new applications because the cost of calculation is extremely low. Objective The objective of this research was to use personal computer bibliographic software technology to support the determination of spacecraft maximum acceptable concentration (SMAC) values. Specific Aims The specific aims were to produce draft SMAC documents for hydrogen sulfide and tetrachloroethylene taking maximum advantage of the bibliographic software.

  7. Modeling the Effects of Spacecraft Venting on Instrument Measurements of the Martian Atmosphere for an Elliptical Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Elaine; Hughes, David

    2011-01-01

    Analysis has been performed for MAVEN mission. Due to the elliptical orbit, large pressure variations in orbit will be experienced, there is a need to understand how internal pressures change and the flux of gas from vents could potentially bias instrument measurements. Goal of this analysis is to predict the effect that atmospheric gases trapped and vented from spacecraft volumes could have on instrument measurements.

  8. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA Aqua Spacecraft: A General Remote Sensing Tool for Understanding Atmospheric Structure, Dynamics and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. Early in the mission, the AIRS instrument demonstrated its value to the weather forecasting community with better than 6 hours of improvement on the 5 day forecast. Now with over eight years of consistent and stable data from AIRS, scientists are able to examine processes governing weather and climate and look at seasonal and interannual trends from the AIRSdata with high statistical confidence. Naturally, long-term climate trends require a longer data set, but indications are that the Aqua spacecraft and the AIRS instrument should last beyond 2018. This paper briefly describes the AIRS data products and presents some of the most significant findings involving the use of AIRS data in the areas of weather forecast improvement, climate processes and model validation, cloud and polar processes, and atmospheric composition (chemistry and dust).

  9. Transparent electrically conducting thin films for spacecraft temperature control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, G.; Heaney, J. B.; Toft, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Thin transparent films of In2O3 or In2O3 + SnO2 prepared by evaporation or sputtering have been tested for use as surface layers for spacecraft temperature control coatings. The films are intended to prevent nonuniform electric charge buildup on the spacecraft exterior. Film thicknesses of 300 to 500 A were found to be optimal in terms of durability and minimum impact on the solar absorptance and the thermal emissivity of the underlayers. As a verification of their suitability for long-duration space missions, the films were subjected to simulated solar UV plus proton irradiation in a vacuum.

  10. Using the Mil. Std 1553B data bus in future spacecraft onboard applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Chris; Bordes, Yves

    2002-07-01

    This paper discusses the use of the Mil. Std 1553B data bus as the principal onboard data handling bus for future spacecraft applications. The paper takes a pragmatic approach by: Identifying the characteristics of the onboard bus traffic and its characteristics; Looking at future trends in onboard bus traffic; Describing the characteristics of the Mil. Std 1553B data bus; Proposing techniques that can be used on the Mil. Std 1553B data bus in future spacecraft application.

  11. Solar Manuvering Spacecraft Guidance and Control System Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to discuss the time of a transfer trajectory by consideration of the Earth's shadow. The time of transfer trajectory of a sail spacecraft was determined by consideration of the Earth's shadow and it was compared with the results in a case where the Earth's shadow was not taken into account. The solar sail spacecraft was demonstrated to be oriented in such a way that the solar force applies in one appropriate direction. The mathematical concept and feature shape of solar sail spacecraft were proven as correct design approaches. The equations of motion that were developed in the project were proven in correct format for transfer trajectory approach by means of the purposed CN (Cyrus Nejat) Equations of Motion. Four important comments were discussed from the observed results. The problem statement was depened along with appropriate assumptions. The solar sail craft was defined appropriately. The equations of motion were determined in order to evaluate the transfer trajectory of solar sail spacecraft. In this case, the time of flight was determined for two cases: with Earth's shadow, and without Earth's shadow. The results showed that the time of fight with the Earth's shadow consideration is higher than the time of fight without the Earth's shadow, but it had close responses due to small amount of force from the solar radiation pressure. The future of this project should also apply the Moon's shadow in the problem statement and determine the shadow of the Earth as it can be seen in a cone zone. There are also appropriate control system devices that should be designed for attitude determination. It is also necessary to apply appropriate damper system, composite and smart materials to remedy vibration problems.

  12. Application of Kalman filtering to spacecraft range residual prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madrid, G. A.; Bierman, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    One function of the Deep Space Network is validation of the range data that they receive. In this paper we present an automated online sequential range predictor which shows promise of significantly reducing computational and manpower expenditures. The proposed algorithm, a U-D covariance factored Kalman filter, is demonstrated by processing a four-month record of Viking spacecraft data taken enroute to Mars.

  13. Contingency Trajectory Design for a Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver Failure by the Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Loucks, Michael; Carrico, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this extended abstract is to present results from a failed lunar-orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver contingency analysis for the Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission, managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA. The LADEE spacecrafts nominal trajectory implemented multiple sub-lunar phasing orbits centered at Earth before eventually reaching the Moon (Fig. 1) where a critical LOI maneuver was to be performed [1,2,3]. If this LOI was missed, the LADEE spacecraft would be on an Earth-escape trajectory, bound for heliocentric space. Although a partial mission recovery is possible from a heliocentric orbit (to be discussed in the full paper), it was found that an escape-prevention maneuver could be performed several days after a hypothetical LOI-miss, allowing a return to the desired science orbit around the Moon without leaving the Earths sphere-of-influence (SOI).

  14. Radio Wave Scintillation in the Neutral Atmosphere as Noise in Precision Spacecraft Tracking Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1996-05-01

    Tropospheric phase scintillation degrades the coherence of a radio link and thus introduces noise in interferometer observations and spacecraft Doppler tracking experiments. High-quality Doppler data were taken in March-April 1993 with the Mars Observer spacecraft when it was in interplanetary cruise (sun-earth-spacecraft angle ~100 degrees; earth-spacecraft distance ~500 light seconds). The radio wave phase residuals from these tracks can be used to study the statistics of the tropospheric scintillation and to assess its importance in precision tracking. Here I present temporal radio wave phase structure functions, < {mid phi (t) - phi (t + tau ) mid }(2) >, for X-band data taken at the three NASA/JPL Deep Space Network Tracking complexes. The observed structure functions are approximately powerlaw, D(tau ) = const τ(alpha ) . I characterize the structure functions by their levels at tau = 100 seconds and their powerlaw indices, alpha . The powerlaw indices varied between 0.67 and 1.6, averaging 1.2. Substantial variation in the structure function level was observed, with a histogram of level showing many relatively low values and fewer relatively large levels. There were small systematic variations in the levels between the tracking sites, with Australia having larger levels in this sample. I compare these observations with interferometric (i.e., spatial) measurements and discuss some implications for spacecraft tracking, particularly as these observations refine the noise model for low-frequency gravitational wave searches.

  15. Spacecraft VHF Radio Propagation Analysis in Ocean Environments Including Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian; Moreno, Gerardo; Desilva, Kanishka; Jih, CIndy

    2010-01-01

    The Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Johnson Space Center (JSC) is tasked to perform spacecraft and ground network communication system simulations. The CSSL has developed simulation tools that model spacecraft communication systems and the space/ground environment in which they operate. This paper is to analyze a spacecraft's very high frequency (VHF) radio signal propagation and the impact to performance when landing in an ocean. Very little research work has been done for VHF radio systems in a maritime environment. Rigorous Radio Frequency (RF) modeling/simulation techniques were employed for various environmental effects. The simulation results illustrate the significance of the environmental effects on the VHF radio system performance.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-31

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O) which flows between two concentric cylindrical electrodes: an outer grounded electrode and an inner electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, ionized or dissociated by electron impact. The fast-flowing effluent consists of ions and electrons, which are rapidly lost by recombination, highly reactive radicals (e.g., O, OH), and metastable species (e.g., O2). The metastable O2, which is reactive to hydrocarbon and other organic species, has been observed through optical emission spectroscopy to decrease by a factor of 2 from the APPJ nozzle exit to a distance of 10 cm. Unreacted metastable O2, and that which does not impinge on a surface, will then decay back to ordinary ground state O2, resulting in a completely dry, environmentally-benign form of surface cleaning. Applications such as removal of photoresist, oxide films and organic residues from wafers for the electronics industry, decontamination of civilian and military areas and personnel exposed to chemical or biological warfare agents, and paint (e.g., graffiti) removal are being considered.

  17. Application of Surface Micro-Discharge plasma to spacecraft component decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Barczyk, Simon; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias; Zimmermann, Julia; Weber, Peter; Morfill, Gregor; Thomas, Hubertus

    2013-09-01

    In the field of extinct or extant extraterrestrial life research on other planets and moons, the prevention of biological contamination through spaceprobes is one of the most important requirements, and its detailed conditions are defined by the COSPAR planetary protection policy. Currently, a dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) method is the only applicable way to satisfy the demand, which could, however, damage the sophisticated components like integrated circuits. In this study, cold atmospheric plasma based on the Surface Micro-Discharge technology was investigated for inactivation of different types of bacteria and endospores as an alternative method. After 90 min of plasma gas exposure, 3-6 log reductions were observed for the vegetative bacteria Escherichia coliand Deinococcus radiodurans and several types of bacterial endospores - including Bacillus atrophaeus, B. safensis, B. megaterium, B. megaterium 2c1 and B. thuringiensis E24. Furthermore, the applicability of the system for spacecraft decontamination was checked by studying the inactivation homogeneity, the temperature at the area of interest and the effects of the plasma gas exposure on different materials. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from Deutches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (FKZ 50 JR1005).

  18. Application of software technology to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaugh, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how major improvements in spacecraft computer systems can be obtained from recent advances in hardware and software technology. Investigations into integrated circuit technology indicated that the CMOS/SOS chip set being developed for the Air Force Avionics Laboratory at Wright Patterson had the best potential for improving the performance of spaceborne computer systems. An integral part of the chip set is the bit slice arithmetic and logic unit. The flexibility allowed by microprogramming, combined with the software investigations, led to the specification of a baseline architecture and instruction set.

  19. Characterization of a Regenerable Impactor Filter for Spacecraft Cabin Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerable filters will play an important role in human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Life Support Systems aboard crewed spacecrafts will have to operate reliably and with little maintenance over periods of more than a year, even multiple years. Air filters are a key component of spacecraft life support systems, but they often require frequent routine maintenance. Bacterial filters aboard the International Space Station require almost weekly cleaning of the pre-filter screen to remove large lint debris captured in the microgravity environment. The source of the airborne matter which is collected on the filter screen is typically from clothing fibers, biological matter (hair, skin, nails, etc.) and material wear. Clearly a need for low maintenance filters requiring little to no crew intervention will be vital to the success of the mission. An impactor filter is being developed and tested to address this need. This filter captures large particle matter through inertial separation and impaction methods on collection surfaces, which can be automatically cleaned after they become heavily loaded. The impactor filter can serve as a pre-filter to augment the life of higher efficiency filters that capture fine and ultrafine particles. A prototype of the filter is being tested at the Particulate Filtration Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center to determine performance characteristics, including particle cut size and overall efficiency. Model results are presented for the flow characteristics near the orifice plate through which the particle-laden flow is accelerated as well as around the collection bands.

  20. Unique Features and Spacecraft Applications of Dynamic Isotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, B.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic isotope power system represents the most recent attempt to develop a heat-engine generator for space electric power. A major objective in this most recent effort was to increase the power and to reduce the cost of nuclear space power systems to the point where the unique features of this power source could be brought to bear for Earth-orbit missions which could benefit therefrom. This objective was largely achieved; both weight and cost of the dynamic isotope systems are comparable to solar power systems. The dynamic isotope power system, designed for spacecraft requiring prime power in the 500-2000 W range, has been successfully built and ground tested. A number of studies, summarized herein, have demonstrated the advantages of using such a power system instead of the conventional solar system for a variety of Earth-orbit missions. These advantages stem from the unique nature of the dynamic isotope system, different in kind from solar power systems. As a result, in many cases, the spacecraft design can be significantly simplified and more closely harmonized with mission requirements. This overall advantage can be crucial in missions which have stringent pointing, stability, viewing, and/or positioning requirements.

  1. Development of an integrated cryogenic bus for spacecraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, David C.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Tomlinson, Joe; Stoyanof, Marko; Crawford, Larry; Glaister, David S.

    1997-01-01

    To improve the efficiency and reduce the overdesign penalties associated with integrating cryogenic systems into spacecraft, the Integrated Cryogenic Bus (ICB) program was initiated in April 1996. The technical objectives of the program were to develop an integrated, lightweight means of thermally linking a cryogenic cooling source to a cooled satellite component, to commonize the interfaces to the cooling source and cooled component, and to commonize the integration of these systems into spacecraft. The technical plan involves several steps beginning with the definition of requirements, the identification and characterization of potential bus components, the development of new concepts and optimization methods, breadboard testing, and prototype development. Six months into the program, over 25 cryocooler, focal plane, and cryogenic hardware organizations have been interviewed or surveyed to identify requirements, numerous components have been identified and characterized, several preliminary concepts have been developed, an optimization plan has been outlined, and critical breadboard tests have begun. This paper summarizes the progress to date during Phase I of this Phillips Laboratory program funded by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO).

  2. Advanced On-Board Processor (AOP). [for future spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Advanced On-board Processor the (AOP) uses large scale integration throughout and is the most advanced space qualified computer of its class in existence today. It was designed to satisfy most spacecraft requirements which are anticipated over the next several years. The AOP design utilizes custom metallized multigate arrays (CMMA) which have been designed specifically for this computer. This approach provides the most efficient use of circuits, reduces volume, weight, assembly costs and provides for a significant increase in reliability by the significant reduction in conventional circuit interconnections. The required 69 CMMA packages are assembled on a single multilayer printed circuit board which together with associated connectors constitutes the complete AOP. This approach also reduces conventional interconnections thus further reducing weight, volume and assembly costs.

  3. Spacecraft propulsion: new methods.

    PubMed

    Alfvén, H

    1972-04-14

    Cosmic plasmas contain energy which may be tapped and used for spacecraft propulsion. The energy needed for launching a spacecraft could be supplied to it from the ground through a plasma channel in the atmosphere.

  4. Laser applications to atmospheric sciences: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is given of 1460 references of the applications of lasers to atmospheric sciences. The subjects covered include: aerosols; clouds; the distribution and motion of atmospheric natural and man-made constituents; winds; temperature; turbulence; scintillation; elastic, Raman and resonance scattering; fluorescence; absorption and transmission; the application of the Doppler effect and visibility. Instrumentation, in particular lidar, is included, also data handling, and interpretation of the data for meteorological processes. Communications, geodesy and rangefinding are not included as distinct areas. The application to the atmosphere is covered, but not the ocean or its surface.

  5. Lunar shadow eclipse prediction models for the Earth orbiting spacecraft: Comparison and application to LEO and GEO spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kulshrestha, Shivali; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Bhaskar, M. K.; Kushvah, Badam Singh; Shiggavi, Prakash; Vallado, David A.

    2015-05-01

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Moon and Earth are aligned in such a way that shadow of the Moon falls on the Earth. The Moon's shadow also falls on the Earth orbiting spacecraft. In this case, the alignment of the Sun, Moon, and spacecraft is similar to that of the Sun, Moon, and Earth but this phenomenon is often referred as a lunar eclipse falling on the spacecraft. Lunar eclipse is not as regular in terms of times of occurrence, duration, and depth as the Earth shadow eclipse and number of its occurrence per orbital location per year ranges from zero to four with an average of two per year; a spacecraft may experience two to three lunar eclipses within a twenty-four hour period [2]. These lunar eclipses can cause severe spacecraft operational problems. This paper describes two lunar shadow eclipse prediction models using a projection map approach and a line of intersection method by extending the Earth shadow eclipse models described by Srivastava et al. [10,11] for the Earth orbiting spacecraft. The attractive feature of both models is that they are much easier to implement. Both mathematical models have been simulated for two Indian low Earth orbiting spacecrafts: Oceansat-2, Saral-1, and two geostationary spacecrafts: GSAT-10, INSAT-4CR. Results obtained by the models compare well with lunar shadow model given by Escobal and Robertson [12], and high fidelity commercial software package, Systems Tool Kit (STK) of AGI.

  6. A High Efficiency DC Bus Regulator / RPC for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2004-02-01

    DC bus voltage regulation may be required in future high powered spacecraft due to the length of the busses or because they are not generated at precise voltage levels. In these cases the regulation range is often only a few percent increase or decrease, but conventional DC voltage regulators switch all the power passing through them, and this level of power switched determines the size and losses in the regulator. A recently developed concept uses a low power DC-DC converter in series with the bus to raise or lower the bus voltage over a small range. This partial power processing technique combines the small size and power losses of the low power converter with the ability to regulate, (over a small range) a high power bus. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator (SCBBR) described herein provides bus regulation with an efficiency of 98%. The circuit also provides bus switching and overcurrent limiting functions of a Remote Power Controller (RPC). This paper describes the circuit design and performance of a breadboard SCBBR configured as a bus voltage regulator providing +/- 40% voltage regulation range, bus switching, and overload limiting.

  7. Water electrolysis system - H2 and O2 generation. [for spacecraft atmosphere revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. K.; Davenport, R. J.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    An oxygen generation system design based on the static feed water electrolysis concept is described. The system is designed to generate 4.20 kg/d of oxygen to satisfy the metabolic needs of a three-person crew, to compensate for spacecraft leakage, and to provide the oxygen required by the electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator. The system has a fixed hardware weight of 75 kg, occupies a volume of 0.11 cu m, and requires only 1.1 kw of electrical power. The static feed electrolysis concept is discussed, and experimental data on the high-performance electrode are presented.

  8. Applications of structural optimization methods to fixed-wing aircraft and spacecraft in the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Neill, Douglas J.

    1992-01-01

    This report is the summary of a technical survey on the applications of structural optimization in the U.S. aerospace industry through the 1980s. Since applications to rotary wing aircraft will be covered by other literature, applications to fixed-wing aircraft and spacecraft were considered. It became clear that very significant progress has been made during this decade, indicating this technology is about to become one of the practical tools in computer aided structural design.

  9. The Ultimate Factor of Safety for Aircraft and Spacecraft Its History, Applications and Misconceptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipay, John J.; Modlin, C. Thomas, Jr.; Larsen, Curtis E.

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate factor of safety (FOSULT) concept used in aircraft and spacecraft has evolved over many decades. Currently an FOSULT 1.5 is the FAR-mandated value for aircraft while an FOSULT of 1.4 has been used in various spacecraft. This paper was motivated by the desire to concisely explain the origins, proper interpretation and application of the ultimate factor of safety concept, since the authors have seen throughout their careers many misconceptions and incorrect applications of this concept. The history of the ultimate factor of safety concept is briefly summarized, the proper application of the factor of safety in aircraft design, structural analysis and operations is covered in detail, examples of limit load exceedance in aircraft and spacecraft are discussed, the evolution of the 1.4 FOSULT for spacecraft is described and some misconceptions regarding the ultimate factor of safety concept are addressed. It is hoped that this paper can be a summary resource for engineers to understand the origin, purpose and proper application of the ultimate factor of safety.

  10. GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERIC MODELS FOR AEROASSIST APPLICATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Aleta; Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Aeroassist is a broad category of advanced transportation technology encompassing aerocapture, aerobraking, aeroentry, precision landing, hazard detection and avoidance, and aerogravity assist. The eight destinations in the Solar System with sufficient atmosphere to enable aeroassist technology are Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for five of these targets - Earth, Mars, Titan, Neptune, and Venus - have been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. These models are useful as tools in mission planning and systems analysis studies associated with aeroassist applications. The series of models is collectively named the Global Reference Atmospheric Model or GRAM series. An important capability of all the models in the GRAM series is their ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analysis in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, for aerothermal design, and for other applications sensitive to atmospheric variability. Recent example applications are discussed.

  11. The lateral surface drag coefficient of cylindrical spacecraft in a rarefied finite temperature atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    In the present determination of the free molecule flow drag coefficient for a cylindrical spacecraft flying parallel to its principal axis, the lateral surface effects of thermal motion are explicitly included in terms of the average impact angle of the incident gas momentum vector. Kinetic theory is used to characterize self-shadowing, as well as to obtain an expression for the lateral surface coefficient in terms of the average impact angle of the incident momentum vector and the fractional momentum transfer along the line of impact. It is found that, for a length/diameter ratio of about 5, the lateral surface contribution to the drag coefficient is comparable to that of the front face.

  12. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratio in Jupiter's Atmosphere from Observations by Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Owen, T.; Conrath, B. J.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Nixon, C. A..; Achterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G.; Jennings, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft made infrared observations of Jupiter's atmosphere during the flyby in December 2000 to January 2001. The unique database in the 600-1400/cm region with 0.53 and 2.8/cm spectral resolutions obtained from the observations permits retrieval of global maps of the thermal structure and composition of Jupiter's atmosphere including the distributions of (14)NH3 and (15)NH3. Analysis of Jupiter's ammonia distributions from three isolated (15)NH3 spectral lines in eight latitudes is presented for evaluation of the nitrogen isotopic ratio. The nitrogen isotopic ratio (14)N/(15)N (or (15)N/(14)N) in Jupiter's atmosphere in this analysis is calculated to be: 448 +/- 62 ((2.23 +/- 0.31) x 10(exp -3)). This value of the ratio determined from CIRS data is found to be in very close agreement with the value previously obtained from the measurements by the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer. Some possible mechanisms to account for the variation of Jupiter's observed isotopic ratio relative to various astrophysical environments are discussed.

  13. Lidar Measurements of Methane and Applications for Aircraft and Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Abshire, James; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric methane levels have remained relatively constant over the last decade around 1.78 parts per million (ppm) but observations since 2007 show that levels may be increasing. This trend may be caused by increased fossil fuel production, rice farming, livestock and landfills, but the underlying causes are quite uncertain. One hypothesis is that reservoirs of carbon trapped in the permafrost regions of northern Canada, Europe, and Siberia thaw as global temperatures rise and are releasing increasing amounts of methane. Another hypothesis points to increased production of methane by microbes as the permafrost warms. Currently most observations of greenhouse gases are limited to in-situ (surface and tower sites) and limited airborne in-situ measurements. Space column density measurements are starting to become available from the GOSAT mission. Although methane survives for a shorter time in the atmosphere than CO2, its impact on climate change per molecule is about 23 times than that of CO2. Accurate global observations of several greenhouse gases, including methane, are urgently needed in order to better understand climate change processes and to reduce the uncertainty in the carbon budget. Differential absorption lidar is a well-established technique to measure atmospheric gases, and methane has optical absorption bands near 1.65,2.2,3.4 and 7.8 micron. The near infrared overtones lines of CH4 near 1650 nm are relatively free of interference from other species. There are absorption lines near 1651 nm which are both temperature insensitive and have line strengths well suited for lidar measurements. We have developed a laser and demonstrated lidar measurements of CH4 using lines in this band. Our laser uses a narrow linewidth 1064 nm laser pulse passing through a nonlinear crystal. We generate the tunable laser signals near 1651 nm by using the optical parametric amplification (OPA) process. Inside the crystal the 1064 nm beam overlaps with an injection seed

  14. Physico-chemical state of the air at the stagnation point during the atmospheric reentry of a spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoui, Rabah

    2011-06-01

    Hypersonic flows around spatial vehicles during their reentry phase in planetary atmospheres are characterized by intense aerothermal phenomena. The aim of this work is to analyze high temperature flows around an axisymmetric blunt body taking into account chemical and vibrational non-equilibrium for air mixture species. For this purpose, a finite volume methodology is employed to determine the supersonic flow parameters around the axisymmetric blunt body, especially at the stagnation point and along the wall of spacecraft for several altitudes. Our code permits to capture the detached shock wave with exactitude before a blunt body placed in supersonic free stream. The numerical technique uses the Flux Vector Splitting method of Van Leer. Here, adequate time stepping parameter, along with CFL coefficient and mesh size level are selected to ensure numerical convergence, sought with an order of 10 -8.

  15. Development of a refrigeration system for lunar surface and spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of refrigeration devices suitable for potential lunar surface and spacecraft applications was performed. The following conclusions were reached: (1) the vapor compression system is the best overall refrigeration system for lunar surface and spacecraft applications and the single phase radiator system is generally preferred for earth orbit applications, (2) the vapor compression cycle may have some application for simultaneous heating and cooling, (3) a Stirling cycle refrigerator was selected for the manned cabin of the space shuttle, and (4) significant increases in payload heat rejection can be obtained by a kit vapor compression refrigerator added to the shuttle R-21 loop. The following recommendations were made: (1) a Stirling cycle refrigerator may be used for food freezer and biomedical sample storage, (2) the best system for a food freezer/experiments compartment for an earth orbit space station has not been determined, (3) a deployed radiator system can be designed for large heat loads in earth orbit.

  16. Qualification of room-temperature-curing epoxy adhesives for spacecraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Alain; O'Donnell, Tim

    1988-01-01

    An adhesive-bonding test program is being conducted in order to develop structural adhesives applicable to JPL spacecraft. A noteworthy application for such an adhesive will be JPL's Galileo mission, whose trajectory will involve the circumnavigation of the planet Venus prior to Jupiter rendezvous, and will accordingly require stringent temperature and radiation environment requirements. The baseline adhesive for the test program is the EA 934 room temperature-cure epoxy, which has been widely used as a 'space-qualified' material.

  17. Vacuum stability requirements of polymeric material for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish outgassing requirements and test guidelines for polymeric materials used in the space thermal/vacuum environment around sensitive optical or thermal control surfaces. The scope of this document covers the control of polymeric materials used near or adjacent to optical or thermal control surfaces that are exposed to the thermal/vacuum environment of space. This document establishes the requirements and defines the test method to evaluate polymeric materials used in the vicinity of these surfaces in space applications.

  18. Development of lightweight reinforced plastic laminates for spacecraft interior applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Lightweight, Kevlar - reinforced laminating systems that are non-burning, generate little smoke in the space shuttle environment, and are physically equivalent to the fiberglass/polyimide system used in the Apollo program for non-structural cabin panels, racks, etc. Resin systems representing five generic classes were screened as matrices for Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates. Of the systems evaluated, the polyimides were the most promising with the phenolics a close second. Skybond 703 was selected as the most promising resin candidate. With the exception of compression strength, all program goals of physical and mechanical properties were exceeded. Several prototype space shuttle mobility and translation handrail segments were manufactured using Kevlar/epoxy and Kevlar-graphite/epoxy. This application shows significant weight savings over the baseline aluminum configuration used previous. The hybrid Kevlar-graphite/epoxy is more suitable from a processing standpoint.

  19. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an STS-66 mission onboard photo of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis showing the payload of the third Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission. During the ATLAS missions, international teams of scientists representing many disciplines combined their expertise to seek answers to complex questions about the atmospheric and solar conditions that sustain life on Earth. The ATLAS program specifically investigated how Earth's middle and upper atmospheres and climate are affected by by the sun and by products of industrial and agricultural activities on Earth. Thirteen ATLAS instruments supported experiments in atmospheric sciences, solar physics, space plasma physics, and astronomy. The instruments were mounted on two Spacelab pallets in the Space Shuttle payload bay. The ATLAS-3 mission continued a variety of atmospheric and solar studies to improve understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and its energy input from the sun. A key scientific objective was to refine existing data on variations in the fragile ozone layer of the atmosphere. The Orbiter Atlantis was launched on November 3, 1994 for the ATLAS-3 mission (STS-66).

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  1. Design and test of a flywheel energy storage unit for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormack, A., III; Notti, J. E., Jr.; Ruiz, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and test of a development flywheel energy storage device intended for spacecraft application. The flywheel unit is the prototype for the rotating assembly portion of an Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS). The paper includes a general description of the flywheel unit; specific design characteristics for the rotor and bearings, motor-generators, and electronics; an efficiency analysis; and test results for a research unit.

  2. Damping Models for Shear-Deformable Beam with Applications to Spacecraft Wiring Harness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL /RVSV Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave., SE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117...Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVSV/Derek... AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 DAMPING MODELS FOR SHEAR-DEFORMABLE BEAM WITH APPLICATIONS TO SPACECRAFT WIRING HARNESS

  3. Development of a three-man preprototype CO2 collection subsystem for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.; Quattrone, P. D.; Marshall, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Future long-duration manned space missions will require regenerable carbon dioxide (CO2) collection concepts such as the Electrochemical Depolarized CO2 Concentrator (EDC). A three-man-capacity preprototype CO2 Collection Subsystem (CS-3) is being developed for eventual flight demonstration as part of the Air Revitalization System (ARS) of the Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) experiment. The CS-3 employs an EDC to concentrate CO2 from the low partial-pressure levels required of spacecraft atmospheres to high partial-pressure levels needed for oxygen (O2) recovery through CO2 reduction processes. The CS-3 is sized to remove a nominal 3.0 kg/day (6.6 lb/day) of the CO2 to maintain the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of the cabin atmosphere at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) or less. This paper presents the preprototype design, configuration, operation, and projected performance characteristics.

  4. Application of lidar to current atmospheric topics

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to address the various applications of lidar to topics of interest in the atmospheric community. Specifically, with the development of frequency-agile, all solid state laser systems, high-quantum-efficiency detectors, increased computational power along with new and more powerful algorithms, and novel detection schemes, the application of lidar to both old and new problems has expanded. This expansion is evidenced by the contributions to the proceedings, which demonstrate the progress made on a variety of atmospheric remote sensing problems, both theoretically and experimentally. The first session focused on aerosol, ozone, and temperature profile measurements from ground-based units. The second session, Chemical Detection, provided applications of lidar to the detection of atmospheric pollutants. Papers in the third session, Wind and Turbulence Measurements, described the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiments, Doppler techniques for ground-based wind profiling and mesopause radial wind and temperature measurements utilizing a frequency-agile lidar system. The papers in the last two sessions, Recent Advanced in Lidar Technology and Techniques and Advanced Operational Lidars, provided insights into novel approaches, materials, and techniques that would be of value to the lidar community. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Silicon photomultiplier detector for atmospheric lidar applications.

    PubMed

    Riu, Jordi; Sicard, Michaël; Royo, Santiago; Comerón, Adolfo

    2012-04-01

    The viability and performance of using a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) in atmospheric lidar applications is experimentally compared against the well-established use of photomultiplier tubes. By using a modified lidar setup for simultaneous data acquisition of both types of sensors, we demonstrate that a SiPM can offer appropriate qualities for this specific application where the detection of fast, extremely low light pulses and large dynamic range signals are essential capabilities. The experimental results show that the SiPM has an appropriate behaviour offering suitable capabilities for elastic, backscatter aerosol lidars. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing SiPM for atmospheric lidar applications.

  6. Application of First Principles Ni-Cd and Ni-H2 Battery Models to Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Bugga, Ratnakumar; DiStefano, Salvador

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the application of first principles model to spacecraft operations are: the first principles of Bi-phasic electrode presented model provides an explanation for many behaviors on voltage fading on LEO cycling.

  7. Simultaneous observations of atmospheric tides from combined in situ and remote observations at Mars from the MAVEN spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Scott L.; Liu, Guiping; Withers, Paul; Yiǧit, Erdal; Lo, Daniel; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; McClintock, William E.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Elrod, Meredith; Benna, Mehdi; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the observations of longitudinal variations in the Martian thermosphere associated with nonmigrating tides. Using the Neutral Gas Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) and the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft, this study presents the first combined analysis of in situ and remote observations of atmospheric tides at Mars for overlapping volumes, local times, and overlapping date ranges. From the IUVS observations, we determine the altitude and latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the nonmigrating tidal signatures, which is combined with the NGIMS, providing information on the compositional impact of these waves. Both the observations of airglow from IUVS and the CO2 density observations from NGIMS reveal a strong wave number 2 signature in a fixed local time frame. The IUVS observations reveal a strong latitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature. Combining this with the accurate CO2 density observations from NGIMS, this would suggest that the CO2 density variation is as high as 27% at 0-10° latitude. The IUVS observations reveal little altitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature, varying by only 20% from 160 to 200 km. Observations of five different species with NGIMS show that the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature varies in proportion to the inverse of the species scale height, giving rise to variation in composition as a function of longitude. The analysis and discussion here provide a roadmap for further analysis as additional coincident data from these two instruments become available.

  8. The application of total quality management principles to spacecraft mission operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetin, Maury

    1993-03-01

    By now, the philosophies of Total Quality Management have had an impact on every aspect of American industrial life. The trail-blazing work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, first implemented in Japan, has 're-migrated' across the Pacific and now plays a growing role in America's management culture. While initially considered suited only for a manufacturing environment, TQM has moved rapidly into the 'service' areas of offices, sales forces, and even fast-food restaurants. The next logical step has also been taken - TQM has found its way into virtually all departments of the Federal Government, including NASA. Because of this widespread success, it seems fair to ask whether this new discipline is directly applicable to the profession of spacecraft operations. The results of quality emphasis on OAO Corporation's contract at JPL provide strong support for Total Quality Management as a useful tool in spacecraft operations.

  9. The application of total quality management principles to spacecraft mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetin, Maury

    1993-01-01

    By now, the philosophies of Total Quality Management have had an impact on every aspect of American industrial life. The trail-blazing work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, first implemented in Japan, has 're-migrated' across the Pacific and now plays a growing role in America's management culture. While initially considered suited only for a manufacturing environment, TQM has moved rapidly into the 'service' areas of offices, sales forces, and even fast-food restaurants. The next logical step has also been taken - TQM has found its way into virtually all departments of the Federal Government, including NASA. Because of this widespread success, it seems fair to ask whether this new discipline is directly applicable to the profession of spacecraft operations. The results of quality emphasis on OAO Corporation's contract at JPL provide strong support for Total Quality Management as a useful tool in spacecraft operations.

  10. High performance polymers and polymer matrix composites for spacecraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Connell, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    A program implemented by NASA Langley Research Center to develop and evaluate new polymers and polymer matrix composites for spacecraft structural applications is examined. Various polymeric films, moldings, and adhesives are evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen and high energy electron and UV radiation. Thin films from the poly(arylene ether)s containing phenylphosphine oxide groups and the siloxane-epoxies exhibited minor weight loss compared to Kapton polyimide after exposure. Large doses (greater than 10 exp 9 rads) of electron radiation, simulating 30 yr of exposure in GEO, are found to alter the chemical structure of epoxies by both chain scission and cross-linking. The thermal cycling representative of both LEO and GEO environments can cause microcracking in composites which can in turn affect the dimensional stability and produce mechanical property reductions. The processing and fabrication issues associated with precision composite spacecraft components are also addressed.

  11. Spectra of van der Waals complexes (dimers) with applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth; Kim, Sang J.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral features observed in the atmosphere of Titan by the Voyager IR experiment have been attributed to weakly bound complexes of N2 and H2, dominant and minor constituents, respectively. The abundance of H2-N2 dimers there was computed. Current calculations include quantitative spectral line positions and intensities for N2-Ar and CO2-CO2 relating to Titan and Earth, and to Mars and Venus, respectively. This work suggests applications to spectra of planetary atmospheres obtained in spacecraft missions.

  12. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Concept: Transitioning Research to Operations and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Burns, H. D.; Clinton, R. G.; Schumacher, D.; Spann, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    support function also includes working in coordination with the program in anomaly resolution and generation of lesson learned documentation. The goal of this space environment and spacecraft effects organization is to develop decision-making tools and engineering products to support the mission phases of mission concept through operations by focusing on transitioning research to application. Products generated by this space environments and spacecraft effects organization are suitable for use in anomaly investigations. This paper will describe the organizational structure for this space environments and spacecraft effects organization, and outline the scope of conceptual TWG's and their relationship to the functional areas.

  13. Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e <1) and underexpanded exhaust plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These

  14. Spacecraft Cabin Air Quality Control and Its Application to Tight Buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Graf, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Air quality is an important consideration not only for the external environment, but also for the indoor environment. Most people spend a majority of their lives indoors and the air that they breathe is important to their physical and emotional well being. Since most modern building designs have focused on energy efficiency, less fresh air is brought from the outside. As a result, pollutants from building materials, furniture, cleaning, and cooking have no place to go. To make matters worse, most ventilation systems do not include any means for removing pollutants from the recycled air. Unfortunately, pollution at even a small level can result in eye, throat, and lung irritation in addition to chronic headaches, nausea, and fatigue. A spacecraft cabin, which represents the worst case in tight building design, requires special consideration of air quality since any effects pollutants may have on a crewmember can potentially place a mission or other crewmembers at risk. A detailed approach has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to minimize cabin atmosphere pollution and provide the crew with an environment which is as free of pollutants as possible. This approach is a combination of passive and active contamination control concepts involving the evaluation and selection of materials to be used onboard the spacecraft, the establishment of air quality standards to ensure crew health, and the use of active control means onboard the spacecraft to further ensure an acceptable atmosphere. This approach has allowed NASA to prevent illness by providing crewmembers with a cabin atmosphere which contains pollutant concentrations up to 100 times lower than those specified for terrestrial indoor environments. Standard building construction, however, does not take into account the potentially harmful effects of materials used in the construction process on the health of future occupants and relies primarily on remedial rather than

  15. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  16. Nonlinear Analysis and Optimal Design of Dynamic Mechanical Systems for Spacecraft Application.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    links were considered flexible, and thus a S-.quasi- static (linear) finite element analysis was used to obtain deformations and stresses. The GRG...Alga ൴ NONLINEAR ANALYSIS AMD OPTINALfDSIGN OFDYNAMIC l’ MECHANICAL SYSTEMS FOR SPACECRAFT APPLICATION(U) CLARKSON_ NIV POTSDAM NY K D MILINERT ET...TEST CHART .’.. Nŕ. :4. St 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0. 6 0." UJEILL cony Io RIALFinal Report AFOSR 84-0076 * DE7H Nonlinear Analysis and Optimal

  17. The management of energy utilization in a spacecraft tracking station and its industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, R. L.; Hume, P.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of a tracking station within the NASA/Jet Propulsion Deep Space Network is characterized by a wide diversity of spacecraft types, communications ranges, and data accuracy requirements. In the present paper, the system architecture, communications techniques, and operators interfaces for a utility controller are described. The control equipment as designed and installed is meant to be a tool to study applications of automated control in the dynamic environment of a tracking station. It allows continuous experimenting with new technology without disruption of the tracking activities.

  18. The achievement of spacecraft autonomy through the thematic application of multiple cooperating intelligent agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossomando, Philip J.

    1992-01-01

    A description is given of UNICORN, a prototype system developed for the purpose of investigating artificial intelligence (AI) concepts supporting spacecraft autonomy. UNICORN employs thematic reasoning, of the type first described by Rodger Schank of Northwestern University, to allow the context-sensitive control of multiple intelligent agents within a blackboard based environment. In its domain of application, UNICORN demonstrates the ability to reason teleologically with focused knowledge. Also presented are some of the lessons learned as a result of this effort. These lessons apply to any effort wherein system level autonomy is the objective.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and control of flexible, articulated spacecraft - Application to SSF/MRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, W. H.; Kwatny, H. G.; Baek, M.-J.

    1992-08-01

    Results are presented of a study on the application of partial feedback linearization methods to the attitude control of an articulated spacecraft configuration representative of the Space Station Freedom with a mobile remote manipulator system (SSF/MRMS). The case considered is the attitude regulation of the SSF while the MRMS undergoes arbitrary prescribed maneuvers. The results of calculations confirm previous observations that MRMS motion can significantly degrade and even destabilize attitude regulation when linear controllers are applied to this nonlinear system. It is shown that, in the flexible case, the linear regulator must be significantly detuned in order to achieve stable responses.

  20. Materials Characterization at Utah State University: Facilities and Knowledge-base of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, C. D.; Kite, J.; Zavyalov, V.; Corbridge, Jodie

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to improve the reliability and versatility of spacecraft charging models designed to assist spacecraft designers in accommodating and mitigating the harmful effects of charging on spacecraft, the NASA Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program has funded development of facilities at Utah State University for the measurement of the electronic properties of both conducting and insulating spacecraft materials. We present here an overview of our instrumentation and capabilities, which are particularly well suited to study electron emission as related to spacecraft charging. These measurements include electron-induced secondary and backscattered yields, spectra, and angular resolved measurements as a function of incident energy, species and angle, plus investigations of ion-induced electron yields, photoelectron yields, sample charging and dielectric breakdown. Extensive surface science characterization capabilities are also available to fully characterize the samples in situ. Our measurements for a wide array of conducting and insulating spacecraft materials have been incorporated into the SEE Charge Collector Knowledge-base as a Database of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging. This Database provides an extensive compilation of electronic properties, together with parameterization of these properties in a format that can be easily used with existing spacecraft charging engineering tools and with next generation plasma, charging, and radiation models. Tabulated properties in the Database include: electron-induced secondary electron yield, backscattered yield and emitted electron spectra; He, Ar and Xe ion-induced electron yields and emitted electron spectra; photoyield and solar emittance spectra; and materials characterization including reflectivity, dielectric constant, resistivity, arcing, optical microscopy images, scanning electron micrographs, scanning tunneling microscopy images, and Auger electron spectra. Further

  1. Atmospheric applications of high-energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-03-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, many still remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionarey history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  2. An Application of the "Virtual Spacecraft" Concept in Evaluation of the Mars Pathfinder Lander Low Gain Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, R. J.; Beckon, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The virtual spacecraft concept is embodied in a set of subsystems, either in the form of hardware or computational models, which together represent all, or a portion of, a spacecraft. For example, the telecommunications transponder may be a hardware prototype while the propulsion system may exist only as a simulation. As the various subsystems are realized in hardware, the spacecraft becomes progressively less virtual. This concept is enabled by JPL's Mission System Testbed which is a set of networked workstations running a message passing operating system called "TRAMEL" which stands for Task Remote Asynchronous Message Exchange Layer. Each simulation on the workstations, which may in fact be hardware controlled by the workstation, "publishes" its operating parameters on TRAMEL and other simulations requiring those parameters as input may "subscribe" to them. In this manner, the whole simulation operates as a single virtual system. This paper describes a simulation designed to evaluate a communications link between the earth and the Mars Pathfinder Lander module as it descends under a parachute through the Martian atmosphere toward the planet's surface. This link includes a transmitter and a low gain antenna on the spacecraft and a receiving antenna and receiver on the earth as well as a simulation of the dynamics of the spacecraft. The transmitter, the ground station antenna, the receiver and the dynamics are all simulated computationally while the spacecraft antenna is implemented in hardware on a very simple spacecraft mockup. The dynamics simulation is a record of one output of the ensemble of outputs of a Monte Carlo simulation of the descent. Additionally, the antenna/spacecraft mock-up system was simulated using APATCH, a shooting and bouncing ray code developed by Demaco, Inc. The antenna simulation, the antenna hardware, and the link simulation are all physically located in different facilities at JPL separated by several hundred meters and are linked via

  3. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  4. An application of software design and documentation language. [Galileo spacecraft command and data subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, E. D.; Clarkson, T. B.; Frasier, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The software design and documentation language (SDDL) is a general purpose processor to support a lanugage for the description of any system, structure, concept, or procedure that may be presented from the viewpoint of a collection of hierarchical entities linked together by means of binary connections. The language comprises a set of rules of syntax, primitive construct classes (module, block, and module invocation), and language control directives. The result is a language with a fixed grammar, variable alphabet and punctuation, and an extendable vocabulary. The application of SDDL to the detailed software design of the Command Data Subsystem for the Galileo Spacecraft is discussed. A set of constructs was developed and applied. These constructs are evaluated and examples of their application are considered.

  5. Application of a Nonlinear Optimal Control Algorithm to Spacecraft and Airship Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hironori A.; Kusagaya, Tairo; Watanabe, Takeo; An, Andrew

    This paper presents a synthetic method that is based on both the algorithm of the geometry nonlinear feedback and nonlinear system optimal control of hierarchical differential feedback regulation. This method enables us to solve optimal feedback control problems without solving the Riccati Equations or adjoint vectors. Also, the method takes into consideration the avoidance of conjugate points, which is a important aspect of research in optimal control of nonlinear system. The present method is applied to two examples, one is a nonlinear attitude maneuver of spacecraft and the other is an airship optimal feedback tracking control. These applications have been studied numerically in order to show the performance of the present method applied to nonlinear optimal control for aerospace application.

  6. Applicability of Aerospace Materials Ground Flammability Test Data to Spacecraft Environments Theory and Applied Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Beeson, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ground test data in reference to flammability to spacecraft environments. It reviews the current approach to spacecraft fire safety, the challenges to fire safety that the Constellation program poses, the current trends in the evaluation of the Constellation materials flammability, and the correlation of test data from ground flammability tests with the spacecraft environment. Included is a proposal for testing and the design of experiments to test the flammability of materials under similar spacecraft conditions.

  7. Applications of ISES for the atmospheric sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The proposed Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES) will offer the opportunity for real-time access to measurements acquired aboard the Earth Observation System (Eos) satellite. These measurements can then be transmitted to remotely located ground based stations. The application of such measurements to issues related to atmospheric science which was presented to a workshop convened to review possible application of the ISES in earth sciences is summarized. The proposed protocol for Eos instruments requires that measurement results be available in a central data archive within 72 hours of acquiring data. Such a turnaround of raw satellite data to the final product will clearly enhance the timeliness of the results. Compared to the time that results from many current satellite programs, the 72 hour turnaround may be considered real time. Examples are discussed showing how real-time measurements from one or more of the proposed Eos instruments could have been applied to the study of certain issues important to global atmospheric chemistry. Each of the examples discussed is based upon a field mission conducted during the past five years. Each of these examples will emphasize how real-time data could have been used to alter the course of a field experiment, thereby enhancing the scientific output. For the examples, brief overviews of the scientific rationale and objectives, the region of operation, the measurements aboard the aircraft, and finally how one or more of the proposed Eos instruments could have provided data to enhance the productivity of the mission are discussed.

  8. Application of dynamic uncertain causality graph in spacecraft fault diagnosis: Multi-conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Quanying; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Yang, Ping; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhu, Ma

    2017-03-01

    Intelligent diagnosis system is applied to fault diagnosis in spacecraft. Dynamic Uncertain Causality Graph (DUCG) is a new probability graphic model with many advantages. In this paper, DUGG is applied to fault diagnosis in spacecraft: introducing conditional functional events into ordinary DUCG to deal with spacecraft multi-conditions. Now, DUCG has been tested in 16 typical faults with 100% diagnosis accuracy.

  9. Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margle, Janice M. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Fire detection, fire standards and testing, fire extinguishment, inerting and atmospheres, fire-related medical science, aircraft fire safety, Space Station safety concerns, microgravity combustion, spacecraft material flammability testing, and metal combustion are among the topics considered.

  10. Progress in navigation filter estimate fusion and its application to spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1994-01-01

    A new derivation of an algorithm which fuses the outputs of two Kalman filters is presented within the context of previous research in this field. Unlike other works, this derivation clearly shows the combination of estimates to be optimal, minimizing the trace of the fused covariance matrix. The algorithm assumes that the filters use identical models, and are stable and operating optimally with respect to their own local measurements. Evidence is presented which indicates that the error ellipsoid derived from the covariance of the optimally fused estimate is contained within the intersections of the error ellipsoids of the two filters being fused. Modifications which reduce the algorithm's data transmission requirements are also presented, including a scalar gain approximation, a cross-covariance update formula which employs only the two contributing filters' autocovariances, and a form of the algorithm which can be used to reinitialize the two Kalman filters. A sufficient condition for using the optimally fused estimates to periodically reinitialize the Kalman filters in this fashion is presented and proved as a theorem. When these results are applied to an optimal spacecraft rendezvous problem, simulated performance results indicate that the use of optimally fused data leads to significantly improved robustness to initial target vehicle state errors. The following applications of estimate fusion methods to spacecraft rendezvous are also described: state vector differencing, and redundancy management.

  11. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 1A: Brief descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. S. (Editor); Vostreys, R. W. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Planetary and heliocentric spacecraft, including planetary flybys and probes, are described. Imaging, particles and fields, ultraviolet, infrared, radio science and celestial mechanics, atmospheres, surface chemistry, biology, and polarization are discussed.

  12. The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusion propulsion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.; Klein, G.; Sercel, J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Chang-Diaz, F.

    1987-10-02

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

  13. The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusions propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, Charles D.; Klein, Gail; Sercel, Joel; Hoffman, Nate; Murray, Kathy; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

  14. An X-band spacecraft transponder for deep space applications - Design concepts and breadboard performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Perret, Jonathan D.; Kermode, Arthur W.

    1992-01-01

    The design concepts and measured performance characteristics are summarized of an X band (7162 MHz/8415 MHz) breadboard deep space transponder (DSP) for future spacecraft applications, with the first use scheduled for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) and Cassini missions in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The DST consists of a double conversion, superheterodyne, automatic phase tracking receiver, and an X band (8415 MHz) exciter to drive redundant downlink power amplifiers. The receiver acquires and coherently phase tracks the modulated or unmodulated X band (7162 MHz) uplink carrier signal. The exciter phase modulates the band (8415 MHz) downlink signal with composite telemetry and ranging signals. The receiver measured tracking threshold, automatic gain control, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the breadboard DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The measured results show a receiver tracking threshold of -158 dBm and a dynamic signal range of 88 dB.

  15. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for spacecraft application. I - Silicate matrix formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.; Odonnell, T. P.; Hribar, V. F.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the graphite silicate paints MH-11 and MH-11Z, which will serve as electrically conductive, heat-resistant thermal control coatings for the Galileo spacecraft's 400 Newton engine plume shield, 10 Newton thruster plume shields, and external shunt radiators, is described, and performance results for these paints are reported. The MH-11 is produced by combining a certain grade of graphite powder with a silicate base to produce a black, inorganic, electrically conductive, room temperature cure thermal control paint having high temperature capability. Zinc oxide is added to the MH-11 formulation to produce the blister resistant painta MH-11Z. The mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and radiation characteristics of the coatings are reported. The formulation, mixing, application, and surface preparation of the substrates are described, and a method of determining the electrical resistance of the coatings is demonstrated.

  16. Design concepts and performance of NASA X-band transponder (DST) for deep space spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Perret, Jonathan D.; Kermode, Arthur W.

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts and measured performance characteristics of an X band (7162 MHz/8415 MHz) breadboard deep space transponder (DST) for future spacecraft applications, with the first use scheduled for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) and Cassini missions in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The DST consists of a double conversion, superheterodyne, automatic phase tracking receiver, and an X band (8415 MHz) exciter to drive redundant downlink power amplifiers. The receiver acquires and coherently phase tracks the modulated or unmodulated X band (7162 MHz) uplink carrier signal. The exciter phase modulates the X band (8415 MHz) downlink signal with composite telemetry and ranging signals. The receiver measured tracking threshold, automatic gain control static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the breadboard DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The measured results show a receiver tracking threshold of -158 dBm and a dynamic signal range of 88 dB.

  17. On-orbit spacecraft servicing: An element in the evolution of space robotics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Carl J.; Roy, Claude H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the renewed interest in on-orbit spacecraft servicing (OSS), and how it fits into the evolution of space applications for intelligent robots. Investment in the development of space robotics and associated technologies is growing as nations recognize that it is a critical component of the exploration and commercial development of space. At the same time, changes in world conditions have generated a renewal of the interest in OSS. This is reflected in the level of activity in the U.S., Japan and Europe in the form of studies and technology demonstration programs. OSS is becoming widely accepted as an opportunity in the evolution of space robotics applications. Importantly, it is a feasible proposition with current technologies and the direction of ongoing research and development activities. Interest in OSS dates back more than two decades, and several programs have been initiated, but no operational system has come on line, arguably with the Shuttle as the exception. With new opportunities arising, however, a fresh look at the feasibility of OSS is warranted. This involves the resolution of complex market, technical and political issues, through market studies, economic analyses, mission requirement definitions, trade studies, concept designs and technology demonstrations. System architectures for OSS are strongly dependent on target spacecraft design and launch delivery systems. Performance and cost factors are currently forcing significant changes in these areas. This presents both challenges and opportunities in the provision of OSS services. In conclusion, there is no question OSS will become a reality, but only when the technical feasibility is combined with either economic viability or political will. In the evolution of space robotics satellite servicing can become the next step towards its eventual role in support of planetary exploration and human beings' journey out into the universe.

  18. Atmospheric spectroscopy applications 96. Selected papers. 4th Conference on Atmospheric Spectroscopy Applications (ASA), Reims (France), 4 - 6 Sep 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, A.; Mérienne, M. F.; Rothman, L. S.

    1998-05-01

    The following topics were dealt with: atmospheric spectroscopy applications, including - (1) laboratory data; (2) atmospheric observations; (3) lineshape and continua; (4) techniques; (5) non-local thermodynamic equilibrium; and (6) databases.

  19. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: Application to gravitational wave searches

    SciTech Connect

    Tinto, Massimo; Dick, George J.; Prestage, John D.; Armstrong, J. W.

    2009-05-15

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multilink CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would give GW strain sensitivity of 3.7x10{sup -14} Hz{sup -1/2} for randomly polarized, monochromatic GW signals isotropically distributed over the celestial sphere, over a two-decade ({approx}0.0001-0.01 Hz) region of the low-frequency band. This is about an order of magnitude better than currently achieved with traditional two-way coherent Doppler experiments. The utility of optimally combining simultaneous up- and down-link observations is not limited to GW searches. The Doppler tracking technique discussed here could be performed at minimal incremental cost to improve also other radio science experiments (i.e., tests of relativistic gravity, planetary and satellite gravity field measurements, atmospheric and ring occultations) on future interplanetary missions.

  20. Coorbital Restricted Problem and its Application in the Design of the Orbits of the LISA Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhaohua; Li, Guangyu; Heinzel, Gerhard; Rüdiger, Albrecht; Jennrich, Oliver; Wang, Li; Xia, Yan; Zeng, Fei; Zhao, Haibin

    On the basis of many coorbital phenomena in astronomy and spacecraft motion, a dynamics model is proposed in this paper — treating the coorbital restricted problem together with method for obtaining a general approximate solution. The design of the LISA spacecraft orbits is a special 2+3 coorbital restricted problem. The problem is analyzed in two steps. First, the motion of the barycenter of the three spacecraft is analyzed, which is a planar coorbital restricted three-body problem. And an approximate analytical solution of the radius and the argument of the center is obtained consequently. Secondly, the configuration of the three spacecraft with minimum arm-length variation is analyzed. The motion of a single spacecraft is a near-planar coorbital restricted three-body problem, allowing approximate analytical solutions for the orbit radius and the argument of a spacecraft. Thus approximative expressions for the arm-length are given.

  1. RF generated atmospheric pressure plasmas and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.; Henins, Ivars; Gautier, Donald C.

    2001-10-01

    RF generated atmospheric pressure plasma sources have been developed for various materials applications. They operate with rf power and produce a α-mode capacitive discharge that is stable, steady-state, non-thermal, and volumetric. The plasma parameters of this source have been measured: electron densities of 10^11 cm-3 and electron temperatures of 2 eV by using neutral bremsstrahlung emission. Localized electron heating near the sheath boundary has been observed and is related to the discharge stability and α to γ mode (or arcing) transition using 1D fluid model. The discharge stability improves with increase in rf frequency. The electrode surface property such as the secondary electron emission coefficient also plays a significant role in determining α to γ mode transition. For example, a stable α-mode air discharge is produced using 100 MHz rf power with the use of a boron nitride cover on one of the electrodes. In comparison, an air discharge becomes unstable at a lower rf frequency (e.g. 13.56 MHz) or with an alumina cover. Similar results were obtained with various feedgas such as steam, CO_2, and hydrocarbon containing gases. Further characterization of this high frequency source is under progress. For its applications, we have successfully demonstrated the effective neutralization of actual chemical warfare agents such as VX, GD and HD. In addition, significant progresses have been made in the area of etching of organic and metal film etching, and production of novel materials.

  2. Applications Technology Satellite ATS-6 experiment checkout and continuing spacecraft evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W.; Prensky, W. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The activities of the ATS-6 spacecraft are reviewed. The following subsystems and experiments are summarized: (1) radio beacon experiments; (2) spacecraft attitude precision pointing and slewing adaptive control experiment; (3) satellite instruction television experiment; (4) thermal control subsystem; (5) spacecraft propulsion subsystem; (6) telemetry and control subsystem; (7) millimeter wave experiment; and (8) communications subsystem. The results of performance evaluation of its subsystems and experiments are presented.

  3. The Atmospheric Sciences: Problems and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Committee on Atmospheric Sciences.

    Over the years, the Committee on Atmospheric Sciences of the National Research Council has published a number of scientific and technical reports dealing with many aspects of the atmospheric sciences. This publication is an attempt to present to a broad audience this information about problems and research in the atmospheric sciences. Chapters…

  4. Estimating the water content of geologic materials using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy: Applications to laboratory and spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, Ralph Edward

    Visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to relate the absorption strength of the 3 micrometer hydration feature to absolute water content (weight percent) of hydrated geologic materials. Complicating factors of albedo, particle size, and composition were examined individually. Laboratory results combining spectral measurements of materials under ambient, low relative humidity, and heated conditions with measurements of water content provide a method to link changes in band strength to changes in water content for materials under varying hydration states. Primary results indicate that reflectance spectra should be converted to single scattering albedo in order to accurately estimate water content for a wide variety of clay minerals, sulfates, zeolites, and hydrated volcanic materials. These methods are applicable to both laboratory and remotely sensed reflectance spectra. Application of our hydration model to high-resolution Mars Express OMEGA spectra of the martian surface reveal that bright and dark regions have similar water contents in the equatorial latitudes (2--4 wt. %), hydration increases with latitude poleward of ˜60°N (up to 8--15 wt. %), and local outcrops of sulfate and phyllosilicate material exhibit water contents of 5--8 wt. %. Furthermore, high latitude surfaces exhibit seasonal changes in water content on the order of 2--3 wt. %, likely the result of water vapor exchange between the regolith and atmosphere. The methods and model presented here provide a robust, non-destructive technique for estimating the water content of particulate samples spanning a wide albedo range (0.07--0.9), particle size (<250 mum), and composition (well-ordered to poorly crystalline). Applying these models to laboratory samples and spacecraft data will provide insight into the hydration state of terrestrial and planetary materials and the location, amount, and role of water in the solar system under current and past conditions.

  5. TERRA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD, is the centerpiece of the Earth Science Enterprise (formerly called 'Mission to Planet Earth'), a long-term coordinated research effort to study the Earth as a global system. Terra was launched on December 18, 1999 aboard an ATLAS-IIAS launch vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA. Terra is a near-polar orbiting spacecraft that will cross the equator at 10:30 am local time. Terra will collect data simultaneously from a complement of five instruments: CERES, MISR, and MODIS are proved by the US; MOPITT by Canada; and ASTER by Japan. Researchers around the world will use data from these instruments to study how the atmosphere, land, ocean, and life interact with each other on a global scale.

  6. Physics and applications of atmospheric nonlinear optics and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-07

    We review the properties and applications of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere, with a particular focus on filamentation. Filamentation is a non-linear propagation regime specific of ultrashort and ultraintense laser pulses in the atmosphere. Typical applications include remote sensing of atmospheric gases and aerosols, lightning control, laser-induced spectroscopy, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, and the generation of sub-THz radiation.

  7. The theory and applications of ocean wave measuring systems at and below the sea surface, on the land, from aircraft, and from spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for measuring and analyzing ocean waves are described, including those presently in use on spacecraft and planned for SEASAT-A. Potential difficulties with synthetic aperture systems for a spacecraft are described and an alternate design is suggested. The different methods can yield different kinds of spectra and other kinds of imagery. Ways to compare different kinds of data are given. The scientific and practical applications of data from spacecraft are given.

  8. Mars Observer: Applications to atmospheric transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Richard W.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) is an atmospheric sounder designed to observe temporal and spatial variations of water vapor and of dust suspended in the Mars atmosphere, to characterize the planetary-scale thermal structure and circulation of the atmosphere, and to quantify the polar radiative balance. These measurements are fundamental to understanding the seasonal cycles of dust, of water, and of CO2 on Mars and, in particular, to determining the role of atmospheric transport. Using measurements in eight narrow-band infrared spectral regions and one broadband visible channel, the PMIRR investigation teams at JPL and Oxford University will derive vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, extinction due to suspended dust, and water vapor concentration, as well as locations of CO2 and H2O ice clouds. These data will be used in a variety of ways to address issues of atmospheric dynamics and transport. Three topics will be emphasized here: (1) the expected precision of the retrieved profiles of temperature, dust extinction, and water vapor, including plans for validating the profiles; (2) the observation strategy, designed to best use PMIRR's two-axis scan mirror, as deployed in the Mars Observer mapping orbit; and (3) approaches to mapping the atmospheric fields globally and the derivation of key meteorological fields related to estimating atmospheric transport.

  9. Application of numerical Fourier transformation on measurements made on board rotating spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, R.; Boesch, B.; Wolf, H.

    Use of a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm to perform digital evaluation of signals from spacecraft featuring spin modulation and nutational effects is described. The case of a rotating spacecraft without nutation is modeled, with account taken of demodulation performed simultaneously with respect to amplitude and phase. Applying the demodulation technique twice removes the nutational effects. Assumptions are made that the spectral functions do not vary as fast as the spin modulation, and the signal variance independent of spacecraft rotation occurs at a rate significantly less than the spin rate. A demodulation example is given for a signal received from a probe on the Porcupine 2 rocket.

  10. Models for Galactic Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particles and their Application to Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of radiation environment in interplanetary space must be taken into account for spacecraft design. This is done by modeling this environment and propagating it to the electronic parts of interest within the spacecraft then calculating the effects of this radiation on these parts. This talk will present a survey of the existing models for the interplanetary radiation environment and the results of comparing them with measurements. It will also include a survey of radiation transport methods and methods for estimating the effects of this radiation on spacecraft.

  11. Applications of high thermal conductivity composites to electronics and spacecraft thermal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, high thermal conductivity continuous graphite fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) have become available that can save much weight over present methods of heat conduction. These materials have two or three times higher thermal conductivity in the fiber direction than the pure metals when compared on a thermal conductivity to weight basis. Use of these materials for heat conduction purposes can result in weight savings of from 50 to 70 percent over structural aluminum. Another significant advantage is that these materials can be used without the plumbing and testing complexities that accompany the use of liquid heat pipes. A spinoff of this research was the development of other MMC's as electronic device heat sinks. These use particulates rather than fibers and are formulated to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of electronic substrates in order to alleviate thermally induced stresses. The development of both types of these materials as viable weight saving substitutes for traditional methods of thermal control for electronics packaging and also for spacecraft thermal control applications are the subject of this report.

  12. Airborne spacecraft - A remotely powered, high-altitude RPV for environmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, J. W.; Darnell, W. L.; Johnson, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-altitude, unmanned, propeller-driven electric airplane is proposed for remote sensing of environmental phenomena. With motive power from surface-mounted solar arrays or microwave receivers, flight endurance of weeks to months could be anticipated. The proposed system offers unique capability for monitoring oceanic and atmospheric characteristics on local or regional scales. Coastal marine and tropospheric research activities, which require temporal resolutions of 2-72 hours, would be prime application areas. Potential missions might include the monitoring of ocean disposals, episodic marine biological events, and river/ocean interactions. Preliminary sizing and performance calculations are presented along with possible mission scenarios and payload complements.

  13. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  14. Four methods of attitude determination for spin-stabilized spacecraft with applications and comparative results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The attitude of a spacecraft is determined by specifying independent parameters which relate the spacecraft axes to an inertial coordinate system. Sensors which measure angles between spin axis and other vectors directed to objects or fields external to the spacecraft are discussed. For the spin-stabilized spacecraft considered, the spin axis is constant over at least an orbit, but separate solutions based on sensor angle measurements are different due to propagation of errors. Sensor-angle solution methods are described which minimize the propagated errors by making use of least squares techniques over many sensor angle measurements and by solving explicitly (in closed form) for the spin axis coordinates. These methods are compared with star observation solutions to determine if satisfactory accuracy is obtained by each method.

  15. Comprehensive Fault Tolerance and Science-Optimal Attitude Planning for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Ali

    Spacecraft operate in a harsh environment, are costly to launch, and experience unavoidable communication delay and bandwidth constraints. These factors motivate the need for effective onboard mission and fault management. This dissertation presents an integrated framework to optimize science goal achievement while identifying and managing encountered faults. Goal-related tasks are defined by pointing the spacecraft instrumentation toward distant targets of scientific interest. The relative value of science data collection is traded with risk of failures to determine an optimal policy for mission execution. Our major innovation in fault detection and reconfiguration is to incorporate fault information obtained from two types of spacecraft models: one based on the dynamics of the spacecraft and the second based on the internal composition of the spacecraft. For fault reconfiguration, we consider possible changes in both dynamics-based control law configuration and the composition-based switching configuration. We formulate our problem as a stochastic sequential decision problem or Markov Decision Process (MDP). To avoid the computational complexity involved in a fully-integrated MDP, we decompose our problem into multiple MDPs. These MDPs include planning MDPs for different fault scenarios, a fault detection MDP based on a logic-based model of spacecraft component and system functionality, an MDP for resolving conflicts between fault information from the logic-based model and the dynamics-based spacecraft models〝 and the reconfiguration MDP that generates a policy optimized over the relative importance of the mission objectives versus spacecraft safety. Approximate Dynamic Programming (ADP) methods for the decomposition of the planning and fault detection MDPs are applied. To show the performance of the MDP-based frameworks and ADP methods, a suite of spacecraft attitude planning case studies are described. These case studies are used to analyze the content and

  16. Technology for small spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report gives the results of a study by the National Research Council's Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology that reviewed NASA's technology development program for small spacecraft and assessed technology within the U.S. government and industry that is applicable to small spacecraft. The panel found that there is a considerable body of advanced technology currently available for application by NASA and the small spacecraft industry that could provide substantial improvement in capability and cost over those technologies used for current NASA small spacecraft. These technologies are the result of developments by commercial companies, Department of Defense agencies, and to a lesser degree NASA. The panel also found that additional technologies are being developed by these same entities that could provide additional substantial improvement if development is successfully completed. Recommendations for future technology development efforts by NASA across a broad technological spectrum are made.

  17. New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

  18. Control of nonlinear systems with applications to constrained robots and spacecraft attitude stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Hariharan

    1993-06-01

    This thesis is organized in two parts. In Part 1, control systems described by a class of nonlinear differential and algebraic equations are introduced. A procedure for local stabilization based on a local state realization is developed. An alternative approach to local stabilization is developed based on a classical linearization of the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations. A theoretical framework is established for solving a tracking problem associated with the differential-algebraic system. First, a simple procedure is developed for the design of a feedback control law which ensures, at least locally, that the tracking error in the closed loop system lies within any given bound if the reference inputs are sufficiently slowly varying. Next, by imposing additional assumptions, a procedure is developed for the design of a feedback control law which ensures that the tracking error in the closed loop system approaches zero exponentially for reference inputs which are not necessarily slowly varying. The control design methodologies are used for simultaneous force and position control in constrained robot systems. The differential-algebraic equations are shown to characterize the slow dynamics of a certain nonlinear control system in nonstandard singularly perturbed form. In Part 2, the attitude stabilization (reorientation) of a rigid spacecraft using only two control torques is considered. First, the case of momentum wheel actuators is considered. The complete spacecraft dynamics are not controllable. However, the spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable in a reduced sense. The reduced spacecraft dynamics cannot be asymptotically stabilized using continuous feedback, but a discontinuous feedback control strategy is constructed. Next, the case of gas jet actuators is considered. If the uncontrolled principal axis is not an axis of symmetry, the complete spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable. However, the spacecraft attitude

  19. Control of nonlinear systems with applications to constrained robots and spacecraft attitude stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Hariharan

    1993-01-01

    This thesis is organized in two parts. In Part 1, control systems described by a class of nonlinear differential and algebraic equations are introduced. A procedure for local stabilization based on a local state realization is developed. An alternative approach to local stabilization is developed based on a classical linearization of the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations. A theoretical framework is established for solving a tracking problem associated with the differential-algebraic system. First, a simple procedure is developed for the design of a feedback control law which ensures, at least locally, that the tracking error in the closed loop system lies within any given bound if the reference inputs are sufficiently slowly varying. Next, by imposing additional assumptions, a procedure is developed for the design of a feedback control law which ensures that the tracking error in the closed loop system approaches zero exponentially for reference inputs which are not necessarily slowly varying. The control design methodologies are used for simultaneous force and position control in constrained robot systems. The differential-algebraic equations are shown to characterize the slow dynamics of a certain nonlinear control system in nonstandard singularly perturbed form. In Part 2, the attitude stabilization (reorientation) of a rigid spacecraft using only two control torques is considered. First, the case of momentum wheel actuators is considered. The complete spacecraft dynamics are not controllable. However, the spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable in a reduced sense. The reduced spacecraft dynamics cannot be asymptotically stabilized using continuous feedback, but a discontinuous feedback control strategy is constructed. Next, the case of gas jet actuators is considered. If the uncontrolled principal axis is not an axis of symmetry, the complete spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable. However, the spacecraft attitude

  20. The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

  1. Practical Applications of Cosmic Ray Science: Spacecraft, Aircraft, Ground Based Computation and Control Systems and Human Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Koontz, Steve; Normand, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review the discovery of cosmic ray effects on the performance and reliability of microelectronic systems as well as on human health and safety, as well as the development of the engineering and health science tools used to evaluate and mitigate cosmic ray effects in earth surface, atmospheric flight, and space flight environments. Three twentieth century technological developments, 1) high altitude commercial and military aircraft; 2) manned and unmanned spacecraft; and 3) increasingly complex and sensitive solid state micro-electronics systems, have driven an ongoing evolution of basic cosmic ray science into a set of practical engineering tools (e.g. ground based test methods as well as high energy particle transport and reaction codes) needed to design, test, and verify the safety and reliability of modern complex electronic systems as well as effects on human health and safety. The effects of primary cosmic ray particles, and secondary particle showers produced by nuclear reactions with spacecraft materials, can determine the design and verification processes (as well as the total dollar cost) for manned and unmanned spacecraft avionics systems. Similar considerations apply to commercial and military aircraft operating at high latitudes and altitudes near the atmospheric Pfotzer maximum. Even ground based computational and controls systems can be negatively affected by secondary particle showers at the Earth's surface, especially if the net target area of the sensitive electronic system components is large. Accumulation of both primary cosmic ray and secondary cosmic ray induced particle shower radiation dose is an important health and safety consideration for commercial or military air crews operating at high altitude/latitude and is also one of the most important factors presently limiting manned space flight operations beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO).

  2. Overview of Potable Water Systems on Spacecraft Vehicles and Applications for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie J.; Callahan, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Providing water necessary to maintain life support has been accomplished in spacecraft vehicles for over forty years. This paper will investigate how previous U.S. space vehicles provided potable water. The water source for the spacecraft, biocide used to preserve the water on-orbit, water stowage methodology, materials, pumping mechanisms, on-orbit water requirements, and water temperature requirements will be discussed. Where available, the hardware used to provide the water and the general function of that hardware will also be detailed. The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV or Orion) water systems will be generically discussed to provide a glimpse of how similar they are to water systems in previous vehicles. Conclusions on strategies that could be used for CEV based on previous spacecraft water systems will be made in the form of questions and recommendations.

  3. Earth horizon modeling and application to static Earth sensors on TRMM spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keat, J.; Challa, M.; Tracewell, D.; Galal, K.

    1995-05-01

    Data from Earth sensor assemblies (ESA's) often are used in the attitude determination (AD) for both spinning and Earth-pointing spacecraft. The ESA's on previous such spacecraft for which the ground-based AD operation was performed by the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) used the Earth scanning method. AD on such spacecraft requires a model of the shape of the Earth disk as seen from the spacecraft. AD accuracy requirements often are too severe to permit Earth oblateness to be ignored when modeling disk shape. Section 2 of this paper reexamines and extends the methods for Earth disk shape modeling employed in AD work at FDD for the past decade. A new formulation, based on a more convenient Earth flatness parameter, is introduced, and the geometric concepts are examined in detail. It is shown that the Earth disk can be approximated as an ellipse in AD computations. Algorithms for introducing Earth oblateness into the AD process for spacecraft carrying scanning ESA's have been developed at FDD and implemented into the support systems. The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) will be the first spacecraft with AD operation performed at FDD that uses a different type of ESA - namely, a static one - containing four fixed detectors D(sub i) (i = 1 to 4). Section 3 of this paper considers the effect of Earth oblateness on AD accuracy for TRMM. This effect ideally will not induce AD errors on TRMM when data from all four D(sub i) are present. When data from only two or three D(sub i) are available, however, a spherical Earth approximation can introduce errors of 0.05 to 0.30 deg on TRMM. These oblateness-induced errors are eliminated by a new algorithm that uses the results of Section 2 to model the Earth disk as an ellipse.

  4. Stabilization of large-scale systems - A spinning flexible spacecraft. [Skylab applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stabilization of high-order constant systems by multilevel control is proposed in the framework of the decomposition-aggregation method for stability analysis of large-scale systems. An 11-order linear model of a spinning flexible spacecraft is stabilized by the method using both the passive and the active stabilization devices. The method can take advantage of the special structural features of the model to provide the best estimate of the stability region for an important parameter which couples the wobble and the spin motion of the spacecraft.

  5. TERRA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS), managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland, is the centerpiece of the Earth Science Enterprise (formerly called "Mission to Planet Earth"), a long-term coordinated research effort to study the Earth as a global system. Terra was launched on December 18, 1999 aboard an ATLAS-IIAS launch vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Terra is a near-polar orbiting spacecraft that will cross the equator at 10:30 AM local time. Terra will collect data simultaneously from a complement of five instruments: CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) and MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) are provided by the United States; MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) by Canada; and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer) by Japan. Researchers around the world will use data from these instruments to study how the atmosphere, land, ocean, and life interact with each other on a global scale. This interactive CD introduces Terra's overall objectives and its instruments, the new technologies developed for Terra, the launch of Terra, and its flight dynamics.

  6. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4B: Descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Carolyn; Stonesifer, G. Richard

    1989-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  7. Application of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System to the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The core dynamics of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a widely used and powerful mesoscale Earth model, is adapted to the Martian Atmosphere and applied in the study of aeolian surface features. In particular, research efforts focused on the substitution of Martian planetary and atmospheric properties such as rotation rate, and thermodynamic constants in place of hard-wired Earth properties. Application of the model was restricted to three-dimensional flow impinging upon impact craters, and the search for plausible wind patterns that could produce the so-called light and dark streaks downwind of topographic barriers.

  8. Lidar application to middle atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K.; Sridharan, S.

    2016-05-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is an optical remote sensing technique which can be used to probe middle atmosphere (stratosphere & mesosphere) from where RADAR (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system fails to get scattering. The Mie and Rayleigh lidar system installed at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) has been operating at 532 nm green laser with increased energy of 600 mJ/pulse and pulse repletion frequency of 50 Hz since 2007. From the Rayleigh lidar observations, vertical profiles of atmospheric density and temperature can be obtained above 25-30 km (where the aerosols are almost negligible) at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The temperature profiles often show mesospheric inversion layers (MILs), the causative mechanisms of which are yet to be understood. In the present study, the improved performance of the lidar system is demonstrated by showing the height profile of temperature and its error obtained with the high power laser ( 12 W per pulse) on 20 January 2007 when compared to the same obtained using the low power laser ( 5 W per pulse) on 05 February 2007 over Gadanki. The temperature errors observed at 80 km are 3.5 K, 18 K with high and low power lasers respectively. A large MIL has been observed on 20 January 2007 above 78 km with amplitude of 31 K from the lidar temperature operated with high power laser. The dominant gravity wave (GW) period and vertical wavelengths are found to be T 66 min and λz 6.4 km in the inversion region. The wave saturation ratio and eddy diffusion coefficient due to the GW breaking are calculated and it is found that the wave gets saturated at 84-85 km and the eddy diffusion coefficient increases from 25 m2/sec above the inversion region ( 83 km). This result suggests that the occurrence of this large MIL event is probably due to gravity wave breaking.

  9. Latitude and Longitude Patterns of Soft X-Rays Emitted from the Earth's Upper Atmosphere as Observed with the Coronas-F Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Spjeldvik, Walther; Martin, Inacio

    Long-term monitoring during 2001 through 2005 of the low energy 3-8 keV X-ray emission was carried out with CdTe solid state detector on Low Earth Orbit CORONAS-F spacecraft. Care was taken to exclude the sections of the spacecraft orbit where direct or scattered solar X-ray fluxes would reach the detector. We have found definite patterns as well as irregularities in these soft X-rays emanating from the upper Earth atmosphere. In the northern hemisphere we have found latitudinal distributions extending over +/- 10 degrees latitude centered on the middle latitudes and extending over half of the Earth latitude range. We report that the X-ray intensity is up to 10 kW in this soft X-ray band. Luminosity of the whole the Earth’s globe at altitude of 500 km amounts to several tens kW. The radiation possesses the seasonal variations; it intensity significantly depends on solar activity level. We reason that these X-ray fluxes can not be scattering solar roentgen ones as these photons are observed on night side of the Earth, and we note that solar roentgen emission has a little lower energy, typically less than about 2 keV. We surmise that the observed emission is mostly the result from Bremsstrahlung radiation due to magnetospheric electrons precipitating from the Earth’s radiation belts being influenced by electromagnetic disturbances of different origin (e.g., persistent ELF and VLF plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, possible ducted lightning electromagnetic emissions, electromagnetic pulses in earthquakes, enhancement of plasma waves geomagnetic storms and/or substorms, etc.).

  10. Computing Electric Currents in the Martian Ionosphere Using Magnetometer Data from the Mars Atmospheric Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogle, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mars does not have a global magnetic field like Earth does. However, due to solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) interactions, electric currents are induced which create an induced magnetosphere. As MAVEN passes through the ionosphere of Mars, the magnetometer on board continuously measures the induced magnetic field in the ionosphere. Using Ampere's Law (∇ × B = µ0j) along with these measurements of the induced magnetic field, we can quantify the electric currents in the ionosphere. We are particularly interested in magnetic field profiles that have a radial component that is less than or equal to 5 nanoteslas in magnitude. By only using measurements where the radial component of the magnetic field satisfies the aforementioned condition and assuming that there are no horizontal gradients in the magnetic field, we will calculate horizontal currents in the ionosphere. Using these calculated currents, we will analyze altitudinal variations in magnitude and direction of the currents. Measuring these horizontal currents can give us insights into how the solar wind and IMF can affect the upper atmosphere of Mars. For example, induced electric currents can cause Joule heating in the atmosphere, which can potentially modify its neutral dynamics.

  11. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  12. Spacecraft 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the Workshop was to focus on the key technology area for 21st century spacecraft and the programs needed to facilitate technology development and validation. Topics addressed include: spacecraft systems; system development; structures and materials; thermal control; electrical power; telemetry, tracking, and control; data management; propulsion; and attitude control.

  13. [Human-centered ergonomical study and applications in manned spacecraft project of China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-hua; Zhou, Qian-xiang; Xu, Yong-zhong; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Yao, Su-ying; Jiang, Shi-zhong

    2003-01-01

    High G and weightlessness are two important environment factors that are unavoidable during spaceflight. They will bring key effects on astronauts' posture and working efficiency. In this paper, on the basis of experience of China first manned spacecraft project in the past 10 years, the concept of space ergonomics and its role in the project were reviewed. Ergonomic research items and corresponding methods were systematically analyzed with astronauts' working state, and ergonomic evaluation types and approaches were discussed with some given cases being used in the project. Finally, some suggestions were proposed on space man-machine system development according to recent ergonomic trend in space ergonomics and the basis of experience of first manned spacecraft project.

  14. Applications of square-root information filtering and smoothing in spacecraft orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tseng-Chan; Collier, James B.; Ekelund, John E.; Breckheimer, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Orbit Determination Software System is a set of computer programs developed for the primary purpose of determining the flight path of deep-space mission spacecraft in NASA's Planetary Program and highly elliptical orbiting spacecraft in Earth orbit. The filtering processes available within the JPL Orbit Determination Software are discussed, and several examples are presented. In particular, solutions obtained by the Square Root Information Filter (SRIF) using Bierman's Estimation Subroutine Library (ESL) are discussed and compared with the solutions obtained by the singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. It is concluded that the SRIF filtering and smoothing algorithms are efficient and numerically stable for well-conditioned systems. The use of Bierman's ESL simplifies the task of maintaining the orbit determination software by providing efficient, tested filtering tools. For solving a large well-conditioned system (rank higher than 120), SRIF is approximately four times faster than SVD; however, for solving an ill-conditioned system, SVD is recommended.

  15. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  16. Some applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, A. N.; Bryson, J. C.; Vasuki, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs are described. The organization, operations, and functions of an air quality monitoring network at New Castle County, Delaware is discussed. The data obtained by the air quality monitoring network ground stations and the equipment used to obtain atmospheric data are explained. It is concluded that correlation of the information obtained by the network will make it possible to anticipate air pollution problems in the Chesapeake Bay area before a crisis develops.

  17. An 8 x 10 to the 5th bit bubble memory cell for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. J.; Murray, G. W.; Bohning, O. D.; Stermer, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple chip magnetic bubble memory cell design developed for NASA embodies the low power, low weight, environmental tolerance and reliability necessary for successful operation in spacecraft launch and mission environments. Packaging of multiple chips in a common magnetic bias, drive coil assembly reduces weight and volume overhead per chip and also reduces the number of coil drive components required. This 8 x 10 to the 5th bit cell is conduction cooled and provides a metal and ceramic sealed hermetic chip environment.

  18. Spacecraft orbit/earth scan derivations, associated APL program, and application to IMP-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    The derivation of a time shared, remote site, demand processed computer program is discussed. The computer program analyzes the effects of selected orbit, attitude, and spacecraft parameters on earth sensor detections of earth. For prelaunch analysis, the program may be used to simulate effects in nominal parameters which are used in preparing attitude data processing programs. After launch, comparison of results from a simulation and from satellite data will produce deviations helpful in isolating problems.

  19. Application of Single Spacecraft Methods to Study the Motion of the Venusian Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, Stefanos; Pope, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Collisionless shockwaves are associated with a plethora of processes throughout the universe. Supernova remnant shocks are considered one of the main mechanisms that are capable to accelerate particles at high enough energies as the ones observed in cosmic rays. It is still unknown how these shocks accelerate particle to such high energies. By studying shocks in the heliosphere in order to define as much as possible of their parameter space, we could find the answer to this question. One important collisionless shock parameter is the velocity that the shock is travelling. This velocity can be used to define the spatial scales of the shock. The spatial scale in turn is closely related to the processes that govern the energy dissipation and in turn the nature of the shock. The use of multi-spacecraft measurements are the most reliable method to determine the shock velocity. However single spacecraft measurements are often only available, particularly for planetary missions. In a previous study we examined the accuracy of some of the single spacecraft methods that have been developed. Here we apply these approaches to a series of observations of the Venusian bow shock at different locations using Venus Express magnetic field data.

  20. A Concise Guide to Feature Histograms with Applications to LIDAR-Based Spacecraft Relative Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Andrew P.; Christian, John A.; Evans, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    With the availability and popularity of 3D sensors, it is advantageous to re-examine the use of point cloud descriptors for the purpose of pose estimation and spacecraft relative navigation. One popular descriptor is the oriented unique repeatable clustered viewpoint feature histogram (OUR-CVFH), which is most often utilized in personal and industrial robotics to simultaneously recognize and navigate relative to an object. Recent research into using the OUR-CVFH descriptor for spacecraft navigation has produced favorable results. Since OUR-CVFH is the most recent innovation in a large family of feature histogram point cloud descriptors, discussions of parameter settings and insights into its functionality are spread among various publications and online resources. This paper organizes the history of feature histogram point cloud descriptors for a straightforward explanation of their evolution. This article compiles all the requisite information needed to implement OUR-CVFH into one location, as well as providing useful suggestions on how to tune the generation parameters. This work is beneficial for anyone interested in using this histogram descriptor for object recognition or navigation - may it be personal robotics or spacecraft navigation.

  1. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  2. Solar array/spacecraft biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Biasing techniques and their application to the control of spacecraft potential is discussed. Normally when a spacecraft is operated with ion thrusters, the spacecraft will be 10-20 volts negative of the surrounding plasma. This will affect scientific measurements and will allow ions from the charge-exchange plasma to bombard the spacecraft surfaces with a few tens of volts of energy. This condition may not be tolerable. A proper bias system is described that can bring the spacecraft to or near the potential of the surrounding plasma.

  3. The Development of Fuel Cell Technology for Electric Power Generation - From Spacecraft Applications to the Hydrogen Economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The fuel cell uses a catalyzed reaction between a fuel and an oxidizer to directly produce electricity. Its high theoretical efficiency and low temperature operation made it a subject of much study upon its invention ca. 1900, but its relatively high life cycle costs kept it as "solution in search of a problem" for its first half century. The first problem for which fuel cells presented a cost effective solution was, starting in the 1960's that of a power source for NASA's manned spacecraft. NASA thus invested, and continues to invest, in the development of fuel cell power plants for this application. However, starting in the mid-1990's, prospective environmental regulations have driven increased governmental and industrial interest in "green power" and the "Hydrogen Economy." This has in turn stimulated greatly increased investment in fuel cell development for a variety of terrestrial applications. This investment is bringing about notable advances in fuel cell technology, but these advances are often in directions quite different from those needed for NASA spacecraft applications. This environment thus presents both opportunities and challenges for NASA's manned space program.

  4. Discussion meeting on Gossamer spacecraft (ultralightweight spacecraft)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, R. G. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Concepts, technology, and application of ultralightweight structures in space are examined. Gossamer spacecraft represented a generic class of space vehicles or structures characterized by a low mass per unit area (approximately 50g/m2). Gossamer concepts include the solar sail, the space tether, and various two and three dimensional large lightweight structures that were deployed or assembled in space. The Gossamer Spacecraft had a high potential for use as a transportation device (solar sail), as a science instrument (reflecting or occulting antenna), or as a large structural component for an enclosure, manned platform, or other human habitats. Inflatable structures were one possible building element for large ultralightweight structures in space.

  5. Manifold dynamics in the Earth-Moon system via isomorphic mapping with application to spacecraft end-of-life strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontani, Mauro; Giancotti, Marco; Teofilatto, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    application of manifold dynamics to defining suitable, convenient end-of-life strategies for spacecraft orbiting the Earth. Seven distinct options are identified, and lead to placing the spacecraft into the final disposal orbit, which is either (a) a lunar capture orbit, (b) a lunar impact trajectory, (c) a stable lunar periodic orbit, or (d) an outer orbit, never approaching the Earth or the Moon. Two remarkable properties that relate the velocity variations with the spacecraft energy are employed for the purpose of identifying the optimal locations, magnitudes, and directions of the velocity impulses needed to perform the seven transfer trajectories. The overall performance of each end-of-life strategy is evaluated in terms of time of flight and propellant budget.

  6. Observations of Mercury's Surface-Bounded Exosphere from Orbit: Results from the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, W. E.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Killen, R. M.; Merkel, A. W.; Sarantos, M.; Solomon, S. C.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, conducted orbital observations of Mercury's dayside and nightside exosphere from 29 March 2011 to the end of the mission on 30 April 2015. Over slightly more than four Earth-years, MASCS measured emission profiles versus altitude for calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), and magnesium (Mg) at a daily cadence. These species exhibit different spatial distributions, suggesting distinct source processes. MASCS observed seasonal variations in all three species that are remarkably repeatable from one Mercury year to the next, and did so consistently during the entire 17-Mercury-year duration of the orbital phase of the mission. Whereas MASCS has characterized the seasonal variation, it has provided, at best, only weak evidence for the episodic behavior observed in ground-based studies of Na. Joint analyses of MASCS observations and surface precipitation patterns for energetic particles inferred from observations by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) on MESSENGER have not yielded clear correlations. This lack of correlation may be due in part to the MASCS observational geometries. MASCS has conducted a number of searches for other, weakly emitting species. Hydrogen data from the orbital phase are consistent with profiles observed during MESSENGER's flybys of Mercury. Oxygen detections have proven elusive, and the previously reported observation with a brightness of 4 R may only be an upper limit. Ongoing analysis of weak species data suggests that additional species are present.

  7. Flow field investigation of atmospheric braking for high drag vehicles with forward facing jets. [in spacecraft entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenich, A. F.; Woods, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Flow field phenomena associated with a supersonic jet issuing upstream into a hypervelocity flow field were investigated experimentally in support of a new space vehicle aerobraking concept developed by Boeing for Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV's). Tests were made on OTV models in the NASA Langley 22 in., Mach 20 helium tunnel with jet exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 6.18 and ballute half angles of 45 and 60 deg. Force data were taken at zero angle of attack to determine the effect of ballute angle, jet Mach number and jet flow rate on vehicle drag. Bow shock structures were examined in terms of flow steadiness to define acceptable jet flow rate regimes for use in drag modulation. Limited tests were made to obtain pressure and temperature distributions around the ballute and to determine the ballute center of pressure. Test results are presented and discussed relative to OTV application and similar previous experimental investigations.

  8. Error detection and correction unit with built-in self-test capability for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timoc, Constantin

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project was to research and develop a 32-bit single chip Error Detection and Correction unit capable of correcting all single bit errors and detecting all double bit errors in the memory systems of a spacecraft. We designed the 32-bit EDAC (Error Detection and Correction unit) based on a modified Hamming code and according to the design specifications and performance requirements. We constructed a laboratory prototype (breadboard) which was converted into a fault simulator. The correctness of the design was verified on the breadboard using an exhaustive set of test cases. A logic diagram of the EDAC was delivered to JPL Section 514 on 4 Oct. 1988.

  9. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science, Mission 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul D. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission, planned for late 1990, includes experiments in four areas: Atmospheric Science, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, and Astronomy. The atmospheric science investigations will study the composition of the atmosphere in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere. The solar physics investigations will measure the total energy output of the sun. The space plasma physics investigations will study the charged particle and plasma environment of the earth. The astronomy investigation will study astronomical sources of radiation in the ultraviolet wavelengths that are inaccessible to observers on earth. Most of the experimental equipment has been flown before on one of the Spacelab missions. Brief descriptions of the experiments are given.

  10. Polymer-Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Composites for Potential Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Watson, K. A.; Pawlowski, K.; Lowther, S. E.; Connell, J. W.; Siochi, E. J.; Harrison, J. S.; St.Clair, T. L.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer-single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films were prepared and characterized as part of an effort to develop polymeric materials with improved combinations of properties for potential use on future spacecraft. Next generation spacecraft will require ultra-lightweight materials that possess specific and unique combinations of properties such as radiation and atomic oxygen resistance, low solar absorptivity, high thermal emissitivity, electrical conductivity, tear resistance, ability to be folded and seamed, and good mechanical properties. The objective of this work is to incorporate sufficient electrical conductivity into space durable polyimides to mitigate static charge build-up. The challenge is to obtain this level of conductivity (10(exp -8) S/cm) without degrading other properties of importance, particularly optical transparency. Several different approaches were attempted to fully disperse the SWNTs into the polymer matrix. These included high shear mixing, sonication, and synthesizing the polymers in the presence of pre-dispersed SWNTs. Acceptable levels of conductivity were obtained at loading levels less than one tenth weight percent SWNT without significantly sacrificing optical properties. Characterization of the nanocomposite films and the effect of SWNT concentration and dispersion on the conductivity, solar absorptivity, thermal emissivity, mechanical and thermal properties were discussed. Fibers and non-woven porous mats of SWNT reinforced polymer nanocomposite were produced using electrospinning.

  11. Unmanned spacecraft for research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of unmanned spacecraft for research purposes are discussed. Specific applications of the Communication and Navigation satellites and the Earth Observations satellites are described. Diagrams of communications on world-wide basis using synchronous satellites are developed. Photographs of earth resources and geology obtained from space vehicles are included.

  12. Practical Applications of Cosmic Ray Science: Spacecraft, Aircraft, Ground-Based Computation and Control Systems, and Human Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Koontz, Steve; Normand, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Three twentieth century technological developments, 1) high altitude commercial and military aircraft; 2) manned and unmanned spacecraft; and 3) increasingly complex and sensitive solid state micro-electronics systems, have driven an ongoing evolution of basic cosmic ray science into a set of practical engineering tools needed to design, test, and verify the safety and reliability of modern complex technological systems. The effects of primary cosmic ray particles and secondary particle showers produced by nuclear reactions with the atmosphere, can determine the design and verification processes (as well as the total dollar cost) for manned and unmanned spacecraft avionics systems. Similar considerations apply to commercial and military aircraft operating at high latitudes and altitudes near the atmospheric Pfotzer maximum. Even ground based computational and controls systems can be negatively affected by secondary particle showers at the Earth s surface, especially if the net target area of the sensitive electronic system components is large. Finally, accumulation of both primary cosmic ray and secondary cosmic ray induced particle shower radiation dose is an important health and safety consideration for commercial or military air crews operating at high altitude/latitude and is also one of the most important factors presently limiting manned space flight operations beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). In this paper we review the discovery of cosmic ray effects on the performance and reliability of microelectronic systems as well as human health and the development of the engineering and health science tools used to evaluate and mitigate cosmic ray effects in ground-based atmospheric flight, and space flight environments. Ground test methods applied to microelectronic components and systems are used in combinations with radiation transport and reaction codes to predict the performance of microelectronic systems in their operating environments. Similar radiation transport

  13. Optimal control of spacecraft motion in the Newtonian gravitational field: application of quaternions to describe orbit orientation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    1999-08-01

    The problem of rendezvous of a controllable spacecraft with a spacecraft moving along a Keplerian orbit is solved. Four variants of solutions to the problem and specific cases of the problem solution are considered.

  14. Photoabsorption cross sections of organic molecules in the VUV at low temperatures : application to Titan's atmosphere observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To build photochemical models of planetary atmospheres and to interpret observations the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain VUV 110-210 nm for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan s atmosphere showed a critical lack of data In particular many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since even at room temperature absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to o measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan s atmosphere The first molecules that we have studied are HCN HC3N and C4H2 We used the Berlin synchrotron facility BESSY to obtained those new absorption coefficients including the first spectra in the 110 to 210 nm range at the low temperature representative of Titan s atmosphere The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed A application to the determination of photodissociation rate of those molecules will be showed And an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan s atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft will be presented

  15. Simulating Flexible-Spacecraft Dynamics and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Versatile program applies to many types of spacecraft and dynamical problems. Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) developed to aid in simulation of large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. Extremely versatile and used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. Applicable to inertially oriented spinning, Earth-oriented, or gravity-gradient-stabilized spacecraft. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  16. Multi-Functional Sandwich Composites for Spacecraft Applications: An Initial Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel O.; Webb, Nicholas Jason; Yarger, Cody B.; Hunter, Abigail; Oborn, Kelli D.

    2007-01-01

    Current spacecraft implement relatively uncoupled material and structural systems to address a variety of design requirements, including structural integrity, damage tolerance, radiation protection, debris shielding and thermal insulation. This investigation provided an initial assessment of multi-functional sandwich composites to integrate these diverse requirements. The need for radiation shielding was addressed through the selection of polymeric constituents with high hydrogen content. To provide increased damage tolerance and debris shielding, manufacturing techniques were developed to incorporate transverse stitching reinforcement, internal layers, and a self-healing ionomer membrane. To assess the effects of a space environment, thermal expansion behavior of the candidate foam materials was investigated under a vacuum and increasing temperature. Finally, a thermal expansion model was developed for foam under vacuum conditions and its predictive capability assessed.

  17. Development of an iodine generator for reclaimed water purification in manned spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynveen, R. A.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1973-01-01

    A successful 30-day test is described of a prototype Iodine Generating and Dispensing System (IGDS). The IGDS was sized to iodinate the drinking water nominally consumed by six men, 4.5 to 13.6 kg (10 to 30 lb) water per man-day with a + or - 10 to 20% variation with iodine (I2) levels of 0.5 to 20 parts per million (ppm). The I2 treats reclaimed water to prevent or eliminate microorganism contamination. Treatment is maintained with a residual of I2 within the manned spacecraft water supply. A simplified version of the chlorogen water disinfection concept, developed by life systems for on-site generation of chlorine (Cl2), was used as a basis for IGDS development. Potable water contaminated with abundant E. Coliform Group organisms was treated by electrolytically generated I2 at levels of 5 to 10 ppm. In all instances, the E. coli were eliminated.

  18. A Hardware-in-the-Loop Testbed for Spacecraft Formation Flying Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is being developed as a modular, hybrid dynamic simulation facility employed for end-to-end guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) analysis and design for formation flying clusters and constellations of satellites. The FFTB will support critical hardware and software technology development to enable current and future missions for NASA, other government agencies, and external customers for a wide range of missions, particularly those involving distributed spacecraft operations. The initial capabilities of the FFTB are based upon an integration of high fidelity hardware and software simulation, emulation, and test platforms developed at GSFC in recent years; including a high-fidelity GPS simulator which has been a fundamental component of the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center's GPS Test Facility. The FFTB will be continuously evolving over the next several years from a too[ with initial capabilities in GPS navigation hardware/software- in-the- loop analysis and closed loop GPS-based orbit control algorithm assessment to one with cross-link communications and relative navigation analysis and simulation capability. Eventually the FFT13 will provide full capability to support all aspects of multi-sensor, absolute and relative position determination and control, in all (attitude and orbit) degrees of freedom, as well as information management for satellite clusters and constellations. In this paper we focus on the architecture for the FFT13 as a general GN&C analysis environment for the spacecraft formation flying community inside and outside of NASA GSFC and we briefly reference some current and future activities which will drive the requirements and development.

  19. Orbital spacecraft resupply technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Tracey, T. R.; Bailey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The resupplying of orbital spacecraft using the Space Shuttle, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, Orbital Transfer Vehicle or a depot supply at a Space Station is studied. The governing factor in fluid resupply designs is the system size with respect to fluid resupply quantities. Spacecraft propellant management for tankage via diaphragm or surface tension configurations is examined. The capabilities, operation, and application of adiabatic ullage compression, ullage exchange, vent/fill/repressurize, and drain/vent/no-vent fill/repressurize, which are proposed transfer methods for spacecraft utilizing tankage configurations, are described. Selection of the appropriate resupply method is dependent on the spacecraft design features. Hydrazine adiabatic compression/detonation, liquid-free vapor venting to prevent freezing, and a method for no-vent liquid filling are analyzed. Various procedures for accurate measurements of propellant mass in low gravity are evaluated; a system of flowmeters with a PVT system was selected as the pressurant solubility and quantity gaging technique. Monopropellant and bipropellant orbital spacecraft consumable resupply system tanks which resupply 3000 lb of hydrazine and 7000 lb of MMH/NTO to spacecraft on orbit are presented.

  20. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  1. Cassini Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Research Lab (JPL) workers use a borescope to verify the pressure relief device bellow's integrity on a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that has been installed on the Cassini spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The activity is part of the mechanical and electrical verification testing of RTGs during prelaunch processing. RTGs use heat from the natural decay of plutonium to generate electrical power. The three RTGs on Cassini will enable the spacecraft to operate far from the Sun where solar power systems are not feasible. They will provide electrical power to Cassini on it seven year trip to the Saturnian system and during its four year mission at Saturn.

  2. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  3. Atmospheric Microplasma Application for Surface Modification of Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Fukunaga, Hodaka; Tatematsu, Shigeki; Blajan, Marius

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric microplasma has been intensively studied for applications in various fields, since in this technology the generated field is only 1 kV (approx) under atmospheric pressure and a dielectric barrier discharge gap of 10 to 100 µm. A low discharge voltage atmospheric plasma process is an economical and effective solution for various applications such as indoor air control including sterilization, odor removal, and surface treatment, and would be suitable for medical applications in the field of plasma life sciences. In this paper, we present the application of microplasma for the surface treatment of materials used in medical fields. Moreover, a biomaterial composed of L-lactic acid is used in experiments, which can be biodecomposed in the human body after medical operations. The surface modification process was carried out with active species generated between the microplasma electrodes, which were observed by emission spectrometry. Microplasma treatment of a polymer sheet using Ar as the process gas decreased the contact angle of a water droplet at the surface of the polymer from 78.3 to 45.6° in 10 s, indicating improved surface adhesive characteristics.

  4. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) System Concept Applications at Solar System Bodies With an Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Greg; Polidan, Ronald; Ross, Floyd; Sokol, Daniel; Warwick, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Northrop Grumman and L’Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, semi-buoyant, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere.The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieves this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. The mass savings realized by eliminating the heavy aeroshell allows significantly more payload to be accommodated by the platform for additional science collection and return.In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the mid-cloud layer of Venus’ atmosphere at night.Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low or medium altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface or high resolution surface imaging. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  5. Design application and development of spacecraft in LEO utilizing LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, George B., Jr.; Sudduth, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    In general, the results from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have provided much useful information on material sensitivity in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment. This is particularly true for selected materials such as thermal control coatings, composites, polymers, fasteners and solar cells. However, LDEF material sensitivity data for other materials like glasses, glass coatings, lubricants, adhesives and seal materials were limited. Some of this important LDEF material sensitivity data has not yet been addressed in detail at the LDEF meetings. The type of material information needed in the design and development of a new spacecraft in LEO depends to a large extent on program phase. In early program phases it is only necessary to have material sensitivity data to determine what materials may or may not work. Later program phases require details on the material strength, optical properties, and/or other long term survivability requirements for materials in LEO. Unfortunately, documentation of exposure results for many materials sensitivity experiments that flew on LDEF has not yet been summarized in a convenient form for use by multiple users. Documentation of this data in a form convenient for scientists, engineers as well as technicians remains a significant area of concern for the aerospace industry. Many of the material experiments that flew on LDEF were only designed to measure material sensitivity for one year in an LEO environment. However, some materials expected to survive one year simply did not survive the 5.8 years that LDEF eventually remained in orbit. Therefore the survivability of several materials in an LEO environment was determined by default. Most of the LDEF materials experiments were not designed to establish long term material survivability data. This long term material survivability data is particularly useful in later program phases of spacecraft development. The lack of more controlled materials experiments to determine long

  6. Multiple concurrent recursive least squares identification with application to on-line spacecraft mass-property identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention is a method for identifying unknown parameters in a system having a set of governing equations describing its behavior that cannot be put into regression form with the unknown parameters linearly represented. In this method, the vector of unknown parameters is segmented into a plurality of groups where each individual group of unknown parameters may be isolated linearly by manipulation of said equations. Multiple concurrent and independent recursive least squares identification of each said group run, treating other unknown parameters appearing in their regression equation as if they were known perfectly, with said values provided by recursive least squares estimation from the other groups, thereby enabling the use of fast, compact, efficient linear algorithms to solve problems that would otherwise require nonlinear solution approaches. This invention is presented with application to identification of mass and thruster properties for a thruster-controlled spacecraft.

  7. Design concepts and performance of NASA X-band (7162 MHz/8415 MHz) transponder for deep-space spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Perret, J. D.; Kermode, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts and measured performance characteristics are summarized of an X band (7162 MHz/8415 MHz) breadboard deep space transponder (DSP) for future spacecraft applications, with the first use scheduled for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) and Cassini missions in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The DST consists of a double conversion, superheterodyne, automatic phase tracking receiver, and an X band (8415 MHz) exciter to drive redundant downlink power amplifiers. The receiver acquires and coherently phase tracks the modulated or unmodulated X band (7162 MHz) uplink carrier signal. The exciter phase modulates the X band (8415 MHz) downlink signal with composite telemetry and ranging signals. The receiver measured tracking threshold, automatic gain control, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the breadboard DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The measured results show a receiver tracking threshold of -158 dBm and a dynamic signal range of 88 dB.

  8. Spacecraft architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zefeld, V. V.

    1986-01-01

    Three requirements for a spacecraft interior are considered. Adequate motor activity in the anatomical-physiological sense results from attention to the anthropometric characteristics of humans. Analysis of work requirements is a prerequisite for the planning of adequate performance space. The requirements for cognitive activity are also elucidated. The importance of a well-designed interior during a long space flight is discussed.

  9. A High Efficiency DC Bus Regulator/RPC for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2003-01-01

    DC bus voltage regulation may be required in future high powered spacecraft due to the length of the busses or because they are not generated at precise voltage levels. In these cases the regulation range is often only a few percent increase or decrease, but conventional DC voltage regulators switch all the power passing through them, and this level of power switched determines the size and losses in the regulator. A recently developed concept used a low power DC-DC converter in series with the bs to raise or lower the bus voltage over a small range. This partial power processing technique combines the small size and power losses of the low power converter with the ability to regulate, (over a small range) a high power bus. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator (SCBBR) described herein provides bus regulation with an efficiency of 98%. The circuit also provides bus switching and overcurrent limiting functions of a Remote Power Controller (RPC). This paper described the circuit design and performance of a breadboard SCBBR configured as a bus voltage regulator providing plus of minus 40% voltage regulation range, bus switching, and overload limiting.

  10. Application of a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to the spacecraft stationkeeping problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Philip L.; Spencer, David B.

    2016-10-01

    Satellite operations are becoming an increasingly private industry, requiring increased profitability. Efficient and safe operation of satellites in orbit will ensure longer lasting and more profitable satellite services. This paper focuses on the use of a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to schedule the maneuvers of a hypothetical satellite operating at geosynchronous altitude, by seeking to minimize the propellant consumed through the execution of stationkeeping maneuvers and the time the satellite is displaced from its desired orbital plane. Minimization of the time out of place increases the operational availability and minimizing the propellant usage which allows the spacecraft to operate longer. North-South stationkeeping was studied in this paper, through the use of a set of orbit inclination change maneuvers each year. Two cases for the maximum number of maneuvers to be executed were considered, with four and five maneuvers per year. The results delivered by the algorithm provide maneuver schedules which require 40-100 m/s of total Δv for two years of operation, with the satellite maintaining the satellite's orbital plane to within 0.1° between 84% and 96% of the two years being modeled.

  11. On the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Discrepancies produced by the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence are examined. First- and second-order densities from several data sources have been measured for this purpose. Particular care was paid to each selection of turbulence that provides stationary mean and variance over the entire segment. Results show that even for a stationary segment of turbulence, the process is still highly non-Gaussian, in spite of a Gaussian appearance for its first-order distribution. Data also indicate strongly non-Gaussian second-order distributions. It is therefore concluded that even stationary atmospheric turbulence with a normal first-order distribution cannot be considered a Gaussian process, and consequently the application of Rice's exceedance statistics should be approached with caution.

  12. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations

  13. Computational Nonlinear Optics: Femtosecond Atmospheric Light String Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-20

    the famous Nonlinear Schr ~ dinger Equation pulse propagation model and to the many more recent propagation models proposed as an improvement on NLSE. In...per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing date sources, gathenng and maintaining the data needed, and...AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Computational Nonlinear Optics: Femtosecond Atmospheric Light String Applications F4 9620-03-1-0194 6. AUTHOR(S) PI

  14. Performance analysis of advanced spacecraft TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft entering a planetary atmosphere require a very sophisticated thermal protection system. The materials used must be tailored to each specific vehicle based on its planned mission profiles. Starting with the Space Shuttle, many types of ceramic insulation with various combinations of thermal properties have been developed by others. The development of two new materials is described: A Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation which has a significantly lower effective thermal conductivity than other ceramic blankets; and a Silicon Matrix Composite which has applications at high temperature locations such as wing leading edges. Also, a systematic study is described that considers the application of these materials for a proposed Personnel Launch System. The study shows how most of these available ceramic materials would perform during atmospheric entry of this vehicle. Other specific applications of these thermal protection materials are discussed.

  15. Artificial Neural Networks Applications: from Aircraft Design Optimization to Orbiting Spacecraft On-board Environment Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Lin, Paul P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the recent applications of artificial neural networks taken from various works performed by the authors over the last four years at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper focuses mainly on two areas. First, artificial neural networks application in design and optimization of aircraft/engine propulsion systems to shorten the overall design cycle. Out of that specific application, a generic design tool was developed, which can be used for most design optimization process. Second, artificial neural networks application in monitoring the microgravity quality onboard the International Space Station, using on-board accelerometers for data acquisition. These two different applications are reviewed in this paper to show the broad applicability of artificial intelligence in various disciplines. The intent of this paper is not to give in-depth details of these two applications, but to show the need to combine different artificial intelligence techniques or algorithms in order to design an optimized or versatile system.

  16. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  17. Conditions of the Maximum Principle in the Problem of Optimal Control over an Aggregate of Dynamic Systems and Their Application to Solution of the Problems of Optimal Control of Spacecraft Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, I. S.; Grigoriev, K. G.

    2003-05-01

    The necessary first-order conditions of strong local optimality (conditions of maximum principle) are considered for the problems of optimal control over a set of dynamic systems. To derive them a method is suggested based on the Lagrange principle of removing constraints in the problems on a conditional extremum in a functional space. An algorithm of conversion from the problem of optimal control of an aggregate of dynamic systems to a multipoint boundary value problem is suggested for a set of systems of ordinary differential equations with the complete set of conditions necessary for its solution. An example of application of the methods and algorithm proposed is considered: the solution of the problem of constructing the trajectories of a spacecraft flight at a constant altitude above a preset area (or above a preset point) of a planet's surface in a vacuum (for a planet with atmosphere beyond the atmosphere). The spacecraft is launched from a certain circular orbit of a planet's satellite. This orbit is to be determined (optimized). Then the satellite is injected to the desired trajectory segment (or desired point) of a flyby above the planet's surface at a specified altitude. After the flyby the satellite is returned to the initial circular orbit. A method is proposed of correct accounting for constraints imposed on overload (mixed restrictions of inequality type) and on the distance from the planet center: extended (nonpointlike) intermediate (phase) restrictions of the equality type.

  18. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The EPOXI flight mission has been testing a new commercial system, Splunk, which employs data mining techniques to organize and present spacecraft telemetry data in a high-level manner. By abstracting away data-source specific details, Splunk unifies arbitrary data formats into one uniform system. This not only reduces the time and effort for retrieving relevant data, but it also increases operational visibility by allowing a spacecraft team to correlate data across many different sources. Splunk's scalable architecture coupled with its graphing modules also provide a solid toolset for generating data visualizations and building real-time applications such as browser-based telemetry displays.

  19. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) Applications at Solar System Bodies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Sen, B.; Polidan, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: Northrop Grumman and L'Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere. The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieve this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the "habitable layers" of Venus' atmosphere at night. Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low, medium, or high altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  20. Novel coordinates for nonlinear multibody motion with applications to spacecraft dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Hanspeter

    1998-12-01

    Novel sets of attitude coordinates called the Stereographic Parameters (SPs) and configuration quasivelocity coordinates called the Eigenfactor Quasivelocities (EQVs) are discussed. The SPs are generated through stereographic projections of the Euler parameter constraint hypersphere onto hyperplanes. SP sets are non-unique and have distinct alternate sets referred to as shadow sets. They abide by the same differential kinematic equation, but generally display a different singular behavior. Explicit expressions are developed that map the original SP set to the shadow set and thus avoid any singularities. Both symmetric SPs such as the classical and Modified Rodrigues Parameters (MRPs), as well as asymmetric SPs are discussed. A globally asymptotically stable MRP feedback law which tracks any reference trajectory is presented. Both unsaturated and saturated control cases are discussed. Further, an MRP costate switching condition is developed that allows both original and shadow MRPs to be used simultaneously in optimal control problems. The Lagrange equations of motion in terms of the n-dimensional EQV vector are developed. The EQV formulation has an identity mass matrix which results in no matrix inverse being taken in numerical simulations. An explicit expression is presented that incorporates Pfaffian non-holonomic constraints into the EQV formulation without increasing the system order. Unfortunately, the use of EQV in numerical simulations only proved beneficial in selected cases. Generally the computational burden proved too high. However, the EQVs are found to be valuable when used as velocity feedback coordinates. EQV feedback laws have an exponentially decaying kinetic energy, superior performance to traditional state velocity feedback laws and are found to decouple the motion of multi-link robotic systems. The equations of motion and steering laws of spacecraft containing Variable Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs) are developed. Contrary to classical

  1. Nonlinear response - A time domain approach. [with applications to acoustic fatigue, spacecraft and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper reviews the basic concepts of nonlinear response of panels to surface flow and acoustic pressures, simulation of random processes, time domain solutions and the Monte Carlo Method. Applications of this procedure to the orbit-on-demand space vehicles, acoustic fatigue and composite materials are discussed. Numerical examples are included for a variety of nonlinear problems to illustrate the applicability of this method.

  2. Recent NASA progress in composites. [application to spacecraft and aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenfels, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The application of composites in aerospace vehicle structures is reviewed. Research and technology program results and specific applications to space vehicles, aircraft engines, and aircraft and helicopter structures are discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is given to flight service evaluation programs that are or will be accumulating substantial experience with secondary and primary structural components on military and commercial aircraft to increase confidence in their use.

  3. Medical applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    An innovative approach for producing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The technique has been applied in a wide variety of fields ranging from the micro-fabrication of electric devices to the treatment of disease. Although non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been shown to be clinically beneficial for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this review, we describe the current progress in plasma medicine, with a particular emphasis on plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is a solution that is irradiated with a plasma and has broadened the applications of plasmas in medicine. PMID:28163379

  4. Development of a six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide collection subsystem for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    Life Systems, working with NASA, has developed an electrochemical, six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem (CX-6) designed to normally remove 13.2 lb/day of CO2 while maintaining the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of the cabin atmosphere at 3 mm Hg or less. The CX-6 was subjected to extensive parametric and endurance testing. The effects of operating conditions on CO2 removal and electrical efficiencies were determined, including effects of hydrogen (H2) flow rate, process airflow rate, pCO2, operating temperature and current density. A total of 209 days of operation was accumulated. The subsystem was designed with self-contained electronic control and monitoring instrumentation. The CX-6 was redesigned and repackaged into the CO2 collection subsystem for the air revitalization group of the space station prototype.

  5. Results of induced atmosphere measurements from the Apollo program. [possible effects of the induced environment in the vicinity of manned spacecraft on future manned laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments on Apollo missions 15, 16, and 17 were utilized in an attempt to learn about the induced environment in the vicinity of manned spacecraft. Photographic sequences were examined to obtain scattered light data from the spacecraft-generated particulates during quiescence periods and after liquid dumps. The results allowed estimates of the obscuration factor and the clearing times after dumps. It was found that the clearing times were substantially longer than anticipated. The mass spectrometer detected a high molecular flux in lunar orbit which was induced by the spacecraft. It is shown that this is most likely caused by small ice crystals being continually produced in lunar orbit. Other data from the ultraviolet spectrometer and the stellar camera are also analyzed, and estimated values or upper limits are placed on the total scattering background, the size and number of particles generated, the velocity range, and the column density.

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  7. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    approaches. The cost to implement is much less than current approaches due to the availability of highly reliable and standard Internet tools. Use of standard Internet applications onboard reduces the risk of obsolescence inherent in custom protocols due to extremely wide use across all domains. These basic building blocks provide the framework for building onboard software to support direct user communication with payloads including payload control. Other benefits are payload to payload communication from dissimilar spacecraft, constellations of spacecraft, and reconfigurability on orbit. This work is funded through contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  8. Atmospheric Propagation of High Energy Lasers and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-04-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, still many remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionary history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  9. Extreme Spacecraft Charging in Polar Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Andrew D.; Minow, Joseph I.; NeergaardParker, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth's land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems episodically charge to frame potentials in the kilovolt range when exposed to space weather environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (10 s kilovolt) electrons in regions of low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. We first review the physics of space environment interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments. Finally, a set of extreme DMSP charging events are described varying in maximum negative frame potential from 0.6 kV to 2 kV, focusing on the characteristics of the charging events that are of importance both to the space system designer and to spacecraft operators. The goal of the presentation is to bridge the gap between scientific studies of auroral charging and the need for engineering teams to understand how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  10. Extreme Spacecraft Charging in Polar Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colson, A.; Minow, J. I.; Parker, L.

    2012-12-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth's land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems episodically charge to frame potentials in the kilovolt range when exposed to space weather environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (~10's kilovolt) electrons in regions of low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. We first review the physics of space environment interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments. Finally, a set of extreme DMSP charging events are described varying in maximum negative frame potential from ~0.6 kV to ~2 kV, focusing on the characteristics of the charging events that are of importance both to the space system designer and to spacecraft operators. The goal of the presentation is to bridge the gap between scientific studies of auroral charging and the need for engineering teams to understand how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  11. Extreme Spacecraft Charging in Polar Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Andrew D.; Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, L. Neergaard

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun -synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth fs land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems episodically charge to frame potentials in the kilovolt range when exposed to space weather environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.10 fs kilovolt) electrons in regions of low background plasma density. Auroral charging conditions are similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. We first review the physics of space environment interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments. Finally, a set of extreme DMSP charging events are described varying in maximum negative frame potential from approx.0.6 kV to approx.2 kV, focusing on the characteristics of the charging events that are of importance both to the space system designer and to spacecraft operators. The goal of the presentation is to bridge the gap between scientific studies of auroral charging and the need for engineering teams to understand how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  12. Survey - Applications of structural optimization methods to fixed wing aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Neill, Douglas J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a technical survey of the practical applications of structural optimization methods in the U.S. aerospace industry through 1980s are summarized. One of the most important developments in the 80s is the more widespread acceptance of structural optimization as one of the design tools that support practical structural design. Another significant advance is the development of large software tools for production applications. Attention is also given to the tailoring of the computerized design process to the specific environment of each company. The two most important aspects of this tailoring are seamless and easy-to-use incorporation of structural optimization in the overall aerospace design/production process and multidisciplinary integration aimed at ultimate performance optimization of the final product. Some specific applications discussed include the X-29 forward swept wing demonstrator aircraft, composite wing and vertical tail program, fighter wing redesign evaluations, high speed aircraft design, and space structures.

  13. Practical Applications of Cosmic Ray Science: Spacecraft, Aircraft, Ground-Based Computation and Control Systems, Exploration, and Human Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation a review of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on microelectronic systems and human health and safety is given. The methods used to evaluate and mitigate unwanted cosmic ray effects in ground-based, atmospheric flight, and space flight environments are also reviewed. However not all GCR effects are undesirable. We will also briefly review how observation and analysis of GCR interactions with planetary atmospheres and surfaces and reveal important compositional and geophysical data on earth and elsewhere. About 1000 GCR particles enter every square meter of Earth’s upper atmosphere every second, roughly the same number striking every square meter of the International Space Station (ISS) and every other low- Earth orbit spacecraft. GCR particles are high energy ionized atomic nuclei (90% protons, 9% alpha particles, 1% heavier nuclei) traveling very close to the speed of light. The GCR particle flux is even higher in interplanetary space because the geomagnetic field provides some limited magnetic shielding. Collisions of GCR particles with atomic nuclei in planetary atmospheres and/or regolith as well as spacecraft materials produce nuclear reactions and energetic/highly penetrating secondary particle showers. Three twentieth century technology developments have driven an ongoing evolution of basic cosmic ray science into a set of practical engineering tools needed to design, test, and verify the safety and reliability of modern complex technological systems and assess effects on human health and safety effects. The key technology developments are: 1) high altitude commercial and military aircraft; 2) manned and unmanned spacecraft; and 3) increasingly complex and sensitive solid state micro-electronics systems. Space and geophysical exploration needs drove the development of the instruments and analytical tools needed to recover compositional and structural data from GCR induced nuclear reactions and secondary particle showers. Finally, the

  14. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  15. Review of thin film solar cell technology and applications for ultra-light spacecraft solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in thin-film amorphous and polycrystalline photovoltaic cells are reviewed and discussed with a view to potential applications in space. Two important figures of merit are discussed: efficiency (i.e., what fraction of the incident solar energy is converted to electricity), and specific power (power to weight ratio).

  16. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  17. DORIS applications for solid earth and atmospheric sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Pascal; Soudarin, Laurent; Jayles, Christian; Rolland, Lucie

    2007-12-01

    DORIS is a French precise orbit determination system. However, in the past four years, through the creation of the International DORIS Service, a larger international cooperation was involved. Furthermore, the precision of its scientific applications (geodesy, geophysics) gradually improved and expanded to new fields (atmospheric sciences), leading, for example, to the publication of a special issue of the Journal of Geodesy. The goal of this manuscript is to present and explain these changes and to put them in perspective with current results obtained with other space geodetic techniques, such as GPS or Satellite Laser Ranging.

  18. Electron deposition in water vapor, with atmospheric applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivero, J. J.; Stagat, R. W.; Green, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the consequences of electron impact on water vapor in terms of the microscopic details of excitation, dissociation, ionization, and combinations of these processes. Basic electron-impact cross-section data are assembled in many forms and are incorporated into semianalytic functions suitable for analysis with digital computers. Energy deposition in water vapor is discussed, and the energy loss function is presented, along with the 'electron volts per ion pair' and the efficiencies of energy loss in various processes. Several applications of electron and water-vapor interactions in the atmospheric sciences are considered, in particular, H2O comets, aurora and airglow, and lightning.

  19. Investigation of a para-ortho hydrogen reactor for application to spacecraft sensor cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nast, T. C.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of solid hydrogen in space for sensor and instrument cooling is a very efficient technique for long term cooling or for cooling at high heat rates. The solid hydrogen can provide temperatures as low as 7 to 8 K to instruments. Vapor cooling is utilized to reduce parasitic heat inputs to the 7 to 8 K stage and is effective in providing intermediate cooling for instrument components operating at higher temperatures. The use of solid hydrogen in place of helium may lead to weight reductions as large as a factor of ten and an attendent reduction in system volume. The results of an investigation of a catalytic reactor for use with a solid hydrogen cooling system is presented. Trade studies were performed on several configurations of reactor to meet the requirements of high reactor efficiency with low pressure drop. Results for the selected reactor design are presented for both liquid hydrogen systems operating at near atmospheric pressure and the solid hydrogen cooler operating as low as 1 torr.

  20. Creating a Prototype Web Application for Spacecraft Real-Time Data Visualization on Mobile Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jeremy S.; Irving, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices (smart phones, tablets) have become commonplace among almost all sectors of the workforce, especially in the technical and scientific communities. These devices provide individuals the ability to be constantly connected to any area of interest they may have, whenever and wherever they are located. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is attempting to take advantage of this constant connectivity to extend the data visualization component of the Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC) to a person's mobile device. POIC users currently have a rather unique capability to create custom user interfaces in order to view International Space Station (ISS) payload health and status telemetry. These displays are used at various console positions within the POIC. The Software Engineering team has created a Mobile Display capability that will allow authenticated users to view the same displays created for the console positions on the mobile device of their choice. Utilizing modern technologies including ASP.net, JavaScript, and HTML5, we have created a web application that renders the user's displays in any modern desktop or mobile web browser, regardless of the operating system on the device. Additionally, the application is device aware which enables it to render its configuration and selection menus with themes that correspond to the particular device. The Mobile Display application uses a communication mechanism known as signalR to push updates to the web client. This communication mechanism automatically detects the best communication protocol between the client and server and also manages disconnections and reconnections of the client to the server. One benefit of this application is that the user can monitor important telemetry even while away from their console position. If expanded to the scientific community, this application would allow a scientist to view a snapshot of the state of their particular experiment at any time or place

  1. 21St Century Atmospheric Forecasting for Space Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.; Craddock, M.; Kiley, H.; Mason, M.

    2016-09-01

    Many space based applications from imaging to communications are impacted by the atmosphere. Atmospheric impacts such as optical turbulence and clouds are the main drivers for these types of systems. For example, in space based optical communications, clouds will produce channel fades on the order of many hundreds of decibels (dB) thereby breaking the communication link. Optical turbulence can also produce fades but these can be compensated for by adaptive optics. The ability to forecast the current and future location and optical thickness of clouds for space to ground Electro Optical or optical communications is therefore critical in order to achieve a highly reliable system. We have developed an innovative method for producing such forecasts. These forecasts are intended to provide lead times on the order of several hours to days so that communication links can be transferred from a currently loudy ground location to another more desirable ground site. The system uses high resolution Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) along with a variational data assimilation (DA) scheme to improve the initial conditions and forecasts. DA is used to provide an improved estimate of the atmospheric state by combining meteorological observations with NWP products and their respective error statistics. Variational DA accomplishes this through the minimization of a prescribed cost function, whereby differences between the observations and analysis are damped according to their perceived error. The NWP model is a fully three-dimensional (3D) physics-based model of the atmosphere initialized with gridded atmospheric data obtained from a global scale model. The global model input data has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25km, which is insufficient for the desired atmospheric forecasts required at near 1km resolution. Therefore, a variational DA system is used to improve the quality and resolution of the initial conditions first prescribed by the global model. Data used by the

  2. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  3. Evaluation of actuator energy storage and power sources for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Young, Fred M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this evaluation is to determine an optimum energy storage/power source combination for electrical actuation systems for existing (Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Shuttle) and future (Advanced Launch System (ALS), Shuttle Derivative) vehicles. Characteristic of these applications is the requirement for high power pulses (50-200 kW) for short times (milliseconds to seconds), coupled with longer-term base or 'housekeeping' requirements (5-16 kW). Specific study parameters (e.g., weight, volume, etc.) as stated in the proposal and specified in the Statement of Work (SOW) are included.

  4. Performance of preproduction model cesium beam frequency standards for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    A cesium beam frequency standards for spaceflight application on Navigation Development Satellites was designed and fabricated and preliminary testing was completed. The cesium standard evolved from an earlier prototype model launched aboard NTS-2 and the engineering development model to be launched aboard NTS satellites during 1979. A number of design innovations, including a hybrid analog/digital integrator and the replacement of analog filters and phase detectors by clocked digital sampling techniques are discussed. Thermal and thermal-vacuum testing was concluded and test data are presented. Stability data for 10 to 10,000 seconds averaging interval, measured under laboratory conditions, are shown.

  5. Application of the minimum correlation technique to the correction of the magnetic field measured by magnetometers on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the problem of obtaining precise, absolute determination of the vector of low magnetic fields existing in the interplanetary medium are addressed. In the case of a real S/C, there is always the possibility of a spurious field which includes the spacecraft residual field and/or possible field from the sensors, due to both electronic drifts or changes of the magnetic properties of the sensor core. These latter effects may occur during storage of the sensors prior to launching and/or in-flight. The reliability is demonstrated for a method which postulates that there should be no correlation between changes in measured field magnitude and changes in the measured inclination of the field with respect to any one of three fixed Cartesian component directions. Application of this minimum correlation technique to data from IMP-8 and Helios 1-2 shows it is appropriate for determination of the zero offset corrections of triaxial magnetometers. In general, a number of the order of 1000 consecutive data points is sufficient for a good determination.

  6. Use of Spacecraft Command Language for Advanced Command and Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mims, Tikiela L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the use of SCL in building and monitoring command and control applications in order to determine its fitness for space operations. Approximately 24,325 lines of PCG2 code was converted to SCL yielding a 90% reduction in the number of lines of code as many of the functions and scripts utilized in SCL could be ported and reused. Automated standalone testing, simulating the actual production environment, was performed in order to generalize and gauge the relative time it takes for SCL to update and write a given display. The use of SCL rules, functions, and scripts allowed the creation of several test cases permitting the detection of the amount of time it takes update a given set of measurements given the change in a globally existing CUI or CUI. It took the SCL system an average 926.09 ticks to update the entire display of 323 measurements.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  8. Development of a lightweight, light-trapped, thin GaAs solar cell for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Margaret H.; Dinetta, Louis C.; Dashiell, Michael W.; Cummings, John R.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ultra-lightweight, high performance, thin, light trapping GaAs solar cells for advanced space power systems. The device designs can achieve 24.5 percent efficiency at AMO and 1X conditions, corresponding to a power density of 330 W/m2. A significant breakthrough lies in the potential for a specific power of 2906 W/kg because the entire device is less than 1.5 microns thick. This represents a 440 percent improvement over conventional 4-mil silicon solar cells. In addition to being lightweight, this thin device design can result in increased radiation tolerance. The attachment of the cover glass support to the front surface has been demonstrated by both silicone and electrostatic bonding techniques. Device parameters of 1.002 volts open-circuit voltage, 80 percent fill factor, and a short-circuit current of 24.3 mA/sq cm have been obtained. This demonstrates a conversion efficiency of 14.4 percent resulting in a specific power of 2240 W/kg. Additionally, this new technology offers an alternative approach for enabling multi-bandgap solar cells and high output space solar power devices. The thin device structure can be applied to any 3-5 based solar cell application, yielding both an increase in specific power and radiation tolerance.

  9. Innovative viscoelastic material selection strategy based on dma and mini-shaker tests for spacecraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawak, B. J.; Cabon, B. H.; Aglietti, G. S.

    2017-02-01

    With the increase of payload sensitivity (such as high precision optics for sub-metric imager), micro-vibration disturbances generated by spinning actuators, if not controlled, may affect on-board instruments and may worsen the quality of pictures taken by an Earth observation imager. For the last two decades, viscoelastic materials have been gradually used in isolators designed for space applications. Their attractiveness comes from their ability to act as a second order low pass filter to minimise micro-vibration forces. In this study, an innovative viscoelastic material pre-selection process has been developed to assess the mechanical and thermal properties of viscoelastic isolators during early design stages. In order to characterise the viscoelastic isolators, tests have been performed at viscoelastic material level (material characterisation) and at viscoelastic isolator level (isolator characterisation). A qualitative correlation has been established between the master curves (material characterisation) and the transmissibility curves (isolator characterisation) which leads to a possible prediction of expected isolation performances of a viscoelastic material during early design stages.

  10. MMIC linear-phase and digital modulators for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of space-borne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a compact lumped element quadrature hybrid and Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFET)-varactors to provide low loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters were modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation. The modulator will accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry and ranging data, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 8 +/- 0.5 dB. The MMIC digital modulator is designed to provide greater than 10 Mb/s of bi-phase modulation at X-band.

  11. Destructive materials thermal characteristics determination with application for spacecraft structures testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Budnik, S. A.; Nenarokomov, A. V.; Netelev, A. V.; Titov, D. M.

    2013-04-01

    In many practical situations it is impossible to measure directly thermal and thermokinetic properties of analyzed composite materials. The only way that can often be used to overcome these difficulties is indirect measurements. This type of measurements is usually formulated as the solution of inverse heat transfer problems. Such problems are ill-posed in mathematical sense and their main feature shows itself in the solution instabilities. That is why special regularizing methods are needed to solve them. The general method of iterative regularization is concerned with application to the estimation of materials properties. The objective of this paper is to estimate thermal and thermokinetic properties of advanced materials using the approach based on inverse methods. An experimental-computational system is presented for investigating the thermal and kinetics properties of composite materials by methods of inverse heat transfer problems and which is developed at the Thermal Laboratory of Department Space Systems Engineering, of Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI). The system is aimed at investigating the materials in conditions of unsteady contact and/or radiation heating over a wide range of temperature changes and heating rates in a vacuum, air and inert gas medium.

  12. The Application of Computer-Aided Discovery to Spacecraft Site Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, V.; Blair, D. M.; Gowanlock, M.; Herring, T.

    2015-12-01

    The selection of landing and exploration sites for interplanetary robotic or human missions is a complex task. Historically it has been labor-intensive, with large groups of scientists manually interpreting a planetary surface across a variety of datasets to identify potential sites based on science and engineering constraints. This search process can be lengthy, and excellent sites may get overlooked when the aggregate value of site selection criteria is non-obvious or non-intuitive. As planetary data collection leads to Big Data repositories and a growing set of selection criteria, scientists will face a combinatorial search space explosion that requires scalable, automated assistance. We are currently exploring more general computer-aided discovery techniques in the context of planetary surface deformation phenomena that can lend themselves to application in the landing site search problem. In particular, we are developing a general software framework that addresses key difficulties: characterizing a given phenomenon or site based on data gathered from multiple instruments (e.g. radar interferometry, gravity, thermal maps, or GPS time series), and examining a variety of possible workflows whose individual configurations are optimized to isolate different features. The framework allows algorithmic pipelines and hypothesized models to be perturbed or permuted automatically within well-defined bounds established by the scientist. For example, even simple choices for outlier and noise handling or data interpolation can drastically affect the detectability of certain features. These techniques aim to automate repetitive tasks that scientists routinely perform in exploratory analysis, and make them more efficient and scalable by executing them in parallel in the cloud. We also explore ways in which machine learning can be combined with human feedback to prune the search space and converge to desirable results. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge support from NASA AIST

  13. Runaway greenhouse atmospheres: Applications to Earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Runaway greenhouse atmospheres are discussed from a theoretical standpoint and with respect to various practical situation in which they might occur. The following subject areas are covered: (1) runaway greenhouse atmospheres; (2) moist greenhouse atmospheres; (3) loss of water from Venus; (4) steam atmosphere during accretion; and (5) the continuously habitable zone.

  14. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  15. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  16. The One Atmosphere Glow Discharge in Air: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gadri, Rami; Sherman, Daniel M.; Chen, Zhiyu; Karakaya, Fuat; Reece Roth, J.

    1999-10-01

    The existence of an atmospheric pressure RF glow plasma with the characteristics of a classical low pressure DC glow discharge has been experimentally and theoretically demonstrated [1, 2]. At the UTK Plasma Sciences Laboratory, the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) in air has been applied to a wide range of plasma processing applications. The technology is simple, technically attractive, and suitable for online treatment of webs and 3-dimensional workpieces. A parallel plate reactor and a Remote Exposure Reactor (RER) have been developed for direct plasma immersion and remote exposure, respectively. The RER is based on generating active species capable of sterilization and surface treatment in a uniform surface layer of the OAUGDP on planar panels [3], and convecting the active species to a remote chamber where the workpiece is located. A related surface plasma has been developed for indoor air filtration systems. In addition, the surface plasma on flat panels modified the boundary layer in wind tunnel tests to produce electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow effects that can be used to increase or decrease aerodynamic drag [3]. [1] Massines et al., J. Appl. Phys., Vol. 83, N 6, pp 2950-2957, Mar. 1998. [2] J. R. Roth, "Industrial Plasma Engineering" Vol. I: Principles. Inst. Phys. Pub., Bristol and philadelphia, ISBN 0-7503-0318-2, 1995. [3] Roth et al., AIAA Paper 98-0328, 36th AIAA Meeting, Reno NV, 1998, Jan. 12-15.

  17. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  18. A study of alternative methods for reclaiming oxygen from carbon dioxide and water by a solid-electrolyte process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two alternative technical approaches were studied for application of an electrochemical process using a solid oxide electrolyte (zirconia stabilized by yttria or scandia) to oxygen reclamation from carbon dioxide and water, for spacecraft life support systems. Among the topics considered are the advisability of proceeding to engineering prototype development and fabrication of a full scale model for the system concept, the optimum choice of method or approach to be carried into prototype development, and the technical problem areas which exist.

  19. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  20. Application of MAVEN Accelerometer and Attitude Control Data to Mars Atmospheric Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Richard W.; Tolson, Robert H.; Baird, Darren; Johnson, Mark Z.; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the upper atmosphere of Mars (above ˜100 km) has been probed in situ mainly using spacecraft accelerometers during the aerobraking phases of 3 Mars orbiters. In a similar manner, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Accelerometer Experiment (ACC) will also use atmospheric drag accelerations sensed by inertial measurement units (IMU) onboard the spacecraft to recover atmospheric density along the orbiter path. These densities are used to estimate hydrostatic `vertical' density and temperature profiles, along track and altitudinal density waves, and latitudinal and longitudinal density variations. The IMU accelerometer signal-to-noise should permit profile reconstructions from spacecraft periapsis, nominally at 150 km altitude, to ˜170 km, an altitude range nominally spanning densities of 0.05-0.15 kg/km3. However, in situ measurements over a much greater altitude range, down to ˜125 km (reaching densities of ˜2-3.5 kg/km3), can be made during each of five week-long "Deep Dip" (DD) campaigns, and these are the prime focus of the Accelerometer Experiment. Judicious choice of the timing of these Deep-Dip campaigns during the MAVEN periapsis progression through local time, latitude and longitude in both hemispheres and in different seasons will add significantly to the existing data base of lower thermospheric densities. Other IMU and attitude control data may be used to estimate torques in order to improve the atmospheric density analysis, especially in the higher altitudes of the nominal science orbit, and, more challengingly, to estimate cross-track winds during the Deep-Dips.

  1. SOHO spacecraft observations interrupted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    Efforts to re-establish nominal operations did not succeed and telemetry was lost. Subsequent attempts using the full NASA Deep Space Network capabilities have so far not been successful. ESA and NASA engineers are continuing with the task of re-establishing contact with the spacecraft. The SOHO mission is a joint undertaking of ESA and NASA. The spacecraft was launched aboard an Atlas II rocket from Florida on 2 December 1995 from the Cape Canaveral Air Station. Mission operations are directed from the control center at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, USA. In April 1998 SOHO successfully completed its nominal two-year mission to study the Sun's atmosphere, surface and interior. Major science highlights include the detection of rivers of plasma beneath the surface of the sun; the discovery of a magnetic "carpet" on the solar surface that seems to account for a substantial part of the energy that is needed to cause the very high temperatures of the corona, the Sun's outermost layer; the first detection of flare-induced solar quakes; the discovery of more than 50 sungrazing comets; the most detailed view to date of the solar atmosphere; and spectacular images and movies of Coronal Mass Ejections, which are being used to improve the ability to forecast space weather.

  2. Bayesian framework for assessing the value of scientific space systems: Value of information approach with application to earth science spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brathwaite, Joy; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2013-03-01

    Space systems play an important role in today's society by generating or transmitting information from source to sink(s). The acquisition of the space system is often justified by the type, quantity and quality of information provided or transmitted. This work posits that the value of a class of space systems derives from and can be assessed through the value of information these systems provide. To this effect, a Bayesian framework is developed to assess system value in which systems are viewed as information sources, and stakeholders as information recipients. Information has value to stakeholders as it helps to update their beliefs, enabling them to make decisions that can yield higher expected pay-offs than in the absence of information. This increase in expected pay-offs is ascribed to the value of the system. Based on this idea, a new metric, Value-of-Design (VOD), is introduced to quantify the value of a class of space systems with unpriced services. The Bayesian framework assesses the Value-of-Design for the space system by considering the impact of the information transmitted on the actions taken by stakeholders, and estimating the resulting pay-offs from these actions. The framework here developed is then applied to the case of an Earth Science satellite that provides hurricane information to oil rig operators in the Gulf of Mexico. Probability models of stakeholders' beliefs, and economic models of pay-offs are developed and integrated with a spacecraft design tool. Results from the application point to clusters of payload instruments that yielded higher information value, and minimum information thresholds below which it is difficult to justify the acquisition of the system. Additionally, the system is analyzed in Cost-VOD trade space to provide program managers with additional insights into the coupling of a system's predicted value generation and its associated lifecycle cost.

  3. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often lead to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Steffes and Eshleman showed that under environmental conditions corresponding to the middle atmosphere of Venus, the microwave absorption due to atmospheric SO2 was 50 percent greater than that calculated from Van Vleck-Weiskopff theory. Similarly, the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 was found to be a factor of 7 greater than theoretically predicted for conditions of the Venus middle atmosphere. The recognition of the need to make such measurements over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the periapsis altitudes of radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements.

  4. Small Spacecraft for Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bousquet, Pierre-W.; Vane, Gregg; Komarek, Tomas; Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As planetary science continues to explore new and remote regions of the Solar system with comprehensive and more sophisticated payloads, small spacecraft offer the possibility for focused and more affordable science investigations. These small spacecraft or micro spacecraft (< 100 kg) can be used in a variety of architectures consisting of orbiters, landers, rovers, atmospheric probes, and penetrators. A few such vehicles have been flown in the past as technology demonstrations. However, technologies such as new miniaturized science-grade sensors and electronics, advanced manufacturing for lightweight structures, and innovative propulsion are making it possible to fly much more capable micro spacecraft for planetary exploration. While micro spacecraft, such as CubeSats, offer significant cost reductions with added capability from advancing technologies, the technical challenges for deep space missions are very different than for missions conducted in low Earth orbit. Micro spacecraft must be able to sustain a broad range of planetary environments (i.e., radiations, temperatures, limited power generation) and offer long-range telecommunication performance on a par with science needs. Other capabilities needed for planetary missions, such as fine attitude control and determination, capable computer and data handling, and navigation are being met by technologies currently under development to be flown on CubeSats within the next five years. This paper will discuss how micro spacecraft offer an attractive alternative to accomplish specific science and technology goals and what relevant technologies are needed for these these types of spacecraft. Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  5. Modeling Temporal Processes in Early Spacecraft Design: Application of Discrete-Event Simulations for Darpa's F6 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubos, Gregory F.; Cornford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    While the ability to model the state of a space system over time is essential during spacecraft operations, the use of time-based simulations remains rare in preliminary design. The absence of the time dimension in most traditional early design tools can however become a hurdle when designing complex systems whose development and operations can be disrupted by various events, such as delays or failures. As the value delivered by a space system is highly affected by such events, exploring the trade space for designs that yield the maximum value calls for the explicit modeling of time.This paper discusses the use of discrete-event models to simulate spacecraft development schedule as well as operational scenarios and on-orbit resources in the presence of uncertainty. It illustrates how such simulations can be utilized to support trade studies, through the example of a tool developed for DARPA's F6 program to assist the design of "fractionated spacecraft".

  6. Spacecraft -- Capsule Separation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Spacecraft -- Capsule Separation animation

    This animation shows the return capsule separating from the Stardust spacecraft.

  7. Manned Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-14

    protective coating from niobium (where it works when t>I09iC) and tantalum (where it it works when t >146C). At lower temperatures it is proposed to utilize...temperatures intensely are oxidized. Therefore, protective coatings are necessary for them. Used as such coatings most frequently are silicides , aluminides...atmosphere is now the use of protective coating from heat-insulating 0 DOC = 89059204 PAGE * layers of fiberglass and other similar to it materials. As a

  8. Viking I Spacecraft in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The planetary landing spacecraft Viking, which includes stereo cameras, a weather station, an automated stereo analysis laboratory and a biology instrument that can detect life, is under assembly at Martin Marietta Aerospace near Denver, Colorado. This Viking spacecraft will travel more than 460 million miles from Earth to a soft landing on Mars in 1976 to explore the surface and atmosphere of the red planet. Martin Marietta is prime and integration contractor for the Viking mission to NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The lander will be powered by two nuclear generators.

  9. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; McNutt, Ralph L; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2011-11-29

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon's crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus.

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  11. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  12. To-date spacecraft applications and demonstration testing results, and future product development for new molecular adsorber technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Shaun; Hansen, Patricia; Straka, Sharon; Chen, Philip; Triolo, Jack; Bettini, Ron; Carosso, Paolo; Carosso, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The use of molecular adsorbers, in order to aid in the reduction of the spacecraft contamination levels, is discussed. Molecular adsorbers are characterized by an extremely large surface area, molecularly-porous substructure, and processing charged sites capable of retaining molecular contaminant species. Molecular adsorbers were applied on two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions, as well as on the tropical rainfall measuring mission. The use of molecular adsorbers carries the potential for low cost, easy fabrication and integration of reliable means for reducing the contamination level around spacecraft.

  13. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  14. CAD-based stand-alone spacecraft radiation exposure analysis system: An application of the early man-tended Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, M. H.; Golightly, M. J.; Hardy, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Major improvements have been completed in the approach to analyses and simulation of spacecraft radiation shielding and exposure. A computer-aided design (CAD)-based system has been developed for determining the amount of shielding provided by a spacecraft and simulating transmission of an incident radiation environment to any point within or external to the vehicle. Shielding analysis is performed using a customized ray-tracing subroutine contained within a standard engineering modeling software package. This improved shielding analysis technique has been used in several vehicle design programs such as a Mars transfer habitat, pressurized lunar rover, and the redesigned international Space Station. Results of analysis performed for the Space Station astronaut exposure assessment are provided to demonastrate the applicability and versatility of the system.

  15. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  16. Spacecraft attitude dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobotov, Vladimir A.

    This overview of spacecraft dynamics encompasses the fundamentals of kinematics, rigid-body dynamics, linear control theory, orbital environmental effects, and the stability of motion. The theoretical treatment of each issue is complemented by specific references to spacecraft control systems based on spin, dual-spin, three-axis-active, and reaction-wheel methodologies. Also examined are control-moment-gyro, gravity-gradient, and magnetic control systems with attention given to key issues such as nutation damping, separation dynamics of spinning bodies, and tethers. Environmental effects that impinge on the application of spacecraft-attitude dynamics are shown to be important, and consideration is given to gravitation, solar radiation, aerodynamics, and geomagnetics. The publication gives analytical methods for examining the practical implementation of the control techniques as they apply to spacecraft.

  17. Preventing Spacecraft Failures Due to Tribological Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Many mechanical failures that occur on spacecraft are caused by tribological problems. This publication presents a study that was conducted by the author on various preventatives, analyses, controls and tests (PACTs) that could be used to prevent spacecraft mechanical system failure. A matrix is presented in the paper that plots tribology failure modes versus various PACTs that should be performed before a spacecraft is launched in order to insure success. A strawman matrix was constructed by the author and then was sent out to industry and government spacecraft designers, scientists and builders of spacecraft for their input. The final matrix is the result of their input. In addition to the matrix, this publication describes the various PACTs that can be performed and some fundamental knowledge on the correct usage of lubricants for spacecraft applications. Even though the work was done specifically to prevent spacecraft failures the basic methodology can be applied to other mechanical system areas.

  18. Spacecraft radiator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Grant A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft radiator system designed to provide structural support to the spacecraft. Structural support is provided by the geometric "crescent" form of the panels of the spacecraft radiator. This integration of radiator and structural support provides spacecraft with a semi-monocoque design.

  19. Application of VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) data in weather analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which analyzes irregularly spaced satellite data is described. An experiment with rawinsonde and VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) radiance measurements collected on March 6-7, 1982 is conducted to reveal the applicability of the technique. The rawinsonde data are analyzed on a 16 x 12 grid using the two pass analysis scheme of Barnes (1973). A scheme similar to the Barnes (1973) procedure is employed to produce gridded analysis of VAS data over a 200 x 15000 km region in central part of the U.S. The use of a correction pass on the initial gridded field is described; the technique is extremely effective on uniformly spaced observations. The incorporation of the limited fine mesh model to the scheme to analyze data in sparse and cloudy regions is examined. A comparison of rawinsonde data with VAS data is provided. The technique proves effective for studying cloudy and sparse areas with VAS data and produces a four-dimensional data set with significant mesoscale structure.

  20. Control of spacecraft with relay-impulse and continuous-action controllers on the basis of an algorithm with a predictive model and its application to spacecraft rendezvous dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, N. E.

    1989-03-01

    The paper examines the problem of spacecraft control with simultaneously functioning relay-impulse and continuous-action controllers using a modified optimal control algorithm with a predictive model reproducing the motion of the vehicle in accelerated time. The proposed theory is applied to the control of spacecraft rendezvous in an orbital coordinate system.

  1. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  2. Trace chemical contaminant generation rates for spacecraft contamination control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    A spacecraft presents a unique design challenge with respect to providing a comfortable environment in which people can live and work. All aspects of the spacecraft environmental design including the size of the habitable volume, its temperature, relative humidity, and composition must be considered to ensure the comfort and health of the occupants. The crew members and the materials selected for outfitting the spacecraft play an integral part in designing a habitable spacecraft because material offgassing and human metabolism are the primary sources for continuous trace chemical contaminant generation onboard a spacecraft. Since these contamination sources cannot be completely eliminated, active control processes must be designed and deployed onboard the spacecraft to ensure an acceptably clean cabin atmosphere. Knowledge of the expected rates at which contaminants are generated is very important to the design of these processes. Data from past spacecraft missions and human contaminant production studies have been analyzed to provide this knowledge. The resulting compilation of contaminants and generation rates serve as a firm basis for past, present, and future contamination control system designs for space and aeronautics applications.

  3. Application of model following control and estimation techniques to attitude control of maneuvering spacecraft. Part 1: Theory and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwartbol, T.; Terpstra, A. P.; Vanwoerkom, P. T. L. M.; Vandendam, R. F.

    1982-10-01

    An approach to on-board sampled data estimation and control of the attitude motion of maneuvering spacecraft is presented. Algorithms for model following control of attitude maneuvers; estimation of spacecraft state (attitude, angular velocity, disturbance, torque); and optical-inertial attitude determination, with estimation of gyro parameters (drift rate bias, scale factor error) were developed. The algorithms were validated in single-axis software simulations of an attitude control system of the type used in the Infrared Astronomical Satellite. The control system comprises a strapdown rate-integrating gyro and a slit-type star sensor for optical-inertial attitude sensing, a reaction wheel actuator, and a digital on-board computer. The truth models for simulation of the hardware components are discussed.

  4. Solid State Laser Technology Development for Atmospheric Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.

    1998-01-01

    NASA atmospheric scientists are currently planning active remote sensing missions that will enable global monitoring of atmospheric ozone, water vapor, aerosols and clouds as well as global wind velocity. The measurements of these elements and parameters are important because of the effects they have on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, atmospheric transport and, in general, the health of the planet. NASA will make use of Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and backscatter lidar techniques for active remote sensing of molecular constituents and atmospheric phenomena from advanced high-altitude aircraft and space platforms. This paper provides an overview of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) development of advanced solid state lasers, harmonic generators, and wave mixing techniques aimed at providing the broad range of wavelengths necessary to meet measurement goals of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  5. Temperature Measurements Taken by Phoenix Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This chart plots the minimum daily atmospheric temperature measured by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander spacecraft since landing on Mars. As the temperature increased through the summer season, the atmospheric humidity also increased. Clouds, ground fog, and frost were observed each night after the temperature started dropping.

  6. Physics and medical applications of cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were applied in a quest to understand physics of cold plasmas. In particular it was established that the streamer head charge is about 108 electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 107 V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 1019 m3. We have demonstrated the efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). Both in-vitro andin-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration velocity can have important implications in cancer treatment by localizing the affected area of the tissue and by decreasing metastasic development. In addition, cold plasma treatment has affected the cell cycle of cancer cells. In particular, cold plasmainduces a 2-fold increase in cells at the G2/M-checkpoint in both papilloma and carcinoma cells at ~24 hours after treatment, while normal epithelial cells (WTK) did not show significant differences. It was shown that reactive oxygen species metabolism and oxidative stress responsive genes are deregulated. We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with cold plasma treatment as a potential mechanism for the tumor ablation observed.

  7. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  8. a Portable Dual Frequency Comb Spectrometer for Atmospheric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Waxman, Eleanor; Truong, Gar-Wing; Giorgetta, Fabrizio; Swann, William C.; Coburn, Sean; Wright, Robert; Rieker, Greg B.; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-06-01

    Dual frequency comb (DFC) spectroscopy is a new technique that combines broad spectral bandwidth, high spectral resolution, rapid data acquisition, and high sensitivity. In addition, unlike standard Fourier-transform spectroscopy, it has an almost ideal instrument lineshape function, does not require recalibration, and has no moving parts. These features make DFC spectroscopy well suited for accurate measurements of multiple species simultaneously. Because the frequency comb lasers can be well collimated, such a system can be used for long open-path measurements with path lengths ranging from hundreds of meters to several kilometers. This length scale bridges the gap between point measurements and satellite-based measurements and is ideal for providing information about local sources and quantifying emissions. Here we show a fully portable DFC spectrometer operating over a wide spectral region in the near-infrared (about 1.5-2.1 μm or 6670-4750 cm-1 sampled at 0.0067 cm-1) and across several different open-air paths up to a path length of 11.8 km. The current spectrometer fits in about a 500 L volume and has low power consumption. It provides simultaneous measurements of CO_2, CH_4, and water isotopes with a time resolution of seconds to minutes. This system has several potential applications for atmospheric measurements including continuous monitoring city-scale emissions and localizing methane leaks from oil and gas wells. G. B. Rieker, F. R. Giorgetta, W. C. Swann, J. Kofler, A. M. Zolot, L. C. Sinclair, E. Baumann, C. Cromer, G. Petron, C. Sweeney, P. P. Tans, I. Coddington, and N. R. Newbury, Frequency-comb-based remote sensing of greenhouse gases over kilometer air paths, Optica, 1(5), 290-298 (2014).

  9. Lagrangian descriptors and their applications to oceanic and atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancho, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Geometry has been a very useful approach for studying dynamical systems. At the basis are Poincare ideas of seeking structures on the phase space that divide it into regions corresponding to trajectories with different dynamical fates. These ideas have demonstrated to be very powerful for the description of transport in purely advective flows and important applications have been found in geophysics. This presentation explores the performance of new Lagrangian tools, so called, Lagrangian descriptors [1,2,3], which are based on the integration along trajectories of bounded positive scalars which express an intrinsic geometrical or physical property of the trajectory. We analyze the convenience of different descriptors from several points of view and compare outputs with other methods proposed in the literature. We discuss applications of these new tools on oceanic datasets taken from altimeter satellites on the Kuroshio region, and on reanalysis data on the Antarctic polar vortex [4,5,6]. This research has been supported by MINECO under grants MTM2011-26696 and ICMAT Severo Ochoa project SEV-2011-0087 and CSIC under grant ILINK-0145. Computational support from CESGA and CCC-UAM is acknowledged. [1] J. A. J. Madrid, A. M. Mancho. Distinguished trajectories in time dependent vector fields. Chaos 19 (2009), 013111-1-013111-18. [2] C. Mendoza, A. M. Mancho. The hidden geometry of ocean flows. Physical Review Letters 105 (2010), 3, 038501-1-038501-4. [3], A. M. Mancho, S. Wiggins, J. Curbelo, C. Mendoza. In preparation. [4] A. de la Cámara, A. M. Mancho, K. Ide, E. Serrano, C.R. Mechoso. Routes of transport across the Antarctic polar vortex in the southern spring. Journal of Atmospheric Sciences 69, 2 (2012). [5] C. Mendoza, A. M. Mancho, M. H. Rio. The turnstile mechanism across the Kuroshio current: analysis of dynamics in altimeter velocity fields. Nonlinear Proc. Geoph 17 (2010), 2, 103-111. [6] Carolina Mendoza, Ana M. Mancho. The Lagrangian description of

  10. Atmospheric turbulence simulation techniques with application to flight analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. T.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical modeling of atmospheric turbulence is discussed. The statistical properties of atmospheric turbulence, in particular the probability distribution, the spectra, and the coherence are reviewed. Different atmospheric turbulence simulation models are investigated, and appropriate statistical analyses are carried out to verify their validity. The models for simulation are incorporated into a computer model of aircraft flight dynamics. Statistical results of computer simulated landings for an aircraft having characteristics of a DC-8 are reported for the different turbulence simulation techniques. The significance of various degrees of sophistication in the turbulence simulation techniques on the landing performance of the aircraft is discussed.

  11. Technology requirements for a generic aerocapture system. [for atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The technology requirements for the design of a generic aerocapture vehicle system are summarized. These spacecraft have the capability of completely eliminating fuel-costly retropropulsion for planetary orbit capture through a single aerodynamically controlled atmospheric braking pass from a hyperbolic trajectory into a near circular orbit. This generic system has application at both the inner and outer planets. Spacecraft design integration, navigation, communications, and aerothermal protection system design problems were assessed in the technology requirements study and are discussed in this paper.

  12. Interactions between spacecraft and their environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1993-01-01

    Spacecraft inevitably interact with their environments. Besides the interactions one immediately thinks of in space (zero-g, solar heating, atmospheric drag, expansion into vacuum conditions, etc.) other interactions are also important. Those of interest to spacecraft designers so far may be grouped under several headings; plasma interactions and spacecraft charging, impact of debris and micrometeoroids, chemical reactions with neutral species, radiation degradation, etc. Researchers have made great progress in defining and evaluating the interactions of spacecraft with their expected ambient environments near Earth and in interplanetary space. Some of these interactions are discussed with an eye toward expanding our knowledge into new environments, such as may be found at the moon and Mars, that will interact in new and different ways with exploring spacecraft and spacefarers.

  13. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  14. HC3N and C4H2 low temperature VUV photoabsorption cross sections: application to their observation in Titan's atmosphere by UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To interpret observations of Titan's high atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft, the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed. A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain (VUV: 110-210 nm) for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan's atmosphere, showed a critical lack of data. In particular, many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature. The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since, even at room temperature, absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous. A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan's atmosphere. We have measured HC3N and C4H2 spectra using the Berlin synchrotron facility (BESSY) to obtain new absorption coefficients in the 110 to 190 nm range, at the low temperature representative of Titan's atmosphere. The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed. And, an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan's atmosphere obtained by UVIS will be presented.

  15. NASA's spacecraft data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudmore, Alan; Flanegan, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Small Explorer Data System (SEDS), a space flight data system developed to support the Small Explorer (SMEX) project, is addressed. The system was flown on the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) SMEX mission, and with reconfiguration for different requirements will fly on the X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). SEDS is also foreseen for the Hubble repair mission. Its name was changed to Spacecraft Data System (SDS) in view of expansions. Objectives, SDS hardware, and software are described. Each SDS box contains two computers, data storage memory, uplink (command) reception circuitry, downlink (telemetry) encoding circuitry, Instrument Telemetry Controller (ITC), and spacecraft timing circuitry. The SDS communicates with other subsystems over the MIL-STD-1773 data bus. The SDS software uses a real time Operating System (OS) and the C language. The OS layer, communications and scheduling layer, application task layer, and diagnostic software, are described. Decisions on the use of advanced technologies, such as ASIC's (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) and fiber optics, led to technical improvements, such as lower power and weight, without increasing the risk associated with the data system. The result was a successful SAMPEX development, integration and test, and mission using SEDS, and the upgrading of that system to SDS for TRMM and XTE.

  16. Analysis of geophysical measurements and spacecraft interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, J. N.; Bhavnani, K. H.; Bonito, N. A.; Bounar, K. H.; Grady, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations were supported to analyze geophysical measurements with integrated applications of ephemerides physics and mathematics of the ionosphere and near space. The projects undertaken included analytical and computational simulation of the interactive spacecraft processes associated with the following: charging, contamination, liquid venting, and critical ionization velocity; data based and analytical investigations of trapped particles, dosage, magnetic fields, and instrumentation for the CRRES experiment; and data based studies of auroral electron and ion precipitation including neural network techniques, ionospheric scintillation and OTH backscatter, and atmospheric density and orbital decay. Systems were developed and applied for calibration and processing of the CRRES and APEX magnetometers, and for generation of satellite attitude and ephemeris. Techniques employed for applying coordinate systems, depicting vehicle and astronomical circumstances, and interactively presenting data in conventional and color formats are also described.

  17. System design of an ion drive spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J.

    1978-01-01

    As electric propulsion technology has improved and mission requirements have changed, a series of Ion Propulsion Module (IPM) design concepts have evolved. The most recent iteration occurred in the NASA-sponsored Halley Comet Rendezvous Mission (HCRM) study of ion drive. Spacecraft system design considerations introduced by the integration of such an IPM as the primary propulsion source are described with reference to the synthesis of the HCRM spacecraft and spacecraft design considerations for other interplanetary applications. IPM interactions with the system (especially telecommunications and science) are found to be manageable. The spacecraft design developed for the HCRM indicates the interface simplicity between the IPM and the spacecraft. Methods are shown for readily applying this IPM to a variety of planetary missions. Methods are also described for the IPM to provide up to 5 kW to the spacecraft for increasing the mission science return

  18. On the practical applications of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave coupling in mesoscale numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanski, Adam

    The objectives of this work were to develop coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave models for the verification of the atmospheric simulations, model the small-scale ocean circulations, analyze the role of the atmospheric stability in the generation of coastal upwelling, improve the accuracy of numerical prediction over the coastal areas, and develop a parameterization of the swell-induced wind stress. The study confirmed the applicability of the high resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field prediction to driving small scale ocean models applied to the U.S. West Coast, and showed that the small-scale circulation pattern of Bodega Bay can be well simulated even by the relatively simple 2D ocean model. Additional experiments performed with the complex 3D Princeton Ocean Model (POM) coupled with the MM5 showed the importance of the atmospheric stability in terms of the modification of the wind stress-curl pattern and the generation of coastal upwelling. The study revealed that the introduction of the stability effect to the wind stress computation may change the monthly mean wind stress curl by up to 0.15Pa/100km, and increase the simulated upwelling velocity by up to 25%, significantly improving the picture of the simulated upwelling and relaxation events. Further analysis performed with the MM5 model run at 9km resolution, showed that the introduction of the atmosphere-ocean coupling greatly improved the quality of the model results. The comparison with buoy data revealed that the atmosphere-ocean coupling led to a 95% increase in the correlation coefficients of the air temperature and heat fluxes, 23% for the wind direction, and up to 25% for the wind speed, and the reduction of the mean errors by up to 30%. The air-wave interaction model developed during this study showed the applicability of the innovative semi-analytical approach to the computation of the swell-induced stress. Its results also confirmed the importance of the swell-induced stress for

  19. Polarimetic Study of Atmospheric Phenomena and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Polarized light occurs in three states: unpolarized, linear and circularized. Each mode of polarized light provides information about the scattering medium, from atmospheres to search for signatures of habitability. Linear polarization in the optical and near-infrared windows are optimum to study changes in cloud/hazes in planetary atmospheres. Circular polarization is important to understand the influence of multiple scattering in the atmosphere. Linear and circular polarization of comets provides information about the composition and wavelength dependence of the dust, indicative of new, active comets vs. older comets. Changes in magnetic fields (as in aurorae) can be explored with polarimetry. Atmospheric phenomena such as rainbows,clouds and haloes exhibit polarimetric signatures that can be used as diagnostics to probe the atmosphere and may be possible to extend this approach to other planets and exoplanets. Biological molecules exhibit an inherent handedness or circular polarization or chirality, assisting in search for the identification of astrobiological material in the solar system. I shall highlight observations and models for these phenomena.

  20. A stochastic atmospheric model for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    There are many factors which reduce the accuracy of classification of objects in the satellite remote sensing of Earth's surface. One important factor is the variability in the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmospheric components such as particulates and the variable gases. For multispectral remote sensing of the Earth's surface in the visible and infrared parts of the spectrum the atmospheric particulates are a major source of variability in the received signal. It is difficult to design a sensor which will determine the unknown atmospheric components by remote sensing methods, at least to the accuracy needed for multispectral classification. The problem of spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric quantities which can affect the measured radiances are examined. A method based upon the stochastic nature of the atmospheric components was developed, and, using actual data the statistical parameters needed for inclusion into a radiometric model was generated. Methods are then described for an improved correction of radiances. These algorithms will then result in a more accurate and consistent classification procedure.

  1. Magnetic bearings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have been successfully applied to motorized rotor systems in the multi-kilogram range, at speeds up to 1200 radians per second. These engineering models also indicated the need for continued development in specific areas to make them feasible for spacecraft applications. Significant power reductions have recently been attained. A unique magnetic circuit, combining permanent magnets with electromagnetic control, has a bidirectional forcing capability with improved current sensitivity. The multi-dimensional nature of contact-free rotor support is discussed. Stable continuous radial suspension is provided by a rotationally symmetric permanent magnet circuit. Two bearings, on a common shaft, counteract the normal instability perpendicular to the rotational axis. The axial direction is servoed to prevent contact. A new bearing technology and a new field of application for magnetics is foreseen.

  2. An Internet Protocol-Based Software System for Real-Time, Closed-Loop, Multi-Spacecraft Mission Simulation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Cary, Everett; Higinbotham, John; Burns, Richard; Hogie, Keith; Hallahan, Francis

    2003-01-01

    The paper will provide an overview of the web-based distributed simulation software system developed for end-to-end, multi-spacecraft mission design, analysis, and test at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This software system was developed for an internal research and development (IR&D) activity at GSFC called the Distributed Space Systems (DSS) Distributed Synthesis Environment (DSE). The long-term goal of the DSS-DSE is to integrate existing GSFC stand-alone test beds, models, and simulation systems to create a "hands on", end-to-end simulation environment for mission design, trade studies and simulations. The short-term goal of the DSE was therefore to develop the system architecture, and then to prototype the core software simulation capability based on a distributed computing approach, with demonstrations of some key capabilities by the end of Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). To achieve the DSS-DSE IR&D objective, the team adopted a reference model and mission upon which FY02 capabilities were developed. The software was prototyped according to the reference model, and demonstrations were conducted for the reference mission to validate interfaces, concepts, etc. The reference model, illustrated in Fig. 1, included both space and ground elements, with functional capabilities such as spacecraft dynamics and control, science data collection, space-to-space and space-to-ground communications, mission operations, science operations, and data processing, archival and distribution addressed.

  3. Application of the MHD energy principle to magnetostatic atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.

    1984-11-01

    We apply the MHD energy principle to the stability of a magnetized atmosphere which is bounded below by much denser fluid, as is the solar corona. We treat the two fluids as ideal; the approximation which is consistent with the energy principle, and use the dynamical conditions that must hold at a fluid-fluid interface to show that if vertical displacements of the lower boundary are permitted, then the lower atmosphere must be perturbed as well. However, displacements which do not perturb the coronal boundary can be properly treated as isolated perturbations of the corona alone.

  4. Application of the MHD energy principle to magnetostatic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    The MHD energy principle is applied to the stability of a magnetized atmosphere which is bounded below by much denser fluid, as is the solar corona. The two fluids are treated as ideal; the approximation is consistent with the energy principle, and the dynamical conditions that must hold at a fluid-fluid interface are used to show that if vertical displacements of the lower boundary are premitted, then the lower atmosphere must be perturbed as well. However, displacements which do not perturb the coronal boundary can be properly treated as isolated perturbations of the corona alone.

  5. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  6. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of the aerospace environment with spacecraft surfaces and onboard, high voltage spacecraft systems operating over a wide range of altitudes from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit is considered. Emphasis is placed on control of spacecraft electric potential. Electron and ion beams, plasma neutralizers material selection, and magnetic shielding are among the topics discussed.

  7. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 2A: Descriptions of geostationary and high-altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hills, H. K. (Editor); Littlefield, R. G. (Editor); Schofield, N. J. (Editor); Vetts, J. I. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Data from Earth-orbiting spacecraft at geostationary and higher altitudes was cataloged. Three lunar-orbiting spacecraft and some others whose apogees did not attain the geostationary altitude are included.

  8. America in Space: The First Decade - Spacecraft Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, William R.

    1970-01-01

    Electrical power is necessary for every manned and unmanned spacecraft, with the exception of a few special-purpose Earth satellites. It is the reliable flow and availability of electrical power that allows man to extend his personal ventures safely beyond the atmosphere and keeps unmanned scientific payloads serving as useful tools for space exploration and applications. Electric power is essential to space communications, guidance, control, tracking, telemetry, life-support systems, sensors, data handling and storage, and to assure the proper functioning of countless experimental and housekeeping systems and subsystems aboard operating spacecraft. It remains the task of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, since NASA's founding in 1958, to fully investigate the chemical, nuclear and solar sources of energy and to see how best they can be converted to reliable spacecraft power. The research and technology of power-generating systems illustrates a seldom recognized goal of NASA - to assure this Nation a freedom of choice; the choice, in this case, being that of going where we wish to go in the atmosphere or in space. Technical capability is the key to such freedom. Power requirements and profiles are reviewed and power sources, including batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, RTGs and nuclear fission power plants in space, are highlighted.

  9. How to feed a spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, William

    1987-01-01

    The uplink process between ground computers and the spacecraft computer is examined. Data is uplinked to a spacecraft by a load (a sequence of preplanned commands) or by real-time commands; the differences between these two types of uplinks are discussed. The sequencing of a load involves: (1) request generation, (2) request integration, (3) reference generation, and (4) transmitting the load. The functions of each of the sequencing steps are described. The development of new sequencing methods using expert systems and AI is being studied. A symbolic processing software which has the ability to transmit data typed into a computer in English was developed. Consideration is given to the composition, capabilities of the parser, and application of the symbolic processing software to the Comet Renedezvous Asteroid Flyby spacecraft.

  10. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  11. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  12. An application of gas chromatography to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V.

    1974-01-01

    A gas chromatography developed for the Viking experiment is described. The instrument is designed to measure gases in planetary atmospheres and head space in a chamber. It is hoped that the chromatograph will also measure any biological activity present in these environments.

  13. VAPORIZATION OF THE EARTH: APPLICATION TO EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Laura; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lschaefer@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bfegley@wustl.edu

    2012-08-10

    Currently, there are about three dozen known super-Earths (M < 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }), of which eight are transiting planets suitable for atmospheric follow-up observations. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b, and all of these planets have equilibrium temperatures significantly hotter than the Earth. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their crustal and/or mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical equilibrium composition of such heated systems from 500 to 4000 K and total pressures from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup +2} bars. The major gases are H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} over broad temperature and pressure ranges, and Na, K, O{sub 2}, SiO, and O at high temperatures and low pressures. We discuss the differences in atmospheric composition arising from vaporization of SiO{sub 2}-rich (i.e., felsic) silicates (like Earth's continental crust) and MgO-, FeO-rich (i.e., mafic) silicates (like the bulk silicate Earth). The computational results will be useful in planning spectroscopic studies of the atmospheres of Earth-like exoplanets.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  15. Docking structure for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A docking structure for a pair of spacecraft is described comprising a conical receptacle on the docking end of a first spacecraft that receives a mating conical projection on the docking end of the second spacecraft. The conical receptacle of the first spacecraft constitutes an exterior portion of a sealed gas-tight compartment. Pressurization of the sealed compartment causes the conical receptacle to extend toward the incoming conical projection of the second spacecraft. When the mating conical portions are latched together, the docking energy is absorbed by the compressed gas in the sealed compartment. Rebound forces are countered by a plurality of actuator cylinders supporting the conical receptacle.

  16. Semiconductor-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide nanostructures on silicon substrate: Applications for thermal control of spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Leahu, G. L. Li Voti, R. Larciprete, M. C. Belardini, A. Mura, F. Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Fratoddi, I.

    2014-06-19

    We present a detailed infrared study of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) in a vanadium dioxide (VO2) film deposited on silicon wafer. The VO2 phase transition is studied in the mid-infrared (MIR) region by analyzing the transmittance and the reflectance measurements, and the calculated emissivity. The temperature behaviour of the emissivity during the SMT put into evidence the phenomenon of the anomalous absorption in VO2 which has been explained by applying the Maxwell Garnett effective medium approximation theory, together with a strong hysteresis phenomenon, both useful to design tunable thermal devices to be applied for the thermal control of spacecraft. We have also applied the photothermal radiometry in order to study the changes in the modulated emissivity induced by laser. Experimental results show how the use of these techniques represent a good tool for a quantitative measurement of the optothermal properties of vanadium dioxide based structures.

  17. The prediction of zenith range refraction from surface measurements of meteorological parameters. [mathematical models of atmospheric refraction used to improve spacecraft tracking space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the last two decades, increasingly sophisticated deep space missions have placed correspondingly stringent requirements on navigational accuracy. As part of the effort to increase navigational accuracy, and hence the quality of radiometric data, much effort has been expended in an attempt to understand and compute the tropospheric effect on range (and hence range rate) data. The general approach adopted has been that of computing a zenith range refraction, and then mapping this refraction to any arbitrary elevation angle via an empirically derived function of elevation. The prediction of zenith range refraction derived from surface measurements of meteorological parameters is presented. Refractivity is separated into wet (water vapor pressure) and dry (atmospheric pressure) components. The integration of dry refractivity is shown to be exact. Attempts to integrate wet refractivity directly prove ineffective; however, several empirical models developed by the author and other researchers at JPL are discussed. The best current wet refraction model is here considered to be a separate day/night model, which is proportional to surface water vapor pressure and inversely proportional to surface temperature. Methods are suggested that might improve the accuracy of the wet range refraction model.

  18. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Design and Operations in Auroral Charging Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth s land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems are episodically exposed to environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.1 to 10 s kilovolt) electrons in regions of very low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. While it is well established that charging conditions in geostationary orbit are responsible for many anomalies and even spacecraft failures, to date there have been relatively few such reports due to charging in auroral environments. This presentation first reviews the physics of the space environment and its interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments and discuss how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  19. Atmospheric science experiments applicable to Space Shuttle Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.; Vaughan, W. W.; Goodman, S. J.; Robertson, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The present lack of a lower atmosphere research satellite program for the 1980s has prompted consideration of the Space Shuttle/Spacelab system as a means of flying sensor complements geared toward specific research problems, as well as continued instrument development. Three specific examples of possible science questions related to precipitation are discussed: (1) spatial structure of mesoscale cloud and precipitation systems, (2) lightning and storm development, and (3) cyclone intensification over oceanic regions. Examples of space sensors availab le to provide measurements needed in addressing these questions are also presented. Distinctive aspects of low-earth orbit experiments would be high resolution, multispectral sensing of atmospheric phenomena by complements of instruments, and more efficient sensor development through reflights of specific hardware packages.

  20. Applications of multigrid software in the atmospheric sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Garcia, R.; Gross, B.; Hack, J.; Haidvogel, D.; Pizzo, V.

    1992-01-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations from different areas in the atmospheric sciences are efficiently and easily solved utilizing the multigrid software package named MUDPACK. It is demonstrated that the multigrid method is more efficient than other commonly employed techniques, such as Gaussian elimination and fixed-grid relaxation. The efficiency relative to other techniques, both in terms of storage requirement and computational time, increases quickly with grid size.

  1. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  2. Atmosphere composition monitor for space station and advanced missions application

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Powell, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Long-term human occupation of extraterrestrial locations may soon become a reality. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently completed the definition and preliminary design of the low earth orbit (LEO) space station. They are now currently moving into the detailed design and fabrication phase of this space station and are also beginning to analyze the requirements of several future missions that have been identified. These missions include, for example, Lunar and Mars sorties, outposts, bases, and settlements. A requirement of both the LEO space station and future missions are environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), which provide a comfortable environment for humans to live and work. The ECLSS consists of several major systems, including atmosphere revitalization system (ARS), atmosphere pressure and composition control system, temperature and humidity control system, water reclamation system, and waste management system. Each of these major systems is broken down into subsystems, assemblies, units, and instruments. Many requirements and design drivers are different for the ECLSS of the LEO space station and the identified advanced missions (e.g., longer mission duration). This paper discusses one of the ARS assemblies, the atmosphere composition monitor assembly (ACMA), being developed for the LEO space station and addresses differences that will exist for the ACMA of future missions.

  3. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry

    PubMed Central

    McSween, Harry Y.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon’s crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  4. The SORCE Spacecraft and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparn, Thomas P.; Rottman, Gary; Woods, Thomas N.; Boyle, Brian D.; Kohnert, Richard; Ryan, Sean; Davis, Randall; Fulton, Robert; Ochs, William

    2005-08-01

    The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment, SORCE, is a satellite carrying four scientific instruments that measure the total solar irradiance and the spectral irradiance from the ultraviolet to the infrared. The instruments were all developed by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The spacecraft carrying and accommodating the instruments was developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Virginia. It is three-axis stabilized with a control system to point the instruments at the Sun, as well as the stars for calibration. SORCE was successfully launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 25 January 2003 aboard a Pegasus XL rocket. The anticipated lifetime is 5 years, with a goal of 6 years. SORCE is operated from the Mission Operations Center at LASP where all data are collected, processed, and distributed. This paper describes the SORCE spacecraft, integration and test, mission operations, and ground data system.

  5. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT) have been developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters have been flown in space, though only PPTs have been used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPTs is quite poor, providing only about 8 percent efficiency at about 1000 sec specific impulse. Laboratory PPTs yielding 34 percent efficiency at 5170 sec specific impulse have been demonstrated. Laboratory MPD thrusters have been demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 7000 sec specific impulse. Recent PIT performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 and 8000 sec.

  6. Model-based fault detection and isolation for intermittently active faults with application to motion-based thruster fault detection and isolation for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is a method for detecting and isolating fault modes in a system having a model describing its behavior and regularly sampled measurements. The models are used to calculate past and present deviations from measurements that would result with no faults present, as well as with one or more potential fault modes present. Algorithms that calculate and store these deviations, along with memory of when said faults, if present, would have an effect on the said actual measurements, are used to detect when a fault is present. Related algorithms are used to exonerate false fault modes and finally to isolate the true fault mode. This invention is presented with application to detection and isolation of thruster faults for a thruster-controlled spacecraft. As a supporting aspect of the invention, a novel, effective, and efficient filtering method for estimating the derivative of a noisy signal is presented.

  7. CO2 laser cutting of ultra thin (75 μm) glass based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shubham; Sridhara, N.; Mitra, Avijit; Yougandar, B.; Dash, Sarat Kumar; Agarwal, Sanjay; Dey, Arjun

    2017-03-01

    Present study reports for the first time laser cutting of multilayered coatings on both side of ultra thin (i.e., 75 μm) glass substrate based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft thermal control application. The optimization of cutting parameters was carried out as a function of laser power, cutting speed and number of cutting passes and their effect on cutting edge quality. Systematic and in-detail microstructural characterizations were carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques to study the laser affected zone and cutting edge quality. Sheet resistance and water contact angle experiments were also conducted locally both prior and after laser cut to investigate the changes of electrical and surface properties, if any.

  8. Design and analysis of low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder (DST) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and the development of an X-band transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. Two- and three-cascaded sections have been modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation to accommodate down-link signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging with a deviation linearity tolerance +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase modulator requirements, and excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  9. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  10. Outward atmospheric scintillation effects and inward atmospheric scintillation effects comparisons for direct detection ladar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces intensity modulation or "scintillation" effects on both on the outward laser-mode path and on the return backscattered radiation path. These both degrade laser radar (ladar) target acquisition, ranging, imaging, and feature estimation. However, the finite sized objects create scintillation averaging on the outgoing path and the finite sized telescope apertures produce scintillation averaging on the return path. We expand on previous papers going to moderate to strong turbulence cases by starting from a 20kft altitude platform and propagating at 0° elevation (with respect to the local vertical) for 100km range to a 1 m diameter diffuse sphere. The outward scintillation and inward scintillation effects, as measured at the focal plane detector array of the receiving aperture, will be compared. To eliminate hard-body surface speckle effects in order to study scintillation, Goodman's M-parameter is set to 106 in the analytical equations and the non-coherent imaging algorithm is employed in Monte Carlo realizations. The analytical equations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRp), or mean squared signal over a variance, for a given focal plane array pixel window of interest will be summarized and compared to Monte Carlo realizations of a 1m diffuse sphere.

  11. Measurements of distributed polarized radio sources from spinning spacecraft - Effect of a tilted axial antenna ISEE-3 application and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Hoang, S.; Manning, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the system response of a satellite receiver-antenna system to locate a radio source when the satellite is tilted on its axis. The satellite is spin stabilized but experiences a tilt due to either a mechanical misalignment or a shift in the electrical axis caused by parasitic currents in other spacecraft structures. The shorter the antenna, the more significant the effects. Numerical techniques are developed for obtaining the Stokes parameters and the angular parameters of a uniform conical source sensed by a linear antenna in order to derive the average power response of a synthesized dipole to a point on a distributed polarized source. Relative gains are calculated along the antenna at different angles to the source. The techniques are applied to sample ISEE-3 satellite data for Type III solar radio bursts which were sensed by an axial and an equatorial antenna. The two antennas permit localization of the source and quantification of the polarization and angular extent of the source. The resulting high precision in calculations of all three source parameters commends use of the model in analyses of data from the planned ULYSSES mission.

  12. Spacecraft Escape Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Charles, Dingell W.; Bufkin, Ann L.; Rodriggs, Liana M.; Peterson, Wayne; Cuthbert, Peter; Lee, David E.; Westhelle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses the Gumdrop capsule a conceptual spacecraft that would enable the crew to escape safely in the event of a major equipment failure at any time from launch through atmospheric re-entry. The scaleable Gumdrop capsule would comprise a command module (CM), a service module (SM), and a crew escape system (CES). The CM would contain a pressurized crew environment that would include avionic, life-support, thermal control, propulsive attitude control, and recovery systems. The SM would provide the primary propulsion and would also supply electrical power, life-support resources, and active thermal control to the CM. The CES would include a solid rocket motor, embedded within the SM, for pushing the CM away from the SM in the event of a critical thermal-protection-system failure or loss of control. The CM and SM would normally remain integrated with each other from launch through recovery, but could be separated using the CES, if necessary, to enable the safe recovery of the crew in the CM. The crew escape motor could be used, alternatively, as a redundant means of de-orbit propulsion for the CM in the event of a major system failure in the SM.

  13. Hydrazine monitoring in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine (HZ) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) are highly toxic compounds used as fuels in the Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Engines and in its maneuvering and reaction control system. Satellite refueling during a mission may also result in release of hydrazines. During extravehicular activities, the potential exists for hydrazines to contaminate the suit and to be brought into the internal atmosphere inadvertantly. Because of the high toxicity of hydrazines, a very sensitive, reliable, interference-free, and real-time method of measurement is required. A portable ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has exhibited a low ppb detection limit for hydrazines suggesting a promising technology for the detection of hydrazines in spacecraft air. The Hydrazine Monitor is a modified airborne vapor monitor (AVM) with a custom-built datalogger. This off-the-shelf IMS was developed for the detection of chemical warfare agents on the battlefield. After early evaluations of the AVM for hydrazine measurements showed a serious interference from ammonia, the AVM was modified to measure HZ and MMH in the ppb concentration range without interference from ammonia in the low ppm range. A description of the Hydrazine Monitor and how it functions is presented.

  14. Application of nonlinear acoustics in the atmosphere and biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    David Blackstock has made important contributions to understanding nonlinear processes in underwater acoustics, atmospheric acoustics, and biomedical acoustics. In this talk, two of these areas that David has been involved with are addressed by contrasting the evolution of sonic booms in an inhomogeneous atmosphere with the evolution of shock waves in lithotripsy (breaking of kidney stones by shock waves). The distortion of N waves generated by supersonic aircraft is affected by geometrical spreading and changes in the acoustic properties of the medium with altitude. In shock wave lithotripsy, the distortion of triangle waves is affected by geometrical spreading and changes in the acoustic properties due to layering of tissue types. In addition, the turbulent boundary layer near the ground and the inhomogeneous nature of tissue, means that both sonic booms and lithotripter shock waves pass through a random media. Calculations are presented using weak shock to compare the distortion that occurs in the two scenarios. Measurements of saturationlike effects are shown for a clinical shock wave therapy device. Numerical simulations for propagation through random media demonstrate the localized focusing and defocusing that can occur for both sonic booms and lithotripter shock waves. [Work supported in part by NIH and NASA.

  15. Atmospheric In-Situ Resource Utilization For Mars Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Macy; Muscatello, Anthony; Hintze, Paul; Meier, Anne; Bayliss, Jon; Petersen, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    NASA now looks to Mars as the next step in human space exploration. A couple of challenges of such a destination include affordability and weight/volume limitations. As a way to solve these issues NASA is looking into the practice of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Instead of manufacturing and bringing all the supplies necessary for a Mars mission and return trip, the goal is to send a preliminary mission to produce reserves of propellant, water, and oxygen on site. Part of this effort includes the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The APM is part of a lander that is composed of multiple compartments, each having a unique function; regolith collection/processing, water processing, atmospheric processing, and product storage. The overall goal is to develop the capability to produce methane (CH4) and oxygen as a fuel/oxidizer combo via a Sabatier reaction using resources from the Martian environment. The APM still must undergo modifications in design, and perhaps method, to become flight-ready to produce methane at the level of purity and quantity needed for a vehicle.

  16. Aerothermodynamics of the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, Russell W.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    The aerothermodynamics characteristics of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft are investigated and reported. These results have been used by the Mars Global Surveyor mission planners to design the aerobraking phase of the mission. Analytical and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computer codes were used with a detailed, three dimensional model of the spacecraft to evaluate spacecraft aerobraking characteristics for flight in free molecular and transitional flow regimes. The spacecraft is found to be aerodynamically stable in aerobraking and planned contingency configurations. Aerodynamic forces, moments, and heating are found to be highly dependent on atmospheric density. Accommodation coefficient. is seen to strongly influence drag coefficient. Transitional flow effects are found to reduce overall solar panel heating. Attitude control thruster plumes are shown to interact with the freestream, diminishing the effectiveness of the attitude control system and even leading to thrust reversal. These plume-freestream interaction effects are found to be highly dependent on freestream density.

  17. Dynamics Explorer dual spacecraft to be launched on July 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Plans for the launch of the Dynamics Explorers A and B are announced. The mission of the spacecraft is described. Specific knowledge about the coupling of energy, electric currents, electric fields, and plasmas between the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the atmosphere is sought. The instrumentation of the spacecraft is described and the spacecraft and Delta 3918 launch vehicle characterized. Detailed background information amplifying the mission is included.

  18. Analyzing Spacecraft Telecommunication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, Mark; Hanks, David; Gladden, Roy; Wood, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is a C-language computer program for analyzing proposed spacecraft telecommunication systems. MMTAT utilizes parameterized input and computational models that can be run on standard desktop computers to perform fast and accurate analyses of telecommunication links. MMTAT is easy to use and can easily be integrated with other software applications and run as part of almost any computational simulation. It is distributed as either a stand-alone application program with a graphical user interface or a linkable library with a well-defined set of application programming interface (API) calls. As a stand-alone program, MMTAT provides both textual and graphical output. The graphs make it possible to understand, quickly and easily, how telecommunication performance varies with variations in input parameters. A delimited text file that can be read by any spreadsheet program is generated at the end of each run. The API in the linkable-library form of MMTAT enables the user to control simulation software and to change parameters during a simulation run. Results can be retrieved either at the end of a run or by use of a function call at any time step.

  19. Spacecraft camera image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Chan, Fred N. T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system for achieving spacecraft camera (1, 2) image registration comprises a portion external to the spacecraft and an image motion compensation system (IMCS) portion onboard the spacecraft. Within the IMCS, a computer (38) calculates an image registration compensation signal (60) which is sent to the scan control loops (84, 88, 94, 98) of the onboard cameras (1, 2). At the location external to the spacecraft, the long-term orbital and attitude perturbations on the spacecraft are modeled. Coefficients (K, A) from this model are periodically sent to the onboard computer (38) by means of a command unit (39). The coefficients (K, A) take into account observations of stars and landmarks made by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2) themselves. The computer (38) takes as inputs the updated coefficients (K, A) plus synchronization information indicating the mirror position (AZ, EL) of each of the spacecraft cameras (1, 2), operating mode, and starting and stopping status of the scan lines generated by these cameras (1, 2), and generates in response thereto the image registration compensation signal (60). The sources of periodic thermal errors on the spacecraft are discussed. The system is checked by calculating measurement residuals, the difference between the landmark and star locations predicted at the external location and the landmark and star locations as measured by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2).

  20. Virucide properties of cold atmospheric plasma for future clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M; Daeschlein, G; Kramer, A; Burchardt, M; Brucker, S; Wallwiener, D; Stope, M B

    2016-10-03

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been repeatedly identified to bear powerful microbicidal efficacy on bacteria including multidrug resistant organisms and fungi on non-living surfaces, in biofilms as well as on contaminated and infected tissues. CAP furthermore was found to stimulate wound healing in chronic wounds and exerted anti-neoplastic effects on numerous tumor entities. Thus, CAP represents a promising medical tool for many clinical and therapeutic issues. Studies about CAP effects on virus particles recently were in arrears, but to date increasingly move into the focus of interest. Apparently, CAP treatment is followed by a promising virus inactivation and contributes to tissue regeneration. Here we review the current state of science concerning the so far investigated CAP effects on different virus species and virus-associated disorders. J. Med. Virol. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  2. Infrared characterized spacecraft contaminants and related compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    The limits of the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed, together with an explanation of some of the shortcomings of obtaining data in this range. Similarities and differences in the interest taken by the chemist/spectroscopist and the space/spectroscopist in the IR spectrum are discussed. The chemist uses IR spectra to identify materials and contaminants associated with spacecraft fabrication and testing. The space scientist, using IR spectrometry, can determine atmospheric conditions around planets, stars, and galaxies. He could also determine the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere at different altitudes, or even the temperature profile of the Sun. The importance of detecting contamination of spacecraft and the possible results of not taking corrective action are explored. All space experiments contain some contaminants, to a lesser or greater degree; the responsible personnel involved must determine the level of toleration. A collection of IR spectra of known spacecraft contaminants is presented as a guide for cognizant scientists and engineers.

  3. Combined 2-micron Dial and Doppler Lidar: Application to the Atmosphere of Earth or Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Wood, Sidney A.; Emmitt, G. David

    2006-01-01

    A concept is explored for combining the Doppler and DIAL techniques into a single, multifunctional instrument. Wind, CO2 concentration, and aerosol density can all be measured. Technology to build this instrument is described, including the demonstration of a prototype lidar. Applications are described for use in the Earth science. The atmosphere of Mars can also be studied, and results from a recently-developed simulation model of performance in the Martian atmosphere are presented.

  4. Programs To Optimize Spacecraft And Aircraft Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauer, G. L.; Petersen, F. M.; Cornick, D.E.; Stevenson, R.; Olson, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    POST/6D POST is set of two computer programs providing ability to target and optimize trajectories of powered or unpowered spacecraft or aircraft operating at or near rotating planet. POST treats point-mass, three-degree-of-freedom case. 6D POST treats more-general rigid-body, six-degree-of-freedom (with point masses) case. Used to solve variety of performance, guidance, and flight-control problems for atmospheric and orbital vehicles. Applications include computation of performance or capability of vehicle in ascent, or orbit, and during entry into atmosphere, simulation and analysis of guidance and flight-control systems, dispersion-type analyses and analyses of loads, general-purpose six-degree-of-freedom simulation of controlled and uncontrolled vehicles, and validation of performance in six degrees of freedom. Written in FORTRAN 77 and C language. Two machine versions available: one for SUN-series computers running SunOS(TM) (LAR-14871) and one for Silicon Graphics IRIS computers running IRIX(TM) operating system (LAR-14869).

  5. [Contribution of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration under elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application].

    PubMed

    Kou, Tai-ji; Xu, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Jian-guo; Xie, Zu-bin; Guo, Da-yong; Miao, Yan-fang

    2011-10-01

    With the support of free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) system and by using isotope 13C technique, and through planting wheat (Triticum aestivum L., C3 crop) on a soil having been planted with maize (Zea mays L., C4 crop) for many years, this paper studied the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 and the wheat rhizosphere respiration. With the growth of wheat, the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 had a gradual decrease. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (200 micromol mol(-1)) decreased the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 at booting and heading stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 250 kg hm(-2) (HN), and at jointing and booting stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 150 kg hm(-2) (LN). Nevertheless, the elevated atmospheric CO2 promoted the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration at booting and heading stages significantly. From jointing stage to maturing stage, the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration were 24%-48% (HN) and 21%-48% (LN) under elevated atmospheric CO2, and 20%-36% (HN) and 19%-32% (LN) under ambient atmospheric CO2. Under both elevated and ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 and the rhizosphere respiration had different responses to the increased nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant interactive effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application rate on the wheat rhizosphere respiration at jointing stage.

  6. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Effects on the internal spacecraft electronics due to exposure to the natural and enhanced space radiation environment will be reviewed. The emphasis will be placed on the description of the nature of both the exposure environment and failure mechanisms in semiconductors. Understanding both the system environment and device effects is critical in the use of laboratory simulation environments to obtain the data necessary to design and qualify components for successful application.

  7. Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Siebes, Georg; Swanson, Theodore D.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal control of the spacecraft is typically achieved by removing heat from the spacecraft parts that tend to overheat and adding heat to the parts that tend get too cold. The equipment on the spacecraft can get very hot if it is exposed to the sun or have internal heat generation. The pans also can get very cold if they are exposed to the cold of deep space. The spacecraft and instruments must be designed to achieve proper thermal balance. The combination of the spacecraft's external thermal environment, its internal heat generation (i.e., waste heat from the operation of electrical equipment), and radiative heat rejection will determine this thermal balance. It should also be noted that this is seldom a static situation, external environmental influences and internal heat generation are normally dynamic variables which change with time. Topics discussed include thermal control system components, spacecraft mission categories, spacecraft thermal requirements, space thermal environments, thermal control hardware, launch and flight operations, advanced technologies for future spacecraft,

  8. The electrification of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akishin, A. I.; Novikov, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    Physical and applied aspects of the electrification of space vehicles and natural celestial objects are discussed, the factors resulting in electrification of spacecraft are analyzed, and methods of investigating various phenomena associated with this electrification and ways of protecting spacecraft against the influence of static electricity are described. The booklet is intended for the general reader interested in present day questions of space technology.

  9. Docking system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A mechanism is disclosed for the docking of a spacecraft to a space station where a connection for transfer of personnel and equipment is desired. The invention comprises an active docking structure on a spacecraft and a passive docking structure on the station. The passive structure includes a docking ring mounted on a tunnel structure fixed to the space station. The active structure includes a docking ring carried by an actuator-attenuator devices, each attached at one end to the ring and at its other end in the spacecraft payload bay. The devices respond to command signals for moving the docking ring between a stowed position in the spacecraft to a deployed position suitable for engagement with the docking ring. The devices comprise means responsive to signals of sensed loadings to absorb impact energy and retraction means for drawing the coupled spacecraft and station into final docked configuration and moving the tunnel structure to a berthed position in the spacecraft. Latches couple the spacecraft and space station upon contact of the docking rings and latches establish a structural tie between the spacecraft when retracted.

  10. Miniature Robotic Spacecraft for Inspecting Other Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven; Abbott, Larry; Duran, Steve; Goode, Robert; Howard, Nathan; Jochim, David; Rickman, Steve; Straube, Tim; Studak, Bill; Wagenknecht, Jennifer; Lemke, Matthew; Wade, Randall; Wheeler, Scott; Baggerman, Clinton

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)-- a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. The Mini AERCam is a successor to the AERCam Sprint -- a prior miniature robotic inspection spacecraft that was demonstrated in a space-shuttle flight experiment in 1997. The prototype of the Mini AERCam is a demonstration unit having approximately the form and function of a flight system. The Mini AERCam is approximately spherical with a diameter of about 7.5 in. (.19 cm) and a weight of about 10 lb (.4.5 kg), yet it has significant additional capabilities, relative to the 14-in. (36-cm), 35-lb (16-kg) AERCam Sprint. The Mini AERCam includes miniaturized avionics, instrumentation, communications, navigation, imaging, power, and propulsion subsystems, including two digital video cameras and a high-resolution still camera. The Mini AERCam is designed for either remote piloting or supervised autonomous operations, including station keeping and point-to-point maneuvering. The prototype has been tested on an air-bearing table and in a hardware-in-the-loop orbital simulation of the dynamics of maneuvering in proximity to the International Space Station.

  11. Current LISA Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Castellucci, K. E.; Depalo, S. V.; Generie, J. A.; Maghami, P. G.; Peabody, H. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. a space based gravitational wave detector. uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that the three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument. unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LISA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a "sciencecraft." Here we describe some of the unique features of the LISA spacecraft design that help create the quiet environment necessary for gravitational wave observations.

  12. Current LISA Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, a space based gravitational wave detector, uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument, unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LiSA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a "sciencecraft." A detailed discussion will be presented that describes the current spacecraft design and mission architecture needed to meet the LISA science requirements.

  13. High Resolution Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M; Bulaevskaya, V; Glascoe, L; Singer, M

    2010-03-18

    The ability of the WRF atmospheric model to forecast wind speed over the Nysted wind park was investigated as a function of time. It was found that in the time period we considered (August 1-19, 2008), the model is able to predict wind speeds reasonably accurately for 48 hours ahead, but that its forecast skill deteriorates rapidly after 48 hours. In addition, a preliminary analysis was carried out to investigate the impact of vertical grid resolution on the forecast skill. Our preliminary finding is that increasing vertical grid resolution does not have a significant impact on the forecast skill of the WRF model over Nysted wind park during the period we considered. Additional simulations during this period, as well as during other time periods, will be run in order to validate the results presented here. Wind speed is a difficult parameter to forecast due the interaction of large and small length scale forcing. To accurately forecast the wind speed at a given location, the model must correctly forecast the movement and strength of synoptic systems, as well as the local influence of topography / land use on the wind speed. For example, small deviations in the forecast track or strength of a large-scale low pressure system can result in significant forecast errors for local wind speeds. The purpose of this study is to provide a preliminary baseline of a high-resolution limited area model forecast performance against observations from the Nysted wind park. Validating the numerical weather prediction model performance for past forecasts will give a reasonable measure of expected forecast skill over the Nysted wind park. Also, since the Nysted Wind Park is over water and some distance from the influence of terrain, the impact of high vertical grid spacing for wind speed forecast skill will also be investigated.

  14. Modelling Atmospheric Scatterers Using Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rages, Kathy A.

    1999-01-01

    This project report reviews the analysis of data from the Voyager encounter with Neptune and Triton, and the primary Galileo mission to Jupiter. The project included analysis of the images from Voyager of the limb images from Neptune and Triton. Also included in the project was analysis of the Images from Galileo of Venus' and Jupiter's limb. The project work on the latitude bands and temporal variations on Uranus using the images from Voyager is summarized. Also, work on information from the Galileo Probe's Nephelometer is also covered

  15. Reactor power system/spacecraft integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The new national initiative in space reactor technology evaluation and development is strongly tied to mission applications and to spacecraft and space transportation system (STS) compatibility. This paper discusses the power system integration interfaces with potential using spacecraft and the STS, and the impact of these requirements on the design. The integration areas of interest are mechanical, thermal, electrical, attitude control, and mission environments. The mission environments include space vacuum, solar input, heat sink, space radiation, weapons effects, and reactor power system radiation environments. The natural, reactor, and weapons effects radiation must be evaluated and combined to define the design requirements for spacecraft electronic equipment.

  16. Superfluid helium sloshing dynamics induced oscillations and fluctuations of angular momentum, force and moment actuated on spacecraft driven by gravity gradient or jitter acceleration associated with slew motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations associated with slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) for slew motion which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers have also been derived. Examples are also given for cases applicable to the AXAF-S spacecraft sloshing dynamics associated with slew motion.

  17. Materials for Spacecraft. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.

    2016-01-01

    The general knowledge in this chapter is intended for a broad variety of spacecraft: manned or unmanned, low Earth to geosynchronous orbit, cis-lunar, lunar, planetary, or deep space exploration. Materials for launch vehicles are covered in chapter 7. Materials used in the fabrication of spacecraft hardware should be selected by considering the operational requirements for the particular application and the design engineering properties of the candidate materials. The information provided in this chapter is not intended to replace an in-depth materials study but rather to make the spacecraft designer aware of the challenges for various types of materials and some lessons learned from more than 50 years of spaceflight. This chapter discusses the damaging effects of the space environment on various materials and what has been successfully used in the past or what may be used for a more robust design. The material categories covered are structural, thermal control for on-orbit and re-entry, shielding against radiation and meteoroid/space debris impact, optics, solar arrays, lubricants, seals, and adhesives. Spacecraft components not directly exposed to space must still meet certain requirements, particularly for manned spacecraft where toxicity and flammability are concerns. Requirements such as fracture control and contamination control are examined, with additional suggestions for manufacturability. It is important to remember that the actual hardware must be tested to understand the real, "as-built" performance, as it could vary from the design intent. Early material trades can overestimate benefits and underestimate costs. An example of this was using graphite/epoxy composite in the International Space Station science racks to save weight. By the time the requirements for vibration isolation, Space Shuttle frequencies, and experiment operations were included, the weight savings had evaporated.

  18. Practical applications of cosmic ray science: Spacecraft, aircraft, ground based computation and control systems, and human health and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, William; Koontz, Steve; Normand, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we review cosmic ray effects on the performance and reliability of microelectronic systems and human health as well as the development of the engineering and health science tools used to evaluate and mitigate cosmic ray effects in ground-based, atmospheric flight, and space flight environments. Ground based test methods applied to microelectronic components and systems are used in combination with radiation transport and reaction codes to predict the performance of microelectronic systems in their operating environments. Similar radiation transport codes are an important tool for evaluating possible human health effects of cosmic ray. Finally, the limitations on human space operations beyond low-Earth orbit imposed by long term exposure to galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  19. Transmission probabilities of rarefied flows in the application of atmosphere-breathing electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, T.; Boldini, P. C.; Romano, F.; Herdrich, G.; Fasoulas, S.

    2016-11-01

    Atmosphere-Breathing Electric Propulsion systems (ABEP) are currently investigated to utilize the residual atmosphere as propellant for drag-compensating thrusters on spacecraft in (very) low orbits. The key concept for an efficient intake of such a system is to feed a large fraction of the incoming flow to the thruster by a high transmission probability Θ for the inflow while Θ for the backflow should be as low as possible. This is the case for rarefied flows through tube-like structures of arbitrary cross section when assuming diffuse wall reflections inside and after these ducts, and entrance velocities u larger than thermal velocities vt h∝√{kBT /m } . The theory of transmission for free molecular flow through cylinders is well known for u = 0, but less research results are available for u > 0. In this paper, the desired theoretical characteristics of intakes for ABEP are pointed out, a short review of transmission probabilities is given, and results of Monte Carlo simulations concerning Θ are presented. Based on simple algebraic relations, an intake can be optimized in terms of collection efficiency by choosing optimal ducts. It is shown that Θ depends only on non-dimensional values of the duct geometry combined with vth and u. The simulation results of a complete exemplary ABEP configuration illustrate the influence of modeling quality in terms of inflow conditions and inter-particle collisions.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  1. Instrumentation for Spacecraft-to-Spacecraft Radio Science Observations of Jupiter and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Sami; Folkner, W.; Hinson, D.; Iess, L.; Linscott, I.; Marouf, E.; Tortora, P.

    2010-10-01

    Investigations of planetary atmospheres and surfaces via radio occultation and scattering techniques have been successfully conducted on many planets and several large satellites in the solar system using one-way downlink from a spacecraft to a ground station. Limitations on the received SNR or geometrical coverage can be overcome with alternate observation configurations. Uplink observations where a signal is transmitted from a ground station and received by the spacecraft can have an SNR advantage of almost three orders of magnitude. Spacecraft-to-spacecraft observations can also have significant SNR advantage over the traditional one-way downlink technique and can yield improved geometrical coverage. These have never been carried out before because a special radio science receiver is required onboard the spacecraft. One type of this receiver is onboard the New Horizons mission for an uplink occultation of Pluto. Another prototype receiver on MRO has been used to demonstrate a spacecraft-to-spacecraft occultation with the Odyssey spacecraft. A new digital open-loop receiver specifically designed to meet the requirements of an occultation experiment has been prototyped for flight on the EJSM missions to the Jovian system. This instrument is based on heritage of the MRO receiver with significant improvements and can be used to achieve multiple objectives, all of scientific interest to the community and all using the crosslink or uplink configurations. They include: (1) occultations of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Jupiter, (2) occultations of the tenuous atmospheres and ionospheres of the Jovian satellites, (3) occultations of the tenuous Jovian rings, and (4) bistatic scattering from surfaces of the satellites. Studies are underway to determine the appropriate wavelengths of the radio links and the design of the onboard receiver, including the front-end down-converters, the required antennas, and the baseband digital signal processor configuration. This paper

  2. Application of chemiluminescence to monitoring of trace atmospheric species

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the development of analytical instrumentation based on gas phase chemiluminescence for the monitoring of nitric acid, methyl nitrate, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and total acidity. Nitric acid was converted to NO and NO{sub 2} by a 400 C glass beads converter and the resulting NO{sub 2} was monitored by a luminol-based detector. A CrO{sub 3} converter was used to convert the NO generated in the system to NO{sub 2} to lower the detection limit of the instrument. The detection limit of the configuration was 0.30 ppb of nitric acid. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO{sub 2} were separated and detected with a novel gas chromatographic system which did not require compressed gas cylinder. Air that has been scrubbed by passing it over FeSO{sub 4} was used as the carrier gas which eliminates the need for any compressed gas cylinders. The detection limits for the instrument (PAN-GC) were 0.12 ppb for PAN and 0.20 ppb for NO{sub 2}. Methyl nitrate was separated from PAN and NO{sub 2} using a modified version of the PAN-GC. A 200 C quartz converter inserted between the end of the column and the detector in the PAN-GC, converts methyl nitrate and PAN into NO{sub 2} for detection by the luminol-based detector. The detection limits are 0.30 ppb for PAN, 0.30 ppb for methyl nitrate, and 0.20 ppb for NO{sub 2} The development of a total acidity detector based on the reaction of O and F atoms with hydrazoic acid (HN{sub 3}) was also carried out. Several methods for converting atmospheric acidity to HN{sub 3} were tested. These included packed bed, coated filters, and denuder methods. The system was calibrated with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid and the characterization of the response to various organic acids was investigated. The detection limits for nitric acid and for hydrochloric acid were 0.51 ppb and 0.63 ppb, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of Optical Magnitude of Deep Space Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Zheng-Hong, T.; Yong-da, L.

    2007-12-01

    Optical-electric technology can measure the tangential position and velocity of spacecraft. To know the feasibility of the use of optical-electric technology, it is necessary to estimate the magnitude of spacecraft first. Since the spacecrafts are non-self-illumination objects, the estimation formulas of the optical magnitude of spacecraft is constructed according to the radiation theory and the extra-atmospheric radiant emittance of the Sun in the visible light wave band. Taking Chang'e-1 as an example, the magnitude of it in different situations is calculated.

  4. Contributions of Microgravity Test Results to the Design of Spacecraft Fire Safety Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Urban, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments conducted in spacecraft and drop towers show that thin-sheet materials have reduced flammability ranges and flame-spread rates under quiescent low-gravity environments (microgravity) as compared to normal gravity. Furthermore, low-gravity flames may be suppressed more easily by atmospheric dilution or decreasing atmospheric total pressure than their normal-gravity counterparts. The addition of a ventilating air flow to the low-gravity flame zone, however, can greatly enhance the flammability range and flame spread. These results, along with observations of flame and smoke characteristics useful for microgravity fire-detection 'signatures', promise to be of considerable value to spacecraft fire-safety designs. The paper summarizes the fire detection and suppression techniques proposed for the Space Station Freedom and discusses both the application of low-gravity combustion knowledge to improve fire protection and the critical needs for further research.

  5. DMSP Spacecraft Charging in Auroral Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Andrew; Minow, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft are a series of low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites whose mission is to observe the space environment using the precipitating energetic particle spectrometer (SSJ/4-5). DMSP satellites fly in a geosynchronous orbit at approx.840 km altitude which passes through Earth s ionosphere. The ionosphere is a region of partially ionized gas (plasma) formed by the photoionization of neutral atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Earth. For satellites in LEO, such as DMSP, the plasma density is usually high and the main contributors to the currents to the spacecraft are the precipitating auroral electrons and ions from the magnetosphere as well as the cold plasma that constitutes the ionosphere. It is important to understand how the ionosphere and auroral electrons can accumulate surface charges on satellites because spacecraft charging has been the cause of a number of significant anomalies for on-board instrumentation on high altitude spacecraft. These range from limiting the sensitivity of measurements to instrument malfunction depending on the magnitude of the potential difference over the spacecraft surface. Interactive Data Language (IDL) software was developed to process SSJ/4-5 electron and ion data and to create a spectrogram of the particles number and energy fluxes. The purpose of this study is to identify DMSP spacecraft charging events and to present a preliminary statistical analysis. Nomenclature

  6. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  7. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, D. E.; Harkness, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A life cycle test of secondary electric batteries for spacecraft applications was conducted. A sample number of nickel cadmium batteries were subjected to general performance tests to determine the limit of their actual capabilities. Weaknesses discovered in cell design are reported and aid in research and development efforts toward improving the reliability of spacecraft batteries. A statistical analysis of the life cycle prediction and cause of failure versus test conditions is provided.

  8. Planning the Voyager spacecraft's mission to Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plagemann, Stephen H.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the systems engineering process to the planning of the Voyager spacecraft mission is described. The Mission Planning Office prepared guidelines that controlled the use of the project and multimission resources and spacecraft consumables in order to obtain valuable scientific data at an acceptable risk level. Examples of mission planning which are concerned with the design of the Deep Space Network antenna, the uplink window for transmitting computer command subsystem loads, and the contingency and risk assessment functions are presented.

  9. MIDN: a spacecraft microdosimeter mission.

    PubMed

    Pisacane, V L; Ziegler, J F; Nelson, M E; Caylor, M; Flake, D; Heyen, L; Youngborg, E; Rosenfeld, A B; Cucinotta, F; Zaider, M; Dicello, J F

    2006-01-01

    MIDN (MIcroDosimetry iNstrument) is a payload on the MidSTAR-I spacecraft (Midshipman Space Technology Applications Research) under development at the United States Naval Academy. MIDN is a solid-state system being designed and constructed to measure microdosimetric spectra to determine radiation quality factors for space environments. Radiation is a critical threat to the health of astronauts and to the success of missions in low-Earth orbit and space exploration. The system will consist of three separate sensors, one external to the spacecraft, one internal and one embedded in polyethylene. Design goals are mass <3 kg and power <2 W. The MidSTAR-I mission in 2006 will provide an opportunity to evaluate a preliminary version of this system. Its low power and mass makes it useful for the International Space Station and manned and unmanned interplanetary missions as a real-time system to assess and alert astronauts to enhanced radiation environments.

  10. Flywheel energy storage for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1984-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage systems have been studied to determine their potential for use in spacecraft. This system was found to be superior to alkaline secondary batteries and regenerative fuel cells in most of the areas that are important in spacecraft applications. Of special importance, relative to batteries, are lighter weight, longer cycle and operating life, and high efficiency which minimizes solar array size and the amount of orbital makeup fuel required. In addition, flywheel systems have a long shelf life, give a precise state of charge indication, have modest thermal control needs, are capable of multiple discharges per orbit, have simple ground handling needs, and have the capability of generating extremely high power for short durations.

  11. High resolution infrared spectroscopy: Some new approaches and applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of spectral line formation and of techniques for retrieval of atmospheric temperature and constituent profiles are discussed. Applications to the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are illustrated by results obtained with Fourier transform and infrared heterodyne spectrometers at resolving powers (lambda/delta hyperon lambda of approximately 10,000 and approximately 10 to the seventh power), respectively, showing the high complementarity of spectroscopy at these two widely different resolving powers. The principles of heterodyne spectroscopy are presented and its applications to atmospheric probing and to laboratory spectroscopy are discussed. Direct absorption spectroscopy with tuneable semiconductor lasers is discussed in terms of precision frequency-and line strength-measurements, showing substantial advances in laboratory infrared spectroscopy.

  12. Spacecraft Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghofranian, Siamak (Inventor); Chuang, Li-Ping Christopher (Inventor); Motaghedi, Pejmun (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for docking a spacecraft. The apparatus comprises elongate members, movement systems, and force management systems. The elongate members are associated with a docking structure for a spacecraft. The movement systems are configured to move the elongate members axially such that the docking structure for the spacecraft moves. Each of the elongate members is configured to move independently. The force management systems connect the movement systems to the elongate members and are configured to limit a force applied by the each of the elongate members to a desired threshold during movement of the elongate members.

  13. Low power arcjet system spacecraft impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lichtin, D. A.; Palchefsky, J. W.; Bogorad, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Application of electrothermal arcjets on communications satellites requires assessment of integration concerns identified by the user community. Perceived risks include plume contamination of spacecraft materials, induced arcing or electrostatic discharges between differentially charged spacecraft surfaces, and conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) for both steady state and transient conditions. A Space Act agreement between Martin Marietta Astro Space, the Rocket Research Company, and NASA's Lewis Research Center was established to experimentally examine these issues. Spacecraft materials were exposed to an arcjet plume for 40 hours, representing 40 weeks of actual spacecraft life, and contamination was characterized by changes in surface properties. With the exception of the change in emittance of one sample, all measurable changes in surface properties resulted in acceptable end of life characteristics. Charged spacecraft samples were benignly and consistently reduced to ground potential during exposure to the powered arcjet plume, suggesting that the arcjet could act as a charge control device on spacecraft. Steady state EMI signatures obtained using two different power processing units were similar to emissions measured in a previous test. Emissions measured in UHF, S, C, Ku and Ka bands obtained a null result which verified previous work in the UHF, S, and C bands. Characteristics of conducted and radiated transient emissions appear within standard spacecraft susceptibility criteria.

  14. Spacecraft Systems Engineering, 3rd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Peter; Stark, John; Swinerd, Graham

    2003-03-01

    Following on from the hugely successful previous editions, the third edition of Spacecraft Systems Engineering incorporates the most recent technological advances in spacecraft and satellite engineering. With emphasis on recent developments in space activities, this new edition has been completely revised. Every chapter has been updated and rewritten by an expert engineer in the field, with emphasis on the bus rather than the payload. Encompassing the fundamentals of spacecraft engineering, the book begins with front-end system-level issues, such as environment, mission analysis and system engineering, and progresses to a detailed examination of subsystem elements which represent the core of spacecraft design - mechanical, electrical, propulsion, thermal, control etc. This quantitative treatment is supplemented by an appreciation of the interactions between the elements, which deeply influence the process of spacecraft systems design. In particular the revised text includes * A new chapter on small satellites engineering and applications which has been contributed by two internationally-recognised experts, with insights into small satellite systems engineering. * Additions to the mission analysis chapter, treating issues of aero-manouevring, constellation design and small body missions. In summary, this is an outstanding textbook for aerospace engineering and design students, and offers essential reading for spacecraft engineers, designers and research scientists. The comprehensive approach provides an invaluable resource to spacecraft manufacturers and agencies across the world.

  15. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  16. Some basic mathematical methods of diffusion theory. [emphasis on atmospheric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giere, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory treatment of the fundamentals of diffusion theory is presented, starting with molecular diffusion and leading up to the statistical methods of turbulent diffusion. A multilayer diffusion model, designed to permit concentration and dosage calculations downwind of toxic clouds from rocket vehicles, is described. The concepts and equations of diffusion are developed on an elementary level, with emphasis on atmospheric applications.

  17. Atmospheric stability intervals influencing the potential for off-target movement of spray in aerial application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine atmospheric conditions favorable for long-distance movement of spray from aerial application that can have deleterious consequences to susceptible crops. A tall meteorological monitoring tower was equipped with six precision thermistors at six heights to 27.4 m a...

  18. Development of an advanced spacecraft tandem mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Russell C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to apply current advanced technology in electronics and materials to the development of a miniaturized Tandem Mass Spectrometer that would have the potential for future development into a package suitable for spacecraft use. The mass spectrometer to be used as a basis for the tandem instrument would be a magnetic sector instrument, of Nier-Johnson configuration, as used on the Viking Mars Lander mission. This instrument configuration would then be matched with a suitable second stage MS to provide the benefits of tandem MS operation for rapid identification of unknown organic compounds. This tandem instrument is configured with a newly designed GC system to aid in separation of complex mixtures prior to MS analysis. A number of important results were achieved in the course of this project. Among them were the development of a miniaturized GC subsystem, with a unique desorber-injector, fully temperature feedback controlled oven with powered cooling for rapid reset to ambient conditions, a unique combination inlet system to the MS that provides for both membrane sampling and direct capillary column sample transfer, a compact and ruggedized alignment configuration for the MS, an improved ion source design for increased sensitivity, and a simple, rugged tandem MS configuration that is particularly adaptable to spacecraft use because of its low power and low vacuum pumping requirements. The potential applications of this research include use in manned spacecraft like the space station as a real-time detection and warning device for the presence of potentially harmful trace contaminants of the spacecraft atmosphere, use as an analytical device for evaluating samples collected on the Moon or a planetary surface, or even use in connection with monitoring potentially hazardous conditions that may exist in terrestrial locations such as launch pads, environmental test chambers or other sensitive areas. Commercial development of the technology

  19. Unusual spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Jonathan V.

    1990-01-01

    For particularly innovative space exploration missions, unusual requirements are levied on the structural components of the spacecraft. In many cases, the preferred solution is the utilization of unusual materials. This trend is forecast to continue. Several hypothetic examples are discussed.

  20. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  1. Design and analysis of a low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and development of an X-band (8145 MHz) transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single-section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. A linear phase deviation of 92 deg with a linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent was measured for this modulator from 8257 MHz to 8634 MHz over the temperature range -20 to 75 C. The measured insertion loss and the static delay variation with temperature were 2 +/- 0.3 dB and 0.16 psec/ C, respectively. Based on this design, cascaded sections have been modeled, and simulations were performed to provide an X-band deep space transponder (DST) phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians (+/- 143 deg) of peak phase deviation to accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase-modulator requirements and show excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  2. Spacecraft Charge as a Source of Electrical Power for Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics.47: Spacecraft Charging by3Maanetospheric Plasmas : 15-30, 1976. Nicholson, Dwight R...34 Spacecraft Charging Investigation: A Joint Research and Technology Program," Progress in Astronautics and Astronautics . 47: Spacecraft Charging by... Magnetospheric Plasmas : 3-14, 1976. l Massaro, N.J. and others. "A Charging Model for Three-Axis Stabilized Spacecraft ,"

  3. Viking lander spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander was the first spacecraft to fly a sterilized nickel-cadmium battery on a mission to explore the surface of a planet. The significant results of the battery development program from its inception through the design, manufacture, and test of the flight batteries which were flown on the two Lander spacecraft are documented. The flight performance during the early phase of the mission is also presented.

  4. Printable Spacecraft: Flexible Electronic Platforms for NASA Missions. Phase One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Kendra (Principal Investigator); Van Buren, David (Principal Investigator)

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric confetti. Inchworm crawlers. Blankets of ground penetrating radar. These are some of the unique mission concepts which could be enabled by a printable spacecraft. Printed electronics technology offers enormous potential to transform the way NASA builds spacecraft. A printed spacecraft's low mass, volume and cost offer dramatic potential impacts to many missions. Network missions could increase from a few discrete measurements to tens of thousands of platforms improving areal density and system reliability. Printed platforms could be added to any prime mission as a low-cost, minimum resource secondary payload to augment the science return. For a small fraction of the mass and cost of a traditional lander, a Europa flagship mission might carry experimental printed surface platforms. An Enceladus Explorer could carry feather-light printed platforms to release into volcanic plumes to measure composition and impact energies. The ability to print circuits directly onto a variety of surfaces, opens the possibility of multi-functional structures and membranes such as "smart" solar sails and balloons. The inherent flexibility of a printed platform allows for in-situ re-configurability for aerodynamic control or mobility. Engineering telemetry of wheel/soil interactions are possible with a conformal printed sensor tape fit around a rover wheel. Environmental time history within a sample return canister could be recorded with a printed sensor array that fits flush to the interior of the canister. Phase One of the NIAC task entitled "Printable Spacecraft" investigated the viability of printed electronics technologies for creating multi-functional spacecraft platforms. Mission concepts and architectures that could be enhanced or enabled with this technology were explored. This final report captures the results and conclusions of the Phase One study. First, the report presents the approach taken in conducting the study and a mapping of results against the proposed

  5. Fire behavior and risk analysis in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    1988-01-01

    Practical risk management for present and future spacecraft, including space stations, involves the optimization of residual risks balanced by the spacecraft operational, technological, and economic limitations. Spacecraft fire safety is approached through three strategies, in order of risk: (1) control of fire-causing elements, through exclusion of flammable materials for example; (2) response to incipient fires through detection and alarm; and (3) recovery of normal conditions through extinguishment and cleanup. Present understanding of combustion in low gravity is that, compared to normal gravity behavior, fire hazards may be reduced by the absence of buoyant gas flows yet at the same time increased by ventilation flows and hot particle expulsion. This paper discusses the application of low-gravity combustion knowledge and appropriate aircraft analogies to fire detection, fire fighting, and fire-safety decisions for eventual fire-risk management and optimization in spacecraft.

  6. Industry perspectives on Plug-& -Play Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, R.; Graven, P.; Liptak, L.

    This paper describes the methodologies and findings from an industry survey of awareness and utility of Spacecraft Plug-& -Play Avionics (SPA). The survey was conducted via interviews, in-person and teleconference, with spacecraft prime contractors and suppliers. It focuses primarily on AFRL's SPA technology development activities but also explores the broader applicability and utility of Plug-& -Play (PnP) architectures for spacecraft. Interviews include large and small suppliers as well as large and small spacecraft prime contractors. Through these “ product marketing” interviews, awareness and attitudes can be assessed, key technical and market barriers can be identified, and opportunities for improvement can be uncovered. Although this effort focuses on a high-level assessment, similar processes can be used to develop business cases and economic models which may be necessary to support investment decisions.

  7. Wavefront phase retrieval with multi-aperture Zernike filter for atmospheric sensing and adaptive optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, Behzad; Farwell, Nathan H.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.

    2016-09-01

    A novel scintillation resistant wavefront sensor based on a densely packed array of classical Zernike filters, referred to as the multi-aperture Zernike wavefront sensor (MAZ-WFS), is introduced and analyzed through numerical simulations. Wavefront phase reconstruction in the MAZ-WFS is performed using iterative algorithms that are optimized for phase aberration sensing in severe atmospheric turbulence conditions. The results demonstrate the potential of the MAZ-WFS for high-resolution retrieval of turbulence-induced phase aberrations in strong scintillation conditions for atmospheric sensing and adaptive optics applications.

  8. Adsorption Processes in Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Liese Dall; Finn, John E.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft must maintain a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work. The system's functions include supplying the crew with oxygen and water as well as removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used in the past, logistics and safety factors of current and future missions in space make near-complete recycling of the cabin's air and water imperative. The recycling process may include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and other processes. Several of these operations can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are frequently good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relatively high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerability. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. This article focuses on three current spacecraft life support applications that often use adsorption technology: gas-phase trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide removal from cabin air, and potable water recovery from waste streams. In each application, adsorption technology has been selected for use on the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for each of these applications are discussed. Eventually, human space exploration may lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different requirements and resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Adsorption separation and

  9. Computation of Normal Modes for a spherical Planet with a non-adiabatic atmosphere : application to the Earth and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, G.; Lognonne, P.; Garcia, R.

    2004-12-01

    Thanks to technological advances over the past fifteen years the atmosphere is now a new medium for seismological investigation. Surface waves emitted after large earthquakes are known to induce, by dynamic coupling, atmospheric infrasonic and gravity waves propagating upward through the atmosphere. Those waves have been detected recently at ionospheric heights using a variety of techniques, such as Doppler or GPS ionospheric sounding. The theoretical description of the coupling processes and propagation in the atmosphere already take into account the viscosity of the atmosphere. However, for acoustic waves in atmosphere, the effects of thermal-conduction can reach 30% of the total dissipation. We describe a new theory taking into account the thermal conduction effects and which allows a more precise modelling of the propagation and provide the temperature fluctuation associated to the seismic waves at high altitudes. This theory is use to model waves and signals for different earthquakes, and the modelled data are compared to the observations and results discussed. Modelling is also performed in the case of Venus, and the perspectives of detection by ESA's Venus Express Spacecraft are specified.

  10. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  11. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  12. Application of pulsed GaAs diode lasers to spectral atmospheric monitoring and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Penchev, S.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Naboko, Sergei V.

    1999-05-01

    We report new aspects of application of pulsed GaAs diode lasers, concerning absorption spectroscopy of water vapor of third oscillatory molecular overtone 8990 - 9012 angstroms, and Mie-scattering lidar signal in the 15 km range. It is accessible by the power characteristics of a system utilizing the powerful `chip-stack' GaAs diode lasers, employing optimal photodetection technique based on an analyzing system with computer operated boxcar. Data on atmospheric aerosol backscatter signal acquired by DL lidar are presented with relevance to the potential of complex atmospheric remote sensing. GaAs diode lasers, with radiation matching water vapor spectrum of absorption- coefficients of 0.5 - 5 km-1 in Beer's law, are shown feasible for DIAL monitoring of atmospheric humidity.

  13. Application of the DSMC Method in Modeling Earth's Rarefied Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, W.; Walker, A. C.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improving the accuracy and robustness of simulations of Earth's upper atmosphere is a priority for satellite drag and space weather applications. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo [DSMC] method is well-suited to modeling the dynamics of such rarefied and non-equilibrium regimes, where continuum techniques break down. Here, we apply DSMC in three-dimensional, transient, and self-consistent neutral density simulations of Earth's rarefied upper atmosphere.An existing planetary-science code base, established in the modeling of the lunar and Ionian environs, is extended to reflect the physics of Earth's upper atmosphere. Comprehensive atmospheric simulations are computed in parallel on a domain extending from the mid-thermosphere, below the continuum-rarefied transition, through 1000 km altitude. The simulation code includes multi-species neutral- and photo-chemistry, tracking of particle rotational and vibrational states, and non-equilibrium radiation transport. Substantial model development is demonstrated in application to the Earth's atmosphere, including the incorporation of lower-boundary conditions consistent with the NRLMSISE-00 semi-empirical model, ultraviolet radiation and photo-chemistry rates modeled with reference to space weather indices, and radiative absorption attenuated by integrated column density.Comparisons with results drawn from existing upper atmospheric models and from indirect satellite mass density measurements are employed in benchmarking model accuracy. Avenues for further development include hybridization with continuum global circulation models in the mid-thermosphere, and the extension of the planetary code's magnetic field and charged-particle models to the Earth case.Research supported by the Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School, LANL Institutional Computing, and the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) at LANL.

  14. Nuclear electric propulsion system utilization for earth orbit transfer of large spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses a potential application of electric propulsion to perform orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) from LEO, utilizing a nuclear reactor space power source in the spacecraft on a shared basis. The discussions include spacecraft, thrust system, and nuclear reactor space power system concepts. Emphasis is placed on orbiter payload arrangements, spacecraft launch constraints, and spacecraft LEO assembly and deployment sequences.

  15. Mechanical Design of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    In the spring of 1962, engineers from the Engineering Mechanics Division of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory gave a series of lectures on spacecraft design at the Engineering Design seminars conducted at the California Institute of Technology. Several of these lectures were subsequently given at Stanford University as part of the Space Technology seminar series sponsored by the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Presented here are notes taken from these lectures. The lectures were conceived with the intent of providing the audience with a glimpse of the activities of a few mechanical engineers who are involved in designing, building, and testing spacecraft. Engineering courses generally consist of heavily idealized problems in order to allow the more efficient teaching of mathematical technique. Students, therefore, receive a somewhat limited exposure to actual engineering problems, which are typified by more unknowns than equations. For this reason it was considered valuable to demonstrate some of the problems faced by spacecraft designers, the processes used to arrive at solutions, and the interactions between the engineer and the remainder of the organization in which he is constrained to operate. These lecture notes are not so much a compilation of sophisticated techniques of analysis as they are a collection of examples of spacecraft hardware and associated problems. They will be of interest not so much to the experienced spacecraft designer as to those who wonder what part the mechanical engineer plays in an effort such as the exploration of space.

  16. Docking mechanism for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Gregory A. (Inventor); Mcmanamen, John P. (Inventor); Schliesing, John A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is presented for docking a space vehicle to a space station where a connecting tunnel for in-flight transfer of personnel is required. Cooperable coupling mechanisms include docking rings on the space vehicle and space station. The space station is provided with a tunnel structure, a retraction mechanism, and a docking ring. The vehicle coupling mechanism is designed to capture the station coupling mechanism, arrest relative spacecraft motions while limiting loads to acceptable levels, and then realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The docking ring of the space vehicle coupling mechanism is supported by linear attentuator actuator devices, each of which is controlled by a control system which receives loading information signals and attenuator stroke information signals from each device and supplies output signals for controlling its linear actuation to attenuate impact loading or to realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The retraction mechanism is used to draw the spacecraft together after initial contact and coupling. Tunnel trunnions, cooperative with the latches on the space vehicle constitute the primary structural tie between the spacecraft in final docked configuration.

  17. Coffee-can-sized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    1988-01-01

    The current status and potential scientific applications of intelligent 1-5-kg projectiles being developed by SDIO and DARPA for military missions are discussed. The importance of advanced microelectronics for such small spacecraft is stressed, and it is pointed out that both chemical rockets and EM launchers are currently under consideration for these lightweight exoatmospheric projectiles (LEAPs). Long-duration power supply is identified as the primary technological change required if LEAPs are to be used for interplanetary scientific missions, and the design concept of a solar-powered space-based railgun to accelerate LEAPs on such missions is considered.

  18. Electron yields from spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, K.; Gordon, W. L.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Photoyields and secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics were determined under UHV conditions for a group of insulating materials used in spacecraft applications. The SEE studies were carried out with a pulsed primary beam while photoyields were obtained with a chopped photon beam from a Kr resonance source with major emission at 123.6 nm. This provides a photon flux close to that of the Lyman alpha in the space environment. Yields per incident photon are obtained relative to those from a freshly evaporated and air oxidized Al surface. Results are presented for Kapton, FEP Teflon, the borosilicate glass covering of a shuttle tile, and spacesuit outer fabric.

  19. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    PubMed

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-04

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old.

  20. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century

    PubMed Central

    Graven, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon (14C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio 14C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ14CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ14CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all 14C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ14CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ14CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas “business-as-usual” emissions will reduce Δ14CO2 to −250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial “aging” of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old. PMID:26195757

  1. Taurus lightweight manned spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Kevin A.; Vandersall, Eric J.; Plotkin, Jennifer; Travisano, Jeffrey J.; Loveless, Dennis; Kaczmarek, Michael; White, Anthony G.; Est, Andy; Bulla, Gregory; Henry, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff data of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step towards larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the Space Shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster--1300 kg to a 300 km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The human factors system deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The propulsion section contains the abort system, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and power generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the structures section. The avionics section includes navigation, attitude determination, data processing, communication systems, and sensors. The mission analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The systems integration section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft and addressed costing and reliability.

  2. Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosset, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff date of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step toward larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the space shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low-cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low Earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster - 1300 kg to a 300-km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The Human Factors section deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The Propulsion section contains the Abort System, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and Power Generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the Structures section. The Avionics section includes Navigation, Attitude Determination, Data Processing, Communication systems, and Sensors. The Mission Analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The Systems Integration Section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft, and addressed costing and reliability.

  3. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Banks, Bruce; deGroh, Kim; Miller, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of specific space environmental threats to exterior spacecraft materials. The scope will be confined to effects on exterior spacecraft surfaces, and will not, therefore, address environmental effects on interior spacecraft systems, such as electronics. Space exposure studies and laboratory simulations of individual and combined space environemntal threats will be summarized. A significant emphasis is placed on effects of Earth orbit environments, because the majority of space missions have been flown in Earth orbits which have provided a significant amount of data on materials effects. Issues associated with interpreting materials degradation results will be discussed, and deficiencies of ground testing will be identified. Recommendations are provided on reducing or preventing space environmental degradation through appropriate materials selection.

  4. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  5. Standardized Spacecraft Onboard Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; Plummer, Chris; Plancke, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), an international organization of national space agencies, is branching out to provide new standards to enhanced reuse of onboard spacecraft equipment and software. These Spacecraft Onboard Interface (SOIF) standards will be, in part, based on the well-known Internet protocols. This paper will provide a description of the SOIF work by describing three orthogonal views: the Services View that describes data communications services, the Interoperability view shows how to exchange data and messages between different spacecraft elements, and the Protocol view, that describes the SOIF protocols and services. We will also provide a description of the present state of the services that will be provided to SOIF users, and are the basis of the utility of these standards.

  6. Addressing EO-1 Spacecraft Pulsed Plasma Thruster EMI Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrzwski, C. M.; Davis, Mitch; Sarmiento, Charles; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Experiment on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) spacecraft has been designed to demonstrate the capability of a new generation PPT to perform spacecraft attitude control. Results from PPT unit level radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) tests led to concerns about potential interference problems with other spacecraft subsystems. Initial plans to address these concerns included firing the PPT at the spacecraft level both in atmosphere, with special ground support equipment. and in vacuum. During the spacecraft level tests, additional concerns where raised about potential harm to the Advanced Land Imager (ALI). The inadequacy of standard radiated emission test protocol to address pulsed electromagnetic discharges and the lack of resources required to perform compatibility tests between the PPT and an ALI test unit led to changes in the spacecraft level validation plan. An EMI shield box for the PPT was constructed and validated for spacecraft level ambient testing. Spacecraft level vacuum tests of the PPT were deleted. Implementation of the shield box allowed for successful spacecraft level testing of the PPT while eliminating any risk to the ALI. The ALI demonstration will precede the PPT demonstration to eliminate any possible risk of damage of ALI from PPT operation.

  7. Analysis and application of Fourier transform spectroscopy in atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis method for Fourier transform spectroscopy is summarized with applications to various types of distortion in atmospheric absorption spectra. This analysis method includes the fast Fourier transform method for simulating the interferometric spectrum and the nonlinear least-squares method for retrieving the information from a measured spectrum. It is shown that spectral distortions can be simulated quite well and that the correct information can be retrieved from a distorted spectrum by this analysis technique.

  8. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  9. Optical holography applications for the zero-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A complete description of holography is provided, both for the time-dependent case of moving scene holography and for the time-independent case of stationary holography. Further, a specific holographic arrangement for application to the detection of particle size distribution in an atmospheric simulation cloud chamber. In this chamber particle growth rate is investigated; therefore, the proposed holographic system must capture continuous particle motion in real time. Such a system is described.

  10. Aspects of Spacecraft Charging in Sunlight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    that of the positive ions by two orders of magnitude M. F. Tautz is with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research ( AER )/ [1], [2] and the secondary...itgaedwhtedetermined by surface material properties. In the theory of critical temperature, the ambient electron temperature Te is an important space dV (0 0 , r) plasma...parameter controlling the onset of spacecraft charging. dV , r)rs = 0 (2) Characterizing the ambient space plasma by Te, we have found that

  11. NASA launches dual Dynamics Explorer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A Delta launch vehicle was used to insert Dynamics Explorer A into a highly elliptical polar orbit, ranging from 675 to 24,945 km, and Dynamics Explorer B satellite into a low polar orbit, ranging from 306 to 1,300 km. The two spacecraft are designed to provide specific knowledge about the interaction of energy, electric currents, electric fields, and plasmas between the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the atmosphere.

  12. Application of Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Differenced One-Way Doppler (DOWD) Tracking Data for Orbit Determination and Station Acquisition Support of User Spacecraft Without TDRS Compatible Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszewski, A. D., Jr.; Wilcox, T. P.; Beckman, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Many spacecraft are launched today with only an omni-directional (omni) antenna and do not have an onboard Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) transponder that is capable of coherently returning a carrier signal through TDRS. Therefore, other means of tracking need to be explored and used to adequately acquire the spacecraft. Differenced One-Way Doppler (DOWD) tracking data are very useful in eliminating the problems associated with the instability of the onboard oscillators when using strictly one-way Doppler data. This paper investigates the TDRS DOWD tracking data received by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) during the launch and early orbit phases for the the Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (WIND) and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-J missions. In particular FDF personnel performed an investigation of the data residuals and made an assessment of the acquisition capabilities of DOWD-based solutions. Comparisons of DOWD solutions with existing data types were performed and analyzed in this study. The evaluation also includes atmospheric editing of the DOWD data and a study of the feasibility of solving for Doppler biases in an attempt to minimize error. Furthermore, by comparing the results from WIND and NOAA-J, an attempt is made to show the limitations involved in using DOWD data for the two different mission profiles. The techniques discussed in this paper benefit the launches of spacecraft that do not have TDRS transponders on board, particularly those launched into a low Earth orbit. The use of DOWD data is a valuable asset to missions which do not have a stable local oscillator to enable high-quality solutions from the one-way/return-link Doppler tracking data.

  13. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  14. Large size SiPM matrix for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Corti, D.; Ionica, M.; Manea, C.; Mariotti, M.; Rando, R.; Reichardt, I.; Schultz, C.

    2016-07-01

    SiPM photo detectors are nowadays commonly used in many applications. For large size telescopes like MAGIC or the future Large Size Telescope (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project, a pixel size of some square centimeters is needed. An analog amplifier and sum stage was built and characterized. A large and compact SiPM matrix prototype, with the associated focusing optics, was assembled into a monolithic light detector with an active area of 3 cm2. The performance of the electronics is tailored for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) applications, with fast signal and adequate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio.

  15. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for atmospheric sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-01

    The application of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in atmospheric science for trace detection of gases has been demonstrated using sensors in point or remote sensing configurations. Many of these systems utilize single narrowly-tunable (~10 cm-1) distributed feedback (DFB-) QCLs that limit simultaneous detection to a restricted number of small chemical species like H2O or N2O. The narrow wavelength range of DFB-QCLs precludes accurate quantification of large chemical species with broad rotationally-unresolved vibrational spectra, such as volatile organic compounds, that play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. External-cavity (EC-) QCL systems are available that offer tuning ranges >100 cm-1, making them excellent IR sources for measuring multiple small and large chemical species in the atmosphere. While the broad wavelength coverage afforded by an EC system enables measurements of large chemical species, most commercial systems can only be swept over their entire wavelength range at less than 10 Hz. This prohibits broadband simultaneous measurements of multiple chemicals in plumes from natural or industrial sources where turbulence and/or chemical reactivity are resulting in rapid changes in chemical composition on sub-1s timescales. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory we have developed rapidly-swept EC-QCL technology that acquires broadband absorption spectra (~100 cm-1) on ms timescales. The spectral resolution of this system has enabled simultaneous measurement of narrow rotationally-resolved atmospherically-broadened lines from small chemical species, while offering the broad tuning range needed to measure broadband spectral features from multiple large chemical species. In this talk the application of this technology for open-path atmospheric measurements will be discussed based on results from laboratory measurements with simulated plumes of chemicals. The performance offered by the system for simultaneous detection of multiple chemical

  16. Lessons from NASA. [spacecraft reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Particular requirements related to the design and the operation of spacecraft have forced NASA to take a reliability approach that differs somewhat from that used in many other applications. NASA has found that some of the traditional tools of reliability engineering, such as life testing, reliability demonstration testing, maintainability analysis, and direct failure analysis, are impractical for spacecraft. In place of a statistical approach, the space agency uses an engineering approach to mission reliability. Reliability is to be obtained with the aid of three different approaches, including the application of effective design principles, the control and screening of all parts, and the testing of the entire spacecraft or its prototype for predicted capabilities. Attention is given to failure-mode analysis, the enhancement of Voyager reliability by autonomous operation, the redundancy in Shuttle design, the weeding out of bad hardware, and the preference for off-the-shelf devices.

  17. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  18. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 1A: Descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and investigations, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Winifred Sawtell (Editor); Vostreys, Robert W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and associated experiments. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also included.

  19. Data Catalog Series for Space Science and Applications Flight Missions. Volume 2B; Descriptions of Data Sets from Geostationary and High-Altitude Scientific Spacecraft and Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, Norman J. (Editor); Parthasarathy, R. (Editor); Hills, H. Kent (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from geostationary and high altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  20. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 1B: Descriptions of data sets from planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Richard (Compiler); Jackson, John E. (Compiler); Cameron, Winifred S. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and associated experiments. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  1. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 3B: Descriptions of data sets from low- and medium-altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, John E. (Editor); Horowitz, Richard (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from low and medium altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  2. Spacecraft Environmental Anomalies Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    engineering solutions for mitigating the effects of environmental anomalies have been developed. Among the causes o, spacecraft anomalies are surface...have been discovered after years of investig!:tion, and engineering solutions for mitigating the effccts of environmental anomalies have been developed...23 * 6.4.3 Fauth Tolerant Solutions .............................................................................. 23 6.4.4. Methods

  3. Microbial contamination of spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Pierson, D L

    2001-06-01

    Spacecraft and space habitats supporting human exploration contain a diverse population of microorganisms. Microorganisms may threaten human habitation in many ways that directly or indirectly impact the health, safety, or performance of astronauts. The ability to produce and maintain spacecraft and space stations with environments suitable for human habitation has been established over 40 years of human space flight. An extensive database of environmental microbiological parameters has been provided for short-term (< 20 days) space flight by more than 100 missions aboard the Space Shuttle. The NASA Mir Program provided similar data for long-duration missions. Interestingly, the major bacterial and fungal species found in the Space Shuttle are similar to those encountered in the nearly 15-year-old Mir. Lessons learned from both the US and Russian space programs have been incorporated into the habitability plan for the International Space Station. The focus is on preventive measures developed for spacecraft, cargo, and crews. On-orbit regular housekeeping practices complete with visual inspections are essential, along with microbiological monitoring. Risks associated with extended stays on the Moon or a Mars exploration mission will be much greater than previous experiences because of additional unknown variables. The current knowledge base is insufficient for exploration missions, and research is essential to understand the effects of space flight on biological functions and population dynamics of microorganisms in spacecraft. Equally important is a better understanding of the immune response and of human-microorganism-environment interactions during long-term space habitation.

  4. Analysis of spacecraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Support was provided for the maintenance and modifications of software for the production and detailed analysis of data from the DE-A spacecraft and new software developed for this end. Software for the analysis of the data from the Spacelab Experimental Particle Accelerator (SEPAC) was also developed.

  5. Spacecraft attitude sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, A. C.; Grant, M. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for sensing the attitude of a spacecraft includes a pair of optical scanners having a relatively narrow field of view rotating about the spacecraft x-y plane. The spacecraft rotates about its z axis at a relatively high angular velocity while one scanner rotates at low velocity, whereby a panoramic sweep of the entire celestial sphere is derived from the scanner. In the alternative, the scanner rotates at a relatively high angular velocity about the x-y plane while the spacecraft rotates at an extremely low rate or at zero angular velocity relative to its z axis to provide a rotating horizon scan. The positions of the scanners about the x-y plane are read out to assist in a determination of attitude. While the satellite is spinning at a relatively high angular velocity, the angular positions of the bodies detected by the scanners are determined relative to the sun by providing a sun detector having a field of view different from the scanners.

  6. Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) Code and Application to WASP-43b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Cubillos, Patricio; Bowman, Oliver; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Challener, Ryan; Foster, Austin James; Foster, Andrew S.; Blumenthal, Sarah D.; Bruce, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    We present a new open-source Bayesian radiative-transfer framework, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART, https://github.com/exosports/BART), and its application to WASP-43b. BART initializes a model for the atmospheric retrieval calculation, generates thousands of theoretical model spectra using parametrized pressure and temperature profiles and line-by-line radiative-transfer calculation, and employs a statistical package to compare the models with the observations. It consists of three self-sufficient modules available to the community under the reproducible-research license, the Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances module (TEA, https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA, Blecic et al. 2015}, the radiative-transfer module (Transit, https://github.com/exosports/transit), and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module (MCcubed, https://github.com/pcubillos/MCcubed, Cubillos et al. 2015). We applied BART on all available WASP-43b secondary eclipse data from the space- and ground-based observations constraining the temperature-pressure profile and molecular abundances of the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  7. Demonstration of Spacecraft Fire Safety Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the Constellation Program, the development of spacecraft fire safety technologies were focused on the immediate questions related to the atmosphere of the habitable volume and implementation of fire detection, suppression, and postfire clean-up systems into the vehicle architectures. One of the difficulties encountered during the trade studies for these systems was the frequent lack of data regarding the performance of a technology, such as a water mist fire suppression system or an optically-based combustion product monitor. Even though a spacecraft fire safety technology development project was being funded, there was insufficient time and funding to address all the issues as they were identified. At the conclusion of the Constellation Program, these knowledge gaps formed the basis for a project proposed to the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program. This project, subsequently funded by the AES Program and in operation since October 2011, has as its cornerstone the development of an experiment to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Science s Cygnus vehicle after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. The technology development efforts being conducted in this project include continued quantification of low- and partial-gravity maximum oxygen concentrations of spacecraft-relevant materials, development and verification of sensors for fire detection and post-fire monitoring, development of standards for sizing and selecting spacecraft fire suppression systems, and demonstration of post-fire cleanup strategies. The major technology development efforts are identified in this paper but its primary purpose is to describe the spacecraft fire safety demonstration being planned for the reentry vehicle.

  8. Cassini spacecraft and instrument force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.; Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The application of force limiting to spacecraft equipment is illustrated with the random vibration test of the Cassini radio plasma wave subsystem antenna instrument. Force limiting was used in the vibration tests of most of the instruments and major equipment on the Cassini spacecraft, as well as in the vibration test of the complete flight spacecraft. Force limits for the Cassini instruments and complete spacecraft vibration tests were developed using a semi-empirical method which only requires the acceleration specification and the data from a low level pre-test in order to determine the mass of the test item.

  9. Intelligent spacecraft module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  10. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations

  11. Orbit Estimation of Non-Cooperative Maneuvering Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    uses numerical integration of orbit dynamics with 21 × 21 spherical harmonic expansion of the Geopotential, atmospheric drag, lunar gravity, and solar ... ORBIT ESTIMATION OF NON-COOPERATIVE MANEUVERING SPACECRAFT DISSERTATION Gary M. Goff, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-DS-15-J-051 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-DS-15-J-051 ORBIT ESTIMATION OF NON-COOPERATIVE MANEUVERING SPACECRAFT DISSERTATION Presented to

  12. Spacecraft Dynamics as Related to Laboratory Experiments in Space. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H. (Editor); Antar, B. N. (Editor); Collins, F. G. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Proceedings are presented of a conference sponsored by the Physics and Chemistry Experiments in Space Working Group to discuss the scientific and engineering aspects involved in the design and performance of reduced to zero gravity experiments affected by spacecraft environments and dynamics. The dynamics of drops, geophysical fluids, and superfluid helium are considered as well as two phase flow, combustion, and heat transfer. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments are also examined.

  13. A History of Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daues, Katherine R.

    2006-01-01

    A spacecraft's Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system enables and maintains a habitable and sustaining environment for its crew. A typical ECLS system provides for atmosphere consumables and revitalization, environmental monitoring, pressure, temperature and humidity control, heat rejection (including equipment cooling), food and water supply and management, waste management, and fire detection and suppression. The following is a summary of ECLS systems used in United States (US) and Russian human spacecraft.

  14. Assessment of atmospheric mercury emission reduction measures relevant for application in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Hlawiczka, S.; Fudala, J.

    2008-03-15

    Fuel combustion for heat and power generation, together with cement production, were the most significant sources of anthropogenic atmospheric mercury emission in Poland in 2003, with 57 and 27% of Hg emission, respectively. It was found that in Poland, Hg emission reduction measures need to be focused on the energy generation sector. Sorbent injection upstream of an electrostatic precipitator or fabric filter, mercury oxidation upstream of a wet or dry flue gas desulphurisation installation, together with Hg capture on sorbents, should be considered as priority in Polish conditions. This refers mainly to fuel combustion processes but also to the production of cement. For economic reasons it seems advisable that, apart from activated carbons as sorbents, application of zeolites obtained from power plant fly ash should also be considered. Application of primary methods seems to be very promising in Polish conditions, although they should be considered rather as an additional option apart from sorbent injection as the best option. Switching from coal to liquid and gaseous fuels shows the highest potential for reducing Hg emission. For chlorine production using the mercury cell electrolysis method, strict monitoring of Hg emissions and good housekeeping of Hg releasing processes seems a promising approach, but the main activity should focus on changing mercury-based technologies into membrane cell methods. Emission abatement potential for the atmospheric mercury in Poland has been roughly assessed, showing that in perspective of 2015, the emission could be reduced to about 25% of the anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emission in 2003.

  15. A study of structural concepts for ultralightweight spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Knapp, K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Structural concepts for ultralightweight spacecraft were studied. Concepts for ultralightweight space structures were identified and the validity of heir potential application in advanced spacecraft was assessed. The following topics were investigated: (1) membrane wrinkling under pretensioning; (2) load-carrying capability of pressurized tubes; (3) equilibrium of a precompressed rim; (4) design of an inflated reflector spacecraft; (5) general instability of a rim; and (6) structural analysis of a pressurized isotensoid column. The design approaches for a paraboloidal reflector spacecraft included a spin-stiffened design, both inflated and truss central columns, and to include both deep truss and rim-stiffened geodesic designs. The spinning spacecraft analysis is included, and the two truss designs are covered. The performances of four different approaches to the structural design of a paraboloidal reflector spacecraft are compared. The spinning and inflated configurations result in very low total masses and some concerns about their performance due to unresolved questions about dynamic stability and lifetimes, respectively.

  16. Analysis of Adaptive Mesh Refinement for IMEX Discontinuous Galerkin Solutions of the Compressible Euler Equations with Application to Atmospheric Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of Adaptive Mesh Refinement for IMEX Discontinuous Galerkin Solutions of the Compressible Euler Equations with Application to Atmospheric...order discontinuous Galerkin method on quadrilateral grids with non-conforming elements. We perform a detailed analysis of the cost of AMR by comparing...adaptive mesh refinement, discontinuous Galerkin method, non-conforming mesh, IMEX, compressible Euler equations, atmospheric simulations 1. Introduction

  17. Trajectory Design for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Loucks, Michel E.; Yang, Fan Yang; Lee, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design and analysis was performed for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment (PADME) mission concept as part of a NASA proposal submission managed by NASA Ames Research Center in the 2014-2015 timeframe. The PADME spacecraft would be a derivative of the successfully flown Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. While LADEE was designed to enter low-lunar orbit, the PADME spacecraft would instead enter an elliptical Mars orbit of 2-week period. This Mars orbit would pass by Phobos near periapsis on successive orbits and then raise periapsis to yield close approaches of Deimos every orbit thereafter.

  18. Fire Safety in the Low-Gravity Spacecraft Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Research in microgravity (low-gravity) combustion promises innovations and improvements in fire prevention and response for human-crew spacecraft. Findings indicate that material flammability and fire spread in microgravity are significantly affected by atmospheric flow rate, oxygen concentration, and diluent composition. This information can lead to modifications and correlations to standard material-assessment tests for prediction of fire resistance in space. Research on smoke-particle changes in microgravity promises future improvements and increased sensitivity of smoke detectors in spacecraft. Research on fire suppression by extinguishing agents and venting can yield new information on effective control of the rare, but serious fire events in spacecraft.

  19. Autonomous navigation of USAF spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. R., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    The U. S. Air Force is developing satellite-borne sensors to enable autonomous navigation of spacecraft in the near future. This study compares the observations from several medium-accuracy space sensors, such as the existing telescopic space sextant, with those of future matrix-type sensors. The large field of view of matrix sensors will allow them to determine the Earth horizon to approximately an order of magnitude better than current infrared sensors by observing atmospheric refraction of stellar light. This horizon determination will give the matrix sensors an accuracy of less than 1 km. The limiting factor in Earth-horizon determination is the modeling of atmospheric refraction effects. For high-accuracy requirements (100 meters or less), the Global Positioning System (GPS) offers the only near-term solution. A relative navigation technique using range and Doppler data is proposed for autonomous navigation of the GPS satellites. The navigation accuracy of this technique is evaluated by consider covariance analysis and by processing corrupted data through a reduced-order onboard Sequentially Partitioned Algorithm. The algorithm is stable and for the GPS system produces in-plane accuracy of 40 meters over twenty days. However, out-of-plane motion is shown to be unobservable in the GPS-to-GPS tracking mode, and errors of up to 1.5 km over 60 days are experienced. For this reason, a supplemental transmitter on the ground or in a different orbit is recommended.

  20. Attitude stabilization of a rigid spacecraft using two control torques: A nonlinear control approach based on the spacecraft attitude dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Hariharan; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; McClamroch, Harris

    1994-06-01

    The attitude stabilization problem of a rigid spacecraft using control torques supplied by gas jet actuators about only two of its principal axes is considered. If the uncontrolled principal axis of the spacecraft is not an axis of symmetry, then the complete spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable. However, the spacecraft cannot be asymptotically stabilized to any equilibrium attitude using time-invariant continuous feedback. A discontinuous stabilizing feedback control strategy is constructed which stabilizes the spacecraft to any equilibrium attitude. If the uncontrolled principal axis of the spacecraft is an axis of symmetry, the complete spacecraft dynamics are not even assessible. However, the spacecraft dynamics are strongly accessible and small time locally controllable in a reduced sense. The reduced spacecraft dynamics cannot be asymptotically stabilized to any equilibrium attitude using time-invariant continuous feedback, but again a discontinuous stabilizing feedback control strategy is constructed. In both cases, the discontinuous feedback controllers are constructed by switching between several feedback functions which are selected to accomplish a sequence of spacecraft maneuvers. The results of the paper show that although standard nonlinear control techniques are not applicable, it is possible to construct a nonlinear discontinuous control law based on the dynamics of the particular physical system.

  1. Method for deploying multiple spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharer, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for deploying multiple spacecraft is disclosed. The method can be used in a situation where a first celestial body is being orbited by a second celestial body. The spacecraft are loaded onto a single spaceship that contains the multiple spacecraft and the spacecraft is launched from the second celestial body towards a third celestial body. The spacecraft are separated from each other while in route to the third celestial body. Each of the spacecraft is then subjected to the gravitational field of the third celestial body and each of the spacecraft assumes a different, independent orbit about the first celestial body. In those situations where the spacecraft are launched from Earth, the Sun can act as the first celestial body, the Earth can act as the second celestial body and the Moon can act as the third celestial body.

  2. NASA Now: EPOXI Flyby Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Close Encounters of the Comet Kind: In this installment of NASA Now, you’ll meet spacecraft pilot and engineer Steven Wissler, who talks about the challenges of flying a spacecraft remotely from ...

  3. Spacecraft Images Comet Target's Jets

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Deep Impact spacecraft's High- and Medium-Resolution Imagers (HRI and MRI) have captured multiple jets turning on and off while the spacecraft is 8 million kilometers (5 million miles) away fro...

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the physics of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  5. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  6. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  7. Fine Pointing of Military Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    better spacecraft control . In the early 1990s, researchers introduced nonlinear adaptive control techniques to estimate on- orbit spacecraft inertia...general form, the resulting regression model used in the control signal requires several pages to express for three-dimensional spacecraft rotational...a reference trajectory that addresses system lead/lag when applying the assumed control to a spacecraft with modeling errors, disturbances and

  8. A Novel Spacecraft Charge Monitor for LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goembel, Luke

    2004-01-01

    Five years ago we introduced a new method for measuring spacecraft chassis floating potential relative to the space plasma (absolute spacecraft potential) in low Earth orbit. The method, based on a straightforward interpretation of photoelectron spectra, shows promise for numerous applications, but has not yet been tried. In the interest of testing the method, and ultimately supplying another tool for measuring absolute spacecraft charge, we are producing a flight prototype Spacecraft Charge Monitor (SCM) with support from NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Although insight into the technique came from data collected in space over two decades ago, very little data are available. The data indicate that it may be possible to determine spacecraft floating potential to within 0.1 volt each with the SCM second under certain conditions. It is debatable that spacecraft floating potential has ever been measured with such accuracy. The compact, easily deployed SCM also offers the advantage of long-term stability in calibration. Accurate floating potential determinations from the SCM could be used to correct biases in space plasma measurements and evaluate charge mitigation and/or sensing devices. Although this paper focuses on the device's use in low Earth orbit (LEO), the device may also be able to measure spacecraft charge at higher altitudes, in the solar wind, and in orbits around other planets. The flight prototype SCM we are producing for delivery to NASA in the third quarter of 2004 will measure floating potential from 0 to -150 volts with 0.1 volt precision, weigh approximately 600-700 grams, consume approximately 2 watts, and will measure approximately 8 x 10 x 17 cm.

  9. Guidance and control of swarms of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Daniel James

    There has been considerable interest in formation flying spacecraft due to their potential to perform certain tasks at a cheaper cost than monolithic spacecraft. Formation flying enables the use of smaller, cheaper spacecraft that distribute the risk of the mission. Recently, the ideas of formation flying have been extended to spacecraft swarms made up of hundreds to thousands of 100-gram-class spacecraft known as femtosatellites. The large number of spacecraft and limited capabilities of each individual spacecraft present a significant challenge in guidance, navigation, and control. This dissertation deals with the guidance and control algorithms required to enable the flight of spacecraft swarms. The algorithms developed in this dissertation are focused on achieving two main goals: swarm keeping and swarm reconfiguration. The objectives of swarm keeping are to maintain bounded relative distances between spacecraft, prevent collisions between spacecraft, and minimize the propellant used by each spacecraft. Swarm reconfiguration requires the transfer of the swarm to a specific shape. Like with swarm keeping, minimizing the propellant used and preventing collisions are the main objectives. Additionally, the algorithms required for swarm keeping and swarm reconfiguration should be decentralized with respect to communication and computation so that they can be implemented on femtosats, which have limited hardware capabilities. The algorithms developed in this dissertation are concerned with swarms located in low Earth orbit. In these orbits, Earth oblateness and atmospheric drag have a significant effect on the relative motion of the swarm. The complicated dynamic environment of low Earth orbits further complicates the swarm-keeping and swarm-reconfiguration problems. To better develop and test these algorithms, a nonlinear, relative dynamic model with J2 and drag perturbations is developed. This model is used throughout this dissertation to validate the algorithms

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  11. Effects of arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Sanders, N. L.; Ellen, J. M., Jr.; Inouye, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the hazard associated with spacecraft charging and arcing on spacecraft systems is presented. A literature survey on arc discharge thresholds and characteristics was done and gaps in the data and requirements for additional experiments were identified. Calculations of coupling of arc discharges into typical spacecraft systems were made and the susceptibility of typical spacecraft to disruption by arc discharges was investigated. Design guidelines and recommended practices to reduce or eliminate the threat of malfunction and failures due to spacecraft charging/arcing were summarized.

  12. Interplanetary spacecraft design using solar electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, J. H.; Paul, G. M.

    1974-01-01

    Emphasis of the electric propulsion technology program is now on the application of solar electric propulsion to scientific missions. Candidate planetary, cometary, and geosynchronous missions are being studied. The object of this paper is to describe a basic spacecraft design proposed as the means to accomplish (1) a comet Encke slow flyby, (2) a comet Encke rendezvous, and (3) an out-of-the-ecliptic mission. The discussion includes design differences foreseen for the various missions and indicates those areas where spacecraft design commonality is possible. Particular emphasis is placed on a solar electric propulsion module design which permits an attractive degree of design inheritance from mission to mission.

  13. Martian Atmospheric Modeling of Scale Factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft.

  14. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  15. Dawn Spacecraft Reaction Control System Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Nakazono, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Dawn spacecraft mission is studying conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating two protoplanets remaining intact since their formations, Ceres and Vesta. Launch was in 2007. Ion propulsion is used to fly to and enter orbit around Vesta, depart Vesta and fly to Ceres, and enter orbit around Ceres. A conventional blowdown hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) is used to provide external torques for attitude control. Reaction wheel assemblies were intended to provide attitude control in most cases. However, the spacecraft experienced one, then two apparent failures of reaction wheels. Also, similar thrusters experienced degradation in a long life application on another spacecraft. Those factors led to RCS being operated in ways completely different than anticipated prior to launch. Numerous mitigations and developments needed to be implemented. The Vesta mission was fully successful. Even with the compromises necessary due to those anomalies, the Ceres mission is also projected to be feasible.

  16. Habitability design for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    Habitability is understood to mean those spacecraft design elements that involve a degree of comfort, quality or necessities to support man in space. These elements are environment, architecture, mobility, clothing, housekeeping, food and drink, personal hygiene, off-duty activities, each of which plays a substantial part in the success of a mission. Habitability design for past space flights is discussed relative to the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab spacecraft, with special emphasis on an examination of the Shuttle Orbiter cabin design from a habitability standpoint. Future projects must consider the duration and mission objectives to meet their habitability requirements. Larger ward rooms, improved sleeping quarters and more complete hygiene facilities must be provided for future prolonged space flights

  17. Radiation Environment Inside Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Patrick O'Neill, NASA Johnson Space Center, will present a detailed description of the radiation environment inside spacecraft. The free space (outside) solar and galactic cosmic ray and trapped Van Allen belt proton spectra are significantly modified as these ions propagate through various thicknesses of spacecraft structure and shielding material. In addition to energy loss, secondary ions are created as the ions interact with the structure materials. Nuclear interaction codes (FLUKA, GEANT4, HZTRAN, MCNPX, CEM03, and PHITS) transport free space spectra through different thicknesses of various materials. These "inside" energy spectra are then converted to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and dose rate - that's what's needed by electronics systems designers. Model predictions are compared to radiation measurements made by instruments such as the Intra-Vehicular Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (IV-CPDS) used inside the Space Station, Orion, and Space Shuttle.

  18. A programmable heater control circuit for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, D. D.; Owen, J. W.; Smith, D. A.; Lewter, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal control is accomplished for many components through use of multilayer insulation systems, electrical heaters, and radiator systems. The heaters are commanded to maintain component temperatures within design specifications. The programmable heater control circuit (PHCC) was designed to obtain an effective and efficient means of spacecraft thermal control. The hybrid circuit provides use of control instrumentation as temperature data, available to the spacecraft central data system, reprogramming capability of the local microprocessor during the spacecraft's mission, and the elimination of significant spacecraft wiring. The hybrid integrated circuit has a temperature sensing and conditioning circuit, a microprocessor, and a heater power and control circuit. The device is miniature and housed in a volume which allows physical integration with the component to be controlled. Applications might include alternate battery-powered logic-circuit configurations. A prototype unit with appropriate physical and functional interfaces was procured for testing. The physical functionality and the feasibility of fabrication of the hybrid integrated circuit were successfully verified. The remaining work to develop a flight-qualified device includes fabrication and testing of a Mil-certified part. An option for completing the PHCC flight qualification testing is to enter into a joint venture with industry.

  19. Simulator for Testing Spacecraft Separation Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Nick; Gaines, Joe; Bryan, Tom

    2006-01-01

    A report describes the main features of a system for testing pyrotechnic and mechanical devices used to separate spacecraft and modules of spacecraft during flight. The system includes a spacecraft simulator [also denoted a large mobility base (LMB)] equipped with air thrusters, sensors, and data-acquisition equipment. The spacecraft simulator floats on air bearings over an epoxy-covered concrete floor. This free-flotation arrangement enables simulation of motion in outer space in three degrees of freedom: translation along two orthogonal horizontal axes and rotation about a vertical axis. The system also includes a static stand. In one application, the system was used to test a bolt-retraction system (BRS) intended for separation of the lifting-body and deorbit-propulsion stages of the X- 38 spacecraft. The LMB was connected via the BRS to the static stand, then pyrotechnic devices that actuate the BRS were fired. The separation distance and acceleration were measured. The report cites a document, not yet published at the time of reporting the information for this article, that is said to present additional detailed information.

  20. Spacecraft Attitude Maneuver Planning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    A key enabling technology that leads to greater spacecraft autonomy is the capability to autonomously and optimally slew the spacecraft from and to different attitudes while operating under a number of celestial and dynamic constraints. The task of finding an attitude trajectory that meets all the constraints is a formidable one, in particular for orbiting or fly-by spacecraft where the constraints and initial and final conditions are of time-varying nature. This approach for attitude path planning makes full use of a priori constraint knowledge and is computationally tractable enough to be executed onboard a spacecraft. The approach is based on incorporating the constraints into a cost function and using a Genetic Algorithm to iteratively search for and optimize the solution. This results in a directed random search that explores a large part of the solution space while maintaining the knowledge of good solutions from iteration to iteration. A solution obtained this way may be used as is or as an initial solution to initialize additional deterministic optimization algorithms. A number of representative case examples for time-fixed and time-varying conditions yielded search times that are typically on the order of minutes, thus demonstrating the viability of this method. This approach is applicable to all deep space and planet Earth missions requiring greater spacecraft autonomy, and greatly facilitates navigation and science observation planning.