Science.gov

Sample records for special operations capable

  1. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  2. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Elon; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  3. 77 FR 29899 - Safety Zone; International Special Operations Forces Week Capability Exercise, Seddon Channel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Week Capability Exercise, Seddon Channel, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... Operations Forces Week Capability Exercise. The exercise is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, May 22, 2012... associated with airborne and waterborne activities occurring during the exercise. Persons and vessels...

  4. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  5. Operant Conditioning for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, Bonnie C.; Pedrini, D. T.

    The paper briefly explains operant conditioning as it pertains to special educators. Operant conditioning is thought to be an efficient method for modifying student behavior. Using the B. F. Skinner frame of reference, operant conditioning is said to include behavior modification and therapy, programed instruction, and computer assisted and…

  6. Dynamic Capability of an Operating Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and the US Department of Energy are currently developing a Stirling convertor for use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space missions. NASA Headquarters has recently identified the Stirling technology generator for potential use as the spacecraft power system for two of NASA's new missions, the Europa Orbiter and the Solar Probe missions (planned for launch in 2006 and 2007 respectively). As part of the development of this power system, a Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor was vibration tested at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center to verify its survivability and capability of withstanding the harsh dynamic environment typically seen by the spacecraft when it is launched by an expendable launch vehicle. The Technology Demonstration Convertor was fully operational (producing power) during the random vibration testing. The output power of the convertor and other convertor performance indicators were measured during the testing, and these results are discussed in this paper. Numerous accelerometers and force gauges also were used to provide information on the dynamic characteristics of the Technology Demonstration Convertor and as an indication of any possible damage due to the vibration. These measurements will also be discussed in this paper. The vibration testing of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor was extremely successful. The Technology Demonstration Convertor survived all its vibration testing with no structural damage or functional performance degradation. As a result of this testing, the Stirling convertor's capability to withstand vibration has been demonstrated, enabling its usage in future spacecraft power systems.

  7. Special problems and capabilities of high altitude lighter than air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, P. R.; Petrone, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Powered LTA vehicles have historically been limited to operations at low altitudes. Conditions exist which may enable a remotely piloted unit to be operated at an altitude near 70,000 feet. Such systems will be launched like high altitude balloons, operate like nonrigid airships, and have mission capabilities comparable to a low altitude stationary satellite. The limited lift available and the stratospheric environment impose special requirements on power systems, hull materials and payloads. Potential nonmilitary uses of the vehicle include communications relay, environmental monitoring and ship traffic control.

  8. Special Libraries: Planning and Operation; Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Betty H.

    An attempt is made in this report to combine a pragmatic how-to-do-it approach with suggestions for applying system analysis techniques for planning and operating a small special library or information center. A special library is defined as a library in a commercial, industrial, governmental or non-profit organization such as research…

  9. Comprehensive Performance Nutrition for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Karen A; Logan, Christi M; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) training, combat, and contingency operations are unique and demanding. Performance nutrition within the Department of Defense has emphasized that nutrition is relative to factors related to the desired outcome, which includes successful performance of mentally and physically demanding operations and missions of tactical and strategic importance, as well as nonoperational assignments. Discussed are operational, nonoperational, and patient categories that require different nutrition strategies to facilitate category-specific performance outcomes. Also presented are 10 major guidelines for a SOF comprehensive performance nutrition program, practical nutrition recommendations for Special Operators and medical providers, as well as resources for dietary supplement evaluation. Foundational health concepts, medical treatment, and task-specific performance factors should be considered when developing and systematically implementing a comprehensive SOF performance nutrition program. When tailored to organizational requirements, SOF unit- and culture-specific nutrition education and services can optimize individual Special Operator performance, overall unit readiness, and ultimately, mission success.

  10. Comprehensive Performance Nutrition for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Karen A; Logan, Christi M; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) training, combat, and contingency operations are unique and demanding. Performance nutrition within the Department of Defense has emphasized that nutrition is relative to factors related to the desired outcome, which includes successful performance of mentally and physically demanding operations and missions of tactical and strategic importance, as well as nonoperational assignments. Discussed are operational, nonoperational, and patient categories that require different nutrition strategies to facilitate category-specific performance outcomes. Also presented are 10 major guidelines for a SOF comprehensive performance nutrition program, practical nutrition recommendations for Special Operators and medical providers, as well as resources for dietary supplement evaluation. Foundational health concepts, medical treatment, and task-specific performance factors should be considered when developing and systematically implementing a comprehensive SOF performance nutrition program. When tailored to organizational requirements, SOF unit- and culture-specific nutrition education and services can optimize individual Special Operator performance, overall unit readiness, and ultimately, mission success. PMID:26630094

  11. A deployable telemedicine capability in support of humanitarian operations.

    PubMed

    Meade, Kenneth; Lam, David M

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes how a military concept for telemedicine support in humanitarian crisis, the Medical Command, Control, Communication and Telemedicine Special Medical Augmentation Team (MC3T SMART TEAM), was transitioned from a theoretical concept into a functioning, operational entity. The European Regional Medical Command (ERMC) MC3T SMART TEAM successfully tested its capabilities during a military training exercise with the 212th mobile army surgical hospital (MASH). This was followed by successful real-life telemedicine support missions during a planned humanitarian support mission in Africa and then an emergency disaster support mission in Pakistan. While on these missions, the SMART team provided access to the Internet and e-mail by means of limited bandwidth mobile satellite equipment, established a working telemedicine process by introducing the staff to the United States Army's "Army Knowledge Online (AKO) Remote Consultation Program," and established a successful connection of the 212th's digital radiography system to the "Tri-Service Global Encrypted Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and Teleradiology Network." PMID:17603836

  12. Manned Mars mission on-orbit operations FTS capabilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Frank G.; Jackson, Stewart W.

    1989-01-01

    This document presents an overview of the characteristics and capabilities of the flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), under development at GSFC at the time the report was prepared; the project has since been cancelled. The assessment was directed toward developing the FTS to enable assembly and servicing of the Mars vehicle at the space station; facilitate rendezvous, docking, and fluid transfer operations involving the Mars vehicle fuel tank; to perform strip-mining operations on the lunar/martian surfaces; and to construct a three-story shelter on the martian surface. The report considers the FTS' mechanical, electrical, thermal, and operational subsystems, as well as its proposed manipulator capabilities.

  13. Tactical lighting in special operations medicine: survey of current preferences.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Christopher J; Enzenauer, Robert W; Eisnor, Derek L; Laporta, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Success in Special Operations Forces medicine (SOFMED) is dependent on maximizing visual capability without compromising the provider or casualty position when under fire. There is no single ideal light source suitable for varied SOFMED environments. We present the results of an online survey of Special Operations Medical Operators in an attempt to determine strengths and weaknesses of current systems. There was no consensus ideal hue for tactical illumination. Most Operators own three or more lights, and most lights were not night vision compatible. Most importantly, nearly 25% of respondents reported that lighting issues contributed to a poor casualty outcome; conversely, a majority (50 of 74) stated their system helped prevent a poor outcome. Based on the results of this initial survey, we can affirm that the design and choice of lighting is critical to SOFMED success. We are conducting ongoing studies to further define ideal systems for tactical applications including field, aviation, and marine settings.

  14. Does the Health Maintenance Facility Provide Speciality Capabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey; Wurgler, James; Broadwell, Kim; Martin, William; Stiernberg, Charles M.; Bove, Alfred; Fromm, Rob; O'Neill, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) is capable of handling all minor illnesses, most moderate illnesses, and some major illnesses on board a space station. Its primary purpose should be to treat problems that are mission threatening, not life threatening. The HMF will have greater medical capabilities than those currently on Navy submarines. Much of the discussion in this document focuses on the possibilities of treating specific medical conditions on board a space station. The HMF will be limited to caring for critically ill patients for a few days, so a crew return vehicle will be important.

  15. Expanding Remote Science Operations Capabilities Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig A.; Dyer, Steven V.; Gibbs, Richard E., III; Cech, John G.

    2004-01-01

    EXPRESS Racks have been supporting payload science operations onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since April of 2001. EXPRESS is an acronym that stands for "EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station." This name reflects NASA's focus to simplify the process of manifesting experiments and maximizing scientific research capabilities by providing a robust, remotely operated payload support platform. The EXPRESS Rack System was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and built by The Boeing Company in Huntsville, Alabama. Eight EXPRESS racks were built and five are currently onboard the ISS supporting science operations. The design and development of the EXPRESS Rack System is a long story that has been documented in previous publications. This paper briefly describes the facilities used to develop and verify flight software, test operational capabilities. It then traces the advancements made in the operational capabilities of the EXPRESS Racks from the time they were launched on STS-100 through the present. The paper concludes with a description of potential enhancements that will make the EXPRESS racks one of the most advanced and capable remote science platforms ever developed.

  16. Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, Daniel R.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  17. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. 49.4 Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.4 Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. (a) If an...

  18. Disability, Capability, and Special Education: Towards a Capability-Based Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the article was to investigate the claim that the capability approach fares better with an understanding of disability as presented by the World Health Organization's "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health" (ICF) than by the social model, which has been promoted within disability studies. Scholars…

  19. LOTIS facility initial operational capabilities: flexible user interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Sheldon B.; Bell, Raymond M., Jr.; Borota, Stephen A.; Cuzner, Gregor J.; Cochrane, Andrew T.

    2010-10-01

    The Large Optical Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Sunnyvale, CA, has successfully reached Initial Operational Capability (IOC). LOTIS is designed for the verification and testing of optical systems. The facility consists of a large, temperature stabilized vacuum chamber that also functions as a class 10k cleanroom. Within this chamber and atop an advanced vibration-isolation bench are the 6.5 meter diameter LOTIS Collimator and Scene Generator, LOTIS alignment and support equipment. IOC included completion of the entire facility as well as operation of the LOTIS collimator in air. Wavefront properties of the collimator will be described as well as facility vibration isolation properties and turbulence levels within the collimator test chamber. User-specific test capabilities will also be addressed for two major areas of concern.

  20. Telescience testbedding: Technical and operational requirements for an international capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Arshad; Rasmussen, Daryl

    1990-10-01

    Clear and predetermined definitions of interoperability, data exchange, standards and commonality are identified as crucial in research and development work involving the participation of several countries. Such international cooperation includes payloads of several countries flown together on a platform developed by a different country. This environment necessitates that privacy and security also be ensured. Testbedding as a means of rapid prototyping new technologies and operational scenarios is outlined. Several NASA, European and Japanese programs employing this methodology to evaluate and develop telescience capabilities for space science users and mission operators are described. Collaborative testbeding by international participants can provide the focus for studying some of the key interface and operational issues for the space and ground information and communication systems of the 1990's. Existing NASA, ESA and NASDA testbeds, an architecture for interconnecting them, potential for joint utilization, and some management concepts for fostering collaboration are described.

  1. What Is the Purpose? Reflections on Inclusion and Special Education from a Capability Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2010-01-01

    This article investigated what the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum can contribute to the issue of inclusion as a new theoretical framework for special education. By posing the question: "What is the purpose of inclusion?", I have proposed to answer this query by investigating how the capability approach is able to…

  2. 32 CFR 707.8 - Special operations lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special operations lights. 707.8 Section 707.8... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.8 Special operations lights. Naval vessels may dispay, as a means of coordinating certain special operations, a revolving beam colored red, green,...

  3. Maintaining US Space Weather Capabilities after DMSP: Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Holeman, E. G.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft was launched in 1972; the last is scheduled to fly in 2020. Presently, there is no replacement for the space-weather monitoring sensors that now fly on DMSP. The present suite has provided comprehensive, long-term records that constitute a critical component of the US space weather corporate memory. Evolving operational needs and research accomplishments justify continued collection of space environmental data. Examples include measurements to: (1) Monitor the Dst index in real time as a driver of next-generation satellite drag models; (2) Quantify electromagnetic energy fluxes from deep space to the ionosphere/ thermosphere that heat neutrals, drive disturbance-dynamo winds and degrade precise orbit determinations; (3) Determine strengths of stormtime electric fields at high and low latitudes that lead to severe blackouts and spacecraft anomalies; (4) Specify variability of plasma density irregularities, equatorial plasma bubbles, and the Appleton anomaly to improve reliability of communication, navigation and surveillance links; (5) Characterize energetic particle fluxes responsible for auroral clutter and radar degradation; (6) Map regions of L-Band scintillation for robust GPS applications; and (7) Update the World Magnetic Field Model needed to maintain guidance system superiority. These examples illustrate the utility of continued space environment awareness. Comprehensive assessments of both operational requirements and research advances are needed to make informed selections of sensors and spacecraft that support future capabilities. A proposed sensor set and satellite constellation to provide the needed measurement capabilities will be presented.

  4. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D.

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  5. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn; Capps, Richard A.; Day, Kevin Brian

    2013-01-01

    After takeoff, aircraft must merge into en route (Center) airspace traffic flows which may be subject to constraints that create localized demandcapacity imbalances. When demand exceeds capacity Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) often use tactical departure scheduling to manage the flow of departures into the constrained Center traffic flow. Tactical departure scheduling usually involves use of a Call for Release (CFR) procedure wherein the Tower must call the Center TMC to coordinate a release time prior to allowing the flight to depart. In present-day operations release times are computed by the Center Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) decision support tool based upon manual estimates of aircraft ready time verbally communicated from the Tower to the Center. The TMA-computed release is verbally communicated from the Center back to the Tower where it is relayed to the Local controller as a release window that is typically three minutes wide. The Local controller will manage the departure to meet the coordinated release time window. Manual ready time prediction and verbal release time coordination are labor intensive and prone to inaccuracy. Also, use of release time windows adds uncertainty to the tactical departure process. Analysis of more than one million flights from January 2011 indicates that a significant number of tactically scheduled aircraft missed their en route slot due to ready time prediction uncertainty. Uncertainty in ready time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route flows and lead to lost throughput. Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) plans call for development of Tower automation systems capable of computing surface trajectory-based ready time estimates. NASA has developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept that uses this technology to improve tactical departure scheduling by automatically communicating surface trajectory-based ready time predictions to the

  6. 32 CFR 707.8 - Special operations lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special operations lights. 707.8 Section 707.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.8 Special operations lights. Naval vessels...

  7. 32 CFR 707.8 - Special operations lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special operations lights. 707.8 Section 707.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.8 Special operations lights. Naval vessels...

  8. 32 CFR 707.8 - Special operations lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special operations lights. 707.8 Section 707.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.8 Special operations lights. Naval vessels...

  9. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; (5) The mine shall not have a history of flammable-gas emission or accumulation, and the mined... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. 49.4 Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION,...

  10. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; (5) The mine shall not have a history of flammable-gas emission or accumulation, and the mined... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. 49.4 Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION,...

  11. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lined with combustible materials; (5) The mine shall not have a history of flammable-gas emission or... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. 49.4 Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION,...

  12. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions. 49.4 Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal...

  13. Remote sensing: special operations with unattended ground sensors -- perspectives and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul F.

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses the USSOCOM Special Operations Technology Objectives with regard to Unattended Ground Sensors. It covers capabilities, objectives and challenges. Special operations are conducted by highly trained, organized and equipped military and paramilitary forces to achieve military, political, economic or informational objectives by unconventional military means in hostile, denied, or politically sensitive areas. Political-military considerations frequently shape special operations, requiring clandestine, covert, or low visibility techniques and oversight at the national level. Special Reconnaissance, a core task, for USSOCOM are those surveillance activities conducted by SOF to obtain or verify by visual or other collection methods, information concerning the capabilities, intentions, and activities of enemy forces or to secure data concerning the meteorological, hydrographic, or geographic characteristics of a particular area. It includes target acquisition, area assessment and post-strike reconnaissance. This is a general overview; it does not discuss specific mission requirements or scenarios.

  14. 20 CFR 632.253 - Special operating provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Special operating provisions. Native American grantees shall: (a) Provide services to youths most in need... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special operating provisions. 632.253 Section... appropriate efforts to encourage educational agencies and post-secondary institutions to award academic...

  15. 20 CFR 632.253 - Special operating provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Special operating provisions. Native American grantees shall: (a) Provide services to youths most in need... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special operating provisions. 632.253 Section... appropriate efforts to encourage educational agencies and post-secondary institutions to award academic...

  16. 75 FR 61612 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... ellen.crum@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On November 30, 1999 (64 FR 66768), the FAA... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions AGENCY... amending its airports and locations special operating restrictions regulation to clarify a...

  17. Initial operating capability for the hypercluster parallel-processing test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gary L.; Blech, Richard A.; Quealy, Angela

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is investigating the benefits of parallel processing to applications in computational fluid and structural mechanics. To aid this investigation, NASA Lewis is developing the Hypercluster, a multi-architecture, parallel-processing test bed. The initial operating capability (IOC) being developed for the Hypercluster is described. The IOC will provide a user with a programming/operating environment that is interactive, responsive, and easy to use. The IOC effort includes the development of the Hypercluster Operating System (HYCLOPS). HYCLOPS runs in conjunction with a vendor-supplied disk operating system on a Front-End Processor (FEP) to provide interactive, run-time operations such as program loading, execution, memory editing, and data retrieval. Run-time libraries, that augment the FEP FORTRAN libraries, are being developed to support parallel and vector processing on the Hypercluster. Special utilities are being provided to enable passage of information about application programs and their mapping to the operating system. Communications between the FEP and the Hypercluster are being handled by dedicated processors, each running a Message-Passing Kernel, (MPK). A shared-memory interface allows rapid data exchange between HYCLOPS and the communications processors. Input/output handlers are built into the HYCLOPS-MPK interface, eliminating the need for the user to supply separate I/O support programs on the FEP.

  18. Evaluating the operations capability of Freedom's Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowizral, Henry A.

    1990-01-01

    Three areas of Data Management System (DMS) performance are examined: raw processor speed, the subjective speed of the Lynx OS X-Window system, and the operational capacity of the Runtime Object Database (RODB). It is concluded that the proposed processor will operate at its specified rate of speed and that the X-Window system operates within users' subjective needs. It is also concluded that the RODB cannot provide the required level of service, even with a two-order of magnitude (100 fold) improvement in speed.

  19. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance capabilities for physical protection of... (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.25 Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material...

  20. Implementing Strategic Planning Capabilities Within the Mars Relay Operations Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hy, Franklin; Gladden, Roy; Allard, Dan; Wallick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Since the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), Spirit and Opportunity, began their travels across the Martian surface in January of 2004, orbiting spacecraft such as the Mars 2001 Odyssey orbiter have relayed the majority of their collected scientific and operational data to and from Earth. From the beginning of those missions, it was evident that using orbiters to relay data to and from the surface of Mars was a vastly more efficient communications strategy in terms of power consumption and bandwidth compared to direct-to-Earth means. However, the coordination between the various spacecraft, which are largely managed independently and on differing commanding timelines, has always proven to be a challenge. Until recently, the ground operators of all these spacecraft have coordinated the movement of data through this network using a collection of ad hoc human interfaces and various, independent software tools. The Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS) has been developed to manage the evolving needs of the Mars relay network, and specifically to standardize and integrate the relay planning and coordination data into a centralized infrastructure. This paper explores the journey of developing the MaROS system, from inception to delivery and acceptance by the Mars mission users.

  1. The MMS Science Data Center. Operations, Capabilities, and Data Availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristopher; Pankratz, Chris; Giles, Barbara; Kokkonen, Kim; Putnam, Brian; Schafer, Corey; Baker, Dan; Burch, Jim

    2016-04-01

    On September 1, 2015 the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) constellation of satellites completed their six-month commissioning period and began collecting data under nominal conditions. Science operations for the mission are conducted at the Science Operations Center (SOC) at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA. The Science Data Center (SDC) is a component of the SOC responsible for the data production, management, distribution, archiving, and visualization of the data from the Solving Magnetospheric Acceleration, Reconnection, and Turbulence (SMART) instrument package on board the spacecraft. The mission collects several gigabytes of particle and field data per day, but the constraints on download volumes require efficient tools to manage the selection, transmission, and analysis of data to determine the highest value science data to downlink. This is the Scientist-in-the-Loop (SITL) program and is a critical piece of the MMS science data operations. As of March 2016, MMS science data is available to the entire science community. This includes both the survey data as well as the ultra-high resolution burst data downlinked through the SITL process. This presentation will explain the data and demonstrate the tools available to the community via the SDC so as to encourage as many scientists as possible to look at the wealth of magnetospheric data being produced and made available from MMS.

  2. How Does the Capability Approach Address Current Issues in Special Educational Needs, Disability and Inclusive Education Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwich, Brahm

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to examine what the capability approach has to offer to the field of special needs and inclusive education. Several key questions are addressed: can the capability approach replace the language of needs and rights; whether the capability approach can address key issues in the field of disabilities and difficulties in education and…

  3. Developing physical capability standards that are predictive of success on Special Forces selection courses.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew P; Orr, Robin M; Billing, Daniel C

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to develop minimum standards for physical capability assessments (vertical jump, sit and reach, push-ups, seven-stage sit-ups, heaves, agility, 20-m shuttle run, loaded 5-km pack march, and 400-m swim) that candidates must pass before they can commence Australian Army Special Forces (SF) selection courses. Soldiers (Part A: n = 104; Part B: n = 92) completed the physical capability assessments before commencing a SF selection course. At the beginning of these selection courses, participants attempted two barrier assessments (3.2-km battle run and 20-km march). Statistical analysis revealed several physical capability assessments were associated with performance on the barrier assessments and selection course outcome (Part A); however, these statistical models were unable to correctly classify all candidates as likely to pass or fail the selection course. Alternatively, manual analysis identified a combination of physical capability standards that correctly classified 14% to 18% of candidates likely to fail, without excluding any candidates able to pass (Part A). The standards were applied and refined through Part B and included completing the 5-km pack march in ≤45:45 minutes : seconds, achieving ≥level five on the sit-up test, or completing ≥66 push-ups. Implementation of these standards may reduce attrition rates and enhance the efficiency of the SF recruitment process.

  4. Implementing Strategic Planning Capabilities Within the Mars Relay Operations Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hy, Franklin

    2011-01-01

    Throughout this development and deployment process we have followed a few guiding principles: (1) Ensure ubiquitous access through ReSTful and web interfaces; (2) Design a system that is mission and even planet agnostic so that future missions may be added with little hassle, and the system itself may be redeployed for other planetary relay networks; (3) Accept constant input and feedback between mission operators and the development team to ensure that there is a useful product that may be used for years to come.

  5. The MMS Science Data Center: Operations, Capabilities, and Resource.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Pankratz, C. K.; Giles, B. L.; Kokkonen, K.; Putnam, B.; Schafer, C.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) constellation of satellites completed their six month commissioning period in August, 2015 and began science operations. Science operations for the Solving Magnetospheric Acceleration, Reconnection, and Turbulence (SMART) instrument package occur at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The Science Data Center (SDC) at LASP is responsible for the data production, management, distribution, and archiving of the data received. The mission will collect several gigabytes per day of particles and field data. Management of these data requires effective selection, transmission, analysis, and storage of data in the ground segment of the mission, including efficient distribution paths to enable the science community to answer the key questions regarding magnetic reconnection. Due to the constraints on download volume, this includes the Scientist-in-the-Loop program that identifies high-value science data needed to answer the outstanding questions of magnetic reconnection. Of particular interest to the community is the tools and associated website we have developed to provide convenient access to the data, first by the mission science team and, beginning March 1, 2016, by the entire community. This presentation will demonstrate the data and tools available to the community via the SDC and discuss the technologies we chose and lessons learned.

  6. The Relationship Between of Manufacturing Flexibility, Innovation Capability, and Operational Performance in Indonesian Manufacturing SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, U. S.; Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between manufacturing flexibility competence and operational performance with technological innovation capability as mediator variables. A survey method was applied to collect data pertaining to the variables being investigated. The findings indicated that manufacturing flexibility competence is positively associated with technological innovation capability and operational performance. The findings also suggested that technological innovation capability types mediated positively to the operational performance implication of manufacturing flexibility competence. This implies that manufacturing organizations pursuing manufacturing flexibility competence need to develop technological innovation capability in obtaining a high operational performance.

  7. 36 CFR 251.122 - Historical operator special use authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... use authorizations. 251.122 Section 251.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.122 Historical operator special use authorizations. (a) A historical operator has the right to continue to provide...

  8. 36 CFR 251.122 - Historical operator special use authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... use authorizations. 251.122 Section 251.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.122 Historical operator special use authorizations. (a) A historical operator has the right to continue to provide...

  9. 36 CFR 251.122 - Historical operator special use authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... use authorizations. 251.122 Section 251.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.122 Historical operator special use authorizations. (a) A historical operator has the right to continue to provide...

  10. 36 CFR 251.122 - Historical operator special use authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... use authorizations. 251.122 Section 251.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.122 Historical operator special use authorizations. (a) A historical operator has the right to continue to provide...

  11. 36 CFR 251.122 - Historical operator special use authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... use authorizations. 251.122 Section 251.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.122 Historical operator special use authorizations. (a) A historical operator has the right to continue to provide...

  12. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-21T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.17Ad-21T Section 240.17Ad-21T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Company Rules § 240.17Ad-21T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section...

  13. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-21T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.17Ad-21T Section 240.17Ad-21T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Organizations § 240.17Ad-21T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies...

  14. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-21T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.17Ad-21T Section 240.17Ad-21T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Company Rules § 240.17Ad-21T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section...

  15. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-21T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.17Ad-21T Section 240.17Ad-21T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Company Rules § 240.17Ad-21T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section...

  16. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-21T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.17Ad-21T Section 240.17Ad-21T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Company Rules § 240.17Ad-21T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section...

  17. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Alaska Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 97 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97—Special Operating.... Expiration date This Special Federal Aviation Regulation will remain in effect until rescinded....

  18. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Alaska Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 97 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97—Special Operating.... Expiration date This Special Federal Aviation Regulation will remain in effect until rescinded....

  19. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Alaska Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 97 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97—Special Operating... covered under this SFAR. Section 5. Expiration date This Special Federal Aviation Regulation will...

  20. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Alaska Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 97 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97—Special Operating.... Expiration date This Special Federal Aviation Regulation will remain in effect until rescinded....

  1. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Alaska Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 97 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97—Special Operating.... Expiration date This Special Federal Aviation Regulation will remain in effect until rescinded....

  2. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... strategic special nuclear material in transit. 73.25 Section 73.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Transit § 73.25 Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit. (a) To meet the general performance objective and requirements of § 73.20 an in-transit...

  3. 46 CFR 167.30-10 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SCHOOL SHIPS Repairs or Alterations § 167.30-10 Special operating requirements. Inspection and testing... requirements, as may be deemed necessary to maintain, insofar as can reasonably be done, the safe conditions in... certifications as considered required. Such qualifications and requirements shall include precautions...

  4. 46 CFR 167.30-10 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SCHOOL SHIPS Repairs or Alterations § 167.30-10 Special operating requirements. Inspection and testing... requirements, as may be deemed necessary to maintain, insofar as can reasonably be done, the safe conditions in... certifications as considered required. Such qualifications and requirements shall include precautions...

  5. 46 CFR 167.30-10 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SCHOOL SHIPS Repairs or Alterations § 167.30-10 Special operating requirements. Inspection and testing... requirements, as may be deemed necessary to maintain, insofar as can reasonably be done, the safe conditions in... certifications as considered required. Such qualifications and requirements shall include precautions...

  6. Surgeon specialization and operative mortality in United States: retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Maurice; Cutler, David M; Birkmeyer, John D; Chandra, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure the association between a surgeon’s degree of specialization in a specific procedure and patient mortality. Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare data. Setting US patients aged 66 or older enrolled in traditional fee for service Medicare. Participants 25 152 US surgeons who performed one of eight procedures (carotid endarterectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, lung resection, cystectomy, pancreatic resection, or esophagectomy) on 695 987 patients in 2008-13. Main outcome measure Relative risk reduction in risk adjusted and volume adjusted 30 day operative mortality between surgeons in the bottom quarter and top quarter of surgeon specialization (defined as the number of times the surgeon performed the specific procedure divided by his/her total operative volume across all procedures). Results For all four cardiovascular procedures and two out of four cancer resections, a surgeon’s degree of specialization was a significant predictor of operative mortality independent of the number of times he or she performed that procedure: carotid endarterectomy (relative risk reduction between bottom and top quarter of surgeons 28%, 95% confidence interval 0% to 48%); coronary artery bypass grafting (15%, 4% to 25%); valve replacement (46%, 37% to 53%); abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (42%, 29% to 53%); lung resection (28%, 5% to 46%); and cystectomy (41%, 8% to 63%). In five procedures (carotid endarterectomy, valve replacement, lung resection, cystectomy, and esophagectomy), the relative risk reduction from surgeon specialization was greater than that from surgeon volume for that specific procedure. Furthermore, surgeon specialization accounted for 9% (coronary artery bypass grafting) to 100% (cystectomy) of the relative risk reduction otherwise attributable to volume in that specific procedure. Conclusion For several common procedures, surgeon specialization was an important predictor

  7. Desert Rats 2011 Mission Simulation: Effects of Microgravity Operational Modes on Fields Geology Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Hurtado, J. M., Jr.; Meyer, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) is a multi-year series of NASA tests that deploy planetary surface hardware and exercise mission and science operations in difficult conditions to advance human and robotic exploration capabilities. DRATS 2011 (Aug. 30-Sept. 9, 2011) tested strategies for human exploration of microgravity targets such as near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Here we report the crew perspective on the impact of simulated microgravity operations on our capability to conduct field geology.

  8. Demonstration of Four Operating Capabilities to Enable a Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Brooks, Frederick M.

    2005-01-01

    The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) project has been a five-year effort fostering research and development that could lead to the transformation of our country s air transportation system. It has become evident that our commercial air transportation system is reaching its peak in terms of capacity, with numerous delays in the system and the demand keeps steadily increasing. The SATS vision is to increase mobility in our nation s transportation system by expanding access to more than 3400 small community airports that are currently under-utilized. The SATS project has focused its efforts on four key operating capabilities that have addressed new emerging technologies and procedures to pave the way for a new way of air travel. The four key operating capabilities are: Higher Volume Operations at Non-Towered/Non-Radar Airports, En Route Procedures and Systems for Integrated Fleet Operations, Lower Landing Minimums at Minimally Equipped Landing Facilities, and Increased Single Pilot Performance. These four capabilities are key to enabling low-cost, on-demand, point-to-point transportation of goods and passengers utilizing small aircraft operating from small airports. The focus of this paper is to discuss the technical and operational feasibility of the four operating capabilities and demonstrate how they can enable a small aircraft transportation system.

  9. JELC-LITE: Unconventional Instructional Design for Special Operations Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Current special operations staff training is based on the Joint Event Life Cycle (JELC). It addresses operational level tasks in multi-week, live military exercises which are planned over a 12 to 18 month timeframe. As the military experiences changing global mission sets, shorter training events using distributed technologies will increasingly be needed to augment traditional training. JELC-Lite is a new approach for providing relevant training between large scale exercises. This new streamlined, responsive training model uses distributed and virtualized training technologies to establish simulated scenarios. It keeps proficiency levels closer to optimal levels -- thereby reducing the performance degradation inherent in periodic training. It can be delivered to military as well as under-reached interagency groups to facilitate agile, repetitive training events. JELC-Lite is described by four phases paralleling the JELC, differing mostly in scope and scale. It has been successfully used with a Theater Special Operations Command and fits well within the current environment of reduced personnel and financial resources.

  10. Rationale for Use of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Special Operations Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vokoun, Edward Scott

    2015-01-01

    Use of intravenous acetaminophen has increased recently as an opioid-sparing strategy for patients undergoing major surgery. Its characteristics and efficacy suggest that it would a useful adjunct in combat trauma medicine. This article reviews those characteristics, which include rapid onset, high peak plasma concentration, and favorable side-effect profile. Also discussed is the hepatotoxicity risk of acetaminophen in a combat trauma patient. It concludes that intravenous acetaminophen should be considered as an addition to the US Special Operations Command Tactical Trauma Protocols and supplied to medics for use in field care.

  11. Special Operations Forces (SOF) technical analysis and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1987-08-31

    In response to Task Order 001, Los Alamos National Laboratory Contract 9-L5H-1508P-1, Betac Corporation is pleased to provide ten quick-response, short-term analytical papers in support of Low Intensity Conflict (LIC) and Special Operations (SO). The papers are study methodologies which provide background, baseline, concepts, approaches, and recommendations in the mission areas identified in the Statement of Work. Although the Statement of Work specifies only nine papers, a tenth paper has been included addressing Command Relationships, since this subject affects all other topics and is of critical importance to USCINCSOC in establishing the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). Each paper addresses the feasibility of further effort in each area of interest. The ten papers address: (1) mission support systems; (2) research, development, and acquisition; (3) headquarters equipment; (4) C3I architecture; (5) intelligence dissemination; (6) intelligence collection management; (7) intelligence support to SOF targeting; (8) joint mission area analysis (JMAA); (9) joint SOF master plan; and (10) command relationships.

  12. A Capability Perspective on Impairment, Disability and Special Needs: Towards Social Justice in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzi, Lorella

    2005-01-01

    This article presents elements of a capability perspective on impairment and disability and develops in connection with it a multidimensional and relational account of disability. It suggests how a capability perspective provides new and fundamental insights into the conceptualization of impairment and disability, and in doing this, resolves the…

  13. Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Fring, Andreas; Guenther, Uwe; Jones, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators. The main motivation behind this special issue is to gather together recent results, developments and open problems in this rapidly evolving field of research in a single comprehensive volume. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will be open to all contributions containing new results on non-Hermitian theories which are explicitly PT-symmetric and/or pseudo-Hermitian or quasi-Hermitian. The main novelties in the past years in this area have been many experimental observations, realizations, and applications of PT symmetric Hamiltonians in optics and microwave cavities. We especially invite contributions on the theoretical interpretations of these recent PT-symmetric experiments and on theoretical proposals for new experiments. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Carl Bender, Andreas Fring, Uwe Guenther and Hugh Jones. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: spectral problems novel properties of complex optical potentials PT-symmetry related threshold lasers and spectral singularities construction of metric operators scattering theory supersymmetric theories Lie algebraic and Krein-space methods random matrix models classical and semi-classical models exceptional points in model systems operator theoretic approaches microwave cavities aspects of integrability and exact solvability field theories with indefinite metric All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 March 2012. This deadline will allow the

  14. Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Fring, Andreas; Guenther, Uwe; Jones, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators. The main motivation behind this special issue is to gather together recent results, developments and open problems in this rapidly evolving field of research in a single comprehensive volume. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will be open to all contributions containing new results on non-Hermitian theories which are explicitly PT-symmetric and/or pseudo-Hermitian or quasi-Hermitian. The main novelties in the past years in this area have been many experimental observations, realizations, and applications of PT symmetric Hamiltonians in optics and microwave cavities. We especially invite contributions on the theoretical interpretations of these recent PT-symmetric experiments and on theoretical proposals for new experiments. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Carl Bender, Andreas Fring, Uwe Guenther and Hugh Jones. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: spectral problems novel properties of complex optical potentials PT-symmetry related threshold lasers and spectral singularities construction of metric operators scattering theory supersymmetric theories Lie algebraic and Krein-space methods random matrix models classical and semi-classical models exceptional points in model systems operator theoretic approaches microwave cavities aspects of integrability and exact solvability field theories with indefinite metric All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 March 2012. This deadline will allow the

  15. Medical capability team: the clinical microsystem for combat healthcare delivery in counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Clark, Susz; Van Steenvort, Jon K

    2008-01-01

    Today's operational environment in the support of counterinsurgency operations requires greater tactical and operational flexibility and diverse medical capabilities. The skills and organizations required for full spectrum medical operations are different from those of the past. Combat healthcare demands agility and the capacity for rapid change in clinical systems and processes to better support the counterinsurgency environment. This article proposes the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) develop and implement the medical capability team (MCT) for combat healthcare delivery. It discusses using the concept of the brigade combat team to develop medical capability teams as the unit of effectiveness to transform frontline care; provides a theoretical overview of the MCT as a "clinical microsystem"; discusses MCT leadership, training, and organizational support, and the deployment and employment of the MCT in a counterinsurgency environment. Additionally, this article proposes that the AMEDD initiate the development of an AMEDD Combat Training Center of Excellence to train and validate the MCTs. The complexity of combat healthcare demands an agile and campaign quality AMEDD with joint expeditionary capability in order to promote the best patient outcomes in a counterinsurgency environment.

  16. Entirely passive heat-pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, D.R.

    1981-02-11

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  17. Special Challenges in the Operation of International Monitoring System Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastowka, L.; Daly, T.; Anichenko, A.; Galindo, M.; Villagran-Herrera, M.; Mori, S.; Malakhova, M.; Otsuka, R.; Stangel, H.

    2007-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) is a global treaty that bans nuclear test explosions in any environment. The treaty was opened for signature on 24 September 1996. To date, 177 countries have signed the treaty and 138 have ratified it. Among those having ratified are 34 of 44 required for the treaty to enter into force. The three pillars that support the treaty are the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect test explosions, the International Data Centre (IDC) to produce and distribute both automatic and analyst reviewed data products, and On Site Inspection (OSI) to clarify whether a detected event was, in fact, a nuclear test explosion. The IMS is a globally distributed network of four technologies. Three wave-form technologies are designed to detect the waves produced by nuclear test explosions underground, in the air, and underwater. A radionuclide particulate network and noble gas experiment are designed detect radioactive isotopes generated by nuclear explosions. The diverse nature of the network presents a number of special challenges to the Network and Data System Operations Section of the IDC (NDSO), the group responsible for the effective operation of the IMS. One challenge faced by NDSO is the diversity of the equipment and software suppliers. There are currently many companies supplying equipment and technology for the 321 station IMS. This poses problems of consistency in operator training and in the applications of standard operating procedures. One solution to this problem was the development of the Standard Station Interface (SSI). The extensive geographical distribution of the stations presents another, challenge to effective IMS operations. The IMS includes stations in such remote locations as Soccorro Island, Tristan de Cunha, and the Antarctic and Sub-antarctic regions. Each of these locations presents its own set of challenges in terms of environment, logistics, and availability of qualified personnel.

  18. Underwater application of nasal decongestants: method for special operations.

    PubMed

    Mutzbauer, T S; Mueller, P H; Sigg, O; Tetzlaff, K; Neubauer, B

    2000-11-01

    A simple method of emergency underwater application of a nasal decongestant in divers to prevent diving-related accidents or even fatalities attributable to sequelae of middle-ear and sinus barotrauma of ascent was evaluated. Eleven military divers had to inject 1 mL of 0.02% methylene blue into a central venous catheter after having inserted the tip between their upper lip and the mask at 1 m depth in a pool. After injection, the head had to be reclined. Blue liquid flowing from a diver's nostril and a "bitter" taste sensation reported immediately after surfacing indicated successful application. All divers were observed to have had blue liquid flowing from the nostril of application, and one diver could not describe the taste. This method of underwater application of nasal decongestants may be useful for emergency prevention in divers, especially during covert operations. Underwater availability of the system in a special kit carried by divers would be required.

  19. 46 CFR 153.1002 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. 153.1002 Section 153.1002 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1002 Special operating requirements for heat...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1002 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. 153.1002 Section 153.1002 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1002 Special operating requirements for heat...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1002 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. 153.1002 Section 153.1002 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1002 Special operating requirements for heat...

  2. Primer for Charter School Operators: Special Education Requirements and Including Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Sandra Hopfengardner; Ahearn, Eileen M.; Giovannetti, Elizabeth A.; Lange, Cheryl M.; Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide operators with implementation and operational technical assistance related to special education in charter schools. Special education is a very complicated component of public education and providing operators with technical assistance regarding special education is particularly challenging. This primer…

  3. Overview of the Small Aircraft Transportation System Project Four Enabling Operating Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Brooks, Frederick M.; Johnson, Sally C.

    2005-01-01

    It has become evident that our commercial air transportation system is reaching its peak in terms of capacity, with numerous delays in the system and the demand still steadily increasing. NASA, FAA, and the National Consortium for Aviation Mobility (NCAM) have partnered to aid in increasing the mobility throughout the United States through the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) project. The SATS project has been a five-year effort to provide the technical and economic basis for further national investment and policy decisions to support a small aircraft transportation system. The SATS vision is to enable people and goods to have the convenience of on-demand point-to-point travel, anywhere, anytime for both personal and business travel. This vision can be obtained by expanding near all-weather access to more than 3,400 small community airports that are currently under-utilized throughout the United States. SATS has focused its efforts on four key operating capabilities that have addressed new emerging technologies, procedures, and concepts to pave the way for small aircraft to operate in nearly all weather conditions at virtually any runway in the United States. These four key operating capabilities are: Higher Volume Operations at Non-Towered/Non-Radar Airports, En Route Procedures and Systems for Integrated Fleet Operations, Lower Landing Minimums at Minimally Equipped Landing Facilities, and Increased Single Pilot Performance. The SATS project culminated with the 2005 SATS Public Demonstration in Danville, Virginia on June 5th-7th, by showcasing the accomplishments achieved throughout the project and demonstrating that a small aircraft transportation system could be viable. The technologies, procedures, and concepts were successfully demonstrated to show that they were safe, effective, and affordable for small aircraft in near all weather conditions. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of the technical and operational feasibility of the

  4. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all

  5. Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) Initial Operating Capability (IOC) documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dana P.

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) software package is described. TRACS offers supplemental tools for the analysis, control, and interchange of project requirements. This package provides the fundamental capability to analyze and control requirements, serves a focal point for project requirements, and integrates a system that supports efficient and consistent operations. TRACS uses relational data base technology (ORACLE) in a stand alone or in a distributed environment that can be used to coordinate the activities required to support a project through its entire life cycle. TRACS uses a set of keyword and mouse driven screens (HyperCard) which imposes adherence through a controlled user interface. The user interface provides an interactive capability to interrogate the data base and to display or print project requirement information. TRACS has a limited report capability, but can be extended with PostScript conventions.

  6. Detection of Special Operations Forces Using Night Vision Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.M.

    2001-10-22

    Night vision devices, such image intensifiers and infrared imagers, are readily available to a host of nations, organizations, and individuals through international commerce. Once the trademark of special operations units, these devices are widely advertised to ''turn night into day''. In truth, they cannot accomplish this formidable task, but they do offer impressive enhancement of vision in limited light scenarios through electronically generated images. Image intensifiers and infrared imagers are both electronic devices for enhancing vision in the dark. However, each is based upon a totally different physical phenomenon. Image intensifiers amplify the available light energy whereas infrared imagers detect the thermal energy radiated from all objects. Because of this, each device operates from energy which is present in a different portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This leads to differences in the ability of each device to detect and/or identify objects. This report is a compilation of the available information on both state-of-the-art image intensifiers and infrared imagers. Image intensifiers developed in the United States, as well as some foreign made image intensifiers, are discussed. Image intensifiers are categorized according to their spectral response and sensitivity using the nomenclature of GEN I, GEN II, and GEN III. As the first generation of image intensifiers, GEN I, were large and of limited performance, this report will deal with only GEN II and GEN III equipment. Infrared imagers are generally categorized according to their spectral response, sensor materials, and related sensor operating temperature using the nomenclature Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) Cooled and Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) Uncooled. MWIR Cooled refers to infrared imagers which operate in the 3 to 5 {micro}m wavelength electromagnetic spectral region and require either mechanical or thermoelectric coolers to keep the sensors operating at 77 K. LWIR Uncooled refers

  7. Building a computer-aided design capability using a standard time share operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes how an integrated system of engineering computer programs can be built using a standard commercially available operating system. The discussion opens with an outline of the auxiliary functions that an operating system can perform for a team of engineers involved in a large and complex task. An example of a specific integrated system is provided to explain how the standard operating system features can be used to organize the programs into a simple and inexpensive but effective system. Applications to an aircraft structural design study are discussed to illustrate the use of an integrated system as a flexible and efficient engineering tool. The discussion concludes with an engineer's assessment of an operating system's capabilities and desirable improvements.

  8. A Co-operative Approach to Training Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karagianis, L. D.; Nesbit, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    This article describes Memorial University's overseas campus program in Harlow, Essex, where special education teacher trainees spend 13 weeks gaining insight into British methods of special education through lecture-seminar courses, practicums in local schools, and field trips. Three field trips to special schools are discussed in detail. (SJL)

  9. Optimization of the terrain following radar flight cues in special operations aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garman, Patrick J.; Trang, Jeff A.

    1995-05-01

    Over the past 18 months the Army has been developing a terrain following capability in it's next generation special operations aircraft (SOA), the MH-60K and the MH-47E. As two experimental test pilots assigned to the Army's Airworthiness Qualification Test Directorate of the US Army Aviation Technical Test Center, we would like to convey the role that human factors has played in the development of the MMR for terrain following operations in the SOA. In the MH-60K, the pilot remains the interface between the aircraft, via the flight controls and the processed radar data, and the flight director cues. The presentation of the processed radar data to the pilot significantly affects the overall system performance, and is directly driven by the way humans see, process, and react to stimuli. Our development has been centered around the optimization of this man-machine interface.

  10. 14 CFR 93.317 - Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew. 93.317 Section 93.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand...

  11. 14 CFR 93.317 - Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew. 93.317 Section 93.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand...

  12. 14 CFR 93.315 - Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations. 93.315 Section 93.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity...

  13. 14 CFR 93.317 - Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew. 93.317 Section 93.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand...

  14. 14 CFR 93.315 - Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations. 93.315 Section 93.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity...

  15. 14 CFR 93.315 - Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations. 93.315 Section 93.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity...

  16. 14 CFR 93.315 - Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations. 93.315 Section 93.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity...

  17. 14 CFR 93.317 - Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew. 93.317 Section 93.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand...

  18. 14 CFR 93.317 - Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commercial Special Flight Rules Area operation curfew. 93.317 Section 93.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand...

  19. 14 CFR 93.315 - Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for commercial Special Flight Rules Area operations. 93.315 Section 93.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-81 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-81 Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. When table 151.05 refers to...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-81 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-81 Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. When table 151.05 refers to...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-81 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-81 Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. When table 151.05 refers to...

  3. A report on training equipment enhancements for the U.S. Special Operations Command

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Training support systems - including devices, simulators and simulations - significantly improve training. Of course this is important for all military units. But for Special Operations Forces, such improvements are critical. Special Operations Forces must be prepared to operate in the most difficult, least forgiving of environments and do it right on the first try. The objective of this project is to report on the latest state-of-the-art training devices and systems which can enhance the training of Special Operations Forces.

  4. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  5. Results from Operational Testing of the Siemens Smart Grid-Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2015-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Siemens smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Siemens for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Siemens smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  6. Acoustic facilities for human factors research at NASA Langley Research Center: Description and operational capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    A number of facilities were developed which provide a unique test capability for psychoacoustics and related human factors research. The design philosophy, physical layouts, dimensions, construction features, operating capabilities, and example applications for these facilities are described. In the exterior effects room, human subjects are exposed to the types of noises that are experienced outdoors, and in the interior effects room, subjects are exposed to the types of noises and noise-induced vibrations that are experience indoors. Subjects are also exposed to noises in an echo-free environment in the anechoic listening room. An aircraft noise synthesis system, which simulates aircraft flyover noise at an observer position on the ground, is used in conjunction with these three rooms. The passenger ride quality apparatus, a device for studying passenger response to noise and vibration in aircraft, or in other vehicles, is described.

  7. SSA Building Blocks - Transforming Your Data and Applications into Operational Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, D.; Hawthorne, Shayn, L.; Higgins, J.

    The Electronic System Center's 850 Electronic Systems Group (ELSG) is currently using a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to rapidly create net-centric experimental prototypes. This SOA has been utilized effectively across diverse mission areas, such as global air operations and rapid sensor tasking for improved space event management. The 850 ELSG has deployed a working, accredited, SOA on the SIPRNET and provided real-time space information to five separate distributed operations centers. The 850 ELSG has learned first-hand the power of SOAs for integrating DoD and non-DoD SSA data in a rapid and agile manner, allowing capabilities to be fielded and sensors to be integrated in weeks instead of months. This opens a world of opportunity to integrate University data and experimental or proof-of-concept data with sensitive sensors and sources to support developing an array of SSA products for approved users in and outside of the space community. This paper will identify how new capabilities can be proactively developed to rapidly answer critical needs when SOA methodologies are employed and identifies the operational utility and the far-reaching benefits realized by implementing a service-oriented architecture. We offer a new paradigm for how data and application producer's contributions are presented for the rest of the community to leverage.

  8. History of POIC Capabilities and Limitations to Conduct International Space Station Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Rebecca; Horvath, Tim; Morris, Denise; Willis, Emily; Stacy, Lamar; Shell, Mike; Faust, Mark; Norwood, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Payload science operations on the International Space Station (ISS) have been conducted continuously twenty-four hours per day, 365 days a year beginning February, 2001 and continuing through present day. The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), located at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, has been a leader in integrating and managing NASA distributed payload operations. The ability to conduct science operations is a delicate balance of crew time, onboard vehicle resources, hardware up-mass to the vehicle, and ground based flight control team manpower. Over the span of the last ten years, the POIC flight control team size, function, and structure has been modified several times commensurate with the capabilities and limitations of the ISS program. As the ISS vehicle has been expanded and its systems changed throughout the assembly process, the resources available to conduct science and research have also changed. Likewise, as ISS program financial resources have demanded more efficiency from organizations across the program, utilization organizations have also had to adjust their functionality and structure to adapt accordingly. The POIC has responded to these often difficult challenges by adapting our team concept to maximize science research return within the utilization allocations and vehicle limitations that existed at the time. In some cases, the ISS and systems limitations became the limiting factor in conducting science. In other cases, the POIC structure and flight control team size were the limiting factors, so other constraints had to be put into place to assure successful science operations within the capabilities of the POIC. This paper will present the POIC flight control team organizational changes responding to significant events of the ISS and Shuttle programs.

  9. Essays on strategy: hostage rescue planning; maritime theater nuclear capability; strategic psychological operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, R.F.; Thomas, R.E.; Kriesel, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The essays in the volume won recognition in the 1984 Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategy Essay Competition. The volume contains three essays. The author of the first essay considers the requirements for successful planning of hostage rescues, specifically reviewing the Son Tay raid, the Mayaguez crisis, the Entebbe rescue, and the Iranian hostage rescue attempt. The author of the second essay looks at the US Navy's capability for maritime theater nuclear warfare, identifying problems and recommending improvements. The author of the third essay finds the United States lacking a national-level mechanism for coordinating military psychological operations and proposes a way to remedy the problem.

  10. Injury epidemiology of U.S. Army Special Operations forces.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Lovalekar, Mita T; Keenan, Karen A; Bozich, Anthony J; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Kane, Shawn F; Benson, Peter J; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries have long been a problem in general purpose forces, yet anecdotal evidence provided by medical, human performance, and training leadership suggests musculoskeletal injuries are also a readiness impediment to Special Operations Forces (SOF). The purpose of this study was to describe the injury epidemiology of SOF utilizing self-reported injury histories. Data were collected on 106 SOF (age: 31.7 ± 5.3 years, height: 179.0 ± 5.5 cm, mass: 85.9 ± 10.9 kg) for 1 year before the date of laboratory testing and filtered for total injuries and those with the potential to be preventable based on injury type, activity, and mechanism. The frequency of musculoskeletal injuries was 24.5 injuries per 100 subjects per year for total injuries and 18.9 injuries per 100 subjects per year for preventable injuries. The incidence of musculoskeletal injuries was 20.8 injured subjects per 100 subjects per year for total injuries and 16.0 injured subjects per 100 subjects per year for preventable injuries. Preventable musculoskeletal injuries comprised 76.9% of total injuries. Physical training (PT) was the most reported activity for total/preventable injuries (PT Command Organized: 46.2%/60.0%, PT Noncommand Organized: 7.7%/10.0%, PT Unknown: 3.8%/5.0%). Musculoskeletal injuries impede optimal physical readiness/tactical training in the SOF community. The data suggest a significant proportion of injuries are classified as preventable and may be mitigated with human performance programs. PMID:25269128

  11. 48 CFR 1236.570 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contract Clauses 1236.570 Special precautions for work at operating airports. Where any acquisition will require work at an operating airport, insert the clause at (TAR) 48 CFR 1252.236-70, Special Precautions... work at operating airports. 1236.570 Section 1236.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  12. STS-49 - A demonstration of EMU operational capabilities for Space Station Freedom assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleisath, Scott A.; Johnson, Kieth G.

    1992-01-01

    One of the primary objectives for Space Shuttle mission STS-49 is to perform three EVAs on consecutive days in a manner similar to those planned for Space Station Freedom (SSF) assembly missions. The preparation and completion of this mission will serve as a pathfinder for future EVA intensive SSF assembly flights. Several operational issues pertaining to the EMU have been addressed in preparation for this mission. Provisioning and orbiter stowage of the EMU and associated hardware have been optimized for four EVA crewmembers. EMU preparatory and maintenance activities have been streamlined to help minimize crew overhead and have been carefully integrated into a very demanding mission timeline. The constraints and limitations have been assessed in providing a backup EMU capability for each EVA crewmember. Several EMU concerns have also been addressed in supporting new EVA task requirements, such as large mass handling and performing SSF assembly operations over the crew cabin and nose of the Shuttle orbiter.

  13. Energy capability improvement of power DMOS transistors operating in pulsed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costachescu, Dragos; Pfost, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Modern power DMOS transistors greatly benefit from the continuous advances of the technology, which yield devices with very low area-specific RDS,on figures of merit and therefore allow for significantly reduced active areas. However, in many applications, where the devices must dissipate high amounts of energy and thus are subjected to significant self-heating, the active area is not dictated by RDS,on requirements, but by the energy constraints. In this paper, a simple method of improving the energy capability and reliability of power DMOS transistors operating in pulsed conditions is proposed and experimentally verified. The method consists in redistributing the power density from the hotter to the cooler device regions, hence achieving a more homogeneous temperature distribution and a reduced peak temperature. To demonstrate the principle, a simple gate offset circuit is used to redistribute the current density to the cooler DMOS parts. No technology changes are needed for the implementation, only minor changes to the driver circuit are necessary, with a minimal impact on the additional required active area. Improvements in the energy capability from 9.2% up to 39% have been measured. Furthermore, measurements have shown that the method remains effective also if the operating conditions change significantly. The simplicity and the effectiveness of the implementation makes the proposed method suitable to be used in a wide range of applications.

  14. Operating capability and current status of the reactivated NASA Lewis Research Center Hypersonic Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott R.; Trefny, Charles J.; Pack, William D.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a free-jet, blowdown propulsion test facility that can simulate up to Mach-7 flight conditions with true air composition. Mach-5, -6, and -7 nozzles, each with a 42 inch exit diameter, are available. Previously obtained calibration data indicate that the test flow uniformity of the HTF is good. The facility, without modifications, can accommodate models approximately 10 feet long. The test gas is heated using a graphite core induction heater that generates a nonvitiated flow. The combination of clean-air, large-scale, and Mach-7 capabilities is unique to the HTF and enables an accurate propulsion performance determination. The reactivation of the HTF, in progress since 1990, includes refurbishing the graphite heater, the steam generation plant, the gaseous oxygen system, and all control systems. All systems were checked out and recertified, and environmental systems were upgraded to meet current standards. The data systems were also upgraded to current standards and a communication link with NASA-wide computers was added. In May 1994, the reactivation was complete, and an integrated systems test was conducted to verify facility operability. This paper describes the reactivation, the facility status, the operating capabilities, and specific applications of the HTF.

  15. Special Operations of CERES for Radiation Experiment Tests (SOCRATES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, Z. Peter

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System project flew a scanning radiometer (PFM) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission TRMM satellite, and two each aboard the Terra (FM1 FM2) and Aqua spacecraft (FM3 FM4). The primary objectives of the pairs of in-struments were for one to scan cross-track to map the geographical distribution of reflected solar radiation and Earth-emitted radiation and for the other to scan in azimuth as well as in elevation angle to provide data from which to develop models to describe the directionally-dependent dis-tribution of reflected solar radiance and Earth-emitted radiance. The Programmable Azimuth Plane Scan (PAPS) feature of the CERES instrument is a variant of the latter, and enables a scanner to target ground stations, or to match other satellite instruments viewing geometry to generate data sets for various scientific investigations. This paper presents special operations of CERES using the PAPS mode with the objective to collect data for comparison at the radiance level with other Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instruments, and also shows numerical results of such comparisons. The following campaigns are covered in the paper: (i) In 1998, the CERES instrument (PFM) was rotated in azimuth so its scan plane coincided with the cross-track scan plane of the ScaRAB-2 instrument when the orbits of their spacecraft intersected. In this data set, both instruments viewed the same scenes from the same directions within a few minutes of each other, so the radiance measured by both instruments could be compared. (ii) In March of 2000, the scan plane of CERES Terra (FM1 and FM2) was rotated to coincide with the cross-track scan of the PFM aboard TRMM satellite. Data collected over up to 10 orbital crossings per day are used to compare radiance measurements of PFM and FM1 or FM2. (iii) In July of 2002, radiance measurements of scanners on Terra and Aqua satellites are compared. Since both satellites are in a polar orbit, the scan planes

  16. 46 CFR 98.25-90 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-90 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous... to transport lading other than anhydrous ammonia in the cargo tanks. (d) Sufficient hose...

  17. Evolution of the Scope and Capabilities of Uplink Support Software for Mars Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Marc; Laubach, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In January of 2004 both of the Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft landed safely, initiating daily surface operations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for what was anticipated to be approximately three months of mobile exploration. The longevity of this mission, still ongoing after ten years, has provided not only a tremendous return of scientific data but also the opportunity to refine and improve the methodology by which robotic Mars surface missions are commanded. Since the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft in August of 2012, this methodology has been successfully applied to operate a Martian rover which is both similar to, and quite different from, its predecessors. For MER and MSL, daily uplink operations can be most broadly viewed as converting the combined interests of both the science and engineering teams into a spacecraft-safe set of transmittable command files. In order to accomplish these ends a discrete set of mission-critical software tools were developed which not only allowed for conformation to established JPL standards and practices but also enabled innovative technologies specific to each mission. Although these primary programs provided the requisite capabilities for meeting the high-level goals of each distinct phase of the uplink process, there was little in the way of secondary software to support the smooth flow of data from one phase to the next. In order to address this shortcoming a suite of small software tools was developed to aid in phase transitions, as well as to automate some of the more laborious and error-prone aspects of uplink operations. This paper describes the evolution of this software suite, from its initial attempts to merely shorten the duration of the operator's shift, to its current role as an indispensable tool enforcing workflow of the uplink operations process and agilely responding to the new and unexpected challenges of missions which can, and have, lasted many years longer than originally anticipated.

  18. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  19. Operant Conditioning: A Tool for Special Physical Educators in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John M.; French, Ron

    1982-01-01

    The usefulness of operant conditioning for the special physical educator in managing behavior problems is pointed out, and steps to follow in applying operant conditioning techniques are outlined. (SB)

  20. 78 FR 6401 - Seventy Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 147, Minimum Operational Performance Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment AGENCY... RTCA Special Committee 147, Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision... Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment. DATES: The meeting will be held February...

  1. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-06

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  2. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and 208Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  3. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-81 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. 151.50-81 Section 151.50-81 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... § 151.50-81 Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. When table 151.05 refers to...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-81 - Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. 151.50-81 Section 151.50-81 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... § 151.50-81 Special operating requirements for heat sensitive cargoes. When table 151.05 refers to...

  6. 14 CFR 91.858 - Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.858 Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations..., lease, or scrap the airplane; (2) Obtain modifications to meet Stage 3 noise levels; (3) Obtain... Office of Environment and Energy for a special flight authorization. The applicant must file in...

  7. 30 CFR 785.12 - Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special bituminous surface coal mining and... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL....12 Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (a) This section applies to...

  8. 76 FR 66051 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2010 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2010 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory List of Contracts for Services AGENCY: United States Special Operations Command... 2330a of Title 10 United States Code as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for...

  9. 77 FR 38274 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2011 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2011 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory List of Contracts for Services AGENCY: United States Special Operations Command... 2330a of Title 10, United States Code as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for...

  10. 30 CFR 905.822 - Special performance standards-Operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 905.822 Section 905.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.822 Special performance standards—Operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  11. 30 CFR 947.822 - Special performance standards-operations on alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 947.822 Section 947.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE WASHINGTON § 947.822 Special performance standards—operations on alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Performance Standards—Operations on Alluvial Valley Floors, shall apply...

  12. 30 CFR 903.822 - Special performance standards-Operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 903.822 Section 903.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE ARIZONA § 903.822 Special performance standards—Operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  13. 30 CFR 903.822 - Special performance standards-Operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 903.822 Section 903.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE ARIZONA § 903.822 Special performance standards—Operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  14. 30 CFR 947.822 - Special performance standards-operations on alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 947.822 Section 947.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE WASHINGTON § 947.822 Special performance standards—operations on alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Performance Standards—Operations on Alluvial Valley Floors, shall apply...

  15. 30 CFR 905.822 - Special performance standards-Operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 905.822 Section 905.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.822 Special performance standards—Operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  16. 30 CFR 912.822 - Special performance standards-operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 912.822 Section 912.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE IDAHO § 912.822 Special performance standards—operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  17. 30 CFR 912.822 - Special performance standards-operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 912.822 Section 912.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE IDAHO § 912.822 Special performance standards—operations in alluvial valley floors. Part 822 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations in Alluvial Valley...

  18. 46 CFR 153.1000 - Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water. 153.1000 Section 153.1000 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures...

  19. 46 CFR 153.1000 - Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special operating requirements for cargoes reactive with water. 153.1000 Section 153.1000 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures...

  20. 49 CFR 175.9 - Exceptions for special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., fire fighting and prevention, flood control, or avalanche control purposes, when the following... expending operation. (5) When dynamite and blasting caps are carried for avalanche control flights,...

  1. Enhanced methods for determining operational capabilities and support costs of proposed space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the work accomplished during the first two years of research to provide support to NASA in predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. The first year's research developed a methodology for deriving reliability and maintainability (R & M) parameters based upon the use of regression analysis to establish empirical relationships between performance and design specifications and corresponding mean times of failure and repair. The second year focused on enhancements to the methodology, increased scope of the model, and software improvements. This follow-on effort expands the prediction of R & M parameters and their effect on the operations and support of space transportation vehicles to include other system components such as booster rockets and external fuel tanks. It also increases the scope of the methodology and the capabilities of the model as implemented by the software. The focus is on the failure and repair of major subsystems and their impact on vehicle reliability, turn times, maintenance manpower, and repairable spares requirements. The report documents the data utilized in this study, outlines the general methodology for estimating and relating R&M parameters, presents the analyses and results of application to the initial data base, and describes the implementation of the methodology through the use of a computer model. The report concludes with a discussion on validation and a summary of the research findings and results.

  2. 48 CFR 3036.570 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... work at operating airports. Where any acquisition will require work at an operating airport, insert the clause at (HSAR) 48 CFR 3052.236-70, Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports, in solicitations... work at operating airports. 3036.570 Section 3036.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  3. 30 CFR 710.12 - Special exemption for small operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 710.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... intends to conduct surface coal mining operations on or after May 3, 1978, that permittee may receive from... handling of spoil; (2) Apply to surface coal mining operations to be conducted under a permit or...

  4. 30 CFR 710.12 - Special exemption for small operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 710.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... intends to conduct surface coal mining operations on or after May 3, 1978, that permittee may receive from... handling of spoil; (2) Apply to surface coal mining operations to be conducted under a permit or...

  5. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  6. Expanding the Capabilities of the Pulsed Plasma Thruster for In-Space and Atmospheric Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ian Kronheim

    Of all in-space propulsion systems to date, the Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) is unique in its simplicity and wide range of operational parameters. This study examined multiple uses of the thruster for in-space and atmospheric propulsion, as well as the creation of a CubeSat satellite and atmospheric airship as test beds for the thruster. The PPT was tested as a solid-propellant feed source for the High Power Helicon Thruster, a compact plasma source capable of generating order of magnitude higher plasma densities than comparable power level systems. Replacing the gaseous feed system reduced the thruster size and complexity, as well as allowing for extremely discrete discharges, minimizing the influence of wall effects. Teflon (C2F4) has been the traditional propellant for PPTs due to a high exhaust velocity and ability to ablate without surface modification over long durations. A number of alternative propellants, including minerals and metallics commonly found on asteroids, were tested for use with the PPT. Compounds with significant fractions of sulfur showed the highest performance increase, with specific thrusts double that of Teflon. A PPT with sulfur propellant designed for CubeSat operation, as well as the subsystems necessary for autonomous operation, was built and tested in the laboratory. The PPT was modified for use at atmospheric pressures where the impulse was well defined as a function of the discharge chamber volume, capacitor energy, and background pressure. To demonstrate that the air-breathing PPT was a viable concept the device was launched on two atmospheric balloon flights.

  7. 17 CFR 240.15b7-3T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.15b7-3T Section 240.15b7-3T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... § 240.15b7-3T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies to...

  8. 17 CFR 240.15b7-3T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.15b7-3T Section 240.15b7-3T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... § 240.15b7-3T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies to...

  9. 17 CFR 240.15b7-3T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.15b7-3T Section 240.15b7-3T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... § 240.15b7-3T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies to...

  10. 17 CFR 240.15b7-3T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.15b7-3T Section 240.15b7-3T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... § 240.15b7-3T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies to...

  11. 17 CFR 240.15b7-3T - Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. 240.15b7-3T Section 240.15b7-3T Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... § 240.15b7-3T Operational capability in a Year 2000 environment. (a) This section applies to...

  12. NATO Special Operations Forces Medical Engagements and Partnering Course: Initial Curriculum Recommendations from the NSHQ SOFMEP Committee.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Shawn M; Arvidsson, C Jimmy; Boedecker, Ben H; Durck, Craig H; Ferguson, Jason L; Harreld, Chad E; House, John H; Irizarry, Daniel J; Oshiki, Michael S; Sanchack, Kristian E; Torres, John E

    2012-01-01

    Military partnering operations and military engagements with host nation civil infrastructure are fundamental missions for NATO Special Operations Forces (SOF) conducting military assistance operations. Unit medical advisors are frequently called upon to support partnering operations and execute medical engagements with host nation health systems. As a primary point of NATO SOF medical capability development and coordination, the NATO Special Operations Headquarters (NSHQ) sought to create a practical training opportunity in which medical advisors are taught how to prepare for, plan, and execute these complex military assistance operations. An international committee of SOF medical advisors, planners and teachers was assembled to research and develop the curriculum for the first NSHQ SOF Medical Engagement and Partnering (SOFMEP) course. The committee found no other venues offering the necessary training. Furthermore, a lack of a common operating language and inadequate outcome metrics were identified as sources of knowledge deficits that create confusion and inhibit process improvement. These findings provided the foundation of this committee?s curricular recommendations. The committee constructed operational definitions to improve understanding and promote dialogue between medical advisors and commanders. Active learning principles were used to construct a curriculum that engages learners and enhances retention of new material. This article presents the initial curriculum recommendations for the SOFMEP course, which is currently scheduled for October 2012.

  13. NATO Special Operations Forces Medical Engagements and Partnering Course: Initial Curriculum Recommendations from the NSHQ SOFMEP Committee.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Shawn M; Arvidsson, C Jimmy; Boedecker, Ben H; Durck, Craig H; Ferguson, Jason L; Harreld, Chad E; House, John H; Irizarry, Daniel J; Oshiki, Michael S; Sanchack, Kristian E; Torres, John E

    2012-01-01

    Military partnering operations and military engagements with host nation civil infrastructure are fundamental missions for NATO Special Operations Forces (SOF) conducting military assistance operations. Unit medical advisors are frequently called upon to support partnering operations and execute medical engagements with host nation health systems. As a primary point of NATO SOF medical capability development and coordination, the NATO Special Operations Headquarters (NSHQ) sought to create a practical training opportunity in which medical advisors are taught how to prepare for, plan, and execute these complex military assistance operations. An international committee of SOF medical advisors, planners and teachers was assembled to research and develop the curriculum for the first NSHQ SOF Medical Engagement and Partnering (SOFMEP) course. The committee found no other venues offering the necessary training. Furthermore, a lack of a common operating language and inadequate outcome metrics were identified as sources of knowledge deficits that create confusion and inhibit process improvement. These findings provided the foundation of this committee?s curricular recommendations. The committee constructed operational definitions to improve understanding and promote dialogue between medical advisors and commanders. Active learning principles were used to construct a curriculum that engages learners and enhances retention of new material. This article presents the initial curriculum recommendations for the SOFMEP course, which is currently scheduled for October 2012. PMID:22707022

  14. Biometrics in support of special forces medical operations.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Recommendations on ways in which the ODA can leverage biometrics in medical operations to improve their security, improve relations with indigenous personnel, and contribute to the larger theater biometrics program. PMID:23536454

  15. Biometrics in support of special forces medical operations.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Recommendations on ways in which the ODA can leverage biometrics in medical operations to improve their security, improve relations with indigenous personnel, and contribute to the larger theater biometrics program.

  16. 46 CFR 78.83-1 - Special operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... met. (b) Spaces exposed to carbon monoxide or other hazardous vapors from exhausts of power-operated...%) as a time-weighted average, and persons shall be removed from the area if the concentration...

  17. 46 CFR 78.83-1 - Special operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... met. (b) Spaces exposed to carbon monoxide or other hazardous vapors from exhausts of power-operated industrial trucks shall have adequate ventilation. The senior deck officer shall see that tests of the...

  18. Operations with the special purpose dextrous manipulator on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B.; Brown, D.; Hiltz, M.

    1991-01-01

    SPAR Canada is actively participating in the Space Station Freedom Program by contributing the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) which will be involved in assembly, maintenance and servicing of both the Space Station and the MSS itself. Part of the MSS is the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a two armed dextrous robot with advanced vision and manipulative capabilities. In addition to Space Station and payload servicing activities the SPDM will be designed to perform self maintenance on the MSS itself. The majority of Space Station equipment will be on orbit for the anticipated 30 year lifespan and the maintenance philosophy will be to repair by the exchange of Orbit Replacement Units or ORUs. The present concept, configuration, and operation of the SPDM and the detailed simulations associated with the maintenance of part of the MSS are described. The Design Reference Mission is the replacement of a Joint Drive Module on the Canadian large payload manipulator, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System. Other Design Reference Missions that were investigated are briefly described, and future operations activity to support the definition of SPDM requirements are discussed.

  19. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR part 133 approved by the FAA... preservation and protection, fire fighting and prevention, flood control, or avalanche control purposes, when... detonators and detonator assemblies) and detonators or detonator assemblies are carried for avalanche...

  20. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR Part 133 approved by the FAA... preservation and protection, fire fighting and prevention, flood control, or avalanche control purposes, when... detonators and detonator assemblies) and detonators or detonator assemblies are carried for avalanche...

  1. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR Part 133 approved by the FAA... preservation and protection, fire fighting and prevention, flood control, or avalanche control purposes, when... detonators and detonator assemblies) and detonators or detonator assemblies are carried for avalanche...

  2. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR Part 133 approved by the FAA... preservation and protection, fire fighting and prevention, flood control, or avalanche control purposes, when... detonators and detonator assemblies) and detonators or detonator assemblies are carried for avalanche...

  3. 46 CFR 78.83-1 - Special operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... met. (b) Spaces exposed to carbon monoxide or other hazardous vapors from exhausts of power-operated industrial trucks shall have adequate ventilation. The senior deck officer shall see that tests of the carbon... acquainted with the test equipment and procedure. The carbon monoxide concentration in the holds...

  4. 46 CFR 78.83-1 - Special operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... met. (b) Spaces exposed to carbon monoxide or other hazardous vapors from exhausts of power-operated industrial trucks shall have adequate ventilation. The senior deck officer shall see that tests of the carbon... acquainted with the test equipment and procedure. The carbon monoxide concentration in the holds...

  5. 46 CFR 78.83-1 - Special operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... met. (b) Spaces exposed to carbon monoxide or other hazardous vapors from exhausts of power-operated industrial trucks shall have adequate ventilation. The senior deck officer shall see that tests of the carbon... acquainted with the test equipment and procedure. The carbon monoxide concentration in the holds...

  6. 46 CFR 98.25-90 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... state is present in the system. (b) During the time anhydrous ammonia is laden in the tanks the vessel... respiratory protective devices shall be of types suitable for starting and operating at the temperatures... carry on his person a respiratory protective device which will protect the wearer against ammonia...

  7. 46 CFR 98.25-90 - Special operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... state is present in the system. (b) During the time anhydrous ammonia is laden in the tanks the vessel... respiratory protective devices shall be of types suitable for starting and operating at the temperatures... carry on his person a respiratory protective device which will protect the wearer against ammonia...

  8. Testing of an Arcjet Thruster with Capability of Direct-Drive Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Smith, James W.; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Electric thrusters typically require a power processing unit (PPU) to convert the spacecraft provided power to the voltage-current that a thruster needs for operation. Testing has been initiated to study whether an arcjet thruster can be operated directly with the power produced by solar arrays without any additional conversion. Elimination of the PPU significantly reduces system-level complexity of the propulsion system, and lowers developmental cost and risk. The work aims to identify and address technical questions related to power conditioning and noise suppression in the system and heating of the thruster in long-duration operation. The apparatus under investigation has a target power level from 400-1,000 W. However, the proposed direct-drive arcjet is potentially a highly scalable concept, applicable to solar-electric spacecraft with up to 100's of kW and beyond. A direct-drive electric propulsion system would be comprised of a thruster that operates with the power supplied directly from the power source (typically solar arrays) with no further power conditioning needed between those two components. Arcjet thrusters are electric propulsion devices, with the power supplied as a high current at low voltage; of all the different types of electric thruster, they are best suited for direct drive from solar arrays. One advantage of an arcjet over Hall or gridded ion thrusters is that for comparable power the arcjet is a much smaller device and can provide more thrust and orders of magnitude higher thrust density (approximately 1-10 N/sq m), albeit at lower I(sub sp) (approximately 800-1000 s). In addition, arcjets are capable of operating on a wide range of propellant options, having been demonstrated on H2, ammonia, N2, Ar, Kr, Xe, while present SOA Hall and ion thrusters are primarily limited to Xe propellant. Direct-drive is often discussed in terms of Hall thrusters, but they require 250-300 V for operation, which is difficult even with high-voltage solar

  9. Large format high-operability SWIR and MWIR focal plane array performance and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, James; Langell, Mark; Reddy, Madhu; Melkonian, Leon; Johnson, Scott; Elizondo, Lee; Rybnicek, Kimon; Norton, Elyse; Jaworski, Frank; Asbrock, James; Baur, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    High-performance large-format detector arrays responsive to the 1-5μm wavelength range of the infrared spectrum fabricated using large area HgCdTe layers grown on 6-inch diameter (211) silicon substrates are available for advanced imaging applications. This paper reviews performance and capabilities of Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) HgCdTe/Si Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) and shows 2k x 2k format MWIR HgCdTe/Si FPA performance with NEdT operabilities better than 99.9%. SWIR and MWIR detector performance for HgCdTe/Si is comparable to established performance of HgCdTe/CdZnTe wafers. HgCdTe devices fabricated on both types of substrates have demonstrated very low dark current, high quantum efficiency and full spectral band fill factor characteristic of HgCdTe. HgCdTe has the advantage of being able to precisely tune the detector cutoff via adjustment of the Cd composition in the MBE growth. The HgCdTe/Si detectors described in this paper are p-on-n mesa delineated architecture and fabricated using the same mature etch, passivation, and metallization processes as our HgCdTe/CdZnTe line. Uniform device quality HgCdTe epitaxial layers and application of detector fabrication processes across the full area of 6-inch wafers routinely produces high performing detector pixels from edge to edge of the photolithographic limits across the wafer, offering 5 times the printable area as costly 6×6cm CdZnTe substrates. This 6-inch HgCdTe detector wafer technology can provide applications demanding very wide FOV high resolution coverage the capability to produce a very large single piece infrared detector array, up to a continuous image plane 10×10 cm in size. Alternatively, significant detector cost reduction through allowing more die of a given size to be printed on each wafer is possible, with further cost reduction achieved through transition towards automated detector fabrication and photolithographic processes for both increased yields and reduced touch labor costs. RVS continues

  10. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-3 - Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Laboratory management and operation. 970.1504-1-3 Section 970.1504-1-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contracting by Negotiation 970.1504-1-3 Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation. (a) For the...

  11. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-3 - Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special considerations... Negotiation 970.1504-1-3 Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation. (a) For the management... contracted effort; (3) Facilities capital or capital equipment acquisition plans; (4) Other funding needs,...

  12. 36 CFR 251.124 - Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... competitive special use authorization procedures. 251.124 Section 251.124 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.124 Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures. (a) In selecting persons...

  13. 36 CFR 251.124 - Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... competitive special use authorization procedures. 251.124 Section 251.124 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.124 Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures. (a) In selecting persons...

  14. 36 CFR 251.124 - Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... competitive special use authorization procedures. 251.124 Section 251.124 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.124 Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures. (a) In selecting persons...

  15. 36 CFR 251.124 - Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... competitive special use authorization procedures. 251.124 Section 251.124 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.124 Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures. (a) In selecting persons...

  16. 36 CFR 251.124 - Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... competitive special use authorization procedures. 251.124 Section 251.124 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Revenue-Producing Visitor Services in Alaska § 251.124 Preferred operator competitive special use authorization procedures. (a) In selecting persons...

  17. 14 CFR 91.858 - Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations. 91.858 Section 91.858 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Office of Environment and Energy for a special flight authorization. The applicant must file in...

  18. 14 CFR 91.858 - Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special flight authorizations for non-revenue Stage 2 operations. 91.858 Section 91.858 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Office of Environment and Energy for a special flight authorization. The applicant must file in...

  19. 7 CFR 3560.454 - Special servicing actions related to housing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special servicing actions related to housing operations. 3560.454 Section 3560.454 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Special Servicing, Enforcement, Liquidation, and...

  20. 7 CFR 3560.454 - Special servicing actions related to housing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special servicing actions related to housing...) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Special... housing operations. (a) Changing rents or revising budgets. The Agency may approve a borrower request...

  1. 7 CFR 3560.454 - Special servicing actions related to housing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special servicing actions related to housing...) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Special... housing operations. (a) Changing rents or revising budgets. The Agency may approve a borrower request...

  2. 7 CFR 3560.454 - Special servicing actions related to housing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special servicing actions related to housing operations. 3560.454 Section 3560.454 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Special Servicing, Enforcement, Liquidation, and...

  3. 7 CFR 3560.454 - Special servicing actions related to housing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special servicing actions related to housing...) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Special... housing operations. (a) Changing rents or revising budgets. The Agency may approve a borrower request...

  4. 43 CFR 6304.11 - What special provisions apply to operations under the mining laws?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operations under the mining laws? 6304.11 Section 6304.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Uses Addressed in Special Provisions of the Wilderness Act Mining Under the General Mining Laws § 6304.11 What special provisions apply to...

  5. 43 CFR 6304.11 - What special provisions apply to operations under the mining laws?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operations under the mining laws? 6304.11 Section 6304.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Uses Addressed in Special Provisions of the Wilderness Act Mining Under the General Mining Laws § 6304.11 What special provisions apply to...

  6. 43 CFR 6304.11 - What special provisions apply to operations under the mining laws?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operations under the mining laws? 6304.11 Section 6304.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Uses Addressed in Special Provisions of the Wilderness Act Mining Under the General Mining Laws § 6304.11 What special provisions apply to...

  7. 43 CFR 6304.11 - What special provisions apply to operations under the mining laws?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operations under the mining laws? 6304.11 Section 6304.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Uses Addressed in Special Provisions of the Wilderness Act Mining Under the General Mining Laws § 6304.11 What special provisions apply to...

  8. Mars Express Forward Link Capabilities for the Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Daniel A.; Wallick, Michael N.; Gladden, Roy E.; Wang, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This software provides a new capability for landed Mars assets to perform forward link relay through the Mars Express (MEX) European Union orbital spacecraft. It solves the problem of standardizing the relay interface between lander missions and MEX. The Mars Operations Relay Service (MaROS) is intended as a central point for relay planning and post-pass analysis for all Mars landed and orbital assets. Through the first two phases of implementation, MaROS supports relay coordination through the Odyssey orbiter and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). With this new software, MaROS now fully integrates the Mars Express spacecraft into the relay picture. This new software generates and manages a new set of file formats that allows for relay request to MEX for forward and return link relay, including the parameters specific to MEX. Existing MEX relay planning interactions were performed via email exchanges and point-to-point file transfers. By integrating MEX into MaROS, all transactions are managed by a centralized service for tracking and analysis. Additionally, all lander missions have a single, shared interface with MEX and do not have to integrate on a mission-by mission basis. Relay is a critical element of Mars lander data management. Landed assets depend largely upon orbital relay for data delivery, which can be impacted by the availability and health of each orbiter in the network. At any time, an issue may occur to prevent relay. For this reason, it is imperative that all possible orbital assets be integrated into the overall relay picture.

  9. Evaluation of Anomaly Detection Capability for Ground-Based Pre-Launch Shuttle Operations. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will provide a thorough end-to-end description of the process for evaluation of three different data-driven algorithms for anomaly detection to select the best candidate for deployment as part of a suite of IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. These algorithms were deemed to be sufficiently mature enough to be considered viable candidates for deployment in support of the maiden launch of Ares I-X, the successor to the Space Shuttle for NASA's Constellation program. Data-driven algorithms are just one of three different types being deployed. The other two types of algorithms being deployed include a "nile-based" expert system, and a "model-based" system. Within these two categories, the deployable candidates have already been selected based upon qualitative factors such as flight heritage. For the rule-based system, SHINE (Spacecraft High-speed Inference Engine) has been selected for deployment, which is a component of BEAM (Beacon-based Exception Analysis for Multimissions), a patented technology developed at NASA's JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and serves to aid in the management and identification of operational modes. For the "model-based" system, a commercially available package developed by QSI (Qualtech Systems, Inc.), TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) has been selected for deployment to aid in diagnosis. In the context of this particular deployment, distinctions among the use of the terms "data-driven," "rule-based," and "model-based," can be found in. Although there are three different categories of algorithms that have been selected for deployment, our main focus in this chapter will be on the evaluation of three candidates for data-driven anomaly detection. These algorithms will be evaluated upon their capability for robustly detecting incipient faults or failures in the ground-based phase of pre-launch space shuttle operations, rather than based oil heritage as performed in previous studies. Robust

  10. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  11. 46 CFR 154.1800 - Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter. 154.1800 Section 154.1800 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Operations § 154.1800 Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter. Each vessel must meet the requirements of Part 35 of this chapter except § 35.30-20....

  12. 30 CFR 941.822 - Special performance standards-operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 941.822 Section 941.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.822 Special performance standards—operations in alluvial valley floors. Part... Floors, shall apply to any person who conducts surface coal mining and reclamation operations on...

  13. 30 CFR 941.822 - Special performance standards-operations in alluvial valley floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alluvial valley floors. 941.822 Section 941.822 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.822 Special performance standards—operations in alluvial valley floors. Part... Floors, shall apply to any person who conducts surface coal mining and reclamation operations on...

  14. 47 CFR 90.475 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems in specially equipped systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of internal transmitter control... Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.475 Operation of internal transmitter control systems in specially equipped systems. (a) An internal transmitter control system need not be designed to meet...

  15. Advance of Hazardous Operation Robot and its Application in Special Equipment Accident Rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qin-Da; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Geng-Feng

    A survey of hazardous operation robot is given out in this article. Firstly, the latest researches such as nuclear industry robot, fire-fighting robot and explosive-handling robot are shown. Secondly, existing key technologies and their shortcomings are summarized, including moving mechanism, control system, perceptive technology and power technology. Thirdly, the trend of hazardous operation robot is predicted according to current situation. Finally, characteristics and hazards of special equipment accident, as well as feasibility of hazardous operation robot in the area of special equipment accident rescue are analyzed.

  16. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Operating Limitations for Unscheduled Operations at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accordance with 14 CFR part 380. d. The Public Charter Operator must identify the call sign/flight number or.... Hurley Air Traffic Control System Command Center. It is responsible for the administration of... (14 CFR, part 93, subpart k), unscheduled flights under Special Traffic Management Programs, and the...

  17. Seroprevalence of Dengue Fever in US Army Special Operations Forces: Initial Results and the Way Ahead.

    PubMed

    Caci, Jennifer B; Blaylock, Jason M; De La Barrera, Rafael; Griggs, April N; Lin, Leyi; Jarman, Richard G; Thomas, Stephen J; Lyons, Arthur G

    2014-01-01

    The endemicity of dengue fever (DF) and, consequently, sequelae of DF are increasing worldwide. The increases are largely a result of widespread international travel and the increased range of the mosquito vectors. US Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) personnel are at an increased risk of exposure to dengue based on their frequent deployments to and presence in dengue endemic areas worldwide. Repeated deployments to different endemic areas can increase the risk for developing the more serious sequelae of dengue: dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Information about the seroprevalence rate of dengue in USASOC personnel, in particular, is lacking and is critical to assessing the risk, tailoring preventive medicine countermeasures, leveraging field diagnostics, and maintaining mission capability. In the first part of a two-part project to assess baseline seroprevalence in USASOC units, a random, unit-stratified sample of 500 anonymous serum specimens from personnel assigned to the highest-risk units in USASOC were screened for dengue using a microneutralization assay. Of the 500 specimens screened, 56 (11.2%) of 500 had neutralizing titers (NT) (MN₅₀≥10) against at least one DENV serotype. Subsequent sample titration resulted in 48 (85.7%) of 56 of the samples with NT (MN₅₀≥10) against at least one dengue serotype for an overall dengue exposure rate of 9.6% (48 of 500). The second part of the ongoing project, started in 2012, was a multicenter, serosurveillance project using predeployment and postdeployment sera collected from USASOC personnel deployed to South and Central America, Africa, and Southeast Asia. Preliminary results show a 13.2% (55 of 414) seropositivity rate. The significance of these findings as they relate to personal risk and operational impact is discussed.

  18. Variable-Speed Wind Power Plant Operating With Reserve Power Capability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Ela, E.

    2013-10-01

    As the level of wind penetration increases, wind turbine technology must move from merely generating power from wind to taking a role in supporting the bulk power system. Wind turbines should have the capability to provide inertial response and primary frequency (governor) response. Wind turbine generators with this capability can support the frequency stability of the grid. To provide governorresponse, wind turbines should be able to generate less power than the available wind power and hold the rest in reserves, ready to be accessed as needed. In this paper, we explore several ways to control wind turbine output to enable reserve-holding capability. The focus of this paper is on doubly-fed induction generator (also known as Type 3) and full-converter (also known as Type 4) windturbines.

  19. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  20. Capability of the Maximax&Maximin selection operator in the evolutionary algorithm for a nurse scheduling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Razamin; Tein, Lim Huai

    2016-08-01

    A good work schedule can improve hospital operations by providing better coverage with appropriate staffing levels in managing nurse personnel. Hence, constructing the best nurse work schedule is the appropriate effort. In doing so, an improved selection operator in the Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) strategy for a nurse scheduling problem (NSP) is proposed. The smart and efficient scheduling procedures were considered. Computation of the performance of each potential solution or schedule was done through fitness evaluation. The best so far solution was obtained via special Maximax&Maximin (MM) parent selection operator embedded in the EA, which fulfilled all constraints considered in the NSP.

  1. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... unauthorized materials by stealth or force into the vicinity of transports and strategic special nuclear... unauthorized material into transports by stealth or force using the following subsystems and subfunctions: (i...) Detect attempts to remove strategic special nuclear material from transports by stealth or force...

  2. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... unauthorized materials by stealth or force into the vicinity of transports and strategic special nuclear... unauthorized material into transports by stealth or force using the following subsystems and subfunctions: (i...) Detect attempts to remove strategic special nuclear material from transports by stealth or force...

  3. Problems and Delays Overshadow NRC's Initial Success in Improving Reactor Operators' Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island raised many questions concerning the safety of nuclear power plant operations and the ability of nuclear plant reactor operators to respond to abnormal or accident conditions. In response, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed a plan, which included short- and long-term actions to…

  4. Primary and Secondary Lithium Batteries Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Approach: (1) Develop advanced Li ]ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -60 to +60 C). Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (2) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (3) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  5. Recent Developments in the Design, Capabilities and Autonomous Operations of a Lightweight Surface Manipulation System and Test-bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, W. R.; Brady, Jeffrey S.; Berry, Felecia C.; Ganoe, George G.; Anderson, Eric; King, Bruce D.; Mercer, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The first generation of a versatile high performance device for performing payload handling and assembly operations on planetary surfaces, the Lightweight Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed and built. Over the course of its development, conventional crane type payload handling configurations and operations have been successfully demonstrated and the range of motion, types of operations and the versatility greatly expanded. This enhanced set of 1st generation LSMS hardware is now serving as a laboratory test-bed allowing the continuing development of end effectors, operational techniques and remotely controlled and automated operations. This paper describes the most recent LSMS and test-bed development activities, that have focused on two major efforts. The first effort was to complete a preliminary design of the 2nd generation LSMS that has the capability for limited mobility and can reposition itself between lander decks, mobility chassis, and fixed base locations. A major portion of this effort involved conducting a study to establish the feasibility of, and define, the specifications for a lightweight cable-drive waist joint. The second effort was to continue expanding the versatility and autonomy of large planetary surface manipulators using the 1st generation LSMS as a test-bed. This has been accomplished by increasing manipulator capabilities and efficiencies through both design changes and tool and end effector development. A software development effort has expanded the operational capabilities of the LSMS test-bed to include; autonomous operations based on stored paths, use of a vision system for target acquisition and tracking, and remote command and control over a communications bridge.

  6. An Overview of Current Capabilities and Research Activities in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy M.; Palmer, Everett; Callantine, Todd; Lee, Paul; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeff; Martin, Lynne; Brasil, Connie; Cabrall, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames conducts research to provide a better understanding of roles, responsibilities, and requirements for human operators and automation in future air traffic management (ATM) systems. The research encompasses developing, evaluating, and integrating operational concepts and technologies for near-, mid-, and far-term air traffic operations. Current research threads include efficient arrival operations, function allocation in separation assurance and efficient airspace and trajectory management. The AOL has developed powerful air traffic simulation capabilities, most notably the Multi Aircraft Control System (MACS) that is used for many air traffic control simulations at NASA and its partners in government, academia and industry. Several additional NASA technologies have been integrated with the AOL's primary simulation capabilities where appropriate. Using this environment, large and small-scale system-level evaluations can be conducted to help make near-term improvements and transition NASA technologies to the FAA, such as the technologies developed under NASA's Air Traffic Management Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). The AOL's rapid prototyping and flexible simulation capabilities have proven a highly effective environment to progress the initiation of trajectory-based operations and support the mid-term implementation of NextGen. Fundamental questions about accuracy requirements have been investigated as well as realworld problems on how to improve operations in some of the most complex airspaces in the US. This includes using advanced trajectory-based operations and prototype tools for coordinating arrivals to converging runways at Newark airport and coordinating departures and arrivals in the San Francisco and the New York metro areas. Looking beyond NextGen, the AOL has started exploring hybrid human/automation control strategies as well as highly autonomous operations in the air traffic control domain. Initial results

  7. Drain-extended MOS transistors capable for operation at 10 V and at radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Andreas; Rücker, Holger

    2011-11-01

    This work reports on the integration of n-type lateral-drain-extended MOS transistors (LDMOS) in a 0.13 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. The transistors are realized with no additional process steps using the core dual-gate-oxide CMOS flow only. LDMOS drift regions are formed by compensating lightly-doped drain (LDD) implantations of NMOS and PMOS transistors of the baseline process. Stable operation with less than 10% parameter variations in 10 years is achieved up to operating voltages VDD,max of 10 V for devices with breakdown voltages BVDSS = 30 V and on-resistances RON = 7.3 Ω mm. Devices for different operating voltages VDD,max are realized by layout variations. Devices with VDD,max = 6 V demonstrate breakdown voltages BVDSS = 25 V, on-resistances RON = 4.9 Ω mm, and peak transit frequencies fT = 32 GHz.

  8. Lithium Batteries and Supercapacitors Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co - solvents (i.e., methyl propionate and ethyl butyrate) in a number of prototype cells: center dot Successfully scaled up low temperature technology to 12 Ah size prismatic Li - ion cells (Quallion, LCC), and demonstrated good performance down to - 60 o C. center dot Demonstrated wide operating temperature range performance ( - 60 o to +60 o C) in A123 Systems LiFePO 4 - based lithium - ion cells containing methyl butyrate - based low temperature electrolytes. These systems were also demonstrated to have excellent cycle life performance at ambient temperatures, as well as the ability to be cycled up to high temperatures.

  9. 30 CFR 785.12 - Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demonstrate that the operations will comply with the requirements of the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (c) The... be conducted in compliance with the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (d) Upon amendment or revision to the... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special bituminous surface coal mining...

  10. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (OCT... shall be marked by yellow flags during daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights... roads and adjacent parking lots may be either electric or battery type lights. These lights and...

  11. 78 FR 69928 - First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 228-Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of... Unmanned Aircraft Systems. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 228--Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned Aircraft...

  12. On the Special Characteristics of Institutional Operation in the Process of Undergraduate Teaching Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xianjun, Liu

    2009-01-01

    That each institution of higher education should develop its own salient special characteristics ("te se") of institutional operation is a matter of major and far-reaching significance for the reform and development of higher education, and every institution of higher education should attach a high degree of importance to, and correctly…

  13. Case Report of an Anthrax Presentation Relevant to Special Operations Medicine.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Stephen; Enzenauer, Robert W; Karesh, James W; Pasteur, Nshimyimana; Eisnor, Derek L; Painter, Rex B; Calvano, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical personnel function worldwide in environments where endemic anthrax (caused by Bacillus anthracis infection) may present in one of three forms: cutaneous, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal. This report presents a rare periocular anthrax case from Haiti to emphasize the need for heightened diagnostic suspicion of unusual lesions likely to be encountered in SOF theaters. PMID:27450596

  14. 30 CFR 785.12 - Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstrate that the operations will comply with the requirements of the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (c) The... be conducted in compliance with the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (d) Upon amendment or revision to the... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special bituminous surface coal mining...

  15. 49 CFR 37.191 - Special provision for small mixed-service operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.191 Special provision for... 25 percent of its buses for fixed-route service. (b) An operator meeting the criteria of paragraph (a... with the accessible bus acquisition/equivalent service obligations of § 37.183(b)....

  16. 49 CFR 37.191 - Special provision for small mixed-service operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.191 Special provision for... 25 percent of its buses for fixed-route service. (b) An operator meeting the criteria of paragraph (a... with the accessible bus acquisition/equivalent service obligations of § 37.183(b)....

  17. 30 CFR 785.12 - Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demonstrate that the operations will comply with the requirements of the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (c) The... be conducted in compliance with the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (d) Upon amendment or revision to the... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special bituminous surface coal mining...

  18. 30 CFR 785.12 - Special bituminous surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstrate that the operations will comply with the requirements of the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (c) The... be conducted in compliance with the Act and 30 CFR part 825. (d) Upon amendment or revision to the... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special bituminous surface coal mining...

  19. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shall be marked by yellow flags during daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights... day and when directed by the Contracting Officer, with red obstruction lights at nights. All equipment...) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports...

  20. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shall be marked by yellow flags during daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights... day and when directed by the Contracting Officer, with red obstruction lights at nights. All equipment...) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports...

  1. 47 CFR 90.475 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems in specially equipped systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.475 Operation of internal transmitter control systems in specially equipped systems. (a) An internal transmitter control system need not be designed to meet the... premises controlled by the licensee. (2) An internal transmitter control system may be used in...

  2. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  3. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  4. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  5. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  6. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  7. New stopping cell capabilities: RF carpet performance at high gas density and cryogenic operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W. R.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a stopping cell to be used at the FRS and Super-FRS (Super-conducting FRagment Separator) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), both in Darmstadt, Germany. The cell has a stopping volume with a length of 1 m and a diameter of 25 cm. It is aimed at operation with high-density helium gas (up to 0.2 mg/cm3). Ours is the first realisation of a stopping cell in which the required purity of the helium stopping gas is ensured by operation at cryogenic temperatures. On the exit side, the ions are guided to the exit hole by an RF carpet with 4 electrodes per mm, operating at a frequency of 5.8 MHz. We present the first commissioning results of the cryogenic stopping cell. Using 219Rn ions emitted as alpha-decay recoils from a 223Ra source, a combined ion survival and extraction efficiency between 10 and 25% is measured for helium gas at a temperature of 85 K and with a density up to 0.07 mg/cm3 (equivalent to a pressure of 430 mbar at room temperature). This density is almost two times higher than demonstrated up to now for RF ion repelling structures in helium gas. Given the operational and design parameters of the system, it is projected that this technology is useful up to a helium gas density of at least 0.2 mg/cm3.

  8. Use of a pitch adjustable foot restraint system: Operator strength capability and load requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmington, Robert P.; Poliner, Jeffrey; Klute, Glenn K.

    1994-01-01

    The zero-gravity environment creates a need for a proper human body restraint system to maintain a comfortable posture with less fatigue and to maximize productivity. In addition, restraint systems must be able to meet the loading demands of maintenance and assembly tasks performed on orbit. The shuttle's primary intravehicular astronaut restraint system is currently a foot loop design that attaches to flat surfaces on the shuttle, allowing for varying mounting locations and easy egress and ingress. However, this design does not allow for elevation, pitch, or foot loop length adjustment. Several prototype foot restraint systems are being evaluated for use aboard the space station and the space shuttle. The JSC Anthropometry and Biomechanics Laboratory initiated this study to quantify the maximum axial forces and moments that would be induced on a foot loop type of restraint while operators performed a torque wrench task, also allowing for angling the restraint pitch angle to study yet another effect. Results indicate that the greatest forces into the torque wrench and into the foot restraint system occur while the operator performs an upward effort. This study did not see any significant difference in the operators' force due to pitch orientation. Thus, in a work environment in which hand holds are available, no significant influence of the pitch angle on forces imparted to the restraint system existed.

  9. Fiber Grating Coupled Light Source Capable of Tunable, Single Frequency Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A. (Inventor); Duerksen, Gary L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating coupled light sources can achieve tunable single-frequency (single axial and lateral spatial mode) operation by correcting for a quadratic phase variation in the lateral dimension using an aperture stop. The output of a quasi-monochromatic light source such as a Fabry Perot laser diode is astigmatic. As a consequence of the astigmatism, coupling geometries that accommodate the transverse numerical aperture of the laser are defocused in the lateral dimension, even for apsherical optics. The mismatch produces the quadratic phase variation in the feedback along the lateral axis at the facet of the laser that excites lateral modes of higher order than the TM(sub 00). Because the instability entails excitation of higher order lateral submodes, single frequency operation also is accomplished by using fiber Bragg gratings whose bandwidth is narrower than the submode spacing. This technique is particularly pertinent to the use of lensed fiber gratings in lieu of discrete coupling optics. Stable device operation requires overall phase match between the fed-back signal and the laser output. The fiber Bragg grating acts as a phase-preserving mirror when the Bragg condition is met precisely. The phase-match condition is maintained throughout the fiber tuning range by matching the Fabry-Perot axial mode wavelength to the passband center wavelength of the Bragg grating.

  10. The Geostationary Lighting Mapper (GLM) for GOES-R: A New Operational Capability to Improve Storm Forecasts and Warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R.; Koshak, William J.; Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L.; Mah, D.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series is a follow on to the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved spectral (3x), spatial (4x), and temporal (5x) resolution for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The GLM, an optical transient detector and imager operating in the near-IR at 777.4 nm will map all (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lighting flashes continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions, from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development (a prototype and 4 flight models), a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time lightning mapping data are being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) national centers and forecast offices via the GOES-R Proving Ground to help improve our understanding of the application of these data in operational settings and

  11. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  12. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  13. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  14. Increased ISR operator capability utilizing a centralized 360° full motion video display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andryc, K.; Chamberlain, J.; Eagleson, T.; Gottschalk, G.; Kowal, B.; Kuzdeba, P.; LaValley, D.; Myers, E.; Quinn, S.; Rose, M.; Rusiecki, B.

    2012-06-01

    In many situations, the difference between success and failure comes down to taking the right actions quickly. While the myriad of electronic sensors available today can provide data quickly, it may overload the operator; where only a contextualized centralized display of information and intuitive human interface can help to support the quick and effective decisions needed. If these decisions are to result in quick actions, then the operator must be able to understand all of the data of his environment. In this paper we present a novel approach in contextualizing multi-sensor data onto a full motion video real-time 360 degree imaging display. The system described could function as a primary display system for command and control in security, military and observation posts. It has the ability to process and enable interactive control of multiple other sensor systems. It enhances the value of these other sensors by overlaying their information on a panorama of the surroundings. Also, it can be used to interface to other systems including: auxiliary electro-optical systems, aerial video, contact management, Hostile Fire Indicators (HFI), and Remote Weapon Stations (RWS).

  15. Effects of quantum noises and noisy quantum operations on entanglement and special dense coding

    SciTech Connect

    Quek, Sylvanus; Li Ziang; Yeo Ye

    2010-02-15

    We show how noncommuting noises could cause a Bell state {chi}{sub 0} to suffer entanglement sudden death (ESD). ESD may similarly occur when a noisy operation acts, if the corresponding Hamiltonian and Lindblad operator do not commute. We study the implications of these in special dense coding S. When noises that cause ESD act, we show that {chi}{sub 0} may lose its capacity for S before ESD occurs. Similarly, {chi}{sub 0} may fail to yield information transfer better than classically possible when the encoding operations are noisy, though entanglement is not destroyed in the process.

  16. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  17. Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Bakken, H.L.

    1996-04-01

    The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full range of military options to counter this threat. SOF provides the National Command Authority (NCA) with flexible and responsive options. In order to successfully execute any type of CP related special operation, the interagency process must be fully engaged and synchronized. This study assesses the nature of the threat, reviews the evolution of the DOD CPI, and focuses on the use of SOF as an instrument of U.S. policy. Specifically this study explores the connectivity of the interagency process to support a U.S. SOF Counterproliferation mission.

  18. California GAMA Special Study. Development of a Capability for the Analysis of Krypton-85 in Groundwater Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ate; Bibby, Richard K.; Moran, Jean E.; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-06-01

    A capability for the analysis of krypton-85 (85Kr) in groundwater samples was developed at LLNL. Samples are collected by extracting gas from 2000-4000 L of groundwater at the well, yielding approximately 0.2 cm3 STP krypton. Sample collection takes 1 to 4 hours. Krypton is purified in the laboratory using a combination of molecular sieve and activated charcoal traps, and transferred to a liquid scintillation vial. The 85Kr activity is measured by liquid scintillation on a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter from PerkinElmer. The detection limit for a typical 0.2 cm3Kr sample size is 11% of the present day activity in air, corresponding to the decay corrected activity in air in 1987. The typical measurement uncertainty is below 10% for recently recharged samples. Six groundwater samples were collected, purified and counted. 85Kr was not detected in any of the samples counted at LLNL. 85Kr was detected by the low level counting laboratory of Bern University in all samples between 1.5 and 6.6 decays per minute per cm3 krypton, corresponding to decay corrected activities in air between 1971 and 1985. The new capability is an excellent complement to tritium-helium, expanding the existing suite of age dating tools available to the GAMA program (35S, 3H/3He, 14C and radiogenic helium). 85Kr can replace 3H/3He in settings where 3H/3He ages are impossible to determine (for example where terrigenic helium overwhelms tritiogenic helium) and provides additional insight into travel time distributions in complex mixed groundwater systems.

  19. Residual Impact of Previous Injury on Musculoskeletal Characteristics in Special Forces Operators

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Jeffrey J.; Clark, Nicholas C.; Abt, John P.; Kresta, Julie Y.; Keenan, Karen A.; Kane, Shawn F.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal injuries are a significant burden to United States Army Special Operations Forces. The advanced tactical skill level and physical training required of Army Special Operators highlights the need to optimize musculoskeletal characteristics to reduce the likelihood of suffering a recurrent injury. Purpose To identify the residual impact of previous injury on musculoskeletal characteristics. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Isokinetic strength of the knee, shoulder, and back and flexibility of the shoulder and hamstrings were assessed as part of a comprehensive human performance protocol, and self-reported musculoskeletal injury history was obtained. Subjects were stratified based on previous history of low back, knee, or shoulder injury, and within-group and between-group comparisons were made for musculoskeletal variables. Results Knee injury analysis showed no significant strength or flexibility differences. Shoulder injury analysis found internal rotation strength of the healthy subjects (H) was significantly higher compared with injured (I) and uninjured (U) limbs of the injured group (H, 60.8 ± 11.5 percent body weight [%BW]; I, 54.5 ± 10.5 %BW; U, 55.5 ± 11.3 %BW) (P = .014 [H vs I] and P = .05 [H vs U]). The external rotation/internal rotation strength ratio was significantly lower in the healthy subjects compared with injured and uninjured limbs of the injured group (H, 0.653 ± 0.122; I, 0.724 ± 0.121; U, 0.724 ± 0.124) (P = .026 [H vs I] and P = .018 [H vs U]). Posterior shoulder tightness was significantly different between the injured and uninjured limb of the injured group (I, 111.6° ± 9.4°; U, 114.4° ± 9.3°; P = .008). The back injury analysis found no significant strength differences between the healthy and injured groups. Conclusion Few physical differences existed between operators with prior knee or back injury. However, operators with a previous history of shoulder injury

  20. Operational vector-borne disease surveillance and control: closing the capabilities gap through research at overseas military laboratories.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian P; Clark, Jeffrey W; Barbara, Kathryn A; Mundal, Kirk D; Furman, Barry D; McAvin, James C; Richardson, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, leishmaniasis, and a myriad of other vector-borne diseases pose significant threats to the warfighter and to the overall combat effectiveness of units. Military preventive medicine (PM) assets must accurately evaluate the vector-borne disease threat and then implement and/or advise the commander on countermeasures to reduce a particular threat. The success of these measures is contingent upon the biology of the disease vector and on the tools or methods used to conduct vector/pathogen surveillance and vector control. There is a significant gap between the tools available and those required for operational PM assets to provide real-time, effective surveillance and control. A network of US Army and US Navy overseas laboratories is focused on closing the current capabilities gap. Their mission is to develop and field test tools and methods to enhance the combatant commander's ability to identify and mitigate the threat posed by these vector-borne diseases.

  1. Developing an emergency department based Special Operations Team: Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Valendo, Michael; Torres, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital initiated an emergency department based Special Operations Team as a way to help prepare staff for the care of hazardous material incidents (HAZMAT) victims and the unexpected consequences of a mass casualty incident. The team evolved over a period of 5 years and is now able to provide significant educational offerings, policy and procedure review and participation in extensive planning efforts in the hospital and community. This article will review the process and present future goals of the team.

  2. Developing an emergency department based Special Operations Team: Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Valendo, Michael; Torres, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital initiated an emergency department based Special Operations Team as a way to help prepare staff for the care of hazardous material incidents (HAZMAT) victims and the unexpected consequences of a mass casualty incident. The team evolved over a period of 5 years and is now able to provide significant educational offerings, policy and procedure review and participation in extensive planning efforts in the hospital and community. This article will review the process and present future goals of the team. PMID:15133453

  3. The effect of different operations modes on science capabilities during the 2010 Desert RATS test: Insights from the geologist crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Rice, James W.; Garry, W. Brent

    2013-10-01

    The 2010 Desert RATS field test utilized two Space Exploration Vehicles (prototype planetary rovers) and four crewmembers (2 per rover) to conduct a geologic traverse across northern Arizona while testing continuous and twice-per-day communications paired with operation modes of separating and exploring individually (Divide & Conquer) and exploring together (Lead & Follow), respectively. This report provides qualitative conclusions from the geologist crewmembers involved in this test as to how these modes of communications and operations affected our ability to conduct field geology. Each mode of communication and operation provided beneficial capabilities that might be further explored for future Human Spaceflight Missions to other solar system objects. We find that more frequent interactions between crews and an Apollo-style Science Team on the Earth best enables scientific progress during human exploration. However, during multiple vehicle missions, this communication with an Earth-based team of scientists, who represent "more minds on the problem", should not come at the exclusion of (or significantly decrease) communication between the crewmembers in different vehicles who have the "eyes on the ground". Inter-crew communications improved when discussions with a backroom were infrequent. Both aspects are critical and cannot be mutually exclusive. Increased vehicle separation distances best enable encounters with multiple geologic units. However, seemingly redundant visits by multiple vehicles to the same feature can be utilized to provide improved process-related observations about the development and modification of the local terrain. We consider the value of data management, transfer, and accessibility to be the most important lesson learned. Crews and backrooms should have access to all data and related interpretations within the mission in as close to real-time conditions as possible. This ensures that while on another planetary surface, crewmembers are as

  4. 47 CFR 101.149 - Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz 101.149 Section 101.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.149...

  5. 47 CFR 101.149 - Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz 101.149 Section 101.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.149...

  6. 47 CFR 101.149 - Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz 101.149 Section 101.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.149...

  7. 47 CFR 101.149 - Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz 101.149 Section 101.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.149...

  8. 47 CFR 101.149 - Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for operation in the band 38,600-40,000 MHz 101.149 Section 101.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.149...

  9. 47 CFR 25.256 - Special Requirements for operations in the 3.65-3.7 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.256 Special Requirements for... station, licensees of earth stations operating on a primary basis in the fixed satellite service in the...

  10. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  11. Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Naval Special Warfare Sea, Air, and Land Operators.

    PubMed

    Lovalekar, Mita; Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Wood, Dallas E; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to describe medical chart reviewed musculoskeletal injuries among Naval Special Warfare Sea, Air, and Land Operators. 210 Operators volunteered (age: 28.1 ± 6.0 years, height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, weight: 85.4 ± 9.3 kg). Musculoskeletal injury data were extracted from subjects' medical charts, and injuries that occurred during 1 year were described. Anatomic location of injury, cause of injury, activity when injury occurred, and injury type were described. The frequency of injuries was 0.025 per Operator per month. Most injuries involved the upper extremity (38.1% of injuries). Frequent anatomic sublocations for injuries were the shoulder (23.8%) and lumbopelvic region of the spine (12.7%). Lifting was the cause of 7.9% of injuries. Subjects were participating in training when 38.1% of injuries occurred and recreational activity/sports when 12.7% of injuries occurred. Frequent injury types were strain (20.6%), pain/spasm/ache (19.0%), fracture (11.1%), and sprain (11.1%). The results of this analysis underscore the need to investigate the risk factors, especially of upper extremity and physical activity related injuries, in this population of Operators. There is a scope for development of a focused, customized injury prevention program, targeting the unique injury profile of this population. PMID:26741478

  12. Operational vector-borne disease surveillance and control: closing the capabilities gap through research at overseas military laboratories.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian P; Clark, Jeffrey W; Barbara, Kathryn A; Mundal, Kirk D; Furman, Barry D; McAvin, James C; Richardson, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, leishmaniasis, and a myriad of other vector-borne diseases pose significant threats to the warfighter and to the overall combat effectiveness of units. Military preventive medicine (PM) assets must accurately evaluate the vector-borne disease threat and then implement and/or advise the commander on countermeasures to reduce a particular threat. The success of these measures is contingent upon the biology of the disease vector and on the tools or methods used to conduct vector/pathogen surveillance and vector control. There is a significant gap between the tools available and those required for operational PM assets to provide real-time, effective surveillance and control. A network of US Army and US Navy overseas laboratories is focused on closing the current capabilities gap. Their mission is to develop and field test tools and methods to enhance the combatant commander's ability to identify and mitigate the threat posed by these vector-borne diseases. PMID:20084734

  13. Conceptualizing the impact of special events on community health service levels: an operational analysis.

    PubMed

    Lund, Adam; Turris, Sheila A; Bowles, Ron

    2014-10-01

    Mass gatherings (MG) impact their host and surrounding communities and with inadequate planning, may impair baseline emergency health services. Mass gatherings do not occur in a vacuum; they have both consumptive and disruptive effects that extend beyond the event itself. Mass gatherings occur in real geographic locations that include not only the event site, but also the surrounding neighborhoods and communities. In addition, the impact of small, medium, or large special events may be felt for days, or even months, prior to and following the actual events. Current MG reports tend to focus on the events themselves during published event dates and may underestimate the full impact of a given MG on its host community. In order to account for, and mitigate, the full effects of MGs on community health services, researchers would benefit from a common model of community impact. Using an operations lens, two concepts are presented, the "vortex" and the "ripple," as metaphors and a theoretical model for exploring the broader impact of MGs on host communities. Special events and MGs impact host communities by drawing upon resources (vortex) and by disrupting normal, baseline services (ripple). These effects are felt with diminishing impact as one moves geographically further from the event center, and can be felt before, during, and after the event dates. Well executed medical and safety plans for events with appropriate, comprehensive risk assessments and stakeholder engagement have the best chance of ameliorating the potential negative impact of MGs on communities.

  14. NASA's Rodent Research Project: Validation of Flight Hardware, Operations and Science Capabilities for Conducting Long Duration Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. Y.; Beegle, J. E.; Wigley, C. L.; Pletcher, D.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Research using rodents is an essential tool for advancing biomedical research on Earth and in space. Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty C57BL/6J adult female mice were launched on Sept 21, 2014 in a Dragon Capsule (SpaceX-4), then transferred to the ISS for a total time of 21-22 days (10 commercial mice) or 37 (10 validation mice). Tissues collected on-orbit were either rapidly frozen or preserved in RNA later at less than or equal to -80 C (n=2/group) until their return to Earth. Remaining carcasses were rapidly frozen for dissection post-flight. The three controls groups at Kennedy Space Center consisted of: Basal mice euthanized at the time of launch, Vivarium controls, housed in standard cages, and Ground Controls (GC), housed in flight hardware within an environmental chamber. FLT mice appeared more physically active on-orbit than GC, and behavior analysis are in progress. Upon return to Earth, there were no differences in body weights between FLT and GC at the end of the 37 days in space. RNA was of high quality (RIN greater than 8.5). Liver enzyme activity levels of FLT mice and all control mice were similar in magnitude to those of the samples that were optimally processed in the laboratory. Liver samples collected from the intact frozen FLT carcasses had RNA RIN of 7.27 +/- 0.52, which was lower than that of the samples processed on-orbit, but similar to those obtained from the control group intact carcasses. Nonetheless, the RNA samples from the intact carcasses were acceptable for the most demanding transcriptomic analyses. Adrenal glands, thymus and spleen (organs associated with stress response) showed no significant difference in weights between FLT and GC. Enzymatic activity was also not significantly different. Over 3,000 tissues collected from the four groups of mice have become available for the Biospecimen Sharing

  15. The development of a preselection physical fitness training program for Canadian Special Operations Regiment applicants.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Mark J; Jaenen, Suzanne P

    2012-07-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) soldiers must undergo a rigorous selection process that requires high levels of physical fitness and stamina to complete. Physical preparedness is crucial for an applicant's performance during a selection process; preselection physical training programs for SOF applicants must be specific to the demands of the selection process. The purpose of this study was to analyze the physical demands of the Canadian Special Operations Regiment (CSOR) Assessment Center (AC) to develop an evidence-based physical fitness program to assist future applicants to CSOR with their physical preparation. Seventy-one men volunteered to undergo a battery of fitness tests before attending the CSOR AC. Forty-six (mean [SD]: age 26.2 [4.4] years, height 176.5 [7.4] cm, body mass 82.4 [10.1] kg) of the 71 participants further volunteered to participate in the characterization of the physical demands of the AC. Heart rate (HR) data were collected during the physically demanding sessions, and a subsequent task and physiological analysis was conducted to determine key performance variables for exercise prescription. The physically demanding sessions ranged in length from 26.38 (4.24) minutes to 668.52 (30.09) minutes, with the mean HR data ranging from 169.81 (6.64) to 97.51 (6.65) b·min⁻¹, respectively. Key predictors of completion of the AC were V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (βexp: 5.92; confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-31.0), and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squats (βexp: 5.16; CI: 1.2-22.2). The information derived from this study provided the foundation for the design of an evidence-based preparatory training program for future applicants that is reflective of the physical demands of the selection process.

  16. The development of a preselection physical fitness training program for Canadian Special Operations Regiment applicants.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Mark J; Jaenen, Suzanne P

    2012-07-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) soldiers must undergo a rigorous selection process that requires high levels of physical fitness and stamina to complete. Physical preparedness is crucial for an applicant's performance during a selection process; preselection physical training programs for SOF applicants must be specific to the demands of the selection process. The purpose of this study was to analyze the physical demands of the Canadian Special Operations Regiment (CSOR) Assessment Center (AC) to develop an evidence-based physical fitness program to assist future applicants to CSOR with their physical preparation. Seventy-one men volunteered to undergo a battery of fitness tests before attending the CSOR AC. Forty-six (mean [SD]: age 26.2 [4.4] years, height 176.5 [7.4] cm, body mass 82.4 [10.1] kg) of the 71 participants further volunteered to participate in the characterization of the physical demands of the AC. Heart rate (HR) data were collected during the physically demanding sessions, and a subsequent task and physiological analysis was conducted to determine key performance variables for exercise prescription. The physically demanding sessions ranged in length from 26.38 (4.24) minutes to 668.52 (30.09) minutes, with the mean HR data ranging from 169.81 (6.64) to 97.51 (6.65) b·min⁻¹, respectively. Key predictors of completion of the AC were V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (βexp: 5.92; confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-31.0), and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squats (βexp: 5.16; CI: 1.2-22.2). The information derived from this study provided the foundation for the design of an evidence-based preparatory training program for future applicants that is reflective of the physical demands of the selection process. PMID:22643138

  17. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  18. Development and Implementation of a New Physical Training Concept in the Norwegian Navy Special Operations Command.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Paul André; Paulsen, Gøran; Slaathaug, Ole Gunnar; Skare, Magnhild; Wood, Dallas; Huls, Shaun; Raastad, Truls

    2015-11-01

    A high level of physical fitness is one important factor for optimal performance in Special Operation Forces (SOF). Still, information about physical training for SOF operators is not easily accessible. This study aimed to implement and assess a new training concept in the Norwegian Navy SOF. A longitudinal study where 22 operators completed a 6-month linear periodization (LP), followed by a 6-month nonlinear periodization (NLP) program. Both protocols were block periodized, focusing on either strength or aerobic capacity. A battery of tests covering strength, endurance, power, mobility, and body composition was performed, and individual capacity analyses were established. A training week consisted of 5 to 6 sessions including 1 or 2 individualized sessions directed towards improving the weakest capacity. The LP had a clear effect on mobility (19 ± 9%), abdominal strength (25 ± 16%), upper body power (PowerUB; 6 ± 9%), standing long-jump (3 ± 6%), pull-ups (24 ± 31%), agility (2 ± 4%), V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (2 ± 3%), fat percent (-5 ± 31%), and muscle mass (1 ± 3%). The NLP increased abdominal strength (15 ± 17%), standing long-jump (3 ± 4%), and anaerobic capacity (10 ± 8%), whereas V[Combining Dot Above]O2 max (-3 ± 4%) and PowerUB (-2 ± 7%) decreased. Additional analyses showed clear increases among those individually instructed to improve strength. Results support the benefits of combined periodized programming and individualized training sessions among SOF operators with initially good fitness levels. Largest effects were observed in the first phase with the LP. However, subsequent NLP additionally increased anaerobic and jumping capacity, possibly due to more frequent muscular endurance and power training. Because of frequent interruptions, the LP tended to be more difficult to follow than the NLP and is suggested when continuity is possible, whereas an NLP is recommended for maintenance and when standing on national preparedness. PMID

  19. Block-Periodized Training Improves Physiological and Tactically Relevant Performance in Naval Special Warfare Operators.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Oliver, Jonathan M; Nagai, Takashi; Sell, Timothy C; Lovalekar, Mita T; Beals, Kim; Wood, Dallas E; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Human performance training and prevention strategies are necessary to promote physical readiness and mitigate musculoskeletal injuries of the Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Operator. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of 2 training programs when performed during a training evolution of Operators. A total of 85 Operators (experimental: n = 46, age: 29.4 ± 5.5 years, height: 176.7 ± 6.4 cm, mass: 86.7 ± 11.6 kg; control: n = 39, age: 29.0 ± 6.0 years, height: 177.1 ± 6.3 cm, mass: 85.7 ± 12.5 kg) participated in a trial to measure the effectiveness of these programs to improve physical, physiological, and performance characteristics. Operators in the experimental group performed a 12-week block-periodized program, whereas those in the control group performed a nonlinear periodized program. Pretesting/posttesting was performed to assess body composition, aerobic capacity/lactate threshold, muscular strength, flexibility, landing biomechanics, postural stability, and tactically relevant performance. The experimental group demonstrated a significant loss in body fat, fat mass, and body mass compared with the control group, whereas aerobic capacity increased for the both groups. The experimental group demonstrated a significant increase in posterior shoulder flexibility and ankle dorsiflexion, whereas the control group had a significant reduction in shoulder, knee, and ankle flexibility. The experimental group also improved landing strategies and balance. Both groups improved upper and lower muscular power and upper-body muscular endurance, whereas only the experimental group demonstrated significant improvements in agility and total body muscular strength. Implementation of a population-specific training program provides structured and progressive training effectively and promotes physical readiness concurrently with tactical training without overload.

  20. Design, operation, and monitoring capability of an experimental artificial-recharge facility at East Meadow, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, B.J.; Oaksford, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial recharge with tertiary-treated sewage is being tested at East Meadow to evaluate the physical and chemical effects on the groundwater system. The recharge facility contains 11 recharge basins and 5 injection wells and is designed to accept 4 million gallons of reclaimed water per day. Of the 11 basins, 7 are recently constructed and will accept 0.5 million gallons per day each. An observation manhole (12-foot inside diameter and extending 16 feet below the basin floor) was installed in each of two basins to enable monitoring and sampling of percolating reclaimed water in the unsaturated zone with instruments such as tensiometers, gravity lysimeters, thermocouples, and soil-gas samplers. Five shallow (100-feet deep) injection wells will each return 0.5 million gallons per day to the groundwater reservoir. Three types of injection-well design are being tested; the differences are in the type of gravel pack around the well screen. When clogging at the well screen occurs, redevelopment should restore the injection capability. Flow to the basins and wells is regulated by automatic flow controllers in which a desired flow rate is maintained by electronic sensors. Basins can also operate in a constant-head mode in which a specified head is maintained in the basin automatically. An observation-well network consisting of 2-inch- and 6-inch-diameter wells was installed within a 1-square-mile area at the recharge facility to monitor aquifer response and recharge. During 48 days of operation within a 17-week period (October 1982 through January 1983), 88.5 million gallons of reclaimed water was applied to the shallow water table aquifer through the recharge basins. A 4.29-foot-high groundwater mound developed during a 14-day test; some water level increase associated with the mound was detected 1,000 ft from the basins. Preliminary water quality data from wells affected by reclaimed water show evidence that mechanisms of mixing, dilution, and dispersion are

  1. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  2. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  3. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  4. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  5. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... certificated repairman with a light-sport aircraft maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or...

  6. 46 CFR 35.01-50 - Special operating requirements for tank barges carrying certain dangerous bulk cargoes-B/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... certain dangerous bulk cargoes-B/ALL. 35.01-50 Section 35.01-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Special operating requirements for tank barges carrying certain dangerous bulk cargoes—B/ALL. (a) The... closed and secured at all times. (f) During the time the cargo tanks contain dangerous cargoes...

  7. 46 CFR 35.01-50 - Special operating requirements for tank barges carrying certain dangerous bulk cargoes-B/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... certain dangerous bulk cargoes-B/ALL. 35.01-50 Section 35.01-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Special operating requirements for tank barges carrying certain dangerous bulk cargoes—B/ALL. (a) The... closed and secured at all times. (f) During the time the cargo tanks contain dangerous cargoes...

  8. 47 CFR 25.256 - Special Requirements for operations in the 3.65-3.7 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-3.7 GHz band. 25.256 Section 25.256 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.256 Special Requirements for... station, licensees of earth stations operating on a primary basis in the Fixed-Satellite Service in the...

  9. 47 CFR 25.256 - Special Requirements for operations in the 3.65-3.7 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-3.7 GHz band. 25.256 Section 25.256 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.256 Special Requirements for... station, licensees of earth stations operating on a primary basis in the fixed satellite service in the...

  10. 47 CFR 25.256 - Special Requirements for operations in the 3.65-3.7 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-3.7 GHz band. 25.256 Section 25.256 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.256 Special Requirements for... station, licensees of earth stations operating on a primary basis in the fixed satellite service in the...

  11. 47 CFR 25.256 - Special Requirements for operations in the 3.65-3.7 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-3.7 GHz band. 25.256 Section 25.256 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.256 Special Requirements for... station, licensees of earth stations operating on a primary basis in the Fixed-Satellite Service in the...

  12. A summary of capabilities and operations for the fluids and combustion facility Fluids Integrated Rack-first four experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Myron E.; Saavedra, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Long-term microgravity experiments will continue on-board the International Space Station (ISS). Glenn Research Center (GRC) is the implimenting center for microgravity research in the areas of combustion science, fluid physics and acceleration measurement disciplines. This paper focuses on the initial ISS facilities and capabilities envisioned for the first four fluids physics experiments. GRC is developing the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) to accommodate this first wave of experiments in the 2004 timeframe. Many capabilities are provided by FIR such as: cameras and illumination systems; command and data management systems; environmental control systems; electrical power subsystems; active rack isolation systems; and optics bench accommodations of investigator hardware. The first four experiments, in addition, require microscopy capability; and as well as other sophisticated optical diagnostics (e.g., light scattering). A multi-user apparatus was thus conceived that has developed into the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). The LMM experiments discussed include: ``Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB)'' (Prof. P. Wayner, RPI); ``Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment'' (PHaSE-2) (Prof. P. Chaikin, Princeton University); ``Physics of Colloids in Space'' (PCS-2) (Prof. D. Weitz, Harvard University); and the ``Colloidal Assembly in Binary Particle Suspensions'' (Prof. A. Yodh, University of Pennsylvania). .

  13. Knowledge Operation Capability Evaluation Model and Strategic Orientation of Supply Chain: Exploratory Research Based on View of Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen-Yong; Song, Ze-Qian

    The competitiveness of Supply Chain (SC) correlates intimately with its knowledge operation (KO). In order to realize better assessment value, this paper constructed an evaluation framework on knowledge operation of SC and a detailed index system. According to theory of ecology, expounded the evaluation orientation and future research direction from view of comprehensiveness and adaptability. Additionally, a case about Toyota recall-gate was analyzed. Through research, it provides two dimensions of results evaluating orientation which may help enterprise make right decision upon SC.

  14. MEDCAN-GRO: Medical Capacity for African Nations - Growing Regional Operability A Case Study in Special Operations Forces Capacity Building.

    PubMed

    Givens, Melissa L; Verlo, April

    2015-01-01

    Medical Capacity for African Nations-Growing Regional Operability (MEDCAN-GRO) is a framework for addressing healthcare engagements that are intended to provide sustainable capacity building with partner nations. MEDCAN-GRO provides SOF units with a model that can be scaled to partner nation needs and aligned with the goals of the TSOC in an effort to enhance partner nation security.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply to: (a) Operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 in airplanes with a passenger seating... following, in addition to requirements set forth in 14 CFR 91.107, 121.571, or 135.117: (a) Water...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply to: (a) Operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 in airplanes with a passenger seating... following, in addition to requirements set forth in 14 CFR 91.107, 121.571, or 135.117: (a) Water...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply to: (a) Operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 in airplanes with a passenger seating... following, in addition to requirements set forth in 14 CFR 91.107, 121.571, or 135.117: (a) Water...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply to: (a) Operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 in airplanes with a passenger seating... following, in addition to requirements set forth in 14 CFR 91.107, 121.571, or 135.117: (a) Water...

  19. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply to: (a) Operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 in airplanes with a passenger seating... following, in addition to requirements set forth in 14 CFR 91.107, 121.571, or 135.117: (a) Water...

  20. 76 FR 58077 - Seventy-Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 147: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment AGENCY: Federal... Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment...: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems...

  1. Design of a Versatile, Teleoperable, Towable Lifting Machine with Robotic Capabilities for Use in Nasa's Lunar Base Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Elizabeth; Ogle, James; Schoppe, Dean

    1989-01-01

    The lifting machine will assist in lifting cargo off of landers sent to the Moon and in the construction of a lunar base. Three possible designs were considered for the overall configuration of the lifting machine: the variable angle crane, the tower crane, and the gantry crane. Alternate designs were developed for the major components of the lifting machine. A teleoperable, variable angle crane was chosen as its final design. The design consists of a telescoping boom mounted to a chassis that is supported by two conical wheels for towing and four outriggers for stability. Attached to the end of the boom is a seven degree of freedom robot arm for light, dexterous, lifting operations. A cable and hook suspends from the end of the boom for heavy, gross, lifting operations. Approximate structural sizes were determined for the lifter and its components. However, further analysis is needed to determine the optimum design dimensions. The design team also constructed a model of the design which demonstrates its features and operating principals.

  2. A taco complex derived from a bis-crown ether capable of executing molecular logic operation through reversible complexation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amal Kumar; Das, Priyadip; Mahato, Prasenjit; Acharya, Suhash; Das, Amitava

    2012-08-17

    As learned from natural systems, self-assembly and self-sorting help in interconnecting different molecular logic gates and thus achieve high-level logic functions. In this context, demonstration of important logic operations using changes in optical responses due to the formation of molecular assemblies is even more desirable for the construction of a molecular computer. Synthesis of an appropriate divalent as well as a luminescent crown ether based host 1 and paraquat derivatives, 2(PF(6))(2) and 3(PF(6))(2), as guests helped in demonstrating a reversible [3](taco complex) (1·{2(PF(6))(2)}(2) or 1·{3(PF(6))(2)}(2)) formation in nonpolar solvent. Detailed (1)H NMR studies revealed that two paraquat units were bound cooperatively by the two crown units in 1. Because of preorganization, the flexible host molecule 1 adopts a folded conformation, where each of two paraquat units remain sandwiched between the two aromatic units of each folded crown ether moiety in 1. Disassembly of the "taco" complex in the presence of KPF(6) and reassembly on subsequent addition of DB18C6 was initially demonstrated by (1)H NMR spectral studies, which were subsequently corroborated through luminescence spectral studies. Further, luminescence spectral responses as output signals with appropriate and two independent molecular inputs could be correlated to demonstrate basic logic operation like OR and YES gates, while the results of the three molecular inputs could be utilized to demonstrate important logic operation like an INHIBIT gate.

  3. 49 CFR 37.191 - Special provision for small mixed-service operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... small mixed-service operators. (a) For purposes of this section, a small mixed-service operator is a...) of this section may conduct all its trips, including fixed-route trips, on an advance-reservation basis as provided for demand-responsive trips in § 37.189. Such an operator is not required to...

  4. 49 CFR 37.191 - Special provision for small mixed-service operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... small mixed-service operators. (a) For purposes of this section, a small mixed-service operator is a...) of this section may conduct all its trips, including fixed-route trips, on an advance-reservation basis as provided for demand-responsive trips in § 37.189. Such an operator is not required to...

  5. 49 CFR 37.191 - Special provision for small mixed-service operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... small mixed-service operators. (a) For purposes of this section, a small mixed-service operator is a...) of this section may conduct all its trips, including fixed-route trips, on an advance-reservation basis as provided for demand-responsive trips in § 37.189. Such an operator is not required to...

  6. Corneal foreign body management at a role 1 flight line aid station: risks, benefits, and implications for Special Operations medicine.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Christopher J; Enzenauer, Robert W; Wenkel, Jack W; Henke, Jessica L; Rohrbough, Christiana K; Miller, Stephanie L; Howerton, Paul H; Schreffler, James P

    2014-01-01

    Eye injuries are common in forward areas of operations. Definitive diagnosis and care may be limited not by provider skill but rather by available equipment. The ability to treat simple trauma such as corneal foreign bodies at the Role 1 level has advantages including rapid return to duty, decreased cost of treatment, and, most important, decreased risk of delayed care. We propose the device such as a hand-held portable slit lamp should be made available for appropriate Special Operations Medical Forces (SOFMED) or aviation providers.

  7. 36 CFR 261.1a - Special use authorizations, contracts and operating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.1a Special use authorizations, contracts... National Forest System in accordance with authority which is delegated elsewhere in this chapter or in the... act or omission that would otherwise be a violation of a subpart A or subpart C regulation or...

  8. International Labour Standards and Technical Co-Operation: The Case of Special Public Works Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Jean

    1989-01-01

    Applies international labor standards to results of the International Labour Office's special public works programs to discover whether program intentions have been met. Finds that while productive employment has been pursued, popular participation is not occurring and such issues as (1) forced labor, (2) child employment, and (3) inequality of…

  9. 76 FR 81360 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane, Operation Without Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... 27, 2011 (76 FR 66660). No comments were received, and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... generation and distribution architecture is equipped with an auxiliary power unit (APU) and is not equipped... power, which is generated by the airplane's engine generators or APU is not extremely improbable....

  10. 76 FR 7107 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    .../2008 USCG-2008-0948 Shark River Channel, NJ.. Safety Zones (Part 165)...... 10/3/2008 USCG-2008-0981... 165)...... 3/6/2009 USCG-2009-0095 White River Safety Zones (Part 165)...... 12/22/2008 USCG-2009-0096...)...... 7/2/2009 USCG-2009-0564 Great Lakes Special Local Regulation 6/26/2009 (Part 100)....

  11. A taco complex derived from a bis-crown ether capable of executing molecular logic operation through reversible complexation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amal Kumar; Das, Priyadip; Mahato, Prasenjit; Acharya, Suhash; Das, Amitava

    2012-08-17

    As learned from natural systems, self-assembly and self-sorting help in interconnecting different molecular logic gates and thus achieve high-level logic functions. In this context, demonstration of important logic operations using changes in optical responses due to the formation of molecular assemblies is even more desirable for the construction of a molecular computer. Synthesis of an appropriate divalent as well as a luminescent crown ether based host 1 and paraquat derivatives, 2(PF(6))(2) and 3(PF(6))(2), as guests helped in demonstrating a reversible [3](taco complex) (1·{2(PF(6))(2)}(2) or 1·{3(PF(6))(2)}(2)) formation in nonpolar solvent. Detailed (1)H NMR studies revealed that two paraquat units were bound cooperatively by the two crown units in 1. Because of preorganization, the flexible host molecule 1 adopts a folded conformation, where each of two paraquat units remain sandwiched between the two aromatic units of each folded crown ether moiety in 1. Disassembly of the "taco" complex in the presence of KPF(6) and reassembly on subsequent addition of DB18C6 was initially demonstrated by (1)H NMR spectral studies, which were subsequently corroborated through luminescence spectral studies. Further, luminescence spectral responses as output signals with appropriate and two independent molecular inputs could be correlated to demonstrate basic logic operation like OR and YES gates, while the results of the three molecular inputs could be utilized to demonstrate important logic operation like an INHIBIT gate. PMID:22834483

  12. Demonstration of a Real Time Capability to Produce Tidal Heights and Currents for Naval Operational Use: A Cast Study for the West Coast of Africa (Liberia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, Avichal; Anantharaj, Valentine; Payne, Steve; Kantha, Lakshmi

    1996-01-01

    This report documents an existing capability to produce operationally relevant products on sea level and currents from a tides/storm surge model for any coastal region around the world within 48 hours from the time of the request. The model is ready for transition to the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) for potential contingency use anywhere around the world. A recent application to naval operations offshore Liberia illustrates this. Mississippi State University, in collaboration with the University of Colorado and NAVOCEANO, successfully deployed the Colorado University Rapidly Relocatable Nestable Tides and Storm Surge (CURReNTSS) model that predicts sea surface height, tidal currents and storm surge, and provided operational products on tidal sea level and currents in the littoral region off south-western coast of Africa. This report summarizes the results of this collaborative effort in an actual contingency use of the relocatable model, summarizes the lessons learned, and provides recommendations for further evaluation and transition of this modeling capability to operational use.

  13. Operating Modes and Cooling Capabilities of the Flight ADR for the SXS Instrument on Astro-H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The microcalorimeter array on the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on Astro-H requires cooling to 50 mK, which will be accomplished by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR is surrounded by a cryogenic system consisting of a superfluid helium tank, a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, and additional 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers that pre-cool the JT cooler and radiation shields within the cryostat. The unique ADR design allows the instrument to meet all of its science requirements using either the stored cryogen or the JT cryocooler as its heat sink, giving the instrument an unusual degree of tolerance for component failures or degradation in the cryogenic system. The flight detector assembly, ADR and dewar were integrated in early 2014, and have since been extensively characterized and calibrated. At present, the four instruments are being integrated with the spacecraft in preparation for an early 2016 launch. This presentation summarizes the operation and performance of the ADR in all of its operating modes.

  14. An Assessment of Hickam Air Force Base's Capability to Support Strategic Airlift Throughput when Operating under an Avian Flu Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Brigantic, Robert T.; Campbell, James R.; Doctor, Pamela G.; Johnson, Alan; Coomber, P.

    2006-03-10

    Hickam Air Force Base (AFB), Hawaii provides an ideal waypoint for U.S. strategic airlift aircraft to refuel and receive other services on their way to Northeast and Southeast Asia from the continental United States. Hickam AFB also serves as a critical aerial port of debarkation (APOD) for deploying U.S. forces and equipment to more distant lands as needed. Making use of the United States Transportation Command’s Aerial Port of Debarkation Plus model, this paper examines the ability of Hickam AFB to serve in its important role as an APOD when operating under the effects of a major avian flu pandemic. In this regard, the major influence on Hickam AFB will be a serious degradation to the number of available personnel to service aircraft and operate Hickam AFB’s aerial port. It is noted that the results presented herein are based on simplistic attrition rate assumptions. Nonetheless, it is envisioned that this work is applicable to more realistic input attrition rates as avian flu epidemiological models are refined, as well as attrition associated with other types of contagious pandemic disease or willful biological warfare attack.

  15. Introducing an operational method to forecast long-term regional drought based on the application of artificial intelligence capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousari, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Mitra Esmaeilzadeh; Ahani, Hossein; Hakimelahi, Hemila

    2015-09-01

    An effective forecast of the drought definitely gives lots of advantages in regard to the management of water resources being used in agriculture, industry, and households consumption. To introduce such a model applying simple data inputs, in this study a regional drought forecast method on the basis of artificial intelligence capabilities (artificial neural networks) and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI in 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 monthly series) has been presented in Fars Province of Iran. The precipitation data of 41 rain gauge stations were applied for computing SPI values. Besides, weather signals including Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), NINO1+2, anomaly NINO1+2, NINO3, anomaly NINO3, NINO4, anomaly NINO4, NINO3.4, and anomaly NINO3.4 were also used as the predictor variables for SPI time series forecast the next 12 months. Frequent testing and validating steps were considered to obtain the best artificial neural networks (ANNs) models. The forecasted values were mapped in verification sector then they were compared with the observed maps at the same dates. Results showed considerable spatial and temporal relationships even among the maps of different SPI time series. Also, the first 6 months forecasted maps showed an average of 73 % agreements with the observed ones. The most important finding and the strong point of this study was the fact that although drought forecast in each station and time series was completely independent, the relationships between spatial and temporal predictions remained. This strong point mainly referred to frequent testing and validating steps in order to explore the best drought forecast models from plenty of produced ANNs models. Finally, wherever the precipitation data are available, the practical application of the presented method is possible.

  16. 76 FR 66660 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane, Operation Without Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... power generation and distribution architecture is equipped with an essential APU and not equipped with a... generators or auxiliary power unit (APU) is not extremely improbable. Thus, it must be demonstrated that the... multiple start attempts of the engines and APU. This capability must be provided in addition to...

  17. A Methodology to Assess the Capability of Engine Designs to Meet Closed-Loop Performance and Operability Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Csank, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Designing a closed-loop controller for an engine requires balancing trade-offs between performance and operability of the system. One such trade-off is the relationship between the 95 percent response time and minimum high-pressure compressor (HPC) surge margin (SM) attained during acceleration from idle to takeoff power. Assuming a controller has been designed to meet some specification on response time and minimum HPC SM for a mid-life (nominal) engine, there is no guarantee that these limits will not be violated as the engine ages, particularly as it reaches the end of its life. A characterization for the uncertainty in this closed-loop system due to aging is proposed that defines elliptical boundaries to estimate worst-case performance levels for a given control design point. The results of this characterization can be used to identify limiting design points that bound the possible controller designs yielding transient results that do not exceed specified limits in response time or minimum HPC SM. This characterization involves performing Monte Carlo simulation of the closed-loop system with controller constructed for a set of trial design points and developing curve fits to describe the size and orientation of each ellipse; a binary search procedure is then employed that uses these fits to identify the limiting design point. The method is demonstrated through application to a generic turbofan engine model in closed-loop with a simplified controller; it is found that the limit for which each controller was designed was exceeded by less than 4.76 percent. Extension of the characterization to another trade-off, that between the maximum high-pressure turbine (HPT) entrance temperature and minimum HPC SM, showed even better results: the maximum HPT temperature was estimated within 0.76 percent. Because of the accuracy in this estimation, this suggests another limit that may be taken into consideration during design and analysis. It also demonstrates the extension

  18. A Methodology to Assess the Capability of Engine Designs to Meet Closed-loop Performance and Operability Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Designing a closed-loop controller for an engine requires balancing trade-offs between performance and operability of the system. One such trade-off is the relationship between the 95% response time and minimum high-pressure compressor (HPC) surge margin (SM) attained during acceleration from idle to takeoff power. Assuming a controller has been designed to meet some specification on response time and minimum HPC SM for a mid-life (nominal) engine, there is no guarantee that these limits will not be violated as the engine ages, particularly as it reaches the end of its life. A characterization for the uncertainty in this closed-loop system due to aging is proposed that defines elliptical boundaries to estimate worst-case performance levels for a given control design point. The results of this characterization can be used to identify limiting design points that bound the possible con- troller designs yielding transient results that do not exceed specified limits in response time or minimum HPC SM. This characterization involves performing Monte Carlo simulation of the closed-loop system with controller constructed for a set of trial design points and developing curve fits to describe the size and orientation of each ellipse; a binary search procedure is then employed that uses these fits to identify the limiting design point. The method is demonstrated through application to a generic turbofan engine model in closed- loop with a simplified controller; it is found that the limit for which each controller was designed was exceeded by less than 4.76%. Extension of the characterization to another trade-off, that between the maximum high-pressure turbine (HPT) entrance temperature and minimum HPC SM, showed even better results: the maximum HPT temperature was estimated within 0.76%. Because of the accuracy in this estimation, this suggests another limit that may be taken into consideration during design and analysis. It also demonstrates the extension of the

  19. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights along the edge of the construction areas... Officer, with red obstruction lights at nights. All equipment operating on the apron, taxiway, runway, and... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following...

  20. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights along the edge of the construction areas... Officer, with red obstruction lights at nights. All equipment operating on the apron, taxiway, runway, and... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following...

  1. 78 FR 21159 - Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR... Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's Approval of the Information... Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be submitted...

  2. Vocational Agriculture Training Program: Safe Tractor and Farm Machinery Operation. Special Paper No. 8. Second Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, Frank; Doss, Howard

    The publication was prepared for the United States Office of Education for use by teachers who direct agricultural training programs in safe tractor operation and safe farm machinery operation that comply with the United States Department of Labor regulations on hazardous occupations in agriculture. Upon successful completion of these training…

  3. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  4. A Description of the Development, Capabilities, and Operational Status of the Test SLATE Data Acquisition System at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Wright, James D.; Simmons, Scott A.; Bobbitt, Lynn E.; DeMoss, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper will present a brief background of the previous data acquisition system at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the reasoning and goals behind the upgrade to the current Test SLATE (Test Software Laboratory and Automated Testing Environments) data acquisition system. The components, performance characteristics, and layout of the Test SLATE system within the NTF control room will be discussed. The development, testing, and integration of Test SLATE within NTF operations will be detailed. The operational capabilities of the system will be outlined including: test setup, instrumentation calibration, automatic test sequencer setup, data recording, communication between data and facility control systems, real time display monitoring, and data reduction. The current operational status of the Test SLATE system and its performance during recent NTF testing will be highlighted including high-speed, frame-by-frame data acquisition with conditional sampling post-processing applied. The paper concludes with current development work on the system including the capability for real-time conditional sampling during data acquisition and further efficiency enhancements to the wind tunnel testing process.

  5. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Locations at which solo student, sport, and recreational pilot activity is not permitted. Pursuant to § 91.131(b)(2), solo student, sport, and recreational pilot operations are not permitted at any of...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Locations at which solo student, sport, and recreational pilot activity is not permitted. Pursuant to § 91.131(b)(2), solo student, sport, and recreational pilot operations are not permitted at any of...

  7. 75 FR 20671 - Seventieth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 147: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment AGENCY: Federal... Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment meeting. SUMMARY...: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems...

  8. 75 FR 52590 - Seventy-First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 147: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment AGENCY: Federal... Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment meeting. SUMMARY...: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems...

  9. Some special properties of the neutron transport operator in bounded geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtar-Kharroubi, M.

    1987-11-01

    Existence and nonexistence eigenvalue results are given. We also estimate the leading eigenvalue of the transport operator in terms of some geometrical parameters of the configuration space. Some results related to the criticality problem are given.

  10. 14 CFR 121.355 - Equipment for operations on which specialized means of navigation are used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... (a) No certificate holder may conduct an operation— (1) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... approved in accordance with appendix G to this part; or (2) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... authorized for the particular operation. (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, Doppler Radar...

  11. 14 CFR 121.355 - Equipment for operations on which specialized means of navigation are used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) No certificate holder may conduct an operation— (1) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... approved in accordance with appendix G to this part; or (2) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... authorized for the particular operation. (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, Doppler Radar...

  12. 14 CFR 121.355 - Equipment for operations on which specialized means of navigation are used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (a) No certificate holder may conduct an operation— (1) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... approved in accordance with appendix G to this part; or (2) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... authorized for the particular operation. (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, Doppler Radar...

  13. 14 CFR 121.355 - Equipment for operations on which specialized means of navigation are used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (a) No certificate holder may conduct an operation— (1) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... approved in accordance with appendix G to this part; or (2) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... authorized for the particular operation. (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, Doppler Radar...

  14. 14 CFR 121.355 - Equipment for operations on which specialized means of navigation are used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (a) No certificate holder may conduct an operation— (1) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... approved in accordance with appendix G to this part; or (2) Using Doppler Radar or an Inertial Navigation... authorized for the particular operation. (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, Doppler Radar...

  15. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following clause... daylight hours and by red lights at other times. The red lights along the edge of the construction areas... electric or battery type lights. These lights and flags shall be placed so as to outline the...

  16. 43 CFR 3809.100 - What special provisions apply to operations on segregated or withdrawn lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management General Information § 3809... examination report. After the date on which the lands are withdrawn from appropriation under the mining laws... segregation or withdrawal date, whichever is earlier; and (ii) Approve a plan of operations for the...

  17. 43 CFR 3809.100 - What special provisions apply to operations on segregated or withdrawn lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management General Information § 3809... examination report. After the date on which the lands are withdrawn from appropriation under the mining laws... segregation or withdrawal date, whichever is earlier; and (ii) Approve a plan of operations for the...

  18. 43 CFR 3809.100 - What special provisions apply to operations on segregated or withdrawn lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management General Information § 3809... examination report. After the date on which the lands are withdrawn from appropriation under the mining laws... segregation or withdrawal date, whichever is earlier; and (ii) Approve a plan of operations for the...

  19. 43 CFR 3809.100 - What special provisions apply to operations on segregated or withdrawn lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management General Information § 3809... examination report. After the date on which the lands are withdrawn from appropriation under the mining laws... segregation or withdrawal date, whichever is earlier; and (ii) Approve a plan of operations for the...

  20. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-3 - Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principles (i.e., commercial using 48 CFR 31.2, nonprofit using OMB Circular A-122, or university-affiliated... operating contractor should be classified as direct or indirect (overhead or G&A) charges to the contract... appropriate for laboratories (science/technology and support) is rated at less than the target level...

  1. 76 FR 8314 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Operation Without Normal Electric Power

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... power unit (APU) generated electrical power inoperative. Service experience has shown that loss of all electrical power from the airplane's engine and APU driven generators is not extremely improbable. Thus... failure must be made. 4. Availability of APU operation should not be considered in establishing...

  2. Minimal number of runs and the sequential scheme for local discrimination between special unitary operations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Qing; Yang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Tian, Guo-Jing; Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that any two different multipartite unitary operations are perfectly distinguishable by local operations and classical communication with a finite number of runs. Meanwhile, two open questions were left. One is how to determine the minimal number of runs needed for the local discrimination, and the other is whether a perfect local discrimination can be achieved by merely a sequential scheme. In this paper, we answer the two questions for some unitary operations U1 and U2 with locally unitary equivalent to a diagonal unitary matrix in a product basis. Specifically, we give the minimal number of runs needed for the local discrimination, which is the same with that needed for the global discrimination. In this sense, the local operation works the same with the global one. Moreover, when adding the local property to U1 or U2, we present that the perfect local discrimination can be also realized by merely a sequential scheme with the minimal number of runs. Both results contribute to saving the resources used for the discrimination. PMID:27221229

  3. Minimal number of runs and the sequential scheme for local discrimination between special unitary operations

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tian-Qing; Yang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Tian, Guo-Jing; Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that any two different multipartite unitary operations are perfectly distinguishable by local operations and classical communication with a finite number of runs. Meanwhile, two open questions were left. One is how to determine the minimal number of runs needed for the local discrimination, and the other is whether a perfect local discrimination can be achieved by merely a sequential scheme. In this paper, we answer the two questions for some unitary operations U1 and U2 with locally unitary equivalent to a diagonal unitary matrix in a product basis. Specifically, we give the minimal number of runs needed for the local discrimination, which is the same with that needed for the global discrimination. In this sense, the local operation works the same with the global one. Moreover, when adding the local property to U1 or U2, we present that the perfect local discrimination can be also realized by merely a sequential scheme with the minimal number of runs. Both results contribute to saving the resources used for the discrimination. PMID:27221229

  4. 77 FR 45921 - Alaskan Fuel Hauling as a Restricted Category Special Purpose Flight Operation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... the Federal Register (74 FR 39242) in which the FAA proposed to specify Alaskan fuel hauling as a... Purpose Flight Operation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), (DOT). ACTION: Notice of policy... submitted was, ``The transport of the fuel could be made safer by limiting the payload on each flight to...

  5. ISS Operations for the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Experiences from the Robotic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (RSEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinler, Anthony B.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will present a new era of telerobotic operations on-orbit. Operating the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) in its tasks of maintaining the multitude of Space Station Orbital Replaceable Units (ORUs) creates numerous operational considerations not seen in the existing Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) or the future Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The differences between the large arms and the dexterous arm greatly affect the interconnection of man, robot, and task. This paper presents some of the issues arising from this new breed of on-orbit robotics as garnered from over three years of ORU testing experience within the Robotic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (RSEL) at NASA Johnson Space Center. The effects of new robotic features on operations, the issues surrounding targets and visual cues, the differences in operating with Force Moment Accommodation (FMA), the effects of changes in task complexity and scale, the lack of supporting flight information, and the changes in procedures required by the dexterous task will be discussed.

  6. Bacteriology of Air-Conditioning Ducts with Special Reference to Operating Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Peter; Doherty, Jane

    1963-01-01

    The number of bacteria in air, before filtration with five different easily available filters in the low positive-pressure type of airconditioning system of the Winnipeg General Hospital, was between 3 and 4/cu. ft., and after filtration between 1 and 2/cu. ft. with all types of filters. Cl. welchii contributed about 1% and Staph. pyogenes about 0.1% of this total. Sampling the exhaust air from an operating room during an operation showed that the bacterial count fluctuated with the degree of activity in the room and was from two to 10 times as high as in the air delivered to the room. Atlhough every reasonable attempt should be made to diminish the bacterial count of air in hospitals, if much energy and money is to be spent it would probably be wiser to investigate sources of hospital infection other than the type of air-conditioning system described in this report. PMID:13998955

  7. Transit satellite system timing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finsod, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Current time transfer capabilities of the Transit Satellite System are reviewed. Potential improvements in the changes in equipment and operational procedures using operational satellites are discussed.

  8. Special report on antitrust. Part One: Antitrust constraints on the creation and operation of joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Enders, R J

    1988-02-01

    In a few areas of the country the phrase "health care joint venture" is still almost unknown. In most areas, however, such ventures are becoming common, and in many parts of the country there is truly a plethora of joint venture activity in the industry. The antitrust treatment of the formation and operation of these affiliations is therefore an area of increased concern for industry executives. This first of a two-part series for the Newsletter will describe the general framework for an antitrust evaluation of a joint venture. Next month's article will discuss specific situations.

  9. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    PubMed

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  10. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  11. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin; Ya-Tang Cheng

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  13. The Effect of Different Operations Modes on Science Capabilities During the 2010 Desert-RATS Test: Insights from the Geologist Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Young, Kelsey E.; Rice, James W., Jr.; Garry, W. Brent

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Desert RATS field test utilized two Space Exploration Vehicles (prototype planetary rovers) and four crewmembers (2 per rover) to conduct a geologic traverse across northern Arizona while testing continuous and twice-per-day communications paired with operation modes of separating and exploring individually (Divide & Conquer) and exploring together (Lead & Follow), respectively. This report provides qualitative conclusions from the geologist crewmembers involved in this test as to how these modes of communications and operations affected our ability to conduct field geology. Each mode of communication and operation provided beneficial capabilities that might be further explored for future Human Spaceflight Missions to other solar system objects. We find that more frequent interactions between crews and an Apollo-style Science Team on the Earth best enables scientific progress during human exploration. However, during multiple vehicle missions, this communication with an Earth-based team of scientists, who represent "more minds on the problem", should not come at the exclusion of (or significantly decrease) communication between the crewmembers in different vehicles who have the "eyes on the ground". Inter-crew communications improved when discussions with a backroom were infrequent. Both aspects are critical and cannot be mutually exclusive. Increased vehicle separation distances best enable encounters with multiple geologic units. However, seemingly redundant visits by multiple vehicles to the same feature can be utilized to provide improved process-related observations about the development and modification of the local terrain. We consider the value of data management, transfer, and accessibility to be the most important lesson learned. Crews and backrooms should have access to all data and related interpretations within the mission in as close to real-time conditions as possible. This ensures that while on another planetary surface, crewmembers are as

  14. Bioculture System Expanding ISS Capabilities for Space Biosciences Research and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Kevin Y.

    2013-01-01

    Oral presentation at the ASGSR 2013 Annual Meeting. The presentation describes the NASA Bioculture System hardware design, capabilities, enabling science research capabilities, and flight concept of operations. The presentation is part of the Enabling Technologies special session and will be presented to perspective users in both academics and commercial communities.

  15. Plans for National Ignition Facility operations training and operations procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Mantrom, D.D., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A preliminary plan for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Operations training developed for the 200+ staff anticipated to operate the NIF facility is discussed. We also address the development and implementation of NIF Operations procedures. These procedures serve as an essential part of the staff training program. A special aspect of NIF Operations procedures is that they will be on-line with electronic links to design, operations, and test databases, and will likely incorporate electronic checklists and archiving capabilities.

  16. Aspects on the design, implementation, and simulation of a tracked mini robot destined for special applications in theatres of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrişor, Silviu-Mihai; Bârsan, GhiÅ£Ä.ƒ

    2013-12-01

    The authors of this paper wish to highlight elements regarding the organology, functioning and simulation, in a real workspace, of a tracked mini robot structure destined for special applications in theatres of operation, a technological product which is subject to a national patent granted to our institution (patent no. RO a 2012 01051), the result of research activities undertaken under a contract won by national competition, a grant for young research teams, PN-RUTE- 2010 type. The issues outlined in this paper are aspects related to the original invention in comparison with other mini-robot structures, the inventors presenting succinctly the technological product description and its applicability both in the military and applicative area as well as in the educational one. Additionally, the advantages of using the technological product are shown in a real workspace, the constructive and functional solution before, finally, presenting, based on the modelling of the mechanical structure of the tilting module attached to the mini-robot, an application on the simulation and programming of the mini-robot under study.

  17. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  18. Single-Leg Balance Impairments Persist in Fully Operational Military Special Forces Operators With a Previous History of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Timothy C.; Clark, Nicholas C.; Wood, Dallas; Abt, John P.; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single-leg balance (SLB) can be chronically impaired after low back pain (LBP). Impaired SLB is a risk factor for recurrent LBP and lower extremity injury. In the United States military, the special forces operator (SFO) deploys on high-risk missions under extreme conditions, and impaired SLB can potentially threaten SFO safety and mission success. Purpose: To compare SLB in fully operational SFOs with and without a history of LBP. The hypothesis was that SLB deficits would be present in SFOs with a history of LBP. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 226 SFOs were included in this analysis. Comparisons were made between SFOs with and without medical chart documented history of LBP (LBP group [n = 43]: mean age = 31.2 ± 10.3 years, mean height = 177.3 ± 7.2 cm, mean mass = 87.3 ± 11.8 kg; healthy group [n = 183]: mean age = 28.0 ± 6.0 years, mean height = 177.9 ± 6.0 cm, mean mass = 84.9 ± 8.8 kg). Bilateral SLB was tested (eyes open and eyes closed) in both groups using a force plate. The variability in the ground-reaction forces was averaged across 3 trials for each leg for both conditions. Comparisons were made between legs in the LBP and between the LBP and healthy group (α = .05). Results: There were significant between-group differences for each leg for both conditions, with the healthy group demonstrating better SLB compared with the LBP group. P values ranged from .01 to .03. Conclusion: Impaired SLB persists in SFOs with previously reported LBP. Balance assessments of individuals who report LBP may assist with designing targeted interventions to address potential deficits that may increase the risk of future injury. Clinical Relevance: SFOs with a known history of LBP would benefit from examination of SLB and may benefit from balance training to resolve any deficits that may be present to lower the potential risk for future injury. PMID:26535329

  19. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 380 - Public Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 380 of the Special Regulations of the Department...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 380 of the Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR Part 380) A Appendix A to Part 380 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  20. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 380 - Public Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 380 of the Special Regulations of the Department...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 380 of the Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR Part 380) A Appendix A to Part 380 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Bases for the Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings for HFIR Operation at 100 MW and 468 psig Primary Pressure, Using Specially Selected Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rothrock, R.B.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes thermal hydraulic analyses performed to support HFIR operation at 100 MW and 468 psig pressure using specially selected fuel elements. The analyses were performed with the HFIR steady state heat transfer code, originally developed during HFIR design. This report addresses the increased core heat removal capability which can be achieved in fuel elements having coolant channel thicknesses that exceed the minimum requirements of the HFIR fuel fabrication specifications. Specific requirements for the minimum value of effective uniform as-built coolant channel thickness are established for fuel elements to be used at 100 MW. The burnout correlation currently used in the steady-state heat transfer code was also compared with more recent experimental results for stability of high-velocity flow in narrow heated channels, and the burnout correlation was found to be conservative with respect to flow stability at typical HFIR hot channel exit conditions at full power.

  2. Design of Training Systems Utility Assessment: The Training Process Flow and System Capabilities/Requirements and Resources Models Operating in the TRAPAC Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Larry R.

    The report summarizes the results of a field test conducted for the purpose of determining the utility to Naval training of the Systems Capabilities/Requirements and Resources (SCRR) and the Training Process Flow (TPF) computer-based mathematical models. Basic descriptions of the SCRR and the TPF and their development are given. Training…

  3. Information warfare analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J.

    1998-11-18

    With the rapid growth of global computing and communications, information security is a critical issue in all national infrastructure protection discussions. The purpose of our LDRD project-the Information Operations, Warfare, and Assurance (IOWA) initiative-is to advance the enabling core technologies of this field. Special emphasis is placed on computer networks and telecommunication systems. During FY 1998, we developed (1) techniques for identifying the topology of large, complex computer networks, (2) data representation models for these systems, (3) high-performance methods for visualizing the resulting complex models, (4) automated analysis methods for processing large network representations, (5) specialized search techniques for isolating vulnerabilities, (6) a foundation for simulating network operation, and (7) an assessment methodology for determining the consequences of system component failure or disruption.

  4. 17 CFR 210.6-08 - Special provisions applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount certificates. 210.6-08 Section 210.6-08... applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount certificates. Statements of operations filed by issuers of face-amount certificates shall comply with the following provisions: Statements...

  5. Region VII Special Education Services Center; An Operational Proposal by the Pine Bluff School District No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine Bluff School District 3, AR.

    A special education service center was proposed, to be located at a children's clinic and to provide mobile on site services to school districts in an eight county area. Regional services were to include the following: diagnosis and evaluation of children with poor academic skills; perceptual development treatment and physical, occupational, and…

  6. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 372 - Overseas Military Personnel Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 372 of the Special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR Part 372) A Appendix A to Part 372 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overseas Military Personnel Charter... Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR Part 372) Know all men by these...

  7. Telementoring for airway management between a far forward special operations location to a major medical center using inexpensive telemedicine solutions.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Daniel; Boedeker, Ben H; Bernhagen, Mary; Miljkovic, Nikola; Nicholas Iv, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients in remote settings have limited access to specialized care. Telemedicine/telementoring can improve access to quality care, although VTC equipment is costly. This study showed that an inexpensive internet telecom software program can be effectively employed in the intubation training of a remote trainee. PMID:22356988

  8. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 372 - Overseas Military Personnel Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 372 of the Special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR Part 372) A Appendix A to Part 372 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR Part 372) Know all men by these presents... America in the sum of ________ (see § 372.24(a), 14 CFR Part 372) for which payment, well and truly to...

  9. 17 CFR 210.6-08 - Special provisions applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940, AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Registered Investment Companies § 210.6-08 Special...

  10. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  11. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  12. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  13. Validity, Reliability, and Performance Determinants of a New Job-Specific Anaerobic Work Capacity Test for the Norwegian Navy Special Operations Command.

    PubMed

    Angeltveit, Andreas; Paulsen, Gøran; Solberg, Paul A; Raastad, Truls

    2016-02-01

    Operators in Special Operation Forces (SOF) have a particularly demanding profession where physical and psychological capacities can be challenged to the extremes. The diversity of physical capacities needed depend on the mission. Consequently, tests used to monitor SOF operators' physical fitness should cover a broad range of physical capacities. Whereas tests for strength and aerobic endurance are established, there is no test for specific anaerobic work capacity described in the literature. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the reliability, validity, and to identify performance determinants of a new test developed for testing specific anaerobic work capacity in SOF operators. Nineteen active young students were included in the concurrent validity part of the study. The students performed the evacuation (EVAC) test 3 times and the results were compared for reliability and with performance in the Wingate cycle test, 300-m sprint, and a maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) test. In part II of the study, 21 Norwegian Navy Special Operations Command operators conducted the EVAC test, anthropometric measurements, a dual x-ray absorptiometry scan, leg press, isokinetic knee extensions, maximal oxygen uptake test, and countermovement jump (CMJ) test. The EVAC test showed good reliability after 1 familiarization trial (intraclass correlation = 0.89; coefficient of variance = 3.7%). The EVAC test correlated well with the Wingate test (r = -0.68), 300-m sprint time (r = 0.51), and 300-m mean power (W) (r = -0.67). No significant correlation was found with the MAOD test. In part II of the study, height, body mass, lean body mass, isokinetic knee extension torque, maximal oxygen uptake, and maximal power in a CMJ was significantly correlated with performance in the EVAC test. The EVAC test is a reliable and valid test for anaerobic work capacity for SOF operators, and muscle mass, leg strength, and leg power seem to be the most important determinants

  14. 17 CFR 210.6-08 - Special provisions applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount certificates. 210.6-08 Section 210.6-08... issuers of face-amount certificates. Statements of operations filed by issuers of face-amount certificates... included in income, the bases of recognition and measurement used in respect to such amounts shall...

  15. 17 CFR 210.6-08 - Special provisions applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount certificates. 210.6-08 Section 210.6-08... issuers of face-amount certificates. Statements of operations filed by issuers of face-amount certificates... included in income, the bases of recognition and measurement used in respect to such amounts shall...

  16. 17 CFR 210.6-08 - Special provisions applicable to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to the statements of operations of issuers of face-amount certificates. 210.6-08 Section 210.6-08... issuers of face-amount certificates. Statements of operations filed by issuers of face-amount certificates... included in income, the bases of recognition and measurement used in respect to such amounts shall...

  17. 10 CFR 2.103 - Action on applications for byproduct, source, special nuclear material, facility and operator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... nuclear material, facility and operator licenses. (a) If the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor... repository operations area under parts 60 or 63 of this chapter, the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Director, Office of New Reactors, Director, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards,...

  18. 10 CFR 2.103 - Action on applications for byproduct, source, special nuclear material, facility and operator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... nuclear material, facility and operator licenses. (a) If the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor... repository operations area under parts 60 or 63 of this chapter, the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Director, Office of New Reactors, Director, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards,...

  19. Application of fuzzy logic-neural network based reinforcement learning to proximity and docking operations: Special approach/docking testcase results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Yashvant

    1993-01-01

    As part of the RICIS project, the reinforcement learning techniques developed at Ames Research Center are being applied to proximity and docking operations using the Shuttle and Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite simulation. In utilizing these fuzzy learning techniques, we use the Approximate Reasoning based Intelligent Control (ARIC) architecture, and so we use these two terms interchangeably to imply the same. This activity is carried out in the Software Technology Laboratory utilizing the Orbital Operations Simulator (OOS) and programming/testing support from other contractor personnel. This report is the final deliverable D4 in our milestones and project activity. It provides the test results for the special testcase of approach/docking scenario for the shuttle and SMM satellite. Based on our experience and analysis with the attitude and translational controllers, we have modified the basic configuration of the reinforcement learning algorithm in ARIC. The shuttle translational controller and its implementation in ARIC is described in our deliverable D3. In order to simulate the final approach and docking operations, we have set-up this special testcase as described in section 2. The ARIC performance results for these operations are discussed in section 3 and conclusions are provided in section 4 along with the summary for the project.

  20. Capability 9.2 Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrasjek, June

    2005-01-01

    Modern operational concepts require significant bandwidths and multipoint communication capabilities. Provide voice, video and data communications among vehicles moving along the surface, vehicles in suborbital transport or reconnaissance, surface elements, and home planet facilities.

  1. Surgical treatment of severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, with special reference to the advantages of early operation.

    PubMed

    Goligher, J C; Hoffman, D C; de Dombal, F T

    1970-12-19

    The management and outcome of 258 severe attacks of ulcerative colitis from 1952 to 1969 has been reviewed. If remission did not occur during an initial course of intensive medical treatment, including administration of corticosteroids, operation (generally ileostomy with proctocolectomy or subtotal colectomy) was performed. This took place some 12 to 17 days after admission as a rule during the years 1952-63, but usually within five to seven days from 1964 to 1969.Roughly half the attacks underwent spontaneous remission during the two periods, but the medical mortality was 4.8% in the former and 0.7% in the latter, the operative mortality 20.0 and 7.0%, and the overall mortality 11.3 and 4.5% respectively. The lowering of the mortality was particularly striking in severe first attacks and in severe attacks in patients over 60 years of age.Perforation of the colon was found in 21 cases, or nearly 20% of 112 patients coming to operation during attacks, being commoner in the first period (32.5%) than in the second (11.1%). The immediate mortality of all such operations was 11.6%; in cases with perforation it was 28.6%.Acute colonic dilatation was observed in 28 cases. All but one were treated by emergency colectomy, at which the colon was noted to be perforated in 11. The mortality of these operations was 18.5%.Follow-up of the 140 patients who survived without coming to operation during their attacks shows that 52 (37.1%) subsequently underwent surgical treatment either during further attacks or electively.Though all 258 attacks were thought at the time to be due to ordinary ulcerative colitis, subsequent pathological examination of operative specimens derived from 98 patients who came to urgent or subsequent operation during the 1964-9 period revealed that the lesion in the large bowel was Crohn's disease in 17 instances. PMID:5491253

  2. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

  3. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

    1992-09-01

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

  4. Why Bother? They Are Not Capable of This Level of Work: Manifestations of Teacher Attitudes in an Urban High School Self-Contained Special Education Classroom with Majority Blacks and Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Felicity A.

    2007-01-01

    Using an ethnographic approach the study describes the curricula that veteran urban high school special educators use in self-contained special education classrooms with majority Blacks and Latinos. The findings show that the teachers routinely exposed students to elementary level curricula and to material that was rife with racist images of…

  5. A fast operator perturbation method for the solution of the special relativistic equation of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A fast method for the solution of the radiative transfer equation in rapidly moving spherical media, based on an approximate Lambda-operator iteration, is described. The method uses the short characteristic method and a tridiagonal approximate Lambda-operator to achieve fast convergence. The convergence properties and the CPU time requirements of the method are discussed for the test problem of a two-level atom with background continuum absorption and Thomson scattering. Details of the actual implementation for fast vector and parallel computers are given. The method is accurate and fast enough to be incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic calculations.

  6. Analyses of microbial community within a composter operated using household garbage with special reference to the addition of soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, M; Pedro, M S; Haruta, S; Ding, L; Fukada, T; Kigawa, A; Kodama, T; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y

    2001-01-01

    A commercially available composter was operated using fixed composition of garbage with or without the addition of soybean oil. The composter was operated without adding seed microorganisms or bulking materials. Microflora within the composter were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in the case of oil addition, or by 16/18 S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolated microorganisms in the case of no oil addition. The results showed that, irrespective of the addition of oil, the bacteria identified were all gram positive, and that lactobacilli seemed to be the key microorganisms. Based on the results, suitable microflora for use in a household composter are discussed.

  7. COGEMA Experience on Retrieving and Automatically Remote Cutting Large Metallic Structures Using Special Saw During Nuclear Decommissioning Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, F.; Barandas, C.

    2002-02-26

    Used spent fuel baskets have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until decommissioning. In 1998, COGEMA decided to retrieve, cut and condition these spent fuel baskets. This paper describes the experience gained, since the start up of this operation in 1999, discusses resulting dosimetry and waste produced, during retrieving and remotely cutting of LL activity large metallic structures. This process result in significantly lower exposures to workers in the D and D operations. In addition the work was carried out in an environmentally safe manner with reasonable financial costs.

  8. Operating modes and cooling capabilities of the 3-stage ADR developed for the Soft-X-ray Spectrometer instrument on Astro-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore; DiPirro, Michael J.; Letmate, Richard V.; Sampson, Michael A.; Bialas, Tom G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Kelley, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    A 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) (Shirron et al., 2012) is used on the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument (Mitsuda et al., 2010) on Astro-H (Takahashi et al., 2010) [3] to cool a 6 × 6 array of X-ray microcalorimeters to 50 mK. The ADR is supported by a cryogenic system (Fujimoto et al., 2010) consisting of a superfluid helium tank, a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, and additional 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers that pre-cool the JT cooler and cool radiation shields within the cryostat. The ADR is configured so that it can use either the liquid helium or the JT cryocooler as its heat sink, giving the instrument an unusual degree of tolerance for component failures or degradation in the cryogenic system. The flight detector assembly, ADR and dewar were integrated into the flight dewar in early 2014, and have since been extensively characterized and calibrated. This paper summarizes the operation and performance of the ADR in all of its operating modes.

  9. Assessment of DICOM Viewers Capable of Loading Patient-specific 3D Models Obtained by Different Segmentation Platforms in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Giuseppe; Carbone, Marina; Ciriaci, Damiano; Aramini, Daniele; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    Patient-specific 3D models obtained by the segmentation of volumetric diagnostic images play an increasingly important role in surgical planning. Surgeons use the virtual models reconstructed through segmentation to plan challenging surgeries. Many solutions exist for the different anatomical districts and surgical interventions. The possibility to bring the 3D virtual reconstructions with native radiological images in the operating room is essential for fostering the use of intraoperative planning. To the best of our knowledge, current DICOM viewers are not able to simultaneously connect to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and import 3D models generated by external platforms to allow a straight integration in the operating room. A total of 26 DICOM viewers were evaluated: 22 open source and four commercial. Two DICOM viewers can connect to PACS and import segmentations achieved by other applications: Synapse 3D® by Fujifilm and OsiriX by University of Geneva. We developed a software network that converts diffuse visual tool kit (VTK) format 3D model segmentations, obtained by any software platform, to a DICOM format that can be displayed using OsiriX or Synapse 3D. Both OsiriX and Synapse 3D were suitable for our purposes and had comparable performance. Although Synapse 3D loads native images and segmentations faster, the main benefits of OsiriX are its user-friendly loading of elaborated images and it being both free of charge and open source.

  10. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program May 2003 Intensive Operations Period Examining Aerosol Properties and Radiative Influences: Preface to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Ogren, John; Schmid, Beat; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Sheridan, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate by scattering and absorbing radiation in clear air (direct effects) and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, modifying the microphysical properties of clouds, influencing radiation and precipitation development (indirect effects). Much of present uncertainty in forcing of climate change is due to uncertainty in the relations between aerosol microphysical and optical properties and their radiative influences (direct effects) and between microphysical properties and their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei at given supersaturations (indirect effects). This paper introduces a special section that reports on a field campaign conducted at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in North Central Oklahoma in May, 2003, examining these relations using in situ airborne measurements and surface-, airborne-, and space-based remote sensing.

  11. 14 CFR 63.23 - Special purpose flight engineer and flight navigator certificates: Operation of U.S.-registered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purpose flight engineer and flight navigator certificates: Operation of U.S.-registered civil airplanes... flight engineer or flight navigator duties on a civil airplane of U.S. registry, leased to a person not a... certificate holder is performing flight engineer or flight navigator duties on the U.S.-registered...

  12. The Operation of a Specialized Scientific Information and Data Analysis Center With Computer Base and Associated Communications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, William B.; And Others

    The Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) is a highly sophisticated scientific information center operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Its information file, which consists of both data and bibliographic information, is computer stored and numerous programs have been developed to facilitate the…

  13. Development and field application of a 6-bottle serial gas-tight fluid sampler for collecting seafloor cold seep and hydrothermal vent fluids with autonomous operation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Ding, K.; Yang, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-bottle serial gas-tight sampler (so-called "six-shooter") was developed for application with deep-sea vent fluids. The new device is composed of a custom-made 6-channel valve manifold and six sampling bottles which are circularly distributed around the valve manifold. Each valve channel consists of a high-pressure titanium cartridge valve and a motor-driven actuator. A sampling snorkel is connected to the inlet of the manifold that delivers the incoming fluid to different bottles. Each sampling bottle has a 160 ml-volume chamber and an accumulator chamber inside where compressed nitrogen is used to maintain the sample at near in-situ pressure. An electronics chamber that is located at the center of the sampler is used to carry out all sampling operations, autonomously, if desired. The sampler is of a compact circular configuration with a diameter of 26 cm and a length of 54 cm. During the SVC cruise AT 26-12, the sampler was deployed by DSV2 Alvin at a cold seep site MC036 with a depth of 1090 m in the Gulf of Mexico. The sampler collected fluid samples automatically following the tidal cycle to monitor the potential impact of the tide cycle on the fluid chemistry of cold seep in a period of two day. During the cruise AT 26-17, the sampler was used with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin three times at the hydrothermal vent sites along Axial Seamount and Main Endeavor Field on Juan de Fuca Ridge. During a 4-day deployment at Anemone diffuse site (Axial Caldera), the sampler was set to work in an autonomous mode to collect fluid samples according to the preset interval. During other dives, the sampler was manually controlled via ICL (Inductively Coupled Link) communication through the hull. Gas-tight fluid samples were collected from different hydrothermal vents with temperatures between 267 ℃ and 335 ℃ at the depth up to 2200 m. The field results indicate unique advantages of the design. It can be deployed in extended time period with remote operation or working

  14. Macro-molecular data storage with petabyte/cm3 density, highly parallel read/write operations, and genuine 3D storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud; Khulbe, Pramod K.

    2004-09-01

    Digital information can be encoded in the building-block sequence of macromolecules, such as RNA and single-stranded DNA. Methods of "writing" and "reading" macromolecular strands are currently available, but they are slow and expensive. In an ideal molecular data storage system, routine operations such as write, read, erase, store, and transfer must be done reliably and at high speed within an integrated chip. As a first step toward demonstrating the feasibility of this concept, we report preliminary results of DNA readout experiments conducted in miniaturized chambers that are scalable to even smaller dimensions. We show that translocation of a single-stranded DNA molecule (consisting of 50 adenosine bases followed by 100 cytosine bases) through an ion-channel yields a characteristic signal that is attributable to the 2-segment structure of the molecule. We also examine the dependence of the rate and speed of molecular translocation on the adjustable parameters of the experiment.

  15. A study of operators' computing efficiency with special focus on the readability under different viewing angles of a desktop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillck, Z.; Asjad, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the reading performance of operators' under different viewing angles of a desktop computer. The effects of text/background color, viewing distance and character size on the speed of reading were investigated. The text and/or the background color combination were varied, with constant luminance contrast. Performance was recorded in terms of words per minutes. Standard workplace design recommendations to position center of visual display terminal 15° and 40°, below horizontal eye level, were taken up for a visually intensive readability task. An orthogonal array, signal-to-noise ratio and the analysis of variance were carried out to investigate the above mentioned operating parameters to determine optimum readability performance. The results suggested that performance was better at 15° viewing angle as compared to 40°.

  16. Space Shuttle utilization characteristics with special emphasis on payload design, economy of operation and effective space exploitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    The reusable manned Space Shuttle has made new and innovative payload planning a reality and opened the door to a variety of payload concepts formerly unavailable in routine space operations. In order to define the payload characteristics and program strategies, current Shuttle-oriented programs are presented: NASA's Space Telescope, the Long Duration Exposure Facility, the West German Shuttle Pallet Satellite, and the Goddard Space Flight Center's Multimission Modular Spacecraft. Commonality of spacecraft design and adaptation for specific mission roles minimizes payload program development and STS integration costs. Commonality of airborne support equipment assures the possibility of multiple program space operations with the Shuttle. On-orbit maintenance and repair was suggested for the module and system levels. Program savings from 13 to over 50% were found obtainable by the Shuttle over expendable launch systems, and savings from 17 to 45% were achievable by introducing reuse into the Shuttle-oriented programs.

  17. Collaborative pre-competitive preclinical drug discovery with academics and pharma/biotech partners at Sanford|Burnham: infrastructure, capabilities & operational models.

    PubMed

    Chung, Thomas D Y

    2014-03-01

    There has been increased concern that the current "blockbuster" model of drug discovery and development practiced by "Big Pharma" are unsustainable in terms of cost (> $1 billion/approved drug) and time to market (10 - 15 years). The recent mergers and acquisitions (M&A), shuttering of internal research programs, closure of "redundant" sites of operations, senior management turnover and continued workforce reductions among the top 10 major pharmaceutical companies reflect draconian responses to reduce costs. However, the resultant exodus of intellectual capital, loss in motivation and momentum, and exit from early stage discovery programs by pharmaceutical companies has contributed to an "innovation deficit". Disease advocacy groups, investment communities and the government are calling for new innovative business models to address this deficit. In particular they are looking towards academia and clinical trials centers to catalyze new innovations in translational research. Indeed over the last decade many academic institutions have launched drug discovery centers largely comprising high-throughput screening (HTS) to accelerate "translational" research. A major impetus for this "open innovation" effort has been the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" and Molecular Libraries Initiative/Program (MLI/MLP), which is in its last year, and will be transitioned into the National Center for the Advancement of Translational Sciences (NCATS). With the end of Roadmap funding, general reduction in Federal government funding and its recent sequestration, academic drug discovery centers are being challenged to become selfsustaining, adding financial value, while remaining aligned with the missions of their respective academic non-profit institutions. We describe herein, a brief history of our bi-coastal Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics (Prebys Center) at the Sanford|Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI), the key components of its infrastructure, core

  18. Collaborative pre-competitive preclinical drug discovery with academics and pharma/biotech partners at Sanford|Burnham: infrastructure, capabilities & operational models.

    PubMed

    Chung, Thomas D Y

    2014-03-01

    There has been increased concern that the current "blockbuster" model of drug discovery and development practiced by "Big Pharma" are unsustainable in terms of cost (> $1 billion/approved drug) and time to market (10 - 15 years). The recent mergers and acquisitions (M&A), shuttering of internal research programs, closure of "redundant" sites of operations, senior management turnover and continued workforce reductions among the top 10 major pharmaceutical companies reflect draconian responses to reduce costs. However, the resultant exodus of intellectual capital, loss in motivation and momentum, and exit from early stage discovery programs by pharmaceutical companies has contributed to an "innovation deficit". Disease advocacy groups, investment communities and the government are calling for new innovative business models to address this deficit. In particular they are looking towards academia and clinical trials centers to catalyze new innovations in translational research. Indeed over the last decade many academic institutions have launched drug discovery centers largely comprising high-throughput screening (HTS) to accelerate "translational" research. A major impetus for this "open innovation" effort has been the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" and Molecular Libraries Initiative/Program (MLI/MLP), which is in its last year, and will be transitioned into the National Center for the Advancement of Translational Sciences (NCATS). With the end of Roadmap funding, general reduction in Federal government funding and its recent sequestration, academic drug discovery centers are being challenged to become selfsustaining, adding financial value, while remaining aligned with the missions of their respective academic non-profit institutions. We describe herein, a brief history of our bi-coastal Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics (Prebys Center) at the Sanford|Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI), the key components of its infrastructure, core

  19. Antarctic Exploration Parallels for Future Human Planetary Exploration: Science Operations Lessons Learned, Planning, and Equipment Capabilities for Long Range, Long Duration Traverses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    late 1940s and includes contemporary experience. The people presenting bring a variety of points of view, including not only U.S. but international, although most, if not all, have collaborated on international teams. The second day will consist of a series of small focused group interactions centered on those elements likely to be needed for traverse missions, such as mobility, habitation, and extravehicular activity (EVA, aka space suits). Our invited participants will be talking with people that specialize in these elements so that we can foster more direct interaction and exchange of experiences between these two exploration communities. After the workshop we will be preparing a report documenting these presentations and the essence of the focused interactions.

  20. An introduction to the special section on U.S. military operations: effects on military members' partners and children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2011-08-01

    The deployment of U.S. military personnel to global hot spots, whether as combatants or as peacekeepers, has increased attention to the psychological well-being of military personnel and their family members. Despite the growing awareness that deployments have reverberating effects on all family members, theoretical explanations and empirical research on the impact of deployment on couple, family, and child adjustment, factors that serve to protect families from the demands of military employment, and effective methods of treating the mental health needs of military families are needed. The seven papers in this section increase our understanding of how the demands of U.S. military operations impact couples, family functioning, parenting, and child psychological adjustment and provide an additional resource for mental health professionals who work with these families.

  1. Planning and operational considerations for units utilizing military working dogs.

    PubMed

    Royal, Joseph; Taylor, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    Military working dogs are rapidly becoming integral to military operations. While they bring many valuable capabilities to the battlefield, it is important that Special Operations leaders consider canine team capabilities and requirements when planning missions. Careful logistical and operational planning can optimize the health, performance, and readiness of the working dog while protecting the safety and well-being of the team members working with them. We also offer recommendations for medical treatment of dog bites.

  2. Beyond Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan; Lipsky, Dorothy Kerzner

    Faults of special education include its medical view of disability, its arbitrary division of students into handicapped and nonhandicapped, and the resultant separation between general and special education. Disabled adults are becoming less tolerant of an educational system that fails to recognize the capabilities of handicapped students.…

  3. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.

  4. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  5. SAPHIRE 8 New Features and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) software performs probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations. SAPHIRE is used in support of NRC’s risk-informed programs such as the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program, Management Directive 8.3, “NRC Incident Investigation Program,” or the Significance Determination Process (SDP). It is also used to develop and run the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. SAPHIRE Version 8 is a new version of the software with an improved interface and capabilities to support risk-informed programs. SAPHIRE Version 8 is designed to easily handle larger and more complex models. Applications of previous SAPHIRE versions indicated the need to build and solve models with a large number of sequences. Risk assessments that include endstate evaluations for core damage frequency and large, early release frequency evaluations have greatly increased the number of sequences required. In addition, the complexity of the models has increased since risk assessments evaluate both potential internal and external events, as well as different plant operational states. Special features of SAPHIRE 8 help create and run integrated models which may be composed of different model types. SAPHIRE 8 includes features and capabilities that are new or improved over the current Version 7 to address the new requirements for risk-informed programs and SPAR models. These include: • Improved User Interfaces • Model development • Methods • General Support Features

  6. Space station operations management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Kathleen V.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom operations management concepts must be responsive to the unique challenges presented by the permanently manned international laboratory. Space Station Freedom will be assembled over a three year period where the operational environment will change as significant capability plateaus are reached. First Element Launch, Man-Tended Capability, and Permanent Manned Capability, represent milestones in operational capability that is increasing toward mature operations capability. Operations management concepts are being developed to accomodate the varying operational capabilities during assembly, as well as the mature operational environment. This paper describes operations management concepts designed to accomodate the uniqueness of Space Station Freedoom, utilizing tools and processes that seek to control operations costs.

  7. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  8. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  9. Special Days, Special Ways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    Presents unique ways to create special rituals that recognize individual students' achievements and milestones. Ideas include throwing a send-off party for a student who is moving; holding monthly birthday luncheons; choosing an ambassador to accompany new students around school; and making a lost tooth container that students can use to safely…

  10. Satellite observations of a polar low over the Norwegian Sea by Special Sensor Microwave Imager, Geosat, and TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Mognard, Nelly M.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Many polar lows are generated at the boundary between sea ice and the ocean, in regions of large temperature gradients, where in situ observations are rare or nonexistent. Since satellite observations are frequent in high-latitude regions, they can be used to detect polar lows and track their propagation and evolution. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) providing estimates of surface wind speed, integrated cloud liquid water content, water vapor content, and precipitation size ice-scattering signal over the ocean; the Geosat radar altimeter measuring surface wind speed and significant wave height; and the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) allowing the determination of temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere have been used in synergy for a specific case which occurred in the Norwegian Sea on January, 23-24 1988. All three instruments show sharp atmospheric gradients associated with the propagation of this low across the ocean, which permit the detection of the polar low at a very early stage and tracking it during its development, propagation, and decay. The wind speed gradients are measured with good qualitative agreement between the altimeter and SSM/I. TOVS retrieved fields prior to the formation of the low confirm the presence of an upper level trough, while during the mature phase baroclinicity can be observed in the 1000-500 hPa geopotential thicknesses.

  11. Loch ness, special operations executive and the first surgeon in paradise: Robert Kenneth Wilson (26.1.1899-6.6.1969).

    PubMed

    Watters, David A K

    2007-12-01

    Lieutenant Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson (1899-1969) was a surgeon who fought in both world wars and joined the Special Operations Executive parachuting behind enemy lines into Holland, France and Borneo, the last mission being with Australian forces (Semut II). He was an expert on firearms and gave opinion on ballistics at the Old Bailey during the 1930s. He also wrote a definitive text on automatic pistols with editions published in 1943 and 1975. He was an Edinburgh Fellow (1926), who had a practice in general surgery and gynaecology in Queen Anne Street during the 1930s. He took the famous 1934 'surgeon's photo' of the Loch Ness monster that was not admitted to be a hoax until 1994. After World War II, he became the first surgical specialist to work in the public service of the then Territory of Papua and New Guinea (1950-1956), where he wrote several papers on surgical topics. He married Gwen (1924), the daughter of Henrietta Gulliver, an Australian painter. They had two sons, Richard and Phillip. After practice he retired to Melbourne where he died of carcinoma oesophagus.

  12. Mission operations systems for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.; Wolff, Donna M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is twofold: (1) to present an overview of the processes comprising planetary mission operations as conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and (2) to present a project-specific and historical context within which this evolving process functions. In order to accomplish these objectives, the generic uplink and downlink functions are described along with their specialization to current flight projects. Also, new multimission capabilities are outlined, including prototyping of advanced-capability software for subsequent incorporation into more automated future operations. Finally, a specific historical ground is provided by listing some major operations software plus a genealogy of planetary missions beginning with Mariner 2 in 1962.

  13. Improving the RPC rate capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Stante, L.; Iuppa, R.; Liberti, B.; Paolozzi, L.; Pastori, E.; Santonico, R.; Toppi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper has the purpose to study the rate capability of the Resistive Plate Chamber, RPC, starting from the basic physics of this detector. The effect of different working parameters determining the rate capability is analysed in detail, in order to optimize a new family of RPCs for applications to heavy irradiation environments and in particular to the LHC phase 2. A special emphasis is given to the improvement achievable by minimizing the avalanche charge delivered in the gas. The paper shows experimental results of Cosmic Ray tests, performed to study the avalanche features for different gas gap sizes, with particular attention to the overall delivered charge. For this purpose, the paper studies, in parallel to the prompt electronic signal, also the ionic signal which gives the main contribution to the delivered charge. Whenever possible the test results are interpreted on the basis of the RPC detector physics and are intended to extend and reinforce our physical understanding of this detector.

  14. The National Ignition Facility: Experimental Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-09-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules of infrared light and over 16 kJ at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for facility diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as green laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  15. Demystifying Special Education in Virtual Charter Schools. Special Report. Primers on Special Education in Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhim, Lauren Morando; Kowal, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This special report is a supplement to a series of special education primers created to inform state officials, authorizers and charter school operators about special education in the charter sector. The primer series also provides tools to help these stakeholders build charter school capacity to provide special education and related services. In…

  16. 10 CFR 73.45 - Performance capabilities for fixed site physical protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... movement of strategic special nuclear material within material access areas. To achieve this capability the physical protection system shall: (1) Detect unauthorized placement and movement of strategic special...) Controls and procedures to delineate authorized placement and control for strategic special...

  17. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  18. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  19. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  20. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  1. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  2. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  3. Metrology measurement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division's (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  4. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: mechanical; environmental, gas, liquid; electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/microwave); and optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. FM and T Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Department of energy`s Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 16 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in this report.

  5. Metrology measurement capability

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division`s (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  6. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  7. Title VI and Title IX Compliance by the Office for Civil Rights in State-Operated Special Purpose and Vocational Schools Pursuant to Adams v. Mathews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Phyllis

    This paper examines the compliance activities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) undertaken to eliminate racial and sex discrimination in special purpose schools administered by State departments of education. After reviewing background to non-enforcement of Title VI, and briefly explaining Title IX, the activities of OCR with regard to special…

  8. A Guide for the Management of Special Education Programs. 2.0 Education and Counseling. Newday Operations Guide for Drug Dependent Minor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the second component, Education and Counseling, of a special day class educational program for drug dependent minors. A major goal of the program is given to be the provision of successful academic experiences, positive rewards for desired behavior, and individual and family counseling. The behavior modification program is described,…

  9. Co-Operative Learning for Children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Mainstream and Special Class Settings: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Ian M.; Bruton, Cora; Honan, Rita; McGuinness, Roisin; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a cooperative learning (CL) intervention on the levels of social and task engagement of a child with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) conducted in a mainstream class setting and a child with ASD implemented in a special needs class setting. The target children were two 8-year-old boys…

  10. A Guide for the Management of Special Education Programs. 3.0 Educational Simulations. Newday Operations Guide for Drug Dependent Minor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the third component, Educational Simulations, of a special day class educational program for drug dependent minors. One objective of the project is said to have been the identification of instructional methods and materials suited to drug dependent minors. Educational games and simulations designed to provide practice in reading and…

  11. Human push capability.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  12. 47 CFR 80.223 - Special requirements for survival craft stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for survival craft... requirements for survival craft stations. (a) Survival craft stations capable of transmitting on: (1) 2182 kHz... operate with A3E or A3N emission. (b) Survival craft stations must be able to receive the frequency...

  13. Project CAPABLE: Model Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madawaska School District, ME.

    Project CAPABLE (Classroom Action Program: Aim: Basic Learning Effectiveness) is a classroom approach which integrates the basic learning skills with content. The goal of the project is to use basic learning skills to enhance the learning of content and at the same time use the content to teach basic learning skills. This manual illustrates how…

  14. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  15. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  16. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  17. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths. PMID:15202293

  18. Effect of present technology on airship capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect is presented of updating past airship designs using current materials and propulsion systems to determine new airship performance and productivity capabilities. New materials and power plants permit reductions in the empty weights and increases in the useful load capabilities of past airship designs. The increased useful load capability results in increased productivity for a given range, i.e., either increased payload at the same operating speed or increased operating speed for the same payload weight or combinations of both. Estimated investment costs and operating costs are presented to indicate the significant cost parameters in estimating transportation costs of payloads in cents per ton mile. Investment costs are presented considering production lots of 1, 10 and 100 units. Operating costs are presented considering flight speeds and ranges.

  19. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  20. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  1. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties in laboratories that conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM and T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. These parameters are summarized.

  2. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  3. Specialized Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  4. Specialized science.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2014-04-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  5. Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Ray, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on special needs instruction and technology: (1) "Hawaii Special Education Teacher Induction" (Kalena Oliva and Quinn Avery); (2) "The Impact of Group v Individual Use of Hypermedia-Based Instruction" (Lewis R. Johnson, Louis P. Semrau, and Gail E. Fitzgerald); (3) "Assistive Technology Meets…

  6. 47 CFR 25.257 - Special requirements for operations in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz between NGSO MSS and LMDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...-geostationary mobile satellite service (NGSO MSS) operators shall be licensed to use the 29.1-29.25 GHz band...

  7. 47 CFR 25.257 - Special requirements for operations in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz between NGSO MSS and LMDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...-geostationary mobile satellite service (NGSO MSS) operators shall be licensed to use the 29.1-29.25 GHz band...

  8. 47 CFR 25.257 - Special requirements for operations in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz between NGSO MSS and LMDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...-geostationary Mobile-Satellite Service (NGSO MSS) operators shall be licensed to use the 29.1-29.25 GHz band...

  9. 47 CFR 25.257 - Special requirements for operations in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz between NGSO MSS and LMDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...-geostationary mobile satellite service (NGSO MSS) operators shall be licensed to use the 29.1-29.25 GHz band...

  10. 47 CFR 25.257 - Special requirements for operations in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz between NGSO MSS and LMDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...-geostationary Mobile-Satellite Service (NGSO MSS) operators shall be licensed to use the 29.1-29.25 GHz band...

  11. Special Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Phil

    1986-01-01

    Specialized publications such as "Opera News,""Gourmet," and "Forbes" can bring an institution's story to targeted audiences. The experiences of Chautauqua Institution are described. Some of the benefits of marketing articles to these publications are discussed. (MLW)

  12. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  13. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  14. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  15. PHOBICS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center of mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, we outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, we then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that we plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{zeta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi}{r_arrow} K{sup +}K{sup -} decays.

  16. Special Education Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Provided are special education guidelines (revised 1974) for exceptional (handicapped or gifted) American Indian and Alaskan Native children from birth through age 25 years in schools operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Reviewed are broad philosophical guidelines emphasizing individualized instruction, objectives such as decreasing…

  17. Capability 9.4 Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Rud

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on capability structure 9.4 servicing. The topics include: 1) Servicing Description; 2) Benefits of Servicing; 3) Drivers & Assumptions for Servicing; 4) Capability Breakdown Structure 9.4 Servicing; 5) Roadmap for Servicing; 6) 9.4 Servicing Critical Gaps; 7) Capability 9.4 Servicing; 8) Capability 9.4.1 Inspection; 9) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.1 Inspection; 10) Capability 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 11) State-of-the-Art/Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 12) Capability 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 13) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 14) Capability 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 15) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 16) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 17) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 18) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 19) Capability 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, Training; and 20) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, & Training;

  18. Advanced capability RFID system

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2007-09-25

    A radio-frequency transponder device having an antenna circuit configured to receive radio-frequency signals and to return modulated radio-frequency signals via continuous wave backscatter, a modulation circuit coupled to the antenna circuit for generating the modulated radio-frequency signals, and a microprocessor coupled to the antenna circuit and the modulation circuit and configured to receive and extract operating power from the received radio-frequency signals and to monitor inputs on at least one input pin and to generate responsive signals to the modulation circuit for modulating the radio-frequency signals. The microprocessor can be configured to generate output signals on output pins to associated devices for controlling the operation thereof. Electrical energy can be extracted and stored in an optional electrical power storage device.

  19. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  20. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  1. Meso-Machining Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

    2001-06-01

    Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femtosecond laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale mechanical components and actuators which require meso-scale parts fabricated in a variety of materials. Subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes expand the functionality of meso-scale components and complement silicon based MEMS and LIGA technologies.

  2. Advanced CLIPS capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1991-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language developed by NASA. CLIPS was designed specifically to provide high portability, low cost, and easy integration with external systems. The current release of CLIPS, version 4.3, is being used by over 2500 users throughout the public and private community. The primary addition to the next release of CLIPS, version 5.0, will be the CLIPS Object Oriented Language (COOL). The major capabilities of COOL are: class definition with multiple inheritance and no restrictions on the number, types, or cardinality of slots; message passing which allows procedural code bundled with an object to be executed; and query functions which allow groups of instances to be examined and manipulated. In addition to COOL, numerous other enhancements were added to CLIPS including: generic functions (which allow different pieces of procedural code to be executed depending upon the types or classes of the arguments); integer and double precision data type support; multiple conflict resolution strategies; global variables; logical dependencies; type checking on facts; full ANSI compiler support; and incremental reset for rules.

  3. SERAPH facility capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.; Su, W.

    1980-06-01

    The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

  4. MSFC/EV44 Natural Environment Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Willis, E. M.; Minow, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is an integral part of many NASA satellite and launch vehicle programs, providing analyses of the space and terrestrial environments that are used for program development efforts, operational support, and anomaly investigations. The space environment capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at MSFC will be presented. These capabilities include model development, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface charging modeling (e.g., Nascap-2k), space environment definition and radiation assessments for electronic parts. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions that are successful from launch to operations in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits. We will show examples of recent applications of branch capabilities to NASA missions.

  5. Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cissom, R. D.; Melton, T. L.; Schneider, M. P.; Lapenta, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide the future ISS scientist and/or engineer a sense of what ISS payload operations are expected to be. This paper uses a real-time operations scenario to convey this message. The real-time operations scenario begins at the initiation of payload operations and runs through post run experiment analysis. In developing this scenario, it is assumed that the ISS payload operations flight and ground capabilities are fully available for use by the payload user community. Emphasis is placed on telescience operations whose main objective is to enable researchers to utilize experiment hardware onboard the International Space Station as if it were located in their terrestrial laboratory. An overview of the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) systems and user ground system options is included to provide an understanding of the systems and interfaces users will utilize to perform payload operations. Detailed information regarding POIC capabilities can be found in the POIC Capabilities Document, SSP 50304.

  6. NASA Lewis Research Center's combustor test facilities and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) presently accommodates a total of six combustor test facilities with unique capabilities. The facilities are used to evaluate combustor and afterburner concepts for future engine applications, and also to test the survivability and performance of innovative high temperature materials, new instrumentation, and engine components in a realistic jet engine environment. The facilities provide a variety of test section interfaces and lengths to allow for flametube, sector and component testing. The facilities can accommodate a wide range of operating conditions due to differing capabilities in the following areas: inlet air pressure, temperature, and flow; fuel flow rate, pressure, and fuel storage capacity; maximum combustion zone temperature; cooling water flow rate and pressure; types of exhaust - atmospheric or altitude; air heater supply pressure; and types of air heaters - vitiated or nonvitiated. All of the facilities have provisions for standard gas (emissions) analysis, and a few of the facilities are equipped with specialized gas analysis equipment, smoke and particle size measurement devices, and a variety of laser systems. This report will present some of the unique features of each of the high temperature/high pressure combustor test facilities at NASA LeRC.

  7. Space station program operations - Making it work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Station Program (SSP) will consist, in part, of a permanently orbiting facility composed of a mix of manned and unmanned elements. To insure that such a facility will be an operationally viable and productive one, capable of performing a myriad of assigned missions, special attention must be given to the following operational disciplines during the design and development of the SSP systems and subsystems: (1) Automation/Autonomy, (2) Customer Interfaces/Operations, (3) Habitability/Crew Productivity, (4) Maintainability, and (5) Logistics. In order to properly address these disciplines, from an operations point of view, the Director of the Space Station Task Force (SSTF) formed the Operations Working Group (OWG) in July 1982, and chartered this group to develop the top level operational technical and management-approach philosophies and requirements for the SSP. This paper attempts to summarize the results and conclusions reached by the OWG after an 18 month intensive study effort.

  8. A portable ECG monitoring device with Bluetooth and Holter capabilities for telemedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Lucani, Daniel; Cataldo, Giancarlos; Cruz, Julio; Villegas, Guillermo; Wong, Sara

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of a portable ECG-monitoring device has been developed for clinical and non-clinical environments as part of a telemedicine system to provide remote and continuous surveillance of patients. The device can acquire, store and/or transmit ECG signals to computer-based platforms or specially configured access points (AP) with Intranet/Internet capabilities in order to reach remote monitoring stations. Acquired data can be stored in a flash memory card in FAT16 format for later recovery, or transmitted via Bluetooth or USB to a local station or AP. This data acquisition module (DAM) operates in two modes: Holter and on-line transmission.

  9. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  10. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  11. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  12. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  13. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Jose A; Park, Min S; Unkefer, Clifford J; Bradbury, Andrew M; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2009-01-01

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and

  14. Special Advocate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Weele, Maribeth

    1992-01-01

    Thomas Hehir, special education chief of Chicago Public Schools, is evangelist of integrating children with disabilities into regular classrooms. By completely reorganizing department viewed as political patronage dumping ground, Hehir has made remarkable progress in handling large number of children awaiting evaluation and placement in special…

  15. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  16. LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-07-27

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

  17. ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

  18. MAVEN Relay Operations Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Gladden, Roy; Bruvold, Kris

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission will launch in late 2013 and following a 10 month cruise to Mars, will study the upper atmosphere of the planet. In addition to the science instruments, the MAVEN spacecraft is equipped with an Electra UHF transceiver to support relay communication with landed assets. This paper describes how UHF relay service is provisioned by MAVEN. The discussion includes a description of the Electra payload, the process by which relay activities are coordinated and accounted for, the process of a typical relay session, including uplink and downlink, as well as special commands to calibrate and verify relay performance. The operational processes for providing these services are inherited largely from prior Mars missions and take advantage of existing infrastructure and lessons learned from those missions. Preliminary data volume return capabilities using adaptive data rates and low-density parity check channel coding are presented.

  19. Specialized progenitors and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells. PMID:23404104

  20. STS upper stage operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, M. D.; Schnyer, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several design/development and operational approaches for STS upper stages are being pursued to realize maximum operational and economic benefits upon the introduction of the STS in the 1980s. The paper focuses special attention on safety operations, launch site operations and on-orbit operations.

  1. Future capabilities for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, J. B.; Bryant, S. H.; Andrews, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will look at three new capabilities that are in different stages of development. First, turbo decoding, which provides improved telemetry performance for data rates up to about 1 Mbps, will be discussed. Next, pseudo-noise ranging will be presented. Pseudo-noise ranging has several advantages over the current sequential ranging, anmely easier operations, improved performance, and the capability to be used in a regenerative implementation on a spacecraft. Finally, Low Density Parity Check decoding will be discussed. LDPC codes can provide performance that matches or slightly exceed turbo codes, but are designed for use in the 10 Mbps range.

  2. The Special Ways of Handhelds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulchak, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Handheld computers can leverage the power of technology to enable all students to succeed, including children with special education needs. They are cheaper than laptops, are more portable, and have more memory and power capabilities than handhelds possessed just five years ago. In this article, the author cites the various research he conducted…

  3. Special topics--Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: II. A review of manure management mitigation options.

    PubMed

    Montes, F; Meinen, R; Dell, C; Rotz, A; Hristov, A N; Oh, J; Waghorn, G; Gerber, P J; Henderson, B; Makkar, H P S; Dijkstra, J

    2013-11-01

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. Reducing excreted nitrogen (N) and degradable organic carbon (C) by diet manipulation to improve the balance of nutrient inputs with production is an effective practice to reduce CH4 and N2O emissions. Most CH4 is produced during manure storage; therefore, reducing storage time, lowering manure temperature by storing it outside during colder seasons, and capturing and combusting the CH4 produced during storage are effective practices to reduce CH4 emission. Anaerobic digestion with combustion of the gas produced is effective in reducing CH4 emission and organic C content of manure; this increases readily available C and N for microbial processes creating little CH4 and increased N2O emissions following land application. Nitrous oxide emission occurs following land application as a byproduct of nitrification and dentrification processes in the soil, but these processes may also occur in compost, biofilter materials, and permeable storage covers. These microbial processes depend on temperature, moisture content, availability of easily degradable organic C, and oxidation status of the environment, which make N2O emissions and mitigation results highly variable. Managing the fate of ammoniacal N is essential to the success of N2O and CH4 mitigation because ammonia is an important component in the cycling of N through manure, soil, crops, and animal feeds. Manure application techniques such as subsurface injection reduce ammonia and CH4 emissions but can result in increased N2O emissions. Injection works well when combined with anaerobic digestion and solids separation by improving infiltration. Additives such as urease and nitrification inhibitors that inhibit microbial processes have mixed results but are generally effective in controlling N2O emission from intensive grazing systems. Matching plant nutrient

  4. NASA Dryden's UAS Service Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The vision of NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is to "fly what others only imagine." Its mission is to advance technology and science through flight. Objectives supporting the mission include performing flight research and technology integration to revolutionize aviation and pioneer aerospace technology, validating space exploration concepts, conducting airborne remote sensing and science missions, and supporting operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. A significant focus of effort in recent years has been on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), both in support of the Airborne Science Program and as research vehicles to advance the state of the art in UAS. Additionally, the Center has used its piloted aircraft in support of UAS technology development. In order to facilitate greater access to the UAS expertise that exists at the Center, that expertise has been organized around three major capabilities. The first is access to high-altitude, long-endurance UAS. The second is the establishment of a test range for small UAS. The third is safety case assessment support.

  5. Atlas capabilities for non-geosynchronous orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, M.; Huynh, C.

    1992-03-01

    Atlas, with the Centaur upper stage, is well known for launching geosynchronous communications satellites. Atlas, however, also has excellent capabilities for launches to other, nongeosynchronous orbits which can be useful for communications. In 1958, an Atlas launched Score, the first spacecraft to be used for communications, into a nongeosynchronous orbit. In the 1990s, single launches of Atlas vehicles will be able to deliver many small spacecraft at a time to deploy constellations of communications satellites in low earth orbits. Atlas vehicles are also well suited to launch specialized spacecraft into escape trajectories for communication between earth and the moon, Mars, and other planetary bodies. Payload weight capabilities of the Atlas family cover the range necessary for the wide variety of nongeosynchronous communications satellite systems being considered. This robust range of capabilities provides enough margin to accommodate potential spacecraft weight growth during development. Atlas capabilities, developed through 33 years of communications satellite launch experience, are readily adaptable to meet the needs of the new market for communications satellites in nongeosynchronous orbits.

  6. Capabilities and Incapabilities of the Capabilities Approach to Health Justice.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This first part of this article critiques Sridhar Venkatapuram's conception of health as a capability. It argues that Venkatapuram relies on the problematic concept of dignity, implies that those who are unhealthy lack lives worthy of dignity (which seems politically incorrect), sets a low bar for health, appeals to metaphysically problematic thresholds, fails to draw clear connections between appealed-to capabilities and health, and downplays the importance/relevance of health functioning. It concludes by questioning whether justice entitlements should pertain to the capability for health versus health achievements, challenging Venkatapuram's claims about the strength of health entitlements, and demonstrating that the capabilities approach is unnecessary to address social determinants of health.

  7. Protecting the public or setting the bar too high? Understanding the causes and consequences of regulatory actions of front-line regulators and specialized drug shop operators in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Francis; Molyneux, Catherine; Mackintosh, Maureen; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    The problem of poor regulatory compliance has been widely reported across private health providers in developing countries. Less known are the underlying reasons for poor compliance, especially with regards to the roles played by front-line regulatory staff, and the regulatory institution as a whole. We designed a qualitative study to address this gap, with the study questions and tools drawing on a conceptual framework informed by theoretical literature on regulation. Data were collected from specialized drug shops (SDSs) in two rural districts in Western Kenya in 2011 through eight focus group discussions, and from regulatory staff from organizations governing the pharmaceutical sector through a total of 24 in-depth interviews. We found that relationships between front-line regulators and SDS operators were a strong influence on regulatory behaviour, often resulting in non-compliance and perverse outcomes such as corruption. It emerged that separate regulatory streams operated in urban and rural locations, based mainly on differing relationships between the front-line regulators and SDS operators, and on broader factors such as the competition environment and community expectations. Effective incentive structures for regulatory staff were either absent, or poorly linked to performance in regulatory organizations, resulting in divergences between the purposes of the regulatory organization and activities of front-line staff. Given the rural-urban differences in the practice environment, the introduction of lower retail practice requirements for rural SDSs could be considered. This would allow illegally operated shops to be brought within the regulatory framework, facilitating good quality provision of essential commodities to marginalized areas, without lowering the practice requirements for the better complying urban SDSs. In addition, regulatory organizations need to devise incentives that better link the level of effort to rewards such as professional

  8. Protecting the public or setting the bar too high? Understanding the causes and consequences of regulatory actions of front-line regulators and specialized drug shop operators in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wafula, Francis; Molyneux, Catherine; Mackintosh, Maureen; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The problem of poor regulatory compliance has been widely reported across private health providers in developing countries. Less known are the underlying reasons for poor compliance, especially with regards to the roles played by front-line regulatory staff, and the regulatory institution as a whole. We designed a qualitative study to address this gap, with the study questions and tools drawing on a conceptual framework informed by theoretical literature on regulation. Data were collected from specialized drug shops (SDSs) in two rural districts in Western Kenya in 2011 through eight focus group discussions, and from regulatory staff from organizations governing the pharmaceutical sector through a total of 24 in-depth interviews. We found that relationships between front-line regulators and SDS operators were a strong influence on regulatory behaviour, often resulting in non-compliance and perverse outcomes such as corruption. It emerged that separate regulatory streams operated in urban and rural locations, based mainly on differing relationships between the front-line regulators and SDS operators, and on broader factors such as the competition environment and community expectations. Effective incentive structures for regulatory staff were either absent, or poorly linked to performance in regulatory organizations, resulting in divergences between the purposes of the regulatory organization and activities of front-line staff. Given the rural-urban differences in the practice environment, the introduction of lower retail practice requirements for rural SDSs could be considered. This would allow illegally operated shops to be brought within the regulatory framework, facilitating good quality provision of essential commodities to marginalized areas, without lowering the practice requirements for the better complying urban SDSs. In addition, regulatory organizations need to devise incentives that better link the level of effort to rewards such as professional

  9. Protecting the public or setting the bar too high? Understanding the causes and consequences of regulatory actions of front-line regulators and specialized drug shop operators in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Francis; Molyneux, Catherine; Mackintosh, Maureen; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    The problem of poor regulatory compliance has been widely reported across private health providers in developing countries. Less known are the underlying reasons for poor compliance, especially with regards to the roles played by front-line regulatory staff, and the regulatory institution as a whole. We designed a qualitative study to address this gap, with the study questions and tools drawing on a conceptual framework informed by theoretical literature on regulation. Data were collected from specialized drug shops (SDSs) in two rural districts in Western Kenya in 2011 through eight focus group discussions, and from regulatory staff from organizations governing the pharmaceutical sector through a total of 24 in-depth interviews. We found that relationships between front-line regulators and SDS operators were a strong influence on regulatory behaviour, often resulting in non-compliance and perverse outcomes such as corruption. It emerged that separate regulatory streams operated in urban and rural locations, based mainly on differing relationships between the front-line regulators and SDS operators, and on broader factors such as the competition environment and community expectations. Effective incentive structures for regulatory staff were either absent, or poorly linked to performance in regulatory organizations, resulting in divergences between the purposes of the regulatory organization and activities of front-line staff. Given the rural-urban differences in the practice environment, the introduction of lower retail practice requirements for rural SDSs could be considered. This would allow illegally operated shops to be brought within the regulatory framework, facilitating good quality provision of essential commodities to marginalized areas, without lowering the practice requirements for the better complying urban SDSs. In addition, regulatory organizations need to devise incentives that better link the level of effort to rewards such as professional

  10. TAKEOFF AND LANDING PERFORMANCE CAPABILITIES OF TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in the design of a commercial transport aircraft is the aircraft's performance during takeoff and landing operations. The aircraft must be designed to meet field length constraints in accordance with airworthiness standards specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations. In addition, the noise levels generated during these operations must be within acceptable limits. This computer program provides for the detailed analysis of the takeoff and landing performance capabilities of transport category aircraft. The program calculates aircraft performance in accordance with the airworthiness standards of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The aircraft and flight constraints are represented in sufficient detail to permit realistic sensitivity studies in terms of either configuration modifications or changes in operational procedures. This program provides for the detailed performance analysis of the takeoff and landing capabilities of specific aircraft designs and allows for sensitivity studies. The program is not designed to synthesize configurations or to generate aerodynamic, propulsion, or structural characteristics. This type of information must be generated externally to the program and then input as data. The program's representation of the aircraft data is extensive and includes realistic limits on engine and aircraft operational boundaries and maximum attainable lift coefficients. The takeoff and climbout flight-path is generated by a stepwise integration of the equation of motion. Special features include options for nonstandard-day operation, for balanced field length, for derated throttle to meet a given field length for off-loaded aircraft, and for throttle cutback during climbout for community noise alleviation. Advanced takeoff procedures for noise alleviation such as programmed throttle and control flaps may be investigated with the program. Approach profiles may incorporate advanced procedures such as two segment

  11. On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew; Allman, Mark; Taylor, Curtis R

    2011-01-01

    There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

  12. Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and programmatic aspects of the integrated analysis capability (IAC) are described. The (IAC) is an interdisciplinary analysis system containing a wide range of general purpose analysis programs that are interfaced via a common data base and a unified executive. The system is designed with significant interactive capability as well as the capability to support the entire range of design phases from the definition phase to the verification phase. The system functions as a standalone or interfaced with IPAD.

  13. Graphics with Special Interfaces for Disabled People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronconi, A.; And Others

    The paper describes new software and special input devices to allow physically impaired children to utilize the graphic capabilities of personal computers. Special input devices for computer graphics access--the voice recognition card, the single switch, or the mouse emulator--can be used either singly or in combination by the disabled to control…

  14. Machine Process Capability Information Through Six Sigma

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, M.F.

    1998-03-13

    A project investigating details concerning machine process capability information and its accessibility has been conducted. The thesis of the project proposed designing a part (denoted as a machine capability workpiece) based on the major machining features of a given machine. Parts are machined and measured to gather representative production, short-term variation. The information is utilized to predict the expected defect rate, expressed in terms of a composite sigma level process capability index, for a production part. Presently, decisions concerning process planning, particularly what machine will statistically produce the minimum amount of defects based on machined features and associated tolerances, are rarely made. Six sigma tools and methodology were employed to conduct this investigation at AlliedSignal FM and T. Tools such as the thought process map, factor relationship diagrams, and components of variance were used. This study is progressing toward completion. This research study was an example of how machine process capability information may be gathered for milling planar faces (horizontal) and slot features. The planning method used to determine where and how to gather variation for the part to be designed is known as factor relationship diagramming. Components-of-variation is then applied to the gathered data to arrive at the contributing level of variation illustrated within the factor relationship diagram. The idea of using this capability information beyond process planning to the other business enterprise operations is proposed.

  15. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Burnett, Rebeka; Charles, John; Cucinotta, Frank; Fullerton, Richard; Goodman, Jerry R.; Griffith, Anthony D., Sr.; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perchonok, Michele; Railsback, Jan; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Stilwell, Don; Thomas, Gretchen; Tri, Terry; Joshi, Jitendra; Wheeler, Ray; Rudisill, Marianne; Wilson, John; Mueller, Alyssa; Simmons, Anne

    2003-01-01

    These guidelines and capabilities identify the points of intersection between human spaceflight crews and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. In these chapters, we will provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that will address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies will consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  16. Status and capabilities of sonic boom simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and capabilities of sonic boom simulators which might be used in future studies of the effects of sonic boom on people, animals, or structures is summarized. The list of candidate simulators is based on a literature search which was confined to the United States and Canada. Some of the simulators are fully operational, others could be made operational with a modest investment, and still others would require a major investment. For the sake of the completeness, some simulators which were the subject of a previous review, but which no longer exist, are also included herein.

  17. MSFC/EV44 Natural Environment Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NeergaardParker, Linda; Willis, Emily M.; Minnow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Vic N.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is an integral part of many NASA satellite and launch vehicle programs, providing analyses of the space and terrestrial environments that are used for program development efforts, operational support, and anomaly investigations. These capabilities include model development, instrument build and testing, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface and internal charging modeling, space environment definition, and radiation assessments for electronic parts. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions that are successful from launch to operations in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits.

  18. Two-dimensional ultrasound and cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, H M

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound was employed for qualitative and quantitative studies during cardiac operations in 74 patients. A gas-sterilized phased-array transducer applied directly to the anterior surface of the heart produced high-quality images without a water path or other special manipulations. The techniques employed were successful in demonstrating alterations in cardiac anatomy associated with valve disease and cardiac tumors. Continuous clouds of microbubbles ejected from the left ventricle immediately following cardiopulmonary bypass were detected in 42% of 45 patients studied. Measurement of short-axis area change during systole proved useful for evaluation of intraoperative changes in left ventricular function. In the perioperative period, with the chest closed, the method detected increasing left ventricular mass during transplant rejection and was useful for monitoring changes in left ventricular performance when image quality was sufficient. The capabilities and limitations of this technique for special studies during cardiac operations should be familiar to surgeons with access to the method.

  19. Identifying 21st Century Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert

    2012-01-01

    What are the capabilities necessary to meet 21st century challenges? Much of the literature on 21st century skills focuses on skills necessary to meet those challenges associated with future work in a globalised world. The result is a limited characterisation of those capabilities necessary to address 21st century social, health and particularly…

  20. NASA Capability Roadmaps Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willcoxon, Rita; Thronson, Harley; Varsi, Guilio; Mueller, Robert; Regenie, Victoria; Inman, Tom; Crooke, Julie; Coulter, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This document is the result of eight months of hard work and dedication from NASA, industry, other government agencies, and academic experts from across the nation. It provides a summary of the capabilities necessary to execute the Vision for Space Exploration and the key architecture decisions that drive the direction for those capabilities. This report is being provided to the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) team for consideration in development of an architecture approach and investment strategy to support NASA future mission, programs and budget requests. In addition, it will be an excellent reference for NASA's strategic planning. A more detailed set of roadmaps at the technology and sub-capability levels are available on CD. These detailed products include key driving assumptions, capability maturation assessments, and technology and capability development roadmaps.

  1. Walking capabilities of Gregor controlled through Walknet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca; Schilling, Malte; Schmitz, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Locomotion control of legged robots is nowadays a field in continuous evolution. In this work a bio-inspired control architecture based on the stick insect is applied to control the hexapod robot Gregor. The control scheme is an extension of Walknet, a decentralized network inspired by the stick insect, that on the basis of local reflexes generates the control signals needed to coordinate locomotion in hexapod robots. Walknet has been adapted to the specific mechanical structure of Gregor that is characterized by specialized legs and a sprawled posture. In particular an innovative hind leg geometry, inspired by the cockroach, has been considered to improve climbing capabilities. The performances of the new control architecture have been evaluated in dynamic simulation environments. The robot has been endowed with distance and contact sensors for obstacle detection. A heading control is used to avoid large obstacles, and an avoidance reflex, as can be found in stick insects, has been introduced to further improve climbing capabilities of the structure. The reported results, obtained in different environmental configurations, stress the adaptive capabilities of the Walknet approach: Even in unpredictable and cluttered environments the walking behaviour of the simulated robot and the robot prototype, controlled through a FPGA based board, remained stable.

  2. Prescriptive Package. Improving Patrol Productivity. Volume II. Specialized Patrol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schack, Stephen; Gay, William G.

    Designed to assist police departments in improving the productivity of their patrol operations, this volume on specialized patrol and a companion volume on routine patrol operations are intended for use by various sizes of departments. The volume of specialized patrol focuses upon the appropriate use and effective operation of specialized patrol…

  3. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  4. LACIE performance predictor final operational capability program description, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements and processing logic for the LACIE Error Model program (LEM) are described. This program is an integral part of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) system. LEM is that portion of the LPP (LACIE Performance Predictor) which simulates the sample segment classification, strata yield estimation, and production aggregation. LEM controls repetitive Monte Carlo trials based on input error distributions to obtain statistical estimates of the wheat area, yield, and production at different levels of aggregation. LEM interfaces with the rest of the LPP through a set of data files.

  5. LACIE performance predictor final operational capability program description, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Given the swath table files, the segment set for one country and cloud cover data, the SAGE program determines how many times and under what conditions each segment is accessed by satellites. The program writes a record for each segment on a data file which contains the pertinent acquisition data. The weather data file can also be generated from a NASA supplied tape. The Segment Acquisition Selector Program (SACS) selects data from the segment reference file based upon data input manually and from a crop window file. It writes the extracted data to a data acquisition file and prints two summary reports. The POUT program reads from associated LACIE files and produces printed reports. The major types of reports that can be produced are: (1) Substrate Reference Data Reports, (2) Population Mean, Standard Deviation and Histogram Reports, (3) Histograms of Monte Carlo Statistics Reports, and (4) Frequency of Sample Segment Acquisitions Reports.

  6. LACIE performance predictor final operational capability program description, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The program EPHEMS computes the orbital parameters for up to two vehicles orbiting the earth for up to 549 days. The data represents a continuous swath about the earth, producing tables which can be used to determine when and if certain land segments will be covered. The program GRID processes NASA's climatology tape to obtain the weather indices along with associated latitudes and longitudes. The program LUMP takes substrata historical data and sample segment ID, crop window, crop window error and statistical data, checks for valid input parameters and generates the segment ID file, crop window file and the substrata historical file. Finally, the System Error Executive (SEE) Program checks YES error and truth data, CAMS error data, and signature extension data for validity and missing elements. A message is printed for each error found.

  7. Ultrascale visualization capabilities for the ParaView/VTK framework

    SciTech Connect

    MORELAND, KENNETH; FABIAN, NATHAN

    2009-06-09

    The software is a set of technologies developed by the SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization in order to address the visualization needs for petascale computing and beyond. These technologies include improved I/O performance, simulation co-processing, advanced rendering capabilities, and specialized visualization techniques developed for SciDAC applications.

  8. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  9. General aviation components. [performance and capabilities of general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of selected aviation vehicles. The capabilities and performance of these vehicles are first presented, followed by a discussion of the aerodynamics, structures and materials, propulsion systems, noise, and configurations of fixed-wing aircraft. Finally the discussion focuses on the history, status, and future of attempts to provide vehicles capable of short-field operations.

  10. Distorted Representations of the "Capability Approach" in Australian School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skourdoumbis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Recently, curriculum developments in Australia have seen the incorporation of functionalist "general capabilities" as essential markers of schooling, meaning that any pedagogical expression of classroom-based practice, including subsequent instruction, should entail the identification and development of operational general capabilities.…

  11. A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

  12. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  13. SD46 Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The displays for the Materials Conference presents some of the facilities and capabilities in SD46 that can be useful to a prospective researcher from University, Academia or other government labs. Several of these already have associated personnel as principal and co-investigators on NASA peer reviewed science investigations. 1. SCN purification facility 2. ESL facility 3. Static and Dynamic magnetic field facility 4. Microanalysis facility 5. MSG Investigation - PFMI 6. Thermo physical Properties Measurement Capabilities.

  14. Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation reviewing the Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project is shown. The contents include: 1) ESCD Project; 2) Available Flight Assets; 3) Ikhana Procurement; 4) GCS Layout; 5) Baseline Predator B Architecture; 6) Ikhana Architecture; 7) UAV Capability Assessment; 8) The Big Picture; 9) NASA/NOAA UAV Demo (5/05 to 9/05); 10) NASA/USFS Western States Fire Mission (8/06); and 11) Suborbital Telepresence.

  15. Applied Operations Research: Operator's Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operates high value critical equipment (HVCE) that requires trouble shooting, periodic maintenance and continued monitoring by Operations staff. The complexity HVCE and information required to maintain and trouble shoot HVCE to assure continued mission success as paper is voluminous. Training on new HVCE is commensurate with the need for equipment maintenance. LaRC Research Directorate has undertaken a proactive research to support Operations staff by initiation of the development and prototyping an electronic computer based portable maintenance aid (Operator's Assistant). This research established a goal with multiple objectives and a working prototype was developed. The research identified affordable solutions; constraints; demonstrated use of commercial off the shelf software; use of the US Coast Guard maintenance solution; NASA Procedure Representation Language; and the identification of computer system strategies; where these demonstrations and capabilities support the Operator, and maintenance. The results revealed validation against measures of effectiveness and overall proved a substantial training and capability sustainment tool. The research indicated that the OA could be deployed operationally at the LaRC Compressor Station with an expectation of satisfactorily results and to obtain additional lessons learned prior to deployment at other LaRC Research Directorate Facilities. The research revealed projected cost and time savings.

  16. QALYs and the capability approach.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Richard

    2005-08-01

    This explores the applicability of Sen's capability approach to the economic evaluation of health care programmes. An individual's 'capability set' describes his freedom to choose valuable activities and states of being ('functionings'). Direct estimation and valuation of capability sets is not feasible at present. Standard preference-based methods such as willingness to pay are feasible, but problematic due to the adaptive and constructed nature of individual preferences over time and under uncertainty. An alternative is to re-interpret the QALY as a cardinal and interpersonally comparable index of the value of the individual's capability set. This approach has limitations, since the link between QALYs and capabilities is not straightforward. Nevertheless, the QALY approach is recognisable as an application of the capability approach since it pays close attention to functionings, through the use of survey-based multi-attribute health state valuation instruments, and permits conceptions of value other than the traditional utilitarian ones of choice, desire-fulfilment and happiness. Furthermore, suitably re-interpreted, it can account for (i) non-separability between health and non-health components of value; and suitably modified it can also account for (ii) process attributes of care, which may have a direct effect on non-health functionings such as comfort and dignity, and (iii) sub-group diversity in the value of the same health functionings. PMID:15693028

  17. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  18. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  19. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  20. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.