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Sample records for specific dna hybridization

  1. Specific DNA-RNA hybrid recognition by TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Pan, Xiaojing; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Yan, Nieng; Shi, Yigong

    2012-10-25

    The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats). Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  2. [Diagnosed tuberculosis using specific DNA probe hybridization methods].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Itaru; Yamazumi, Toshiaki

    2002-11-01

    In Japan, reported cases of tuberculosis had declined nearly every year until 1995. However, in 1997 newly recorded cases began increasing for the first time in more than 38 years. Recent studies using DNA fingerprinting show that person- to person transmission may account for as many as one-third of new cases of tuberculosis in citizen populations. Nucleic acid hybridization methods using specific DNA probes can specifically identify M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species. Rapid nucleic acid amplification techniques such as polymerase chain reaction methods allow direct identification of M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens. Is 6110 has been exploited extensively as a clonal marker in molecular epidemiology studies of tuberculosis. The emergence of resistance to antituberculosis drugs is a relevant matter worldwide. A recent genotypic method allows earlier detection of RFP-resistant and INH-resistant stains using probes for mutation in rpoB and in katG.

  3. Hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and N. suaveolens: evidence that the Q chromosome causes hybrid lethality based on Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, T; Marubashi, W

    2006-04-01

    Hybrid seedlings from the cross Nicotiana tabacum x N. suaveolens express lethality at 28 degrees C. We carried out a cross between monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking the Q chromosome and N. suaveolens by test-tube pollination and ovule culture at 28 degrees C. To suppress hybrid lethality, hybrid seedlings obtained were transferred to 36 degrees C immediately after germination and cultured. We determined whether Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected among hybrid seedlings. When hybrid seedlings cultured at 36 degrees C were transferred to 28 degrees C, hybrid seedlings in which Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected expressed hybrid lethality, while hybrid seedlings in which Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were not detected did not express hybrid lethality. From these results, we concluded that the presence of the Q chromosome of N. tabacum is related to hybrid lethality observed in crosses between N. tabacum and N. suaveolens. This is the first report that clearly demonstrates the relationship between a certain chromosome and hybrid lethality in the genus Nicotiana using chromosome-specific DNA markers. Additionally, we confirmed that the Q chromosome belongs to the S subgenome because Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected only in N. sylvestris.

  4. DNA hybridization analysis of the nif region of two methylotrophs and molecular cloning of nif-specific DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Toukdarian, A E; Lidstrom, M E

    1984-01-01

    DNA isolated from two diazotrophic methylotrophs, the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus sp. strain 6 and the methanol autotroph Xanthobacter sp. H4-14, hybridized to DNA fragments encoding nitrogen fixation (nif) genes from Klebsiella pneumoniae. This interspecific nif homology was limited to DNA fragments encoding the nitrogenase structural proteins (nifH, nifD, and nifK) and specific methylotroph DNA sequences. The hybridization patterns obtained with the two methylotrophs were dissimilar, indicating that the nif region of methylotrophs is not physically conserved. By using the K. pneumoniae nif structural genes as a probe, a fragment of nif DNA from each methylotroph was cloned and characterized. The DNA fragment from Methylosinus sp. 6 encoded two polypeptides of 57,000 and 34,000 molecular weight. Images PMID:6321444

  5. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  6. Hybrid TiO II nanoparticles: an approach for developing site specific DNA cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Saponjic, Z.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Luo, S.; Preuss, D.; Rajh, T.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed hybrid light responsive TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to PNA oligonucleotides that site specifically bind to double stranded target DNA. This opens a new opportunity for the development of a highly efficient "artificial restriction enzyme" whose activity can be controlled by using light. The work focuses on the use of TiO II nanocomposites as analogs of restriction enzymes with unique specificity that does not exist in current biological approaches. TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to DNA or PNA adapters have been site-specifically attached along double stranded λ DNA vectors. Illumination of this assembly results in selective oxidation of DNA at the deepest "thermodynamic traps" located closest to the nanoparticle surface, causing DNA cleavage. We investigate the effect of the sequence and length of DNA and PNA adapters on the specificity of DNA cleavage. Related to this issue, the potential use of TiO II/DNA nanocomposites as "rare cutters" that cleave DNA in the places not achieved with existing protein-based enzymes is investigated.

  7. Regional localization of chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments by using a hybrid cell deletion mapping panel.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, M J; Drabkin, H A; Firnhaber, C; Miller, Y E; Scoggin, C H; Smith, D I

    1988-01-01

    A series of human chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments isolated and characterized from a lamda phage genomic library were regionally localized on human chromosome 3. This was accomplished using filter hybridization blot analysis of a human chromosome 3 hybrid cell deletion mapping panel. Twenty-three new anonymous DNA fragments were assigned to one of four physical regions of chromosome 3. Seventeen DNA fragments were mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3, including one DNA fragment that demonstrated a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Five DNA fragments were assigned to 3p14.2----pter, including one highly polymorphic fragment sublocalized at 3p25----pter by in situ hybridization. This DNA fragment is the second reported distal 3p polymorphic probe. One DNA fragment was localized to 3p14----p14.2. In addition, three fragments previously assigned to chromosome 3 were confirmed. Polymorphic DNA probes DNF15S2 (formerly D1S1) and D3S2 were mapped to 3p14.2----pter. The previous 3p25 in situ localization of the c-raf-1 oncogene was supported by deletion panel mapping. The physical localization of these twenty-three new DNA fragments has more than doubled the number of cloned DNA fragments assigned to chromosome 3. These and future regional assignments of DNA fragment probes will facilitate construction of both a physical and genetic linkage map of chromosome 3. They may also be useful in characterizing the chromosomal and molecular aberrations involved in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), renal cell carcinoma, other malignancies, and the 3p14.2 common fragile site. Images p[446]-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2902784

  8. Specific detection and confirmation of Campylobacter jejuni by DNA hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, L K; Kingombe, C I; Yan, W; Taylor, D E; Hiratsuka, K; Malik, N; Garcia, M M

    1997-01-01

    Conventional detection and confirmation methods for Campylobacter jejuni are lengthy and tedious. A rapid hybridization protocol in which a 1,475-bp chromogen-labelled DNA probe (pDT1720) and Campylobacter strains filtered and grown on 0.22-micron-pore-size hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) are used was developed. Among the environmental and clinical isolates of C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei, Campylobacter lari, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis and a panel of 310 unrelated bacterial strains tested, only C. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei isolates hybridized with the probe under stringent conditions. The specificity of the probe was confirmed when the protocol was applied to spiked skim milk and chicken rinse samples. Based on the nucleotide sequence of pDT1720, a pair of oligonucleotide primers was designed for PCR amplification of DNA from Campylobacter spp. and other food pathogens grown overnight in selective Mueller-Hinton broth with cefoperazone and growth supplements. All C. jejuni strains tested, including DNase-producing strains and C. jejuni subsp. doylei, produced a specific 402-bp amplicon, as confirmed by restriction and Southern blot analysis. The detection range of the assay was as low as 3 CFU per PCR to as high as 10(5) CFU per PCR for pure cultures. Overnight enrichment of chicken rinse samples spiked initially with as little as approximately 10 CFU/ml produced amplicons after the PCR. No amplicon was detected with any of the other bacterial strains tested or from the chicken background microflora. Since C. jejuni is responsible for 99% of Campylobacter contamination in poultry, PCR and HGMF hybridization were performed on naturally contaminated chicken rinse samples, and the results were compared with the results of conventional cultural isolation on Preston agar. All samples confirmed to be culture positive for C. jejuni were also identified by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification, thus confirming that

  9. Specific detection and confirmation of Campylobacter jejuni by DNA hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed

    Ng, L K; Kingombe, C I; Yan, W; Taylor, D E; Hiratsuka, K; Malik, N; Garcia, M M

    1997-11-01

    Conventional detection and confirmation methods for Campylobacter jejuni are lengthy and tedious. A rapid hybridization protocol in which a 1,475-bp chromogen-labelled DNA probe (pDT1720) and Campylobacter strains filtered and grown on 0.22-micron-pore-size hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) are used was developed. Among the environmental and clinical isolates of C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei, Campylobacter lari, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis and a panel of 310 unrelated bacterial strains tested, only C. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei isolates hybridized with the probe under stringent conditions. The specificity of the probe was confirmed when the protocol was applied to spiked skim milk and chicken rinse samples. Based on the nucleotide sequence of pDT1720, a pair of oligonucleotide primers was designed for PCR amplification of DNA from Campylobacter spp. and other food pathogens grown overnight in selective Mueller-Hinton broth with cefoperazone and growth supplements. All C. jejuni strains tested, including DNase-producing strains and C. jejuni subsp. doylei, produced a specific 402-bp amplicon, as confirmed by restriction and Southern blot analysis. The detection range of the assay was as low as 3 CFU per PCR to as high as 10(5) CFU per PCR for pure cultures. Overnight enrichment of chicken rinse samples spiked initially with as little as approximately 10 CFU/ml produced amplicons after the PCR. No amplicon was detected with any of the other bacterial strains tested or from the chicken background microflora. Since C. jejuni is responsible for 99% of Campylobacter contamination in poultry, PCR and HGMF hybridization were performed on naturally contaminated chicken rinse samples, and the results were compared with the results of conventional cultural isolation on Preston agar. All samples confirmed to be culture positive for C. jejuni were also identified by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification, thus confirming that

  10. Construction of Hypericin Gland-Specific cDNA Library via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Hou, Weina; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Hypericin, an important determinant of the pharmacological properties of the genus Hypericum, is considered as a major molecule for drug development. However, biosynthesis and accumulation of hypericin is not well understood. Identification of genes differentially expressed in tissues with and without hypericin accumulation is a useful strategy to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the dark glands and hypericin biosynthesis. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is a unique method for PCR-based amplification of specific cDNA fragments that differ between a control (driver) and experimental (tester) transcriptome. This technique relies on the removal of dsDNA formed by hybridization between a control and test sample, thus eliminating cDNAs of similar abundance, and retaining differentially expressed or variable in sequence cDNAs. In our laboratory we applied this method to identify the genes involved in the development of dark glands and accumulation of hypericin in Hypericum perforatum. Here we describe the complete procedure for the construction of hypericin gland-specific subtracted cDNA library.

  11. Chromosome-specific DNA repeats: rapid identification in silico and validation using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joanne H; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H; Polyzos, Aris A; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O'Brien, Anna R; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2012-12-20

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as "database mining". Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  12. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  13. Microscale detection of specific bacterial DNA in soil with a magnetic capture-hybridization and PCR amplification assay.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, C S

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic capture-hybridization PCR technique (MCH-PCR) was developed to eliminate the inhibitory effect of humic acids and other contaminants in PCRs targeting specific soil DNA. A single-stranded DNA probe, which was complementary to an internal part of the target gene, was used to coat magnetic beads. After hybridization in a suspension of soil DNA, magnetic extraction of the beads separated the hybrid DNA from all other soil DNA, humic acids, and other interfering soil components. The MCH was followed by PCR amplification of the specific target DNA. In barley rhizosphere soil, detection of a lux gene inserted in a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain could be demonstrated in nonsterile soil samples (0.5 mg). This corresponded to a detection of fewer than 40 bacterial cells per cm of barley root. The MCH-PCR technique greatly improves the current protocols for PCR detection of specific microorganisms or genes in soil because specific target DNA sequences from very small soil samples can be extracted and determined. PMID:7574645

  14. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of miRNA-21 Using a Zinc Finger Protein Specific to DNA-RNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiew San; Kim, Kwang-Sun; Yu, Byeongjun; Jon, Sangyong; Kim, Moon-Soo; Yang, Haesik

    2017-02-07

    Both high sensitivity and high specificity are crucial for detection of miRNAs that have emerged as important clinical biomarkers. Just Another Zinc finger proteins (JAZ, ZNF346) bind preferably (but nonsequence-specifically) to DNA-RNA hybrids over single-stranded RNAs, single-stranded DNAs, and double-stranded DNAs. We present an ultrasensitive and highly specific electrochemical method for miRNA-21 detection based on the selective binding of JAZ to the DNA-RNA hybrid formed between a DNA capture probe and a target miRNA-21. This enables us to use chemically stable DNA as a capture probe instead of RNA as well as to apply a standard sandwich-type assay format to miRNA detection. High signal amplification is obtained by (i) enzymatic amplification by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) coupled with (ii) electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling involving an ALP product (hydroquinone). Low nonspecific adsorption of ALP-conjugated JAZ is obtained using a polymeric self-assembled-monolayer-modified and casein-treated indium-tin oxide electrode. The detection method can discriminate between target miRNA-21 and nontarget nucleic acids (DNA-DNA hybrid, single-stranded DNA, miRNA-125b, miRNA-155, single-base mismatched miRNA, and three-base mismatched miRNA). The detection limits for miRNA-21 in buffer and 10-fold diluted serum are approximately 2 and 30 fM, respectively, indicating that the detection method is ultrasensitive. This detection method can be readily extended to multiplex detection of miRNAs with only one ALP-conjugated JAZ probe due to its nonsequence-specific binding character. We also believe that the method could offer a promising solution for point-of-care testing of miRNAs in body fluids.

  15. Screening and identification of male-specific DNA fragments in common carps Cyprinus carpio using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chen, J J; Du, Q Y; Yue, Y Y; Dang, B J; Chang, Z J

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a sex subtractive genomic DNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between male and female Cyprinus carpio. Twenty-two clones with distinguishable hybridization signals were selected and sequenced. The specific primers were designed based on the sequence data. Those primers were then used to amplify the sex-specific fragments from the genomic DNA of male and female carp. The amplified fragments from two clones showed specificity to males but not to females, which were named as Ccmf2 [387 base pairs (bp)] and Ccmf3 (183 bp), respectively. The sex-specific pattern was analysed in a total of 40 individuals from three other different C. carpio. stocks and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella using Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 as dot-blotting probes. The results revealed that the molecular diversity exists on the Y chromosome of C. carpio. No hybridization signals, however, were detected from individuals of C. idella, suggesting that the two sequences are specific to C. carpio. No significant homologous sequences of Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 were found in GenBank. Therefore, it was interpreted that the results as that Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 are two novel male-specific sequences; and both fragments could be used as markers to rapidly and accurately identify the genetic sex of part of C. carpio. This may provide a very efficient selective tool for practically breeding monosex female populations in aquacultural production.

  16. Mapping of late adenovirus genes by cell-free translation of RNA selected by hybridization to specific DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J B; Atkins, J F; Anderson, C W; Baum, P R; Gesteland, R F

    1975-04-01

    Cytoplasmic RNA, isolated from cells late after infection by adenovirus type 2 and fractionated by hybridization to specific fragments of adenovirus DNA produced by cleavage with the endonuclease R-EcoRI, was used as template for protein synthesis in cell-free mammalian extracts. Each of the R-EcoRI fragments of DNA selects RNA that encodes specific subsets of the viral polypeptides. From the known order of the R-EcoRI fragments, the following partial map is deduced: (III, IIIa, IVa2, V, P-VII, IX), (II, P-VI), 100K, IV-where the relative order of the components enclosed in parentheses has not yet been determined.

  17. Specific Detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus by Amplification of Three Unique DNA Sequences Isolated by Subtraction Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mills, D; Russell, B W; Hanus, J W

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Three single-copy, unique DNA fragments, designated Cms50, Cms72, and Cms85, were isolated from strain CS3 of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus by subtraction hybridization using driver DNA from C. michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, and Rhodococcus facians. Radio-labeled probes made of these fragments and used in Southern blot analysis revealed each to be absolutely specific to all North American C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus strains tested, including plasmidless and nonmucoid strains. The probes have no homology with genomic DNA from related C. michiganensis subspecies insidiosus, michiganensis, and tessellarius, nor with DNA from 11 additional bacterial species and three unidentified strains, some of which have been previously reported to display cross-reactivity with C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus-specific antisera. The three fragments shared no homology, and they appeared to be separated from each other by at least 20 kbp in the CS3 genome. Internal primer sets permitted amplification of each fragment by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only from C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus DNA. In a PCR-based sensitivity assay using a primer set that amplifies Cms85, the lowest level of detection of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus was 100 CFU per milliliter when cells were added to potato core fluid. Erroneous results that may arise from PCR artifacts and mutational events are, therefore, minimized by the redundancy of the primer sets, and the products should be verifiable with unique capture probes in sequence-based detection systems.

  18. Ricin A-chain substrate specificity in RNA, DNA, and hybrid stem-loop structures.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Tim K; Schramm, Vern L

    2004-05-04

    Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) is the catalytic subunit of ricin, a heterodimeric toxin from castor beans. Its ribosomal inactivating activity arises from depurination of a single adenine from position A(4324) in a GAGA tetraloop from 28S ribosomal RNA. Minimal substrate requirements are the GAGA tetraloop and stem of two or more base pairs. Depurination activity also occurs on stem-loop DNA with the same sequence, but with the k(cat) reduced 200-fold. Systematic variation of RNA 5'-G(1)C(2)G(3)C(4)[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)]G(9)C(10)G(11)C(12)-3' 12mers via replacement of each nucleotide in the tetraloop with a deoxynucleotide showed a 16-fold increase in k(cat) for A(6) --> dA(6) but reduced k(cat) up to 300-fold for the other sites. Methylation of individual 2'-hydroxyls in a similar experiment reduced k(cat) by as much as 3 x 10(-3)-fold. In stem-loop DNA, replacement of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] with individual ribonucleotides resulted in small kinetic changes, except for the dA(6) --> A(6) replacement for which k(cat) decreased 6-fold. Insertion of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] into an RNA stem-loop or G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8) into a DNA stem-loop reduced k(cat) by 30- and 5-fold, respectively. Multiple substitutions of deoxyribonucleotides into RNA stem-loops in one case (dG(5),dG(7)) decreased k(cat)/K(m) by 10(5)-fold, while a second change (dG(5),dA(8)) decreased k(cat) by 100-fold. Mapping these interactions on the structure of GAGA stem-loop RNA suggests that all the loop 2'-hydroxyl groups play a significant role in the action of ricin A-chain. Improved binding of RNA-DNA stem-loop hybrids provides a scaffold for inhibitor design. Replacing the adenosine of the RTA depurination site with deoxyadenosine in a small RNA stem-loop increased k(cat) 20-fold to 1660 min(-1), a value similar to RTA's k(cat) on intact ribosomes.

  19. A universal colorimetry for nucleic acids and aptamer-specific ligands detection based on DNA hybridization amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Shang, Xinxin; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yujie; Guo, Yingshu; You, Jinmao

    2017-07-01

    We present a universal amplified-colorimetric for detecting nucleic acid targets or aptamer-specific ligand targets based on gold nanoparticle-DNA (GNP-DNA) hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The universal arrays consisted of capture probe and hairpin DNA-GNP. First, capture probe recognized target specificity and released the initiator sequence. Then dispersed hairpin DNA modified GNPs were cross-linked to form aggregates through HCR events triggered by initiator sequence. As the aggregates accumulate, a significant red-to purple color change can be easily visualized by the naked eye. We used miRNA target sequence (miRNA-203) and aptamer-specific ligand (ATP) as target molecules for this proof-of-concept experiment. Initiator sequence (DNA2) was released from the capture probe (MNP/DNA1/2 conjugates) under the strong competitiveness of miRNA-203. Hairpin DNA (H1 and H2) can be complementary with the help of initiator DNA2 to form GNP-H1/GNP-H2 aggregates. The absorption ratio (A620/A520) values of solutions were a sensitive function of miRNA-203 concentration covering from 1.0 × 10(-11) M to 9.0 × 10(-10) M, and as low as 1.0 × 10(-11) M could be detected. At the same time, the color changed from light wine red to purple and then to light blue have occurred in the solution. For ATP, initiator sequence (5'-end of DNA3) was released from the capture probe (DNA3) under the strong combination of aptamer-ATP. The present colorimetric for specific detection of ATP exhibited good sensitivity and 1.0 × 10(-8) M ATP could be detected. The proposed strategy also showed good performances for qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis of intracellular nucleic acids and aptamer-specific ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Strategies for optimizing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Kashanian, Soheila; Sanadgol, Nima; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Karami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Specific and predictable hybridization of the polynucleotide sequences to their complementary counterparts plays a fundamental role in the rational design of new nucleic acid nanodevices. Generally, nucleic acid hybridization can be performed using two major strategies, namely hybridization of DNA or RNA targets to surface-tethered oligonucleotide probes (solid-phase hybridization) and hybridization of the target nucleic acids to randomly distributed probes in solution (solution-phase hybridization). Investigations into thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of these two strategies showed that hybridization on surfaces is less favorable than that of the same sequence in solution. Indeed, the efficiency of DNA hybridization on surfaces suffers from three constraints: (1) electrostatic repulsion between DNA strands on the surface, (2) steric hindrance between tethered DNA probes, and (3) nonspecific adsorption of the attached oligonucleotides to the solid surface. During recent years, several strategies have been developed to overcome the problems associated with DNA hybridization on surfaces. Optimizing the probe surface density, application of a linker between the solid surface and the DNA-recognizing sequence, optimizing the pH of DNA hybridization solutions, application of thiol reagents, and incorporation of a polyadenine block into the terminal end of the recognizing sequence are among the most important strategies for enhancing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

  1. Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen binds specifically to double-stranded DNA but not to single-stranded DNA or DNA/RNA hybrids containing the SV40 regulatory sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Auborn, K J; Markowitz, R B; Wang, E; Yu, Y T; Prives, C

    1988-01-01

    Simian virus 40 T antigen has been shown previously to bind specifically with high affinity to sites within the regulatory region of double-stranded simian virus 40 DNA. Using competition filter binding and the DNA-binding immunoassay, we show that T antigen did not bind specifically to either early or late single-stranded DNA containing these binding sites. Moreover, T antigen did not bind these sequences present in single-stranded RNA, RNA/RNA duplexes, or RNA/DNA hybrids. T antigen did, however, bind as efficiently to single-stranded DNA-cellulose as to double-stranded DNA-cellulose. This binding was nonspecific because it was independent of the presence of T-antigen-binding sites. The implications of these observations are discussed. Images PMID:3367427

  2. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  3. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  4. Electrokinetic acceleration of DNA hybridization in microsystems.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Wang, Yun-Hsiang; Chen, Huai-Yi; Sun, Jia-Hong; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2015-06-01

    In this work, electrokinetic acceleration of DNA hybridization was investigated by different combinations of frequencies and amplitudes of actuating electric signals. Because the frequencies from low to high can induce different kinds of electrokinetic forces, i.e., electroosmotic to electrothermal forces, this work provides an in-depth investigation of electrokinetic enhanced hybridization. Concentric circular Cr/Au microelectrodes of 350 µm in diameter were fabricated on a glass substrate and probe DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface. Target DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes suspending in solution was then applied to the electrode. Different electrokinetic forces were induced by the application of different electric signals to the circular microelectrodes. Local microfluidic vortexes were generated to increase the collision efficiency between the target DNA suspending in solution and probe DNA immobilized on the electrode surface. DNA hybridization on the electrode surface could be accelerated by the electrokinetic forces. The level of hybridization was represented by the fluorescent signal intensity ratio. Results revealed that such 5-min dynamic hybridization increased 4.5 fold of signal intensity ratio as compared to a 1-h static hybridization. Moreover, dynamic hybridization was found to have better differentiation ability between specific and non-specific target DNA. This study provides a strategy to accelerate DNA hybridization in microsystems.

  5. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  6. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  7. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  8. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  9. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  10. A ribosomal DNA fragment of Listeria monocytogenes and its use as a genus-specific probe in an aqueous-phase hybridization assay.

    PubMed Central

    Emond, E; Fliss, I; Pandian, S

    1993-01-01

    cDNAs were prepared from the total RNA of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19118 and used as probes to screen a genomic library of the same strain. Four clones were identified which contained ribosomal DNA fragments. Recombinant DNA from one of them was fractionated and differentially hybridized with the cDNA probes to RNA of L. monocytogenes and Kurthia zopfii. The resulting hybridization pattern revealed an HpaII fragment of 0.8 kb that was specific for the L. monocytogenes strain. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment showed 159 bases of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA gene, 243 bases of the spacer region, and 382 bases of the 5' end of the 23S rRNA gene. In dot blot hybridization assays, the 32P-labeled 784-bp fragment was specific only for Listeria species. Dot blot assays revealed that the 32P-labeled fragment can easily detect > or = 10 pg of total nucleic acids from pure cultures of L. monocytogenes, which corresponds to approximately 300 bacteria. This fragment was also used as a probe in an assay named the heteroduplex nucleic acid (HNA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this system, the biotinylated DNA probe is hybridized in the aqueous phase with target RNA molecules and then specific HNAs are captured by HNA-specific antibodies. Captured HNA molecules are revealed with an enzyme conjugate of streptavidin. In a preliminary HNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the 784-bp fragment maintained its specificity for Listeria spp. and could detect 5 x 10(2) cells in artificially contaminated meat homogenate. Images PMID:8368854

  11. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual infection of chickens with pox and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) confirmed with specific pox and ILT DNA dot-blot hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Fatunmbi, O O; Reed, W M; Schwartz, D L; Tripathy, D N

    1995-01-01

    Dual infection with fowl pox (FP) and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) was diagnosed as the cause of acute mortality in a flock of three age groups of Hy-Line leghorn layers. The affected chickens had not been previously vaccinated against either FP or ILT. The diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation, histopathology, and the use of specific pox and ILT genomic DNA probes in a dot-blot hybridization assay. FP and ILT vaccinations were recommended to control mortality. The use of FP- and ILT-specific DNA dot-blot hybridization may be used as a routine diagnostic tool to differentiate between the two diseases, especially in atypical cases of either infection or to confirm the existence of the two diseases as a mixed infection in a flock of chickens.

  13. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  14. Further mapping of late adenovirus genes by cell-free translation of RNA selected by hybridization to specific DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W; Atkins, J F

    1977-09-01

    RNA isolated from the cytoplasm of human cells at late times after infection by adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) has been fractionated by hybridization to fragments of Ad2 DNA which were produced by digestion with the restriction endonucleases Hpa I, Eco RI, Bam HI and Hind III. Cell-free translation of these partially purified mRNAs indicates that the genes for the late Ad2 proteins lie within the following intervals on the conventional Ad2 map: 15K (4.4-17.0 map units), IX and IVa2 (7.5-17.0), IIIa (29.1-40.9), III and V (29.1-57.0), pVIII (40.9-57.0), pVI and II (40.9-70.7), 100K (59.0-83.4), pVIII (70.7-83.4) and IV (85.0-100). In addition to the primary hybridization of the late Ad2 mRNAs to the regions indicated above, most late Ad2 mRNAs (except those for 15K, IX and IVa2) exhibited some hybridization to a secondary site between 17.0 and 29.1 map units.

  15. Kinetics and dynamics of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yandong; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2011-11-15

    DNA hybridization, wherein strands of DNA form duplex or larger hybrids through noncovalent, sequence-specific interactions, is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. Developing a better understanding of the kinetic and dynamic properties of DNA hybridization will thus help in the elucidation of molecular mechanisms involved in numerous biochemical processes. Moreover, because DNA hybridization has been widely adapted in biotechnology, its study is invaluable to the development of a range of commercially important processes. In this Account, we examine recent studies of the kinetics and dynamics of DNA hybridization, including (i) intramolecular collision of random coil, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), (ii) nucleic acid hairpin folding, and (iii) considerations of DNA hybridization from both a global view and a detailed base-by-base view. We also examine the spontaneous single-base-pair flipping in duplex DNA because of its importance to both DNA hybridization and repair. Intramolecular collision of random coil ssDNA, with chemical relaxation times ranging from hundreds of nanoseconds to a few microseconds, is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The first passage time theory of Szabo, Schulten, and Schulten, which determines the average reaction time of the intrachain collision, was tested. Although it was found to provide an acceptable approximation, a more sophisticated theoretical treatment is desirable. Nucleic acid hairpin folding has been extensively investigated as an important model system of DNA hybridization. The relaxation time of hairpin folding and unfolding strongly depends on the stem length, and it may range from hundreds of microseconds to hundreds of milliseconds. The traditional two-state model has been revised to a multistate model as a result of new experimental observations and theoretical study, and partially folded intermediate states have been introduced to the folding energy landscape. On the other hand, new

  16. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, M.S.; Lockhart, D.J.; Hubbell, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA chips for genetic analysis, using human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a model. The DNA chips are made up of ordered arrays of DNA oligonucleotide probes, synthesized on a glass substrate using photolithographic techniques. The synthesis site for each different probe is specifically addressed by illumination of the substrate through a photolithographic mask, achieving selective deprotection Nucleoside phosphoramidites bearing photolabile protecting groups are coupled only to exposed sites. Repeated cycles of deprotection and coupling generate all the probes in parallel. The set of 4{sup N} N-mer probes can be synthesized in only 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N or fewer steps. Sequences amplified from the D-loop region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were fluorescently labelled and hybridized to DNA chips containing probes specific for mtDNA. Each nucleotide of a 1.3 kb region spanning the D loop is represented by four probes on the chip. Each probe has a different base at the position of interest: together they comprise a set of A, C, G and T probes which are otherwise identical. In principle, only one probe-target hybrid will be a perfect match. The other three will be single base mismatches. Fluorescence imaging of the hybridized chip allows quantification of hybridization signals. Heterozygous mixtures of sequences can also be characterized. We have developed software to quantitate and interpret the hybridization signals, and to call the sequence automatically. Results of sequence analysis of human mtDNAs will be presented.

  17. Detection of pseudorabies virus by DNA hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A DNA hybridization technique was developed in order to detect the presence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in swine tissue. Seven, /sup 32/P-nick translated probes of high specific activity were prepared from transformed Escherichia coli plasmids into which Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H (Bam H1) restriction fragments of PRV-DNA had been inserted. Under optimal hybridization conditions, the minimum detection level of PRV-DNA was 10/sup -11/ g, which is equivalent to 1 copy of the PRV genome/80 host cells. PRV-DNA was detected in the DNA extracted from the tissues of 10 out of 11 swine previously shown to harbor infective virus. Furthermore, PRV-DNA was present in all four seropositive swine that had recovered from pseudorabies, where no infective virus or viral products were detected at necropsy. The PRV-DNA was present in either the anterior cerebral cortex in 2 swine, or the medulla oblongata and trigeminal ganglion in 1 swine. This perhaps indicates the portal of entry of the virus into the central nervous system. This DNA hybridization assay, which utilizes restriction fragments, may be useful for studying the dynamics and molecular biologic properties of the latency of pseudorabies virus in swine.

  18. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  19. Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nathan K; Shapiro, Beth; Green, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genomewide sequence data and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan K.; Shapiro, Beth; Green, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genome-wide sequence data, and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history. PMID:26826668

  1. Control of DNA hybridization by photoswitchable molecular glue.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Hybridization of DNA is one of the most intriguing events in molecular recognition and is essential for living matter to inherit life beyond generations. In addition to the function of DNA as genetic material, DNA hybridization is a key to control the function of DNA-based materials in nanoscience. Since the hybridization of two single stranded DNAs is a thermodynamically favorable process, dissociation of the once formed DNA duplex is normally unattainable under isothermal conditions. As the progress of DNA-based nanoscience, methodology to control the DNA hybridization process has become increasingly important. Besides many reports using the chemically modified DNA for the regulation of hybridization, we focused our attention on the use of a small ligand as the molecular glue for the DNA. In 2001, we reported the first designed molecule that strongly and specifically bound to the mismatched base pairs in double stranded DNA. Further studies on the mismatch binding molecules provided us a key discovery of a novel mode of the binding of a mismatch binding ligand that induced the base flipping. With these findings we proposed the concept of molecular glue for DNA for the unidirectional control of DNA hybridization and, eventually photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, which enabled the bidirectional control of hybridization under photoirradiation. In this tutorial review, we describe in detail how we integrated the mismatch binding ligand into photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, and the application and perspective in DNA-based nanoscience.

  2. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  3. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:3037104

  4. Method for detection of Hg2+ based on the specific thymine-Hg2+-thymine interaction in the DNA hybridization on the surface of quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhonghan; Han, Jianhua; Zhang, Jianping; Zhao, Hong; Jiang, Long

    2011-10-15

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for the detection of mercury ions with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), based on the specific thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) interaction and gold nanoparticle-mediated signal amplification. To enhance the sensitivity of detection a sandwich hybridization approach was adopted in this work. The QCM gold surface was modified with the probe SH-oligonucleotides (Oligo-1) and 6-Mercapto-1-hexanol to form an active surface for the hybridization of a longer ss-DNA (Oligo-2), and then Oligo-3 hybridazated with an excess and matching part of Oligo-2. In all oligonucleotides, there existed T bases. In the presence of Hg(2+) ions, special T-Hg(2+)-T reaction greatly enhanced the hybridization of oligonucleotides and detection sensitivity. The gold nanoparticle (Au NPs) amplifier method further increased the sensitivity of detection. A detection sensitivity of 5nM Hg(2+) was obtained in the QCM system, whereas other coexisting metal ions (such as Ni(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+), Cr(3+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Ba(2+)) had no significant interference. This method reveals a new approach for the manufacture of a kind of simple and low cost sensors for the Hg(2+) detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recognition of the unique structure of DNA:RNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Nicholas N; Arya, Dev P

    2008-07-01

    Targeting nucleic acids using small molecules routinely uses the end products in the conversion pathway of "DNA to RNA, RNA to protein". However, the intermediate processes in this path have not always been targeted. The DNA-RNA interaction, specifically DNA:RNA hybrid formation, provides a unique target for controlling the transfer of genetic information through binding by small molecules. Not only do DNA:RNA hybrids differ in conformation from widely targeted DNA and RNA, the low occurrence within biological systems further validates their therapeutic potential. Surprisingly, a survey of the literature reveals only a handful of ligands that bind DNA:RNA hybrids; in comparison, the number of ligands designed to target DNA is in the thousands. DNA:RNA hybrids, from their scientific inception to current applications in ligand targeting, are discussed.

  6. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting-based community DNA hybridization to pinpoint genome-specific fragments as molecular markers to identify and track populations common to healthy human guts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guifang; Pan, Li; Du, Huimin; Chen, Junyi; Zhao, Liping

    2004-10-01

    Bacterial populations common to healthy human guts may play important roles in human health. A new strategy for discovering genomic sequences as markers for these bacteria was developed using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting. Structural features within microbial communities are compared with ERIC-PCR followed by DNA hybridization to identify genomic fragments shared by samples from healthy human individuals. ERIC-PCR profiles of fecal samples from 12 diseased or healthy human and piglet subjects demonstrated stable, unique banding patterns for each individual tested. Sequence homology of DNA fragments in bands of identical size was examined between samples by hybridization under high stringency conditions with DIG-labeled ERIC-PCR products derived from the fecal sample of one healthy child. Comparative analysis of the hybridization profiles with the original agarose fingerprints identified three predominant bands as signatures for populations associated with healthy human guts with sizes of 500, 800 and 1000 bp. Clone library profiling of the three bands produced 17 genome fragments, three of which showed high similarity only with regions of the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome, while the remainder were orphan sequences. Association of these sequences with healthy guts was validated by sequence-selective PCR experiments, which showed that a single fragment was present in all 32 healthy humans and 13 healthy piglets tested. Two fragments were present in the healthy human group and in 18 children with non-infectious diarrhea but not in eight children with infectious diarrhea. Genome fragments identified with this novel strategy may be used as genome-specific markers for dynamic monitoring and sequence-guided isolation of functionally important bacterial populations in complex communities such as human gut microflora.

  7. 1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

    1996-10-01

    The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

  8. Class-specific regulation of anti-DNA antibody synthesis and the age-associated changes in (NZB x NZW)F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Sekigawa, I; Okada, T; Noguchi, K; Ueda, G; Hirose, S; Sato, H; Shirai, T

    1987-05-01

    Investigations of regulatory helper and suppressor T cells in the in vitro anti-DNA antibody synthesis in NZB x NZW (B/W) F1 hybrid mice were initiated by the development of an in vitro system in which G10-passed B cells from B/W F1 mice were cocultured with mitomycin C-treated T cells in the presence of Con A and either in the presence or in the absence of LPS. It was revealed that each IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody synthesis was under the regulation of separate L3T4+ helper and Ly-2+ suppressor T cells. The function of these class-specific regulatory T cells was age-dependent. Although the helper effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgG antibody synthesis increased, the effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgM antibody production decreased in B/W F1 mice with aging. The IgG anti-DNA antibody production in the cocultures of L3T4+ T cells and B cells was suppressed by addition of Ly-2+ T cells from young but not aged B/W F1 mice, whereas the production of IgM anti-DNA antibodies was suppressed by Ly-2+ T cells from aged but not young B/W F1 mice. We also found that although IgM anti-DNA antibody-producing B cells were already present in 2-mo-old mice, B cells producing IgG antibodies under the influence of L3T4+ T cells appeared in mice at 7 mo of age. These data clearly indicate that separate class-specific regulatory T cells are involved in the production of IgM and IgG anti-DNA antibodies and that the total serum level of the antibodies is reflected by both their age-associated changes and the generation of antibody-forming B cells in B/W F1 mice.

  9. Differentiation of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with pilin-specific DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Caugant, D A; Bøvre, K

    1992-01-01

    Genetic relationships among strains of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis were studied by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and DNA-DNA hybridization. The 74 isolates analyzed for electrophoretic variation at 12 enzyme loci were assigned to 59 multilocus genotypes. The multilocus genotypes were grouped in four major clusters, one representing strains of M. nonliquefaciens, two representing strains of M. lacunata, and one comprising strains of M. bovis and the single strain of M. equi analyzed. DNA-DNA hybridization with total genomic probes also revealed four major distinctive entities that corresponded to those identified by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The two distinct clusters recognized among the M. lacunata strains apparently corresponded to the species previously designated M. lacunata and M. liquefaciens. Distinction of the four entities was improved by hybridization with polymerase chain reaction products of nonconserved parts of pilin genes as DNA probes. With these polymerase chain reaction probes, new isolates of M. nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, M. liquefaciens, and M. bovis can be identified easily by hybridization. PMID:1452691

  10. Electrical potential-assisted DNA hybridization. How to mitigate electrostatics for surface DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tymoczko, Jakub; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gebala, Magdalena

    2014-12-24

    Surface-confined DNA hybridization reactions are sensitive to the number and identity of DNA capture probes and experimental conditions such as the nature and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution. When the surface probe density is high or the concentration of bulk ions is much lower than the concentration of ions within the DNA layer, hybridization is significantly slowed down or does not proceed at all. However, high-density DNA monolayers are attractive for designing high-sensitivity DNA sensors. Thus, circumventing sluggish DNA hybridization on such interfaces allows a high surface concentration of target DNA and improved signal/noise ratio. We present potential-assisted hybridization as a strategy in which an external voltage is applied to the ssDNA-modified interface during the hybridization process. Results show that a significant enhancement of hybridization can be achieved using this approach.

  11. DNA sequence mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Trask, B.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Various types of DNA probes, such as total genomic DNA, repetitive sequences, unique sequences, and composites of chromosome-specific DNA probes, can be used with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to address research questions having to do with localization, mapping, and distribution of DNA in situ. FISH involves the formation of a heteroduplex between such DNA probes and chromatin targets on a microscope slide, which can be visualized with fluorescent reporter molecules. Three chromatin targets - metaphase chromosomes, somatic interphases, and zygote interphases - offer increasingly extended states of chromatin which can be strategically selected, individually or in combination, to address specific research questions of interest.

  12. Competitive displacement of DNA during surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J; Wilson, C; Chagovetz, A M; Blair, S

    2007-01-01

    Using real-time dual-color fluorescence detection, we have experimentally tracked individual target species during competitive DNA surface hybridization in a two-component sample. Our experimental results demonstrate displacement of the lower affinity species by the higher affinity species and corroborate recent theoretical models describing competitive DNA surface hybridization. Competition at probe sites complementary to one of the two DNA species was monitored in separate experiments for two different target pairs. Each pair differs in sequence by a single nucleotide polymorphism, and one pair includes a folding target. We propose a mechanistic interpretation of the differences between hybridization curves of targets in multi-component and single-component experiments.

  13. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-03-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  14. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  15. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 μM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination. PMID:22354435

  16. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-28

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  17. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  18. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Craig, Stephen L

    2005-09-28

    Dynamic light scattering is used as a sensitive probe of hybridization on DNA-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles. When a target DNA strand possesses an 8 base "dangling end", duplex formation on the surface of the nanoparticles leads to an increase in hydrodynamic radius. Duplex melting is manifested in a drop in hydrodynamic radius with increasing temperature, and the concentration dependence of the melting temperature provides a measure of the thermodynamics of binding. The hybridization thermodynamics are found to be significantly lower at higher hybridization densities than those previously reported for initial hybridization events. The pronounced deviation from Langmuir adsorption behavior is greater for longer duplexes, and it is, therefore, consistent with electrostatic repulsion between densely packed oligonucleotides. The results have implications for sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  19. DNA hybridization probe for clinical diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J; Acuna-Soto, R; Reed, S; Biagi, F; Wirth, D

    1989-01-01

    As an alternative to microscopic identification of Entamoeba histolytica parasites isolated from stool, a sensitive and species-specific DNA hybridization probe was made for rapid diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites in clinical samples directly applied to nylon membranes. The DNA hybridization probe was made by screening a genomic library of a virulent HM-1:IMSS strain of E. histolytica to detect recombinant plasmids containing highly repeated parasite DNA sequences. Four plasmid clones that reacted across Entamoeba species coded for highly repeated rRNA genes of E. histolytica. Four other plasmid clones were E. histolytica specific in that they bound to four axenized and nine xenic strains of E. histolytica but did not recognize closely related E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba moshkovskii, or Entamoeba invadens parasites. The diagnostic clones detected as few as eight cultured amoebae and did not distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic zymodemes of E. histolytica. The diagnostic clones were sequenced and contained 145-base-pair sequences which appear to be tandemly repeated in the genome. No stable transcript which is homologous to the diagnostic DNA was detected. In a study of stool samples from Mexico City shown by microscopy to contain E. histolytica, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia, Endolimax nana, Trichuris trichiuria, and Chilomastix mesnili parasites, the DNA hybridization probe demonstrated a sensitivity of 1.0 and a specificity of 0.93. We conclude that the DNA hybridization probe can be used for rapid and accurate diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites. Images PMID:2542361

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Localized DNA Hybridization Circuits.

    PubMed

    Dalchau, Neil; Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; Phillips, Andrew; Reif, John

    2015-08-21

    Molecular devices made of nucleic acids can perform complex information processing tasks at the nanoscale, with potential applications in biofabrication and smart therapeutics. However, limitations in the speed and scalability of such devices in a well-mixed setting can significantly affect their performance. In this article, we propose designs for localized circuits involving DNA molecules that are arranged on addressable substrates and interact via hybridization reactions. We propose designs for localized elementary logic circuits, which we compose to produce more complex devices, including a circuit for computing the square root of a four bit number. We develop an efficient method for probabilistic model checking of localized circuits, which we implement within the Visual DSD design tool. We use this method to prove the correctness of our circuits with respect to their functional specifications and to analyze their performance over a broad range of local rate parameters. Specifically, we analyze the extent to which our localized designs can overcome the limitations of well-mixed circuits, with respect to speed and scalability. To provide an estimate of local rate parameters, we propose a biophysical model of localized hybridization. Finally, we use our analysis to identify constraints in the rate parameters that enable localized circuits to retain their advantages in the presence of unintended interferences between strands.

  1. Comparison of the Digene Hybrid Capture System Cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA (version 2.0), Roche CMV UL54 analyte-specific reagent, and QIAGEN RealArt CMV LightCycler PCR reagent tests using AcroMetrix OptiQuant CMV DNA quantification panels and specimens from allogeneic-stem-cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Kimberly E; Reller, L Barth; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Horwitz, Mitchell; Long, Gwynn; Alexander, Barbara D

    2007-06-01

    The Digene Hybrid Capture system cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA (version 2.0), Roche CMV UL54 analyte-specific reagent, and QIAGEN RealArt CMV LightCycler PCR reagent tests were compared using whole-virus standards and plasma specimens collected from allogeneic-stem-cell transplant recipients. PCR assays showed better speed, sensitivity, and specificity.

  2. DNA fluorescence shift sensor: a rapid method for the detection of DNA hybridization using silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yong; Hairul Bahara, Nur Hidayah; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon; Tye, Gee Jun

    2014-11-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNC) are a class of subnanometer sized fluorophores with good photostability and brightness. It has been applied as a diagnostic tool mainly for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection. Integration of DNA oligomers to generate AgNCs is interesting as varying DNA sequences can result in different fluorescence spectra. This allows a simple fluorescence shifting effect to occur upon DNA hybridization with the hybridization efficiency being a pronominal factor for successful shifting. The ability to shift the fluorescence spectra as a result of hybridization overcomes the issue of background intensities in most fluorescent based assays. Here we describe an optimized method for the detection of single-stranded and double-stranded synthetic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) target by hybridization with the DNA fluorescence shift sensor. The system forms a three-way junction by successful hybridization of AgNC, G-rich strand (G-rich) to the target DNA, which generated a shift in fluorescence spectra with a marked increase in fluorescence intensity. The DNA fluorescence shift sensor presents a rapid and specific alternative to conventional DNA detection.

  3. Fast-Track, One-Step E. coli Detection: A Miniaturized Hydrogel Array Permits Specific Direct PCR and DNA Hybridization while Amplification.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Antje; Pollok, Sibyll; Rudloff, Anne; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    A timesaving and convenient method for bacterial detection based on one-step, one-tube deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization on hydrogel array while target gene amplification is described. The hydrogel array is generated by a fast one-pot synthesis, where N,N'-dimethylacrylamide/polyethyleneglycol(PEG1900 )-bisacrylamide mixture polymerizes via radical photoinitiation by visible light within 20 min concomitant with in situ capture probe immobilization. These DNA-functionalized hydrogel droplets arrayed on a planar glass surface are placed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture during the thermal amplification cycles. The bacterial cells can be implemented in a direct PCR reaction, omitting the need for prior template DNA extraction. The resulting fluorescence signal is immediately detectable after the end of the PCR (1 h) following one short washing step by microscopy. Therefore a valid signal can be reached within 1.5 h including 10 min for pipetting and placement of the tubes and chips. The performance of this novel hydrogel DNA array was successfully proven with varying cell numbers down to a limit of 10(1) Escherichia coli cells.

  4. Mechanisms of Surface-Mediated DNA Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was employed in conjunction with resonance energy transfer (RET) to observe the dynamic behavior of donor-labeled ssDNA at the interface between aqueous solution and a solid surface decorated with complementary acceptor-labeled ssDNA. At least 100 000 molecular trajectories were determined for both complementary strands and negative control ssDNA. RET was used to identify trajectory segments corresponding to the hybridized state. The vast majority of molecules from solution adsorbed nonspecifically to the surface, where a brief two-dimensional search was performed with a 7% chance of hybridization. Successful hybridization events occurred with a characteristic search time of ∼0.1 s, and unsuccessful searches resulted in desorption from the surface, ultimately repeating the adsorption and search process. Hybridization was reversible, and two distinct modes of melting (i.e., dehybridization) were observed, corresponding to long-lived (∼15 s) and short-lived (∼1.4 s) hybridized time intervals. A strand that melted back onto the surface could rehybridize after a brief search or desorb from the interface. These mechanistic observations provide guidance for technologies that involve DNA interactions in the near-surface region, suggesting a need to design surfaces that both enhance the complex multidimensional search process and stabilize the hybridized state. PMID:24708278

  5. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  6. Methylation profiling using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and tiling array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development and plays a role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. It is dynamically changed during germline development. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is an efficient, cost-effective method for locus-specific and genome-wide analysis. Methylated DNA fragments are enriched by a 5-methylcytidine-recognizing antibody, therefore allowing the analysis of both CpG and non-CpG methylation. The enriched DNA fragments can be amplified and hybridized to tiling arrays covering CpG islands, promoters, or the entire genome. Comparison of different methylomes permits the discovery of differentially methylated regions that might be important in disease- or tissue-specific expression. Here, we describe an established MeDIP protocol and tiling array hybridization method for profiling methylation of testicular germ cells.

  7. Cantilever deflection associated with hybridization of monomolecular DNA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that specific binding between a ligand and surface immobilized receptor, such as hybridization of single stranded DNA immobilized on a microcantilever surface, leads to cantilever deflection. The binding-induced deflection may be used as a method for detection of biomolecules, such as pathogens and biohazards. Mechanical deformation induced due to hybridization of surface-immobilized DNA strands is a commonly used system to demonstrate the efficacy of microcantilever sensors. To understand the mechanism underlying the cantilever deflections, a theoretical model that incorporates the influence of ligand/receptor complex surface distribution and empirical interchain potential is developed to predict the binding-induced deflections. The cantilever bending induced due to hybridization of DNA strands is predicted for different receptor immobilization densities, hybridization efficiencies, and spatial arrangements. Predicted deflections are compared with experimental reports to validate the modeling assumptions and identify the influence of various components on mechanical deformation. Comparison of numerical predictions and experimental results suggest that, at high immobilization densities, hybridization-induced mechanical deformation is determined, primarily by immobilization density and hybridization efficiency, whereas, at lower immobilization densities, spatial arrangement of hybridized chains need to be considered in determining the cantilever deflection.

  8. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  9. Structure of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Suresh; Jagota, Anand; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming

    2010-03-01

    Hybrids of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) render the latter water-dispersable and have allowed their separation by chirality. ssDNA adsorbs on the CNT through π stacking while the negatively charged DNA backbone stabilizes the hybrid in solution. DNA-CNT hybrids have many potential applications in medicine and materials science. These include their use for imaging and as probes inside the cell, for thermal ablation to destroy cancer cells, and the sorting and patterned placement of CNTs. We have recently reported that sorting of CNTs occurs by recognition of individual chirality semiconducting CNTs by special ssDNA sequences. As the basis of this recognition we have proposed a novel ordered form for DNA analogous to the protein β-sheet and β-barrel structures. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this structure is stabilized by interactions with the CNT substrate. We present experimental evidence supporting the existence of hydrogen-bond based ordering in special sequences, and discuss the structure and topology of these new secondary structures.

  10. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed.

  11. Use of RAPD-PCR to isolate a species specific DNA probe for Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, M P; O'Brien, P A

    1993-10-01

    The products of RAPD-PCR amplification of Phytophthora cinnamomi DNA were separated by electrophoresis in agarose. Parallel Southern blots of the gels were hybridized with nick translated DNA from different species of Phytophthora. Fragments that hybridized specifically to P. cinnamomi DNA were identified. These fragments were purified and cloned into pUC18. Their specificity for P. cinnamomi was confirmed.

  12. Effect of sample storage time on detection of hybridization signals in Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Muller, Katia; Sato, Sandra; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Long-term sample storage can affect the intensity of the hybridization signals provided by molecular diagnostic methods that use chemiluminescent detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different storage times on the hybridization signals of 13 bacterial species detected by the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method using whole-genomic DNA probes. Ninety-six subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects, and the intensity of hybridization signals was evaluated at 4 different time periods: (1) immediately after collecting (n = 24) and (2) after storage at -20 °C for 6 months (n = 24), (3) for 12 months (n = 24), and (4) for 24 months (n = 24). The intensity of hybridization signals obtained from groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.001). No differences were found between groups 1 and 2 (p > 0.05). The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was suitable to detect hybridization signals from all groups evaluated, and the intensity of signals decreased significantly after long periods of sample storage.

  13. Application of DNA-DNA colony hybridization to the detection of catabolic genotypes in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, G S; Shields, M S; Tedford, E T; Breen, A; Hooper, S W; Sirotkin, K M; Davis, J W

    1985-01-01

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFR1 and RSF1010, were determined. The detection limits for the TOL plasmid against a nonhomologous plasmid-bearing bacterial background was ascertained. The colony hybridization technique allowed detection of one colony containing TOL plasmid among 10(6) Escherichia coli colonies of nonhomologous DNA. Comparisons between population estimates derived from growth on selective substrates and from hybridizations were examined. Findings indicated that standard sole carbon source enumeration procedures for degradative populations lead to overestimations due to nonspecific growth of other bacteria on the microcontaminant carbon sources present in the media. Population estimates based on the selective growth of a microcosm population on two aromatic substrates (toluene and naphthalene) and estimates derived from DNA-DNA colony hybridizations, using the TOL or NAH plasmid as a probe, corresponded with estimates of substrate mineralization rates and past exposure to environmental contaminants. The applications of such techniques are hoped to eventually allow enumeration of any specific gene sequences in the environment, including both anabolic and catabolic genes. In addition, this procedure should prove useful in monitoring recombinant DNA clones released into environmental situations. Images PMID:4004244

  14. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  15. Single-molecule DNA hybridization on nanoporous gold nanoparticle array chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingting; Zhao, Fusheng; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    DNA hybridization, where two single-stranded DNA molecules form duplex through sequence-specific interactions, is a fundamental biological process. To gain better understanding, sequence-specific detection of hybridization at the singlemolecule level has been instrumental and can find a wide variety of applications. Nanoporous gold nanoparticle (NPGNP) array chip features large specific surface area and high-density plasmonic field enhancement known as "hot-spots" that are attractive in nanoplasmonic sensor development. In this paper, we discuss results on detecting single-molecule DNA hybridization on functionalizing NPG-NP array chip with unique bio-recognition elements towards both high sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Methods for assessing DNA hybridization of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric M. B.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Wu, AiGuo; Thurn, K. Ted; Haley, Benjamin; Clark, Jimmy; Priester, Taisa; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoconjugates and the several novel methods developed to investigate the DNA hybridization behaviors of these constructs. PNAs are synthetic DNA analogs resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes, which hybridize to single strand DNA (ssDNA) with higher affinity than DNA oligonucleotides, invade double strand DNA (dsDNA), and form different PNA-DNA complexes. Previously, we developed a DNA-TiO2 nanoconjugate capable of hybridizing to target DNA intracellularly in a sequence-specific manner, with the ability to cleave DNA when excited by electromagnetic radiation, but susceptible to degradation which may lower its intracellular targeting efficiency and retention time. PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates described herein hybridize to target ssDNA, oligonucleotide dsDNA, and supercoiled plasmid DNA under physiological-like ionic and temperature conditions, enabling rapid and inexpensive, sequence-specific precipitation of nucleic acids in vitro. When modified by the addition of imaging agents or peptides, hybridization capabilities of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates are enhanced which provides essential benefits for numerous in vitro and in vivo applications. The series of experiments shown here could not be done with either TiO2-DNA nanoconjugates or PNAs alone, and the novel methods developed will benefit studies of numerous other nanoconjugate systems. PMID:18786502

  17. Ten-atom silver cluster signaling and tempering DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Petty, Jeffrey T; Sergev, Orlin O; Kantor, Andrew G; Rankine, Ian J; Ganguly, Mainak; David, Frederic D; Wheeler, Sandra K; Wheeler, John F

    2015-05-19

    Silver clusters with ∼10 atoms are molecules, and specific species develop within DNA strands. These molecular metals have sparsely organized electronic states with distinctive visible and near-infrared spectra that vary with cluster size, oxidation, and shape. These small molecules also act as DNA adducts and coordinate with their DNA hosts. We investigated these characteristics using a specific cluster-DNA conjugate with the goal of developing a sensitive and selective biosensor. The silver cluster has a single violet absorption band (λ(max) = 400 nm), and its single-stranded DNA host has two domains that stabilize this cluster and hybridize with target oligonucleotides. These target analytes transform the weakly emissive violet cluster to a new chromophore with blue-green absorption (λ(max) = 490 nm) and strong green emission (λ(max) = 550 nm). Our studies consider the synthesis, cluster size, and DNA structure of the precursor violet cluster-DNA complex. This species preferentially forms with relatively low amounts of Ag(+), high concentrations of the oxidizing agent O2, and DNA strands with ≳20 nucleotides. The resulting aqueous and gaseous forms of this chromophore have 10 silvers that coalesce into a single cluster. This molecule is not only a chromophore but also an adduct that coordinates multiple nucleobases. Large-scale DNA conformational changes are manifested in a 20% smaller hydrodynamic radius and disrupted nucleobase stacking. Multidentate coordination also stabilizes the single-stranded DNA and thereby inhibits hybridization with target complements. These observations suggest that the silver cluster-DNA conjugate acts like a molecular beacon but is distinguished because the cluster chromophore not only sensitively signals target analytes but also stringently discriminates against analogous competing analytes.

  18. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  19. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013.

  20. Isolation and localization of DNA segments from specific human chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, James F.; Keys, Cheryl; Varsanyi-Breiner, Aviva; Kao, Fa-Ten; Jones, Carol; Puck, Theodore T.; Housman, David

    1980-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have been combined with somatic cell genetic methods to identify, isolate, and amplify fragments of human DNA localized at specific regions of human chromosome 11 selected as a model system. A library of genomic DNA segments has been constructed, in λ Charon 4A bacteriophage, from the DNA of a somatic cell hybrid carrying a portion of human chromosome 11 on a Chinese hamster ovary cell background. Using a nucleic acid hybridization technique that distinguishes human and Chinese hamster interspersed, repetitive DNA, we have been able to distinguish recombinant phages carrying DNA segments of human origin from recombinant phages carrying DNA segments of Chinese hamster origin. We have isolated 50 human DNA segments thus far and have characterized 5 in detail. For each DNA segment characterized, a subsegment that carries no repetitive human DNA sequences has been identified. These segments have been used as hybridization probes in experiments that localize the DNA fragment on the chromosome. In each case an unequivocal chromosomal localization has been obtained with reference to a panel of hybrid cell clones each of which carries a deletion of a portion of the short arm of chromosome 11. At least one DNA segment has been identified which maps to each of the four regions on the short arm defined by the panel of hybrid cell clones used. The approaches described here appear to be general. They can be extended to produce a fine structure map of human chromosome 11 and other human chromosomes. This approach promises implications for human genetics generally, for the human genetic diseases, and possibly for understanding of gene regulation in normal and abnormal differentiation. Images PMID:6930670

  1. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  2. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  3. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  4. Quantivirus® HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA) is as sensitive, but less specific than Hybrid Capture 2 test.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; He, Yanxia; Cheng, Guomei; Okunieff, Paul; Li, Xiaofu

    2013-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the primary cause of cervical cancer. The Quantivirus(®) HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (DiaCarta, CA, USA) detects E6/E7 mRNA of 13 high risk subtypes and 6 low risk subtypes. Cervical specimens collected in PreservCyt were processed for HPV detection. Cervical biopsies were taken only from those women with abnormal colposcopy. 200 out of 272 (73.5%) cases were mRNA positive. The percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive samples increases with the severity of the cytological diagnosis, but not in histological diagnosis. In 146 patients with both tests, the E6/E7 mRNA assay had significant higher positivity rate than the Hybrid Capture 2 assay (75.3% versus 62.3%). The HPV mRNA assay and the HC2 assay had the same sensitivity of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+), 82.4% (14/17) (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.3, 100). However, the specificity of CIN 2+ for the HPV mRNA assay was significantly lower than HC2 assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to compare the diagnostic performance of the E6/E7 mRNA and HC2. E6/E7 mRNA achieved 58.8% sensitivity with 74.1% specificity, HC2, achieved 47.1% sensitivity with 70.7% specificity. The overall performance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay for detecting CIN 2+ was lower than HC2. This study does not support the use of this assay in screening for cervical cancer prevention alone.

  5. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. PMID:25623070

  6. Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Tae Soup; Estephan, Zaki G.; Qian, Zhaoxia; Prosser, Jacob H.; Lee, Su Yeon; Chenoweth, David M.; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, So-Jung; Crocker, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Active materials that respond to physical and chemical stimuli can be used to build dynamic micromachines that lie at the interface between biological systems and engineered devices. In principle, the specific hybridization of DNA can be used to form a library of independent, chemically driven actuators for use in such microrobotic applications and could lead to device capabilities that are not possible with polymer- or metal-layer-based approaches. Here, we report shape changing films that are powered by DNA strand exchange reactions with two different domains that can respond to distinct chemical signals. The films are formed from DNA-grafted gold nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer deposition process. Films consisting of an active and a passive layer show rapid, reversible curling in response to stimulus DNA strands added to solution. Films consisting of two independently addressable active layers display a complex suite of repeatable transformations, involving eight mechanochemical states and incorporating self-righting behaviour.

  7. DNA Hybridization: Nonradioactive Labeling Now Available for the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lenore Gardner

    1984-01-01

    The advantages of DNA hybridization procedures for classroom and clinical use can now be realized by the recent development of nonradioactive DNA labeling/detection procedures. These methods (which are described) can replace the use of isotopes in standard DNA hybridization procedures. (JN)

  8. DNA Hybridization: Nonradioactive Labeling Now Available for the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lenore Gardner

    1984-01-01

    The advantages of DNA hybridization procedures for classroom and clinical use can now be realized by the recent development of nonradioactive DNA labeling/detection procedures. These methods (which are described) can replace the use of isotopes in standard DNA hybridization procedures. (JN)

  9. The use of fluorescein for labeling genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Santos Barbosa, Rodrigo Edson; Mardegan Issa, João Paulo; Watanabe, Evandro; Yoko Ito, Izabel; Monesi, Nadia; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira de

    2008-01-01

    Molecular methods that permit the simultaneous detection and quantification of a large number of microbial species are currently employed in the evaluation of complex ecosystems. The checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique enables the simultaneous identification of distinct bacterial species in a large number of dental samples. The original technique employed digoxigenin-labeled whole genomic DNA probes which were detected by chemiluminescence. In this study, we present an alternative protocol for labeling and detecting whole genomic DNA probes in the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from five bacterial species and labeled with fluorescein. The fluorescein labeled whole genomic DNA probes were hybridized against whole genomic DNA or subgingival plaque samples in a checkerboard hybridization format, followed by chemiluminescent detection. Our results reveal that fluorescein is a viable and adequate alternative labeling reagent to be employed in the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique.

  10. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  11. Gene Specific Impedimetric Bacterial DNA Sensor for Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Gupta, Sunil; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    An impedimetric mga gene specific DNA sensor was developed by immobilization of single stranded DNA probe onto the screen printed modified gold-dendrimer nanohybrid composite electrode for early and rapid detection of S. pyogenes in human throat swab samples causing rheumatic heart disease. Electrochemical impedance response was measured after hybridization with bacterial single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) with probe. The sensor was found highly specific to S. pyogenes and can detect as low as 0.01 ng ssDNA in 6 µL sample only in 30 min. The nanohybrid sensor was also tested with non-specific pathogens and characterized by FTIR. An early detection of the pathogen S. pyogenes in human can save damage of mitral and aortic heart valves (rheumatic heart disease) by proper medical care.

  12. Mixed DNA/Oligo(ethylene glycol) Functionalized Gold Surface Improve DNA Hybridization in Complex Media

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gamble, L.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable, direct 'sample-to-answer' capture of nucleic acid targets from complex media would greatly improve existing capabilities of DNA microarrays and biosensors. This goal has proven elusive for many current nucleic acid detection technologies attempting to produce assay results directly from complex real-world samples, including food, tissue, and environmental materials. In this study, we have investigated mixed self-assembled thiolated single-strand DNA (ssDNA) monolayers containing a short thiolated oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) surface diluent on gold surfaces to improve the specific capture of DNA targets from complex media. Both surface composition and orientation of these mixed DNA monolayers were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). XPS results from sequentially adsorbed ssDNA/OEG monolayers on gold indicate that thiolated OEG diluent molecules first incorporate into the thiolated ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer OEG exposures, competitively displace adsorbed ssDNA molecules from the gold surface. NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) indicate that adsorbed thiolated ssDNA nucleotide base-ring structures in the mixed ssDNA monolayers are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure ssDNA monolayers. This supports ssDNA oligomer reorientation towards a more upright position upon OEG mixed adlayer incorporation. DNA target hybridization on mixed ssDNA probe/OEG monolayers was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Improvements in specific target capture for these ssDNA probe surfaces due to incorporation of the OEG diluent were demonstrated using two model biosensing assays, DNA target capture from complete bovine serum and from salmon genomic DNA mixtures. SPR results demonstrate that OEG incorporation into the ssDNA adlayer improves surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and protein

  13. Hybrid magnetic nanoparticle/nanogold clusters and their distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence effect via DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GuThese Authors Contributed Equally To This Study., Xuefan; Wu, Youshen; Zhang, Lingze; Liu, Yongchun; Li, Yan; Yan, Yongli; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-07-01

    To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV)-visible (vis) absorption spectra of the samples were recorded with a UV-2600 spectrophotometer. Fluorescence spectra and the MEF effect were recorded using a spectrophotofluorometer, and lifetimes were determined using a time-correlated single photon counting apparatus. The prepared HMNCs were stable in aqueous solutions and had an average diameter of 87 +/- 3.2 nm, with six to eight AuNPs around a single Fe3O4 nanoparticle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tagged DNA-HMNC conjugates exhibited a significant MEF effect and could accurately detect specific DNA sequences after DNA hybridization. This result indicates their various potential applications in sensors and biomedical fields.To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV

  14. DNA probe and PCR-specific reaction for Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Quere, F; Deschamps, A; Urdaci, M C

    1997-06-01

    A 300 bp DNA fragment of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was cloned and sequenced. This fragment was tested using a dot-blot DNA hybridization to technique for its ability to identify Lact. plantarum strains. This probe hybridized with all Lact. plantarum strains tested and with some strains of Lact. pentosus, albeit more weakly. Two internal primers of this probe were selected (LbP11 and LbP12) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. All Lact. plantarum strains tested amplified a 250 bp fragment contrary to the other LAB species tested. This specific PCR for Lact. plantarum was also performed from colonies grown on MRS medium with similar results. These methods enabled the rapid and specific detection and identification of Lact. plantarum.

  15. Peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay for specific detection of Mycobacterium immunogenum and DNA-FISH assay for analysis of pseudomonads in metalworking fluids and sputum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2008-01-01

    Specific and rapid detection and quantification of mycobacteria in contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF) are problematic due to complexity of the matrix and heavy background co-occurring microflora. Furthermore, cross-reactivity among neighboring species of Mycobacterium makes species differentiation difficult for this genus. Here, we report for the first time a species-specific peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for Mycobacterium immunogenum, a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species prevalent in MWF and implicated in occupational lung disease hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pseudo-outbreaks. A novel species-specific 14-bp PNA probe was designed for M. immunogenum based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and was validated for specificity, by testing against a panel of other phylogenetically closely related rapidly growing mycobacteria and representative species of gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid fast organisms. In addition, a DNA-FISH protocol was optimized for co-detection of Pseudomonas, the most predominantly co-occurring genus in contaminated MWF. Reliable quantification for both the test organisms was achieved at or above a cell density of 10(3)cellsml(-1), a recognized minimum limit for microscopic quantification. The mycobacterial PNA-FISH assay was successfully adapted to human sputum demonstrating its potential for clinical diagnostic applications in addition to industrial MWF monitoring, to assess MWF-associated exposures and pseudo-outbreaks.

  16. HPV 9G DNA chip: 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    An, Heejung; Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Junghoon; Nguyen, Van-Thuan; Ta, Van-Thao; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2012-03-01

    We describe a novel HPV 9G DNA chip test for the accurate and reliable genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV 9G DNA chip test established its efficiency in terms of a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 200, which is 50 times superior to commercial HPV DNA chips, and 100% target-specific hybridization at 25°C. We compared the genotyping results for the 439 clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test with the sequencing results for the MY11/GP6+ (M2) primer set-mediated PCR products. The discrimination of HPV genotypes in the 151 HPV-positive clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test were 100% identical with the sequencing analysis. The clinical sensitivities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and a commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 88%, respectively. However, the clinical specificities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and the commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 94%, respectively. The 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity of the HPV 9G DNA chip test make it a promising diagnostic tool for HPV genotyping.

  17. HPV 9G DNA Chip: 100% Clinical Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    An, Heejung; Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Junghoon; Nguyen, Van-Thuan; Ta, Van-Thao; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel HPV 9G DNA chip test for the accurate and reliable genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV 9G DNA chip test established its efficiency in terms of a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 200, which is 50 times superior to commercial HPV DNA chips, and 100% target-specific hybridization at 25°C. We compared the genotyping results for the 439 clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test with the sequencing results for the MY11/GP6+ (M2) primer set-mediated PCR products. The discrimination of HPV genotypes in the 151 HPV-positive clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test were 100% identical with the sequencing analysis. The clinical sensitivities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and a commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 88%, respectively. However, the clinical specificities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and the commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 94%, respectively. The 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity of the HPV 9G DNA chip test make it a promising diagnostic tool for HPV genotyping. PMID:22170909

  18. Transient RNA-DNA Hybrids Are Required for Efficient Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohle, Corina; Tesorero, Rafael; Schermann, Géza; Dobrev, Nikolay; Sinning, Irmgard; Fischer, Tamás

    2016-11-03

    RNA-DNA hybrids are a major internal cause of DNA damage within cells, and their degradation by RNase H enzymes is important for maintaining genomic stability. Here, we identified an unexpected role for RNA-DNA hybrids and RNase H enzymes in DNA repair. Using a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we showed that RNA-DNA hybrids form as part of the homologous-recombination (HR)-mediated DSB repair process and that RNase H enzymes are essential for their degradation and efficient completion of DNA repair. Deleting RNase H stabilizes RNA-DNA hybrids around DSB sites and strongly impairs recruitment of the ssDNA-binding RPA complex. In contrast, overexpressing RNase H1 destabilizes these hybrids, leading to excessive strand resection and RPA recruitment and to severe loss of repeat regions around DSBs. Our study challenges the existing model of HR-mediated DSB repair and reveals a surprising role for RNA-DNA hybrids in maintaining genomic stability.

  19. Analysis of Small RNA Populations Using Hybridization to DNA Tiling Arrays.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Martine; Sarazin, Alexis; Billoud, Bernard; Bulski, Agnes; Chapell, Louise; Baulcombe, David; Colot, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic response to stress in plants involves changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and expression of small noncoding RNAs (sRNA). Here we present the method of analysis of differential expression of sRNA populations using DNA tiling arrays. sRNA extracted from Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to pathogen elicitor or control plants were reverse-transcribed into cDNAs, and subsequently hybridized after labeling to a custom-made DNA tiling array covering Arabidopsis chromosome 4. We first designed a control experiment with eight cDNA clones corresponding to sequences located on chromosome 4 and obtained robust and specific hybridization signals. Furthermore, hybridization signals along chromosome 4 were in good agreement with sRNA abundance as previously determined by massive parallel sequence signature (MPSS) in the case of untreated plants, but differed substantially after stress treatment. These results demonstrate the utility of hybridization to DNA tiling arrays to detect major changes in sRNA abundance.

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlai; Wang, Wenjuan; Ge, Jing; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into double stranded DNA and its subsequent dissociation into ssDNA were investigated. Melting curves and rates of dissociation and hybridization were measured using fluorescence detection based on hybridization-induced fluorescence change. Two distribution functions, namely the state distribution and the rate distribution, were proposed in order to take interfacial heterogeneity into account and to quantitatively analyze the data. Reaction and activation enthalpies and entropies of DNA hybridization and dissociation on GNPs were derived and compared with the same quantities in solution. Our results show that the interaction between GNPs and DNA reduces the energetic barrier and accelerates the dissociation of adhered DNA. At low surface densities of ssDNA adhered to GNP surface, the primary reaction pathway is that ssDNA in solution first adsorbs onto the GNP, and then diffuses along the surface until hybridizing with an immobilized DNA. We also found that the secondary structure of a DNA hairpin inhibits the interaction between GNPs and DNA and enhances the stability of the DNA hairpin adhered to GNPs.

  1. Mammalian mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates are essentially duplex, but contain extensive tracts of RNA/DNA hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Holmes, J. Bradley; Wood, Stuart R.; Yang, Ming-Yao; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Laura, J. Bailey; Cluett, Tricia J.; Goffart, Steffi; Willcox, Smaranda; Rigby, Rachel E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Griffith, Jack D.; Crouch, Robert J.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate, using transmission electron microscopy and immunopurification with an antibody specific for RNA/DNA hybrid, that intact mtDNA replication intermediates (mtRIs) are essentially duplex throughout their length, but contain extensive RNA tracts on one strand. However, the extent of preservation of RNA in such molecules is highly dependent on the preparative method used. These findings strongly support the strand-coupled model of mtDNA replication involving RNA incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). PMID:20184890

  2. Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; Yurke, Bernard; Reif, John

    2012-01-01

    Can a wide range of complex biochemical behaviour arise from repeated applications of a highly reduced class of interactions? In particular, can the range of DNA manipulations achieved by protein enzymes be simulated via simple DNA hybridization chemistry? In this work, we develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbreviated as mDNA), based on strands of DNA as the only component molecules. Various enzymatic manipulations of these mDNA molecules are simulated via toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reactions. We provide a formal model to describe the required properties and operations of our mDNA, and show that our proposed DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions provide these properties and functionality. Our meta-nucleotides are designed to form flexible linear assemblies (single-stranded mDNA (ssmDNA)) analogous to single-stranded DNA. We describe various isothermal hybridization reactions that manipulate our mDNA in powerful ways analogous to DNA–DNA reactions and the action of various enzymes on DNA. These operations on mDNA include (i) hybridization of ssmDNA into a double-stranded mDNA (dsmDNA) and heat denaturation of a dsmDNA into its component ssmDNA, (ii) strand displacement of one ssmDNA by another, (iii) restriction cuts on the backbones of ssmDNA and dsmDNA, (iv) polymerization reactions that extend ssmDNA on a template to form a complete dsmDNA, (v) synthesis of mDNA sequences via mDNA polymerase chain reaction, (vi) isothermal denaturation of a dsmDNA into its component ssmDNA, and (vii) an isothermal replicator reaction that exponentially amplifies ssmDNA strands and may be modified to allow for mutations. PMID:22237679

  3. Label-free monitoring of individual DNA hybridization using SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ji; Zeng, Jianbo; Zhao, Fusheng; Santos, Greggy M.; Lin, Steven Hsesheng; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Willson, Richard C.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Sequence-specific detection of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level has been instrumental and gradually become a ubiquitous tool in a wide variety of biological and biomedical applications such as clinical diagnostics, biosensors, and drug development. Label-free and amplification-free schemes are of particular interest because they could potentially provide in situ monitoring of individual hybridization events, which may lead to techniques for discriminating subtle variations due to single-base modification without stringency control or repetitive thermal cycling. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for molecular detection and identification by exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance effect when the target molecules are near gold or silver nanostructures. However, effective and robust SERS assays have yet become a reality for trace detection. Recently, we have developed a SERS substrate by shaping nanoporous gold thin films into monolithic submicron disks, called nanoporous gold disks (NPGD). Here we demonstrate in situ monitoring of the same immobilized ssDNA molecules and their individual hybridization events.

  4. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    PubMed

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hybrid magnetic nanoparticle/nanogold clusters and their distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence effect via DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuefan; Wu, Youshen; Zhang, Lingze; Liu, Yongchun; Li, Yan; Yan, Yongli; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-08-07

    To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV)-visible (vis) absorption spectra of the samples were recorded with a UV-2600 spectrophotometer. Fluorescence spectra and the MEF effect were recorded using a spectrophotofluorometer, and lifetimes were determined using a time-correlated single photon counting apparatus. The prepared HMNCs were stable in aqueous solutions and had an average diameter of 87 ± 3.2 nm, with six to eight AuNPs around a single Fe3O4 nanoparticle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tagged DNA-HMNC conjugates exhibited a significant MEF effect and could accurately detect specific DNA sequences after DNA hybridization. This result indicates their various potential applications in sensors and biomedical fields.

  6. Structure and DNA Hybridization Properties of Mixed Nucleic Acid/Maleimide-ethylene glycol Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Grainger, David W.; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.

    2008-01-01

    The surface structure and DNA hybridization performance of thiolated single-strand DNA (HS-ssDNA) covalently attached to a maleimide-ethylene glycol disulfide (MEG) monolayer on gold have been investigated. Monolayer immobilization chemistry and surface coverage of reactive ssDNA probes were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Orientation of the ssDNA probes was determined by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Target DNA hybridization on the DNA-MEG probe surfaces was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to demonstrate the utility of these probe surfaces for detection of DNA targets from both purified target DNA samples and complex biological mixtures such as blood serum. Data from complementary techniques showed that immobilized ssDNA density is strongly dependent on the spotted bulk DNA concentration and buffer ionic strength. Variation of the immobilized ssDNA density had a profound influence on the DNA probe orientation at the surface and subsequent target hybridization efficiency. With increasing surface probe density, NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s → π* transition) indicate that the immobilized ssDNA molecules reorient towards a more upright position on the MEG monolayer. SPR assays of DNA targets from buffer and serum showed that DNA hybridization efficiency increased with decreasing surface probe density. However, target detection in serum was better on the “high density” probe surface than on the “high efficiency” probe surface. The amount of target detected for both ssDNA surfaces were several orders of magnitude poorer in serum than in purified DNA samples due to non-specific serum protein adsorption onto the sensing surface. PMID:17492838

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of DNA bubble induced by site specific DNA-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiputra, Donny; Hidayat, Wahyu; Zen, Freddy P.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a dynamical model describing interactions between DNA and a specific binding protein involving long-range transmission of biological information. The model couples the hydrogen bonds between the one connecting DNA and protein side chain and the one connecting DNA base pairs since they account for site specificity of the binding. We adopt Morse potentials with coupling terms to construct model of coupled hydrogen bonds. We show that the model gives rise to a breather soliton formation, corresponding to the DNA bubbles, which propagates through DNA chain as the carrier of genetic information. We investigate various kinds of possible coupling dynamics and suggest the model realism in depicting the renaturation or hybridization processes.

  8. CD (compact disc)-based DNA hybridization and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guangyao; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Kim, Jitae; Zoval, Jim V.; Madou, Marc J.; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia; Peytavi, Regis; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2004-08-01

    A DNA hybridization and detection unit was developed for a compact disc (CD) platform. The compact disc was used as the fluidic platform for sample and reagent manipulation using centrifugal force. Chambers for reagent storage and conduits for fluidic functions were replicated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using an SU-8 master mold fabricated with a 2-level lithography process we developed specially for the microfluidic structures used in this work. For capture probes, we used self-assembled DNA oligonucleotide monolayers (SAMs) on gold pads patterned on glass slides. The PDMS flow cells were aligned with and sealed against glass slides to form the DNA hybridization detection units. Both an enzymatic-labeled fluorescence technique and a bioluminescent approach were used for hybridization detection. An analytical model was introduced to quantitatively predict the accumulation of hybridized targets. The flow-through hybridization units were tested using DNA samples (25-mers) of different concentrations down to 1 pM and passive assays (no flow), using samples of the same concentrations, were performed as controls. At low concentrations, with the same hybridization time, a significantly higher relative fluorescence intensity was observed in both enzymatic and bioluminescent flow-through assays compared to the corresponding passive hybridization assays. Besides the fast hybridization rate, the CD-based method has the potential for enabling highly automated, multiple and self-contained assays for DNA detection.

  9. Gene Specific DNA Sensors for Diagnosis of Pathogenic Infections.

    PubMed

    Datta, Manali; Desai, Dignya; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    Gene specific DNA based sensors have potential applications for rapid and real time monitoring of hybridization signal with the target nucleic acid of pathogens. Different types of DNA based sensors and their applications have been studied for rapid and accurate detection of pathogens causing human diseases. These sensors are based on surface plasmon resonance, quantum-dots, molecular beacons, piezoelectric and electrochemical etc. Curbing epidemics at an early stage is one of the massive challenges in healthcare systems. Timely detection of the causative organism may provide a solution to restrain mortality caused by the disease. With the advent of interdisciplinary sciences, bioelectronics has emerged as an effective alternative for disease diagnostics. Gene specific DNA sensors present themselves as cost-effective, sensitive and specific platforms for detection of disease causing pathogens. The mini review explores different transducer based sensors and their potential in diagnosis of acute and chronic diseases.

  10. Hybrid Selection of Small RNAs by Using Simian Virus 40 DNA: Evidence that the Simian Virus 40-Associated Small RNA Is Synthesized by Specific Cleavage from Large Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Alwine, James C.

    1982-01-01

    -RNA coding region was not expressed even during a viable lytic infection in which the SAS-RNA could be expressed from the infecting viral genomes. The simplest conclusion drawn from the data is that the SAS-RNA is cleaved from larger late transcripts which initiate at the normal late promoter. This conclusion suggests that many of the small RNAs found in normal eucaryotic cells may be synthesized by specific cleavage rather than by primary transcription. In the course of these studies several small cellular RNAs were detected, due to their specific hybrid selection, by using SV40 DNA. Primary mapping and characterization data of these RNAs are also presented. Images PMID:6292476

  11. DAPI: a DNA-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, J

    1995-09-01

    DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) is a DNA-specific probe which forms a fluorescent complex by attaching in the minor grove of A-T rich sequences of DNA. It also forms nonfluorescent intercalative complexes with double-stranded nucleic acids. The physicochemical properties of the dye and its complexes with nucleic acids and history of the development of this dye as a biological stain are described. The application of DAPI as a DNA-specific probe for flow cytometry, chromosome staining, DNA visualization and quantitation in histochemistry and biochemistry is reviewed. The mechanisms of DAPI-nucleic acid complex formation including minor groove binding, intercalation and condensation are discussed.

  12. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  13. Crowding-induced Cooperativity in DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qun-li; Ren, Chun-lai; Su, Xiao-hang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    High density DNA brush is not only used to model cellular crowding, but also has a wide application in DNA-functionalized materials. Experiments have shown complicated cooperative hybridization/melting phenomena in these systems, raising the question that how molecular crowding influences DNA hybridization. In this work, a theoretical modeling including all possible inter and intramolecular interactions, as well as molecular details for different species, is proposed. We find that molecular crowding can lead to two distinct cooperative behaviours: negatively cooperative hybridization marked by a broader transition width, and positively cooperative hybridization with a sharper transition, well reconciling the experimental findings. Moreover, a phase transition as a result of positive cooperativity is also found. Our study provides new insights in crowding and compartmentation in cell, and has the potential value in controlling surface morphologies of DNA functionalized nano-particles. PMID:25875056

  14. Crowding-induced Cooperativity in DNA Surface Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qun-Li; Ren, Chun-Lai; Su, Xiao-Hang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    High density DNA brush is not only used to model cellular crowding, but also has a wide application in DNA-functionalized materials. Experiments have shown complicated cooperative hybridization/melting phenomena in these systems, raising the question that how molecular crowding influences DNA hybridization. In this work, a theoretical modeling including all possible inter and intramolecular interactions, as well as molecular details for different species, is proposed. We find that molecular crowding can lead to two distinct cooperative behaviours: negatively cooperative hybridization marked by a broader transition width, and positively cooperative hybridization with a sharper transition, well reconciling the experimental findings. Moreover, a phase transition as a result of positive cooperativity is also found. Our study provides new insights in crowding and compartmentation in cell, and has the potential value in controlling surface morphologies of DNA functionalized nano-particles.

  15. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  16. Bacterial RNA:DNA hybrids are activators of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan Vanaja, Sivapriya; Rathinam, Vijay A. K.; Atianand, Maninjay K.; Kalantari, Parisa; Skehan, Brian; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an extracellular pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, has been linked to hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here we identify the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome as an essential mediator of EHEC-induced IL-1β. Whereas EHEC-specific virulence factors were dispensable for NLRP3 activation, bacterial nucleic acids such as RNA:DNA hybrids and RNA gained cytosolic access and mediated inflammasome-dependent responses. Consistent with a direct role for RNA:DNA hybrids in inflammasome activation, delivery of synthetic EHEC RNA:DNA hybrids into the cytosol triggered NLRP3-dependent responses, and introduction of RNase H, which degrades such hybrids, into infected cells specifically inhibited inflammasome activation. Notably, an E. coli rnhA mutant, which is incapable of producing RNase H and thus harbors increased levels of RNA:DNA hybrid, induced elevated levels of NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation. Collectively, these findings identify RNA:DNA hybrids of bacterial origin as a unique microbial trigger of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:24828532

  17. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  18. DNA hybridization to mismatched templates: A chip study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naef, Felix; Lim, Daniel A.; Patil, Nila; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2002-04-01

    High-density oligonucleotide arrays are among the most rapidly expanding technologies in biology today. In the GeneChip system, the reconstruction of the sample mRNA concentrations depends upon the differential signal generated by hybridizing the RNA to two nearly identical templates: a perfect match probe (PM) containing the exact biological sequence; and a single mismatch (MM) differing from the PM by a single base substitution. It has been observed that a large fraction of MMs repeatably bind targets better than the PMs, against the obvious expectation of sequence specificity. We examine this problem via statistical analysis of a large set of microarray experiments. We classify the probes according to their signal to noise (S/N) ratio, defined as the eccentricity of a (PM,MM) pair's ``trajectory'' across many experiments. Of those probes having large S/N (>3) only a fraction behave consistently with the commonly assumed hybridization model. Our results imply that the physics of DNA hybridization in microarrays is more complex than expected, and suggest estimators for the target RNA concentration.

  19. Differential adhesion of microspheres mediated by DNA hybridization I: experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Milam, Valeria T; Graves, David J; Hammer, Daniel A

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel method to study collective behavior of multiple hybridized DNA chains by measuring the adhesion of DNA-coated micron-scale beads under hydrodynamic flow. Beads coated with single-stranded DNA probes are linked to surfaces coated with single target strands through DNA hybridization, and hydrodynamic shear forces are used to discriminate between strongly and weakly bound beads. The adhesiveness of microspheres depends on the strength of interaction between DNA chains on the bead and substrate surfaces, which is a function of the degree of DNA chain overlap, the fidelity of the match between hybridizing pairs, and other factors that affect the hybridization energy, such as the salt concentration in the hybridization buffer. The force for bead detachment is linearly proportional to the degree of chain overlap. There is a detectable drop in adhesion strength when there is a single base mismatch in one of the hybridizing chains. The effect of single nucleotide mismatch was tested with two different strand chemistries, with mutations placed at several different locations. All mutations were detectable, but there was no comprehensive rule relating the drop in adhesive strength to the location of the defect. Since adhesiveness can be coupled to the strength of overlap, the method holds promise to be a novel methodology for oligonucleotide detection.

  20. Microfluidic Arrayed Lab-On-A-Chip for Electrochemical Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Events.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for DNA hybridization detection has been developed. The device comprises a 3 × 3 array of microelectrodes integrated with a dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system that provides controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis of microliter volume samples. The surface of the microelectrodes is functionalized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes which enable specific detection of complementary ssDNA targets. These targets are detected by a capacitive technique which measures dielectric variation at the microelectrode-electrolyte interface due to DNA hybridization events. A quantitative analysis of the hybridization events is carried out based on a sensing modeling that includes detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation components. By calculating these components during hybridization events the device is able to demonstrate specific and dose response sensing characteristics. The developed microfluidic LOC for DNA hybridization detection offers a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of genetic markers outside of laboratory settings, such as at the point-of-care or in-field environmental monitoring.

  1. Design and analysis of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using DNA hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Hieu; Garg, Sudhanshu; Miao, Vincent; Song, Tianqi; Mokhtar, Reem; Reif, John

    2017-01-01

    DNA self-assembly has been employed non-conventionally to construct nanoscale structures and dynamic nanoscale machines. The technique of hybridization chain reactions by triggered self-assembly has been shown to form various interesting nanoscale structures ranging from simple linear DNA oligomers to dendritic DNA structures. Inspired by earlier triggered self-assembly works, we present a system for controlled self-assembly of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using nine distinct DNA hairpins. NUPACK is employed to assist in designing DNA sequences and Matlab has been used to simulate DNA hairpin interactions. Gel electrophoresis and ensemble fluorescence reaction kinetics data indicate strong evidence of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions. The half-time completion of the proposed linear cascade reactions indicates a linear dependency on the number of hairpins.

  2. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  3. Integration of rapid DNA hybridization and capillary zone electrophoresis using bidirectional isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bahga, Supreet S; Han, Crystal M; Santiago, Juan G

    2013-01-07

    We present a method for rapid, sequence-specific detection of multiple DNA fragments by integrating isotachophoresis (ITP) based DNA hybridization and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) using bidirectional ITP. Our method leverages the high preconcentration ability of ITP to accelerate slow, second-order DNA hybridization kinetics, and the high resolving power of CZE to separate and identify reaction products. We demonstrate the speed and sensitivity of our assay by detecting 5 pM, 39 nt ssDNA target within 3 min, using a molecular beacon probe. We also demonstrate the feasibility of our assay for multiplexed detection of multiple-length ssDNA targets by simultaneously detecting 39 and 90 nt ssDNA targets.

  4. Macroscopic Volume Change of Dynamic Hydrogels induced by Reversible DNA Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lu; You, Mingxu; Yuan, Quan; Wu, Cuichen; Han, Da; Chen, Yan; Zhong, Zhihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Tan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition is fundamental to the specific interactions between molecules, of which the best known examples are antibody-antigen binding and complementary DNA hybridization. Reversible manipulation of the molecular recognition events is still a very challenging topic< and such studies are often performed at the molecular level. An important consideration is collection of changes at the molecular level to provide macroscopic observables. This research makes use of photo-responsive molecular recognition for the fabrication of novel photo-regulated dynamic materials. Specifically, a dynamic hydrogel was prepared by grafting azobenzene-tethered ssDNA and its complementary DNA to the hydrogel network. The macroscopic volume of the hydrogel can be manipulated through the photo-reversible DNA hybridization controlled by alternating irradiation of UV and visible light. The effects of synthetic parameters including the concentration of DNA, polymer monomer and permanent crosslinker are also discussed. PMID:22742418

  5. Voltammetric detection of sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Gultekin; Erdem, Arzum; Ceylan, Cagdas; Akgöz, Muslum

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the single-use electrochemical DNA biosensor technology developed for voltammetric detection of sequence selective DNA hybridization related to important human and veterinary pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii. In the principle of electrochemical label-free detection assay, the duplex of DNA hybrid formation was detected by measuring guanine oxidation signal occured in the presence of DNA hybridization. The biosensor design consisted of the immobilization of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE), and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the differential pulse voltammetry(DPV) by measuring the guanine signal. Toxoplasma gondii capture probe was firstly immobilized onto the surface of the activated PGE by wet adsorption. The extent of hybridization at PGE surface between the probe and the target was then determined by measuring the guanine signal observed at +1.0V. The electrochemical monitoring of optimum DNA hybridization has been performed in the target concentration of 40µg/mL in 50min of hybridization time. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was then tested using non-complementary, or mismatch short DNA sequences. Under the optimum conditions, the guanine oxidation signal indicating full hybridization was measured in various target concentration from 0.5 to 25µg/mL and a detection limit was found to be 1.78µg/mL. This single-use biosensor platform was successfully applied for the voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

  6. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  7. Proving the Authenticity of Ancient DNA by Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, S.; Herrmann, B.; Rameckers, J.; Müller, D.; Sperling, K.; Neitzel, H.; Tönnies, H.

    In PCR-supported amplification of ancient, degraded DNA, contamination with contemporary DNA can lead to false-positive results, which frequently give rise to discussions in which the mere existence of ancient DNA is doubted. Our confirmation of ancient DNA using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) eliminates these doubts. Unlike PCR methods, CGH requires no amplification of the DNA to be analyzed if adequate amounts of specimen DNA is used. Thus, false results traceable to contaminations are practically ruled out. The examples provided here prove the authenticity of ancient DNA for a 250-year-old and a 3000-year-old sample. At the same time, the CGH of ancient DNA offers the chance to gain insight into the pattern of DNA degradation and to monitor the preservation of certain chromosomal segments.

  8. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) < 1 nM at 25 °C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  9. Breakpoints in Robertsonian translocations are localized to satellite III DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gravholt, C.H.; Friedrich, U.; Caprani, M.; Jorgensen, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors characterized 21 t(13;14) and 3 t(14;21) Robertsonian translocations for the presence of DNA derived from the short arms of the translocated acrocentric chromosomes and identified their centromeres. Nineteen of these 24 translocation carriers were unrelated. Using centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA as chromosome-specific probe, they found by in situ hybridization that all 24 translocation chromosomes were dicentric. The chromatin between the two centromeres did not stain with silver, and no hybridization signal was detected with probes for rDNA or [beta]-satellite DNA that flank the distal and proximal ends of the rDNA region on the short arm of the acrocentrics. By contrast, all 24 translocation chromosomes gave a distinct hybridization signal when satellite III DNA was used as probe. This result strongly suggests that the chromosomal rearrangements leading to Robertsonian translocations occur preferentially in satellite III DNA. The authors hypothesize that guanine-rich satellite III repeats may promote chromosomal recombination by formation of tetraplex structures. The findings localize satellite III DNA to the short arm of the acrocentric chromosomes distal to centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA and proximal to [beta]-satellite DNA. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Labeling-free fluorescent detection of DNA hybridization through FRET from pyrene excimer to DNA intercalator SYBR green I.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyi; Xu, Chen; Dong, Jie; Wang, Guojie

    2015-03-15

    A novel labeling-free fluorescence complex probe has been developed for DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from pyrene excimer of pyrene-functionalized poly [2-(N, N-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PFP) to SYBR Green I (SG, a specific intercalator of double-stranded DNA) in a cost-effective, rapid and simple manner. The complex probe consists of the positively charged PFP, SG and negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Upon adding a complementary strand to the complex probe solution, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed, followed by the intercalation of SG into dsDNA. The pyrene excimer emission was overlapped with the absorption of SG very well and the electrostatic interactions between PFP and dsDNA kept them in close proximity, enabling efficient FRET from pyrene excimer to SG. The fluorescence of SG in the duplex DNA resulting from FRET can be successfully applied to detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity for a very low detection limit of 10nM and excellent selectivity for detection of single base pair mismatch.

  11. Importance of DNA stiffness in protein-DNA binding specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. E.; Austin, R. H.

    1987-09-01

    From the first high-resolution structure of a repressor bound specifically to its DNA recognition sequence1 it has been shown that the phage 434 repressor protein binds as a dimer to the helix. Tight, local interactions are made at the ends of the binding site, causing the central four base pairs (bp) to become bent and overtwisted. The centre of the operator is not in contact with protein but repressor binding affinity can be reduced at least 50-fold in response to a sequence change there2. This observation might be explained should the structure of the intervening DNA segment vary with its sequence, or if DNA at the centre of the operator resists the torsional and bending deformation necessary for complex formation in a sequence dependent fashion. We have considered the second hypothesis by demonstrating that DNA stiffness is sequence dependent. A method is formulated for calculating the stiffness of any particular DNA sequence, and we show that this predicted relationship between sequence and stiffness can explain the repressor binding data in a quantitative manner. We propose that the elastic properties of DNA may be of general importance to an understanding of protein-DNA binding specificity.

  12. Thymine DNA glycosylase specifically recognizes 5-carboxylcytosine-modified DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Xingyu; Lu, Junyan; Liang, Haihua; Dai, Qing; Xu, Guo-Liang; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2012-04-24

    Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) efficiently excises 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), a key oxidation product of 5-methylcytosine in genomic DNA, in a recently discovered cytosine demethylation pathway. We present here the crystal structures of the hTDG catalytic domain in complex with duplex DNA containing either 5caC or a fluorinated analog. These structures, together with biochemical and computational analyses, reveal that 5caC is specifically recognized in the active site of hTDG, supporting the role of TDG in mammalian 5-methylcytosine demethylation.

  13. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    PubMed

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  14. Ultrasensitive flow injection chemiluminescence detection of DNA hybridization using signal DNA probe modified with Au and CuS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shusheng; Zhong, Hua; Ding, Caifeng

    2008-10-01

    A novel and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for sequence-specific DNA detection based on signal amplification with nanoparticles (NPs) is reported in the present work. The "sandwich-type" DNA biosensor was fabricated with the thiol-functionalized capture DNA first immobilized on an Au electrode and hybridized with one end of target DNA, the other end of which was recognized with a signal DNA probe labeled with CuS NPs and Au NPs on the 3'- and 5'-terminus, respectively. The hybridization events were monitored by the CL intensity of luminol-H2O2-Cu(2+) after the cupric ions were dissolved from the hybrids. We demonstrated that the incorporation of Au NPs in this sensor design significantly enhanced the sensitivity and the selectivity because a single Au NP can be loaded with hundreds of signal DNA probe strands, which were modified with CuS NPs. The ratios of Au NPs, signal DNA probes, and CuS NPs modified on the gold electrode were approximately 1/101/103. A preconcentration process of cupric ions performed by anodic stripping voltammetry technology further increased the sensor performance. As a result of these two combined effects, this DNA sensor could detect as low as femtomolar target DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against two-base mismatched DNA. Under the optimum conditions, the CL intensity was increased with the increase of the concentration of target DNA in the range of 2.0 x 10(-14)-2.0 x 10(-12) M. A detection limit of 4.8 x 10(-15) M target DNA was achieved.

  15. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  16. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  17. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  18. Hybridization and genome size evolution: timing and magnitude of nuclear DNA content increases in Helianthus homoploid hybrid species

    PubMed Central

    Baack, Eric J.; Whitney, Kenneth D.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Hybridization and polyploidy can induce rapid genomic changes, including the gain or loss of DNA, but the magnitude and timing of such changes are not well understood. The homoploid hybrid system in Helianthus (three hybrid-derived species and their two parents) provides an opportunity to examine the link between hybridization and genome size changes in a replicated fashion. Flow cytometry was used to estimate the nuclear DNA content in multiple populations of three homoploid hybrid Helianthus species (Helianthus anomalus, Helianthus deserticola, and Helianthus paradoxus), the parental species (Helianthus annuus and Helianthus petiolaris), synthetic hybrids, and natural hybrid-zone populations. Results confirm that hybrid-derived species have 50% more nuclear DNA than the parental species. Despite multiple origins, hybrid species were largely consistent in their DNA content across populations, although H. deserticola showed significant interpopulation differences. First- and sixth-generation synthetic hybrids and hybrid-zone plants did not show an increase from parental DNA content. First-generation hybrids differed in DNA content according to the maternal parent. In summary, hybridization by itself does not lead to increased nuclear DNA content in Helianthus, and the evolutionary forces responsible for the repeated increases in DNA content seen in the hybrid-derived species remain mysterious. PMID:15998412

  19. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  20. The kinetics of force-dependent hybridization and strand-peeling of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZhouJie; Yuan, GuoHua; Zhai, WeiLi; Yan, Jie; Chen, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) carries the genetic information in all living organisms. It consists of two interwound single-stranded (ss) strands, forming a double-stranded (ds) DNA with a right-handed double-helical conformation. The two strands are held together by highly specific basepairing interactions and are further stabilized by stacking between adjacent basepairs. A transition from a dsDNA to two separated ssDNA is called melting and the reverse transition is called hybridization. Applying a tensile force to a dsDNA can result in a particular type of DNA melting, during which one ssDNA strand is peeled away from the other. In this work, we studied the kinetics of strand-peeling and hybridization of short DNA under tensile forces. Our results show that the force-dependent strand-peeling and hybridization can be described with a simple two-state model. Importantly, detailed analysis of the force-dependent transition rates revealed that the transition state consists of several basepairs dsDNA.

  1. A microfluidic platform for electrical detection of DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, M.; Davis, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods used for detection of DNA hybridization involve the use of DNA microarrays which require overnight incubation times along with bulky and expensive fluorescent scanners. Here, we demonstrate electrical detection of DNA hybridization in an oligonucleotide functionalized microfluidic channel. We use microchannels functionalized with DNA probes integrated with electrodes for measuring conductance across the channel. As beads conjugated with the target DNA passing through the channel are captured on the surface, we are able to electrically detect changes in resistance due to bead capture. Our assay can be completed in less than an hour using less than a microliter of reagent, and has the potential for extensive multiplexing. Such a device can be useful as a handheld platform in a clinical setting where one would need to rapidly genotype a small number of genes rapidly. PMID:23539142

  2. Organizing protein-DNA hybrids as nanostructures with programmed functionalities.

    PubMed

    Teller, Carsten; Willner, Itamar

    2010-12-01

    The structural and functional information encoded in the base sequence of nucleic acids provides a means to organize hybrid protein-DNA nanostructures with pre-designed, programmed functionality. This review discusses the activation of enzyme cascades in supramolecular DNA-protein hybrid structures, the bioelectrocatalytic activation of redox enzymes on DNA scaffolds, and the programmed positioning of enzymes on 1D, 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures. These systems provide starting points towards the design of interconnected enzyme networks. Substantial progress in the tailoring of functional protein-DNA nanostructures has been accomplished in recent years, and advances in this field warrant a comprehensive discussion. The application of these systems for the control of biocatalytic transformations, for amplified biosensing, and for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures are addressed, and future prospects for these systems are highlighted.

  3. Simulation-guided DNA probe design for consistently ultraspecific hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-07-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches to analysing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of the reaction conditions have been used to enable the discrimination of single-nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximately 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 sequences of different target single-nucleotide variants showed between a 200- and 3,000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wild-type sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach, we developed probes that, in combination with PCR amplification, detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA.

  4. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  5. Simulation-guided DNA probe design for consistently ultraspecific hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-07-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches to analysing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of the reaction conditions have been used to enable the discrimination of single-nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximately 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 sequences of different target single-nucleotide variants showed between a 200- and 3,000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wild-type sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach, we developed probes that, in combination with PCR amplification, detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA.

  6. Human gamma X satellite DNA: an X chromosome specific centromeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Li, X; Jabs, E W; Court, D; Lin, C C

    1995-11-01

    The cosmid clone, CX16-2D12, was previously localized to the centromeric region of the human X chromosome and shown to lack human X-specific alpha satellite DNA. A 1.2 kb EcoRI fragment was subcloned from the CX16-2D12 cosmid and was named 2D12/E2. DNA sequencing revealed that this 1,205 bp fragment consisted of approximately five tandemly repeated DNA monomers of 220 bp. DNA sequence homology between the monomers of 2D12/E2 ranged from 72.8% to 78.6%. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of the 2D12/E2 clone displayed a change in monomer unit orientation between nucleotide positions 585-586 from a "tail-to-head" arrangement to a "head-to-tail" configuration. This may reflect the existence of at least one inversion within this repetitive DNA array in the centromeric region of the human X chromosome. The DNA consensus sequence derived from a compilation of these 220 bp monomers had approximately 62% DNA sequence similarity to the previously determined gamma 8 satellite DNA consensus sequence. Comparison of the 2D12/E2 and gamma 8 consensus sequences revealed a 20 bp DNA sequence that was well conserved in both DNA consensus sequences. Slot-blot analysis revealed that this repetitive DNA sequence comprises approximately 0.015% of the human genome, similar to that found with gamma 8 satellite DNA. These observations suggest that this satellite DNA clone is derived from a subfamily of gamma satellite DNA and is thus designated gamma X satellite DNA. When genomic DNA from six unrelated males and two unrelated females was cut with SstI or HpaI and separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed for either gamma X (2D12/E2) or gamma 8 (50E4) probes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the 2D12/E2 clone to the lateral sides of the primary constriction specifically on the human X chromosome.

  7. Instructing cells with programmable peptide DNA hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Ronit; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Álvarez, Zaida; Lewis, Jacob A.; Sur, Shantanu; Serrano, Chris M.; Boekhoven, Job; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2017-07-01

    The native extracellular matrix is a space in which signals can be displayed dynamically and reversibly, positioned with nanoscale precision, and combined synergistically to control cell function. Here we describe a molecular system that can be programmed to control these three characteristics. In this approach we immobilize peptide-DNA (P-DNA) molecules on a surface through complementary DNA tethers directing cells to adhere and spread reversibly over multiple cycles. The DNA can also serve as a molecular ruler to control the distance-dependent synergy between two peptides. Finally, we use two orthogonal DNA handles to regulate two different bioactive signals, with the ability to independently up- or downregulate each over time. This enabled us to discover that neural stem cells, derived from the murine spinal cord and organized as neurospheres, can be triggered to migrate out in response to an exogenous signal but then regroup into a neurosphere as the signal is removed.

  8. Hybrid, multiplexed, functional DNA nanotechnology for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Arrabito, G

    2015-09-07

    We herein aim to report on the fabrication of DNA nano-heterostructures usable as a robust multi-functional analytical system to obtain multiple and complex data in parallel format from a single sample with unprecedented analytical performances. The ability of chemical information contained in the sequences of programmed DNA structures to organize matter made DNA become a unique material in "the nanoworld". Such carefully designed DNA nanostructures can then be functionalized/templated with different biomolecules/nanomaterials as different as nanoparticles, nanowires, organic molecules, peptides, and proteins with controlled spacing on the nanometer scale (<10 nm). In this way, it is possible to combine the properties of both DNA and nanomaterials for exposing the designed functionality and customizable geometrical hetero-nanostructures. By coupling automated on-chip high yield DNA synthesis with low cost detection methods, DNA-nanotechnology can enable the realization of high-sensitivity, multiplexed bioanalytical assays for many different applications like diagnostics, drug screening, toxicology, immunology and biosensors.

  9. Simple method for fluorescence DNA in situ hybridization to squashed chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Larracuente, Amanda M; Ferree, Patrick M

    2015-01-06

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH.

  10. Simple Method for Fluorescence DNA In Situ Hybridization to Squashed Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larracuente, Amanda M.; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  11. Ferrofluids of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals by DNA-Lipid Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Chen, Mengjun; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-01-19

    Here is the first report the creation of ferrofluids of thermotropic liquid crystals in the absence of any solvent or nanoparticle. These ferrofluids were prepared by the electrostatic coupling of single-strand (ss) DNA with paramagnetic lipids. DNA molecules, as rigid parts, offer the orientational anisotropy and lipids (surfactants) due to the flexible hydrocarbon chains suppress crystallization, hybrids with DNA significantly increase the Cure temperature (Tc) of the lipids. The ferrofluids possess good fluidity and low viscosity. They serve as excellent solvents for both hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds. Their strong magnetism further allows the solutes to be controlled by external magnetic force. The DNA-lipid hybrid ferrofluids show liquid crystal (LC) behavior at low temperatures, and the LC phase is made of ordered multilamellar structures. Compared with conventional magnetic nanoparticle dispersions, the solvent-free lipoplex ferrofluids provide potential applications for nanotechnology, material science, and biotechnology.

  12. DNA hybridization to compare species compositions of natural bacterioplankton assemblages.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Fuhrman, J A

    1990-01-01

    Little is known about the species composition and variability of natural bacterial communities, mostly because conventional identification requires pure cultures, but less than 1% of active natural bacteria are cultivable. This problem was circumvented by comparing species compositions via hybridization of total DNA of natural bacterioplankton communities for the estimation of the fraction of DNA in common between two samples (similarity). DNA probes that were labeled with 35S by nick translation were hybridized to filter-bound DNA in a reciprocal fashion; similarities (in percent) were calculated by normalizing the values to self-hybridizations. In tests with DNA mixtures of pure cultures, the experimentally observed similarities agreed with expectations. However, reciprocal similarities (probe and target reversed) were often asymmetric, unlike those of DNA from single strains. This was due to the relative complexity and G + C content of DNA, which provided a means to interpret the asymmetry that was occasionally observed in natural samples. Natural bacteria were collected by filtration from Long Island Sound (LIS), N.Y., the Caribbean and Sargasso seas, and a coral reef lagoon near Bermuda. The samples showed similarities of less than 10 to 95%. The LIS and Sargasso and Caribbean sea samples were 20 to 50% similar to each other. The coral reef sample was less than 10% similar to the others, indicating its unique composition. Seasonality was also observed; an LIS sample obtained in the autumn was 40% similar to two LIS samples obtained in the summer; these latter two samples were 95% similar. We concluded that total DNA hybridization is a rapid, simple, and unbiased method for investigating the variation of bacterioplankton species composition over time and space, avoiding the need of culturing. PMID:2317044

  13. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of DNA hybridization on DNA microarrays enhanced by HRP-modified SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huajun; Wang, Xiaolan; Jiao, Fang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2013-07-02

    Imaging of localized hybridization of nucleic acids immobilized on a glass DNA microarray was performed by means of generation collection (GC) mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Amine-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes, spotted on the glass surface, were hybridized with an unmodified target sequence and a biotinylated indicator probe via sandwich hybridization. Spots where sequence-specific hybridization had occurred were modified by streptavidin-horseradish-peroxidase-(HRP)-wrapped SiO2 nanoparticles through the biotin-streptavidin interaction. In the presence of H2O2, hydroquinone (H2Q) was oxidized to benzoquinone (BQ) at the modified spot surface through the HRP catalytic reaction, and the generated BQ corresponding to the amount of target DNA was reduced in solution by an SECM tip. With this DNA microarray, a number of genes could be detected simultaneously and selectively enough to discriminate between complementary sequences and those containing base mismatches. The DNA targets at prepared spots could be imaged in SECM GC mode over a wide concentration range (10(-7)-10(-12) M). This technique may find applications in genomic sequencing.

  14. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  15. Detection of DNA copy number alterations in cancer by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Michels, Evi; De Preter, Katleen; Van Roy, Nadine; Speleman, Frank

    2007-09-01

    Over the past few years, various reliable platforms for high-resolution detection of DNA copy number changes have become widely available. Together with optimized protocols for labeling and hybridization and algorithms for data analysis and representation, this has lead to a rapid increase in the application of this technology in the study of copy number variation in the human genome in normal cells and copy number imbalances in genetic diseases, including cancer. In this review, we briefly discuss specific technical issues relevant for array comparative genomic hybridization analysis in cancer tissues. We specifically focus on recent successes of array comparative genomic hybridization technology in the progress of our understanding of oncogenesis in a variety of cancer types. A third section highlights the potential of sensitive genome-wide detection of patterns of DNA imbalances or molecular portraits for class discovery and therapeutic stratification.

  16. Site-specific DNA alkylation and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ezaz-Nikpay, K.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a general method for the site-specific insertion of modified nucleotides into DNA and the application of this method to the study of N7-methyl-2[prime]-deoxyguanosine (m[sup 7]dG) in DNA. This thesis describes the chemical basis for the gap insertion/ligation method (GIL) and the use of this method to generate circularly permuted oligonucleotides. In this method, the synthesis of a single oligonucleotide leads to the formation of a double-stranded multimer with periodically-occurring gaps upon base-pairing in solution. The sequential action of a DNA polymerase and a DNA ligase leads to the insertion of a 2[prime]-deoxynucleoside-5[prime]-triphosphate into the gap, and formation of covalently-closed DNA. Finally, restriction endonucleases are used to generate oligonucleotides which contain the introduced nucleotide at symmetrically-related positions. The author describes the use of the GIL method for the insertion of m[sup 7]dG into various oligonucleotides and the Dickerson/Drew dodecamer respectively. The Dickerson/Drew dodecamer was chosen because it has been extensively studies both in its native and adduct bearing forms. The author describes the biophysical characterization of m[sup 7]dG in DNA, and concludes that the probe moiety in dimethyl-sulfate and template-directed interference footprinting of protein-DNA complexes in m[sup 7]dG and not a product of its decomposition. Further studies of m[sub 7]dG in DNA reveal that over long periods of time, the primary product of decomposition is an apurinic site. This dissertation describes the large-scale synthesis of the Dickerson/Drew dodecamer, and the characterization of its effect on DNA structure using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The final chapter describes the overproduction, purification and crystallization of N3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA). AlkA is known to repair m[sup 7]dG residues in DNA.

  17. Role of DNA methylation in hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Takahiro; Ishikura, Sonoko; Miyaji, Naomi; Sasaki, Taku; Wu, Li Min; Itabashi, Etsuko; Takada, Satoko; Shimizu, Motoki; Takasaki-Yasuda, Takeshi; Osabe, Kenji; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-10-25

    Hybrid vigor or heterosis refers to the superior performance of F1 hybrid plants over their parents. Heterosis is particularly important in the production systems of major crops. Recent studies have suggested that epigenetic regulation such as DNA methylation is involved in heterosis, but the molecular mechanism of heterosis is still unclear. To address the epigenetic contribution to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used mutant genes that have roles in DNA methylation. Hybrids between C24 and Columbia-0 (Col) without RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) or methyltransferase I (MET1) function did not reduce the level of biomass heterosis (as evaluated by rosette diameter). Hybrids with a mutation in decrease in dna methylation 1 (ddm1) showed a decreased heterosis level. Vegetative heterosis in the ddm1 mutant hybrid was reduced but not eliminated; a complete reduction could result if there was a change in methylation at all loci critical for generating the level of heterosis, whereas if only a proportion of the loci have methylation changes there may only be a partial reduction in heterosis.

  18. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Identification of DNA viruses by membrane filter hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Stålhandske, P; Pettersson, U

    1982-01-01

    The use of membrane filter hybridization for the identification of DNA viruses is described. We designed and used a procedure for identification of herpes simplex virus. This method can discriminate between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in a simple way. Images PMID:6279697

  20. Magnetic bead-based label-free electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Kawde, A N; Erdem, A; Salazar, M

    2001-11-01

    Magnetic bead capture has been used for eliminating non-specific adsorption effects hampering label-free detection of DNA hybridization based on stripping potentiometric measurements of the target guanine at graphite electrodes. In particular, the efficient magnetic separation has been extremely useful for discriminating against unwanted constituents, including a large excess of co-existing mismatched and non-complementary oligomers, chromosomal DNA, RNA and proteins. The new protocol involves the attachment of biotinylated oligonucleotide probes onto streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, followed by the hybridization event, dissociation of the DNA hybrid from the beads, and potentiometric stripping measurements at a renewable graphite pencil electrode. Such coupling of magnetic hybridization surfaces with renewable graphite electrode transducers and label-free electrical detection results in a greatly simplified protocol and offers great promise for centralized and decentralized genetic testing. A new magnetic carbon-paste transducer, combining the solution-phase magnetic separation with an instantaneous magnetic collection of the bead-captured hybrid, is also described. The characterization, optimization and advantages of the genomagnetic label-free electrical protocol are illustrated below for assays of DNA sequences related to the breast-cancer BRCA1 gene.

  1. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  2. [Graft hybridization and the specificity of heredity in fruit trees].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Bao-Yin; Li, Gui-Rong; Zhou, Xiu-Mei

    2004-09-01

    Emphatically discusses the relationship between graft hybridization and the specificity of heredity in fruit trees on the basis of introducing the recent achievements in plant graft hybridization. We propose that genetic materials in rootstock being translocated and integrated into the genome of the germ cells and embryonic cells in scion are the main reasons why the majority of the hybrid seedlings have wild properties and the heredity of fruit trees violate Mendel's laws of heredity. The potential of graft hybridization in fruit breeding are also discussed.

  3. cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make subtracted cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen subtracted cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.

  4. Rapid genomic DNA changes in allotetraploid fish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, L H; Liu, Q Z; Peng, L Y; Liu, W; Yi, X G; Wang, Y D; Xiao, J; Xu, K; Hu, F Z; Ren, L; Tao, M; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Hong, Y H; Liu, S J

    2015-06-01

    Rapid genomic change has been demonstrated in several allopolyploid plant systems; however, few studies focused on animals. We addressed this issue using an allotetraploid lineage (4nAT) of freshwater fish originally derived from the interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n=100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n=100). We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from allotetraploid hybrids in the 20th generation (F20) and sequenced 14 BAC clones representing a total of 592.126 kb, identified 11 functional genes and estimated the guanine-cytosine content (37.10%) and the proportion of repetitive elements (17.46%). The analysis of intron evolution using nine orthologous genes across a number of selected fish species detected a gain of 39 introns and a loss of 30 introns in the 4nAT lineage. A comparative study based on seven functional genes among 4nAT, diploid F1 hybrids (2nF1) (first generation of hybrids) and their original parents revealed that both hybrid types (2nF1 and 4nAT) not only inherited genomic DNA from their parents, but also demonstrated rapid genomic DNA changes (homoeologous recombination, parental DNA fragments loss and formation of novel genes). However, 4nAT presented more genomic variations compared with their parents than 2nF1. Interestingly, novel gene fragments were found for the iqca1 gene in both hybrid types. This study provided a preliminary genomic characterization of allotetraploid F20 hybrids and revealed evolutionary and functional genomic significance of allopolyploid animals.

  5. Coarse-grained DNA modeling: Hybridization and ionic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel M.

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a biopolymer of enormous significance in living systems. The utility of DNA in such systems is derived from the programmable nature of DNA and its unique mechanical properties. Recently, material scientists have harnessed these properties in order to create systems that spontaneous self-assemble on the nanoscale. Both biologists and material scientists are hindered by an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions that together govern DNA's behavior. Computer simulations, especially those at the coarse-grained (CG) level, can potentially complete this understanding by resolving details indiscernible with current experimental techniques. In this thesis, we advance the state-of-the-art of DNA CG simulations by first reviewing the relevant theory and the evolution of CG DNA models since their inception. Then we present 3SPN.2, an improved CG model for DNA that should provide new insights into biological and nanotechnological systems which incorporate DNA. We perform forward flux sampling simulations in order to examine the effect of sequence, oligomer length, and ionic strength on DNA oligomer hybridization. Due to the limitations inherent in continuum treatments of electrostatic interactions in biological systems, we generate a CG model of biological ions for use with 3SPN.2 and other CG models. Lastly, we illustrate the potential of 3SPN.2 and CG ions by using the models in simulations of viral capsid packaging experiments. The models and results described in this thesis will be useful in future modeling efforts that seek to identify the fundamental physics that govern behavior such as nucleosome positioning, DNA hybridization, and DNA nanoassembly.

  6. Hybridization of denatured RNA and small DNA fragments transferred to nitrocellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P S

    1980-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for transferring RNA from agarose gels to nitrocellulose paper for blot hybridization has been developed. Poly(A)+ and ribosomal RNAs transfer efficiently to nitrocellulose paper in high salt (3 M NaCl/0.3 M trisodium citrate) after denaturation with glyoxal and 50% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. RNA also binds to nitrocellulose after treatment with methylmercuric hydroxide. The method is sensitive: about 50 pg of specific mRNA per band is readily detectable after hybridization with high specific activity probes (10(8) cpm/microgram). The RNA is stably bound to the nitrocellulose paper by this procedure, allowing removal of the hybridized probes and rehybridization of the RNA blots without loss of sensitivity. The use of nitrocellulose paper for the analysis of RNA by blot hybridization has several advantages over the use of activated paper (diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper). The method is simple, inexpensive, reproducible, and sensitive. In addition, denaturation of DNA with glyoxal and dimethyl sulfoxide promotes transfer and retention of small DNAs (100 nucleotides and larger) to nitrocellulose paper. A related method is also described for dotting RNA and DNA directly onto nitrocellulose paper treated with a high concentration of salt; under these conditions denatured DNA of less than 200 nucleotides is retained and hybridizes efficiently. Images PMID:6159641

  7. Identification of Lotus rhizobia by direct DNA hybridization of crushed root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.E.; Bjourson, A.J.; Thompson, J.K.

    1987-07-01

    Hybridization of crushed Lotus pedunculatus root nodules with /sup 32/P-labeled total genomic DNA probes was used to identify Rhizobium loti and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus rhizobia). Probes always hybridized with homologous target DNA and frequency with DNAs of other strains from the same genus. Intergeneric hybridization did not occur. Results were comparable to those from colony hybridization.

  8. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  9. Imaging Specific Genomic DNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Guan, Juan; Huang, Bo

    2016-07-05

    The three-dimensional organization of the genome plays important roles in regulating the functional output of the genome and even in the maintenance of epigenetic inheritance and genome stability. Here, we review and compare a number of newly developed methods-especially those that utilize the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system-that enable the direct visualization of specific, endogenous DNA sequences in living cells. We also discuss the practical considerations in implementing the CRISPR imaging technique to achieve sufficient signal-to-background levels, high specificity, and high labeling efficiency. These DNA labeling methods enable tracking of the copy number, localization, and movement of genomic elements, and we discuss the potential applications of these methods in understanding the searching and targeting mechanism of the Cas9-sgRNA complex, investigating chromosome organization, and visualizing genome instability and rearrangement.

  10. Magnetoresistive sensors for measurements of DNA hybridization kinetics – effect of TINA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, G.; Dufva, M.; Hansen, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the use of magnetoresistive sensors integrated in a microfluidic system for real-time studies of the hybridization kinetics of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles to an array of surface-tethered probes. The nanoparticles were magnetized by the magnetic field from the sensor current. A local negative reference ensured that only the specific binding signal was measured. Analysis of the real-time hybridization using a two-compartment model yielded both the association and dissociation constants kon, and koff. The effect of probe modifications with ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) was studied. Such modifications have been demonstrated to increase the melting temperature of DNA hybrids in solution and are also relevant for surface-based DNA sensing. Kinetic data for DNA probes with no TINA modification or with TINA modifications at the 5′ end (1 × TINA) or at both the 5′ and 3′ ends (2 × TINA) were compared. TINA modifications were found to provide a relative decrease of koff by a factor of 6-20 at temperatures from 57.5 °C to 60 °C. The values of kon were generally in the range between 0.5-2 × 105 M−1s−1 and showed lower values for the unmodified probe than for the TINA modified probes. The observations correlated well with measured melting temperatures of the DNA hybrids. PMID:28167835

  11. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  12. In vitro assembly of multiple DNA fragments using successive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinglin; Yang, Jianming; Zhang, Haibo; Zou, Huibin; Wang, Cong; Xian, Mo

    2012-01-01

    Construction of recombinant DNA from multiple fragments is widely required in molecular biology, especially for synthetic biology purposes. Here we describe a new method, successive hybridization assembling (SHA) which can rapidly do this in a single reaction in vitro. In SHA, DNA fragments are prepared to overlap one after another, so after simple denaturation-renaturation treatment they hybridize in a successive manner and thereby assemble into a recombinant molecule. In contrast to traditional methods, SHA eliminates the need for restriction enzymes, DNA ligases and recombinases, and is sequence-independent. We first demonstrated its feasibility by constructing plasmids from 4, 6 and 8 fragments with high efficiencies, and then applied it to constructing a customized vector and two artificial pathways. As SHA is robust, easy to use and can tolerate repeat sequences, we expect it to be a powerful tool in synthetic biology.

  13. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.

  14. Exploring the mechanisms of DNA hybridization on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Rogers, J. Brandon; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA microarrays are a potentially disruptive technology in the medical field, but their use in such settings is limited by poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as reliable as this process is robust, yet little is known at the molecular level about how the surface affects the hybridization process. This work uses advanced molecular simulation techniques and an experimentally parameterized coarse-grain model to determine the mechanism by which hybridization occurs on surfaces. The results show that hybridization proceeds through a mechanism where the untethered (target) strand often flips orientation. For evenly lengthed strands, the surface stabilizes hybridization (compared to the bulk system) by reducing the barriers involved in the flipping event. For unevenly lengthed strands, the surface destabilizes hybridization compared to the bulk, but the degree of destabilization is dependent on the location of the matching sequence. Taken as a whole, the results offer an unprecedented view into the hybridization process on surfaces and provide some insights as to the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  15. Exploring the mechanisms of DNA hybridization on a surface.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Rogers, J Brandon; Knotts, Thomas A

    2013-01-21

    DNA microarrays are a potentially disruptive technology in the medical field, but their use in such settings is limited by poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as reliable as this process is robust, yet little is known at the molecular level about how the surface affects the hybridization process. This work uses advanced molecular simulation techniques and an experimentally parameterized coarse-grain model to determine the mechanism by which hybridization occurs on surfaces. The results show that hybridization proceeds through a mechanism where the untethered (target) strand often flips orientation. For evenly lengthed strands, the surface stabilizes hybridization (compared to the bulk system) by reducing the barriers involved in the flipping event. For unevenly lengthed strands, the surface destabilizes hybridization compared to the bulk, but the degree of destabilization is dependent on the location of the matching sequence. Taken as a whole, the results offer an unprecedented view into the hybridization process on surfaces and provide some insights as to the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  16. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V.; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Shih, William M.

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  17. The identification of genes specific to Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens using genomic subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Masakiyo, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Shintani, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ansai, Toshihiro; Takehara, Tadamichi

    2010-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, which are often isolated from periodontal sites, were once considered two different genotypes of P. intermedia. Although the genomic sequence of P. intermedia was determined recently, little is known about the genetic differences between P. intermedia and P. nigrescens. The subtractive hybridization technique is a powerful method for generating a set of DNA fragments differing between two closely related bacterial strains or species. We used subtractive hybridization to identify the DNA regions specific to P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. nigrescens ATCC 25261. Using this method, four P. intermedia ATCC 25611-specific and three P. nigrescens ATCC 25261-specific regions were determined. From the species-specific regions, insertion sequence (IS) elements were isolated for P. intermedia. IS elements play an important role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. For the P. intermedia-specific regions, the genes adenine-specific DNA-methyltransferase and 8-amino-7-oxononanoate synthase were isolated. The P. nigrescens-specific region contained a Flavobacterium psychrophilum SprA homologue, a cell-surface protein involved in gliding motility, Prevotella melaninogenica ATCC 25845 glutathione peroxide, and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 leucyl-tRNA synthetase. The results demonstrate that the subtractive hybridization technique was useful for distinguishing between the two closely related species. Furthermore, this technique will contribute to our understanding of the virulence of these species.

  18. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  19. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype

    SciTech Connect

    Martell, M.; Le Gall, I.; Millasseau, P.; Dausset, J.; Cohen, D.

    1988-04-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ..beta..gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. The authors used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period.

  20. Optimization of DNA delivery by three classes of hybrid nanoparticle/DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Plasmid DNA encoding a luciferase reporter gene was complexed with each of six different hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized from mixtures of poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA 50:50) and the cationic lipids DOTAP (1, 2-Dioleoyl-3-Trimethyammonium-Propane) or DC-Chol {3β-[N-(N', N'-Dimethylaminoethane)-carbamyl] Cholesterol}. Particles were 100-400 nm in diameter and the resulting complexes had DNA adsorbed on the surface (out), encapsulated (in), or DNA adsorbed and encapsulated (both). A luciferase reporter assay was used to quantify DNA expression in 293 cells for the uptake of six different NP/DNA complexes. Optimal DNA delivery occurred for 105 cells over a range of 500 ng - 10 μg of NPs containing 20-30 μg DNA per 1 mg of NPs. Uptake of DNA from NP/DNA complexes was found to be 500-600 times as efficient as unbound DNA. Regression analysis was performed and lines were drawn for DNA uptake over a four week interval. NP/DNA complexes with adsorbed NPs (out) showed a large initial uptake followed by a steep slope of DNA decline and large angle of declination; lines from uptake of adsorbed and encapsulated NPs (both) also exhibited a large initial uptake but was followed by a gradual slope of DNA decline and small angle of declination, indicating longer times of luciferase expression in 293 cells. NPs with encapsulated DNA only (in), gave an intermediate activity. The latter two effects were best seen with DOTAP-NPs while the former was best seen with DC-Chol-NPs. These results provide optimal conditions for using different hybrid NP/DNA complexes in vitro and in the future, will be tested in vivo. PMID:20181278

  1. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  2. Submillimetre Network Formation by Light-induced Hybridization of Zeptomole-level DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2016-12-01

    Macroscopic unique self-assembled structures are produced via double-stranded DNA formation (hybridization) as a specific binding essential in biological systems. However, a large amount of complementary DNA molecules are usually required to form an optically observable structure via natural hybridization, and the detection of small amounts of DNA less than femtomole requires complex and time-consuming procedures. Here, we demonstrate the laser-induced acceleration of hybridization between zeptomole-level DNA and DNA-modified nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in the assembly of a submillimetre network-like structure at the desired position with a dramatic spectral modulation within several minutes. The gradual enhancement of light-induced force and convection facilitated the two-dimensional network growth near the air-liquid interface with optical and fluidic symmetry breakdown. The simultaneous microscope observation and local spectroscopy revealed that the assembling process and spectral change are sensitive to the DNA sequence. Our findings establish innovative guiding principles for facile bottom-up production via various biomolecular recognition events.

  3. Submillimetre Network Formation by Light-induced Hybridization of Zeptomole-level DNA

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic unique self-assembled structures are produced via double-stranded DNA formation (hybridization) as a specific binding essential in biological systems. However, a large amount of complementary DNA molecules are usually required to form an optically observable structure via natural hybridization, and the detection of small amounts of DNA less than femtomole requires complex and time-consuming procedures. Here, we demonstrate the laser-induced acceleration of hybridization between zeptomole-level DNA and DNA-modified nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in the assembly of a submillimetre network-like structure at the desired position with a dramatic spectral modulation within several minutes. The gradual enhancement of light-induced force and convection facilitated the two-dimensional network growth near the air-liquid interface with optical and fluidic symmetry breakdown. The simultaneous microscope observation and local spectroscopy revealed that the assembling process and spectral change are sensitive to the DNA sequence. Our findings establish innovative guiding principles for facile bottom-up production via various biomolecular recognition events. PMID:27917861

  4. Fabrication of Uniform DNA-Conjugated Hydrogel Microparticles via Replica Molding for Facile Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Christina L.; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  5. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection.

  6. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  7. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  8. Effects of humic substances on fluorometric DNA quantification and DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bachoon, D S; Otero, E; Hodson, R E

    2001-10-01

    DNA extracts from sediment and water samples are often contaminated with coextracted humic-like impurities. Estuarine humic substances and vascular plant extract were used to evaluate the effect of the presence of such impurities on DNA hybridization and quantification. The presence of humic substances and vascular plant extract interfered with the fluorometric measurement of DNA concentration using Hoechst dye H33258 and PicoGreen reagent. Quantification of DNA amended with humic substances (20-80 ng/microl) using the Hoechst dye assay was more reliable than with PicoGreen reagent. A simple procedure was developed to improve the accuracy for determining the DNA concentration in the presence of humic substances. In samples containing up to 80 ng/microl of humic acids, the fluorescence of the samples were measured twice: first without Hoechst dye to ascertain any fluorescence from impurities in the DNA sample, followed with Hoechst dye addition to obtain the total sample fluorescence. The fluorescence of the Hoechst dye-DNA complex was calculated by subtracting the fluorescence of the impurities from the fluorescence of the sample. Vascular plant extract and humic substances reduced the binding of DNA onto the nylon membrane. Low amounts (<2.0 microg) of humic substances derived from estuarine waters did not affect the binding of 100 ng of target DNA to nylon membranes. DNA samples containing 1.0 microg of humic substances performed well in DNA hybridizations with DIG-labeled oliogonucleotide and chromosomal probes. Therefore, we suggest that DNA samples containing low concentrations of humic substances (<20 ng/microl) could be used in quantitative membrane hybridization without further purification.

  9. Activation of different split functionalities on re-association of RNA-DNA hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, Kirill A.; Viard, Mathias; Martins, Angelica N.; Lockett, Stephen J.; Maciag, Anna E.; Freed, Eric O.; Heldman, Eliahu; Jaeger, Luc; Blumenthal, Robert; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2013-04-01

    Split-protein systems, an approach that relies on fragmentation of proteins with their further conditional re-association to form functional complexes, are increasingly used for various biomedical applications. This approach offers tight control of protein functions and improved detection sensitivity. Here we report a similar technique based on a pair of RNA-DNA hybrids that can be used generally for triggering different split functionalities. Individually, each hybrid is inactive but when two cognate hybrids re-associate, different functionalities are triggered inside mammalian cells. As a proof of concept, this work mainly focuses on the activation of RNA interference. However, the release of other functionalities (such as resonance energy transfer and RNA aptamer) is also shown. Furthermore, in vivo studies demonstrate a significant uptake of the hybrids by tumours together with specific gene silencing. This split-functionality approach presents a new route in the development of `smart' nucleic acid-based nanoparticles and switches for various biomedical applications.

  10. Requirements for species-specific papovavirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E R; Naujokas, M; Hassell, J A

    1989-01-01

    Replication of papovavirus DNA requires a functional replication origin, a virus-encoded protein, large T antigen, and species-specific permissive factors. How these components interact to initiate and sustain viral DNA replication is not known. Toward that end, we have attempted to identify the viral target(s) of permissive factors. The functionally defined replication origins of polyomavirus and simian virus 40, two papovaviruses that replicate in different species (mice and monkeys, respectively), are composed of two functionally distinct domains: a core domain and an auxiliary domain. The origin cores of the two viruses are remarkably similar in primary structure and have common binding sites for large T antigen. By contrast, their auxiliary domains share few sequences and serve as binding sites for cellular proteins. It seemed plausible, therefore, that if cellular permissive factors interacted with the replication origin, their targets were likely to be in the auxiliary domain. To test this hypothesis we constructed hybrid origins for DNA replication that were composed of the auxiliary domain of one virus and the origin core of the other and assessed their capacity to replicate in a number of mouse and monkey cell lines, which express the large T antigen of one or the other virus. The results of this analysis showed that the auxiliary domains of the viral replication origins could substitute for one another in DNA replication, provided that the viral origin core and its cognate large T antigen were present in a permissive cellular milieu. Surprisingly, the large T antigens of the viruses could not substitute for one another, regardless of the species of origin of the host cell, even though the two large T antigens bind to the same sequence motif in vitro. These results suggest that species-specific permissive factors do not interact with the origin-auxiliary domains but, rather, with either the origin core or the large T antigen or with both components to

  11. Adaptive PCR Based on Hybridization Sensing of Mirror-Image l-DNA.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nicholas M; Gabella, William E; Hardcastle, Austin N; Haselton, Frederick R

    2017-01-03

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is dependent on two key hybridization events during each cycle of amplification, primer annealing and product melting. To ensure that these hybridization events occur, current PCR approaches rely on temperature set points and reaction contents that are optimized and maintained using rigid thermal cycling programs and stringent sample preparation procedures. This report describes a fundamentally simpler and more robust PCR design that dynamically controls thermal cycling by more directly monitoring the two key hybridization events during the reaction. This is achieved by optically sensing the annealing and melting of mirror-image l-DNA analogs of the reaction's primers and targets. Because the properties of l-DNA enantiomers parallel those of natural d-DNAs, the l-DNA reagents indicate the cycling conditions required for effective primer annealing and product melting during each cycle without interfering with the reaction. This hybridization-sensing approach adapts in real time to variations in reaction contents and conditions that impact primer annealing and product melting and eliminates the requirement for thermal calibrations and cycling programs. Adaptive PCR is demonstrated to amplify DNA targets with high efficiency and specificity under both controlled conditions and conditions that are known to cause traditional PCR to fail. The advantages of this approach promise to make PCR-based nucleic acid analysis simpler, more robust, and more accessible outside of well-controlled laboratory settings.

  12. An Algorithm for Sequencing by Hybridization Based on an Alternating DNA Chip.

    PubMed

    Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2017-02-28

    Sequencing by hybridization allows the reconstruction of the DNA string of a given length from smaller fragments. These fragments are obtained in the hybridization experiment in which the DNA hybridizes to a DNA chip. In a classical approach, the chip consists of all oligonucleotides of a given length, with only one type of oligonucleotide for each probe of the chip. In this paper, we propose an algorithm solving the non-classical case of SBH, where the chip probes consist set of oligonucleotides described by some specific pattern. We will present the definition of such a non-classical DNA chip and the algorithm solving a sequencing problem related to such a chip. Unlike recent metaheuristic approaches to the classical SBH problem, the proposed algorithm tries to find an exact sequence, and even in the presence of all the hybridization errors in spectrum is very often able to do so in a short time. If only negative errors from repetitions are allowed, then the algorithm is able to reconstruct sequences having length of thousands nucleotides.

  13. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2017-05-29

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R² = 0.8131).

  14. The intrinsic role of nanoconfinement in chemical equilibrium: evidence from DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2013-05-08

    Recently we predicted that when a reaction involving a small number of molecules occurs in a nanometric-scale domain entirely segregated from the surrounding media, the nanoconfinement can shift the position of equilibrium toward products via reactant-product reduced mixing. In this Letter, we demonstrate how most-recently reported single-molecule fluorescence measurements of partial hybridization of ssDNA confined within nanofabricated chambers provide the first experimental confirmation of this entropic nanoconfinement effect. Thus, focusing separately on each occupancy-specific equilibrium constant, quantitatively reveals extra stabilization of the product upon decreasing the chamber occupancy or size. Namely, the DNA hybridization under nanoconfined conditions is significantly favored over the identical reaction occurring in bulk media with the same reactant concentrations. This effect, now directly verified for DNA, can be relevant to actual biological processes, as well as to diverse reactions occurring within molecular capsules, nanotubes, and other functional nanospaces.

  15. DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; López-Fernández, C; Gosálvez, J

    2012-12-28

    DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) is a recently developed technique that allows cell-by-cell detection and quantification of DNA breakage in the whole genome or within specific DNA sequences. The present investigation was conducted to adapt the methodology of DBD-FISH to the visualization and evaluation of DNA damage in buccal epithelial cells. DBD-FISH revealed that DNA damage increased significantly according to H2O2 concentration (r2=0.91). In conclusion, the DBD-FISH technique is easy to apply in buccal cells and provides prompt results that are easy to interpret. Future studies are needed to investigate the potential applicability of a buccal cell DBD-FISH model to human biomonitoring and nutritional work.

  16. Duplication of 10q confirmed by DNA in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Sutliff, W.C.

    1994-08-15

    Partial duplication of 10q is a recognizable clinical entity. In most of the reported cases, the trisomic segment is identified by a balanced translocation state in a parent. Verification remains a problem in de novo cases. However, the recent availability of whole chromosome probes allows for confirmatory diagnosis of suspected cases. We describe a case of de novo duplication (10q) with verification using DNA is situ hybridization. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency.

  18. Physical localisation of repetitive DNA sequences in Alstroemeria: karyotyping of two species with species-specific and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localise two species-specific repetitive DNA sequences, A001-I and D32-13, and two highly conserved 25S and 5S rDNA sequences on the metaphase chromosomes of two species of Alstroemeria. The Chilean species, Alstroemeria aurea (2n = 16), has abundant constitutive heterochromatin, whereas the Brazilian species, Alstroemeria inodora, has hardly any heterochromatin. The A. aurea specific A001-I probe hybridized specifically to the C-band regions on all chromosomes. The FISH patterns on A. inodora chromosomes using species-specific probe D32-13 resembled the C-banding pattern and the A001-I pattern on A. aurea chromosomes. There were notable differences in number and distribution of rDNA sites between the two species. The 25S rDNA probe revealed 16 sites in A. aurea that closely colocalised with A001-I sites and 12 in A. inodora that were predominantly detected in the centromeric regions. FISH karyotypes of the two Alstroemeria species were constructed accordingly, enabling full identification of all individual chromosomes. These FISH karyotypes will be useful for monitoring the chromosomes of both Alstroemeria species in hybrids and backcross derivatives.

  19. Quantum dot monolayer for surface plasmon resonance signal enhancement and DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-06-15

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequence specific to chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). The SPR disk surface has been modified with octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer followed by deposition of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide capped cadmium selenide quantum dots (QD) Langmuir monolayer. The deposition is performed via Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. For the sensor chip preparation, covalent immobilization of the thiol-terminated DNA probe sequence (pDNA) using displacement reaction is accomplished. This integrated SPR chip has been used to detect target complementary DNA concentration by monitoring the change in coupling angle via hybridization. It is revealed that this biosensor exhibits high sensitivity (0.7859 m(0)pM(-1)) towards complementary DNA and can be used to detect it in the concentration range, 180 pM to 5 pM with detection limit as 4.21 pM. The results of kinetic studies yield the values of hybridization and dissociation rate constants as 9.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 2.3 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively, with the equilibrium constant for hybridization as 4.2 × 10(6) M(-1).

  20. Microfluidic chip integrating high throughput continuous-flow PCR and DNA hybridization for bacteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiran; Shao, Ning; Jing, Wenwen; Tao, Shengce; Liu, Sixiu; Sui, Guodong

    2014-05-01

    Rapid identification of clinical pathogens is the initial and essential step for antimicrobial therapy. Herein, we successfully developed a microfluidic device which combines high-throughput continuous-flow PCR and DNA hybridization for the detection of various bacterial pathogens. Universal primers were designed based on the conserved regions of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (16S rDNA), and specific probes were designed from a variable region of 16S rDNA within the amplicon sequences. In the chip operation, after the continuous flow PCR was achieved in the first microfluidic chip, the product was directly introduced into a hybridization chip integrated with microarray containing the immobilized DNA probes. The target-probe hybridization was completed within 1h at 55 °C, and fluorescence signals were obtained as the readout. The presented device is simple, versatile and with less sample consumption compared with traditional instruments. It can perform high-throughput bacteria detections continuously in a single assay, which makes it a promising platform for clinical bacteria identifications.

  1. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide ``primary energy`` ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W{center_dot}h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  2. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide 'primary energy' ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W(center dot)h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  3. Fast and sensitive DNA hybridization assays using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-09-22

    A new, fast, and sensitive DNA hybridization assay platform based on microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF) is presented. Thiolated oligonucleotide anchors were immobilized onto silver nanoparticles on a glass substrate. The hybridization of the complementary fluorescein-labeled DNA target with the surface-bound oligonucleotides was completed within 20 s upon heating with low-power microwaves. In addition, the signal is optically amplified, a consequence of close proximity of the fluorophore to the silvered substrate. In this proof-of-principle methodology, as low as 50 nM of a target DNA was detected, although we envisage far-lower detection limits. Control experiments, where the surface-bound oligonucleotide was omitted, were also performed to determine the extent of non-specific binding. In these studies a significantly reduced non-specific adsorption was found when using microwave heating near to silvered structures as compared to room temperature incubation. These findings suggest that MAMEF could be a most useful alternative to the DNA hybridization assays used today, especially with regard to substantially increasing both the assay rapidity and sensitivity.

  4. Molecular hybridization with DNA-probes as a laboratory diagnostic test for influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pljusnin, A Z; Rozhkova, S A; Nolandt, O V; Bryantseva, E A; Kuznetsov, O K; Noskov, F S

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of using DNA-copies of different influenza A virus genes cloned with recombinant bacterial plasmids for the detection of virus-specific RNA by molecular dot-hybridization were analyzed. High specificity of RNA identification has been demonstrated and it has been shown expedient to use DNA-probes with high-conservative virus genes (polymerase, nucleoprotein, or matrix) for the detection of influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H2N2, H3N2) and probes with corresponding hemagglutinin genes for the differentiation of the subtypes H3N2 and H1N1. The results of nasopharyngeal specimens testing proved the effectiveness of molecular dot-hybridization in epidemiological studies of influenza outbreaks, especially of mixed etiology.

  5. Electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors applied to real and complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tosar, J P; Brañas, G; Laíz, J

    2010-12-15

    DNA hybridization biosensors, also known as genosensors, are analytical devices for the detection of specific DNA "target" sequences in solution, upon hybridization of the targets with complementary "probes" immobilized on a solid substrate. Electrochemical genosensors hold great promise to serve as devices suitable for point-of-care diagnostics and multiplexed platforms for fast, simple and inexpensive nucleic acids analysis. Although a lot of progress has been made in the past few years, the performance of genosensors in complex biological samples has been assayed in only a small fraction of published research articles. This review covers such a group of reports, from the year 2000 onwards. Special attention is played in the nature and complexity of the samples and in the way matrix effects were treated and specificity controls were performed.

  6. Hybrid Pathogen DNA Detector:Users? Manual v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schikora, B; Hietala, S; Shi, L; Lee, L; Skowronski, E; Ardans, A

    2004-01-12

    The Hybrid Unit uses an advanced fluidic design to move very small reagent samples through many unit operations to complete complex molecular biology experiments. The primary use of this machine is to analyze a small liquid sample for the highly specific presence of select agents known to be used in bio-warfare. The Hybrid Unit is coupled with a Luminex bead detection unit for the multiplexing of many assays in one tube. Because of this, multiple controls can be included in each run to avoid false positives. The built-in flow through PCR unit amplifies specific DNA signatures and increases sensitivity, thereby limiting exposure of handlers to highly concentrated (and potentially hazardous, spore containing) sample volumes. The reproducible precision of the Hybrid Unit also gives confidence when a signal is given that detects an agent in a given sample.

  7. A microbiological profile of unexposed and exposed pulp space of primary endodontic infections by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sassone, Luciana M; Fidel, Rivail A; Faveri, Marcelo; Figueiredo, Luciene; Fidel, Sandra R; Feres, Magda

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization, the composition of the microbiota of primary endodontic infections in cases associated with exposed (n = 30) and unexposed (n = 30) pulp space. Samples were collected by means of a #15 H-type file and 2 sterile paper points from 60 single-rooted teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical lesions. The presence, levels, and proportions of 40 bacterial species were determined by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. The species found in higher counts (×10(5)) in exposed pulp space cases were Eubacterium saburreum, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. vincentii, Tannerella forsythia, Enterococcus faecalis, Neisseria mucosa, Campylobacter gracilis, and Prevotella nigrescens, and in unexposed pulp space cases they were F. nucleatum ssp. vincentii, N. mucosa, E. faecalis, E. saburreum, C. gracilis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Counts of F. nucleatum ssp. vincentii, Campylobacter sputigena, Capnocytophaga showae, Treponema socrenskii, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga ochracea were significantly higher in unexposed pulp space cases (P < .05). The data of the present investigation suggested specific differences between the composition of the microbiota in cases with exposed and unexposed pulp space and an association between higher levels of some specific species and unexposed pulp space cases. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  9. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  10. Specific detection of very low concentrations of DNA oligonucleotides with DNA-coated long-period grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecka, Karolina H.; Dominik, Magdalena; Janczuk-Richter, Marta; Niedziółka-Jönsson, Joanna; Bock, Wojtek J.; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2017-04-01

    Label-free biosensing using optical long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in optical fiber and coated with biological compound enables for detection and monitoring the kinetics of reactions taking places on the sensor's surface. The labelfree detection effect for the LPG biosensor working near the dispersion turning point (DTP) of higher order cladding modes can be observed as resonance wavelength shift induced by binding of biomolecules to fiber surface. In this study we analyzed shift of the resonance wavelength for LPG after its functionalization with DNA layer and during DNA hybridization. It has seen found that the LPG is able to be functionalized with DNA oligonucleotide, acting as a probe and after the functionalization can selectively bind specific complementary DNA oligonucleotides in a very low concentration. DNA-coated LPG can be used as a probe capturing specific DNA sequences with wide ranges of concentrations from 0.1 to 10 pM. Hybridization of the DNA on the fiber surface has also been verified with Midorii Green florescent marker.

  11. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  12. Employing double-stranded DNA probes on colloidal substrates for competitive hybridization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bryan Alexander

    DNA has found application beyond its biological function in the cell in a variety of materials assembly systems as well as nucleic acid-based detection devices. In the current research, double-stranded DNA probes are applied in both a colloidal particle assembly and fluorescent assay approach utilizing competitive hybridization interactions. The responsiveness of the double-stranded probes (dsProbes) was tuned by sequence design and tested against a variety of nucleic acid targets. Chapter 1 provides a review of the particle substrate used in the current research, colloidal particles, as well as examines previous applications of DNA in assembly and nucleic acid detection formats. Chapter 2 discusses the formation of fluorescent satellites, or similarly termed fluorescent micelles, via DNA hybridization. The effects of DNA duplex sequence, temperature at which assembly occurs, and oligonucleotide density are variables considered with preferential assembly observed for low oligonucleotide density particles. Chapter 3 demonstrates the controlled disassembly of these satellite structures via competitive hybridization with a soluble target strand. Chapter 4 examines DNA duplexes as fluorescent dsProbes and characterizes the kinetics of competitive hybridization between immobilized dsProbes and solution targets of interest. The sequence-based affinities of dsProbes as well as location of an embedded target sequence are both variables explored in this study. Based on the sequence design of the dsProbes, a range of kinetics responses are observed. Chapter 5 also examines the kinetics of competitive hybridization with dsProbes but with a focus on the specificity of competitive target by including mismatches within a short 15 base competitive target. Chapter 6 examines the effects of dsProbe orientation relative to the particle surface as well as substrate particle size. The kinetics of displacement of DNA targets with those of RNA targets of analogous sequence are also

  13. rDNA Genetic Imbalance and Nucleolar Chromatin Restructuring Is Induced by Distant Hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins. PMID:25723542

  14. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  15. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  16. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  17. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  18. C2'-pyrene-functionalized triazole-linked DNA: universal DNA/RNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2012-01-06

    Development of universal hybridization probes, that is, oligonucleotides displaying identical affinity toward matched and mismatched DNA/RNA targets, has been a longstanding goal due to potential applications as degenerate PCR primers and microarray probes. The classic approach toward this end has been the use of "universal bases" that either are based on hydrogen-bonding purine derivatives or aromatic base analogues without hydrogen-bonding capabilities. However, development of probes that result in truly universal hybridization without compromising duplex thermostability has proven challenging. Here we have used the "click reaction" to synthesize four C2'-pyrene-functionalized triazole-linked 2'-deoxyuridine phosphoramidites. We demonstrate that oligodeoxyribonucleotides modified with the corresponding monomers display (a) minimally decreased thermal affinity toward DNA/RNA complements relative to reference strands, (b) highly robust universal hybridization characteristics (average differences in thermal denaturation temperatures of matched vs mismatched duplexes involving monomer W are <1.7 °C), and (c) exceptional affinity toward DNA targets containing abasic sites opposite of the modification site (ΔT(m) up to +25 °C). The latter observation, along with results from absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, suggests that the pyrene moiety is intercalating into the duplex whereby the opposing nucleotide is pushed into an extrahelical position. These properties render C2'-pyrene-functionalized triazole-linked DNA as promising universal hybridization probes for applications in nucleic acid chemistry and biotechnology.

  19. Specific mutation screening of TP53 gene by low-density DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-López, Angélica; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Beattie, Kenneth L; Maldonado, Rogelio; Mendoza, Patricia; Vázquez, Guelaguetza; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Sánchez, Martha; Navarro, Guillermo; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. Approximately 90% of mutations in this gene are localized between domains encoding exons 5 to 8. The aim of this investigation was to examine the ability of the low density DNA microarray with the assistance of double tandem hybridization platform to characterize TP53 mutational hotspots in exons 5, 7, and 8 of the TP53. Nineteen capture probes specific to each potential mutation site were designed to hybridize to specific site. Virtual hybridization was used to predict the stability of hybridization of each capture probe with the target. Thirty-three DNA samples from different sources were analyzed for mutants in these exons. A total of 32 codon substitutions were found by DNA sequencing. 24 of them a showed a perfect correlation with the hybridization pattern system and DNA sequencing analysis of the regions scanned. Although in this work we directed our attention to some of the most representative mutations of the TP53 gene, the results suggest that this microarray system proved to be a rapid, reliable, and effective method for screening all the mutations in TP53 gene. PMID:24198462

  20. Thermodynamic framework to assess low abundance DNA mutation detection by hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Hanny; Jacobs, An; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Venken, Tom; Valkenborg, Dirk; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of genomic DNA variations in patient samples has a high and increasing value for human diagnostics in its broadest sense. Although many methods and sensors to detect or quantify these variations are available or under development, the number of underlying physico-chemical detection principles is limited. One of these principles is the hybridization of sample target DNA versus nucleic acid probes. We introduce a novel thermodynamics approach and develop a framework to exploit the specific detection capabilities of nucleic acid hybridization, using generic principles applicable to any platform. As a case study, we detect point mutations in the KRAS oncogene on a microarray platform. For the given platform and hybridization conditions, we demonstrate the multiplex detection capability of hybridization and assess the detection limit using thermodynamic considerations; DNA containing point mutations in a background of wild type sequences can be identified down to at least 1% relative concentration. In order to show the clinical relevance, the detection capabilities are confirmed on challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. This enzyme-free detection framework contains the accuracy and efficiency to screen for hundreds of mutations in a single run with many potential applications in molecular diagnostics and the field of personalised medicine. PMID:28542229

  1. Thermodynamic framework to assess low abundance DNA mutation detection by hybridization.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hanny; Jacobs, An; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Venken, Tom; Valkenborg, Dirk; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of genomic DNA variations in patient samples has a high and increasing value for human diagnostics in its broadest sense. Although many methods and sensors to detect or quantify these variations are available or under development, the number of underlying physico-chemical detection principles is limited. One of these principles is the hybridization of sample target DNA versus nucleic acid probes. We introduce a novel thermodynamics approach and develop a framework to exploit the specific detection capabilities of nucleic acid hybridization, using generic principles applicable to any platform. As a case study, we detect point mutations in the KRAS oncogene on a microarray platform. For the given platform and hybridization conditions, we demonstrate the multiplex detection capability of hybridization and assess the detection limit using thermodynamic considerations; DNA containing point mutations in a background of wild type sequences can be identified down to at least 1% relative concentration. In order to show the clinical relevance, the detection capabilities are confirmed on challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. This enzyme-free detection framework contains the accuracy and efficiency to screen for hundreds of mutations in a single run with many potential applications in molecular diagnostics and the field of personalised medicine.

  2. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    PubMed Central

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  3. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  4. Combined hybridization capture and shotgun sequencing for ancient DNA analysis of extinct wild and domestic dromedary camel.

    PubMed

    Mohandesan, Elmira; Speller, Camilla F; Peters, Joris; Uerpmann, Hans-Peter; Uerpmann, Margarethe; De Cupere, Bea; Hofreiter, Michael; Burger, Pamela A

    2017-03-01

    The performance of hybridization capture combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) has seen limited investigation with samples from hot and arid regions until now. We applied hybridization capture and shotgun sequencing to recover DNA sequences from bone specimens of ancient-domestic dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and its extinct ancestor, the wild dromedary from Jordan, Syria, Turkey and the Arabian Peninsula, respectively. Our results show that hybridization capture increased the percentage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recovery by an average 187-fold and in some cases yielded virtually complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes at multifold coverage in a single capture experiment. Furthermore, we tested the effect of hybridization temperature and time by using a touchdown approach on a limited number of samples. We observed no significant difference in the number of unique dromedary mtDNA reads retrieved with the standard capture compared to the touchdown method. In total, we obtained 14 partial mitochondrial genomes from ancient-domestic dromedaries with 17-95% length coverage and 1.27-47.1-fold read depths for the covered regions. Using whole-genome shotgun sequencing, we successfully recovered endogenous dromedary nuclear DNA (nuDNA) from domestic and wild dromedary specimens with 1-1.06-fold read depths for covered regions. Our results highlight that despite recent methodological advances, obtaining ancient DNA (aDNA) from specimens recovered from hot, arid environments is still problematic. Hybridization protocols require specific optimization, and samples at the limit of DNA preservation need multiple replications of DNA extraction and hybridization capture as has been shown previously for Middle Pleistocene specimens. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Organization and Variation Analysis of 5S rDNA in Different Ploidy-level Hybrids of Red Crucian Carp × Topmouth Culter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I–N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics. PMID:22720007

  6. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    PubMed

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  7. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of a specific DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldani, L Z; Maia, A L; Sugar, A M

    1995-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a species-specific 110-bp DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The DNA fragment was generated by PCR with primers complementary to the rat beta-actin gene under a low annealing temperature. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence, after excluding the primers, with those in the GenBank database identified approximately 60% homology with an exon of a major surface glycoprotein gene from Pneumocystis carinii and a fragment of unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII. By Southern hybridization analysis, the 32P-labelled fragment detected 1.0- and 1.9-kb restriction fragments within whole-cell genomic DNA of P. brasiliensis digested with HindIII and PstI, respectively, but failed to hybridize to genomic DNAs from Candida albicans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pneumocystis carinii, rat tissue, or humans under low-stringency hybridization conditions. Additionally, the specific DNA fragment from three different P. brasiliensis isolates (Pb18, RP18, RP17) was amplified by PCR with primers mostly complementary to nonactin sequences of the 110-bp DNA fragment. In contrast, there were no amplified products from other fungus genomic DNAs previously tested, including Histoplasma capsulatum. To date, this is the first species-specific DNA fragment cloned from P. brasiliensis which might be useful as a diagnostic marker for the identification and classification of different P. brasiliensis isolates. PMID:7650207

  8. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of a specific DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Goldani, L Z; Maia, A L; Sugar, A M

    1995-06-01

    We cloned and sequenced a species-specific 110-bp DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The DNA fragment was generated by PCR with primers complementary to the rat beta-actin gene under a low annealing temperature. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence, after excluding the primers, with those in the GenBank database identified approximately 60% homology with an exon of a major surface glycoprotein gene from Pneumocystis carinii and a fragment of unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII. By Southern hybridization analysis, the 32P-labelled fragment detected 1.0- and 1.9-kb restriction fragments within whole-cell genomic DNA of P. brasiliensis digested with HindIII and PstI, respectively, but failed to hybridize to genomic DNAs from Candida albicans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pneumocystis carinii, rat tissue, or humans under low-stringency hybridization conditions. Additionally, the specific DNA fragment from three different P. brasiliensis isolates (Pb18, RP18, RP17) was amplified by PCR with primers mostly complementary to nonactin sequences of the 110-bp DNA fragment. In contrast, there were no amplified products from other fungus genomic DNAs previously tested, including Histoplasma capsulatum. To date, this is the first species-specific DNA fragment cloned from P. brasiliensis which might be useful as a diagnostic marker for the identification and classification of different P. brasiliensis isolates.

  9. Aminoglycoside complexation with a DNA.RNA hybrid duplex: the thermodynamics of recognition and inhibition of RNA processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Christopher M; Li, Tsai-Kun; Guo, Susan; Wang, Gang; Shallop, Anthony J; Pan, Weidong; Yang, Gengcheng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2003-05-28

    Spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques were employed to characterize and contrast the binding of the aminoglycoside paromomycin to three octamer nucleic acid duplexes of identical sequence but different strand composition (a DNA.RNA hybrid duplex and the corresponding DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes). In addition, the impact of paromomycin binding on both RNase H- and RNase A-mediated cleavage of the RNA strand in the DNA.RNA duplex was also determined. Our results reveal the following significant features: (i) Paromomycin binding enhances the thermal stabilities of the RNA.RNA and DNA.RNA duplexes to similar extents, with this thermal enhancement being substantially greater in magnitude than that of the DNA.DNA duplex. (ii) Paromomycin binding to the DNA.RNA hybrid duplex induces CD changes consistent with a shift from an A-like to a more canonical A-conformation. (iii) Paromomycin binding to all three octamer duplexes is linked to the uptake of a similar number of protons, with the magnitude of this number being dependent on pH. (iv) The affinity of paromomycin for the three host duplexes follows the hierarchy, RNA.RNA > DNA.RNA > DNA.DNA. (v) The observed affinity of paromomycin for the RNA.RNA and DNA.RNA duplexes decreases with increasing pH. (vi) The binding of paromomycin to the DNA.RNA hybrid duplex inhibits both RNase H- and RNase A-mediated cleavage of the RNA strand. We discuss the implications of our combined results with regard to the specific targeting of DNA.RNA hybrid duplex domains and potential antiretroviral applications.

  10. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  11. Increasing hybridization rate and sensitivity of DNA microarrays using isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Han, Crystal M; Katilius, Evaldas; Santiago, Juan G

    2014-08-21

    We present an on-chip electrokinetic method to increase the reaction kinetics and sensitivity of DNA microarray hybridization. We use isotachophoresis (ITP) to preconcentrate target molecules in solution and transport them over the immobilized probe sites of a microarray, greatly increasing the binding reaction rate. We show theoretically and experimentally that ITP-enhanced microarrays can be hybridized much faster and with higher sensitivity than conventional methods. We demonstrate our assay using a microfluidic system consisting of a PDMS microchannel superstructure bonded onto a glass slide on which 60 spots of 20-27 nt ssDNA oligonucleotide probes are immobilized. Our 30 min assay results in an 8.2 fold higher signal than the conventional overnight hybridization at 100 fM target concentration. We show rapid and quantitative detection over 4 orders of magnitude dynamic range of target concentration with no increase in the nonspecific signal. Our technique can be further multiplexed for higher density microarrays and extended for other reactions of target-surface immobilized ligands.

  12. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin; Li, Jinghong

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) biosensor for simple, rapid, and specific detection of nucleic acids based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay. This E-DNA biosensor was constructed by self-assembly of a 3' short thiolated capture probe on the gold electrode. DNA detection was realized by outputting a remarkable redox current of the 5' ferrocene (Fc) tail labeled probe. When the target DNA was introduced into the system, it was complementary to the 5' Fc labeled probe at the one-half-segment and complementary to the 3' short thiolated capture probe at the other half-segment, resulting in forming a stable duplex complex. As a result, the Fc probe was proximate to the electrode surface, and the Faradaic current was observed. This E-DNA biosensor was proved to have a low detection limit (1 fM) and a wide dynamic range (from 1 fM to 1 nM) due to the stable hybridization mode. In addition, the sensing system could discriminate the complementary sequence from mismatch sequences, with high sensitivity, stability, and reusability.

  13. A method for recovering strand-specific probes from nick-translated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Dutton, F L; Chovnick, A

    1984-07-01

    A method of preparing strand-specific probes for DNA X DNA or DNA X RNA hybridizations is described. Double-stranded DNA fragments are first isolated from any recombinant DNA clone containing the desired sequence, and then labeled in vitro by nick-translation (T. Maniatis, A. Jeffrey, and D. G. Kleid (1975) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 1184-1188; P. W. J. Rigby, M. Dieckmann, C. Rhodes, and P. Berg (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 113, 237-251). Sequences homologous to the desired strand are captured by annealing the denatured nick-translate to viral strands of an appropriate M13 clone, and recovered by elution of the resulting hybrids from a column of agarose A50M (Bio-Rad). By this method, separate probes with specificity to either strand, as well as the double-stranded probe, may conveniently be prepared from a single nick-translation reaction. Probes may be obtained which are homologous either to the full length of the cloned region or to selected portions thereof by selecting appropriate M13 clones for annealing. The probe is recovered as a population of fragments several hundred bases or less in length, which have been found ideal for saturating liquid hybridizations, and should be similarly well suited for in situ hybridizations to cytological preparations.

  14. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  15. Specific detection of Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA using dual labeled gold nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Santhosh, Devakirubakaran Jayakar; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed at the development and evaluation of a DNA electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA detection in a clinical specimen using a signal amplifier as dual-labeled AuNPs. The DNA electrochemical biosensors were fabricated using a sandwich detection strategy involving two kinds of DNA probes specific to Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA. The probes of enzyme ALP and the detector probe both conjugated on the AuNPs and subsequently hybridized with target DNA immobilized in a SAM/ITO electrode followed by characterization with CV, EIS, and DPV analysis using the electroactive species para-nitrophenol generated by ALP through hydrolysis of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The effect of enhanced sensitivity was obtained due to the AuNPs carrying numerous ALPs per hybridization and a detection limit of 1.25 ng/ml genomic DNA was determined under optimized conditions. The dual-labeled AuNP-facilitated electrochemical sensor was also evaluated by clinical sputum samples, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity and the outcome was in agreement with the PCR analysis. In conclusion, the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrated unique sensitivity and specificity for both genomic DNA and sputum samples and can be employed as a regular diagnostics tool for Mycobacterium sp. monitoring in clinical samples.

  16. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao; Navarro, J.M.

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A specific DNA probe for detecting Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Abiven, P; Blanchard, B; Saillard, C; Kobisch, M; Bove, J M

    1992-10-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. Because of fastidious growth requirements and its serological cross-reactions with other porcine mycoplasmas, we developed a specific DNA probe for its detection. A partial genomic library of M. hyopneumoniae was constructed in plasmid pBR 322 using Hind III chromosomal fragments. The recombinant plasmids were screened by differential hybridization with M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomic DNA probes. One non-hybridizing recombinant plasmid was selected and its 1.65 kbp insert (designated I141) tested for specificity against genomic DNA from numerous mycoplasmas, other bacteria species and DNA from lung tissue of specific pathogen free (SPF) piglets. The 32P labelled I141 could detect specifically down to 400 pg of M. hyopneumoniae genomic DNA. To test the suitability of the I141 probe for the laboratory diagnosis of M. hyopneumoniae infections, we used clinical tracheobronchial specimens from piglets which were experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. The results with hybridization on each specimen were compared to findings with an immunofluorescence test. Of the clinical specimen tested, there was agreement in the two tests of 63%.

  18. DNA hybridization, cladistics, and the phylogeny of phalangerid marsupials.

    PubMed

    Springer, M S; Kirsch, J A; Aplin, K; Flannery, T

    1990-03-01

    Single-copy DNA/DNA hybridization experiments and numerical cladistic analyses of anatomical characters were used to investigate relationships among nine phalangerid (Marsupialia) species from four different genera. Both rate-dependent and rate-independent analyses of molecular data indicate that species of Trichosurus from one clade and that Strigocuscus, Phalanger, and Spilocuscus form a second. Within the latter group, Spilocuscus is excluded from a Strigocuscus-Phalanger clade, which, in turn, is not fully resolved on a jackknife strict consensus tree. Minimum-length Dollo, Wagner, and Camin-Sokal parisomy trees based on 35 anatomical characters, in contrast, suggest placement of Strigocuscus with Trichosurus rather than with Spilocuscus and Phalanger. However, there are two derived characters that support the alternative arrange of Strigocuscus with Spilocuscus and Phalanger and one character that further unites Strigocuscus and Phalanger. Thus, DNA hybridization results are not inconsistent with the distribution of derived character states among anatomical characters, only with minimum-length trees based on character data.

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of piperazino-modified DNA that favours hybridization towards DNA over RNA

    PubMed Central

    Skov, Joan; Bryld, Torsten; Lindegaard, Dorthe; Nielsen, Katrine E.; Højland, Torben; Wengel, Jesper; Petersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two C4′-modified DNA analogues and characterize their structural impact on dsDNA duplexes. The 4′-C-piperazinomethyl modification stabilizes dsDNA by up to 5°C per incorporation. Extension of the modification with a butanoyl-linked pyrene increases the dsDNA stabilization to a maximum of 9°C per incorporation. Using fluorescence, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that the stabilization is achieved by pyrene intercalation in the dsDNA duplex. The pyrene moiety is not restricted to one intercalation site but rather switches between multiple sites in intermediate exchange on the NMR timescale, resulting in broad lines in NMR spectra. We identified two intercalation sites with NOE data showing that the pyrene prefers to intercalate one base pair away from the modified nucleotide with its linker curled up in the minor groove. Both modifications are tolerated in DNA:RNA hybrids but leave their melting temperatures virtually unaffected. Fluorescence data indicate that the pyrene moiety is residing outside the helix. The available data suggest that the DNA discrimination is due to (i) the positive charge of the piperazino ring having a greater impact in the narrow and deep minor groove of a B-type dsDNA duplex than in the wide and shallow minor groove of an A-type DNA:RNA hybrid and (ii) the B-type dsDNA duplex allowing the pyrene to intercalate and bury its apolar surface. PMID:21062815

  20. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  1. Isolation and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 20-specific alpha-satellite DNA clone.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Archidiacono, N; Carbone, R; Bolino, A; Shridhar, V; Miller, O J; Miller, D A; Ward, D C; Rocchi, M

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a human genomic DNA clone (PZ20, locus D20Z2) that identifies, under high-stringency hybridization conditions, an alphoid DNA subset specific for chromosome 20. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sequence analysis confirmed our previously reported data on the great similarity between the chromosome 20 and chromosome 2 alphoid subsets. Comparative mapping of pZ20 on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes, also performed under high-stringency conditions, indicates that the alphoid subset has ancestral sequences on chimpanzee chromosome 11 and gorilla chromosome 19. However, no hybridization was observed to chromosomes 21 in the great apes, the homolog of human chromosome 20.

  2. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  3. Telomeres in ICF syndrome cells are vulnerable to DNA damage due to elevated DNA:RNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sagie, Shira; Toubiana, Shir; Hartono, Stella R.; Katzir, Hagar; Tzur-Gilat, Aya; Havazelet, Shany; Francastel, Claire; Velasco, Guillaume; Chédin, Frédéric; Selig, Sara

    2017-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrids, nucleic acid structures with diverse physiological functions, can disrupt genome integrity when dysregulated. Human telomeres were shown to form hybrids with the lncRNA TERRA, yet the formation and distribution of these hybrids among telomeres, their regulation and their cellular effects remain elusive. Here we predict and confirm in several human cell types that DNA:RNA hybrids form at many subtelomeric and telomeric regions. We demonstrate that ICF syndrome cells, which exhibit short telomeres and elevated TERRA levels, are enriched for hybrids at telomeric regions throughout the cell cycle. Telomeric hybrids are associated with high levels of DNA damage at chromosome ends in ICF cells, which are significantly reduced with overexpression of RNase H1. Our findings suggest that abnormally high TERRA levels in ICF syndrome lead to accumulation of telomeric hybrids that, in turn, can result in telomeric dysfunction. PMID:28117327

  4. Highly sensitive electrochemical impedance spectroscopic detection of DNA hybridization based on Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Du, Meng; Jiao, Kui

    2009-01-15

    A polyaniline nanofibers (PAN(nano))/carbon paste electrode (CPE) was prepared via dopping PAN(nano) in the carbon paste. The nanogold (Au(nano)) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite nanoparticles were bound on the surface of the PAN(nano)/CPE. The immobilization and hybridization of the DNA probe on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films were investigated with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) using methylene blue (MB) as indicator, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) as redox probe. The voltammetric peak currents of MB increased dramatically owing to the immobilization of the probe DNA on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films, and then decreased obviously owing to the hybridization of the DNA probe with the complementary single-stranded DNA (cDNA). The electron transfer resistance (R(et)) of the electrode surface increased after the immobilization of the probe DNA on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films and rose further after the hybridization of the probe DNA. The remarkable difference between the R(et) value at the DNA-immobilized electrode and that at the hybridized electrode could be used for the label-free EIS detection of the target DNA. The loading of the DNA probe on Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films was greatly enhanced and the sensitivity for the target DNA detection was markedly improved. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nopaline synthase (NOS) gene from transgenically modified beans were determined with this label-free EIS DNA detection method. The dynamic range for detecting the PAT gene sequence was from 1.0 x 10(-12)mol/L to 1.0 x 10(-6)mol/L with a detection limit of 5.6 x 10(-13)mol/L.

  5. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Welling, Ryan C; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-01-07

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes-a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  6. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  7. Universal Dynamic DNA Assembly-Programmed Surface Hybridization Effect for Single-Step, Reusable, and Amplified Electrochemical Nucleic Acid Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Fang, Li; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2017-03-07

    The traditional sensitive electrochemical biosensors are commonly confronted with the cumbersome interface operation and washing procedures and the inclusion of extra exogenous reagents, which impose the challenge on the detection simplicity, reliability, and reusability. Herein, we present the proof-of-principle of a unique biosensor architecture based on dynamic DNA assembly programmed surface hybridization, which confers the single-step, reusable, and enzyme-free amplified electrochemical nucleic acid analysis. To demonstrate the fabrication universality three dynamic DNA assembly strategies including DNA-fueled target recycling, catalytic hairpin DNA assembly, and hybridization chain reaction were flexibly harnessed to convey the homogeneous target recognition and amplification events into various DNA scaffolds for the autonomous proximity-based surface hybridization. The current biosensor architecture features generalizability, simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity, and specificity over the traditional nucleic acid-related amplified biosensors. The lowest detection limit of 50 aM toward target DNA could be achieved by hybridization chain reaction-programmed surface hybridization. The reliable working ability for both homogeneous solution and heterogeneous inteface facilitates the target analysis with a robust reliability and reproducibility, also making it to be readily extended for the integration with the kinds of detecting platforms. Thus, it may hold great potential for the biosensor fabrication served for the point-of-care applications in resource constrained regions.

  8. Monitoring DNA hybridization and thermal dissociation at the silica/water interface using resonantly enhanced second harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Azam, Md Shafiul; Gibbs-Davis, Julianne M

    2013-09-03

    The immobilization of oligonucleotide sequences onto glass supports is central to the field of biodiagnostics and molecular biology with the widespread use of DNA microarrays. However, the influence of confinement on the behavior of DNA immobilized on silica is not well understood owing to the difficulties associated with monitoring this buried interface. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an inherently surface specific technique making it well suited to observe processes at insulator interfaces like silica. Using a universal 3-nitropyrolle nucleotide as an SHG-active label, we monitored the hybridization rate and thermal dissociation of a 15-mer of DNA immobilized at the silica/aqueous interface. The immobilized DNA exhibits hybridization rates on the minute time scale, which is much slower than hybridization kinetics in solution but on par with hybridization behavior observed at electrochemical interfaces. In contrast, the thermal dissociation temperature of the DNA immobilized on silica is on average 12 °C lower than the analogous duplex in solution, which is more significant than that observed on other surfaces like gold. We attribute the destabilizing affect of silica to its negatively charged surface at neutral pH that repels the hybridizing complementary DNA.

  9. Accurate measurement of psoralen-crosslinked DNA: direct biochemical measurements and indirect measurement by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, N.; Ross, P.M.

    1988-11-01

    This paper evaluates methods to measure crosslinkage due to psoralen plus light in total DNA and in specific sequences. DNA exposed in cells or in vitro to a bifunctional psoralen and near ultraviolet light accumulates interstrand crosslinks. Crosslinkage is the DNA mass fraction that is attached in both strands to a crosslink. We show here biochemical methods to measure psoralen photocrosslinkage accurately in total DNA. We also describe methods to measure photocrosslinkage indirectly, in specific sequences, by nucleic acid hybridization. We show that a single 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) crosslink causes at least 50 kbp of alkali-denatured DNA contiguous in both strands with it to snap back into the duplex form when the denatured preparation is returned to neutral pH. This process was so efficient that the DNA was not nicked by the single-strand nuclease S1 at 100-fold excess after snapping back. Uncrosslinked DNA was digested to acid-soluble material by the enzyme. Crosslinkage therefore equals the fraction of S1-resistant nucleotide in this kind of experiment. We alkali-denatured DNA samples crosslinked to varying degrees by varying TMP concentration at constant light exposure. We then measured crosslinkage by ethidium bromide (EtBr) fluorometry at pH 11.8; by EtBr fluorometry at neutral pH of S1 digests of the DNA; and by the fraction of radioactivity remaining acid insoluble in S1-digests of DNA labeled uniformly with (3H)deoxythymidine. These assays measure distinct physical properties of crosslinked DNA. Numerical agreement is expected only when all three measurements are accurate. Under optimum conditions, the three methods yielded identical results over the range of measurement. Using alkaline EtBr fluorescence in crude cell lysates, we detected crosslinks at frequencies in the range of 1.6 X 10(-7) per base pair.

  10. HPV Genotyping of Modified General Primer-Amplicons Is More Analytically Sensitive and Specific by Sequencing than by Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Meisal, Roger; Rounge, Trine Ballestad; Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Eieland, Alexander Kirkeby; Worren, Merete Molton; Molden, Tor Faksvaag; Kommedal, Øyvind; Hovig, Eivind; Leegaard, Truls Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive and specific genotyping of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is important for population-based surveillance of carcinogenic HPV types and for monitoring vaccine effectiveness. Here we compare HPV genotyping by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to an established DNA hybridization method. In DNA isolated from urine, the overall analytical sensitivity of NGS was found to be 22% higher than that of hybridization. NGS was also found to be the most specific method and expanded the detection repertoire beyond the 37 types of the DNA hybridization assay. Furthermore, NGS provided an increased resolution by identifying genetic variants of individual HPV types. The same Modified General Primers (MGP)-amplicon was used in both methods. The NGS method is described in detail to facilitate implementation in the clinical microbiology laboratory and includes suggestions for new standards for detection and calling of types and variants with improved resolution. PMID:28045981

  11. Hydroxylamine-amplified gold nanoparticles for the homogeneous detection of sequence-specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aiping; Cai, Sheng; Cao, Zhijuan; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2010-06-01

    Herein, we report the development of a simple, sensitive, inexpensive, and homogeneous detection method for the analysis of DNA hybridization based on the optical properties of hydroxylamine-amplified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in solution phase. The assay relies on a sandwich-type DNA hybridization in which DNA targets are first hybridized with capture DNA probes immobilized on the surface of magnetic beads and then sandwiched with Au NPs modified with biotinylated reporter DNA. Au NPs, after being anchored on the magnetic beads, are then dispersed in solution by the dehybridization and enlarged by using a mixture of HAuCl(4) and NH(2)OH. The Au NP growth signal which is used for the quantitative analysis of sequence-specific DNA can be easily monitored by the naked eye directly or an UV-vis spectrophotometer. Surface plasmonic signature of the enlarged Au NPs and the kinetics of the Au NP growth in the homogenous phase containing of HAuCl(4) and NH(2)OH have also been studied. As a result, such a homogeneous assay allows the detection of 30-base DNA targets down to the 100 amol level, which offers great promise for facilitating sensitive detection of other biorecognition events.

  12. Rotating rod renewable microcolumns for automated, solid-phase DNA hybridization studies.

    PubMed

    Bruckner-Lea, C J; Stottlemyre, M S; Holman, D A; Grate, J W; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2000-09-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization in an automated sequential injection system is described. The flow cell included a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degrees angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevented passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees releases the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately postcolumn during all column perfusion and elution steps using a flow-through fluorescence detector. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 microL, 10 nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than 1 s and a total sample perfusion time of 40 s. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated.

  13. Characterization and differential expression of CPD and 6-4 DNA photolyases in Xiphophorus species and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Walter, Dylan J; Boswell, Mikki; Volk de García, Sara M; Walter, Sean M; Breitenfeldt, Erik W; Boswell, William; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-06-01

    Among the many Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid tumor models are those that exhibit ultraviolet light (UVB) induced melanoma. In previous studies, assessment of UVB induced DNA damage and nucleotide excision DNA repair has been performed in parental lines and interspecies hybrids. Species and hybrid specific differences in the levels of DNA damage induced and the dark repair rates for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidine photoproducts (6-4PPs) have been reported. However, UVB induced DNA lesions in Xiphophorus fishes are thought to primarily be repaired via light dependent CPD and 6-4PP specific photolyases. Photolyases are of evolutionary interest since they are ancient and presumably function solely to ameliorate the deleterious effects of UVB exposure. Herein, we report results from detailed studies of CPD and 6-4PP photolyase gene expression within several Xiphophorus tissues. We determined photolyase gene expression patterns before and after exposure to fluorescent light in X. maculatus, X. couchianus, and for F1 interspecies hybrids produced from crossing these two parental lines (X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus). We present novel results showing these two photolyase genes exhibit species, tissue, and hybrid-specific differences in basal and light induced gene expression.

  14. Detection of mycobacterial DNA by a specific and simple lateral flow assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cimaglia, Fabio; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Sechi, Leonardo; Chiesa, Maurizio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Andreadou, Margarita; Taka, Styliani; Mataragka, Antonia; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots have been incorporated to a lateral flow assay for the specific and very simple detection of different mycobacterial DNA targets within only a few minutes, bypassing the complexity of conventional DNA hybridization assays. The method extends our previous work on protein detection using an identical procedure.

  15. Locational Diversity of Alpha Satellite DNA and Intergeneric Hybridization Aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates Genera of Small Apes

    PubMed Central

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes. PMID:25290445

  16. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    PubMed

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes.

  17. Detection of amplified HPV 6 and 11 DNA in vulvar lesions by hot start PCR in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nuovo, G J; Gallery, F; MacConnell, P

    1992-07-01

    We analyzed the distribution pattern of human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 DNA in vulvar lesions by in situ hybridization after amplification by the "hot start" polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HPV DNA was routinely detected in granular layer cells showing perinuclear halos and nuclear atypia by in situ hybridization with or without PCR. Cells that lack these changes rarely exhibited HPV DNA with standard in situ hybridization. After amplification, in situ analysis showed that many of the cells that lacked halos and atypia did contain HPV DNA and that the hybridization signal often localized to areas where there was a thickened granular layer. HPV DNA was not noted in the basal cells. The one copy of HPV 16 in SiHa cells was detectable after PCR with a single primer pair by in situ analysis only if the hot start modification was employed. Prior reports describing the PCR in situ methodology noted the need for from five to seven primer pairs. The hot start technique, which may be done by withholding the DNA polymerase until the temperature is sufficiently high to disfavor nontarget specific pathways, allowed the use of a single primer pair and showed that the degree of target-specific amplification, and not the size of the amplified product, determines the success of the PCR in situ technique.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the hybridizing fire-bellied toads, Bombina bombina and B. variegata.

    PubMed

    Szymura, J M; Uzzell, T; Spolsky, C

    2000-07-01

    Using five restriction enzymes, geographical variation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Bombina bombina and B. variegata was studied in samples from 20 locations. Each restriction enzyme produced a species-specific fragment pattern. B. bombina haplotypes A and B were closely related to each other. In contrast, haplotypes A and B of B. variegata formed two distinct lineages. A very distinctive haplotype (C) was found in the Carpathian Mountains, whereas two other haplotypes, D and E (differing by a single AvaI site), were present in western Europe and the Balkans, respectively. Populations polymorphic for haplotypes D and E occurred in the central Balkans where the haplotypes could replace each other clinally. mtDNA sequence divergence between B. bombina and B. variegata was estimated as 6.0-8.1% and 4.7-5.2% between type C and types D/E of B. variegata. The latter divergence is contrary to allozyme and morphological data that place the western and Carpathian B. v. variegata together (Nei's D = 0.07) and separate them from the Balkan subspecies B. v. scabra (Nei's D = 0.18). Broad interspecific correlation among morphology, allozymes and mtDNA types in European fire-bellied toads argues that, despite continuous hybridization (interrupted perhaps during Pleistocene glacial maxima), little or no mtDNA introgression between the species has occurred outside the narrow hybrid zones that separate these parapatric species.

  19. Activated paper surfaces for the rapid hybridization of DNA through capillary transport.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana Catarina; Song, Yajing; Lundeberg, Joakim; Ståhl, Patrik L; Brumer, Harry

    2012-04-03

    The development of low-cost, accurate, and equipment-free diagnostic tests is crucial to many clinical, laboratory, and field applications, including forensics and medical diagnostics. Cellulose fiber-based paper is an inexpensive, biodegradable, and renewable resource, the use of which as a biomolecule detection matrix and support confers several advantages compared to traditional materials such as glass. In this context, a new, facile method for the preparation of surface functionalized papers bearing single-stranded probe DNA (ssDNA) for rapid target hybridization via capillary transport is presented. Optimized reaction conditions were developed that allowed the direct, one-step activation of standard laboratory filters by the inexpensive and readily available bifunctional linking reagent, 1,4-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Such papers were thus amenable to subsequent coupling of amine-labeled ssDNA under standard conditions widely used for glass-based supports. The intrinsic wicking ability of the paper matrix facilitated rapid sample elution through arrays of probe DNA, leading to significant, detectable hybridization in the time required for the sample liquid to transit the vertical length of the strip (less than 2 min). The broad applicability of these paper test strips as rapid and specific diagnostics in "real-life" situations was exemplified by the discrimination of amplicons generated from canine and human mitochondrial and genomic DNA in mock forensic samples.

  20. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-04-15

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant color change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays.

  1. Molecular Rigidity and Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation in DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack; Vargas-Lara, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Entropy-enthalpy compensation (EEC) is a general and relatively poorly understood pattern in the energetic parameters governing both binding constants and relaxation processes in condensed matter. After defining the basic phenomenology, we focus on how polymer additives, chain confinement, chain length variation affect a well-studied molecular binding process, the hybridization of duplex DNA. Our study is based on a coarse-grained model of DNA that does treat water explicitly. We find that both crowding due to polymer additives and geometrical confinement lead to a change of the effective chain rigidity and that changes in DNA generally lead to a pattern entropy-enthalpy compensation in the DNA association similar to experimental observations. Modulation of the rigidity of binding specifies by constraints associated with chain structure or environmental conditions can greatly influence both the location and cooperativity of molecular binding transition and the relative enthalpy and entropy contributions to the free energy of binding. Entropy-enthalpy compensation arises in numerous synthetic and biological molecular binding processes and we suggest that that changes in molecular rigidity might provide a common explanation of this ubiquitous phenomenon.

  2. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  3. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM < 1 nM at 25°C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn2+, but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5′-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3′ side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA. PMID:24203707

  4. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  5. Biophysical and electrochemical properties of Self-assembled noncovalent SWNT/DNA hybrid and electroactive nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzapoor, Aboulfazl; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    DNA self-assembled hybrid nanostructures are widely used in recent research in nanobiotechnology. Combination of DNA with carbon based nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and carbon quantum dot were applied in important biological applications. Many examples of biosensors, nanowires and nanoelectronic devices, nanomachine and drug delivery systems are fabricated by these hybrid nanostructures. In this study, a new hybrid nanostructure has been fabricated by noncovalent interactions between single or double stranded DNA and SWNT nanoparticles and biophysical properties of these structures were studied comparatively. Biophysical properties of hybrid nanostructures studied by circular dichroism, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Also, electrochemical properties studied by cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, choronoamperometry and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results revealed that the biophysical and electrochemical properties of SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures were different compare to ss-DNA, ds-DNA and SWNT singly. Circular dichroism results showed that ss-DNA wrapped around the nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions. The results indicated that after adding SWNT to ss-DNA and ds-DNA intensity of CD and UV-vis spectrum peaks were decreased. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ss-DNA improves the electron transfer rate of hybrid nanostructures. It was demonstrated SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures should be a good electroactive nanostructure that can be used for electrochemical detection or sensing.

  6. Detection of salmonellas by DNA hybridization with a fluorescent alkaline phosphatase substrate.

    PubMed

    Cano, R J; Torres, M J; Klem, R E; Palomares, J C; Casadesus, J

    1992-05-01

    This study evaluates a DNA hybridization assay for salmonella with AttoPhos (JBL Scientific, San Luis Obispo, CA), a fluorescent substrate for alkaline phosphatase. The probe used (50 ng/ml) was a biotinylated 600 bp fragment consisting of a tandem repeat of an insertion sequence (IS200) found in most Salmonella spp. evaluated. The hybridization was carried out at 65 degrees C for 2 h without prior prehybridization and hybrids were detected by the addition of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate. Circles (5 mm) were cut from the membrane and placed in a cuvette containing 1 ml of 1 mmol/l AttoPhos. The reaction was evaluated after 30 min at 37 degrees C with a fluorometer with an excitation wavelength of 440 nm and an emission wavelength of 550 nm. The sensitivity of the probe was estimated to be 10,000 copies of target DNA or 5 x 10(-20) mol of DNA. All 74 salmonella strains tested reacted with the probe but none of the 98 heterologous species tested gave positive results. The results of this study indicate that our assay method, which employs a biotinylated tandem repeat of IS200 and AttoPhos, is a specific and highly sensitive quantitative method for the detection of salmonellas.

  7. KRAS mutation screening by chip-based DNA hybridization--a further step towards personalized oncology.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Christine; Steinbrücker, Carolin; Pollok, Sibyll; Walther, Katharina; Clement, Joachim H; Chen, Yuan; Petersen, Iver; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    The use of predictive biomarkers can help to improve therapeutic options for the individual cancer patient. For the treatment of colon cancer patients with anti-EGFR-based drugs, the KRAS mutation status has to be determined to pre-select responders that will benefit from this medication. Amongst others, array-based tests have been established for profiling of the KRAS mutation status. Within this article we describe an on-chip hybridization technique to screen therapeutic relevant KRAS codon 12 mutations. The DNA chip-based platform enables the reliable discrimination of selected mutations by allele-specific hybridization. Here, silver deposits represent robust endpoint signals that allow for a simple naked eye rating. With the here presented assay concept a precise identification of heterozygous and homozygous KRAS mutations, even against a background of up to 95% wild-type DNA, was realizable. The applicability of the test was successfully proven for various cancer cell lines as well as clinical tumour samples. Thus, the chip-based DNA hybridization technique seems to be a promising tool for KRAS mutation analysis to further improve personalized cancer treatment.

  8. A two-hybrid dual bait system to discriminate specificity of protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskii, I; Khazak, V; Golemis, E A

    1999-06-11

    Biological regulatory systems require the specific organization of proteins into multicomponent complexes. Two hybrid systems have been used to identify novel components of signaling networks based on interactions with defined partner proteins. An important issue in the use of two-hybrid systems has been the degree to which interacting proteins distinguish their biological partner from evolutionarily conserved related proteins and the degree to which observed interactions are specific. We adapted the basic two-hybrid strategy to create a novel dual bait system designed to allow single-step screening of libraries for proteins that interact with protein 1 of interest, fused to DNA binding domain A (LexA), but do not interact with protein 2, fused to DNA binding domain B (lambda cI). Using the selective interactions of Ras and Krev-1(Rap1A) with Raf, RalGDS, and Krit1 as a model, we systematically compared LexA- and cI-fused baits and reporters. The LexA and cI baitr reporter systems are well matched for level of bait expression and sensitivity range for interaction detection and allow effective isolation of specifically interacting protein pairs against a nonspecific background. These reagents should prove useful to refine the selectivity of library screens, to reduce the isolation of false positives in such screens, and to perform directed analyses of sequence elements governing the interaction of a single protein with multiple partners.

  9. Detection of bacteria by hybridization of rRNA with DNA-latex and immunodetection of hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Patterson, W L; Johnson, P K; Swartzell, C T; Wogoman, F; Albarella, J P; Carrico, R J

    1988-01-01

    A novel nucleic acid hybridization assay with a DNA probe immobilized on 1.25-micron-diameter latex particles was developed. Hybridization of the immobilized probe DNA with sample rRNA was complete in 10 to 15 min. Alkaline phosphatase-labeled anti-DNA-RNA was allowed to bind to the DNA-RNA hybrids on the latex particles. Then the latex was collected on a small glass fiber filter pad, and bound alkaline phosphatase was quantitated by reflectance rate measurement. The method detected a broad range of bacterial species and had a detection limit of 500 cells per assay. The assay was used to screen urine samples for bacteriuria and had a sensitivity of 96.2% compared with conventional culture at a decision level of greater than or equal to 10(4) CFU/ml. The hybridization method could have broad application to the detection of bacteria and viruses. PMID:2457597

  10. DNA Hybridization Probe for Use in Determining Restricted Nodulation among Bradyrhizobium japonicum Serocluster 123 Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Cregan, Perry B.; Keyser, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    Several soybean plant introduction (PI) genotypes have recently been described which restrict nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 in an apparently serogroup-specific manner. While PI 371607 restricts nodulation of strains in serogroup 123 and some in serogroup 127, those in serogroup 129 are not restricted. When DNA regions within and around the B. japonicum I-110 common nodulation genes were used as probes to genomic DNA from the serogroup strains USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129, several of the probes differentially hybridized to the nodulation-restricted and -unrestricted strains. One of the gene regions, cloned in plasmid pMJS12, was subsequently shown to hybridize to 4.6-kilobase EcoRI fragments from DNAs from nodulation-restricted strains and to larger fragments in nodulation-unrestricted strains. To determine if the different hybridization patterns could be used to predict nodulation restriction, we hybridized pMJS12 to EcoRI-digested genomic DNAs from uncharacterized serocluster 123 field isolates. Of the 36 strains examined, 15 were found to have single, major, 4.6-kilobase hybridizing EcoRI fragments. When tested for nodulation, 80% (12 of 15) of the strains were correctly predicted to be restricted for nodulation of the PI genotypes. In addition, hybridization patterns obtained with pMJS12 and nodulation phenotypes on PI 371607 indicated that there are at least three types of serogroup 127 strains. Our results suggest that the pMJS12 gene probe may be useful in selecting compatible host-strain combinations and in determining the suitability of field sites for the placement of soybean genotypes containing restrictive nodulation alleles. Images PMID:16348217

  11. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DNA hybridization, hemagglutination, and electron microscopy for detection of canine parvovirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Y A; Mildbrand, M M; Carlson, J; Collins, J K; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Canine fecal samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) by using monoclonal antibodies to the canine parvovirus hemagglutinating protein. These data were compared with results obtained with DNA hybridization assays, hemagglutination assays, and electron microscopy. The highest correlation was observed between the ELISA and the hemagglutination tests, with 94.4% of samples showing agreement. Lower correlation was obtained between ELISA and DNA hybridization tests (73.3%). Correlation between ELISA and electron microscopy was 60.9%. The studies indicated that the ELISA can be used as a sensitive and specific diagnostic assay for canine parvovirus infections. Images PMID:6092425

  12. In situ hybridization analysis of HPV 16 DNA sequences in early cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Crum, C. P.; Nagai, N.; Levine, R. U.; Silverstein, S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined 18 cervical intraepithelial neoplasms (CIN) for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences by Southern blot hybridization and DNA-DNA in situ hybridizations for HPV DNA sequences and compared the epithelial distribution of HPV 16 DNA sequences with HPV 6/11 sequences in selected condylomas. Fifteen of the 18 CIN lesions contained HPV 16 DNA as determined by Southern blot hybridization. With the use of biotinylated HPV 16 DNA probes, 10 of the 18 were positive by in situ hybridization, 9 of which were also positive by Southern blot hybridization. In situ hybridization to HPV 16 probes was found primarily in areas of CIN which contained either maturation or koilocytotic atypia, although in two cases hybridizing sequences were detected in superficial cells from epithelium with no discernible maturation. Staining in both condylomas and CIN lesions varied in distribution and intensity. However, in some CIN lesions staining from cell to cell varied considerably. This greater variability in staining appeared to correlate with greater morphologic variations which characterize CIN, and which may influence greater variation in HPV DNA replication. Thus, some differences in patterns of hybridization for HPV DNA between CIN and condylomas may be explained by morphologic differences in the two classes of lesions. Differences in viral gene expression between condylomas and CIN and their relationship to morphologic findings remain to be clarified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2421580

  13. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrating DNA strand displacement circuitry to the nonlinear hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Fan, Tsz Wing; Hsing, I-Ming

    2017-02-23

    Programmable and modular attributes of DNA molecules allow one to develop versatile sensing platforms that can be operated isothermally and enzyme-free. In this work, we present an approach to integrate upstream DNA strand displacement circuits that can be turned on by a sequence-specific microRNA analyte with a downstream nonlinear hybridization chain reaction for a cascading hyperbranched nucleic acid assembly. This system provides a two-step amplification strategy for highly sensitive detection of the miRNA analyte, conducive for multiplexed detection. Multiple miRNA analytes were tested with our integrated circuitry using the same downstream signal amplification setting, showing the decoupling of nonlinear self-assembly with the analyte sequence. Compared with the reported methods, our signal amplification approach provides an additional control module for higher-order DNA self-assembly and could be developed into a promising platform for the detection of critical nucleic-acid based biomarkers.

  15. Evaluation of a fluorescent DNA hybridization assay for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Cano, R J; Palomares, J C; Torres, M J; Klem, R E

    1992-07-01

    This study evaluates a four-hour fluorescent DNA hybridization assay using both known bacterial isolates and clinical specimens. A biotinylated oligonucleotide probe from a sequence of the plasmid-encoded gene cppB was used. Hybrids were detected by addition of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate, followed by incubation for 30 min in a fluorescent substrate for alkaline phosphatase. The level of detection of the fluorescent assay was 0.1 pg of cryptic plasmid DNA or 200 cfu of the plasmid-containing strain NG 34/85 of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A total of 119 reference strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other related bacteria were tested for reactivity with the probe. All Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains, including eight plasmid-free strains, hybridized with the probe. Fluorescence ratios were 2.67 for plasmid-free strains and 3.85 for plasmid-containing strains. Of the heterologous microorganisms tested, only one of six strains of Neisseria cinerea gave a fluorescence ratio above the 2.0 cut-off value for positivity with the probe at a cell density of 1 x 10(4) cfu. The probe was also evaluated using clinical specimens from 100 patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. The sensitivity of the assay was 100% while the specificity was 97.5%. Positive and negative predictive values were 91.2% and 100%, respectively. The fluorescent DNA hybridization assay for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae described here thus appears to be a highly specific and sensitive assay.

  16. FY02 CBNP Annual Report: Discovery of DNA Signature of Biothreat Detection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G L; Radnedge, L

    2002-11-19

    Our goal is to develop robust DNA signatures for rapid and specific DNA-based detection platforms that can be employed by CBNP to detect a wide range of potential agents. Our approach has resulted in highly specific DNA signatures for Yersina pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Brucella species. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any genome (even uncharacterized ones), which facilitates DNA signature development for detection of newly emerging pathogens. We are using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) as a tool to define large DNA regions specific to multiple biothreat pathogens by comparing them to genomes of the most closely related organisms. This approach has become increasingly accurate as we continue to find new, distinctive strains and ever-closer near-neighbors. With the huge costs incurred by whole genome sequencing, it is not possible to sequence each new bacterial genome. However, it is completely practical to identify genome differences in the laboratory using SSH, and becomes especially useful when comparing new strains to previously sequenced genomes.

  17. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Tans, Sander J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN) and the peptide StrepTag II (ST). We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST). In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV) linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV)-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications. PMID:23336001

  18. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  19. Combined immunoaffinity cDNA-RNA hybridization assay for detection of hepatitis A virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R W; Newbold, J E; Lemon, S M

    1985-01-01

    To apply cDNA-RNA hybridization methods to the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in clinical materials, we developed a two-step method in which a microtiter-based, solid-phase immunoadsorption procedure incorporating a monoclonal anti-HAV capture antibody was followed by direct blotting of virus eluates to nitrocellulose and hybridization with 32P-labeled recombinant HAV cDNA. This immunoaffinity hybridization method is simple and involves few sample manipulations, yet it retains high sensitivity (10- to 30-fold more than radioimmunoassay) and is capable of detecting approximately 1 X 10(5) to 2 X 10(5) genome copies of virus. The inclusion of the immunoaffinity step removes most contaminating proteins and thus facilitates subsequent immobilization of the virus for hybridization. It also permits positive hybridization signals to be related to specific antigens and adds a level of specificity to the hybridization procedure. When the method was applied to 23 fecal specimens collected from individuals during week 1 of symptoms due to hepatitis A, 13 specimens were found to be reproducibly positive for HAV RNA by immunoaffinity hybridization, whereas only 11 contained viral antigen detectable by radioimmunoassay. Images PMID:2999190

  20. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  1. Sequence-specific electrochemical detection of asymmetric PCR amplicons of traditional Chinese medicinal plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas M H; Hsing, I-Ming

    2002-10-01

    In this study, an electrochemistry-based approach to detect nucleic acid amplification products of Chinese herbal genes is reported. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and electrochemical techniques, single-stranded target amplicons are produced from trace amounts of DNA sample and sequence-specific electrochemical detection based on the direct hybridization of the crude amplicon mix and immobilized DNA probe can be achieved. Electrochemically active intercalator Hoechst 33258 is bound to the double-stranded duplex formed by the target amplicon hybridized with the 5'-thiol-derivated DNA probe (16-mer) on the gold electrode surface. The electrochemical current signal of the hybridization event is measured by linear sweep voltammetry, the response of which can be used to differentiate the sequence complementarities of the target amplicons. To improve the reproducibility and sensitivity of the current signal, issues such as electrode surface cleaning, probe immobilization, and target hybridization are addressed. Factors affecting hybridization efficiency including the length and binding region of the target amplicon are discussed. Using our approach, differentiation of Chinese herbal species Fritillaria (F. thunbergii and F. cirrhosa) based on the 16-mer unique sequences in the spacer region of the 5S-rRNA is demonstrated. The ability to detect PCR products using a nonoptical electrochemical detection technique is an important step toward the realization of portable biomicrodevices for on-spot bacterial and viral detections.

  2. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  3. Low-molecular-weight DNA replication intermediates in Escherichia coli: mechanism of formation and strand specificity.

    PubMed

    Amado, Luciana; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-11-15

    Chromosomal DNA replication intermediates, revealed in ligase-deficient conditions in vivo, are of low molecular weight (LMW) independently of the organism, suggesting discontinuous replication of both the leading and the lagging DNA strands. Yet, in vitro experiments with purified enzymes replicating sigma-structured substrates show continuous synthesis of the leading DNA strand in complete absence of ligase, supporting the textbook model of semi-discontinuous DNA replication. The discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro results is rationalized by proposing that various excision repair events nick continuously synthesized leading strands after synthesis, producing the observed LMW intermediates. Here, we show that, in an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain with all known excision repair pathways inactivated, new DNA is still synthesized discontinuously. Furthermore, hybridization to strand-specific targets demonstrates that the LMW replication intermediates come from both the lagging and the leading strands. These results support the model of discontinuous leading strand synthesis in E. coli.

  4. Origins of specificity in protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Rohs, Remo; Jin, Xiangshu; West, Sean M; Joshi, Rohit; Honig, Barry; Mann, Richard S

    2010-01-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and DNA are fundamental to many biological processes. In this review, we provide a revised view of protein-DNA interactions that emphasizes the importance of the three-dimensional structures of both macromolecules. We divide protein-DNA interactions into two categories: those when the protein recognizes the unique chemical signatures of the DNA bases (base readout) and those when the protein recognizes a sequence-dependent DNA shape (shape readout). We further divide base readout into those interactions that occur in the major groove from those that occur in the minor groove. Analogously, the readout of the DNA shape is subdivided into global shape recognition (for example, when the DNA helix exhibits an overall bend) and local shape recognition (for example, when a base pair step is kinked or a region of the minor groove is narrow). Based on the >1500 structures of protein-DNA complexes now available in the Protein Data Bank, we argue that individual DNA-binding proteins combine multiple readout mechanisms to achieve DNA-binding specificity. Specificity that distinguishes between families frequently involves base readout in the major groove, whereas shape readout is often exploited for higher resolution specificity, to distinguish between members within the same DNA-binding protein family.

  5. Origins of specificity in protein-DNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Rohs, Remo; Jin, Xiangshu; West, Sean M.; Joshi, Rohit; Honig, Barry; Mann, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and DNA are fundamental to many biological processes. In this review, we provide a revised view of protein-DNA interactions that emphasizes the importance of the three-dimensional structures of both macromolecules. We divide protein-DNA interactions into two categories: those where the protein recognizes the unique chemical signatures of the DNA bases (base readout) and those where the protein recognizes a sequence-dependent DNA shape (shape readout). We further divide base readout into those interactions that occur in the major groove from those that occur in the minor groove. Analogously, the readout of DNA shape is subdivided into global shape recognition, for example when the DNA helix exhibits an overall bend, and local shape recognition, for example when a base pair step is kinked or when a region of the minor groove is narrow. Based on the >1500 structures of protein-DNA complexes now available in the Protein Data Base, we argue that individual DNA binding proteins combine multiple readout mechanisms to achieve DNA binding specificity. Specificity that distinguishes between families frequently involves base readout in the major groove while shape readout is often exploited for higher resolution specificity, to distinguish between members within the same DNA-binding protein family. PMID:20334529

  6. Parental Analysis of Introgressive Hybridization between African and European Honeybees Using Nuclear DNA Rflps

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H. G.

    1990-01-01

    African honeybees, introduced into Brazil 33 years ago, have spread through most of South and Central America and have largely replaced the extant European bees. Due to a paucity of genetic markers, genetic interactions between European and African bees are not well understood. Three restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), detected with random, nuclear DNA probes, are described. The polymorphisms are specific to bees of European descent, possibly specific to certain European races. Each European marker was found present at a high frequency in U.S. colonies but absent in South African bees. Previous mitochondrial DNA studies of neotropical bees have revealed negligible maternal gene flow from managed European apiaries into feral African populations. The findings reported here with nuclear DNA show paternal gene flow between the two but suggest asymmetries in levels of introgressive hybridization. Managed colonies in southern Mexico, derived from European maternal lines, showed diminished levels of the European nuclear markers, reflecting significant hybridization with African drones. The European alleles were present only at low frequencies in feral swarms from the same area. The swarms were of African maternal descent. In Venezuelan colonies, also derived from African maternal lines, the European markers were almost totally absent. The results point to limited paternal introgression from European colonies into the African honeybee populations. These findings dispute other views regarding modes of Africanization. PMID:1974226

  7. Parental analysis of introgressive hybridization between African and European honeybees using nuclear DNA RFLPs.

    PubMed

    Hall, H G

    1990-07-01

    African honeybees, introduced into Brazil 33 years ago, have spread through most of South and Central America and have largely replaced the extant European bees. Due to a paucity of genetic markers, genetic interactions between European and African bees are not well understood. Three restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), detected with random, nuclear DNA probes, are described. The polymorphisms are specific to bees of European descent, possibly specific to certain European races. Each European marker was found present at a high frequency in U.S. colonies but absent in South African bees. Previous mitochondrial DNA studies of neotropical bees have revealed negligible maternal gene flow from managed European apiaries into feral African populations. The findings reported here with nuclear DNA show paternal gene flow between the two but suggest asymmetries in levels of introgressive hybridization. Managed colonies in southern Mexico, derived from European maternal lines, showed diminished levels of the European nuclear markers, reflecting significant hybridization with African drones. The European alleles were present only at low frequencies in feral swarms from the same area. The swarms were of African maternal descent. In Venezuelan colonies, also derived from African maternal lines, the European markers were almost totally absent. The results point to limited paternal introgression from European colonies into the African honeybee populations. These findings dispute other views regarding modes of Africanization.

  8. The Presence of Humic Substances and DNA in RNA Extracts Affects Hybridization Results

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Zheng, Dandan; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    RNA extracts obtained from environmental samples are frequently contaminated with coextracted humic substances and DNA. It was demonstrated that the response in rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe hybridizations decreased as the concentrations of humic substances and DNA in RNA extracts increased. The decrease in hybridization signal in the presence of humic substances appeared to be due to saturation of the hybridization membrane with humic substances, resulting in a lower amount of target rRNA bound to the membrane. The decrease in hybridization response in the presence of low amounts of DNA may be the result of reduced rRNA target accessibility. The presence of high amounts of DNA in RNA extracts resulted in membrane saturation. Consistent with the observations for DNA contamination, the addition of poly(A) to RNA extracts, a common practice used to prepare RNA dilutions for membrane blotting, also reduced hybridization signals, likely because of reduced target accessibility and membrane saturation effects. PMID:11010915

  9. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  10. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Polycomb silencing mediated by specific DNA-binding recruiters.

    PubMed

    March, Eduardo; Farrona, Sara

    2017-09-27

    Regulation of epigenetic factors through their recruitment to specific genomic regions is still poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates a global mechanism of tethering Polycomb group (PcG) proteins through sequence-specific DNA-binding factors.

  12. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Mediated Signal Transmission Between two DNA Origami Structures.

    PubMed

    Helmig, Sarah; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-09-03

    Signal transfer is central to the controlled exchange of information in biology and advanced technologies. Therefore, the development of reliable, long-ranging signal transfer systems for artificial nanoscale assemblies is of great scientific interest. We have designed such a system for signal transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins - of which one is immobilized in specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures - are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred >200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another, and therefore has the potential to be applied to larger multi-component DNA assemblies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Rin4 causes hybrid necrosis and race-specific resistance in an interspecific lettuce hybrid.

    PubMed

    Jeuken, Marieke J W; Zhang, Ningwen W; McHale, Leah K; Pelgrom, Koen; den Boer, Erik; Lindhout, Pim; Michelmore, Richard W; Visser, Richard G F; Niks, Rients E

    2009-10-01

    Some inter- and intraspecific crosses may result in reduced viability or sterility in the offspring, often due to genetic incompatibilities resulting from interactions between two or more loci. Hybrid necrosis is a postzygotic genetic incompatibility that is phenotypically manifested as necrotic lesions on the plant. We observed hybrid necrosis in interspecific lettuce (Lactuca sativa and Lactuca saligna) hybrids that correlated with resistance to downy mildew. Segregation analysis revealed a specific allelic combination at two interacting loci to be responsible. The allelic interaction had two consequences: (1) a quantitative temperature-dependent autoimmunity reaction leading to necrotic lesions, lethality, and quantitative resistance to an otherwise virulent race of Bremia lactucae; and (2) a qualitative temperature-independent race-specific resistance to an avirulent race of B. lactucae. We demonstrated by transient expression and silencing experiments that one of the two interacting genes was Rin4. In Arabidopsis thaliana, RIN4 is known to interact with multiple R gene products, and their interactions result in hypersensitive resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Site-directed mutation studies on the necrosis-eliciting allele of Rin4 in lettuce showed that three residues were critical for hybrid necrosis.

  14. Detection of DNA hybridization by field-effect DNA-based biosensors: mechanisms of signal generation and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2013-08-15

    We model theoretically the electrostatic effects taking place upon DNA hybridization in dense DNA arrays immobilized on a layer of Au nano-particles deposited on the surface of a field-effect-based DNA capacitive biosensor. We consider the influence of separation of a charged analyte from the sensor surface and the salinity of electrolyte solution, in the framework of both linear and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theories. The latter predicts a substantially weaker sensor signals due to electrostatic saturation effects that is the main conclusion of this paper. We analyze how different physical parameters of dense DNA brushes affect the magnitude of hybridization signals. The list includes the fraction of DNA charge neutralization, the length and spatial conformations of adsorbed DNA molecules, as well as the discreteness of DNA charges. We also examine the effect of Donnan ionic equilibrium in DNA lattices on the sensor response. The validity of theoretical models is contrasted against recent experimental observations on detection of DNA hybridization via its intrinsic electric charge. The sensitivity of such biochemical sensing devices, their detection limit, and DNA hybridization efficiency are briefly discussed in the end.

  15. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  16. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  17. Real-time monitoring of DNA hybridization and melting processes using a fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Delport, Filip; Pollet, Jeroen; Janssen, Kris; Verbruggen, Bert; Knez, Karel; Spasic, Dragana; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2012-02-17

    In this paper a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR) sensor was used to analyze the melting process of DNA linked to silica nanoparticles. Real-time monitoring of a DNA melting process has rarely been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), since most commercial SPR setups do not allow for dynamic and accurate temperature control above 50 °C. The FO-SPR sensor platform, with silica nanobead signal amplification, allows sensing inside a standard PCR thermocycler, which makes high resolution DNA melting curve analysis possible. This innovative combination was used to characterize the hybridization and melting events between DNA immobilized on the sensor surface and DNA probes on silica nanoparticles. At optimized hybridization conditions complementary DNA strands of different lengths could be distinguished. While the real-time FO-SPR analysis of DNA hybridization did not result in significant variances, the analysis of DNA melting determined the exact length of overlap and the matching Gibbs energy.

  18. Electrochemical impedance sensing of DNA hybridization on conducting polymer film-modified diamond.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huiru; Su, Xiao di; Loh, Kian Ping

    2005-07-21

    The impedimetric sensing of DNA hybridization on polyaniline/polyacrylate (PANI/PAA)-modified boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode has been investigated. An ultrathin film of PANI-PAA copolymer was electropolymerized onto the diamond surfaces to provide carboxylic groups for tethering to DNA sensing probes. The electrochemical impedance and the intrinsic electroactivity of the polymer-diamond interface were analyzed after the hybridization reaction with target and non-target DNA. The impedance measurement shows changes in the impedance modulus as well as electron-transfer resistance at the stage of probe DNA immobilization (single-strand), as well as after hybridization with target DNA (double-strand). DNA hybridization increases the capacitance of the polymer-DNA layer and reduces the overall impedance of the DNA-polymer-diamond stack significantly. The polymer-modified BDD electrode shows no detectable nonspecific adsorption, with good selectivity between the complementary DNA targets and the one-base mismatch targets. The detection limit was measured to be 2 x 10(-8) M at 1000 Hz. Denaturing test on the hybridized probe and subsequent reuse of the probe indicates chemical robustness of the sensor. Our results suggest that electropolymerization followed by the immobilization of biomolecules is a simple and effective way of creating a functional biomolecular scaffold on the diamond surface. In addition, label-free electrochemical impedance method can provide direct and noninvasive sensing of DNA hybridization on BDD.

  19. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  20. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations. PMID:28084308

  1. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations.

  2. Mediated Electron Transfer at Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes During Detection of DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallen, Rachel; Gokarn, Nirmal; Bercea, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa; Bandyopadhyay, Krisanu

    2015-06-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VASWCNT) assemblies are generated on cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME)-functionalized gold surfaces through amide bond formation between carboxylic groups generated at the end of acid-shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amine groups present on the gold surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging confirms the vertical alignment mode of SWCNT attachment through significant changes in surface roughness compared to bare gold surfaces and the lack of any horizontally aligned SWCNTs present. These SWCNT assemblies are further modified with an amine-terminated single-stranded probe-DNA. Subsequent hybridization of the surface-bound probe-DNA in the presence of complementary strands in solution is followed using impedance measurements in the presence of Fe(CN)6 3-/4- as the redox probe in solution, which show changes in the interfacial electrochemical properties, specifically the charge-transfer resistance, due to hybridization. In addition, hybridization of the probe-DNA is also compared when it is attached directly to the gold surfaces without any intermediary SWCNTs. Contrary to our expectations, impedance measurements show a decrease in charge-transfer resistance with time due to hybridization with 300 nM complementary DNA in solution with the probe-DNA attached to SWCNTs. In contrast, an increase in charge-transfer resistance is observed with time during hybridization when the probe-DNA is attached directly to the gold surfaces. The decrease in charge-transfer resistance during hybridization in the presence of VASWCNTs indicates an enhancement in the electron transfer process of the redox probe at the VASWCNT-modified electrode. The results suggest that VASWCNTs are acting as mediators of electron transfer, which facilitate the charge transfer of the redox probe at the electrode-solution interface.

  3. [Detection of DNA human cytomegalovirus of a molecular methods: hybrid capture DNA CMV by immunocompromised].

    PubMed

    Mhiri, Leila; Arrouji, Zakia; Slim, Amine; Ben Redjeb, Saida

    2006-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the beta-virus herpes family, is a ubiquitous human pathogen. After a primary infection, HCMV establishes life latency. HCMV rarely causes symptomatic disease in an immunocompetent host, however, it is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals and developing fetuses. The HCMV genome consists of 240 kbp of double stranded DNA. Early diagnosis molecular of CMV infection is important. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular methods: Quantitative Hybrid capture for the detection of DNA CMV. We present results for 200 immunocompromised collected from 1999 to 2003 (122 men and 78 women, whom mean age was 35 years). Our results showed that 25% of women and 36% of men were positif for hybrid capture DNA CMV. This simple test (cold probe) provide quantitative and fast results. Also the efficacity of anti-CMV therapy can be followed. More over, in contrary with pp65-antigenemia assay and CMV PCR, this test can be managed on biopsy sample.

  4. Foldamers with Hybrid Biological and Synthetic Sequences as Selective DNA Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wan, Wei; Stachiw, Andrew; Li, Alexander D.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Foldable polymers with alternating single strand deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) and planar fluorescent organic chromophores can self-organize into folded nanostructures and hence are hybrid foldamers with biological sequences and synthetic properties. The biological sequence provides highly specific molecular recognition properties while the physical properties of synthetic chromophores offer sensitive fluorescence detection. In this paper, we describe that rational designed hybrid foldamers exhibit potential in the detection of polynucleotides. Under strictly controlled laboratory conditions, fluorescence measurements indicate that configuration change due to binding of polynucleotides with one or two mismatched bases can be readily distinguished. These results shed light on the design and construction of nanostructured foldamers with actuator and sensory properties, which may find important applications as biological probes. PMID:16086577

  5. Sequence-Specific Molecular Lithography on Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Kinneret; Krueger, Michael; Gilad, Rachel; Ben-Yoseph, Gdalyahu; Sivan, Uri; Braun, Erez

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the realization of individual molecular-scale electronic devices emphasize the need for novel tools and concepts capable of assembling such devices into large-scale functional circuits. We demonstrated sequence-specific molecular lithography on substrate DNA molecules by harnessing homologous recombination by RecA protein. In a sequence-specific manner, we patterned the coating of DNA with metal, localized labeled molecular objects and grew metal islands on specific sites along the DNA substrate, and generated molecularly accurate stable DNA junctions for patterning the DNA substrate connectivity. In our molecular lithography, the information encoded in the DNA molecules replaces the masks used in conventional microelectronics, and the RecA protein serves as the resist. The molecular lithography works with high resolution over a broad range of length scales from nanometers to many micrometers.

  6. Improved DNA hybridization method for detection of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Swierkosz, E M; Scholl, D R; Brown, J L; Jollick, J D; Gleaves, C A

    1987-01-01

    A simplified DNA hybridization method was developed to detect acyclovir-resistant isolates of herpes simplex virus. Herpes simplex virus-infected cell cultures in microtiter plates were treated with concentrations of acyclovir ranging from 8 to 0.015 micrograms/ml. At 48 h postinfection, infected cells were lysed by a one-step procedure and lysates were absorbed to membranes. Without further treatment, membranes were hybridized by using a herpes simplex virus-specific radioiodinated probe. The membranes were then washed and counted in a gamma counter. The elapsed time for assay performance was 4 h. Parallel plaque reduction assays were performed for comparison. The mean 50% inhibitory dose of in vivo- and in vitro-derived acyclovir-resistant, thymidine kinase-negative isolates was greater than 2 micrograms/ml by DNA hybridization. The 50% inhibitory dose of acyclovir-susceptible, thymidine kinase-positive isolates ranged from 0.01 to 1.1 micrograms/ml. This assay is simple and objective and should facilitate antiviral susceptibility testing in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:2829708

  7. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  8. A cytometric bead assay for sensitive DNA detection based on enzyme-free signal amplification of hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Liu, Hongmei; Yang, Wenxia; Fan, Yunlong; Yang, Lang; Wang, Yucong; Liu, Chenghui; Li, Zhengping

    2013-11-15

    A versatile flow cytometric bead assay (CBA) is developed for sensitive DNA detection by integrating the advantages of hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for enzyme-free signal amplification, flow cytometry for robust and rapid signal readout as well as magnetic beads (MBs) for facile separation. In this HCR-CBA, a biotinylated hairpin DNA (Bio-H1) is firstly immobilized on streptavidin-functionalized MBs. Upon the addition of target DNA, each target would hybridize with one Bio-H1 to open its hairpin structure and subsequently initiate a cascade of hybridization events between two species of fluorescent DNA hairpin probes (H1*/H2*) to form a nicked double helical DNA structure, resulting in amplified accumulation of numerous fluorophores on the MBs. Finally, the fluorescent MBs are directly analyzed by flow cytometry. This technique enables quantitative analysis of the HCR products anchored on the MBs as a function of target DNA concentration, and analysis of each sample can be completed within few minutes. Therefore, the HCR-CBA approach provides a practical DNA assay with greatly improved sensitivity. The detection limit of a model DNA target is 0.5 pM (3σ), which is about 3 orders of magnitude lower compared with traditional hybridization methods without HCR. Furthermore, the signal of complementary target can be clearly distinguished from that of single-base mismatched sequences, indicating the high specificity of the HCR-CBA. Moreover, this strategy is also successfully applied to the DNA analysis in complex biological samples, showing great potential in gene analysis and disease diagnosis in clinical samples.

  9. Inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus by using zinc finger-single-chain FokI dimer hybrid.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we reported that an artificial zinc-finger protein (AZP)-staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) hybrid (designated AZP-SNase) inhibited DNA replication of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) in mammalian cells by binding to and cleaving a specific HPV-18 ori plasmid. Although the AZP-SNase did not show any side effects under the experimental conditions, the SNase is potentially able to cleave RNA as well as DNA. In the present study, to make AZP hybrid nucleases that cleave only viral DNA, we switched the SNase moiety in the AZP-SNase to the single-chain FokI dimer (scFokI) that we had developed previously. We demonstrated that transfection with a plasmid expressing the resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-scFokI) inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells more efficiently than AZP-SNase. Then, by linker-mediated PCR analysis, we confirmed that AZP-scFokI cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site in mammalian cells. Finally, a modified MTT assay revealed that AZP-scFokI did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, the newly developed AZP-scFokI hybrid is expected to serve as a novel antiviral reagent for the neutralization of human DNA viruses with less fewer potential side effects.

  10. Photoelectrochemical competitive DNA hybridization assay using semiconductor quantum dot conjugated oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Baş, Deniz; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2011-05-01

    A competitive DNA hybridization assay based on the photoelectrochemistry of the semiconductor quantum dot-single stranded DNA conjugates (QD-ssDNA) was developed. Hybridization of QD-ssDNA with the capture probe DNA immobilized on the indium-tin oxide electrodes enables photocurrent generation when the electrochemical cell was illuminated with a light source. Upon the competition between QD-ssDNA and single-stranded target DNA, the photocurrent response decreased with the increase in the target DNA concentration. A linear relationship between the photocurrent and the target DNA concentration was obtained (R(2) = 0.991). The selectivity of system towards the target DNA was also demonstrated using non-complementary sample.

  11. RNA-DNA hybrid (R-loop) immunoprecipitation mapping: an analytical workflow to evaluate inherent biases.

    PubMed

    Halász, László; Karányi, Zsolt; Boros-Oláh, Beáta; Rózsa, Tímea; Sipos, Éva; Nagy, Éva; Mosolygó-L, Ágnes; Mázló, Anett; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Halmos, Gábor; Székvölgyi, Lóránt

    2017-03-24

    The impact of R-loops on the physiology and pathology of chromosomes has been demonstrated extensively by chromatin biology research. The progress in this field has been driven by technological advancement of R-loop mapping methods that largely relied on a single approach, DNA-RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP). Most of the DRIP protocols use the experimental design that was developed by a few laboratories, without paying attention to the potential caveats that might affect the outcome of RNA-DNA hybrid mapping. To assess the accuracy and utility of this technology, we pursued an analytical approach to estimate inherent biases and errors in the DRIP protocol. By performing DRIP-sequencing, qPCR and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, we tested the effect of formaldehyde fixation, cell lysis temperature, mode of genome fragmentation, and removal of free RNA on the efficacy of RNA-DNA hybrid detection, and implemented workflows that were able to distinguish complex and weak DRIP signals in a noisy background with high confidence. We also show that some of the workflows perform poorly and generate random answers. Furthermore, we found that the most commonly used genome fragmentation method (restriction enzyme digestion) led to the overrepresentation of lengthy DRIP fragments over coding ORFs, and this bias was enhanced at the first exons. Biased genome sampling severely compromised the mapping resolution and prevented the assignment of precise biological function to a significant fraction of R-loops. The revised workflow presented herein is established and optimized using objective ROC analyses and provides reproducible and highly specific RNA-DNA hybrid detection.

  12. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  13. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-18

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  14. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  15. RNA∶DNA Hybrids Initiate Quasi-Palindrome-Associated Mutations in Highly Transcribed Yeast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C.; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA∶DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict. PMID:24244191

  16. RNA∶DNA hybrids initiate quasi-palindrome-associated mutations in highly transcribed yeast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA:DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict.

  17. Purification of specific chromatin regions using oligonucleotides: capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART).

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher P; West, Jason A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genomic binding sites and proteins associated with noncoding RNAs will lead to more complete mechanistic characterization of the regulatory activities of noncoding RNAs. Capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART) is a powerful technique wherein specific RNA molecules are isolated from cross-linked nuclear extracts using complementary, biotinylated capture oligonucleotides, allowing subsequent identification of genomic DNA and proteins cross-linked to the RNA of interest. Here, we describe the procedure for CHART and list strategies to optimize nuclear extract preparation, capture oligonucleotide design, and isolation of nucleic acids and proteins enriched through CHART.

  18. Molecular cytogenetics of Alstroemeria: identification of parental genomes in interspecific hybrids and characterization of repetitive DNA families in constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G; van Os, D P; de Jong, J H; Ramanna, M S

    1997-02-01

    The genus Alstroemeria consists of diploid (2n = 2x = 16) species originating mainly from Chile and Brazil. Most cultivars are triploid or tetraploid interspecific hybrids. C-banding of eight species revealed obvious differentiation of constitutive heterochromatin within the genus. The present study focused on the molecular (cyto)genetic background of this differentiation. Genomic slot-blot analysis demonstrated strong conservation of major parts of the genomes among six species. The chromosomes of A. aurea and A. ligtu, species with pronounced interstitial C-bands, were found to contain large amounts of highly repetitive and species-specific DNA. The variation in size, number and intensity of strongly probed bands of major repetitive DNA families observed in genomic Southern blots of Sau3A, HaeIII, and MseI digests indicated a strong correlation between variation in genomic DNA composition and different C-banding patterns among Alstroemeria species. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) revealed a clear distinction between parental chromosomes in the hybrids between Chilean and Brazilian species and also between Chilean species, as long as at least one of the parental species possessed prominent C-banding. Regarding the latter, discriminative hybridization resulted from highly repetitive species specific DNA in the heterochromatic chromosome regions of A. aurea and A. ligtu, and caused GISH banding patterns that coincided with the C-banding patterns.

  19. Magnetic bead-liposome hybrids enable sensitive and portable detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using personal glucose meter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youna; Xue, Qingwang; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2017-01-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in maintaining genome methylation patterns, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. This encouraged the need to develop highly sensitive, simple, and robust assays for DNA MTase detection and inhibitor screening. Herein, a simple, sensitive, and specific DNA MTase activity assay was developed based on magnetic beads-liposome hybrids combined with personal glucose meter (PGM) for quantitative detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. First, a magnetic beads-liposome hybrid probe is designed by the hybridization of p1DNA-functionalized magnetic bead with p2DNA-functionalized glucoamylase-encapsulated liposome (GEL). It integrates target recognition, magnetic separation and signal amplification within one multifunctional design. Then, in the presence of Dam MTase, the hybrids probe was methylated, and cleaved by methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, making liposome separated from magnetic bead by magnetic separation. Finally, the separated liposome was decomposed, liberating the encapsulated glucoamylase to catalyze the hydrolysis of the signal substrate amylose with multiple turnovers, producing a large amount of glucose for quantitative readout by the PGM. In the proposed assay, the magnetic beads-liposome hybrids offered excellent sensitivity due to primary amplification via releasing numerous glucoamylase from a liposome followed by a secondary enzymatic amplification. The use of portable quantitative device PGM bypasses the requirement of complicated instruments and sophisticated operations, making the method simple and feasible for on-site detection. Moreover, the proposed assay was successfully applied in complex biological matrix and screen suitable inhibitor drugs for DAM for disease(s) treatment. The results reveal that the approach provides a simple, sensitive, and robust platform for DNA MTases detection and screening potential drugs in medical research and

  20. RNA/DNA hybrid binding affinity determines telomerase template-translocation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaodong; Xie, Mingyi; Brown, Andrew F; Bley, Christopher J; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini from an intrinsic RNA template. The processive synthesis of DNA repeats relies on a unique, yet poorly understood, mechanism whereby the telomerase RNA template translocates and realigns with the DNA primer after synthesizing each repeat. Here, we provide evidence that binding of the realigned RNA/DNA hybrid by the active site is an essential step for template translocation. Employing a template-free human telomerase system, we demonstrate that the telomerase active site directly binds to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates for DNA polymerization. In telomerase processivity mutants, the template-translocation efficiency correlates with the affinity for the RNA/DNA hybrid substrate. Furthermore, the active site is unoccupied during template translocation as a 5 bp extrinsic RNA/DNA hybrid effectively reduces the processivity of the template-containing telomerase. This suggests that strand separation and template realignment occur outside the active site, preceding the binding of realigned hybrid to the active site. Our results provide new insights into the ancient RNA/DNA hybrid binding ability of telomerase and its role in template translocation. PMID:21989387

  1. Readily reusable electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensor based on the interaction of DNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Jiao, Kui; Liu, Shufeng; Hu, Yuwei

    2009-08-01

    Carboxylic group-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were assembled vertically on the glassy carbon electrode using ethylenediamine as linking agent to fabricate an aligned electrode (SWNTE). Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) wrapped around the SWNTs to form ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE structures based on the interaction between ssDNA and SWNT. A sensitive differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) response was obtained at the ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE owing to the electrooxidation of guanine bases. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed when ssDNA on the ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE was hybridized with complementary ssDNA (cDNA). The dsDNA was removed from the SWNTs by undergoing a process of preconditioning at -0.6 V. Consequentially, the DPV response of guanine bases decreased. The used SWNTE could be renewed easily via ultrasonically rinsing. On the basis of this mechanism, a label-free and readily reusable electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensor was designed by directly monitoring the current change of guanine bases. Under optimum conditions, the plot of the measurement signal of guanine bases versus the cDNA concentrations was a good straight line in the range of 40-110 nM with a detection limit of 20 nM (3s). The biosensor can be switched to detect different target DNAs easily.

  2. Hybrid specification, storage, retrieval and runtime application of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Y

    2006-06-01

    Clinical guidelines are a major tool in improving the quality of medical care. However, most guidelines are in free text, are not machine-comprehensible and are not easily accessible to clinicians at the point of care. We have designed and implemented a web-based, modular, distributed architecture, the Digital Electronic Guideline Library (DeGeL), which facilitates gradual conversion of clinical guidelines from text to a formal representation in the chosen target guideline ontology. The architecture supports guideline classification, semantic markup, context-sensitive search, browsing, run-time application and retrospective quality assessment. The DeGeL hybrid meta-ontology includes elements common to all guideline ontologies, such as semantic classification and domain knowledge; it also includes four content-representation formats: free text, semi-structured text, semi-formal representation and a formal representation. These formats support increasingly sophisticated computational tasks. Guidelines can thus be in a hybrid representation in which guidelines, and even parts of the same guideline, might exist at different formalisation levels. We have also developed and rigorously evaluated a methodology and an associated web-based tool, Uruz, for gradually structuring and semi-formalising free-text clinical guidelines. Finally, we have designed, implemented and evaluated a new approach, the hybrid runtime application model, for supporting runtime application of clinical guidelines that are not necessarily in a machine-comprehensible format; in particular, when the guideline is in a semi-formal representation and the patient's data are either in an electronic medical record or in a paper format. The tool implementing this new approach, the Spock module, is customised at this point to the Asbru guideline specification language and exploits the hybrid structure of guidelines in DeGeL. The Spock module also exploits our temporal-abstraction mediator to the patient

  3. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  4. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  5. Thermodynamically unfavorable DNA hybridizations can be made to occur by a water to ice phase change.

    PubMed

    Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Guajardo, Cristian; Somasundrum, Mithran; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2013-02-01

    In an apparent contradiction to Debye-Hückel theory, it was possible to hybridize DNA in solutions of Milli-Q water (resistivity>18MΩcm(-1)) containing no added ions. This was demonstrated by hybridizing four bi-complementary DNA sequences to form an 'X' shape, as indicated by acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The requirement for hybridization was that a water-to-ice phase change should occur. Comparative experiments, using freezing by liquid nitrogen and thawing at different temperatures, showed that hybridization could take place during either the freezing or thawing process provided either was slow enough. We speculate that the low solubility of DNA in ice creates liquid inclusions of extremely high DNA and counter-ion concentration prior to complete freezing, and that hence in these inclusions hybridization was actually in accordance with Debye-Hückel theory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequence-Specific DNA Detection at 10 fM by Electromechanical Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Target DNA fragments at 10 fM concentration (approximately 6 × 105 molecules) were detected against a DNA background simulating the noncomplementary genomic DNA present in real samples using a simple, PCR-free, optics-free approach based on electromechanical signal transduction. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is highly desired for a range of diverse applications. We previously described a potentially low-cost device for sequence-specific nucleic acid detection based on conductance change measurement of a pore blocked by electrophoretically mobilized bead-(peptide nucleic acid probe) conjugates upon hybridization with target nucleic acid. Here, we demonstrate the operation of our device with longer DNA targets, and we describe the resulting improvement in the limit of detection (LOD). We investigated the detection of DNA oligomers of 110, 235, 419, and 1613 nucleotides at 1 pM to 1 fM and found that the LOD decreased as DNA length increased, with 419 and 1613 nucleotide oligomers detectable down to 10 fM. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with noncomplementary, control DNA fragments of similar length. The 1613-base DNA oligomer is similar in size to 16S rRNA, which suggests that our device may be useful for detection of pathogenic bacteria at clinically relevant concentrations based on recognition of species-specific 16S rRNA sequences. PMID:25203740

  7. Nanopore based sequence specific detection of duplex DNA for genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Singer, Alon; Wanunu, Meni; Morrison, Will; Kuhn, Heiko; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim; Meller, Amit

    2010-02-10

    We demonstrate a purely electrical method for the single-molecule detection of specific DNA sequences, achieved by hybridizing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes and electrophoretically threading the DNA through sub-5 nm silicon nitride pores. Bis-PNAs were used as the tagging probes in order to achieve high affinity and sequence specificity. Sequence detection is performed by reading the ion current traces of individual translocating DNA molecules, which display a characteristic secondary blockade level, absent in untagged molecules. The potential for barcoding DNA is demonstrated through nanopore analysis of once-tagged and twice-tagged DNA at different locations on the same genomic fragment. Our high-throughput, long-read length method can be used to identify key sequences embedded in individual DNA molecules, without the need for amplification or fluorescent/radio labeling. This opens up a wide range of possibilities in human genomics as well as in pathogen detection for fighting infectious diseases.

  8. The microwave sensing of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotubes decorated with gold nanoislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismaru, Alina; Dragoman, Mircea; Radoi, Antonio; Dinescu, A.; Dragoman, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    The hybridization of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is detected with the help of electromagnetic band gap resonator. The resonance frequency of the unloaded resonator f0=16.07 GHz is shifted to the left at 11.49 GHz when the resonator is loaded with single-stranded DNA anchored to gold nanoislands decorating bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes deposited on the resonator. Further, single stranded DNA is hybridized and the resonator frequency is shifted to 14.16 GHz for double-stranded DNA. So, the frequency span of the two DNA states are separated by a span of 2.6 GHz in the band 11.5-16.07 GHz due to the very different electrical permittivity values of single- and double-stranded DNA. Thus, the hybridization of DNA is detected unambiguously.

  9. Colorimetric detection of DNA hybridization based on a dual platform of gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Thavanathan, Jeevan; Huang, Nay Ming; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-05-15

    The unique property of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) to induce colour change and the versatility of graphene oxides (GO) in surface modification makes them ideal in the application of colorimetric biosensor. Thus we developed a label free optical method to detect DNA hybridization through a visually observed colour change. The Au NP is conjugated to a DNA probe and is allowed to hybridize with the DNA target to the GO thus causing a change in colour from pinkish-red to purplish blue. Spectrophometry analysis gave a wavelength shift of 22 nm with 1 µM of DNA target. Sensitivity testing using serially diluted DNA conjugated GO showed that the optimum detection was at 63 nM of DNA target with the limit at 8 nM. This proves the possibility for the detection of DNA hybridization through the use of dual nanoparticle system by visual observation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  11. Remote electronic control of DNA hybridization through inductive coupling to an attached metal nanocrystal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Schwartz, John J.; Santos, Aaron T.; Zhang, Shuguang; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly detailed structural and dynamic studies are highlighting the precision with which biomolecules execute often complex tasks at the molecular scale. The efficiency and versatility of these processes have inspired many attempts to mimic or harness them. To date, biomolecules have been used to perform computational operations and actuation, to construct artificial transcriptional loops that behave like simple circuit elements and to direct the assembly of nanocrystals. Further development of these approaches requires new tools for the physical and chemical manipulation of biological systems. Biomolecular activity has been triggered optically through the use of chromophores, but direct electronic control over biomolecular `machinery' in a specific and fully reversible manner has not yet been achieved. Here we demonstrate remote electronic control over the hybridization behaviour of DNA molecules, by inductive coupling of a radio-frequency magnetic field to a metal nanocrystal covalently linked to DNA. Inductive coupling to the nanocrystal increases the local temperature of the bound DNA, thereby inducing denaturation while leaving surrounding molecules relatively unaffected. Moreover, because dissolved biomolecules dissipate heat in less than 50picoseconds (ref. 16), the switching is fully reversible. Inductive heating of macroscopic samples is widely used, but the present approach should allow extension of this concept to the control of hybridization and thus of a broad range of biological functions on the molecular scale.

  12. Transcriptome screen for fast evolving genes by Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH).

    PubMed

    Montoya-Burgos, Juan I; Foulon, Aurélia; Bahechar, Ilham

    2010-02-22

    Fast evolving genes are targets of an increasing panel of biological studies, from cancer research to population genetics and species specific adaptations. Yet, their identification and isolation are still laborious, particularly for non-model organisms. We developed a method, named the Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH) method, for generating cDNA libraries enriched in fast evolving genes. It utilizes transcripts of homologous tissues of distinct yet related species. Experimental hybridization conditions are monitored in order to discard transcripts that do not find their homologous counterparts in the two species sets as well as transcripts that display a strong complementarity between the two species. Only heteroduplexes that disanneal at low stringency are used for constructing the resulting cDNA library. We demonstrate the efficiency of the ISSH method by generating a brain cDNA library enriched in fast evolving transcripts of a non-model catfish species as well as a control, non-enriched library. Our results indicate that the enriched library contains effectively more fast evolving sequences than the control library. Gene annotation analyses also indicate enrichment in genes with low expression levels and non-ubiquitously expressed genes, both categories encompassing the majority of fast evolving genes. Furthermore, most of the identified transcripts show higher sequence divergence between two closely related catfish species as compared to recognized fast evolving DNA markers. The ISSH method offers a simple, inexpensive and efficient way to screen the transcriptome for isolating fast evolving genes. This method opens new opportunities in the investigation of biological mechanisms that include fast evolving genes, such as the evolution of lineage specific processes and traits responsible for species adaptation to their environment.

  13. Transcriptome screen for fast evolving genes by Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fast evolving genes are targets of an increasing panel of biological studies, from cancer research to population genetics and species specific adaptations. Yet, their identification and isolation are still laborious, particularly for non-model organisms. We developed a method, named the Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH) method, for generating cDNA libraries enriched in fast evolving genes. It utilizes transcripts of homologous tissues of distinct yet related species. Experimental hybridization conditions are monitored in order to discard transcripts that do not find their homologous counterparts in the two species sets as well as transcripts that display a strong complementarity between the two species. Only heteroduplexes that disanneal at low stringency are used for constructing the resulting cDNA library. Results We demonstrate the efficiency of the ISSH method by generating a brain cDNA library enriched in fast evolving transcripts of a non-model catfish species as well as a control, non-enriched library. Our results indicate that the enriched library contains effectively more fast evolving sequences than the control library. Gene annotation analyses also indicate enrichment in genes with low expression levels and non-ubiquitously expressed genes, both categories encompassing the majority of fast evolving genes. Furthermore, most of the identified transcripts show higher sequence divergence between two closely related catfish species as compared to recognized fast evolving DNA markers. Conclusions The ISSH method offers a simple, inexpensive and efficient way to screen the transcriptome for isolating fast evolving genes. This method opens new opportunities in the investigation of biological mechanisms that include fast evolving genes, such as the evolution of lineage specific processes and traits responsible for species adaptation to their environment. PMID:20175901

  14. Poliovirus genome RNA hybridizes specifically to higher eukaryotic rRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, M A; Perrault, J

    1985-01-01

    The RNA genome of poliovirus hybridizes to 28S and 18S rRNAs of higher eukaryotes under stringent conditions. The hybridization detected by Northern blot analyses is specific since little or no signal was detected for yeast or prokaryotic rRNAs or other major cellular RNAs. Southern blot analysis of DNA clones of mouse rRNA genes leads us to conclude that several regions of 28S rRNA, and at least one region in 18S rRNA, are involved in the hybridization to polio RNA, and that G/C regions are not responsible for this phenomenon. We have precisely mapped one of these hybridizing regions in both molecules. Computer analysis confirms that extensive intermolecular base-pairing (81 out of 104 contiguous bases in the rRNA strand) could be responsible for this one particular site of interaction (polio genome, bases 5075-5250; 28S rRNA, bases 1097-1200). We discuss the possible functional and/or evolutionary significance of this novel type of interaction. Images PMID:2997728

  15. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis.

  16. Microvalve and micropump controlled shuttle flow microfluidic device for rapid DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Li, Chunyu; Lin, Bingcheng; Qin, Jianhua

    2010-11-07

    We present a novel microfluidic device integrated with microvalves and micropumps for rapid DNA hybridization using shuttle flow. The device is composed of 48 hybridization units containing 48 microvalves and 96 micropumps for the automation of shuttle flow. We used four serotypes of Dengue Virus genes (18mer) to demonstrate that the automatic shuttle flow shortened the hybridization time to 90 s, reduced sample consumption to 1 μL and lowered detection limit to 100 pM (100 amol in a 1 μL sample). Moreover, we applied this device to realize single base discrimination and analyze 48 samples containing different DNA targets, simultaneously. For kinetic measurements of nucleotide hybridization, on-line monitoring of the processes was carried out. This rapid hybridization device has the ability for accommodating the entire hybridization process (i.e., injection, hybridization, washing, detection, signal acquisition) in an automated and high-throughput fashion.

  17. Highly specific electronic signal transduction mediated by DNA/metal self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Pathak, Srikant

    2003-11-01

    Highly specific interactions between DNA could potentially be amplified if the DNA interactions were utilized to assemble large scale parts. Fluidic assembly of microsystem parts has the potential for rapid and accurate placement of otherwise difficult to handle pieces. Ideally, each part would have a different chemical interaction that allowed it to interact with the substrate only in specific areas. One easy way to obtain a multiple chemical permutations is to use synthetic DNA oligomers. Si parts were prepared using silicon-on-insulator technology microfabrication techniques. Several surface chemistry protocols were developed to react commercial oligonucleotides to the parts. However, no obvious assembly was achieved. It was thought that small defects on the surface did not allow the microparts to be in close enough proximity for DNA hybridization, and this was. in part, confirmed by interferometry. To assist in the hybridization, plastic, pliable parts were manufactured and a new chemistry was developed. However, assembly was still absent even with the application of force. It is presently thought that one of three mechanisms is preventing the assembly. The surfaces of the two solid substrates can not get in close enough proximity, the surface chemistry lacks sufficient density to keep the parts from separating, or DNA interactions in close proximity on solid substrates are forbidden. These possibilities are discussed in detail.

  18. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  19. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A; Halford, Stephen E; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-02-13

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5' terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3'-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively.

  20. Discovering anomalous hybridization kinetics on DNA nanostructures using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Walter, Nils G

    2014-05-15

    DNA nanostructures are finding diverse applications as scaffolds for molecular organization. In general, components such as nucleic acids, proteins, and nanoparticles are attached to addressable DNA nanostructures via hybridization, and there is interest in exploiting hybridization for localized computation on DNA nanostructures. This report details two fluorescence microscopy methods, single-particle fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) and DNA-PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography), that have been successfully used to detect anomalies of hybridization reactions on individual DNA nanostructures. We compare and contrast the two techniques, highlighting their respective strengths in studying equilibrium and non-equilibrium hybridization as well as assessing the variability of behaviors within individual nanostructures and across a population of nanostructures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA microarrays for comparative genomic hybridization based on DOP-PCR amplification of BAC and PAC clones.

    PubMed

    Fiegler, Heike; Carr, Philippa; Douglas, Eleanor J; Burford, Deborah C; Hunt, Sarah; Scott, Carol E; Smith, James; Vetrie, David; Gorman, Patricia; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Carter, Nigel P

    2003-04-01

    We have designed DOP-PCR primers specifically for the amplification of large insert clones for use in the construction of DNA microarrays. A bioinformatic approach was used to construct primers that were efficient in the general amplification of human DNA but were poor at amplifying E. coli DNA, a common contaminant of DNA preparations from large insert clones. We chose the three most selective primers for use in printing DNA microarrays. DNA combined from the amplification of large insert clones by use of these three primers and spotted onto glass slides showed more than a sixfold increase in the human to E. coli hybridization ratio when compared to the standard DOP-PCR primer, 6MW. The microarrays reproducibly delineated previously characterized gains and deletions in a cancer cell line and identified a small gain not detected by use of conventional CGH. We also describe a method for the bulk testing of the hybridization characteristics of chromosome-specific clones spotted on microarrays by use of DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes. Finally, we describe a set of clones selected from the publicly available Golden Path of the human genome at 1-Mb intervals and a view in the Ensembl genome browser from which data required for the use of these clones in array CGH and other experiments can be downloaded across the Internet.

  2. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  3. DNA structure-specific priming of ATR activation by DNA-PKcs

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Eychenié, Sophie; Décaillet, Chantal; Basbous, Jihane

    2013-01-01

    Three phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–related protein kinases implement cellular responses to DNA damage. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated respond primarily to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Ataxia-telangiectasia and RAD3-related (ATR) signals the accumulation of replication protein A (RPA)–covered single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which is caused by replication obstacles. Stalled replication intermediates can further degenerate and yield replication-associated DSBs. In this paper, we show that the juxtaposition of a double-stranded DNA end and a short ssDNA gap triggered robust activation of endogenous ATR and Chk1 in human cell-free extracts. This DNA damage signal depended on DNA-PKcs and ATR, which congregated onto gapped linear duplex DNA. DNA-PKcs primed ATR/Chk1 activation through DNA structure-specific phosphorylation of RPA32 and TopBP1. The synergistic activation of DNA-PKcs and ATR suggests that the two kinases combine to mount a prompt and specific response to replication-born DSBs. PMID:23897887

  4. Identification of persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structures within the origin of replication of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Prichard, M N; Jairath, S; Penfold, M E; St Jeor, S; Bohlman, M C; Pari, G S

    1998-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic-phase DNA replication initiates at the cis-acting origin of replication, oriLyt. oriLyt is a structurally complex region containing repeat elements and transcription factor binding sites. We identified two site-specific alkali-labile regions within oriLyt which flank an alkali-resistant DNA segment. These alkali-sensitive regions were the result of the degradation of two RNA species embedded within oriLyt and covalently linked to viral DNA. The virus-associated RNA, vRNA, was identified by DNase I treatment of HCMV DNA obtained from sucrose gradient purified virus. This heterogeneous population of vRNA was end labeled and used as a hybridization probe to map the exact location of vRNAs within oriLyt. vRNA-1 is localized between restriction endonuclease sites XhoI at nucleotide (nt) 93799 and SacI at nt 94631 and is approximately 500 bases long. The second vRNA, vRNA-2, lies within a region which exhibits a heterogeneous restriction pattern located between the SphI (nt 92636) and BamHI (nt 93513) and is approximately 300 bases long. This region was previously shown to be required for oriLyt replication (D. G. Anders, M. A. Kacica, G. S. Pari, and S. M. Punturieri, J. Virol. 66:3373-3384, 1992). RNase H analysis determined that vRNA-2 forms a persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structure in the context of the viral genome and in an oriLyt-containing plasmid used in the transient-replication assay.

  5. TAL Effector DNA-Binding Principles and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Richter, Annekatrin; Streubel, Jana; Boch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins with a unique DNA-binding domain that confers both a predictable and programmable specificity. The DNA-binding domain consists typically of 34-amino acid near-identical repeats. The repeats form a right-handed superhelical structure that wraps around the DNA double helix and exposes the variable amino acids at position 13 of each repeat to the sense strand DNA bases. Each repeat binds one base in a highly specific, non-overlapping, and comma-free fashion. Although TALE specificities are encoded in a simple way, sophisticated rules can be taken into account to build highly efficient DNA-binding modules for biotechnological use.

  6. Structure-based modeling of protein: DNA specificity

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Adam P.; Zhang, Chi; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Protein:DNA interactions are essential to a range of processes that maintain and express the information encoded in the genome. Structural modeling is an approach that aims to understand these interactions at the physicochemical level. It has been proposed that structural modeling can lead to deeper understanding of the mechanisms of protein:DNA interactions, and that progress in this field can not only help to rationalize the observed specificities of DNA-binding proteins but also to allow researchers to engineer novel DNA site specificities. In this review we discuss recent developments in the structural description of protein:DNA interactions and specificity, as well as the challenges facing the field in the future. PMID:25414269

  7. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zaffino, R L; Mir, M; Samitier, J

    2014-03-14

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50 nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  8. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  9. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  10. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  11. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  12. Differences in DNA Binding Specificity of Floral Homeotic Protein Complexes Predict Organ-Specific Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Smaczniak, Cezary; Muiño, Jose M; Chen, Dijun; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2017-08-01

    Floral organ identities in plants are specified by the combinatorial action of homeotic master regulatory transcription factors. However, how these factors achieve their regulatory specificities is still largely unclear. Genome-wide in vivo DNA binding data show that homeotic MADS domain proteins recognize partly distinct genomic regions, suggesting that DNA binding specificity contributes to functional differences of homeotic protein complexes. We used in vitro systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (SELEX-seq) on several floral MADS domain protein homo- and heterodimers to measure their DNA binding specificities. We show that specification of reproductive organs is associated with distinct binding preferences of a complex formed by SEPALLATA3 and AGAMOUS. Binding specificity is further modulated by different binding site spacing preferences. Combination of SELEX-seq and genome-wide DNA binding data allows differentiation between targets in specification of reproductive versus perianth organs in the flower. We validate the importance of DNA binding specificity for organ-specific gene regulation by modulating promoter activity through targeted mutagenesis. Our study shows that intrafamily protein interactions affect DNA binding specificity of floral MADS domain proteins. Differential DNA binding of MADS domain protein complexes plays a role in the specificity of target gene regulation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  14. A DNA dot hybridization model for molecular diagnosis of parasitic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chin; Hsieh, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Tsung C; Su, Shu-Li; Tseng, Shin-Ling; Lai, Yu-Hsuan; Kuo, Ming-Tse

    2017-01-01

    Developing a DNA dot hybridization model for diagnosing parasitic keratitis. Newly designed oligonucleotide probes for detecting Acanthamoeba and microsporidia were tested with target reference strains of Acanthamoeba (n = 20) and microsporidia (n = 3), and non-target microorganisms, including bacteria (n = 20) and fungi (n = 20). These probes, which had passed the preliminary tests, were then assembled as a parasite dot hybridization (PDH) model for assessing 33 clinical samples from patients with clinically suspected Acanthamoeba and microsporidia keratitis, including eight positives for Acanthamoeba, 13 positives for microsporidia, and 12 negatives for both pathogens. Two probes for detecting Acanthamoeba and two for detecting microsporidia passed the tests using target and non-target strains and then were assembled in the PDH model. For clinical samples, one Acanthamoeba-positive sample (proved with pathology) was falsely negative according to the PDH assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the PDH assay for diagnosing Acanthamoeba keratitis were 87.5% and 100%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing microsporidia keratitis were 100%. The infectious agent of all clinical samples of microsporidia keratitis was identified as Vittaforma corneae with DNA sequencing, while those of Acanthamoeba keratitis were caused by four species of Acanthamoeba, with Acanthamoeba castellanii found in four samples (50%, 4/8). The PDH model has the potential to be a molecular assay for diagnosing Acanthamoeba and microsporidia keratitis. However, a prospective clinical study might be needed before the model is adopted in routine clinical practice.

  15. Specific suppression of anti-DNA production in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liebling, M.R.; Wong, C.; Radosevich, J.; Louie, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the regulation of anti-DNA antibody production, we generated anti-DNA-specific suppressor cells by exposing normal human T cells and a small percentage of adherent cells to high concentrations of DNA. These cells suppressed the production of anti-DNA by both autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and allogeneic PBMC derived from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Anti-DNA production was suppressed significantly more than anti-RNA, antitetanus, or total immunoglobulin production. Specific suppression was enhanced by increasing the numbers of DNA-primed CD8+ cells and was obliterated by irradiation of the DNA-primed cells. In contrast to T cells from normal individuals, T cells obtained from two intensively studied SLE patients were unable to generate specific suppressor cells for anti-DNA production in both autologous and allogeneic test systems. Despite this defect, these patients were still capable of generating specific suppressor cells for antibody production directed against an exogenous antigen, tetanus toxoid.

  16. Global and gene specific DNA methylation changes during zebrafish development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA methylation is dynamic through the life of an organism. In this study, we measured the global and gene specific DNA methylation changes in zebrafish at different developmental stages. We found that the methylation percentage of cytosines was 11.75 ± 0.96% in 3.3 hour post fertilization (hpf) zeb...

  17. Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive subtractive hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Kathleen G; Lamonica, Janine M; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Williams, Leanne E; Bishara, Joanne; Lewandowski, Anna; Redkar, Rajendra; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2004-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives. PMID:15028116

  18. Intertribal somatic hybrids between Brassica napus and Thlaspi perfoliatum with high content of the T. perfoliatum-specific nervonic acid.

    PubMed

    Fahleson, J; Eriksson, I; Landgren, M; Stymne, S; Glimelius, K

    1994-02-01

    Protoplast fusions were performed between hypocotyl protoplasts of Brassica napus and mesophyll protoplasts of Thlaspi perfoliatum. The two species are members of the Lepidieae and Brassiceae tribes, respectively, in the family of Brassicaceae. Seeds of T. perfoliatum are rich in the fatty acid C24∶1 (nervonic acid), an oil valuable for technical purposes. In the search for renewable oils to replace the mineral oils, plant breeders have been trying to develop oil crops with a high content of long-chain fatty acids. After fusion of B. napus protoplasts with non-irradiated as well as irradiated protoplasts of T. perfoliatum selection was carried out by flow cytometry and cell sorting. Of the shoots regenerated from different calli 27 were verified as hybrids or partial hybrids using the isoenzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) as a marker. Another 6 plants were identified as partial hybrids using a T. perfoliatum-specific repetitive DNA sequence. Slot blot experiments were performed to estimate the copy number of the repetitive DNA sequence in the parental species and in the hybrids. In T. perfoliatum there were approximately 10(5) copies per haploid genome, and the range in the hybrids was 1-37% of the value in T. perfoliatum. When the nuclear DNA content of the regenerated shoots was analysed we found partial as well as symmetric hybrids. Even though the rooting and establishment of hybrid shoots in the greenhouse were difficult, resulting in the death of many plants, 19 plants were cultured to full maturity. Seeds obtained from 15 plants were analysed to determine whether they contained nervonic acid, and 5 of the hybrids were found to contain significantly greater amounts of nervonic acid than B. napus.

  19. DNA elimination in embryogenic development of Pennisetum glaucum x Pennisetum purpureum (Poaceae) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J D; Azevedo, A L S; Pereira, A V; Paula, C M P; Campos, J M S; Lédo, F J S; Santos, V B

    2013-10-22

    Interspecific hybridization between Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), which is widely grown in Brazil for cattle forage, and pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) has been used as a breeding strategy for the development of improved cultivars. However, the hybrid between these two species is sterile due to its triploid condition (2n = 3x = 21 chromosomes), which hinders its use in crop breeding programs. It is known that genomic alterations result from the hybridization process. In order to measure the loss of DNA during embryo development, we used flow cytometry to estimate the nuclear DNA content of triploid and tetraploid embryos produced by interspecific hybridization between Napier grass and pearl millet. The triploid and tetraploid hybrids had a mean DNA content of 4.99-4.87 and 5.25-4.84 pg, at 10 and 30 days after pollination, respectively. The mean reduction in DNA content was higher in the tetraploid hybrids. The flow cytometry results revealed progressive genomic instability in these triploid and tetraploid hybrids, with this instability causing significant alterations in the DNA content of the hybrids.

  20. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids activate the cGAS–STING axis

    PubMed Central

    Mankan, Arun K; Schmidt, Tobias; Chauhan, Dhruv; Goldeck, Marion; Höning, Klara; Gaidt, Moritz; Kubarenko, Andrew V; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Hornung, Veit

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recognition of non-self and also self-nucleic acids can result in the initiation of potent pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokine responses. Most recently, cGAS was shown to be critical for the recognition of cytoplasmic dsDNA. Binding of dsDNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP(2′–5′), which then binds to the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein STING. This initiates a signaling cascade that triggers the induction of an antiviral immune response. While most studies on intracellular nucleic acids have focused on dsRNA or dsDNA, it has remained unexplored whether cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are also sensed by the innate immune system. Studying synthetic RNA:DNA hybrids, we indeed observed a strong type I interferon response upon cytosolic delivery of this class of molecule. Studies in THP-1 knockout cells revealed that the recognition of RNA:DNA hybrids is completely attributable to the cGAS–STING pathway. Moreover, in vitro studies showed that recombinant cGAS produced cGAMP upon RNA:DNA hybrid recognition. Altogether, our results introduce RNA:DNA hybrids as a novel class of intracellular PAMP molecules and describe an alternative cGAS ligand next to dsDNA. PMID:25425575

  1. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids activate the cGAS-STING axis.

    PubMed

    Mankan, Arun K; Schmidt, Tobias; Chauhan, Dhruv; Goldeck, Marion; Höning, Klara; Gaidt, Moritz; Kubarenko, Andrew V; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Hornung, Veit

    2014-12-17

    Intracellular recognition of non-self and also self-nucleic acids can result in the initiation of potent pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokine responses. Most recently, cGAS was shown to be critical for the recognition of cytoplasmic dsDNA. Binding of dsDNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP(2'-5'), which then binds to the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein STING. This initiates a signaling cascade that triggers the induction of an antiviral immune response. While most studies on intracellular nucleic acids have focused on dsRNA or dsDNA, it has remained unexplored whether cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are also sensed by the innate immune system. Studying synthetic RNA:DNA hybrids, we indeed observed a strong type I interferon response upon cytosolic delivery of this class of molecule. Studies in THP-1 knockout cells revealed that the recognition of RNA:DNA hybrids is completely attributable to the cGAS-STING pathway. Moreover, in vitro studies showed that recombinant cGAS produced cGAMP upon RNA:DNA hybrid recognition. Altogether, our results introduce RNA:DNA hybrids as a novel class of intracellular PAMP molecules and describe an alternative cGAS ligand next to dsDNA.

  2. Plant somatic hybrid cytoplasmic DNA characterization by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Hernández-Garrido, María; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2007-06-01

    Unlike maternal inheritance in sexual hybridization, plant somatic hybridization allows transfer, mixing and recombination of cytoplasmic genomes. In addition to the use of somatic hybridization in plant breeding programs, application of this unique tool should lead to a better understanding of the roles played by the chloroplastic and mitochondrial genomes in determining agronomically important traits. The nucleotide sequences of cytoplasmic genomes are much more conserved than those of nuclear genomes. Cytoplasmic DNA composition in somatic hybrids is commonly elucidated either by length polymorphism analysis of restricted genome regions amplified with universal primers (PCR-RF) or by hybridization of total DNA using universal cytoplasmic probes. In this study, we demonstrate that single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is a powerful, quick and easy alternative method for cytoplasmic DNA characterization of somatic hybrids, especially for mitochondrial DNA. The technique allows detection of polymorphisms based on both size and sequence of amplified targets. Twenty-two species of the subfamily Aurantioideae were analyzed with eight universal primers (four from chloroplastic and four from mitochondrial regions). Differences in chloroplastic DNA composition were scored in 98% of all possible two-parent combinations, and different mitochondrial DNA profiles were found in 87% of them. Analysis by SSCP was also successfully used to characterize somatic hybrids and cybrids obtained by fusion of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. and C. excelsa Wester protoplasts.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with gel-immobilized oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Livshits, M A; Mirzabekov, A D

    1996-01-01

    A new method of DNA sequencing by hybridization using a microchip containing a set of immobilized oligonucleotides is being developed. A theoretical analysis is presented of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with deoxynucleotide molecules chemically tethered in a polyacrylamide gel layer. The analysis has shown that long-term evolution of the spatial distribution and of the amount of DNA bound in a hybridization cell is governed by "retarded diffusion," i.e., diffusion of the DNA interrupted by repeated association and dissociation with immobile oligonucleotide molecules. Retarded diffusion determines the characteristic time of establishing a final equilibrium state in a cell, i.e., the state with the maximum quantity and a uniform distribution of bound DNA. In the case of cells with the most stable, perfect duplexes, the characteristic time of retarded diffusion (which is proportional to the equilibrium binding constant and to the concentration of binding sites) can be longer than the duration of the real hybridization procedure. This conclusion is indirectly confirmed by the observation of nonuniform fluorescence of labeled DNA in perfect-match hybridization cells (brighter at the edges). For optimal discrimination of perfect duplexes from duplexes with mismatches the hybridization process should be brought to equilibrium under low-temperature nonsaturation conditions for all cells. The kinetic differences between perfect and nonperfect duplexes in the gel allow further improvement in the discrimination through additional washing at low temperature after hybridization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913616

  4. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  5. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  6. DNA binding and photocleavage properties of a novel cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Xu, Lian-Cai; Huang, Jin-Wang; Zheng, Kang-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Yu, Han-Cheng; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2008-04-01

    A novel cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone (Por-AQ) hybrid has been synthesized and characterized. Using the combination of absorption titration, fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) as well as viscosity measurements, the binding properties of the hybrid to calf thymus (CT) DNA have been investigated compared with its parent porphyrin. The experimental results show that at low [Por]/[DNA] ratios, the parent porphyrin binds to DNA in an intercalative mode while the hybrid binds in a combined mode of outside binding (for porphyrin moiety) and partial intercalation (for anthraquinone). Ethidium bromide (EB) competition experiment determined the binding affinity constants (K(app)) of the compounds for CT DNA. Theoretical calculational results applying the density functional theory (DFT) can explain the different DNA binding behaviors reasonably. (1)O(2) was suggested to be the reactive species responsible for the DNA photocleavage of porphyrin moieties in both two compounds. The wavelength-depending cleavage activities of the compounds were also investigated.

  7. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  8. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results.

  9. Selective, controllable, and reversible aggregation of polystyrene latex microspheres via DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Phillip H; Michel, Eric; Bauer, Carl A; Vanderet, Stephen; Hansen, Daniel; Roberts, Bradley K; Calvez, Antoine; Crews, Jackson B; Lau, Kwok O; Wood, Alistair; Pine, David J; Schwartz, Peter V

    2005-06-07

    The directed three-dimensional self-assembly of microstructures and nanostructures through the selective hybridization of DNA is the focus of great interest toward the fabrication of new materials. Single-stranded DNA is covalently attached to polystyrene latex microspheres. Single-stranded DNA can function as a sequence-selective Velcro by only bonding to another strand of DNA that has a complementary sequence. The attachment of the DNA increases the charge stabilization of the microspheres and allows controllable aggregation of microspheres by hybridization of complementary DNA sequences. In a mixture of microspheres derivatized with different sequences of DNA, microspheres with complementary DNA form aggregates, while microspheres with noncomplementary sequences remain suspended. The process is reversible by heating, with a characteristic "aggregate dissociation temperature" that is predictably dependent on salt concentration, and the evolution of aggregate dissociation with temperature is observed with optical microscopy.

  10. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Combined immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes allows quantification and differentiation of ex vivo generated dendritic cells, leukemia-derived dendritic cells and clonal leukemic cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Kufner, Stefanie; Konhaeuser, Elke; Kroell, Tanja; Hausmann, Andreas; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Schmetzer, Helga

    2013-06-01

    Antileukemic T-cell responses induced by leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)) are variable, due to varying DC/DC(leu) composition/quality. We studied DC/DC(leu) composition/quality after blast culture in four DC media by flow cytometry (FC) and combined fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunophenotyping analysis (FISH-IPA). Both methods showed that DC methods produce variable proportions of DC subtypes. FISH-IPA is an elaborate method to study clonal aberrations in blast/DC cells on slides, however without preselection of distinct cell populations for FISH analysis. FISH-IPA data proved previous FC data: not every clonal/blast cell is converted to DC(leu) (resulting in various proportions of DC(leu)) and not every detectable DC is of clonal/leukemic origin. Preselection of the best of four DC methods for "best" DC/DC(leu) generation is necessary. DC(leu) proportions correlate with the antileukemic functionality of DC/DC(leu)-stimulated T-cells, thereby proving the necessity of studying the quality of DC/DC(leu) after culture. FC is the superior method to quantify DC/DC(leu), since a blast phenotype is available in every given patient, even with low/no proportions of clonal aberrations, and can easily be used to study cellular compositions after DC culture.

  13. Evolutionary history of asexual hybrid loaches (Cobitis: Teleostei) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Janko, K; Kotlík, P; Ráb, P

    2003-11-01

    Reconstruction of the evolutionary history of asexual lineages undermines their suitability as models for the studies of evolutionary consequences of sexual reproduction. Using molecular tools we addressed the origin, age and maternal ancestry of diploid and triploid asexual lineages arisen through the hybridization between spiny loaches Cobitis elongatoides, C. taenia and C. tanaitica. Reconstructions of the phylogenetic relationships among mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes, revealed by sequence analyses, suggest that both hybrid complexes (C. elongatoides-taenia and C. elongatoides-tanaitica) contained several asexual lineages of independent origin. Cobitis elongatoides was the exclusive maternal ancestor of all the C. elongatoides-tanaitica hybrids, whereas within the C. elongatoides-taenia complex, hybridization was reciprocal. In both complexes the low haplotype divergences were consistent with a recent origin of asexual lineages. Combined mtDNA and allozyme data suggest that the triploids arose through the incorporation of a haploid sperm genome into unreduced ova produced by diploid hybrids.

  14. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device. PMID:24569823

  15. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device.

  16. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  17. Enantioselective Catalysis by Using Short, Structurally Defined DNA Hairpins as Scaffold for Hybrid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Marek, Jasmin J; Singh, Raghvendra P; Heuer, Andreas; Hennecke, Ulrich

    2017-05-02

    A new type of DNA metal complex hybrid catalyst, which is based on single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides, is described. It was shown that oligonucleotides as short as 14 nucleotides that fold into hairpin structures are suitable as nucleic acid components for DNA hybrid catalysts. With these catalysts, excellent enantioinduction in asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with selectivity values as high as 96 % enantiomeric excess (ee) can be achieved. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that a rather flexible loop combined with a rigid stem region provides DNA scaffolds with these high selectivity values. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Unrepaired DNA damage facilitates elimination of uniparental chromosomes in interspecific hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yin, Hao; Lv, Lei; Feng, Yingying; Chen, Shaopeng; Liang, Junting; Huang, Yun; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Hanwei; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Wu, Lijun; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Elimination of uniparental chromosomes occurs frequently in interspecific hybrid cells. For example, human chromosomes are always eliminated during clone formation when human cells are fused with mouse cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we show that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells is accompanied by continued cell division at the presence of DNA damage on human chromosomes. Deficiency in DNA damage repair on human chromosomes occurs after cell fusion. Furthermore, increasing the level of DNA damage on human chromosomes by irradiation accelerates human chromosome loss in hybrid cells. Our results indicate that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells results from unrepaired DNA damage on human chromosomes. We therefore provide a novel mechanism underlying chromosome instability which may facilitate the understanding of carcinogenesis.

  19. Hybrid nano-composites made of ss-DNA/wrapped carbon nanotubes and titania.

    PubMed

    Romio, Martina; Mesa, Camillo La

    2017-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNTs, are stabilized thanks to the surface wrapping of single-strand DNA, ss-DNA; the resulting adducts are kinetically and thermodynamically stable Such entities build up nano-hybrids with titania, TiO2, nano-particles, in presence of surfactant as an adjuvant. The conditions leading to TiO2 adsorption onto ss-DNA/CNTs were investigated, by optimizing the concentration of adducts, nano-particles (NPs), and of the cationic surfactant (CTAB). Controlling the working conditions makes possible to get homogeneously organized hybrids. Characterization by DLS, electro-phoretic mobility, SEM and AFM clarified the surfactant-assisted association modes between adducts and CTAB-functionalized TiO2. Nano-particles' clustering onto DNA-wrapped adducts gives hybrids trough electrostatic interactions. Surface coverage by TiO2 is significant and homogeneous. It is expected that the reported hybrids can be useful for applications in heterogeneous catalysis.

  20. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of Bison bison and bison-cattle hybrids: function and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kory C; Halbert, Natalie D; Kolenda, Claire; Childers, Christopher; Hunter, David L; Derr, James N

    2011-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from 43 bison and bison-cattle hybrids were sequenced and compared with other bovids. Selected animals reflect the historical range and current taxonomic structure of bison. This study identified regions of potential nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibilities in hybrids, provided a complete mtDNA phylogenetic tree for this species, and uncovered evidence of bison population substructure. Seventeen bison haplotypes defined by 66 polymorphic sites were discovered, whereas 728 fixed differences and 86 non-synonymous mutations were identified between bison and bison-cattle hybrid sequences. The potential roles of the mtDNA genome in the function of hybrid animals and bison taxonomy are discussed.

  1. In situ DNA-hybridization chain reaction (HCR): a facilitated in situ HCR system for the detection of environmental microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Shuji; Hatamoto, Masashi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masanobu; Araki, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo

    2015-07-01

    In situ detection of microorganisms by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool for environmental microbiology, but analyses can be hampered by low rRNA content in target organisms, especially in oligotrophic environments. Here, we present a non-enzymatic, hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-based signal amplified in situ whole-cell detection technique (in situ DNA-HCR). The components of the amplification buffer were optimized to polymerize DNA amplifier probes for in situ DNA-HCR. In situ hybridization of initiator probes followed by signal amplification via HCR produced bright signals with high specificity and probe permeation into cells. The detection rates for Bacteria in a seawater sample and Archaea in anaerobic sludge samples were comparable with or greater than those obtained by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or standard FISH. Detection of multiple organisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Methanosaetaceae) in an anaerobic sludge sample was achieved by simultaneous in situ DNA-HCR. In summary, in situ DNA-HCR is a simple and easy technique for detecting single microbial cells and enhancing understanding of the ecology and behaviour of environmental microorganisms in situ. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking.

  3. Gene- and Protein-Delivered Zinc Finger–Staphylococcal Nuclease Hybrid for Inhibition of DNA Replication of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP–SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP–SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP–SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP–SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses. PMID:23437192

  4. Gene- and protein-delivered zinc finger-staphylococcal nuclease hybrid for inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP-SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses.

  5. DNA-Assisted Solubilization of Carbon Nanotubes and Construction of DNA-MWCNT Cross-Linked Hybrid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Taki, Yosuke; Sergeyev, Vladimir G.; Murata, Shizuaki

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for preparation of DNA-carbon nanotubes hybrid hydrogel based on a two-step procedure including: (i) solubilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous solution of DNA, and (ii) chemical cross-linking between solubilized MWCNT via adsorbed DNA and free DNA by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether is reported. We show that there exists a critical concentration of MWCNT below which a homogeneous dispersion of MWCNT in hybrid hydrogel can be achieved, while at higher concentrations of MWCNT the aggregation of MWCNT inside hydrogel occurs. The strengthening effect of carbon nanotube in the process of hydrogel shrinking in solutions with high salt concentration was demonstrated and significant passivation of MWCNT adsorption properties towards low-molecular-weight aromatic binders due to DNA adsorption on MWCNT surface was revealed.

  6. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization and interspecies representational difference analysis reveal gross DNA differences between humans and great apes.

    PubMed

    Toder, R; Xia, Y; Bausch, E

    1998-09-01

    Comparative chromosome G-/R-banding, comparative gene mapping and chromosome painting techniques have demonstrated that only few chromosomal rearrangements occurred during great ape and human evolution. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization (CGH), used here in this study, between human, gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee revealed species-specific regions in all three species. In contrast to the human, a far more complex distribution of species-specific blocks was detected with CGH in gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee. Most of these blocks coincide with already described heterochromatic regions on gorilla and chimpanzee chromosomes. Representational difference analysis (RDA) was used to subtract the complex genome of gorilla against human in order to enrich gorilla-specific DNA sequences. Gorilla-specific clones isolated with this technique revealed a 32-bp repeat unit. These clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the telomeric regions of gorilla chromosomes that had been shown by interspecies CGH to contain species-specific sequences.

  7. Computer programs used to aid in the selection of DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, R E

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a package of three programs which used together aid in selecting the best possible sequence to be used as a DNA hybridization probe. This system searches an amino acid sequence for four adjacent amino acids with the fewest possible corresponding mRNA sequences, calculates their probability of occurrence, and locates the positions of wobbles and mismatches between the DNA hybridization probe and the possible mRNA sequences. PMID:6546442

  8. Maternal transmission of cytoplasmic DNA in interspecific hybrids of peat mosses, Sphagnum (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Natcheva, R; Cronberg, N

    2007-07-01

    The progeny of spontaneous interspecific hybrid sporophytes of Sphagnum were used to analyse the inheritance of cytoplasmic DNA. The analysis showed that only the female parent donated chloroplasts and mitochondria in Sphagnum hybrids. Thus, this is the first study demonstrating maternal cytoplasmic inheritance in a nonvascular land plant. This finding has important implications for phylogenetic reconstructions utilizing chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequences as well as for the evolution of cytoplasmic inheritance in relation to the life cycle of land plants.

  9. T-Specific DNA Polymorphisms among Wild Mice from Israel and Spain

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, F.; Neufeld, E.; Ritte, U.; Klein, J.

    1988-01-01

    Lehrach and his coworkers have isolated a series of DNA probes that specifically hybridize with different regions of mouse chromosome 17 within the t complex. The probes display restriction fragment length polymorphisms, RFLPs, which are specific for the t haplotypes in all laboratory mouse strains tested thus far. Some of these probes have been used to test wild mice populations for these t-associated DNA forms. It is demonstrated that populations from Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia, Australia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela contain chromosomes in which all the tested DNA loci display the t-specific polymorphisms. The frequency of mice carrying these chromosomes is as high as 31%. Wild mice from Israel and Spain, on the other hand, carry chromosomes displaying t-specific DNA forms only at one or two of the probed loci, while the other loci carry the wild-type (+) forms. These chromosomes thus resemble the partial t haplotypes known from the study of laboratory mice. One possible interpretation of these findings is that these DNA polymorphisms contributed to the assembly of the complete t haplotypes and that these haplotypes may have originated in the Middle East. PMID:3165081

  10. Sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA: oligodeoxynucleotide-EDTA X Fe(II).

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, G B; Dervan, P B

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a DNA hybridization probe 19 nucleotides in length, equipped with the metal chelator EDTA at C-5 of thymidine in position 10 (indicated by T*) is described. DNA-EDTA 1 has the sequence 5'-T-A-A-C-G-C-A-G-T*-C-A-G-G-C-A-C-C-G-T-3', which is complementary to a 19-nucleotide sequence in the plasmid pBR322. In the presence of Fe(II), O2, and dithiothreitol, DNA-EDTA 1 affords specific cleavage (25 degrees C, pH 7.4, 60 min) at its complementary sequence in a heat-denatured 167-base-pair restriction fragment. Cleavage occurs over a range of 16 nucleotides at the site of hybridization of 1, presumably due to a diffusible reactive species. No other cleavage sites are observed in the 167-base-pair restriction fragment. The procedure used to synthesize DNA-EDTA probes is based on the incorporation of a thymidine modified at C-5 with the triethyl ester of EDTA. By using routine phosphoramidite procedures, thymidine-EDTA can be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides of any desired length and sequence. Because the efficiency of the DNA cleavage reaction is dependent on the addition of both Fe(II) and reducing agent (dithiothreitol), the initiation of the cleavage reaction can be controlled. These DNA-EDTA X Fe(II) probes should be useful for the sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA (and most likely RNA) under mild conditions. Images PMID:3919391

  11. Titantium Dioxide Nanoparticles Assembled by DNA Molecules Hybridization and Loading of DNA Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Brown, Eric M B; Babbo, Angela; Cruz, Cecille; Aslam, Mohamed; Dravid, Vinayak; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the assembly of TiO(2) nanoparticles with attached DNA oligonucleotides into a 3D mesh structure by allowing base pairing between oligonucleotides. A change of the ratio of DNA oligonucleotide molecules and TiO(2) nanoparticles regulates the size of the mesh as characterized by UV-visible light spectra, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. This type of 3D mesh, based on TiO(2)-DNA oligonucleotide nanoconjugates, can be used for studies of nanoparticle assemblies in material science, energy science related to dye-sensitized solar cells, environmental science as well as characterization of DNA interacting proteins in the field of molecular biology. As an example of one such assembly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) was cloned, its activity verified, and the protein was purified, loaded onto double strand DNA oligonucleotide-TiO(2) nanoconjugates, and imaged by atomic force microscopy. This type of approach may be used to sample and perhaps quantify and/or extract specific cellular proteins from complex cellular protein mixtures affinity based on their affinity for chosen DNA segments assembled into the 3D matrix.

  12. A laminated, flex structure for electronic transport and hybridization of DNA.

    PubMed

    Forster, A H; Krihak, M; Swanson, P D; Young, T C; Ackley, D E

    2001-05-01

    We have developed the first prototypes of a three-dimensional, electrophoretically driven microlaboratory for the analysis of proteins and DNA. By selecting the appropriate spacing and geometrical configuration, oligonucleotides were transported, in a controlled, rapid fashion, by electrophoresis in free-space. Transport efficiencies over 2 mm distances exceeded 70%. Electrodes of similar design were combined with an electronically addressed DNA hybridization chip to form a fully electrophoretic microlaboratory. In this instance, gold-plated copper electrodes were patterned on a 2 mil thick polyimide substrate. This polyimide layer was stiffened with 20 mil of polyimide to provide support for flip-chip bonding of our standard 100-site Nanochip. This composite structure illustrated three-dimensional transport of target oligonucleotides, through a via in the polyimide, along a series of electrodes and onto the diagnostic chip. Upon reaching the diagnostic chip, electronic hybridization was performed for a competitive reverse dot blot assay. The electronic assay showed a specific to nonspecific ratio in excess of 20:1. These results suggested that this type of structure might be of practical consequence with the development of a microlaboratory for biowarfare applications.

  13. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dennis H.; King, Brett A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen–DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320–400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA–psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen–TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  14. Cell specificity in DNA binding and repair of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, J A; Rickert, D E; Baranyi, B L; Goodman, J I

    1983-01-01

    Many animal models for organ specific neoplasia have been developed and used to study the pathogenesis of cancer. Morphologic studies have usually concentrated on the response of target cells, whereas biochemical investigations have usually employed whole organ homogenates. Since hepatocytes comprise nearly 90% of the liver's mass and 70-80% of its DNA, alterations in DNA replication, covalent binding and DNA repair of nonparenchymal cells are usually obscured when whole organ homogenates are used. By utilizing cell separation methods, we have been able to demonstrate differences between hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell replication. DNA damage and repair following exposure to a variety of hepatocarcinogen. Differences in removal of simple O6-alkylguanine and DNA replication correlate with cell specific carcinogenesis of simply alkylating agents. For several other procarcinogens, including 2-acetylaminofluorene and dinitroluene, cell specificity appears to reside primarily in the differential metabolic competence of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. This results in greater covalent binding of the carcinogen to hepatocyte DNA, although the DNA adducts are removed at a similar rate in both cell types. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6832089

  15. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent.

  16. Development and application of a DNA microarray-based yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Yildirimman, Reha; Raskó, Tamás; Schaefer, Martin H.; Rasche, Axel; Porras, Pablo; Vázquez-Álvarez, Blanca M.; Russ, Jenny; Rau, Kirstin; Foulle, Raphaele; Zenkner, Martina; Saar, Kathrin; Herwig, Ralf; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Wanker, Erich E.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system is the most widely applied methodology for systematic protein–protein interaction (PPI) screening and the generation of comprehensive interaction networks. We developed a novel Y2H interaction screening procedure using DNA microarrays for high-throughput quantitative PPI detection. Applying a global pooling and selection scheme to a large collection of human open reading frames, proof-of-principle Y2H interaction screens were performed for the human neurodegenerative disease proteins huntingtin and ataxin-1. Using systematic controls for unspecific Y2H results and quantitative benchmarking, we identified and scored a large number of known and novel partner proteins for both huntingtin and ataxin-1. Moreover, we show that this parallelized screening procedure and the global inspection of Y2H interaction data are uniquely suited to define specific PPI patterns and their alteration by disease-causing mutations in huntingtin and ataxin-1. This approach takes advantage of the specificity and flexibility of DNA microarrays and of the existence of solid-related statistical methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data, and allows a quantitative approach toward interaction screens in human and in model organisms. PMID:23275563

  17. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  18. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-12-10

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples.

  19. A Hybrid DNA Extraction Method for the Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Communities from Poultry Production Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rothrock, Michael J.; Hiett, Kelli L.; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C.; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M.; Caporaso, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the “gold standard” enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  20. Development of swine-specific DNA markers for biosensor-based halal authentication.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Kashif, M; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-06-29

    The pig (Sus scrofa) mitochondrial genome was targeted to design short (15-30 nucleotides) DNA markers that would be suitable for biosensor-based hybridization detection of target DNA. Short DNA markers are reported to survive harsh conditions in which longer ones are degraded into smaller fragments. The whole swine mitochondrial-genome was in silico digested with AluI restriction enzyme. Among 66 AluI fragments, five were selected as potential markers because of their convenient lengths, high degree of interspecies polymorphism and intraspecies conservatism. These were confirmed by NCBI blast analysis and ClustalW alignment analysis with 11 different meat-providing animal and fish species. Finally, we integrated a tetramethyl rhodamine-labeled 18-nucleotide AluI fragment into a 3-nm diameter citrate-tannate coated gold nanoparticle to develop a swine-specific hybrid nanobioprobe for the determination of pork adulteration in 2.5-h autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures. This hybrid probe detected as low as 1% pork in deliberately contaminated autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures and no cross-species detection was recorded, demonstrating the feasibility of this type of probe for biosensor-based detection of pork adulteration of halal and kosher foods.

  1. Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Arun Kumar; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Detection of disease-related gene expression by DNA hybridization is a useful diagnostic method. In this study a monolayer graphene field effect transistor (GFET) was fabricated for the detection of a particular single-stranded DNA (target DNA). The probe DNA, which is a single-stranded DNA with a complementary nucleotide sequence, was directly immobilized onto the graphene surface without any linker. The VDirac was shifted to the negative direction in the probe DNA immobilization. A further shift of VDirac in the negative direction was observed when the target DNA was applied to GFET, but no shift was observed upon the application of non-complementary mismatched DNA. Direct immobilization of double-stranded DNA onto the graphene surface also shifted the VDirac in the negative direction to the same extent as that of the shift induced by the immobilization of probe DNA and following target DNA application. These results suggest that the further shift of VDirac after application of the target DNA to the GFET was caused by the hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA. PMID:28179957

  2. Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Arun Kumar; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Detection of disease-related gene expression by DNA hybridization is a useful diagnostic method. In this study a monolayer graphene field effect transistor (GFET) was fabricated for the detection of a particular single-stranded DNA (target DNA). The probe DNA, which is a single-stranded DNA with a complementary nucleotide sequence, was directly immobilized onto the graphene surface without any linker. The VDirac was shifted to the negative direction in the probe DNA immobilization. A further shift of VDirac in the negative direction was observed when the target DNA was applied to GFET, but no shift was observed upon the application of non-complementary mismatched DNA. Direct immobilization of double-stranded DNA onto the graphene surface also shifted the VDirac in the negative direction to the same extent as that of the shift induced by the immobilization of probe DNA and following target DNA application. These results suggest that the further shift of VDirac after application of the target DNA to the GFET was caused by the hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA.

  3. Base pair opening kinetics study of the aegPNA:DNA hydrid duplex containing a site-specific GNA-like chiral PNA monomer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lim, Jisoo; Lee, Eun-Hae; Ok, Taedong; Yoon, Juyoung; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are one of the most widely used synthetic DNA mimics where the four bases are attached to a N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (aeg) backbone instead of the negative-charged phosphate backbone in DNA. We have developed a chimeric PNA (chiPNA), in which a chiral GNA-like γ(3)T monomer is incorporated into aegPNA backbone. The base pair opening kinetics of the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrid duplexes were studied by NMR hydrogen exchange experiments. This study revealed that the aegPNA:DNA hybrid is much more stable duplex and is less dynamic compared to DNA duplex, meaning that base pairs are opened and reclosed much more slowly. The site-specific incorporation of γ(3)T monomer in the aegPNA:DNA hybrid can destabilize a specific base pair and its neighbors, maintaining the thermal stabilities and dynamic properties of other base pairs. Our hydrogen exchange study firstly revealed the unique kinetic features of base pairs in the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrids, which will provide an insight into the development of methodology for specific DNA recognition using PNA fragments.

  4. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  5. Hybridization and Introgression among Species of Sunfish (Lepomis): Analysis by Mitochondrial DNA and Allozyme Markers

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Saunders, Nancy C.

    1984-01-01

    We explore the potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, alone and in conjunction with allozymes, to study low-frequency hybridization and introgression phenomena in natural populations. MtDNAs from small samples of nine species of sunfish (Lepomis, Centrarchidae) were purified and digested with each of 13 informative restriction enzymes. Digestion profiles for all species were highly distinct: estimates of overall fragment homology between pairs of species ranged from 0–36%. Allozymes encoded by nine nuclear genes also showed large frequency differences among species and together with mtDNA provided many genetic markers for hybrid identification. A genetic analysis of 277 sunfish from two locations in north Georgia revealed the following: (1) a low frequency of interspecific hybrids, all of which appeared to be F1's; (2) the involvement of five sympatric Lepomis species in the production of these hybrids; (3) no evidence for introgression between species in our study locales (although for rare hybridization, most later-generation backcrosses would not be reliably distinguished from parentals); (4) a tendency for hybridizations to take place preferentially between parental species differing greatly in abundance; (5) a tendency for the rare species in a hybrid cross to provide the female parent. Our data suggest that absence of conspecific pairing partners and mating stimuli for females of rarer species may be important factors in increasing the likelihood of interspecific hybridization. The maternal inheritance of mtDNA offers at least two novel advantages for hybridization analysis: (1) an opportunity to determine direction in hybrid crosses; and (2) due to the linkage among mtDNA markers, an increased potential to distinguish effects of introgression from symplesiomorphy or character convergence. PMID:6090268

  6. Short thio-multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Au nanoparticles enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a thio group (MWNTs-SH) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for covalent DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is described. The key step for developing this novel DNA biosensor is to cut the pristine MWNT into short and generate lots of active sites simultaneously. With this approach, the target DNA could be quantified in a linear range from 8.5×10-10 to 1.5×10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.67×10-11 mol/L by 3σ.

  7. Comparative analysis of Y chromosome structure in Bos taurus and B. indicus by FISH using region-specific, microdissected, and locus-specific DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goldammer, T; Brunner, R M; Schwerin, M

    1997-01-01

    Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of Bos taurus and B. indicus Y chromosomes using the bovine locus-specific Y probes BC1.2 and lambda ES6.0 and region-specific probes of B. indicus and B. taurus Y chromosomes, which were generated by microdissection and DOP-PCR, indicate that the Y chromosomes of B. indicus (BIN Y) and B. taurus (BTA Y) differ by a pericentric inversion. Parts of the short and long arms of the Y chromosome in B. taurus and the distal half of the Y chromosome in B. indicus were microdissected, amplified by DOP-PCR, biotinylated, and rehybridized in situ to the corresponding metaphase chromosomes to test the chromosome fragment specificity of the DNA probes. The region-specific painting probes were used for hybridization to metaphase chromosomes of the other species. The DNA painting probes BTA Yp12 and BTA Yq12.1-ter derived from BTA Y hybridized to the distal and proximal halves of BIN Y, respectively. Complex hybridization signals on BTA Yq12.1-->qter were generated with the DNA probe BIN Yqcen-centr (centromere-central) after FISH. The results demonstrate that BTA Yp is homologous to the distal half of BIN Y and that BTA Yq corresponds to the proximal part of BIN Yq. Hybridization of the Y chromosome-specific DNA probes lambda ES6.0 to BTA Yp12-->p11 and near to the telomere of BIN Y and BC1.2 to BTA Yq12-->q13 and to the telomere of BIN Y indicate an opposite orientation of the homologous chromosome fragments BTA Yp and of the distal half of BIN Yq.

  8. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James A.; Pastrana, Cesar L.; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J.; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed. PMID:25572315

  9. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the Toll-like Receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confront many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistance to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed from hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to 1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and 2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26947116

  10. Sequence specific recognition of HIV-1 dsDNA in the large amount of normal dsDNA based upon nicking enzyme signal amplification and triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Houya; Zhang, Manjun; Zou, Li; Li, Ruimin; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-10-01

    A sensitive fluorescent strategy for sequence specific recognition of HIV dsDNA was established based upon Nicking Enzyme Signal Amplification (NESA) and triplex formation. dsDNA sequence from the site 7960 to site 7991 of the HIV1 dsDNA gene was designed as target dsDNA, which was composed of two complementary strands Oligonucleotide 1 with the sequence of 3'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA CCT CTC TCT CT-5' (Oligo-1) and Oligonucleotide 2 with the sequence of 5'-GAA GGA ATA GAA GAA GAA GGT GGA GAG AGA GA-3' (Oligo-2). As a proof of concept, Oligonucleotide 5'-6-FAM-GAG GTG GAG CTG CGC GAC TCC TCC TCT CTC TCT CTC CAC CTC-BHQ-1-3'(Oligo-4) acted as molecular beacon(MB) probe, Oligonucleotide 5'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA AAA GGA GTC GCG-3' (Oligo-7) acted as assistant probe. In the presence of target dsDNA, Oligo-4 and Oligo-7 hybridized with target dsDNA through triplex formation and formed Y-shaped structure, NESA occurred with further addition of Nt.BbvCI, accompanied with the release of fluorescent DNA fragment circularly, resulted in the increase of fluorescence intensity. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity was linear with the concentration of target dsDNA over the range from 100pM to 200nM, the linear regression equation was I = 1.266 C + 84.3 (C: nmol/L, R(2) = 0.991), with a detection limit of 65pM. Moreover, the effect of coexisted other dsDNA was investigated as well, and satisfactory results were obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  12. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  13. Cloning and characterization of seven human forkhead proteins: binding site specificity and DNA bending.

    PubMed Central

    Pierrou, S; Hellqvist, M; Samuelsson, L; Enerbäck, S; Carlsson, P

    1994-01-01

    The forkhead domain is a monomeric DNA binding motif that defines a rapidly growing family of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. Genetic and biochemical data suggest a central role in embryonic development for genes encoding forkhead proteins. We have used PCR and low stringency hybridization to isolate clones from human cDNA and genomic libraries that represent seven novel forkhead genes, freac-1 to freac-7. The spatial patterns of expression for the seven freac genes range from specific for a single tissue to nearly ubiquitous. The DNA binding specificities of four of the FREAC proteins were determined by selection of binding sites from random sequence oligonucleotides. The binding sites for all four FREAC proteins share a core sequence, RTAAAYA, but differ in the positions flanking the core. Domain swaps between two FREAC proteins identified two subregions within the forkhead domain as responsible for creating differences in DNA binding specificity. Applying a circular permutation assay, we show that binding of FREAC proteins to their cognate sites results in bending of the DNA at an angle of 80-90 degrees. Images PMID:7957066

  14. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5′-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:24135881

  15. Predicting DNA-Binding Specificities of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Adrian; Eichner, Johannes; Supper, Jochen; Eichner, Jonas; Wanke, Dierk; Henneges, Carsten; Zell, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Today, annotated amino acid sequences of more and more transcription factors (TFs) are readily available. Quantitative information about their DNA-binding specificities, however, are hard to obtain. Position frequency matrices (PFMs), the most widely used models to represent binding specificities, are experimentally characterized only for a small fraction of all TFs. Even for some of the most intensively studied eukaryotic organisms (i.e., human, rat and mouse), roughly one-sixth of all proteins with annotated DNA-binding domain have been characterized experimentally. Here, we present a new method based on support vector regression for predicting quantitative DNA-binding specificities of TFs in different eukaryotic species. This approach estimates a quantitative measure for the PFM similarity of two proteins, based on various features derived from their protein sequences. The method is trained and tested on a dataset containing 1 239 TFs with known DNA-binding specificity, and used to predict specific DNA target motifs for 645 TFs with high accuracy. PMID:21152420

  16. A search for specificity in DNA-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, G; Goodford, P J

    1994-06-01

    The GRID force field and a principal component analysis have been used in order to predict the interactions of small chemical groups with all 64 different triplet sequences of B-DNA. Factors that favor binding to guanine-cytosine base pairs have been identified, and a dictionary of ligand groups and their locations is presented as a guide to the design of specific DNA ligands.

  17. Specific Inhibition of the Eubacterial DNA Ligase by Arylamino Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ciarrocchi, Giovanni; MacPhee, Donald G.; Deady, Les W.; Tilley, Leann

    1999-01-01

    All known DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester linkage between adjacent termini in double-stranded DNA via very similar mechanisms. The ligase family can, however, be divided into two classes: eubacterial ligases, which require NAD+ as a cofactor, and other ligases, from viruses, archaea, and eukaryotes, which use ATP. Drugs that discriminate between DNA ligases from different sources may have antieubacterial activity. We now report that a group of arylamino compounds, including some commonly used antimalarial and anti-inflammatory drugs and a novel series of bisquinoline compounds, are specific inhibitors of eubacterial DNA ligases. Members of this group of inhibitors have different heterocyclic ring systems with a common amino side chain in which the two nitrogens are separated by four carbon atoms. The potency, but not the specificity of action, is influenced by the DNA-binding characteristics of the inhibitor, and the inhibition is noncompetitive with respect to NAD+. The arylamino compounds appear to target eubacterial DNA ligase in vivo, since a Salmonella Lig− strain that has been rescued with the ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase is less sensitive than the parental Salmonella strain. PMID:10543760

  18. Specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-11-01

    The specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of single-stranded DNA made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T arranged in the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic sequences, with the aim to compare them with those related with a genomic DNA sequence. The energy spectra are calculated using the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a tight-binding approximation with the on-site energy exhibiting long-range disorder and nonrandom hopping amplitudes.

  19. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  20. Binding specificity of a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S; Caster, S A

    1982-05-01

    To investigate the interaction of DNA and anti-DNA antibodies in the immune complex disease of systemic lupus erythematosus, the fine specificity of binding of a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody was determined. This antibody, termed Cll, was derived from the fusion of spleen cells from an autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr mouse with the myeloma cell line M45. In a solid-phase ELISA assay to measure anti-DNA activity, Cll showed preference for single stranded compared to double stranded DNA of animal origin. The Cll antibody also bound some deoxyribohomopolymers as well as ribohomopolymers, but failed to bind synthetic DNA duplexes. Defined size oligonucleotides with a size range of 2-(12-18) failed to inhibit the binding of Cll to single stranded DNA. This pattern of binding is consistent with the recognition of a unique structural determinant that can be represented by a variety of nucleic acids. The absence of antigenic activity among the oligonucleotides suggests that an extended polynucleotide structure is required for antibody binding, possibly because of a bivalent or 'monogamous' mode of interaction. The binding properties of Cll further suggest that its ability to participate in immune complex formation may be limited by the nature of the available DNA antigen.

  1. DNA-directed mutations. Leading and lagging strand specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinden, R. R.; Hashem, V. I.; Rosche, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    The fidelity of replication has evolved to reproduce B-form DNA accurately, while allowing a low frequency of mutation. The fidelity of replication can be compromised, however, by defined order sequence DNA (dosDNA) that can adopt unusual or non B-DNA conformations. These alternative DNA conformations, including hairpins, cruciforms, triplex DNAs, and slipped-strand structures, may affect enzyme-template interactions that potentially lead to mutations. To analyze the effect of dosDNA elements on spontaneous mutagenesis, various mutational inserts containing inverted repeats or direct repeats were cloned in a plasmid containing a unidirectional origin of replication and a selectable marker for the mutation. This system allows for analysis of mutational events that are specific for the leading or lagging strands during DNA replication in Escherichia coli. Deletions between direct repeats, involving misalignment stabilized by DNA secondary structure, occurred preferentially on the lagging strand. Intermolecular strand switch events, correcting quasipalindromes to perfect inverted repeats, occurred preferentially during replication of the leading strand.

  2. DNA-directed mutations. Leading and lagging strand specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinden, R. R.; Hashem, V. I.; Rosche, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    The fidelity of replication has evolved to reproduce B-form DNA accurately, while allowing a low frequency of mutation. The fidelity of replication can be compromised, however, by defined order sequence DNA (dosDNA) that can adopt unusual or non B-DNA conformations. These alternative DNA conformations, including hairpins, cruciforms, triplex DNAs, and slipped-strand structures, may affect enzyme-template interactions that potentially lead to mutations. To analyze the effect of dosDNA elements on spontaneous mutagenesis, various mutational inserts containing inverted repeats or direct repeats were cloned in a plasmid containing a unidirectional origin of replication and a selectable marker for the mutation. This system allows for analysis of mutational events that are specific for the leading or lagging strands during DNA replication in Escherichia coli. Deletions between direct repeats, involving misalignment stabilized by DNA secondary structure, occurred preferentially on the lagging strand. Intermolecular strand switch events, correcting quasipalindromes to perfect inverted repeats, occurred preferentially during replication of the leading strand.

  3. A Hybrid Computer Simulation to Generate the DNA Distribution of a Cell Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, John L.; Adams, William S.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a method of simulating the formation of a DNA distribution, on which statistical results and experimentally measured parameters from DNA distribution and percent-labeled mitosis studies are combined. An EAI-680 and DECSystem-10 Hybrid Computer configuration are used. (Author/CS)

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes-polymer modified graphite electrodes for DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Muti, Mihrican; Kuralay, Filiz; Erdem, Arzum

    2012-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)-poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF(+)) modified pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) were developed in our study for the electrochemical monitoring of a sequence-selective DNA hybridization event. Firstly, SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGE, PVF(+) modified PGE and unmodified PGE were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical behavior of these electrodes was then investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGEs were optimized for improved DNA sensing ability by measuring the guanine oxidation signal. In order to obtain the full coverage immobilization of the DNA probe following the optimum working conditions, the effect of amino-linked, thiol-linked and, bare oligonucleotides (ODNs), and the concentration of the DNA probe on the response of the modified electrode were examined. After optimization studies, the sequence-selective DNA hybridization was evaluated in the case of hybridization between an amino-linked probe and its complementary (target), a noncomplementary (NC) sequence, calf thymus double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and target/mismatch (MM) mixtures in the ratio of 1:1. SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGEs presented very effective discrimination of DNA hybridization owing to their superior selectivity and sensitivity.

  5. A Hybrid Computer Simulation to Generate the DNA Distribution of a Cell Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, John L.; Adams, William S.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a method of simulating the formation of a DNA distribution, on which statistical results and experimentally measured parameters from DNA distribution and percent-labeled mitosis studies are combined. An EAI-680 and DECSystem-10 Hybrid Computer configuration are used. (Author/CS)

  6. Genetic composition of interspecific potato somatic hybrids and autofused 4x plants evaluated by DArT and cytoplasmic DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Smyda-Dajmund, Paulina; Śliwka, Jadwiga; Wasilewicz-Flis, Iwona; Jakuczun, Henryka; Zimnoch-Guzowska, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Using DArT analysis, we demonstrated that all Solanum × michoacanum (+) S. tuberosum somatic hybrids contained all parental chromosomes. However, from 13.9 to 29.6 % of the markers from both parents were lost in the hybrids. Somatic hybrids are an interesting material for research of nucleus-cytoplasm interaction and sources of new nuclear and cytoplasmic combinations. Analyses of genomes of somatic hybrids are essential for studies on genome compatibility between species, its evolution and are important for their efficient exploitation. Diversity array technology (DArT) permits analysis of the composition of nuclear DNA of somatic hybrids. The nuclear genome compositions of 97 Solanum × michoacanum (+) S. tuberosum [mch (+) tbr] somatic hybrids from five fusion combinations and 11 autofused 4x mch were analyzed for the first time based on DArT markers. Out of 5358 DArT markers generated in a single assay, greater than 2000 markers were polymorphic between parents, of which more than 1500 have a known chromosomal location on potato genetic or physical map. DArT markers were distributed along the entire length of 12 chromosomes. We noticed elimination of markers of wild and tbr fusion components. The nuclear genome of individual somatic hybrids was diversified. Mch is a source of resistance to Phytophthora infestans. From 97 mch (+) tbr somatic hybrids, two hybrids and all 11 autofused 4x mch were resistant to P. infestans. The analysis of the structure of particular hybrids' chromosomes indicated the presence of markers from both parental genomes as well as missing markers spread along the full length of the chromosome. Markers specific to chloroplast DNA and mitochondrial DNA were used for analysis of changes within the organellar genomes of somatic hybrids. Random and non-random segregations of organellar DNA were noted.

  7. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    PubMed

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  8. Hybrid Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: DNA Origami/Gold Nanoparticle Dimer/Graphene.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Julia; Matković, Aleksandar; Pešić, Jelena; Gajić, Radoš; Bald, Ilko

    2016-10-01

    A combination of three innovative materials within one hybrid structure to explore the synergistic interaction of their individual properties is presented. The unique electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties of graphene are combined with the plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers, which are assembled using DNA origami nanostructures. This novel hybrid structure is characterized by means of correlated atomic force microscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is demonstrated that strong interactions between graphene and AuNPs result in superior SERS performance of the hybrid structure compared to their individual components. This is particularly evident in efficient fluorescence quenching, reduced background, and a decrease of the photobleaching rate up to one order of magnitude. The versatility of DNA origami structures to serve as interface for complex and precise arrangements of nanoparticles and other functional entities provides the basis to further exploit the potential of the here presented DNA origami-AuNP dimer-graphene hybrid structures.

  9. Remote toehold: a mechanism for flexible control of DNA hybridization kinetics.

    PubMed

    Genot, Anthony J; Zhang, David Yu; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2011-02-23

    Hybridization of DNA strands can be used to build molecular devices, and control of the kinetics of DNA hybridization is a crucial element in the design and construction of functional and autonomous devices. Toehold-mediated strand displacement has proved to be a powerful mechanism that allows programmable control of DNA hybridization. So far, attempts to control hybridization kinetics have mainly focused on the length and binding strength of toehold sequences. Here we show that insertion of a spacer between the toehold and displacement domains provides additional control: modulation of the nature and length of the spacer can be used to control strand-displacement rates over at least 3 orders of magnitude. We apply this mechanism to operate displacement reactions in potentially useful kinetic regimes: the kinetic proofreading and concentration-robust regimes.

  10. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  11. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vikash; Mallik, Leena; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Skiniotis, Georgios; Joglekar, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting ‘architecture-function’ analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis. PMID:26348722

  12. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vikash; Mallik, Leena; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Skiniotis, Georgios; Joglekar, Ajit P

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting 'architecture-function' analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis.

  13. Isolation by genomic subtraction of DNA probes specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.

    PubMed Central

    Darrasse, A; Kotoujansky, A; Bertheau, Y

    1994-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica is a pathogen of potatoes in Europe because of its ability to induce blackleg symptoms early in the growing season. However, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora is not able to produce such severe symptoms under the same conditions. On the basis of the technique described by Straus and Ausubel (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:1889-1893, 1990), we isolated DNA sequences of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica 86.20 that were absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26. Six DNA fragments ranging from ca. 180 to 400 bp were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. Each fragment was further hybridized with 130 microorganisms including 87 E. carotovora strains. One probe was specific for typical E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains, two probes hybridized with all E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains and with a few E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains, and two probes recognized only a subset of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains. The last probe was absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26 but was present in the genomes of many strains, including those of other species and genera. This probe is homologous to the putP gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a proline carrier. Further use of the probes is discussed. Images PMID:8117082

  14. RNaseH1 regulates TERRA-telomeric DNA hybrids and telomere maintenance in ALT tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajika; Lee, Yongwoo; Wischnewski, Harry; Brun, Catherine M; Schwarz, Tobias; Azzalin, Claus M

    2014-10-21

    A fraction of cancer cells maintain telomeres through the telomerase-independent, 'Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres' (ALT) pathway. ALT relies on homologous recombination (HR) between telomeric sequences; yet, what makes ALT telomeres recombinogenic remains unclear. Here we show that the RNA endonuclease RNaseH1 regulates the levels of RNA-DNA hybrids between telomeric DNA and the long noncoding RNA TERRA, and is a key mediator of telomere maintenance in ALT cells. RNaseH1 associated to telomeres specifically in ALT cells and its depletion led to telomeric hybrid accumulation, exposure of single-stranded telomeric DNA, activation of replication protein A at telomeres and abrupt telomere excision. Conversely, overexpression of RNaseH1 weakened the recombinogenic nature of ALT telomeres and led to telomere shortening. Altering cellular RNaseH1 levels did not perturb telomere homoeostasis in telomerase-positive cells. RNaseH1 maintains regulated levels of telomeric RNA-DNA hybrids at ALT telomeres to trigger HR without compromising telomere integrity too severely.

  15. A controlled microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip for label-free diffusion-restricted DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-02-15

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for electrochemical analysis of DNA hybridization events offer a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care. Here, we present a microfluidic LOC, with 3 × 3 arrayed electrochemical sensors for the analysis of DNA hybridization events. A new dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system is integrated providing controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis. This feature improves the repeatability, accuracy, and overall sensing performance (Fig. 1). The electrochemical activity of the fabricated microfluidic device is validated and demonstrated repeatable and reversible Nernstian characteristics. System design required detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation as our sensing modeling involves diffusion-related electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of DNA hybridization on the calculated charge transfer resistance and the diffusional resistance components is evaluated. We demonstrate a specific device with an average cross-reactivity value of 27.5%. The device yields semilogarithmic dose response and enables a theoretical detection limit of 1 nM of complementary ssDNA target. This limit is lower than our previously reported non-valved device by 74% due to on-chip valve integration providing controlled and accurate assay capabilities.

  16. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases.

  17. The chromosomal constitution of fish hybrid lineage revealed by 5S rDNA FISH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Ye, Lihai; Chen, Yiyi; Xiao, Jun; Wu, Yanhong; Tao, Min; Xiao, Yamei; Liu, Shaojun

    2015-12-03

    The establishment of the bisexual fertile fish hybrid lineage including the allodiploid and allotetraploid hybrids, from interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var. 2n = 100, 2n = AA) (♀) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. 2n = 100, 2n = BB) (♂), provided a good platform to investigate genetic relationship between the parents and their hybrid progenies. The chromosomal inheritance of diploid and allotetraploid hybrid progenies in successive generations, was studied by applying 5S rDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization. Signals of 5S rDNA distinguished the chromosomal constitution of common carp (B-genome) from red crucian carp (A-genome), in which two strong signals were observed on the first submetacentric chromosome, while no major signal was found in common carp. After fish hybridization, one strong signal of 5S rDNA was detected in the same locus on the chromosome of diploid hybrids. As expected, two strong signals were observed in 4nF3 tetraploid hybrids offspring and it is worth mentioning that two strong signals were detected in a separating bivalent of a primary spermatocyte in 4nF3. Furthermore, the mitosis of heterozygous chromosomes was shown normal and stable with blastular tissue histological studies. We revealed that 5S rDNA signal can be applied to discern A-genome from B-genome, and that 5S rDNA bearing chromosomes can be stably passed down in successive generations. Our work provided a significant method in fish breeding and this is important for studies in fish evolutionary biology.

  18. Microwave-Induced Inactivation of DNA-Based Hybrid Catalyst in Asymmetric Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Shen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based hybrid catalysts have gained strong interests in asymmetric reactions. However, to maintain the high enantioselectivity, these reactions are usually conducted at relatively low temperatures (e.g. < 5 °C) for 2–3 days. Aiming to improve the reaction’s turnover rate, we evaluated microwave irradiation with simultaneous cooling as potential energy source since this method has been widely used to accelerate various chemical and enzymatic reactions. However, our data indicated that microwave irradiation induced an inactivation of DNA-based hybrid catalyst even at low temperatures (such as 5 °C). Circular dichroism (CD) spectra and gel electrophoresis of DNA suggest that microwave exposure degrades DNA molecules and disrupts DNA double-stranded structures, causing changes of DNA–metal ligand binding properties and thus poor DNA catalytic performance. PMID:26712696

  19. Comparative study of antipneumocystis agents in rats by using a Pneumocystis carinii-specific DNA probe to quantitate infection.

    PubMed

    Liberator, P A; Anderson, J W; Powles, M; Pittarelli, L A; Worley, M; Becker-Hapak, M; Graves, D C; Schmatz, D M

    1992-11-01

    A repetitive genomic DNA clone (B12-2) that specifically hybridizes to Pneumocystis carinii DNA has been identified. No cross-hybridization to genomic DNA prepared from bacteria, other fungi, protozoa, or mammals was observed. Clone B12-2 is multiply represented in the P. carinii genome. By direct hybridization to DNA prepared from the lungs of immunosuppressed rats, the probe can detect the equivalent of fewer than 1,000 P. carinii organisms. A hybridization assay employing clone B12-2 has been developed to quantitate organism load in the rat model for P. carinii. Application of the assay to track the accumulation of organisms during the immunosuppression regimen as well as to monitor the efficacy of two drug therapies used clinically for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia is described here. The clone B12-2 hybridization assay for the determination of P. carinii organism load possesses several advantageous features and thus should serve to complement conventional staining and immunohistochemical methods.

  20. Specific mitochondrial DNA deletions in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Marin-Garcia, J; Goldenthal, M J; Ananthakrishnan, R; Pierpont, M E; Fricker, F J; Lipshultz, S E; Perez-Atayde, A

    1996-02-01

    Structural changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in a number of clinical conditions with dysfunctions in oxidative phosphorylation called OX-PHOS diseases, some of which have cardiac involvement. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency and extent of specific mitochondrial DNA deletions in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. DNA extracted from tissue derived from the left ventricle of 41 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 17 controls was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers to assess the incidence and proportion of 5-kb and 7.4-kb deletions in mitochondrial DNA. In reactions using primers to detect the 5-kb deletion, an amplified product of 593 bp was found in low abundance relative to undeleted mitochondrial DNA but with high frequency in a number of controls and patients. A second deletion of 7.4 kb in size was also frequently present in controls and patients. In contrast to previous reports, these deletions were found to be present in both controls and in cardiomyopathic patients, 18 years and younger, including several infants. The 7.4-kb deletion was prominently increased in both frequency and in its proportion relative to undeleted mitochondrial DNA in patients 40 years and older with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. At variance with current literature our study reports a significant presence of both 5 and 7.4-kb deletions in the young and a higher frequency and quantity of the 7.4-kb deletion in the older cardiomyopathic patients in comparison with controls. The increased accumulation of the 7.4-kb deletion as both a function of aging and cardiomyopathy is suggestive that this specific mitochondrial DNA deletion arises more likely as an effect of heart dysfunction rather than as a primary cause of cardiomyopathy.

  1. Hybridization chain reaction-based fluorescence immunoassay using DNA intercalating dye for signal readout.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yan; Nie, Ji; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhao, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2014-07-07

    A novel format of fluorescence immunosorbent assay based on the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) using a DNA intercalating dye for signal readout was constructed for the sensitive detection of targets, both in competitive and sandwich modes. In this platform, the capture and recognition processes are based on immunoreactions and the signal amplification depends on the enzyme-free, isothermal HCR-induced labelling event. After a competitive or a sandwich immunoreaction, a biotinylated capture DNA was bound to a biotinylated signal antibody through avidin, and triggered the HCR by two specific hairpins into a nicked double helix. Gene Finder (GF), a fluorescent probe for double-strand DNA, was intercalated in situ into the amplified chain to produce the fluorescence signal. The limit of detection (LOD) for rabbit IgG in competitive mode by HCR/GF immunoassay was improved at least 100-fold compared with the traditional fluorescence immunoassay using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled-streptavidin or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled second antibody as the signal readout. The proposed fluorescence immunoassay was also demonstrated by using α-fetoprotein as the model target in sandwich mode, and showed a wide linear range from 28 ng mL(-1) to 20 μg mL(-1) with a LOD of 6.0 ng mL(-1). This method also showed satisfactory analysis in spiked human serum, which suggested that it might have great potential for versatile applications in life science and point-of-care diagnostics.

  2. Recovery and separation of rare earth elements using columns loaded with DNA-filter hybrid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Miyaji, Asami; Umeo, Miyuki; Honma, Tetsuo; Asaoka, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Given that the supply of several rare earth elements (REEs) is sometimes limited, recycling REEs used in various advanced materials, such as Nd magnets, is important for realizing efficient use of REE resources. In the present work, the feasibility of using DNA for REE recovery and separation was examined, along with the identification of the binding site of REEs in DNA. In particular, a DNA-cellulose filter paper hybrid was prepared so that DNA-based materials can be used for the separation of REEs using columns loaded with DNA. N,N'-Disuccinimidyl was used as a cross-linker reagent for the fixation of DNA onto a fibrous cellulose filter. The results showed that (i) the DNA-filter hybrid has a sufficiently high affinity to adsorb REEs; (ii) the adsorption capacity was 0.182 mg/g for Nd; and (iii) the affinity of REEs for DNA was stronger for REEs with larger atomic numbers. The difference of the affinity among REEs in the third result was compared with the adsorption patterns of REEs discussed in the literature. The comparison suggests that phosphate in the DNA-filter paper hybrid was responsible for REE adsorption onto the hybrid. The results were supported by the Nd, Dy, and Lu L(III)-edge EXAFS; the REE-P shell was identified for the second neighboring atom, showing the importance of the phosphate site as REE binding sites. The difference in the affinity among REEs suggest that group separation of REEs (such as La, Ce, (Pr and Nd), (Ho, Dy, and Er), (Tb and Gd), (Sm, Eu), Tm, Yb, and Lu) is possible, although complete isolation of each REE from a solution containing all REEs may be difficult. For practical applications, Nd and Fe(III) were successfully separated from a synthetic solution of Nd magnet waste using columns loaded with the DNA-filter hybrid.

  3. Detection and analysis of leptospiral DNA in early Leptospirosis by polymerase chain reaction and DNA hybridization with Digoxingenin-AMPPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Lang; Yu, Ye-Rong; Terpstra, W. J.

    1994-07-01

    Fourteen serum specimens from patients with early Leptospirosis proven by blood culture and serological test were detected by PCR with the oligonucleotide primers obtained from a genomic library of leptospira interrogans. The amplified DNA were hybridized with the homologous DNA probe labeling with Digoxingenin-AMPPD. All of the samples revealed the presence of leptospira and the strong signals were visualized with homologous DNA probes hybridization. Negative and positive controls appeared correctly. The DNA fragment generated from PCR amplification homologically hybridized with the DNA of 16 strains of leptospira. The single recognized band (about 400 bps) from 6 out of the 16 strains has come out which are representative of the principal strains in Sichuan, China. The results demonstrated that PCR is an advanced diagnostic technique for early Leptospirosis. The treatment of samples is easy and has little risk of DNA loss and contamination. This is a considerable advantage over other detective techniques and can be available especially in China and other developing countries.

  4. Matching base-pair number dependence of the kinetics of DNA-DNA hybridization studied by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Keiko; Yao, Danfeng; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2005-08-15

    Two single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides consisting of complementary base-pairs can form double strands. This phenomenon is well studied in solutions, however, in order to clarify the physical mechanism of the hybridization occurring at a solid/solution interface, we studied the kinetics by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS): one single-stranded oligo-DNA (probe-DNA) was immobilized on the substrate, the other one (target-DNA) labelled with a fluorescent probe was added to the flow cell. After hybridization, the chromophores could be excited by the surface plasmon mode and their fluorescence detected with high sensitivity. The dependence of the k(on) and k(off) rate constants on the length of the hybridizing oligonucleotides was investigated by using a MM0 series (no mismatch) and the kinetics was found to be well described by a Langmuir adsorption model. From these measurements we found that also in the case of surface hybridization the affinity of the duplexes decreases as the number of matching base-pairs decreases from 15 to 10. In order to show that SPFS is the powerful technique with high sensitivity, the hybridization process for mixed target-oligos was measured by SPFS and analyzed by an expanded Langmuir model in which two components of target-oligo can bind to probe-DNA at the sensor surface competitively. Two sets of the k(on) and k(off) obtained from the experiment are successfully consistent with the k(on) and k(off) obtained from experiments for single (pure) target-DNA.

  5. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  6. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Sarah J; Meaburn, Emma L; Dempster, Emma L; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L; Smith, Rebecca G; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood.

  7. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes.

  8. Magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor with DNA-modified carbon nanotubes as recognition elements for detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Po; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang; Ling, Jian; Liu, Yu Ling; Fei, Liang Run; Xie, Jian Ping

    2008-03-01

    In this contribution, we design a visual sensor for DNA hybridization with DNA probe-modified magnetic particles (MPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) without involving a visual recognition element such as fluorescent/chemiluminescent reagents. It was found that DNA probe-modified MWNTs, which could be dispersed in aqueous medium and have strong light scattering signals under the excitation of a light beam in the UV-vis region, could connect with DNA probe-modified MPs together in the presence of perfectly complementary target DNA and form a sandwich structure. In a magnetic field, the formed MP-MWNT species can easily be removed from the solution, resulting in a decrease of light scattering signals. Thus, a magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor could be developed to detect DNA hybridization by measuring the light scattering signals with DNA-modified MWNTs as recognition elements. Experiments showed that the DNA-modified MPs sensor could be reused at least 17 times and was stable for more than 6 months.

  9. Distribution of 45S rDNA in Modern Rose Cultivars (Rosa hybrida), Rosa rugosa, and Their Interspecific Hybrids Revealed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Ting-Liang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Le; Yu, Chao; Dong, Gui-Min; Pan, Hui-Tang; Zhang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of the location and number of rDNA loci in the process of polyploidization in the genus Rosa, we examined 45S rDNA sites in the chromosomes of 6 modern rose cultivars (R. hybrida), 5 R. rugosa cultivars, and 20 hybrid progenies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Variation in the number of rDNA sites in parents and their interspecific hybrids was detected. As expected, 4 rDNA sites were observed in the genomes of 4 modern rose cultivars, while 3 hybridization sites were observed in the 2 others. Two expected rDNA sites were found in 2 R. rugosa cultivars, while in the other 3 R. rugosa cultivars 4 sites were present. Among the 20 R. hybrida × R. rugosa offspring, 13 carried the expected number of rDNA sites, and 1 had 6 hybridization sites, which exceeded the expected number by far. The other 6 offspring had either 2 or 3 hybridization sites, which was less than expected. Differences in the number of rDNA loci were observed in interspecific offspring, indicating that rDNA loci exhibit instability after distant hybridization events. Abnormal chromosome pairing may be the main factor explaining the variation in rDNA sites during polyploidization.

  10. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  11. Mechanosensing of DNA bending in a single specific protein-DNA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Shimin; Chen, Hu; Cong, Peiwen; Lin, Jie; Dröge, Peter; Yan, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Many crucial biological processes are regulated by mechanical stimuli. Here, we report new findings that pico-Newton forces can drastically affect the stability of the site-specific DNA binding of a single transcription factor, the E. coli integration host factor (IHF), by stretching a short ~150 nm DNA containing a single IHF binding site. Dynamic binding and unbinding of single IHF were recorded and analyzed for the force-dependent stability of the IHF-DNA complex. Our results demonstrate that the IHF-DNA interaction is fine tuned by force in different salt concentration and temperature over physiological ranges, indicating that, besides other physiological factors, force may play equally important role in transcription regulation. These findings have broad implications with regard to general mechanosensitivity of site-specific DNA bending proteins.

  12. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  13. Specific DNA recognition mediated by a type IV pilin

    PubMed Central

    Cehovin, Ana; Simpson, Peter J.; McDowell, Melanie A.; Brown, Daniel R.; Noschese, Rossella; Pallett, Mitchell; Brady, Jacob; Baldwin, Geoffrey S.; Lea, Susan M.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Natural transformation is a dominant force in bacterial evolution by promoting horizontal gene transfer. This process may have devastating consequences, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance or the emergence of highly virulent clones. However, uptake and recombination of foreign DNA are most often deleterious to competent species. Therefore, model naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria, including the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, have evolved means to preferentially take up homotypic DNA containing short and genus-specific sequence motifs. Despite decades of intense investigations, the DNA uptake sequence receptor in Neisseria species has remained elusive. We show here, using a multidisciplinary approach combining biochemistry, molecular genetics, and structural biology, that meningococcal type IV pili bind DNA through the minor pilin ComP via an electropositive stripe that is predicted to be exposed on the filaments surface and that ComP displays an exquisite binding preference for DNA uptake sequence. Our findings illuminate the earliest step in natural transformation, reveal an unconventional mechanism for DNA binding, and suggest that selective DNA uptake is more widespread than previously thought. PMID:23386723

  14. DNA origami metallized site specifically to form electrically conductive nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Anthony C; Liu, Jianfei; Pound, Elisabeth; Uprety, Bibek; Woolley, Adam T; Davis, Robert C; Harb, John N

    2012-09-06

    DNA origami is a promising tool for use as a template in the design and fabrication of nanoscale structures. The ability to engineer selected staple strands on a DNA origami structure provides a high density of addressable locations across the structure. Here we report a method using site-specific attachment of gold nanoparticles to modified staple strands and subsequent metallization to fabricate conductive wires from DNA origami templates. We have modified DNA origami structures by lengthening each staple strand in select regions with a 10-base nucleotide sequence and have attached DNA-modified gold nanoparticles to the lengthened staple strands via complementary base-pairing. The high density of extended staple strands allowed the gold nanoparticles to pack tightly in the modified regions of the DNA origami, where the measured median gap size between neighboring particles was 4.1 nm. Gold metallization processes were optimized so that the attached gold nanoparticles grew until gaps between particles were filled and uniform continuous nanowires were formed. Finally, electron beam lithography was used to pattern electrodes in order to measure the electrical conductivity of metallized DNA origami, which showed an average resistance of 2.4 kΩ per metallized structure.

  15. Electrochemical DNA sensor for specific detection of picomolar Hg(II) based on exonuclease III-assisted recycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaorong; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2015-03-21

    An ultrasensitive methodology was successfully developed for the quantitative detection of picomolar Hg(2+) based on the combination of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and exonuclease III-aided recycling signal amplification. Single-strand probe DNA was immobilized on an Au electrode via an Au-S bond. In the presence of Hg(2+), the probe DNA hybridized with the target DNA containing four thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatches via the Hg(2+)-mediated coordination of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs. Then the probe DNA in the DNA duplex was specifically recognized and selectively digested by exonuclease III; in contrast the target DNA was safely dissociated from the DNA duplexes to subsequently hybridize with a new signal probe, leading to target recycling and signal amplification. As a result, the peak current caused by the electrostatic interactions of [Ru(NH3)6](3+) cations with the backbone of the probe DNA decreased by different degrees, corresponding to the Hg(2+) concentrations. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor showed a robust detection limit as low as 1 pM (S/N = 3), with a wide linear range from 0.01 to 500 nM and good selectivity. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to assay Hg(2+) in real environmental samples.

  16. DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as a Detection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Su-Moon

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in label free DNA hybridization sensors employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a detection tool are reviewed. These sensors are based on the modulation of the blocking ability of an electrode modified with a probe DNA by an analyte, i.e., target DNA. The probe DNA is immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer, a conducting polymer film, or a layer of nanostructures on the electrode such that desired probe DNA would selectively hybridize with target DNA. The rate of charge transfer from the electrode thus modified to a redox indicator, e.g., [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−, which is measured by EIS in the form of charge transfer resistance (Rct), is modulated by whether or not, as well as how much, the intended target DNA is selectively hybridized. Efforts made to enhance the selectivity as well as the sensitivity of DNA sensors and to reduce the EIS measurement time are briefly described along with brief future perspectives in developing DNA sensors. PMID:22303136

  17. Detection of TT Virus DNA in Liver Biopsies by in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Casqueiro, Mercedes; Bartolomé, Javier; Ortiz-Movilla, Nuria; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Herrero, Montserrat; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Oliva, Horacio; Carreño, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    A novel hepatitis-associated virus named TT virus (TTV) has been isolated. However, its hepatotropism has not been proven. We have retrospectively analyzed the presence of TTV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization in liver biopsies from 30 patients with liver disease (15 TTV-DNA-positive and 15 TTV-DNA-negative in serum), and prospectively in serum and liver from eight patients with normal liver histology. TTV-DNA was detected by PCR in the liver from the 15 patients with serum TTV-DNA and in serum and liver of two of the eight patients without liver disease. TTV-DNA titers in liver were 10 times higher than in serum, although no correlation between TTV-DNA titers in serum and liver were observed. In situ hybridization shows positive signals in the hepatocytes of the 17 patients infected by TTV but in none of the TTV-DNA-negative patients by PCR. No morphological changes were observed in the hepatocytes showing hybridization signals. The percentage of positive hepatocytes ranged from 2.1% to 30% and correlated with the TTV-DNA titers in liver (r = 0.54; P = 0.037). In conclusion, our results show that TTV is able to infect liver cells although they do not support a role for TTV in causing liver disease. PMID:10751348

  18. Identification of Rhizobium spp. in peat-based inoculants by DNA hybridization and PCR and its application in inoculant quality control.

    PubMed Central

    Tas, E; Saano, A; Leinonen, P; Lindström, K

    1995-01-01

    Procedures based on DNA hybridization and PCR were developed for quality control of Rhizobium inoculants. Inoculants for pea and goat's rue were produced by Elomestari Ltd., Juva, Finland, in sterile dry fine peat by the standard procedure used by the company. The inoculants contained Rhizobium galegae HAMBI 1174 and HAMBI 1207 and an R. leguminosarum biovar vicia strain, 16HSA, either solely or in combinations of two or three strains. DNA was isolated from 1-g samples of each peat inoculant and analyzed by nonradioactive DNA-DNA hybridization and by PCR. The hybridization probes were total DNAs from pure cultures of R. galegae HAMBI 1207 and R. leguminosarum biovar viciae 16HSA and a 264-bp strain-specific fragment from the genome of R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The total DNA probes distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae or R. leguminosarum, and the strain-specific probe distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The hybridization results for R. galegae were verified in a PCR experiment by amplifying an R. galegae species-specific fragment and an R. galegae HAMBI 1174 strain-specific fragment in the same reaction. When suitable probes and primers are available, the methods described here offer promising alternatives for the quality control of peat-based inoculants. PMID:7646020

  19. Design and testing of a functional group-specific DNA probe for the study of natural populations of acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, C R; Hui, Y

    1991-01-01

    The acetogens, although phylogenetically diverse, can be characterized by their possession of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, a key enzyme of the acetyl-CoA pathway, was previously cloned from the thermophilic acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum and has now been tested as a group-specific probe for acetogens. Stable hybrids were formed between the probe and single DNA fragments from eight known acetogens representing six genera. A hybrid was also formed between the probe and a DNA fragment from one sulfate reducer known to be capable of both autotrophic CO2 fixation and acetate catabolism. No such hybrid was formed between the probe and DNA from a homoacetate fermenter not known to use the acetyl-CoA pathway, with two known formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase-producing purine fermenters, or with DNA from 27 other species representing 16 genera of organisms that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway. DNA purified from cells extracted from horse manure was also screened with the acetogen probe. Six hybrids, indicating at least six detectable acetogen "strains," were observed. Images PMID:1768134