Science.gov

Sample records for specific dna hybridization

  1. Specific DNA-RNA hybrid recognition by TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Pan, Xiaojing; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Yan, Nieng; Shi, Yigong

    2012-10-25

    The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats). Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  2. [Diagnosed tuberculosis using specific DNA probe hybridization methods].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Itaru; Yamazumi, Toshiaki

    2002-11-01

    In Japan, reported cases of tuberculosis had declined nearly every year until 1995. However, in 1997 newly recorded cases began increasing for the first time in more than 38 years. Recent studies using DNA fingerprinting show that person- to person transmission may account for as many as one-third of new cases of tuberculosis in citizen populations. Nucleic acid hybridization methods using specific DNA probes can specifically identify M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species. Rapid nucleic acid amplification techniques such as polymerase chain reaction methods allow direct identification of M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens. Is 6110 has been exploited extensively as a clonal marker in molecular epidemiology studies of tuberculosis. The emergence of resistance to antituberculosis drugs is a relevant matter worldwide. A recent genotypic method allows earlier detection of RFP-resistant and INH-resistant stains using probes for mutation in rpoB and in katG.

  3. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  4. Hybridization chain reaction-based instantaneous derivatization technology for chemiluminescence detection of specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Lau, Choiwan; Kai, Masaaki; Lu, Jianzhong

    2013-05-07

    We propose here a new amplifying strategy that uses hybridization chain reaction (HCR) to detect specific sequences of DNA, where stable DNA monomers assemble on the magnetic beads only upon exposure to a target DNA. Briefly, in the HCR process, two complementary stable species of hairpins coexist in solution until the introduction of initiator reporter strands triggers a cascade of hybridization events that yield nicked double helices analogous to alternating copolymers. Moreover, a "sandwich-type" detection strategy is employed in our design. Magnetic beads, which are functionalized with capture DNA, are reacted with the target, and sandwiched with the above nicked double helices. Then, chemiluminescence (CL) detection proceeds via an instantaneous derivatization reaction between a specific CL reagent, 3,4,5-trimethoxylphenylglyoxal (TMPG), and the guanine nucleotides within the target DNA, reporter strands and DNA monomers for the generation of light. Our results clearly show that the amplification detection of specific sequences of DNA achieves a better performance (e.g. wide linear response range, low detection limit, and high specificity) as compared to the traditional sandwich type (capture/target/reporter) assays. Upon modification, the approach presented could be extended to detect other types of targets. We believe that this simple technique is promising for improving medical diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Hybrid TiO II nanoparticles: an approach for developing site specific DNA cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Saponjic, Z.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Luo, S.; Preuss, D.; Rajh, T.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed hybrid light responsive TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to PNA oligonucleotides that site specifically bind to double stranded target DNA. This opens a new opportunity for the development of a highly efficient "artificial restriction enzyme" whose activity can be controlled by using light. The work focuses on the use of TiO II nanocomposites as analogs of restriction enzymes with unique specificity that does not exist in current biological approaches. TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to DNA or PNA adapters have been site-specifically attached along double stranded λ DNA vectors. Illumination of this assembly results in selective oxidation of DNA at the deepest "thermodynamic traps" located closest to the nanoparticle surface, causing DNA cleavage. We investigate the effect of the sequence and length of DNA and PNA adapters on the specificity of DNA cleavage. Related to this issue, the potential use of TiO II/DNA nanocomposites as "rare cutters" that cleave DNA in the places not achieved with existing protein-based enzymes is investigated.

  6. Regional localization of chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments by using a hybrid cell deletion mapping panel.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, M J; Drabkin, H A; Firnhaber, C; Miller, Y E; Scoggin, C H; Smith, D I

    1988-01-01

    A series of human chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments isolated and characterized from a lamda phage genomic library were regionally localized on human chromosome 3. This was accomplished using filter hybridization blot analysis of a human chromosome 3 hybrid cell deletion mapping panel. Twenty-three new anonymous DNA fragments were assigned to one of four physical regions of chromosome 3. Seventeen DNA fragments were mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3, including one DNA fragment that demonstrated a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Five DNA fragments were assigned to 3p14.2----pter, including one highly polymorphic fragment sublocalized at 3p25----pter by in situ hybridization. This DNA fragment is the second reported distal 3p polymorphic probe. One DNA fragment was localized to 3p14----p14.2. In addition, three fragments previously assigned to chromosome 3 were confirmed. Polymorphic DNA probes DNF15S2 (formerly D1S1) and D3S2 were mapped to 3p14.2----pter. The previous 3p25 in situ localization of the c-raf-1 oncogene was supported by deletion panel mapping. The physical localization of these twenty-three new DNA fragments has more than doubled the number of cloned DNA fragments assigned to chromosome 3. These and future regional assignments of DNA fragment probes will facilitate construction of both a physical and genetic linkage map of chromosome 3. They may also be useful in characterizing the chromosomal and molecular aberrations involved in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), renal cell carcinoma, other malignancies, and the 3p14.2 common fragile site. Images p[446]-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2902784

  7. Specific detection and confirmation of Campylobacter jejuni by DNA hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, L K; Kingombe, C I; Yan, W; Taylor, D E; Hiratsuka, K; Malik, N; Garcia, M M

    1997-01-01

    Conventional detection and confirmation methods for Campylobacter jejuni are lengthy and tedious. A rapid hybridization protocol in which a 1,475-bp chromogen-labelled DNA probe (pDT1720) and Campylobacter strains filtered and grown on 0.22-micron-pore-size hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) are used was developed. Among the environmental and clinical isolates of C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei, Campylobacter lari, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis and a panel of 310 unrelated bacterial strains tested, only C. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei isolates hybridized with the probe under stringent conditions. The specificity of the probe was confirmed when the protocol was applied to spiked skim milk and chicken rinse samples. Based on the nucleotide sequence of pDT1720, a pair of oligonucleotide primers was designed for PCR amplification of DNA from Campylobacter spp. and other food pathogens grown overnight in selective Mueller-Hinton broth with cefoperazone and growth supplements. All C. jejuni strains tested, including DNase-producing strains and C. jejuni subsp. doylei, produced a specific 402-bp amplicon, as confirmed by restriction and Southern blot analysis. The detection range of the assay was as low as 3 CFU per PCR to as high as 10(5) CFU per PCR for pure cultures. Overnight enrichment of chicken rinse samples spiked initially with as little as approximately 10 CFU/ml produced amplicons after the PCR. No amplicon was detected with any of the other bacterial strains tested or from the chicken background microflora. Since C. jejuni is responsible for 99% of Campylobacter contamination in poultry, PCR and HGMF hybridization were performed on naturally contaminated chicken rinse samples, and the results were compared with the results of conventional cultural isolation on Preston agar. All samples confirmed to be culture positive for C. jejuni were also identified by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification, thus confirming that

  8. Specific detection and confirmation of Campylobacter jejuni by DNA hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed

    Ng, L K; Kingombe, C I; Yan, W; Taylor, D E; Hiratsuka, K; Malik, N; Garcia, M M

    1997-11-01

    Conventional detection and confirmation methods for Campylobacter jejuni are lengthy and tedious. A rapid hybridization protocol in which a 1,475-bp chromogen-labelled DNA probe (pDT1720) and Campylobacter strains filtered and grown on 0.22-micron-pore-size hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) are used was developed. Among the environmental and clinical isolates of C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei, Campylobacter lari, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis and a panel of 310 unrelated bacterial strains tested, only C. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei isolates hybridized with the probe under stringent conditions. The specificity of the probe was confirmed when the protocol was applied to spiked skim milk and chicken rinse samples. Based on the nucleotide sequence of pDT1720, a pair of oligonucleotide primers was designed for PCR amplification of DNA from Campylobacter spp. and other food pathogens grown overnight in selective Mueller-Hinton broth with cefoperazone and growth supplements. All C. jejuni strains tested, including DNase-producing strains and C. jejuni subsp. doylei, produced a specific 402-bp amplicon, as confirmed by restriction and Southern blot analysis. The detection range of the assay was as low as 3 CFU per PCR to as high as 10(5) CFU per PCR for pure cultures. Overnight enrichment of chicken rinse samples spiked initially with as little as approximately 10 CFU/ml produced amplicons after the PCR. No amplicon was detected with any of the other bacterial strains tested or from the chicken background microflora. Since C. jejuni is responsible for 99% of Campylobacter contamination in poultry, PCR and HGMF hybridization were performed on naturally contaminated chicken rinse samples, and the results were compared with the results of conventional cultural isolation on Preston agar. All samples confirmed to be culture positive for C. jejuni were also identified by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification, thus confirming that

  9. Construction of Hypericin Gland-Specific cDNA Library via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Hou, Weina; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Hypericin, an important determinant of the pharmacological properties of the genus Hypericum, is considered as a major molecule for drug development. However, biosynthesis and accumulation of hypericin is not well understood. Identification of genes differentially expressed in tissues with and without hypericin accumulation is a useful strategy to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the dark glands and hypericin biosynthesis. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is a unique method for PCR-based amplification of specific cDNA fragments that differ between a control (driver) and experimental (tester) transcriptome. This technique relies on the removal of dsDNA formed by hybridization between a control and test sample, thus eliminating cDNAs of similar abundance, and retaining differentially expressed or variable in sequence cDNAs. In our laboratory we applied this method to identify the genes involved in the development of dark glands and accumulation of hypericin in Hypericum perforatum. Here we describe the complete procedure for the construction of hypericin gland-specific subtracted cDNA library.

  10. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  11. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of miRNA-21 Using a Zinc Finger Protein Specific to DNA-RNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiew San; Kim, Kwang-Sun; Yu, Byeongjun; Jon, Sangyong; Kim, Moon-Soo; Yang, Haesik

    2017-02-07

    Both high sensitivity and high specificity are crucial for detection of miRNAs that have emerged as important clinical biomarkers. Just Another Zinc finger proteins (JAZ, ZNF346) bind preferably (but nonsequence-specifically) to DNA-RNA hybrids over single-stranded RNAs, single-stranded DNAs, and double-stranded DNAs. We present an ultrasensitive and highly specific electrochemical method for miRNA-21 detection based on the selective binding of JAZ to the DNA-RNA hybrid formed between a DNA capture probe and a target miRNA-21. This enables us to use chemically stable DNA as a capture probe instead of RNA as well as to apply a standard sandwich-type assay format to miRNA detection. High signal amplification is obtained by (i) enzymatic amplification by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) coupled with (ii) electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling involving an ALP product (hydroquinone). Low nonspecific adsorption of ALP-conjugated JAZ is obtained using a polymeric self-assembled-monolayer-modified and casein-treated indium-tin oxide electrode. The detection method can discriminate between target miRNA-21 and nontarget nucleic acids (DNA-DNA hybrid, single-stranded DNA, miRNA-125b, miRNA-155, single-base mismatched miRNA, and three-base mismatched miRNA). The detection limits for miRNA-21 in buffer and 10-fold diluted serum are approximately 2 and 30 fM, respectively, indicating that the detection method is ultrasensitive. This detection method can be readily extended to multiplex detection of miRNAs with only one ALP-conjugated JAZ probe due to its nonsequence-specific binding character. We also believe that the method could offer a promising solution for point-of-care testing of miRNAs in body fluids.

  12. Ricin A-chain substrate specificity in RNA, DNA, and hybrid stem-loop structures.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Tim K; Schramm, Vern L

    2004-05-04

    Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) is the catalytic subunit of ricin, a heterodimeric toxin from castor beans. Its ribosomal inactivating activity arises from depurination of a single adenine from position A(4324) in a GAGA tetraloop from 28S ribosomal RNA. Minimal substrate requirements are the GAGA tetraloop and stem of two or more base pairs. Depurination activity also occurs on stem-loop DNA with the same sequence, but with the k(cat) reduced 200-fold. Systematic variation of RNA 5'-G(1)C(2)G(3)C(4)[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)]G(9)C(10)G(11)C(12)-3' 12mers via replacement of each nucleotide in the tetraloop with a deoxynucleotide showed a 16-fold increase in k(cat) for A(6) --> dA(6) but reduced k(cat) up to 300-fold for the other sites. Methylation of individual 2'-hydroxyls in a similar experiment reduced k(cat) by as much as 3 x 10(-3)-fold. In stem-loop DNA, replacement of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] with individual ribonucleotides resulted in small kinetic changes, except for the dA(6) --> A(6) replacement for which k(cat) decreased 6-fold. Insertion of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] into an RNA stem-loop or G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8) into a DNA stem-loop reduced k(cat) by 30- and 5-fold, respectively. Multiple substitutions of deoxyribonucleotides into RNA stem-loops in one case (dG(5),dG(7)) decreased k(cat)/K(m) by 10(5)-fold, while a second change (dG(5),dA(8)) decreased k(cat) by 100-fold. Mapping these interactions on the structure of GAGA stem-loop RNA suggests that all the loop 2'-hydroxyl groups play a significant role in the action of ricin A-chain. Improved binding of RNA-DNA stem-loop hybrids provides a scaffold for inhibitor design. Replacing the adenosine of the RTA depurination site with deoxyadenosine in a small RNA stem-loop increased k(cat) 20-fold to 1660 min(-1), a value similar to RTA's k(cat) on intact ribosomes.

  13. Strategies for optimizing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Kashanian, Soheila; Sanadgol, Nima; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Karami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Specific and predictable hybridization of the polynucleotide sequences to their complementary counterparts plays a fundamental role in the rational design of new nucleic acid nanodevices. Generally, nucleic acid hybridization can be performed using two major strategies, namely hybridization of DNA or RNA targets to surface-tethered oligonucleotide probes (solid-phase hybridization) and hybridization of the target nucleic acids to randomly distributed probes in solution (solution-phase hybridization). Investigations into thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of these two strategies showed that hybridization on surfaces is less favorable than that of the same sequence in solution. Indeed, the efficiency of DNA hybridization on surfaces suffers from three constraints: (1) electrostatic repulsion between DNA strands on the surface, (2) steric hindrance between tethered DNA probes, and (3) nonspecific adsorption of the attached oligonucleotides to the solid surface. During recent years, several strategies have been developed to overcome the problems associated with DNA hybridization on surfaces. Optimizing the probe surface density, application of a linker between the solid surface and the DNA-recognizing sequence, optimizing the pH of DNA hybridization solutions, application of thiol reagents, and incorporation of a polyadenine block into the terminal end of the recognizing sequence are among the most important strategies for enhancing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

  14. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  15. Electrokinetic acceleration of DNA hybridization in microsystems.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Wang, Yun-Hsiang; Chen, Huai-Yi; Sun, Jia-Hong; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2015-06-01

    In this work, electrokinetic acceleration of DNA hybridization was investigated by different combinations of frequencies and amplitudes of actuating electric signals. Because the frequencies from low to high can induce different kinds of electrokinetic forces, i.e., electroosmotic to electrothermal forces, this work provides an in-depth investigation of electrokinetic enhanced hybridization. Concentric circular Cr/Au microelectrodes of 350 µm in diameter were fabricated on a glass substrate and probe DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface. Target DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes suspending in solution was then applied to the electrode. Different electrokinetic forces were induced by the application of different electric signals to the circular microelectrodes. Local microfluidic vortexes were generated to increase the collision efficiency between the target DNA suspending in solution and probe DNA immobilized on the electrode surface. DNA hybridization on the electrode surface could be accelerated by the electrokinetic forces. The level of hybridization was represented by the fluorescent signal intensity ratio. Results revealed that such 5-min dynamic hybridization increased 4.5 fold of signal intensity ratio as compared to a 1-h static hybridization. Moreover, dynamic hybridization was found to have better differentiation ability between specific and non-specific target DNA. This study provides a strategy to accelerate DNA hybridization in microsystems.

  16. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  17. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  18. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  19. A ribosomal DNA fragment of Listeria monocytogenes and its use as a genus-specific probe in an aqueous-phase hybridization assay.

    PubMed Central

    Emond, E; Fliss, I; Pandian, S

    1993-01-01

    cDNAs were prepared from the total RNA of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19118 and used as probes to screen a genomic library of the same strain. Four clones were identified which contained ribosomal DNA fragments. Recombinant DNA from one of them was fractionated and differentially hybridized with the cDNA probes to RNA of L. monocytogenes and Kurthia zopfii. The resulting hybridization pattern revealed an HpaII fragment of 0.8 kb that was specific for the L. monocytogenes strain. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment showed 159 bases of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA gene, 243 bases of the spacer region, and 382 bases of the 5' end of the 23S rRNA gene. In dot blot hybridization assays, the 32P-labeled 784-bp fragment was specific only for Listeria species. Dot blot assays revealed that the 32P-labeled fragment can easily detect > or = 10 pg of total nucleic acids from pure cultures of L. monocytogenes, which corresponds to approximately 300 bacteria. This fragment was also used as a probe in an assay named the heteroduplex nucleic acid (HNA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this system, the biotinylated DNA probe is hybridized in the aqueous phase with target RNA molecules and then specific HNAs are captured by HNA-specific antibodies. Captured HNA molecules are revealed with an enzyme conjugate of streptavidin. In a preliminary HNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the 784-bp fragment maintained its specificity for Listeria spp. and could detect 5 x 10(2) cells in artificially contaminated meat homogenate. Images PMID:8368854

  20. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  1. Dual infection of chickens with pox and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) confirmed with specific pox and ILT DNA dot-blot hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Fatunmbi, O O; Reed, W M; Schwartz, D L; Tripathy, D N

    1995-01-01

    Dual infection with fowl pox (FP) and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) was diagnosed as the cause of acute mortality in a flock of three age groups of Hy-Line leghorn layers. The affected chickens had not been previously vaccinated against either FP or ILT. The diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation, histopathology, and the use of specific pox and ILT genomic DNA probes in a dot-blot hybridization assay. FP and ILT vaccinations were recommended to control mortality. The use of FP- and ILT-specific DNA dot-blot hybridization may be used as a routine diagnostic tool to differentiate between the two diseases, especially in atypical cases of either infection or to confirm the existence of the two diseases as a mixed infection in a flock of chickens.

  2. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  3. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  4. Detection of pseudorabies virus by DNA hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A DNA hybridization technique was developed in order to detect the presence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in swine tissue. Seven, /sup 32/P-nick translated probes of high specific activity were prepared from transformed Escherichia coli plasmids into which Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H (Bam H1) restriction fragments of PRV-DNA had been inserted. Under optimal hybridization conditions, the minimum detection level of PRV-DNA was 10/sup -11/ g, which is equivalent to 1 copy of the PRV genome/80 host cells. PRV-DNA was detected in the DNA extracted from the tissues of 10 out of 11 swine previously shown to harbor infective virus. Furthermore, PRV-DNA was present in all four seropositive swine that had recovered from pseudorabies, where no infective virus or viral products were detected at necropsy. The PRV-DNA was present in either the anterior cerebral cortex in 2 swine, or the medulla oblongata and trigeminal ganglion in 1 swine. This perhaps indicates the portal of entry of the virus into the central nervous system. This DNA hybridization assay, which utilizes restriction fragments, may be useful for studying the dynamics and molecular biologic properties of the latency of pseudorabies virus in swine.

  5. Control of DNA hybridization by photoswitchable molecular glue.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Hybridization of DNA is one of the most intriguing events in molecular recognition and is essential for living matter to inherit life beyond generations. In addition to the function of DNA as genetic material, DNA hybridization is a key to control the function of DNA-based materials in nanoscience. Since the hybridization of two single stranded DNAs is a thermodynamically favorable process, dissociation of the once formed DNA duplex is normally unattainable under isothermal conditions. As the progress of DNA-based nanoscience, methodology to control the DNA hybridization process has become increasingly important. Besides many reports using the chemically modified DNA for the regulation of hybridization, we focused our attention on the use of a small ligand as the molecular glue for the DNA. In 2001, we reported the first designed molecule that strongly and specifically bound to the mismatched base pairs in double stranded DNA. Further studies on the mismatch binding molecules provided us a key discovery of a novel mode of the binding of a mismatch binding ligand that induced the base flipping. With these findings we proposed the concept of molecular glue for DNA for the unidirectional control of DNA hybridization and, eventually photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, which enabled the bidirectional control of hybridization under photoirradiation. In this tutorial review, we describe in detail how we integrated the mismatch binding ligand into photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, and the application and perspective in DNA-based nanoscience.

  6. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  7. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting-based community DNA hybridization to pinpoint genome-specific fragments as molecular markers to identify and track populations common to healthy human guts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guifang; Pan, Li; Du, Huimin; Chen, Junyi; Zhao, Liping

    2004-10-01

    Bacterial populations common to healthy human guts may play important roles in human health. A new strategy for discovering genomic sequences as markers for these bacteria was developed using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting. Structural features within microbial communities are compared with ERIC-PCR followed by DNA hybridization to identify genomic fragments shared by samples from healthy human individuals. ERIC-PCR profiles of fecal samples from 12 diseased or healthy human and piglet subjects demonstrated stable, unique banding patterns for each individual tested. Sequence homology of DNA fragments in bands of identical size was examined between samples by hybridization under high stringency conditions with DIG-labeled ERIC-PCR products derived from the fecal sample of one healthy child. Comparative analysis of the hybridization profiles with the original agarose fingerprints identified three predominant bands as signatures for populations associated with healthy human guts with sizes of 500, 800 and 1000 bp. Clone library profiling of the three bands produced 17 genome fragments, three of which showed high similarity only with regions of the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome, while the remainder were orphan sequences. Association of these sequences with healthy guts was validated by sequence-selective PCR experiments, which showed that a single fragment was present in all 32 healthy humans and 13 healthy piglets tested. Two fragments were present in the healthy human group and in 18 children with non-infectious diarrhea but not in eight children with infectious diarrhea. Genome fragments identified with this novel strategy may be used as genome-specific markers for dynamic monitoring and sequence-guided isolation of functionally important bacterial populations in complex communities such as human gut microflora.

  8. 1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

    1996-10-01

    The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

  9. Class-specific regulation of anti-DNA antibody synthesis and the age-associated changes in (NZB x NZW)F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Sekigawa, I; Okada, T; Noguchi, K; Ueda, G; Hirose, S; Sato, H; Shirai, T

    1987-05-01

    Investigations of regulatory helper and suppressor T cells in the in vitro anti-DNA antibody synthesis in NZB x NZW (B/W) F1 hybrid mice were initiated by the development of an in vitro system in which G10-passed B cells from B/W F1 mice were cocultured with mitomycin C-treated T cells in the presence of Con A and either in the presence or in the absence of LPS. It was revealed that each IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody synthesis was under the regulation of separate L3T4+ helper and Ly-2+ suppressor T cells. The function of these class-specific regulatory T cells was age-dependent. Although the helper effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgG antibody synthesis increased, the effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgM antibody production decreased in B/W F1 mice with aging. The IgG anti-DNA antibody production in the cocultures of L3T4+ T cells and B cells was suppressed by addition of Ly-2+ T cells from young but not aged B/W F1 mice, whereas the production of IgM anti-DNA antibodies was suppressed by Ly-2+ T cells from aged but not young B/W F1 mice. We also found that although IgM anti-DNA antibody-producing B cells were already present in 2-mo-old mice, B cells producing IgG antibodies under the influence of L3T4+ T cells appeared in mice at 7 mo of age. These data clearly indicate that separate class-specific regulatory T cells are involved in the production of IgM and IgG anti-DNA antibodies and that the total serum level of the antibodies is reflected by both their age-associated changes and the generation of antibody-forming B cells in B/W F1 mice.

  10. Differentiation of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with pilin-specific DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Caugant, D A; Bøvre, K

    1992-01-01

    Genetic relationships among strains of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis were studied by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and DNA-DNA hybridization. The 74 isolates analyzed for electrophoretic variation at 12 enzyme loci were assigned to 59 multilocus genotypes. The multilocus genotypes were grouped in four major clusters, one representing strains of M. nonliquefaciens, two representing strains of M. lacunata, and one comprising strains of M. bovis and the single strain of M. equi analyzed. DNA-DNA hybridization with total genomic probes also revealed four major distinctive entities that corresponded to those identified by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The two distinct clusters recognized among the M. lacunata strains apparently corresponded to the species previously designated M. lacunata and M. liquefaciens. Distinction of the four entities was improved by hybridization with polymerase chain reaction products of nonconserved parts of pilin genes as DNA probes. With these polymerase chain reaction probes, new isolates of M. nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, M. liquefaciens, and M. bovis can be identified easily by hybridization. PMID:1452691

  11. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-03-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  12. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  13. Competitive displacement of DNA during surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J; Wilson, C; Chagovetz, A M; Blair, S

    2007-01-01

    Using real-time dual-color fluorescence detection, we have experimentally tracked individual target species during competitive DNA surface hybridization in a two-component sample. Our experimental results demonstrate displacement of the lower affinity species by the higher affinity species and corroborate recent theoretical models describing competitive DNA surface hybridization. Competition at probe sites complementary to one of the two DNA species was monitored in separate experiments for two different target pairs. Each pair differs in sequence by a single nucleotide polymorphism, and one pair includes a folding target. We propose a mechanistic interpretation of the differences between hybridization curves of targets in multi-component and single-component experiments.

  14. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-28

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  15. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  16. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  17. Fast-Track, One-Step E. coli Detection: A Miniaturized Hydrogel Array Permits Specific Direct PCR and DNA Hybridization while Amplification.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Antje; Pollok, Sibyll; Rudloff, Anne; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    A timesaving and convenient method for bacterial detection based on one-step, one-tube deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization on hydrogel array while target gene amplification is described. The hydrogel array is generated by a fast one-pot synthesis, where N,N'-dimethylacrylamide/polyethyleneglycol(PEG1900 )-bisacrylamide mixture polymerizes via radical photoinitiation by visible light within 20 min concomitant with in situ capture probe immobilization. These DNA-functionalized hydrogel droplets arrayed on a planar glass surface are placed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture during the thermal amplification cycles. The bacterial cells can be implemented in a direct PCR reaction, omitting the need for prior template DNA extraction. The resulting fluorescence signal is immediately detectable after the end of the PCR (1 h) following one short washing step by microscopy. Therefore a valid signal can be reached within 1.5 h including 10 min for pipetting and placement of the tubes and chips. The performance of this novel hydrogel DNA array was successfully proven with varying cell numbers down to a limit of 10(1) Escherichia coli cells.

  18. DNA hybridization probe for clinical diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J; Acuna-Soto, R; Reed, S; Biagi, F; Wirth, D

    1989-01-01

    As an alternative to microscopic identification of Entamoeba histolytica parasites isolated from stool, a sensitive and species-specific DNA hybridization probe was made for rapid diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites in clinical samples directly applied to nylon membranes. The DNA hybridization probe was made by screening a genomic library of a virulent HM-1:IMSS strain of E. histolytica to detect recombinant plasmids containing highly repeated parasite DNA sequences. Four plasmid clones that reacted across Entamoeba species coded for highly repeated rRNA genes of E. histolytica. Four other plasmid clones were E. histolytica specific in that they bound to four axenized and nine xenic strains of E. histolytica but did not recognize closely related E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba moshkovskii, or Entamoeba invadens parasites. The diagnostic clones detected as few as eight cultured amoebae and did not distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic zymodemes of E. histolytica. The diagnostic clones were sequenced and contained 145-base-pair sequences which appear to be tandemly repeated in the genome. No stable transcript which is homologous to the diagnostic DNA was detected. In a study of stool samples from Mexico City shown by microscopy to contain E. histolytica, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia, Endolimax nana, Trichuris trichiuria, and Chilomastix mesnili parasites, the DNA hybridization probe demonstrated a sensitivity of 1.0 and a specificity of 0.93. We conclude that the DNA hybridization probe can be used for rapid and accurate diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites. Images PMID:2542361

  19. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Craig, Stephen L

    2005-09-28

    Dynamic light scattering is used as a sensitive probe of hybridization on DNA-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles. When a target DNA strand possesses an 8 base "dangling end", duplex formation on the surface of the nanoparticles leads to an increase in hydrodynamic radius. Duplex melting is manifested in a drop in hydrodynamic radius with increasing temperature, and the concentration dependence of the melting temperature provides a measure of the thermodynamics of binding. The hybridization thermodynamics are found to be significantly lower at higher hybridization densities than those previously reported for initial hybridization events. The pronounced deviation from Langmuir adsorption behavior is greater for longer duplexes, and it is, therefore, consistent with electrostatic repulsion between densely packed oligonucleotides. The results have implications for sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Localized DNA Hybridization Circuits.

    PubMed

    Dalchau, Neil; Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; Phillips, Andrew; Reif, John

    2015-08-21

    Molecular devices made of nucleic acids can perform complex information processing tasks at the nanoscale, with potential applications in biofabrication and smart therapeutics. However, limitations in the speed and scalability of such devices in a well-mixed setting can significantly affect their performance. In this article, we propose designs for localized circuits involving DNA molecules that are arranged on addressable substrates and interact via hybridization reactions. We propose designs for localized elementary logic circuits, which we compose to produce more complex devices, including a circuit for computing the square root of a four bit number. We develop an efficient method for probabilistic model checking of localized circuits, which we implement within the Visual DSD design tool. We use this method to prove the correctness of our circuits with respect to their functional specifications and to analyze their performance over a broad range of local rate parameters. Specifically, we analyze the extent to which our localized designs can overcome the limitations of well-mixed circuits, with respect to speed and scalability. To provide an estimate of local rate parameters, we propose a biophysical model of localized hybridization. Finally, we use our analysis to identify constraints in the rate parameters that enable localized circuits to retain their advantages in the presence of unintended interferences between strands.

  1. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  2. DNA fluorescence shift sensor: a rapid method for the detection of DNA hybridization using silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yong; Hairul Bahara, Nur Hidayah; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon; Tye, Gee Jun

    2014-11-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNC) are a class of subnanometer sized fluorophores with good photostability and brightness. It has been applied as a diagnostic tool mainly for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection. Integration of DNA oligomers to generate AgNCs is interesting as varying DNA sequences can result in different fluorescence spectra. This allows a simple fluorescence shifting effect to occur upon DNA hybridization with the hybridization efficiency being a pronominal factor for successful shifting. The ability to shift the fluorescence spectra as a result of hybridization overcomes the issue of background intensities in most fluorescent based assays. Here we describe an optimized method for the detection of single-stranded and double-stranded synthetic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) target by hybridization with the DNA fluorescence shift sensor. The system forms a three-way junction by successful hybridization of AgNC, G-rich strand (G-rich) to the target DNA, which generated a shift in fluorescence spectra with a marked increase in fluorescence intensity. The DNA fluorescence shift sensor presents a rapid and specific alternative to conventional DNA detection.

  3. Mechanisms of Surface-Mediated DNA Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was employed in conjunction with resonance energy transfer (RET) to observe the dynamic behavior of donor-labeled ssDNA at the interface between aqueous solution and a solid surface decorated with complementary acceptor-labeled ssDNA. At least 100 000 molecular trajectories were determined for both complementary strands and negative control ssDNA. RET was used to identify trajectory segments corresponding to the hybridized state. The vast majority of molecules from solution adsorbed nonspecifically to the surface, where a brief two-dimensional search was performed with a 7% chance of hybridization. Successful hybridization events occurred with a characteristic search time of ∼0.1 s, and unsuccessful searches resulted in desorption from the surface, ultimately repeating the adsorption and search process. Hybridization was reversible, and two distinct modes of melting (i.e., dehybridization) were observed, corresponding to long-lived (∼15 s) and short-lived (∼1.4 s) hybridized time intervals. A strand that melted back onto the surface could rehybridize after a brief search or desorb from the interface. These mechanistic observations provide guidance for technologies that involve DNA interactions in the near-surface region, suggesting a need to design surfaces that both enhance the complex multidimensional search process and stabilize the hybridized state. PMID:24708278

  4. Methylation profiling using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and tiling array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development and plays a role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. It is dynamically changed during germline development. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is an efficient, cost-effective method for locus-specific and genome-wide analysis. Methylated DNA fragments are enriched by a 5-methylcytidine-recognizing antibody, therefore allowing the analysis of both CpG and non-CpG methylation. The enriched DNA fragments can be amplified and hybridized to tiling arrays covering CpG islands, promoters, or the entire genome. Comparison of different methylomes permits the discovery of differentially methylated regions that might be important in disease- or tissue-specific expression. Here, we describe an established MeDIP protocol and tiling array hybridization method for profiling methylation of testicular germ cells.

  5. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed.

  6. Cantilever deflection associated with hybridization of monomolecular DNA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that specific binding between a ligand and surface immobilized receptor, such as hybridization of single stranded DNA immobilized on a microcantilever surface, leads to cantilever deflection. The binding-induced deflection may be used as a method for detection of biomolecules, such as pathogens and biohazards. Mechanical deformation induced due to hybridization of surface-immobilized DNA strands is a commonly used system to demonstrate the efficacy of microcantilever sensors. To understand the mechanism underlying the cantilever deflections, a theoretical model that incorporates the influence of ligand/receptor complex surface distribution and empirical interchain potential is developed to predict the binding-induced deflections. The cantilever bending induced due to hybridization of DNA strands is predicted for different receptor immobilization densities, hybridization efficiencies, and spatial arrangements. Predicted deflections are compared with experimental reports to validate the modeling assumptions and identify the influence of various components on mechanical deformation. Comparison of numerical predictions and experimental results suggest that, at high immobilization densities, hybridization-induced mechanical deformation is determined, primarily by immobilization density and hybridization efficiency, whereas, at lower immobilization densities, spatial arrangement of hybridized chains need to be considered in determining the cantilever deflection.

  7. Use of RAPD-PCR to isolate a species specific DNA probe for Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, M P; O'Brien, P A

    1993-10-01

    The products of RAPD-PCR amplification of Phytophthora cinnamomi DNA were separated by electrophoresis in agarose. Parallel Southern blots of the gels were hybridized with nick translated DNA from different species of Phytophthora. Fragments that hybridized specifically to P. cinnamomi DNA were identified. These fragments were purified and cloned into pUC18. Their specificity for P. cinnamomi was confirmed.

  8. Structure of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Suresh; Jagota, Anand; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming

    2010-03-01

    Hybrids of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) render the latter water-dispersable and have allowed their separation by chirality. ssDNA adsorbs on the CNT through π stacking while the negatively charged DNA backbone stabilizes the hybrid in solution. DNA-CNT hybrids have many potential applications in medicine and materials science. These include their use for imaging and as probes inside the cell, for thermal ablation to destroy cancer cells, and the sorting and patterned placement of CNTs. We have recently reported that sorting of CNTs occurs by recognition of individual chirality semiconducting CNTs by special ssDNA sequences. As the basis of this recognition we have proposed a novel ordered form for DNA analogous to the protein β-sheet and β-barrel structures. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this structure is stabilized by interactions with the CNT substrate. We present experimental evidence supporting the existence of hydrogen-bond based ordering in special sequences, and discuss the structure and topology of these new secondary structures.

  9. Application of DNA-DNA colony hybridization to the detection of catabolic genotypes in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, G S; Shields, M S; Tedford, E T; Breen, A; Hooper, S W; Sirotkin, K M; Davis, J W

    1985-01-01

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFR1 and RSF1010, were determined. The detection limits for the TOL plasmid against a nonhomologous plasmid-bearing bacterial background was ascertained. The colony hybridization technique allowed detection of one colony containing TOL plasmid among 10(6) Escherichia coli colonies of nonhomologous DNA. Comparisons between population estimates derived from growth on selective substrates and from hybridizations were examined. Findings indicated that standard sole carbon source enumeration procedures for degradative populations lead to overestimations due to nonspecific growth of other bacteria on the microcontaminant carbon sources present in the media. Population estimates based on the selective growth of a microcosm population on two aromatic substrates (toluene and naphthalene) and estimates derived from DNA-DNA colony hybridizations, using the TOL or NAH plasmid as a probe, corresponded with estimates of substrate mineralization rates and past exposure to environmental contaminants. The applications of such techniques are hoped to eventually allow enumeration of any specific gene sequences in the environment, including both anabolic and catabolic genes. In addition, this procedure should prove useful in monitoring recombinant DNA clones released into environmental situations. Images PMID:4004244

  10. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  11. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  12. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013.

  13. Quantivirus® HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA) is as sensitive, but less specific than Hybrid Capture 2 test.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; He, Yanxia; Cheng, Guomei; Okunieff, Paul; Li, Xiaofu

    2013-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the primary cause of cervical cancer. The Quantivirus(®) HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (DiaCarta, CA, USA) detects E6/E7 mRNA of 13 high risk subtypes and 6 low risk subtypes. Cervical specimens collected in PreservCyt were processed for HPV detection. Cervical biopsies were taken only from those women with abnormal colposcopy. 200 out of 272 (73.5%) cases were mRNA positive. The percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive samples increases with the severity of the cytological diagnosis, but not in histological diagnosis. In 146 patients with both tests, the E6/E7 mRNA assay had significant higher positivity rate than the Hybrid Capture 2 assay (75.3% versus 62.3%). The HPV mRNA assay and the HC2 assay had the same sensitivity of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+), 82.4% (14/17) (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.3, 100). However, the specificity of CIN 2+ for the HPV mRNA assay was significantly lower than HC2 assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to compare the diagnostic performance of the E6/E7 mRNA and HC2. E6/E7 mRNA achieved 58.8% sensitivity with 74.1% specificity, HC2, achieved 47.1% sensitivity with 70.7% specificity. The overall performance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay for detecting CIN 2+ was lower than HC2. This study does not support the use of this assay in screening for cervical cancer prevention alone.

  14. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  15. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  16. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  17. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  18. Gene Specific Impedimetric Bacterial DNA Sensor for Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Gupta, Sunil; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    An impedimetric mga gene specific DNA sensor was developed by immobilization of single stranded DNA probe onto the screen printed modified gold-dendrimer nanohybrid composite electrode for early and rapid detection of S. pyogenes in human throat swab samples causing rheumatic heart disease. Electrochemical impedance response was measured after hybridization with bacterial single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) with probe. The sensor was found highly specific to S. pyogenes and can detect as low as 0.01 ng ssDNA in 6 µL sample only in 30 min. The nanohybrid sensor was also tested with non-specific pathogens and characterized by FTIR. An early detection of the pathogen S. pyogenes in human can save damage of mitral and aortic heart valves (rheumatic heart disease) by proper medical care.

  19. Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Tae Soup; Estephan, Zaki G.; Qian, Zhaoxia; Prosser, Jacob H.; Lee, Su Yeon; Chenoweth, David M.; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, So-Jung; Crocker, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Active materials that respond to physical and chemical stimuli can be used to build dynamic micromachines that lie at the interface between biological systems and engineered devices. In principle, the specific hybridization of DNA can be used to form a library of independent, chemically driven actuators for use in such microrobotic applications and could lead to device capabilities that are not possible with polymer- or metal-layer-based approaches. Here, we report shape changing films that are powered by DNA strand exchange reactions with two different domains that can respond to distinct chemical signals. The films are formed from DNA-grafted gold nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer deposition process. Films consisting of an active and a passive layer show rapid, reversible curling in response to stimulus DNA strands added to solution. Films consisting of two independently addressable active layers display a complex suite of repeatable transformations, involving eight mechanochemical states and incorporating self-righting behaviour.

  20. DNA Hybridization: Nonradioactive Labeling Now Available for the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lenore Gardner

    1984-01-01

    The advantages of DNA hybridization procedures for classroom and clinical use can now be realized by the recent development of nonradioactive DNA labeling/detection procedures. These methods (which are described) can replace the use of isotopes in standard DNA hybridization procedures. (JN)

  1. DNA probe and PCR-specific reaction for Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Quere, F; Deschamps, A; Urdaci, M C

    1997-06-01

    A 300 bp DNA fragment of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was cloned and sequenced. This fragment was tested using a dot-blot DNA hybridization to technique for its ability to identify Lact. plantarum strains. This probe hybridized with all Lact. plantarum strains tested and with some strains of Lact. pentosus, albeit more weakly. Two internal primers of this probe were selected (LbP11 and LbP12) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. All Lact. plantarum strains tested amplified a 250 bp fragment contrary to the other LAB species tested. This specific PCR for Lact. plantarum was also performed from colonies grown on MRS medium with similar results. These methods enabled the rapid and specific detection and identification of Lact. plantarum.

  2. HPV 9G DNA chip: 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    An, Heejung; Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Junghoon; Nguyen, Van-Thuan; Ta, Van-Thao; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2012-03-01

    We describe a novel HPV 9G DNA chip test for the accurate and reliable genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV 9G DNA chip test established its efficiency in terms of a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 200, which is 50 times superior to commercial HPV DNA chips, and 100% target-specific hybridization at 25°C. We compared the genotyping results for the 439 clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test with the sequencing results for the MY11/GP6+ (M2) primer set-mediated PCR products. The discrimination of HPV genotypes in the 151 HPV-positive clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test were 100% identical with the sequencing analysis. The clinical sensitivities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and a commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 88%, respectively. However, the clinical specificities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and the commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 94%, respectively. The 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity of the HPV 9G DNA chip test make it a promising diagnostic tool for HPV genotyping.

  3. Mixed DNA/Oligo(ethylene glycol) Functionalized Gold Surface Improve DNA Hybridization in Complex Media

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gamble, L.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable, direct 'sample-to-answer' capture of nucleic acid targets from complex media would greatly improve existing capabilities of DNA microarrays and biosensors. This goal has proven elusive for many current nucleic acid detection technologies attempting to produce assay results directly from complex real-world samples, including food, tissue, and environmental materials. In this study, we have investigated mixed self-assembled thiolated single-strand DNA (ssDNA) monolayers containing a short thiolated oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) surface diluent on gold surfaces to improve the specific capture of DNA targets from complex media. Both surface composition and orientation of these mixed DNA monolayers were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). XPS results from sequentially adsorbed ssDNA/OEG monolayers on gold indicate that thiolated OEG diluent molecules first incorporate into the thiolated ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer OEG exposures, competitively displace adsorbed ssDNA molecules from the gold surface. NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) indicate that adsorbed thiolated ssDNA nucleotide base-ring structures in the mixed ssDNA monolayers are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure ssDNA monolayers. This supports ssDNA oligomer reorientation towards a more upright position upon OEG mixed adlayer incorporation. DNA target hybridization on mixed ssDNA probe/OEG monolayers was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Improvements in specific target capture for these ssDNA probe surfaces due to incorporation of the OEG diluent were demonstrated using two model biosensing assays, DNA target capture from complete bovine serum and from salmon genomic DNA mixtures. SPR results demonstrate that OEG incorporation into the ssDNA adlayer improves surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and protein

  4. Hybrid magnetic nanoparticle/nanogold clusters and their distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence effect via DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GuThese Authors Contributed Equally To This Study., Xuefan; Wu, Youshen; Zhang, Lingze; Liu, Yongchun; Li, Yan; Yan, Yongli; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-07-01

    To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV)-visible (vis) absorption spectra of the samples were recorded with a UV-2600 spectrophotometer. Fluorescence spectra and the MEF effect were recorded using a spectrophotofluorometer, and lifetimes were determined using a time-correlated single photon counting apparatus. The prepared HMNCs were stable in aqueous solutions and had an average diameter of 87 +/- 3.2 nm, with six to eight AuNPs around a single Fe3O4 nanoparticle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tagged DNA-HMNC conjugates exhibited a significant MEF effect and could accurately detect specific DNA sequences after DNA hybridization. This result indicates their various potential applications in sensors and biomedical fields.To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV

  5. Transient RNA-DNA Hybrids Are Required for Efficient Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohle, Corina; Tesorero, Rafael; Schermann, Géza; Dobrev, Nikolay; Sinning, Irmgard; Fischer, Tamás

    2016-11-03

    RNA-DNA hybrids are a major internal cause of DNA damage within cells, and their degradation by RNase H enzymes is important for maintaining genomic stability. Here, we identified an unexpected role for RNA-DNA hybrids and RNase H enzymes in DNA repair. Using a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we showed that RNA-DNA hybrids form as part of the homologous-recombination (HR)-mediated DSB repair process and that RNase H enzymes are essential for their degradation and efficient completion of DNA repair. Deleting RNase H stabilizes RNA-DNA hybrids around DSB sites and strongly impairs recruitment of the ssDNA-binding RPA complex. In contrast, overexpressing RNase H1 destabilizes these hybrids, leading to excessive strand resection and RPA recruitment and to severe loss of repeat regions around DSBs. Our study challenges the existing model of HR-mediated DSB repair and reveals a surprising role for RNA-DNA hybrids in maintaining genomic stability.

  6. Mammalian mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates are essentially duplex, but contain extensive tracts of RNA/DNA hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Holmes, J. Bradley; Wood, Stuart R.; Yang, Ming-Yao; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Laura, J. Bailey; Cluett, Tricia J.; Goffart, Steffi; Willcox, Smaranda; Rigby, Rachel E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Griffith, Jack D.; Crouch, Robert J.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate, using transmission electron microscopy and immunopurification with an antibody specific for RNA/DNA hybrid, that intact mtDNA replication intermediates (mtRIs) are essentially duplex throughout their length, but contain extensive RNA tracts on one strand. However, the extent of preservation of RNA in such molecules is highly dependent on the preparative method used. These findings strongly support the strand-coupled model of mtDNA replication involving RNA incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). PMID:20184890

  7. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlai; Wang, Wenjuan; Ge, Jing; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into double stranded DNA and its subsequent dissociation into ssDNA were investigated. Melting curves and rates of dissociation and hybridization were measured using fluorescence detection based on hybridization-induced fluorescence change. Two distribution functions, namely the state distribution and the rate distribution, were proposed in order to take interfacial heterogeneity into account and to quantitatively analyze the data. Reaction and activation enthalpies and entropies of DNA hybridization and dissociation on GNPs were derived and compared with the same quantities in solution. Our results show that the interaction between GNPs and DNA reduces the energetic barrier and accelerates the dissociation of adhered DNA. At low surface densities of ssDNA adhered to GNP surface, the primary reaction pathway is that ssDNA in solution first adsorbs onto the GNP, and then diffuses along the surface until hybridizing with an immobilized DNA. We also found that the secondary structure of a DNA hairpin inhibits the interaction between GNPs and DNA and enhances the stability of the DNA hairpin adhered to GNPs.

  8. Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; Yurke, Bernard; Reif, John

    2012-01-01

    Can a wide range of complex biochemical behaviour arise from repeated applications of a highly reduced class of interactions? In particular, can the range of DNA manipulations achieved by protein enzymes be simulated via simple DNA hybridization chemistry? In this work, we develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbreviated as mDNA), based on strands of DNA as the only component molecules. Various enzymatic manipulations of these mDNA molecules are simulated via toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reactions. We provide a formal model to describe the required properties and operations of our mDNA, and show that our proposed DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions provide these properties and functionality. Our meta-nucleotides are designed to form flexible linear assemblies (single-stranded mDNA (ssmDNA)) analogous to single-stranded DNA. We describe various isothermal hybridization reactions that manipulate our mDNA in powerful ways analogous to DNA–DNA reactions and the action of various enzymes on DNA. These operations on mDNA include (i) hybridization of ssmDNA into a double-stranded mDNA (dsmDNA) and heat denaturation of a dsmDNA into its component ssmDNA, (ii) strand displacement of one ssmDNA by another, (iii) restriction cuts on the backbones of ssmDNA and dsmDNA, (iv) polymerization reactions that extend ssmDNA on a template to form a complete dsmDNA, (v) synthesis of mDNA sequences via mDNA polymerase chain reaction, (vi) isothermal denaturation of a dsmDNA into its component ssmDNA, and (vii) an isothermal replicator reaction that exponentially amplifies ssmDNA strands and may be modified to allow for mutations. PMID:22237679

  9. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    PubMed

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors.

  10. DAPI: a DNA-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, J

    1995-09-01

    DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) is a DNA-specific probe which forms a fluorescent complex by attaching in the minor grove of A-T rich sequences of DNA. It also forms nonfluorescent intercalative complexes with double-stranded nucleic acids. The physicochemical properties of the dye and its complexes with nucleic acids and history of the development of this dye as a biological stain are described. The application of DAPI as a DNA-specific probe for flow cytometry, chromosome staining, DNA visualization and quantitation in histochemistry and biochemistry is reviewed. The mechanisms of DAPI-nucleic acid complex formation including minor groove binding, intercalation and condensation are discussed.

  11. Hybrid Selection of Small RNAs by Using Simian Virus 40 DNA: Evidence that the Simian Virus 40-Associated Small RNA Is Synthesized by Specific Cleavage from Large Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Alwine, James C.

    1982-01-01

    -RNA coding region was not expressed even during a viable lytic infection in which the SAS-RNA could be expressed from the infecting viral genomes. The simplest conclusion drawn from the data is that the SAS-RNA is cleaved from larger late transcripts which initiate at the normal late promoter. This conclusion suggests that many of the small RNAs found in normal eucaryotic cells may be synthesized by specific cleavage rather than by primary transcription. In the course of these studies several small cellular RNAs were detected, due to their specific hybrid selection, by using SV40 DNA. Primary mapping and characterization data of these RNAs are also presented. Images PMID:6292476

  12. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  13. Crowding-induced Cooperativity in DNA Surface Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qun-Li; Ren, Chun-Lai; Su, Xiao-Hang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    High density DNA brush is not only used to model cellular crowding, but also has a wide application in DNA-functionalized materials. Experiments have shown complicated cooperative hybridization/melting phenomena in these systems, raising the question that how molecular crowding influences DNA hybridization. In this work, a theoretical modeling including all possible inter and intramolecular interactions, as well as molecular details for different species, is proposed. We find that molecular crowding can lead to two distinct cooperative behaviours: negatively cooperative hybridization marked by a broader transition width, and positively cooperative hybridization with a sharper transition, well reconciling the experimental findings. Moreover, a phase transition as a result of positive cooperativity is also found. Our study provides new insights in crowding and compartmentation in cell, and has the potential value in controlling surface morphologies of DNA functionalized nano-particles.

  14. Crowding-induced Cooperativity in DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qun-li; Ren, Chun-lai; Su, Xiao-hang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    High density DNA brush is not only used to model cellular crowding, but also has a wide application in DNA-functionalized materials. Experiments have shown complicated cooperative hybridization/melting phenomena in these systems, raising the question that how molecular crowding influences DNA hybridization. In this work, a theoretical modeling including all possible inter and intramolecular interactions, as well as molecular details for different species, is proposed. We find that molecular crowding can lead to two distinct cooperative behaviours: negatively cooperative hybridization marked by a broader transition width, and positively cooperative hybridization with a sharper transition, well reconciling the experimental findings. Moreover, a phase transition as a result of positive cooperativity is also found. Our study provides new insights in crowding and compartmentation in cell, and has the potential value in controlling surface morphologies of DNA functionalized nano-particles. PMID:25875056

  15. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  16. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  17. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  18. Importance of DNA stiffness in protein-DNA binding specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. E.; Austin, R. H.

    1987-09-01

    From the first high-resolution structure of a repressor bound specifically to its DNA recognition sequence1 it has been shown that the phage 434 repressor protein binds as a dimer to the helix. Tight, local interactions are made at the ends of the binding site, causing the central four base pairs (bp) to become bent and overtwisted. The centre of the operator is not in contact with protein but repressor binding affinity can be reduced at least 50-fold in response to a sequence change there2. This observation might be explained should the structure of the intervening DNA segment vary with its sequence, or if DNA at the centre of the operator resists the torsional and bending deformation necessary for complex formation in a sequence dependent fashion. We have considered the second hypothesis by demonstrating that DNA stiffness is sequence dependent. A method is formulated for calculating the stiffness of any particular DNA sequence, and we show that this predicted relationship between sequence and stiffness can explain the repressor binding data in a quantitative manner. We propose that the elastic properties of DNA may be of general importance to an understanding of protein-DNA binding specificity.

  19. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    PubMed

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  20. Differential adhesion of microspheres mediated by DNA hybridization I: experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Milam, Valeria T; Graves, David J; Hammer, Daniel A

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel method to study collective behavior of multiple hybridized DNA chains by measuring the adhesion of DNA-coated micron-scale beads under hydrodynamic flow. Beads coated with single-stranded DNA probes are linked to surfaces coated with single target strands through DNA hybridization, and hydrodynamic shear forces are used to discriminate between strongly and weakly bound beads. The adhesiveness of microspheres depends on the strength of interaction between DNA chains on the bead and substrate surfaces, which is a function of the degree of DNA chain overlap, the fidelity of the match between hybridizing pairs, and other factors that affect the hybridization energy, such as the salt concentration in the hybridization buffer. The force for bead detachment is linearly proportional to the degree of chain overlap. There is a detectable drop in adhesion strength when there is a single base mismatch in one of the hybridizing chains. The effect of single nucleotide mismatch was tested with two different strand chemistries, with mutations placed at several different locations. All mutations were detectable, but there was no comprehensive rule relating the drop in adhesive strength to the location of the defect. Since adhesiveness can be coupled to the strength of overlap, the method holds promise to be a novel methodology for oligonucleotide detection.

  1. Microfluidic Arrayed Lab-On-A-Chip for Electrochemical Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Events.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for DNA hybridization detection has been developed. The device comprises a 3 × 3 array of microelectrodes integrated with a dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system that provides controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis of microliter volume samples. The surface of the microelectrodes is functionalized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes which enable specific detection of complementary ssDNA targets. These targets are detected by a capacitive technique which measures dielectric variation at the microelectrode-electrolyte interface due to DNA hybridization events. A quantitative analysis of the hybridization events is carried out based on a sensing modeling that includes detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation components. By calculating these components during hybridization events the device is able to demonstrate specific and dose response sensing characteristics. The developed microfluidic LOC for DNA hybridization detection offers a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of genetic markers outside of laboratory settings, such as at the point-of-care or in-field environmental monitoring.

  2. Design and analysis of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using DNA hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Hieu; Garg, Sudhanshu; Miao, Vincent; Song, Tianqi; Mokhtar, Reem; Reif, John

    2017-01-01

    DNA self-assembly has been employed non-conventionally to construct nanoscale structures and dynamic nanoscale machines. The technique of hybridization chain reactions by triggered self-assembly has been shown to form various interesting nanoscale structures ranging from simple linear DNA oligomers to dendritic DNA structures. Inspired by earlier triggered self-assembly works, we present a system for controlled self-assembly of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using nine distinct DNA hairpins. NUPACK is employed to assist in designing DNA sequences and Matlab has been used to simulate DNA hairpin interactions. Gel electrophoresis and ensemble fluorescence reaction kinetics data indicate strong evidence of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions. The half-time completion of the proposed linear cascade reactions indicates a linear dependency on the number of hairpins.

  3. Integration of rapid DNA hybridization and capillary zone electrophoresis using bidirectional isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bahga, Supreet S; Han, Crystal M; Santiago, Juan G

    2013-01-07

    We present a method for rapid, sequence-specific detection of multiple DNA fragments by integrating isotachophoresis (ITP) based DNA hybridization and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) using bidirectional ITP. Our method leverages the high preconcentration ability of ITP to accelerate slow, second-order DNA hybridization kinetics, and the high resolving power of CZE to separate and identify reaction products. We demonstrate the speed and sensitivity of our assay by detecting 5 pM, 39 nt ssDNA target within 3 min, using a molecular beacon probe. We also demonstrate the feasibility of our assay for multiplexed detection of multiple-length ssDNA targets by simultaneously detecting 39 and 90 nt ssDNA targets.

  4. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  5. Voltammetric detection of sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Gultekin; Erdem, Arzum; Ceylan, Cagdas; Akgöz, Muslum

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the single-use electrochemical DNA biosensor technology developed for voltammetric detection of sequence selective DNA hybridization related to important human and veterinary pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii. In the principle of electrochemical label-free detection assay, the duplex of DNA hybrid formation was detected by measuring guanine oxidation signal occured in the presence of DNA hybridization. The biosensor design consisted of the immobilization of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE), and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the differential pulse voltammetry(DPV) by measuring the guanine signal. Toxoplasma gondii capture probe was firstly immobilized onto the surface of the activated PGE by wet adsorption. The extent of hybridization at PGE surface between the probe and the target was then determined by measuring the guanine signal observed at +1.0V. The electrochemical monitoring of optimum DNA hybridization has been performed in the target concentration of 40µg/mL in 50min of hybridization time. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was then tested using non-complementary, or mismatch short DNA sequences. Under the optimum conditions, the guanine oxidation signal indicating full hybridization was measured in various target concentration from 0.5 to 25µg/mL and a detection limit was found to be 1.78µg/mL. This single-use biosensor platform was successfully applied for the voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

  6. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) < 1 nM at 25 °C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  7. Labeling-free fluorescent detection of DNA hybridization through FRET from pyrene excimer to DNA intercalator SYBR green I.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyi; Xu, Chen; Dong, Jie; Wang, Guojie

    2015-03-15

    A novel labeling-free fluorescence complex probe has been developed for DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from pyrene excimer of pyrene-functionalized poly [2-(N, N-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PFP) to SYBR Green I (SG, a specific intercalator of double-stranded DNA) in a cost-effective, rapid and simple manner. The complex probe consists of the positively charged PFP, SG and negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Upon adding a complementary strand to the complex probe solution, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed, followed by the intercalation of SG into dsDNA. The pyrene excimer emission was overlapped with the absorption of SG very well and the electrostatic interactions between PFP and dsDNA kept them in close proximity, enabling efficient FRET from pyrene excimer to SG. The fluorescence of SG in the duplex DNA resulting from FRET can be successfully applied to detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity for a very low detection limit of 10nM and excellent selectivity for detection of single base pair mismatch.

  8. Breakpoints in Robertsonian translocations are localized to satellite III DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gravholt, C.H.; Friedrich, U.; Caprani, M.; Jorgensen, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors characterized 21 t(13;14) and 3 t(14;21) Robertsonian translocations for the presence of DNA derived from the short arms of the translocated acrocentric chromosomes and identified their centromeres. Nineteen of these 24 translocation carriers were unrelated. Using centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA as chromosome-specific probe, they found by in situ hybridization that all 24 translocation chromosomes were dicentric. The chromatin between the two centromeres did not stain with silver, and no hybridization signal was detected with probes for rDNA or [beta]-satellite DNA that flank the distal and proximal ends of the rDNA region on the short arm of the acrocentrics. By contrast, all 24 translocation chromosomes gave a distinct hybridization signal when satellite III DNA was used as probe. This result strongly suggests that the chromosomal rearrangements leading to Robertsonian translocations occur preferentially in satellite III DNA. The authors hypothesize that guanine-rich satellite III repeats may promote chromosomal recombination by formation of tetraplex structures. The findings localize satellite III DNA to the short arm of the acrocentric chromosomes distal to centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA and proximal to [beta]-satellite DNA. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Proving the Authenticity of Ancient DNA by Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, S.; Herrmann, B.; Rameckers, J.; Müller, D.; Sperling, K.; Neitzel, H.; Tönnies, H.

    In PCR-supported amplification of ancient, degraded DNA, contamination with contemporary DNA can lead to false-positive results, which frequently give rise to discussions in which the mere existence of ancient DNA is doubted. Our confirmation of ancient DNA using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) eliminates these doubts. Unlike PCR methods, CGH requires no amplification of the DNA to be analyzed if adequate amounts of specimen DNA is used. Thus, false results traceable to contaminations are practically ruled out. The examples provided here prove the authenticity of ancient DNA for a 250-year-old and a 3000-year-old sample. At the same time, the CGH of ancient DNA offers the chance to gain insight into the pattern of DNA degradation and to monitor the preservation of certain chromosomal segments.

  10. Ultrasensitive flow injection chemiluminescence detection of DNA hybridization using signal DNA probe modified with Au and CuS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shusheng; Zhong, Hua; Ding, Caifeng

    2008-10-01

    A novel and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for sequence-specific DNA detection based on signal amplification with nanoparticles (NPs) is reported in the present work. The "sandwich-type" DNA biosensor was fabricated with the thiol-functionalized capture DNA first immobilized on an Au electrode and hybridized with one end of target DNA, the other end of which was recognized with a signal DNA probe labeled with CuS NPs and Au NPs on the 3'- and 5'-terminus, respectively. The hybridization events were monitored by the CL intensity of luminol-H2O2-Cu(2+) after the cupric ions were dissolved from the hybrids. We demonstrated that the incorporation of Au NPs in this sensor design significantly enhanced the sensitivity and the selectivity because a single Au NP can be loaded with hundreds of signal DNA probe strands, which were modified with CuS NPs. The ratios of Au NPs, signal DNA probes, and CuS NPs modified on the gold electrode were approximately 1/101/103. A preconcentration process of cupric ions performed by anodic stripping voltammetry technology further increased the sensor performance. As a result of these two combined effects, this DNA sensor could detect as low as femtomolar target DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against two-base mismatched DNA. Under the optimum conditions, the CL intensity was increased with the increase of the concentration of target DNA in the range of 2.0 x 10(-14)-2.0 x 10(-12) M. A detection limit of 4.8 x 10(-15) M target DNA was achieved.

  11. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  12. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  13. Human gamma X satellite DNA: an X chromosome specific centromeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Li, X; Jabs, E W; Court, D; Lin, C C

    1995-11-01

    The cosmid clone, CX16-2D12, was previously localized to the centromeric region of the human X chromosome and shown to lack human X-specific alpha satellite DNA. A 1.2 kb EcoRI fragment was subcloned from the CX16-2D12 cosmid and was named 2D12/E2. DNA sequencing revealed that this 1,205 bp fragment consisted of approximately five tandemly repeated DNA monomers of 220 bp. DNA sequence homology between the monomers of 2D12/E2 ranged from 72.8% to 78.6%. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of the 2D12/E2 clone displayed a change in monomer unit orientation between nucleotide positions 585-586 from a "tail-to-head" arrangement to a "head-to-tail" configuration. This may reflect the existence of at least one inversion within this repetitive DNA array in the centromeric region of the human X chromosome. The DNA consensus sequence derived from a compilation of these 220 bp monomers had approximately 62% DNA sequence similarity to the previously determined gamma 8 satellite DNA consensus sequence. Comparison of the 2D12/E2 and gamma 8 consensus sequences revealed a 20 bp DNA sequence that was well conserved in both DNA consensus sequences. Slot-blot analysis revealed that this repetitive DNA sequence comprises approximately 0.015% of the human genome, similar to that found with gamma 8 satellite DNA. These observations suggest that this satellite DNA clone is derived from a subfamily of gamma satellite DNA and is thus designated gamma X satellite DNA. When genomic DNA from six unrelated males and two unrelated females was cut with SstI or HpaI and separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed for either gamma X (2D12/E2) or gamma 8 (50E4) probes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the 2D12/E2 clone to the lateral sides of the primary constriction specifically on the human X chromosome.

  14. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  15. Organizing protein-DNA hybrids as nanostructures with programmed functionalities.

    PubMed

    Teller, Carsten; Willner, Itamar

    2010-12-01

    The structural and functional information encoded in the base sequence of nucleic acids provides a means to organize hybrid protein-DNA nanostructures with pre-designed, programmed functionality. This review discusses the activation of enzyme cascades in supramolecular DNA-protein hybrid structures, the bioelectrocatalytic activation of redox enzymes on DNA scaffolds, and the programmed positioning of enzymes on 1D, 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures. These systems provide starting points towards the design of interconnected enzyme networks. Substantial progress in the tailoring of functional protein-DNA nanostructures has been accomplished in recent years, and advances in this field warrant a comprehensive discussion. The application of these systems for the control of biocatalytic transformations, for amplified biosensing, and for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures are addressed, and future prospects for these systems are highlighted.

  16. A microfluidic platform for electrical detection of DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, M.; Davis, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods used for detection of DNA hybridization involve the use of DNA microarrays which require overnight incubation times along with bulky and expensive fluorescent scanners. Here, we demonstrate electrical detection of DNA hybridization in an oligonucleotide functionalized microfluidic channel. We use microchannels functionalized with DNA probes integrated with electrodes for measuring conductance across the channel. As beads conjugated with the target DNA passing through the channel are captured on the surface, we are able to electrically detect changes in resistance due to bead capture. Our assay can be completed in less than an hour using less than a microliter of reagent, and has the potential for extensive multiplexing. Such a device can be useful as a handheld platform in a clinical setting where one would need to rapidly genotype a small number of genes rapidly. PMID:23539142

  17. Simulation-guided DNA probe design for consistently ultraspecific hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-07-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches to analysing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of the reaction conditions have been used to enable the discrimination of single-nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximately 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 sequences of different target single-nucleotide variants showed between a 200- and 3,000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wild-type sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach, we developed probes that, in combination with PCR amplification, detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA.

  18. Simple Method for Fluorescence DNA In Situ Hybridization to Squashed Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larracuente, Amanda M.; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  19. Hybrid, multiplexed, functional DNA nanotechnology for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Arrabito, G

    2015-09-07

    We herein aim to report on the fabrication of DNA nano-heterostructures usable as a robust multi-functional analytical system to obtain multiple and complex data in parallel format from a single sample with unprecedented analytical performances. The ability of chemical information contained in the sequences of programmed DNA structures to organize matter made DNA become a unique material in "the nanoworld". Such carefully designed DNA nanostructures can then be functionalized/templated with different biomolecules/nanomaterials as different as nanoparticles, nanowires, organic molecules, peptides, and proteins with controlled spacing on the nanometer scale (<10 nm). In this way, it is possible to combine the properties of both DNA and nanomaterials for exposing the designed functionality and customizable geometrical hetero-nanostructures. By coupling automated on-chip high yield DNA synthesis with low cost detection methods, DNA-nanotechnology can enable the realization of high-sensitivity, multiplexed bioanalytical assays for many different applications like diagnostics, drug screening, toxicology, immunology and biosensors.

  20. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of DNA hybridization on DNA microarrays enhanced by HRP-modified SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huajun; Wang, Xiaolan; Jiao, Fang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2013-07-02

    Imaging of localized hybridization of nucleic acids immobilized on a glass DNA microarray was performed by means of generation collection (GC) mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Amine-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes, spotted on the glass surface, were hybridized with an unmodified target sequence and a biotinylated indicator probe via sandwich hybridization. Spots where sequence-specific hybridization had occurred were modified by streptavidin-horseradish-peroxidase-(HRP)-wrapped SiO2 nanoparticles through the biotin-streptavidin interaction. In the presence of H2O2, hydroquinone (H2Q) was oxidized to benzoquinone (BQ) at the modified spot surface through the HRP catalytic reaction, and the generated BQ corresponding to the amount of target DNA was reduced in solution by an SECM tip. With this DNA microarray, a number of genes could be detected simultaneously and selectively enough to discriminate between complementary sequences and those containing base mismatches. The DNA targets at prepared spots could be imaged in SECM GC mode over a wide concentration range (10(-7)-10(-12) M). This technique may find applications in genomic sequencing.

  1. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  2. [Graft hybridization and the specificity of heredity in fruit trees].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Bao-Yin; Li, Gui-Rong; Zhou, Xiu-Mei

    2004-09-01

    Emphatically discusses the relationship between graft hybridization and the specificity of heredity in fruit trees on the basis of introducing the recent achievements in plant graft hybridization. We propose that genetic materials in rootstock being translocated and integrated into the genome of the germ cells and embryonic cells in scion are the main reasons why the majority of the hybrid seedlings have wild properties and the heredity of fruit trees violate Mendel's laws of heredity. The potential of graft hybridization in fruit breeding are also discussed.

  3. Role of DNA methylation in hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Takahiro; Ishikura, Sonoko; Miyaji, Naomi; Sasaki, Taku; Wu, Li Min; Itabashi, Etsuko; Takada, Satoko; Shimizu, Motoki; Takasaki-Yasuda, Takeshi; Osabe, Kenji; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-10-25

    Hybrid vigor or heterosis refers to the superior performance of F1 hybrid plants over their parents. Heterosis is particularly important in the production systems of major crops. Recent studies have suggested that epigenetic regulation such as DNA methylation is involved in heterosis, but the molecular mechanism of heterosis is still unclear. To address the epigenetic contribution to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used mutant genes that have roles in DNA methylation. Hybrids between C24 and Columbia-0 (Col) without RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) or methyltransferase I (MET1) function did not reduce the level of biomass heterosis (as evaluated by rosette diameter). Hybrids with a mutation in decrease in dna methylation 1 (ddm1) showed a decreased heterosis level. Vegetative heterosis in the ddm1 mutant hybrid was reduced but not eliminated; a complete reduction could result if there was a change in methylation at all loci critical for generating the level of heterosis, whereas if only a proportion of the loci have methylation changes there may only be a partial reduction in heterosis.

  4. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  5. cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make subtracted cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen subtracted cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.

  6. Identification of DNA viruses by membrane filter hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Stålhandske, P; Pettersson, U

    1982-01-01

    The use of membrane filter hybridization for the identification of DNA viruses is described. We designed and used a procedure for identification of herpes simplex virus. This method can discriminate between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in a simple way. Images PMID:6279697

  7. The identification of genes specific to Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens using genomic subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Masakiyo, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Shintani, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ansai, Toshihiro; Takehara, Tadamichi

    2010-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, which are often isolated from periodontal sites, were once considered two different genotypes of P. intermedia. Although the genomic sequence of P. intermedia was determined recently, little is known about the genetic differences between P. intermedia and P. nigrescens. The subtractive hybridization technique is a powerful method for generating a set of DNA fragments differing between two closely related bacterial strains or species. We used subtractive hybridization to identify the DNA regions specific to P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. nigrescens ATCC 25261. Using this method, four P. intermedia ATCC 25611-specific and three P. nigrescens ATCC 25261-specific regions were determined. From the species-specific regions, insertion sequence (IS) elements were isolated for P. intermedia. IS elements play an important role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. For the P. intermedia-specific regions, the genes adenine-specific DNA-methyltransferase and 8-amino-7-oxononanoate synthase were isolated. The P. nigrescens-specific region contained a Flavobacterium psychrophilum SprA homologue, a cell-surface protein involved in gliding motility, Prevotella melaninogenica ATCC 25845 glutathione peroxide, and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 leucyl-tRNA synthetase. The results demonstrate that the subtractive hybridization technique was useful for distinguishing between the two closely related species. Furthermore, this technique will contribute to our understanding of the virulence of these species.

  8. Hybridization of denatured RNA and small DNA fragments transferred to nitrocellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P S

    1980-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for transferring RNA from agarose gels to nitrocellulose paper for blot hybridization has been developed. Poly(A)+ and ribosomal RNAs transfer efficiently to nitrocellulose paper in high salt (3 M NaCl/0.3 M trisodium citrate) after denaturation with glyoxal and 50% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. RNA also binds to nitrocellulose after treatment with methylmercuric hydroxide. The method is sensitive: about 50 pg of specific mRNA per band is readily detectable after hybridization with high specific activity probes (10(8) cpm/microgram). The RNA is stably bound to the nitrocellulose paper by this procedure, allowing removal of the hybridized probes and rehybridization of the RNA blots without loss of sensitivity. The use of nitrocellulose paper for the analysis of RNA by blot hybridization has several advantages over the use of activated paper (diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper). The method is simple, inexpensive, reproducible, and sensitive. In addition, denaturation of DNA with glyoxal and dimethyl sulfoxide promotes transfer and retention of small DNAs (100 nucleotides and larger) to nitrocellulose paper. A related method is also described for dotting RNA and DNA directly onto nitrocellulose paper treated with a high concentration of salt; under these conditions denatured DNA of less than 200 nucleotides is retained and hybridizes efficiently. Images PMID:6159641

  9. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  10. Coarse-grained DNA modeling: Hybridization and ionic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel M.

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a biopolymer of enormous significance in living systems. The utility of DNA in such systems is derived from the programmable nature of DNA and its unique mechanical properties. Recently, material scientists have harnessed these properties in order to create systems that spontaneous self-assemble on the nanoscale. Both biologists and material scientists are hindered by an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions that together govern DNA's behavior. Computer simulations, especially those at the coarse-grained (CG) level, can potentially complete this understanding by resolving details indiscernible with current experimental techniques. In this thesis, we advance the state-of-the-art of DNA CG simulations by first reviewing the relevant theory and the evolution of CG DNA models since their inception. Then we present 3SPN.2, an improved CG model for DNA that should provide new insights into biological and nanotechnological systems which incorporate DNA. We perform forward flux sampling simulations in order to examine the effect of sequence, oligomer length, and ionic strength on DNA oligomer hybridization. Due to the limitations inherent in continuum treatments of electrostatic interactions in biological systems, we generate a CG model of biological ions for use with 3SPN.2 and other CG models. Lastly, we illustrate the potential of 3SPN.2 and CG ions by using the models in simulations of viral capsid packaging experiments. The models and results described in this thesis will be useful in future modeling efforts that seek to identify the fundamental physics that govern behavior such as nucleosome positioning, DNA hybridization, and DNA nanoassembly.

  11. Magnetoresistive sensors for measurements of DNA hybridization kinetics – effect of TINA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, G.; Dufva, M.; Hansen, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the use of magnetoresistive sensors integrated in a microfluidic system for real-time studies of the hybridization kinetics of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles to an array of surface-tethered probes. The nanoparticles were magnetized by the magnetic field from the sensor current. A local negative reference ensured that only the specific binding signal was measured. Analysis of the real-time hybridization using a two-compartment model yielded both the association and dissociation constants kon, and koff. The effect of probe modifications with ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) was studied. Such modifications have been demonstrated to increase the melting temperature of DNA hybrids in solution and are also relevant for surface-based DNA sensing. Kinetic data for DNA probes with no TINA modification or with TINA modifications at the 5′ end (1 × TINA) or at both the 5′ and 3′ ends (2 × TINA) were compared. TINA modifications were found to provide a relative decrease of koff by a factor of 6-20 at temperatures from 57.5 °C to 60 °C. The values of kon were generally in the range between 0.5-2 × 105 M−1s−1 and showed lower values for the unmodified probe than for the TINA modified probes. The observations correlated well with measured melting temperatures of the DNA hybrids. PMID:28167835

  12. Rapid genomic DNA changes in allotetraploid fish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, L H; Liu, Q Z; Peng, L Y; Liu, W; Yi, X G; Wang, Y D; Xiao, J; Xu, K; Hu, F Z; Ren, L; Tao, M; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Hong, Y H; Liu, S J

    2015-06-01

    Rapid genomic change has been demonstrated in several allopolyploid plant systems; however, few studies focused on animals. We addressed this issue using an allotetraploid lineage (4nAT) of freshwater fish originally derived from the interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n=100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n=100). We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from allotetraploid hybrids in the 20th generation (F20) and sequenced 14 BAC clones representing a total of 592.126 kb, identified 11 functional genes and estimated the guanine-cytosine content (37.10%) and the proportion of repetitive elements (17.46%). The analysis of intron evolution using nine orthologous genes across a number of selected fish species detected a gain of 39 introns and a loss of 30 introns in the 4nAT lineage. A comparative study based on seven functional genes among 4nAT, diploid F1 hybrids (2nF1) (first generation of hybrids) and their original parents revealed that both hybrid types (2nF1 and 4nAT) not only inherited genomic DNA from their parents, but also demonstrated rapid genomic DNA changes (homoeologous recombination, parental DNA fragments loss and formation of novel genes). However, 4nAT presented more genomic variations compared with their parents than 2nF1. Interestingly, novel gene fragments were found for the iqca1 gene in both hybrid types. This study provided a preliminary genomic characterization of allotetraploid F20 hybrids and revealed evolutionary and functional genomic significance of allopolyploid animals.

  13. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.

  14. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  15. Requirements for species-specific papovavirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E R; Naujokas, M; Hassell, J A

    1989-01-01

    Replication of papovavirus DNA requires a functional replication origin, a virus-encoded protein, large T antigen, and species-specific permissive factors. How these components interact to initiate and sustain viral DNA replication is not known. Toward that end, we have attempted to identify the viral target(s) of permissive factors. The functionally defined replication origins of polyomavirus and simian virus 40, two papovaviruses that replicate in different species (mice and monkeys, respectively), are composed of two functionally distinct domains: a core domain and an auxiliary domain. The origin cores of the two viruses are remarkably similar in primary structure and have common binding sites for large T antigen. By contrast, their auxiliary domains share few sequences and serve as binding sites for cellular proteins. It seemed plausible, therefore, that if cellular permissive factors interacted with the replication origin, their targets were likely to be in the auxiliary domain. To test this hypothesis we constructed hybrid origins for DNA replication that were composed of the auxiliary domain of one virus and the origin core of the other and assessed their capacity to replicate in a number of mouse and monkey cell lines, which express the large T antigen of one or the other virus. The results of this analysis showed that the auxiliary domains of the viral replication origins could substitute for one another in DNA replication, provided that the viral origin core and its cognate large T antigen were present in a permissive cellular milieu. Surprisingly, the large T antigens of the viruses could not substitute for one another, regardless of the species of origin of the host cell, even though the two large T antigens bind to the same sequence motif in vitro. These results suggest that species-specific permissive factors do not interact with the origin-auxiliary domains but, rather, with either the origin core or the large T antigen or with both components to

  16. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V.; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Shih, William M.

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  17. Exploring the mechanisms of DNA hybridization on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Rogers, J. Brandon; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA microarrays are a potentially disruptive technology in the medical field, but their use in such settings is limited by poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as reliable as this process is robust, yet little is known at the molecular level about how the surface affects the hybridization process. This work uses advanced molecular simulation techniques and an experimentally parameterized coarse-grain model to determine the mechanism by which hybridization occurs on surfaces. The results show that hybridization proceeds through a mechanism where the untethered (target) strand often flips orientation. For evenly lengthed strands, the surface stabilizes hybridization (compared to the bulk system) by reducing the barriers involved in the flipping event. For unevenly lengthed strands, the surface destabilizes hybridization compared to the bulk, but the degree of destabilization is dependent on the location of the matching sequence. Taken as a whole, the results offer an unprecedented view into the hybridization process on surfaces and provide some insights as to the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  18. Exploring the mechanisms of DNA hybridization on a surface.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Rogers, J Brandon; Knotts, Thomas A

    2013-01-21

    DNA microarrays are a potentially disruptive technology in the medical field, but their use in such settings is limited by poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as reliable as this process is robust, yet little is known at the molecular level about how the surface affects the hybridization process. This work uses advanced molecular simulation techniques and an experimentally parameterized coarse-grain model to determine the mechanism by which hybridization occurs on surfaces. The results show that hybridization proceeds through a mechanism where the untethered (target) strand often flips orientation. For evenly lengthed strands, the surface stabilizes hybridization (compared to the bulk system) by reducing the barriers involved in the flipping event. For unevenly lengthed strands, the surface destabilizes hybridization compared to the bulk, but the degree of destabilization is dependent on the location of the matching sequence. Taken as a whole, the results offer an unprecedented view into the hybridization process on surfaces and provide some insights as to the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  19. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  20. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype

    SciTech Connect

    Martell, M.; Le Gall, I.; Millasseau, P.; Dausset, J.; Cohen, D.

    1988-04-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ..beta..gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. The authors used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period.

  1. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  2. Submillimetre Network Formation by Light-induced Hybridization of Zeptomole-level DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2016-12-01

    Macroscopic unique self-assembled structures are produced via double-stranded DNA formation (hybridization) as a specific binding essential in biological systems. However, a large amount of complementary DNA molecules are usually required to form an optically observable structure via natural hybridization, and the detection of small amounts of DNA less than femtomole requires complex and time-consuming procedures. Here, we demonstrate the laser-induced acceleration of hybridization between zeptomole-level DNA and DNA-modified nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in the assembly of a submillimetre network-like structure at the desired position with a dramatic spectral modulation within several minutes. The gradual enhancement of light-induced force and convection facilitated the two-dimensional network growth near the air-liquid interface with optical and fluidic symmetry breakdown. The simultaneous microscope observation and local spectroscopy revealed that the assembling process and spectral change are sensitive to the DNA sequence. Our findings establish innovative guiding principles for facile bottom-up production via various biomolecular recognition events.

  3. Submillimetre Network Formation by Light-induced Hybridization of Zeptomole-level DNA

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic unique self-assembled structures are produced via double-stranded DNA formation (hybridization) as a specific binding essential in biological systems. However, a large amount of complementary DNA molecules are usually required to form an optically observable structure via natural hybridization, and the detection of small amounts of DNA less than femtomole requires complex and time-consuming procedures. Here, we demonstrate the laser-induced acceleration of hybridization between zeptomole-level DNA and DNA-modified nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in the assembly of a submillimetre network-like structure at the desired position with a dramatic spectral modulation within several minutes. The gradual enhancement of light-induced force and convection facilitated the two-dimensional network growth near the air-liquid interface with optical and fluidic symmetry breakdown. The simultaneous microscope observation and local spectroscopy revealed that the assembling process and spectral change are sensitive to the DNA sequence. Our findings establish innovative guiding principles for facile bottom-up production via various biomolecular recognition events. PMID:27917861

  4. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection.

  5. Physical localisation of repetitive DNA sequences in Alstroemeria: karyotyping of two species with species-specific and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localise two species-specific repetitive DNA sequences, A001-I and D32-13, and two highly conserved 25S and 5S rDNA sequences on the metaphase chromosomes of two species of Alstroemeria. The Chilean species, Alstroemeria aurea (2n = 16), has abundant constitutive heterochromatin, whereas the Brazilian species, Alstroemeria inodora, has hardly any heterochromatin. The A. aurea specific A001-I probe hybridized specifically to the C-band regions on all chromosomes. The FISH patterns on A. inodora chromosomes using species-specific probe D32-13 resembled the C-banding pattern and the A001-I pattern on A. aurea chromosomes. There were notable differences in number and distribution of rDNA sites between the two species. The 25S rDNA probe revealed 16 sites in A. aurea that closely colocalised with A001-I sites and 12 in A. inodora that were predominantly detected in the centromeric regions. FISH karyotypes of the two Alstroemeria species were constructed accordingly, enabling full identification of all individual chromosomes. These FISH karyotypes will be useful for monitoring the chromosomes of both Alstroemeria species in hybrids and backcross derivatives.

  6. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  7. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  8. The intrinsic role of nanoconfinement in chemical equilibrium: evidence from DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2013-05-08

    Recently we predicted that when a reaction involving a small number of molecules occurs in a nanometric-scale domain entirely segregated from the surrounding media, the nanoconfinement can shift the position of equilibrium toward products via reactant-product reduced mixing. In this Letter, we demonstrate how most-recently reported single-molecule fluorescence measurements of partial hybridization of ssDNA confined within nanofabricated chambers provide the first experimental confirmation of this entropic nanoconfinement effect. Thus, focusing separately on each occupancy-specific equilibrium constant, quantitatively reveals extra stabilization of the product upon decreasing the chamber occupancy or size. Namely, the DNA hybridization under nanoconfined conditions is significantly favored over the identical reaction occurring in bulk media with the same reactant concentrations. This effect, now directly verified for DNA, can be relevant to actual biological processes, as well as to diverse reactions occurring within molecular capsules, nanotubes, and other functional nanospaces.

  9. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  10. DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; López-Fernández, C; Gosálvez, J

    2012-12-28

    DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) is a recently developed technique that allows cell-by-cell detection and quantification of DNA breakage in the whole genome or within specific DNA sequences. The present investigation was conducted to adapt the methodology of DBD-FISH to the visualization and evaluation of DNA damage in buccal epithelial cells. DBD-FISH revealed that DNA damage increased significantly according to H2O2 concentration (r2=0.91). In conclusion, the DBD-FISH technique is easy to apply in buccal cells and provides prompt results that are easy to interpret. Future studies are needed to investigate the potential applicability of a buccal cell DBD-FISH model to human biomonitoring and nutritional work.

  11. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  12. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  13. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  14. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide ``primary energy`` ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W{center_dot}h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  15. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide 'primary energy' ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W(center dot)h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  16. Duplication of 10q confirmed by DNA in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Sutliff, W.C.

    1994-08-15

    Partial duplication of 10q is a recognizable clinical entity. In most of the reported cases, the trisomic segment is identified by a balanced translocation state in a parent. Verification remains a problem in de novo cases. However, the recent availability of whole chromosome probes allows for confirmatory diagnosis of suspected cases. We describe a case of de novo duplication (10q) with verification using DNA is situ hybridization. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Microfluidic chip integrating high throughput continuous-flow PCR and DNA hybridization for bacteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiran; Shao, Ning; Jing, Wenwen; Tao, Shengce; Liu, Sixiu; Sui, Guodong

    2014-05-01

    Rapid identification of clinical pathogens is the initial and essential step for antimicrobial therapy. Herein, we successfully developed a microfluidic device which combines high-throughput continuous-flow PCR and DNA hybridization for the detection of various bacterial pathogens. Universal primers were designed based on the conserved regions of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (16S rDNA), and specific probes were designed from a variable region of 16S rDNA within the amplicon sequences. In the chip operation, after the continuous flow PCR was achieved in the first microfluidic chip, the product was directly introduced into a hybridization chip integrated with microarray containing the immobilized DNA probes. The target-probe hybridization was completed within 1h at 55 °C, and fluorescence signals were obtained as the readout. The presented device is simple, versatile and with less sample consumption compared with traditional instruments. It can perform high-throughput bacteria detections continuously in a single assay, which makes it a promising platform for clinical bacteria identifications.

  18. Quantum dot monolayer for surface plasmon resonance signal enhancement and DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-06-15

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequence specific to chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). The SPR disk surface has been modified with octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer followed by deposition of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide capped cadmium selenide quantum dots (QD) Langmuir monolayer. The deposition is performed via Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. For the sensor chip preparation, covalent immobilization of the thiol-terminated DNA probe sequence (pDNA) using displacement reaction is accomplished. This integrated SPR chip has been used to detect target complementary DNA concentration by monitoring the change in coupling angle via hybridization. It is revealed that this biosensor exhibits high sensitivity (0.7859 m(0)pM(-1)) towards complementary DNA and can be used to detect it in the concentration range, 180 pM to 5 pM with detection limit as 4.21 pM. The results of kinetic studies yield the values of hybridization and dissociation rate constants as 9.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 2.3 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively, with the equilibrium constant for hybridization as 4.2 × 10(6) M(-1).

  19. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of a specific DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Goldani, L Z; Maia, A L; Sugar, A M

    1995-06-01

    We cloned and sequenced a species-specific 110-bp DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The DNA fragment was generated by PCR with primers complementary to the rat beta-actin gene under a low annealing temperature. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence, after excluding the primers, with those in the GenBank database identified approximately 60% homology with an exon of a major surface glycoprotein gene from Pneumocystis carinii and a fragment of unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII. By Southern hybridization analysis, the 32P-labelled fragment detected 1.0- and 1.9-kb restriction fragments within whole-cell genomic DNA of P. brasiliensis digested with HindIII and PstI, respectively, but failed to hybridize to genomic DNAs from Candida albicans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pneumocystis carinii, rat tissue, or humans under low-stringency hybridization conditions. Additionally, the specific DNA fragment from three different P. brasiliensis isolates (Pb18, RP18, RP17) was amplified by PCR with primers mostly complementary to nonactin sequences of the 110-bp DNA fragment. In contrast, there were no amplified products from other fungus genomic DNAs previously tested, including Histoplasma capsulatum. To date, this is the first species-specific DNA fragment cloned from P. brasiliensis which might be useful as a diagnostic marker for the identification and classification of different P. brasiliensis isolates.

  20. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of a specific DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldani, L Z; Maia, A L; Sugar, A M

    1995-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a species-specific 110-bp DNA fragment from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The DNA fragment was generated by PCR with primers complementary to the rat beta-actin gene under a low annealing temperature. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence, after excluding the primers, with those in the GenBank database identified approximately 60% homology with an exon of a major surface glycoprotein gene from Pneumocystis carinii and a fragment of unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII. By Southern hybridization analysis, the 32P-labelled fragment detected 1.0- and 1.9-kb restriction fragments within whole-cell genomic DNA of P. brasiliensis digested with HindIII and PstI, respectively, but failed to hybridize to genomic DNAs from Candida albicans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pneumocystis carinii, rat tissue, or humans under low-stringency hybridization conditions. Additionally, the specific DNA fragment from three different P. brasiliensis isolates (Pb18, RP18, RP17) was amplified by PCR with primers mostly complementary to nonactin sequences of the 110-bp DNA fragment. In contrast, there were no amplified products from other fungus genomic DNAs previously tested, including Histoplasma capsulatum. To date, this is the first species-specific DNA fragment cloned from P. brasiliensis which might be useful as a diagnostic marker for the identification and classification of different P. brasiliensis isolates. PMID:7650207

  1. Fast and sensitive DNA hybridization assays using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-09-22

    A new, fast, and sensitive DNA hybridization assay platform based on microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF) is presented. Thiolated oligonucleotide anchors were immobilized onto silver nanoparticles on a glass substrate. The hybridization of the complementary fluorescein-labeled DNA target with the surface-bound oligonucleotides was completed within 20 s upon heating with low-power microwaves. In addition, the signal is optically amplified, a consequence of close proximity of the fluorophore to the silvered substrate. In this proof-of-principle methodology, as low as 50 nM of a target DNA was detected, although we envisage far-lower detection limits. Control experiments, where the surface-bound oligonucleotide was omitted, were also performed to determine the extent of non-specific binding. In these studies a significantly reduced non-specific adsorption was found when using microwave heating near to silvered structures as compared to room temperature incubation. These findings suggest that MAMEF could be a most useful alternative to the DNA hybridization assays used today, especially with regard to substantially increasing both the assay rapidity and sensitivity.

  2. Electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors applied to real and complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tosar, J P; Brañas, G; Laíz, J

    2010-12-15

    DNA hybridization biosensors, also known as genosensors, are analytical devices for the detection of specific DNA "target" sequences in solution, upon hybridization of the targets with complementary "probes" immobilized on a solid substrate. Electrochemical genosensors hold great promise to serve as devices suitable for point-of-care diagnostics and multiplexed platforms for fast, simple and inexpensive nucleic acids analysis. Although a lot of progress has been made in the past few years, the performance of genosensors in complex biological samples has been assayed in only a small fraction of published research articles. This review covers such a group of reports, from the year 2000 onwards. Special attention is played in the nature and complexity of the samples and in the way matrix effects were treated and specificity controls were performed.

  3. Molecular hybridization with DNA-probes as a laboratory diagnostic test for influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pljusnin, A Z; Rozhkova, S A; Nolandt, O V; Bryantseva, E A; Kuznetsov, O K; Noskov, F S

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of using DNA-copies of different influenza A virus genes cloned with recombinant bacterial plasmids for the detection of virus-specific RNA by molecular dot-hybridization were analyzed. High specificity of RNA identification has been demonstrated and it has been shown expedient to use DNA-probes with high-conservative virus genes (polymerase, nucleoprotein, or matrix) for the detection of influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H2N2, H3N2) and probes with corresponding hemagglutinin genes for the differentiation of the subtypes H3N2 and H1N1. The results of nasopharyngeal specimens testing proved the effectiveness of molecular dot-hybridization in epidemiological studies of influenza outbreaks, especially of mixed etiology.

  4. Hybrid Pathogen DNA Detector:Users? Manual v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schikora, B; Hietala, S; Shi, L; Lee, L; Skowronski, E; Ardans, A

    2004-01-12

    The Hybrid Unit uses an advanced fluidic design to move very small reagent samples through many unit operations to complete complex molecular biology experiments. The primary use of this machine is to analyze a small liquid sample for the highly specific presence of select agents known to be used in bio-warfare. The Hybrid Unit is coupled with a Luminex bead detection unit for the multiplexing of many assays in one tube. Because of this, multiple controls can be included in each run to avoid false positives. The built-in flow through PCR unit amplifies specific DNA signatures and increases sensitivity, thereby limiting exposure of handlers to highly concentrated (and potentially hazardous, spore containing) sample volumes. The reproducible precision of the Hybrid Unit also gives confidence when a signal is given that detects an agent in a given sample.

  5. Specific detection of Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA using dual labeled gold nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Santhosh, Devakirubakaran Jayakar; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed at the development and evaluation of a DNA electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA detection in a clinical specimen using a signal amplifier as dual-labeled AuNPs. The DNA electrochemical biosensors were fabricated using a sandwich detection strategy involving two kinds of DNA probes specific to Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA. The probes of enzyme ALP and the detector probe both conjugated on the AuNPs and subsequently hybridized with target DNA immobilized in a SAM/ITO electrode followed by characterization with CV, EIS, and DPV analysis using the electroactive species para-nitrophenol generated by ALP through hydrolysis of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The effect of enhanced sensitivity was obtained due to the AuNPs carrying numerous ALPs per hybridization and a detection limit of 1.25 ng/ml genomic DNA was determined under optimized conditions. The dual-labeled AuNP-facilitated electrochemical sensor was also evaluated by clinical sputum samples, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity and the outcome was in agreement with the PCR analysis. In conclusion, the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrated unique sensitivity and specificity for both genomic DNA and sputum samples and can be employed as a regular diagnostics tool for Mycobacterium sp. monitoring in clinical samples.

  6. A method for recovering strand-specific probes from nick-translated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Dutton, F L; Chovnick, A

    1984-07-01

    A method of preparing strand-specific probes for DNA X DNA or DNA X RNA hybridizations is described. Double-stranded DNA fragments are first isolated from any recombinant DNA clone containing the desired sequence, and then labeled in vitro by nick-translation (T. Maniatis, A. Jeffrey, and D. G. Kleid (1975) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 1184-1188; P. W. J. Rigby, M. Dieckmann, C. Rhodes, and P. Berg (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 113, 237-251). Sequences homologous to the desired strand are captured by annealing the denatured nick-translate to viral strands of an appropriate M13 clone, and recovered by elution of the resulting hybrids from a column of agarose A50M (Bio-Rad). By this method, separate probes with specificity to either strand, as well as the double-stranded probe, may conveniently be prepared from a single nick-translation reaction. Probes may be obtained which are homologous either to the full length of the cloned region or to selected portions thereof by selecting appropriate M13 clones for annealing. The probe is recovered as a population of fragments several hundred bases or less in length, which have been found ideal for saturating liquid hybridizations, and should be similarly well suited for in situ hybridizations to cytological preparations.

  7. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  8. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  9. Employing double-stranded DNA probes on colloidal substrates for competitive hybridization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bryan Alexander

    DNA has found application beyond its biological function in the cell in a variety of materials assembly systems as well as nucleic acid-based detection devices. In the current research, double-stranded DNA probes are applied in both a colloidal particle assembly and fluorescent assay approach utilizing competitive hybridization interactions. The responsiveness of the double-stranded probes (dsProbes) was tuned by sequence design and tested against a variety of nucleic acid targets. Chapter 1 provides a review of the particle substrate used in the current research, colloidal particles, as well as examines previous applications of DNA in assembly and nucleic acid detection formats. Chapter 2 discusses the formation of fluorescent satellites, or similarly termed fluorescent micelles, via DNA hybridization. The effects of DNA duplex sequence, temperature at which assembly occurs, and oligonucleotide density are variables considered with preferential assembly observed for low oligonucleotide density particles. Chapter 3 demonstrates the controlled disassembly of these satellite structures via competitive hybridization with a soluble target strand. Chapter 4 examines DNA duplexes as fluorescent dsProbes and characterizes the kinetics of competitive hybridization between immobilized dsProbes and solution targets of interest. The sequence-based affinities of dsProbes as well as location of an embedded target sequence are both variables explored in this study. Based on the sequence design of the dsProbes, a range of kinetics responses are observed. Chapter 5 also examines the kinetics of competitive hybridization with dsProbes but with a focus on the specificity of competitive target by including mismatches within a short 15 base competitive target. Chapter 6 examines the effects of dsProbe orientation relative to the particle surface as well as substrate particle size. The kinetics of displacement of DNA targets with those of RNA targets of analogous sequence are also

  10. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  11. Isolation and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 20-specific alpha-satellite DNA clone.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Archidiacono, N; Carbone, R; Bolino, A; Shridhar, V; Miller, O J; Miller, D A; Ward, D C; Rocchi, M

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a human genomic DNA clone (PZ20, locus D20Z2) that identifies, under high-stringency hybridization conditions, an alphoid DNA subset specific for chromosome 20. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sequence analysis confirmed our previously reported data on the great similarity between the chromosome 20 and chromosome 2 alphoid subsets. Comparative mapping of pZ20 on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes, also performed under high-stringency conditions, indicates that the alphoid subset has ancestral sequences on chimpanzee chromosome 11 and gorilla chromosome 19. However, no hybridization was observed to chromosomes 21 in the great apes, the homolog of human chromosome 20.

  12. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  13. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  14. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    PubMed

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  15. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin; Li, Jinghong

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) biosensor for simple, rapid, and specific detection of nucleic acids based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay. This E-DNA biosensor was constructed by self-assembly of a 3' short thiolated capture probe on the gold electrode. DNA detection was realized by outputting a remarkable redox current of the 5' ferrocene (Fc) tail labeled probe. When the target DNA was introduced into the system, it was complementary to the 5' Fc labeled probe at the one-half-segment and complementary to the 3' short thiolated capture probe at the other half-segment, resulting in forming a stable duplex complex. As a result, the Fc probe was proximate to the electrode surface, and the Faradaic current was observed. This E-DNA biosensor was proved to have a low detection limit (1 fM) and a wide dynamic range (from 1 fM to 1 nM) due to the stable hybridization mode. In addition, the sensing system could discriminate the complementary sequence from mismatch sequences, with high sensitivity, stability, and reusability.

  16. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  17. Increasing hybridization rate and sensitivity of DNA microarrays using isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Han, Crystal M; Katilius, Evaldas; Santiago, Juan G

    2014-08-21

    We present an on-chip electrokinetic method to increase the reaction kinetics and sensitivity of DNA microarray hybridization. We use isotachophoresis (ITP) to preconcentrate target molecules in solution and transport them over the immobilized probe sites of a microarray, greatly increasing the binding reaction rate. We show theoretically and experimentally that ITP-enhanced microarrays can be hybridized much faster and with higher sensitivity than conventional methods. We demonstrate our assay using a microfluidic system consisting of a PDMS microchannel superstructure bonded onto a glass slide on which 60 spots of 20-27 nt ssDNA oligonucleotide probes are immobilized. Our 30 min assay results in an 8.2 fold higher signal than the conventional overnight hybridization at 100 fM target concentration. We show rapid and quantitative detection over 4 orders of magnitude dynamic range of target concentration with no increase in the nonspecific signal. Our technique can be further multiplexed for higher density microarrays and extended for other reactions of target-surface immobilized ligands.

  18. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao; Navarro, J.M.

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Detection of mycobacterial DNA by a specific and simple lateral flow assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cimaglia, Fabio; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Sechi, Leonardo; Chiesa, Maurizio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Andreadou, Margarita; Taka, Styliani; Mataragka, Antonia; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots have been incorporated to a lateral flow assay for the specific and very simple detection of different mycobacterial DNA targets within only a few minutes, bypassing the complexity of conventional DNA hybridization assays. The method extends our previous work on protein detection using an identical procedure.

  20. E1 initiator DNA binding specificity is unmasked by selective inhibition of non-specific DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Stenlund, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Initiator proteins are critical components of the DNA replication machinery and mark the site of initiation. This activity probably requires highly selective DNA binding; however, many initiators display modest specificity in vitro. We demonstrate that low specificity of the papillomavirus E1 initiator results from the presence of a non-specific DNA-binding activity, involved in melting, which masks the specificity intrinsic to the E1 DNA-binding domain. The viral factor E2 restores specificity through a physical interaction with E1 that suppresses non-specific binding. We propose that this arrangement, where one DNA-binding activity tethers the initiator to ori while another alters DNA structure, is a characteristic of other viral and cellular initiator proteins. This arrangement would provide an explanation for the low selectivity observed for DNA binding by initiator proteins. PMID:12574131

  1. HPV Genotyping of Modified General Primer-Amplicons Is More Analytically Sensitive and Specific by Sequencing than by Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Meisal, Roger; Rounge, Trine Ballestad; Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Eieland, Alexander Kirkeby; Worren, Merete Molton; Molden, Tor Faksvaag; Kommedal, Øyvind; Hovig, Eivind; Leegaard, Truls Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive and specific genotyping of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is important for population-based surveillance of carcinogenic HPV types and for monitoring vaccine effectiveness. Here we compare HPV genotyping by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to an established DNA hybridization method. In DNA isolated from urine, the overall analytical sensitivity of NGS was found to be 22% higher than that of hybridization. NGS was also found to be the most specific method and expanded the detection repertoire beyond the 37 types of the DNA hybridization assay. Furthermore, NGS provided an increased resolution by identifying genetic variants of individual HPV types. The same Modified General Primers (MGP)-amplicon was used in both methods. The NGS method is described in detail to facilitate implementation in the clinical microbiology laboratory and includes suggestions for new standards for detection and calling of types and variants with improved resolution. PMID:28045981

  2. DNA hybridization, cladistics, and the phylogeny of phalangerid marsupials.

    PubMed

    Springer, M S; Kirsch, J A; Aplin, K; Flannery, T

    1990-03-01

    Single-copy DNA/DNA hybridization experiments and numerical cladistic analyses of anatomical characters were used to investigate relationships among nine phalangerid (Marsupialia) species from four different genera. Both rate-dependent and rate-independent analyses of molecular data indicate that species of Trichosurus from one clade and that Strigocuscus, Phalanger, and Spilocuscus form a second. Within the latter group, Spilocuscus is excluded from a Strigocuscus-Phalanger clade, which, in turn, is not fully resolved on a jackknife strict consensus tree. Minimum-length Dollo, Wagner, and Camin-Sokal parisomy trees based on 35 anatomical characters, in contrast, suggest placement of Strigocuscus with Trichosurus rather than with Spilocuscus and Phalanger. However, there are two derived characters that support the alternative arrange of Strigocuscus with Spilocuscus and Phalanger and one character that further unites Strigocuscus and Phalanger. Thus, DNA hybridization results are not inconsistent with the distribution of derived character states among anatomical characters, only with minimum-length trees based on character data.

  3. Free energy estimation of short DNA duplex hybridizations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Estimation of DNA duplex hybridization free energy is widely used for predicting cross-hybridizations in DNA computing and microarray experiments. A number of software programs based on different methods and parametrizations are available for the theoretical estimation of duplex free energies. However, significant differences in free energy values are sometimes observed among estimations obtained with various methods, thus being difficult to decide what value is the accurate one. Results We present in this study a quantitative comparison of the similarities and differences among four published DNA/DNA duplex free energy calculation methods and an extended Nearest-Neighbour Model for perfect matches based on triplet interactions. The comparison was performed on a benchmark data set with 695 pairs of short oligos that we collected and manually curated from 29 publications. Sequence lengths range from 4 to 30 nucleotides and span a large GC-content percentage range. For perfect matches, we propose an extension of the Nearest-Neighbour Model that matches or exceeds the performance of the existing ones, both in terms of correlations and root mean squared errors. The proposed model was trained on experimental data with temperature, sodium and sequence concentration characteristics that span a wide range of values, thus conferring the model a higher power of generalization when used for free energy estimations of DNA duplexes under non-standard experimental conditions. Conclusions Based on our preliminary results, we conclude that no statistically significant differences exist among free energy approximations obtained with 4 publicly available and widely used programs, when benchmarked against a collection of 695 pairs of short oligos collected and curated by the authors of this work based on 29 publications. The extended Nearest-Neighbour Model based on triplet interactions presented in this work is capable of performing accurate estimations of free energies

  4. Highly sensitive electrochemical impedance spectroscopic detection of DNA hybridization based on Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Du, Meng; Jiao, Kui

    2009-01-15

    A polyaniline nanofibers (PAN(nano))/carbon paste electrode (CPE) was prepared via dopping PAN(nano) in the carbon paste. The nanogold (Au(nano)) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite nanoparticles were bound on the surface of the PAN(nano)/CPE. The immobilization and hybridization of the DNA probe on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films were investigated with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) using methylene blue (MB) as indicator, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) as redox probe. The voltammetric peak currents of MB increased dramatically owing to the immobilization of the probe DNA on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films, and then decreased obviously owing to the hybridization of the DNA probe with the complementary single-stranded DNA (cDNA). The electron transfer resistance (R(et)) of the electrode surface increased after the immobilization of the probe DNA on the Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films and rose further after the hybridization of the probe DNA. The remarkable difference between the R(et) value at the DNA-immobilized electrode and that at the hybridized electrode could be used for the label-free EIS detection of the target DNA. The loading of the DNA probe on Au(nano)-CNT/PAN(nano) films was greatly enhanced and the sensitivity for the target DNA detection was markedly improved. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nopaline synthase (NOS) gene from transgenically modified beans were determined with this label-free EIS DNA detection method. The dynamic range for detecting the PAT gene sequence was from 1.0 x 10(-12)mol/L to 1.0 x 10(-6)mol/L with a detection limit of 5.6 x 10(-13)mol/L.

  5. Telomeres in ICF syndrome cells are vulnerable to DNA damage due to elevated DNA:RNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sagie, Shira; Toubiana, Shir; Hartono, Stella R.; Katzir, Hagar; Tzur-Gilat, Aya; Havazelet, Shany; Francastel, Claire; Velasco, Guillaume; Chédin, Frédéric; Selig, Sara

    2017-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrids, nucleic acid structures with diverse physiological functions, can disrupt genome integrity when dysregulated. Human telomeres were shown to form hybrids with the lncRNA TERRA, yet the formation and distribution of these hybrids among telomeres, their regulation and their cellular effects remain elusive. Here we predict and confirm in several human cell types that DNA:RNA hybrids form at many subtelomeric and telomeric regions. We demonstrate that ICF syndrome cells, which exhibit short telomeres and elevated TERRA levels, are enriched for hybrids at telomeric regions throughout the cell cycle. Telomeric hybrids are associated with high levels of DNA damage at chromosome ends in ICF cells, which are significantly reduced with overexpression of RNase H1. Our findings suggest that abnormally high TERRA levels in ICF syndrome lead to accumulation of telomeric hybrids that, in turn, can result in telomeric dysfunction. PMID:28117327

  6. Universal Dynamic DNA Assembly-Programmed Surface Hybridization Effect for Single-Step, Reusable, and Amplified Electrochemical Nucleic Acid Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Fang, Li; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2017-03-07

    The traditional sensitive electrochemical biosensors are commonly confronted with the cumbersome interface operation and washing procedures and the inclusion of extra exogenous reagents, which impose the challenge on the detection simplicity, reliability, and reusability. Herein, we present the proof-of-principle of a unique biosensor architecture based on dynamic DNA assembly programmed surface hybridization, which confers the single-step, reusable, and enzyme-free amplified electrochemical nucleic acid analysis. To demonstrate the fabrication universality three dynamic DNA assembly strategies including DNA-fueled target recycling, catalytic hairpin DNA assembly, and hybridization chain reaction were flexibly harnessed to convey the homogeneous target recognition and amplification events into various DNA scaffolds for the autonomous proximity-based surface hybridization. The current biosensor architecture features generalizability, simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity, and specificity over the traditional nucleic acid-related amplified biosensors. The lowest detection limit of 50 aM toward target DNA could be achieved by hybridization chain reaction-programmed surface hybridization. The reliable working ability for both homogeneous solution and heterogeneous inteface facilitates the target analysis with a robust reliability and reproducibility, also making it to be readily extended for the integration with the kinds of detecting platforms. Thus, it may hold great potential for the biosensor fabrication served for the point-of-care applications in resource constrained regions.

  7. Accurate measurement of psoralen-crosslinked DNA: direct biochemical measurements and indirect measurement by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, N.; Ross, P.M.

    1988-11-01

    This paper evaluates methods to measure crosslinkage due to psoralen plus light in total DNA and in specific sequences. DNA exposed in cells or in vitro to a bifunctional psoralen and near ultraviolet light accumulates interstrand crosslinks. Crosslinkage is the DNA mass fraction that is attached in both strands to a crosslink. We show here biochemical methods to measure psoralen photocrosslinkage accurately in total DNA. We also describe methods to measure photocrosslinkage indirectly, in specific sequences, by nucleic acid hybridization. We show that a single 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) crosslink causes at least 50 kbp of alkali-denatured DNA contiguous in both strands with it to snap back into the duplex form when the denatured preparation is returned to neutral pH. This process was so efficient that the DNA was not nicked by the single-strand nuclease S1 at 100-fold excess after snapping back. Uncrosslinked DNA was digested to acid-soluble material by the enzyme. Crosslinkage therefore equals the fraction of S1-resistant nucleotide in this kind of experiment. We alkali-denatured DNA samples crosslinked to varying degrees by varying TMP concentration at constant light exposure. We then measured crosslinkage by ethidium bromide (EtBr) fluorometry at pH 11.8; by EtBr fluorometry at neutral pH of S1 digests of the DNA; and by the fraction of radioactivity remaining acid insoluble in S1-digests of DNA labeled uniformly with (3H)deoxythymidine. These assays measure distinct physical properties of crosslinked DNA. Numerical agreement is expected only when all three measurements are accurate. Under optimum conditions, the three methods yielded identical results over the range of measurement. Using alkaline EtBr fluorescence in crude cell lysates, we detected crosslinks at frequencies in the range of 1.6 X 10(-7) per base pair.

  8. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Welling, Ryan C; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-01-07

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes-a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  9. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  10. Characterization and differential expression of CPD and 6-4 DNA photolyases in Xiphophorus species and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Walter, Dylan J; Boswell, Mikki; Volk de García, Sara M; Walter, Sean M; Breitenfeldt, Erik W; Boswell, William; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-06-01

    Among the many Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid tumor models are those that exhibit ultraviolet light (UVB) induced melanoma. In previous studies, assessment of UVB induced DNA damage and nucleotide excision DNA repair has been performed in parental lines and interspecies hybrids. Species and hybrid specific differences in the levels of DNA damage induced and the dark repair rates for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidine photoproducts (6-4PPs) have been reported. However, UVB induced DNA lesions in Xiphophorus fishes are thought to primarily be repaired via light dependent CPD and 6-4PP specific photolyases. Photolyases are of evolutionary interest since they are ancient and presumably function solely to ameliorate the deleterious effects of UVB exposure. Herein, we report results from detailed studies of CPD and 6-4PP photolyase gene expression within several Xiphophorus tissues. We determined photolyase gene expression patterns before and after exposure to fluorescent light in X. maculatus, X. couchianus, and for F1 interspecies hybrids produced from crossing these two parental lines (X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus). We present novel results showing these two photolyase genes exhibit species, tissue, and hybrid-specific differences in basal and light induced gene expression.

  11. Rotating rod renewable microcolumns for automated, solid-phase DNA hybridization studies.

    PubMed

    Bruckner-Lea, C J; Stottlemyre, M S; Holman, D A; Grate, J W; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2000-09-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization in an automated sequential injection system is described. The flow cell included a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degrees angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevented passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees releases the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately postcolumn during all column perfusion and elution steps using a flow-through fluorescence detector. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 microL, 10 nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than 1 s and a total sample perfusion time of 40 s. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated.

  12. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    PubMed

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes.

  13. Activated paper surfaces for the rapid hybridization of DNA through capillary transport.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana Catarina; Song, Yajing; Lundeberg, Joakim; Ståhl, Patrik L; Brumer, Harry

    2012-04-03

    The development of low-cost, accurate, and equipment-free diagnostic tests is crucial to many clinical, laboratory, and field applications, including forensics and medical diagnostics. Cellulose fiber-based paper is an inexpensive, biodegradable, and renewable resource, the use of which as a biomolecule detection matrix and support confers several advantages compared to traditional materials such as glass. In this context, a new, facile method for the preparation of surface functionalized papers bearing single-stranded probe DNA (ssDNA) for rapid target hybridization via capillary transport is presented. Optimized reaction conditions were developed that allowed the direct, one-step activation of standard laboratory filters by the inexpensive and readily available bifunctional linking reagent, 1,4-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Such papers were thus amenable to subsequent coupling of amine-labeled ssDNA under standard conditions widely used for glass-based supports. The intrinsic wicking ability of the paper matrix facilitated rapid sample elution through arrays of probe DNA, leading to significant, detectable hybridization in the time required for the sample liquid to transit the vertical length of the strip (less than 2 min). The broad applicability of these paper test strips as rapid and specific diagnostics in "real-life" situations was exemplified by the discrimination of amplicons generated from canine and human mitochondrial and genomic DNA in mock forensic samples.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the hybridizing fire-bellied toads, Bombina bombina and B. variegata.

    PubMed

    Szymura, J M; Uzzell, T; Spolsky, C

    2000-07-01

    Using five restriction enzymes, geographical variation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Bombina bombina and B. variegata was studied in samples from 20 locations. Each restriction enzyme produced a species-specific fragment pattern. B. bombina haplotypes A and B were closely related to each other. In contrast, haplotypes A and B of B. variegata formed two distinct lineages. A very distinctive haplotype (C) was found in the Carpathian Mountains, whereas two other haplotypes, D and E (differing by a single AvaI site), were present in western Europe and the Balkans, respectively. Populations polymorphic for haplotypes D and E occurred in the central Balkans where the haplotypes could replace each other clinally. mtDNA sequence divergence between B. bombina and B. variegata was estimated as 6.0-8.1% and 4.7-5.2% between type C and types D/E of B. variegata. The latter divergence is contrary to allozyme and morphological data that place the western and Carpathian B. v. variegata together (Nei's D = 0.07) and separate them from the Balkan subspecies B. v. scabra (Nei's D = 0.18). Broad interspecific correlation among morphology, allozymes and mtDNA types in European fire-bellied toads argues that, despite continuous hybridization (interrupted perhaps during Pleistocene glacial maxima), little or no mtDNA introgression between the species has occurred outside the narrow hybrid zones that separate these parapatric species.

  15. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-04-15

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant color change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays.

  16. A two-hybrid dual bait system to discriminate specificity of protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskii, I; Khazak, V; Golemis, E A

    1999-06-11

    Biological regulatory systems require the specific organization of proteins into multicomponent complexes. Two hybrid systems have been used to identify novel components of signaling networks based on interactions with defined partner proteins. An important issue in the use of two-hybrid systems has been the degree to which interacting proteins distinguish their biological partner from evolutionarily conserved related proteins and the degree to which observed interactions are specific. We adapted the basic two-hybrid strategy to create a novel dual bait system designed to allow single-step screening of libraries for proteins that interact with protein 1 of interest, fused to DNA binding domain A (LexA), but do not interact with protein 2, fused to DNA binding domain B (lambda cI). Using the selective interactions of Ras and Krev-1(Rap1A) with Raf, RalGDS, and Krit1 as a model, we systematically compared LexA- and cI-fused baits and reporters. The LexA and cI baitr reporter systems are well matched for level of bait expression and sensitivity range for interaction detection and allow effective isolation of specifically interacting protein pairs against a nonspecific background. These reagents should prove useful to refine the selectivity of library screens, to reduce the isolation of false positives in such screens, and to perform directed analyses of sequence elements governing the interaction of a single protein with multiple partners.

  17. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  18. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  19. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  20. Sequence-specific electrochemical detection of asymmetric PCR amplicons of traditional Chinese medicinal plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas M H; Hsing, I-Ming

    2002-10-01

    In this study, an electrochemistry-based approach to detect nucleic acid amplification products of Chinese herbal genes is reported. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and electrochemical techniques, single-stranded target amplicons are produced from trace amounts of DNA sample and sequence-specific electrochemical detection based on the direct hybridization of the crude amplicon mix and immobilized DNA probe can be achieved. Electrochemically active intercalator Hoechst 33258 is bound to the double-stranded duplex formed by the target amplicon hybridized with the 5'-thiol-derivated DNA probe (16-mer) on the gold electrode surface. The electrochemical current signal of the hybridization event is measured by linear sweep voltammetry, the response of which can be used to differentiate the sequence complementarities of the target amplicons. To improve the reproducibility and sensitivity of the current signal, issues such as electrode surface cleaning, probe immobilization, and target hybridization are addressed. Factors affecting hybridization efficiency including the length and binding region of the target amplicon are discussed. Using our approach, differentiation of Chinese herbal species Fritillaria (F. thunbergii and F. cirrhosa) based on the 16-mer unique sequences in the spacer region of the 5S-rRNA is demonstrated. The ability to detect PCR products using a nonoptical electrochemical detection technique is an important step toward the realization of portable biomicrodevices for on-spot bacterial and viral detections.

  1. Origins of specificity in protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Rohs, Remo; Jin, Xiangshu; West, Sean M; Joshi, Rohit; Honig, Barry; Mann, Richard S

    2010-01-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and DNA are fundamental to many biological processes. In this review, we provide a revised view of protein-DNA interactions that emphasizes the importance of the three-dimensional structures of both macromolecules. We divide protein-DNA interactions into two categories: those when the protein recognizes the unique chemical signatures of the DNA bases (base readout) and those when the protein recognizes a sequence-dependent DNA shape (shape readout). We further divide base readout into those interactions that occur in the major groove from those that occur in the minor groove. Analogously, the readout of the DNA shape is subdivided into global shape recognition (for example, when the DNA helix exhibits an overall bend) and local shape recognition (for example, when a base pair step is kinked or a region of the minor groove is narrow). Based on the >1500 structures of protein-DNA complexes now available in the Protein Data Bank, we argue that individual DNA-binding proteins combine multiple readout mechanisms to achieve DNA-binding specificity. Specificity that distinguishes between families frequently involves base readout in the major groove, whereas shape readout is often exploited for higher resolution specificity, to distinguish between members within the same DNA-binding protein family.

  2. Detection of salmonellas by DNA hybridization with a fluorescent alkaline phosphatase substrate.

    PubMed

    Cano, R J; Torres, M J; Klem, R E; Palomares, J C; Casadesus, J

    1992-05-01

    This study evaluates a DNA hybridization assay for salmonella with AttoPhos (JBL Scientific, San Luis Obispo, CA), a fluorescent substrate for alkaline phosphatase. The probe used (50 ng/ml) was a biotinylated 600 bp fragment consisting of a tandem repeat of an insertion sequence (IS200) found in most Salmonella spp. evaluated. The hybridization was carried out at 65 degrees C for 2 h without prior prehybridization and hybrids were detected by the addition of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate. Circles (5 mm) were cut from the membrane and placed in a cuvette containing 1 ml of 1 mmol/l AttoPhos. The reaction was evaluated after 30 min at 37 degrees C with a fluorometer with an excitation wavelength of 440 nm and an emission wavelength of 550 nm. The sensitivity of the probe was estimated to be 10,000 copies of target DNA or 5 x 10(-20) mol of DNA. All 74 salmonella strains tested reacted with the probe but none of the 98 heterologous species tested gave positive results. The results of this study indicate that our assay method, which employs a biotinylated tandem repeat of IS200 and AttoPhos, is a specific and highly sensitive quantitative method for the detection of salmonellas.

  3. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DNA hybridization, hemagglutination, and electron microscopy for detection of canine parvovirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Y A; Mildbrand, M M; Carlson, J; Collins, J K; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Canine fecal samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) by using monoclonal antibodies to the canine parvovirus hemagglutinating protein. These data were compared with results obtained with DNA hybridization assays, hemagglutination assays, and electron microscopy. The highest correlation was observed between the ELISA and the hemagglutination tests, with 94.4% of samples showing agreement. Lower correlation was obtained between ELISA and DNA hybridization tests (73.3%). Correlation between ELISA and electron microscopy was 60.9%. The studies indicated that the ELISA can be used as a sensitive and specific diagnostic assay for canine parvovirus infections. Images PMID:6092425

  4. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  5. DNA Hybridization Probe for Use in Determining Restricted Nodulation among Bradyrhizobium japonicum Serocluster 123 Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Cregan, Perry B.; Keyser, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    Several soybean plant introduction (PI) genotypes have recently been described which restrict nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 in an apparently serogroup-specific manner. While PI 371607 restricts nodulation of strains in serogroup 123 and some in serogroup 127, those in serogroup 129 are not restricted. When DNA regions within and around the B. japonicum I-110 common nodulation genes were used as probes to genomic DNA from the serogroup strains USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129, several of the probes differentially hybridized to the nodulation-restricted and -unrestricted strains. One of the gene regions, cloned in plasmid pMJS12, was subsequently shown to hybridize to 4.6-kilobase EcoRI fragments from DNAs from nodulation-restricted strains and to larger fragments in nodulation-unrestricted strains. To determine if the different hybridization patterns could be used to predict nodulation restriction, we hybridized pMJS12 to EcoRI-digested genomic DNAs from uncharacterized serocluster 123 field isolates. Of the 36 strains examined, 15 were found to have single, major, 4.6-kilobase hybridizing EcoRI fragments. When tested for nodulation, 80% (12 of 15) of the strains were correctly predicted to be restricted for nodulation of the PI genotypes. In addition, hybridization patterns obtained with pMJS12 and nodulation phenotypes on PI 371607 indicated that there are at least three types of serogroup 127 strains. Our results suggest that the pMJS12 gene probe may be useful in selecting compatible host-strain combinations and in determining the suitability of field sites for the placement of soybean genotypes containing restrictive nodulation alleles. Images PMID:16348217

  6. Low-molecular-weight DNA replication intermediates in Escherichia coli: mechanism of formation and strand specificity.

    PubMed

    Amado, Luciana; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-11-15

    Chromosomal DNA replication intermediates, revealed in ligase-deficient conditions in vivo, are of low molecular weight (LMW) independently of the organism, suggesting discontinuous replication of both the leading and the lagging DNA strands. Yet, in vitro experiments with purified enzymes replicating sigma-structured substrates show continuous synthesis of the leading DNA strand in complete absence of ligase, supporting the textbook model of semi-discontinuous DNA replication. The discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro results is rationalized by proposing that various excision repair events nick continuously synthesized leading strands after synthesis, producing the observed LMW intermediates. Here, we show that, in an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain with all known excision repair pathways inactivated, new DNA is still synthesized discontinuously. Furthermore, hybridization to strand-specific targets demonstrates that the LMW replication intermediates come from both the lagging and the leading strands. These results support the model of discontinuous leading strand synthesis in E. coli.

  7. Detection of bacteria by hybridization of rRNA with DNA-latex and immunodetection of hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Patterson, W L; Johnson, P K; Swartzell, C T; Wogoman, F; Albarella, J P; Carrico, R J

    1988-01-01

    A novel nucleic acid hybridization assay with a DNA probe immobilized on 1.25-micron-diameter latex particles was developed. Hybridization of the immobilized probe DNA with sample rRNA was complete in 10 to 15 min. Alkaline phosphatase-labeled anti-DNA-RNA was allowed to bind to the DNA-RNA hybrids on the latex particles. Then the latex was collected on a small glass fiber filter pad, and bound alkaline phosphatase was quantitated by reflectance rate measurement. The method detected a broad range of bacterial species and had a detection limit of 500 cells per assay. The assay was used to screen urine samples for bacteriuria and had a sensitivity of 96.2% compared with conventional culture at a decision level of greater than or equal to 10(4) CFU/ml. The hybridization method could have broad application to the detection of bacteria and viruses. PMID:2457597

  8. FY02 CBNP Annual Report: Discovery of DNA Signature of Biothreat Detection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G L; Radnedge, L

    2002-11-19

    Our goal is to develop robust DNA signatures for rapid and specific DNA-based detection platforms that can be employed by CBNP to detect a wide range of potential agents. Our approach has resulted in highly specific DNA signatures for Yersina pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Brucella species. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any genome (even uncharacterized ones), which facilitates DNA signature development for detection of newly emerging pathogens. We are using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) as a tool to define large DNA regions specific to multiple biothreat pathogens by comparing them to genomes of the most closely related organisms. This approach has become increasingly accurate as we continue to find new, distinctive strains and ever-closer near-neighbors. With the huge costs incurred by whole genome sequencing, it is not possible to sequence each new bacterial genome. However, it is completely practical to identify genome differences in the laboratory using SSH, and becomes especially useful when comparing new strains to previously sequenced genomes.

  9. Integrating DNA strand displacement circuitry to the nonlinear hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Fan, Tsz Wing; Hsing, I-Ming

    2017-02-23

    Programmable and modular attributes of DNA molecules allow one to develop versatile sensing platforms that can be operated isothermally and enzyme-free. In this work, we present an approach to integrate upstream DNA strand displacement circuits that can be turned on by a sequence-specific microRNA analyte with a downstream nonlinear hybridization chain reaction for a cascading hyperbranched nucleic acid assembly. This system provides a two-step amplification strategy for highly sensitive detection of the miRNA analyte, conducive for multiplexed detection. Multiple miRNA analytes were tested with our integrated circuitry using the same downstream signal amplification setting, showing the decoupling of nonlinear self-assembly with the analyte sequence. Compared with the reported methods, our signal amplification approach provides an additional control module for higher-order DNA self-assembly and could be developed into a promising platform for the detection of critical nucleic-acid based biomarkers.

  10. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of a fluorescent DNA hybridization assay for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Cano, R J; Palomares, J C; Torres, M J; Klem, R E

    1992-07-01

    This study evaluates a four-hour fluorescent DNA hybridization assay using both known bacterial isolates and clinical specimens. A biotinylated oligonucleotide probe from a sequence of the plasmid-encoded gene cppB was used. Hybrids were detected by addition of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate, followed by incubation for 30 min in a fluorescent substrate for alkaline phosphatase. The level of detection of the fluorescent assay was 0.1 pg of cryptic plasmid DNA or 200 cfu of the plasmid-containing strain NG 34/85 of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A total of 119 reference strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other related bacteria were tested for reactivity with the probe. All Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains, including eight plasmid-free strains, hybridized with the probe. Fluorescence ratios were 2.67 for plasmid-free strains and 3.85 for plasmid-containing strains. Of the heterologous microorganisms tested, only one of six strains of Neisseria cinerea gave a fluorescence ratio above the 2.0 cut-off value for positivity with the probe at a cell density of 1 x 10(4) cfu. The probe was also evaluated using clinical specimens from 100 patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. The sensitivity of the assay was 100% while the specificity was 97.5%. Positive and negative predictive values were 91.2% and 100%, respectively. The fluorescent DNA hybridization assay for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae described here thus appears to be a highly specific and sensitive assay.

  13. Combined immunoaffinity cDNA-RNA hybridization assay for detection of hepatitis A virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R W; Newbold, J E; Lemon, S M

    1985-01-01

    To apply cDNA-RNA hybridization methods to the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in clinical materials, we developed a two-step method in which a microtiter-based, solid-phase immunoadsorption procedure incorporating a monoclonal anti-HAV capture antibody was followed by direct blotting of virus eluates to nitrocellulose and hybridization with 32P-labeled recombinant HAV cDNA. This immunoaffinity hybridization method is simple and involves few sample manipulations, yet it retains high sensitivity (10- to 30-fold more than radioimmunoassay) and is capable of detecting approximately 1 X 10(5) to 2 X 10(5) genome copies of virus. The inclusion of the immunoaffinity step removes most contaminating proteins and thus facilitates subsequent immobilization of the virus for hybridization. It also permits positive hybridization signals to be related to specific antigens and adds a level of specificity to the hybridization procedure. When the method was applied to 23 fecal specimens collected from individuals during week 1 of symptoms due to hepatitis A, 13 specimens were found to be reproducibly positive for HAV RNA by immunoaffinity hybridization, whereas only 11 contained viral antigen detectable by radioimmunoassay. Images PMID:2999190

  14. Sequence-Specific Molecular Lithography on Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Kinneret; Krueger, Michael; Gilad, Rachel; Ben-Yoseph, Gdalyahu; Sivan, Uri; Braun, Erez

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the realization of individual molecular-scale electronic devices emphasize the need for novel tools and concepts capable of assembling such devices into large-scale functional circuits. We demonstrated sequence-specific molecular lithography on substrate DNA molecules by harnessing homologous recombination by RecA protein. In a sequence-specific manner, we patterned the coating of DNA with metal, localized labeled molecular objects and grew metal islands on specific sites along the DNA substrate, and generated molecularly accurate stable DNA junctions for patterning the DNA substrate connectivity. In our molecular lithography, the information encoded in the DNA molecules replaces the masks used in conventional microelectronics, and the RecA protein serves as the resist. The molecular lithography works with high resolution over a broad range of length scales from nanometers to many micrometers.

  15. Parental Analysis of Introgressive Hybridization between African and European Honeybees Using Nuclear DNA Rflps

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H. G.

    1990-01-01

    African honeybees, introduced into Brazil 33 years ago, have spread through most of South and Central America and have largely replaced the extant European bees. Due to a paucity of genetic markers, genetic interactions between European and African bees are not well understood. Three restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), detected with random, nuclear DNA probes, are described. The polymorphisms are specific to bees of European descent, possibly specific to certain European races. Each European marker was found present at a high frequency in U.S. colonies but absent in South African bees. Previous mitochondrial DNA studies of neotropical bees have revealed negligible maternal gene flow from managed European apiaries into feral African populations. The findings reported here with nuclear DNA show paternal gene flow between the two but suggest asymmetries in levels of introgressive hybridization. Managed colonies in southern Mexico, derived from European maternal lines, showed diminished levels of the European nuclear markers, reflecting significant hybridization with African drones. The European alleles were present only at low frequencies in feral swarms from the same area. The swarms were of African maternal descent. In Venezuelan colonies, also derived from African maternal lines, the European markers were almost totally absent. The results point to limited paternal introgression from European colonies into the African honeybee populations. These findings dispute other views regarding modes of Africanization. PMID:1974226

  16. Parental analysis of introgressive hybridization between African and European honeybees using nuclear DNA RFLPs.

    PubMed

    Hall, H G

    1990-07-01

    African honeybees, introduced into Brazil 33 years ago, have spread through most of South and Central America and have largely replaced the extant European bees. Due to a paucity of genetic markers, genetic interactions between European and African bees are not well understood. Three restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), detected with random, nuclear DNA probes, are described. The polymorphisms are specific to bees of European descent, possibly specific to certain European races. Each European marker was found present at a high frequency in U.S. colonies but absent in South African bees. Previous mitochondrial DNA studies of neotropical bees have revealed negligible maternal gene flow from managed European apiaries into feral African populations. The findings reported here with nuclear DNA show paternal gene flow between the two but suggest asymmetries in levels of introgressive hybridization. Managed colonies in southern Mexico, derived from European maternal lines, showed diminished levels of the European nuclear markers, reflecting significant hybridization with African drones. The European alleles were present only at low frequencies in feral swarms from the same area. The swarms were of African maternal descent. In Venezuelan colonies, also derived from African maternal lines, the European markers were almost totally absent. The results point to limited paternal introgression from European colonies into the African honeybee populations. These findings dispute other views regarding modes of Africanization.

  17. Detection of DNA hybridization by field-effect DNA-based biosensors: mechanisms of signal generation and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2013-08-15

    We model theoretically the electrostatic effects taking place upon DNA hybridization in dense DNA arrays immobilized on a layer of Au nano-particles deposited on the surface of a field-effect-based DNA capacitive biosensor. We consider the influence of separation of a charged analyte from the sensor surface and the salinity of electrolyte solution, in the framework of both linear and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theories. The latter predicts a substantially weaker sensor signals due to electrostatic saturation effects that is the main conclusion of this paper. We analyze how different physical parameters of dense DNA brushes affect the magnitude of hybridization signals. The list includes the fraction of DNA charge neutralization, the length and spatial conformations of adsorbed DNA molecules, as well as the discreteness of DNA charges. We also examine the effect of Donnan ionic equilibrium in DNA lattices on the sensor response. The validity of theoretical models is contrasted against recent experimental observations on detection of DNA hybridization via its intrinsic electric charge. The sensitivity of such biochemical sensing devices, their detection limit, and DNA hybridization efficiency are briefly discussed in the end.

  18. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  19. Purification of specific chromatin regions using oligonucleotides: capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART).

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher P; West, Jason A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genomic binding sites and proteins associated with noncoding RNAs will lead to more complete mechanistic characterization of the regulatory activities of noncoding RNAs. Capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART) is a powerful technique wherein specific RNA molecules are isolated from cross-linked nuclear extracts using complementary, biotinylated capture oligonucleotides, allowing subsequent identification of genomic DNA and proteins cross-linked to the RNA of interest. Here, we describe the procedure for CHART and list strategies to optimize nuclear extract preparation, capture oligonucleotide design, and isolation of nucleic acids and proteins enriched through CHART.

  20. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  1. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  2. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  3. Mediated Electron Transfer at Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes During Detection of DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallen, Rachel; Gokarn, Nirmal; Bercea, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa; Bandyopadhyay, Krisanu

    2015-06-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VASWCNT) assemblies are generated on cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME)-functionalized gold surfaces through amide bond formation between carboxylic groups generated at the end of acid-shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amine groups present on the gold surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging confirms the vertical alignment mode of SWCNT attachment through significant changes in surface roughness compared to bare gold surfaces and the lack of any horizontally aligned SWCNTs present. These SWCNT assemblies are further modified with an amine-terminated single-stranded probe-DNA. Subsequent hybridization of the surface-bound probe-DNA in the presence of complementary strands in solution is followed using impedance measurements in the presence of Fe(CN)6 3-/4- as the redox probe in solution, which show changes in the interfacial electrochemical properties, specifically the charge-transfer resistance, due to hybridization. In addition, hybridization of the probe-DNA is also compared when it is attached directly to the gold surfaces without any intermediary SWCNTs. Contrary to our expectations, impedance measurements show a decrease in charge-transfer resistance with time due to hybridization with 300 nM complementary DNA in solution with the probe-DNA attached to SWCNTs. In contrast, an increase in charge-transfer resistance is observed with time during hybridization when the probe-DNA is attached directly to the gold surfaces. The decrease in charge-transfer resistance during hybridization in the presence of VASWCNTs indicates an enhancement in the electron transfer process of the redox probe at the VASWCNT-modified electrode. The results suggest that VASWCNTs are acting as mediators of electron transfer, which facilitate the charge transfer of the redox probe at the electrode-solution interface.

  4. Highly specific electronic signal transduction mediated by DNA/metal self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Pathak, Srikant

    2003-11-01

    Highly specific interactions between DNA could potentially be amplified if the DNA interactions were utilized to assemble large scale parts. Fluidic assembly of microsystem parts has the potential for rapid and accurate placement of otherwise difficult to handle pieces. Ideally, each part would have a different chemical interaction that allowed it to interact with the substrate only in specific areas. One easy way to obtain a multiple chemical permutations is to use synthetic DNA oligomers. Si parts were prepared using silicon-on-insulator technology microfabrication techniques. Several surface chemistry protocols were developed to react commercial oligonucleotides to the parts. However, no obvious assembly was achieved. It was thought that small defects on the surface did not allow the microparts to be in close enough proximity for DNA hybridization, and this was. in part, confirmed by interferometry. To assist in the hybridization, plastic, pliable parts were manufactured and a new chemistry was developed. However, assembly was still absent even with the application of force. It is presently thought that one of three mechanisms is preventing the assembly. The surfaces of the two solid substrates can not get in close enough proximity, the surface chemistry lacks sufficient density to keep the parts from separating, or DNA interactions in close proximity on solid substrates are forbidden. These possibilities are discussed in detail.

  5. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations. PMID:28084308

  6. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations.

  7. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  8. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-18

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  9. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  10. A cytometric bead assay for sensitive DNA detection based on enzyme-free signal amplification of hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Liu, Hongmei; Yang, Wenxia; Fan, Yunlong; Yang, Lang; Wang, Yucong; Liu, Chenghui; Li, Zhengping

    2013-11-15

    A versatile flow cytometric bead assay (CBA) is developed for sensitive DNA detection by integrating the advantages of hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for enzyme-free signal amplification, flow cytometry for robust and rapid signal readout as well as magnetic beads (MBs) for facile separation. In this HCR-CBA, a biotinylated hairpin DNA (Bio-H1) is firstly immobilized on streptavidin-functionalized MBs. Upon the addition of target DNA, each target would hybridize with one Bio-H1 to open its hairpin structure and subsequently initiate a cascade of hybridization events between two species of fluorescent DNA hairpin probes (H1*/H2*) to form a nicked double helical DNA structure, resulting in amplified accumulation of numerous fluorophores on the MBs. Finally, the fluorescent MBs are directly analyzed by flow cytometry. This technique enables quantitative analysis of the HCR products anchored on the MBs as a function of target DNA concentration, and analysis of each sample can be completed within few minutes. Therefore, the HCR-CBA approach provides a practical DNA assay with greatly improved sensitivity. The detection limit of a model DNA target is 0.5 pM (3σ), which is about 3 orders of magnitude lower compared with traditional hybridization methods without HCR. Furthermore, the signal of complementary target can be clearly distinguished from that of single-base mismatched sequences, indicating the high specificity of the HCR-CBA. Moreover, this strategy is also successfully applied to the DNA analysis in complex biological samples, showing great potential in gene analysis and disease diagnosis in clinical samples.

  11. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  12. Inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus by using zinc finger-single-chain FokI dimer hybrid.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we reported that an artificial zinc-finger protein (AZP)-staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) hybrid (designated AZP-SNase) inhibited DNA replication of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) in mammalian cells by binding to and cleaving a specific HPV-18 ori plasmid. Although the AZP-SNase did not show any side effects under the experimental conditions, the SNase is potentially able to cleave RNA as well as DNA. In the present study, to make AZP hybrid nucleases that cleave only viral DNA, we switched the SNase moiety in the AZP-SNase to the single-chain FokI dimer (scFokI) that we had developed previously. We demonstrated that transfection with a plasmid expressing the resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-scFokI) inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells more efficiently than AZP-SNase. Then, by linker-mediated PCR analysis, we confirmed that AZP-scFokI cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site in mammalian cells. Finally, a modified MTT assay revealed that AZP-scFokI did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, the newly developed AZP-scFokI hybrid is expected to serve as a novel antiviral reagent for the neutralization of human DNA viruses with less fewer potential side effects.

  13. Specific suppression of anti-DNA production in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liebling, M.R.; Wong, C.; Radosevich, J.; Louie, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the regulation of anti-DNA antibody production, we generated anti-DNA-specific suppressor cells by exposing normal human T cells and a small percentage of adherent cells to high concentrations of DNA. These cells suppressed the production of anti-DNA by both autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and allogeneic PBMC derived from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Anti-DNA production was suppressed significantly more than anti-RNA, antitetanus, or total immunoglobulin production. Specific suppression was enhanced by increasing the numbers of DNA-primed CD8+ cells and was obliterated by irradiation of the DNA-primed cells. In contrast to T cells from normal individuals, T cells obtained from two intensively studied SLE patients were unable to generate specific suppressor cells for anti-DNA production in both autologous and allogeneic test systems. Despite this defect, these patients were still capable of generating specific suppressor cells for antibody production directed against an exogenous antigen, tetanus toxoid.

  14. RNA-DNA hybrid (R-loop) immunoprecipitation mapping: an analytical workflow to evaluate inherent biases.

    PubMed

    Halász, László; Karányi, Zsolt; Boros-Oláh, Beáta; Rózsa, Tímea; Sipos, Éva; Nagy, Éva; Mosolygó-L, Ágnes; Mázló, Anett; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Halmos, Gábor; Székvölgyi, Lóránt

    2017-03-24

    The impact of R-loops on the physiology and pathology of chromosomes has been demonstrated extensively by chromatin biology research. The progress in this field has been driven by technological advancement of R-loop mapping methods that largely relied on a single approach, DNA-RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP). Most of the DRIP protocols use the experimental design that was developed by a few laboratories, without paying attention to the potential caveats that might affect the outcome of RNA-DNA hybrid mapping. To assess the accuracy and utility of this technology, we pursued an analytical approach to estimate inherent biases and errors in the DRIP protocol. By performing DRIP-sequencing, qPCR and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, we tested the effect of formaldehyde fixation, cell lysis temperature, mode of genome fragmentation, and removal of free RNA on the efficacy of RNA-DNA hybrid detection, and implemented workflows that were able to distinguish complex and weak DRIP signals in a noisy background with high confidence. We also show that some of the workflows perform poorly and generate random answers. Furthermore, we found that the most commonly used genome fragmentation method (restriction enzyme digestion) led to the overrepresentation of lengthy DRIP fragments over coding ORFs, and this bias was enhanced at the first exons. Biased genome sampling severely compromised the mapping resolution and prevented the assignment of precise biological function to a significant fraction of R-loops. The revised workflow presented herein is established and optimized using objective ROC analyses and provides reproducible and highly specific RNA-DNA hybrid detection.

  15. Anodized aluminum oxide-based capacitance sensors for the direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongkeun; Yeo, Unjin; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2010-03-15

    We fabricated a capacitance sensor based on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous structure to detect DNA hybridization. We utilized Au film deposited on the surface of the AAO membrane and Au nanowires infiltrating the nanopores as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. When completely complementary target DNA molecules were added to the sensor-immobilized DNA molecule probes, the capacitance was reduced; with a concentration of 1pM, the capacitance decreased by approximately 10%. We measured the capacitance change for different concentrations of the target DNA solution. A linear relationship was found between the capacitance change and DNA concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale. We also investigated the possibility of detecting DNA molecules with a single-base mismatch to the probe DNA molecule. In contrast to complementary target DNA molecules, the addition of one-base mismatch DNA molecules caused no significant change in capacitance, demonstrating that DNA hybridization was detected with single nucleotide polymorphism sensitivity.

  16. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  17. Hybrid specification, storage, retrieval and runtime application of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Y

    2006-06-01

    Clinical guidelines are a major tool in improving the quality of medical care. However, most guidelines are in free text, are not machine-comprehensible and are not easily accessible to clinicians at the point of care. We have designed and implemented a web-based, modular, distributed architecture, the Digital Electronic Guideline Library (DeGeL), which facilitates gradual conversion of clinical guidelines from text to a formal representation in the chosen target guideline ontology. The architecture supports guideline classification, semantic markup, context-sensitive search, browsing, run-time application and retrospective quality assessment. The DeGeL hybrid meta-ontology includes elements common to all guideline ontologies, such as semantic classification and domain knowledge; it also includes four content-representation formats: free text, semi-structured text, semi-formal representation and a formal representation. These formats support increasingly sophisticated computational tasks. Guidelines can thus be in a hybrid representation in which guidelines, and even parts of the same guideline, might exist at different formalisation levels. We have also developed and rigorously evaluated a methodology and an associated web-based tool, Uruz, for gradually structuring and semi-formalising free-text clinical guidelines. Finally, we have designed, implemented and evaluated a new approach, the hybrid runtime application model, for supporting runtime application of clinical guidelines that are not necessarily in a machine-comprehensible format; in particular, when the guideline is in a semi-formal representation and the patient's data are either in an electronic medical record or in a paper format. The tool implementing this new approach, the Spock module, is customised at this point to the Asbru guideline specification language and exploits the hybrid structure of guidelines in DeGeL. The Spock module also exploits our temporal-abstraction mediator to the patient

  18. Molecular cytogenetics of Alstroemeria: identification of parental genomes in interspecific hybrids and characterization of repetitive DNA families in constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G; van Os, D P; de Jong, J H; Ramanna, M S

    1997-02-01

    The genus Alstroemeria consists of diploid (2n = 2x = 16) species originating mainly from Chile and Brazil. Most cultivars are triploid or tetraploid interspecific hybrids. C-banding of eight species revealed obvious differentiation of constitutive heterochromatin within the genus. The present study focused on the molecular (cyto)genetic background of this differentiation. Genomic slot-blot analysis demonstrated strong conservation of major parts of the genomes among six species. The chromosomes of A. aurea and A. ligtu, species with pronounced interstitial C-bands, were found to contain large amounts of highly repetitive and species-specific DNA. The variation in size, number and intensity of strongly probed bands of major repetitive DNA families observed in genomic Southern blots of Sau3A, HaeIII, and MseI digests indicated a strong correlation between variation in genomic DNA composition and different C-banding patterns among Alstroemeria species. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) revealed a clear distinction between parental chromosomes in the hybrids between Chilean and Brazilian species and also between Chilean species, as long as at least one of the parental species possessed prominent C-banding. Regarding the latter, discriminative hybridization resulted from highly repetitive species specific DNA in the heterochromatic chromosome regions of A. aurea and A. ligtu, and caused GISH banding patterns that coincided with the C-banding patterns.

  19. Transcriptome screen for fast evolving genes by Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fast evolving genes are targets of an increasing panel of biological studies, from cancer research to population genetics and species specific adaptations. Yet, their identification and isolation are still laborious, particularly for non-model organisms. We developed a method, named the Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH) method, for generating cDNA libraries enriched in fast evolving genes. It utilizes transcripts of homologous tissues of distinct yet related species. Experimental hybridization conditions are monitored in order to discard transcripts that do not find their homologous counterparts in the two species sets as well as transcripts that display a strong complementarity between the two species. Only heteroduplexes that disanneal at low stringency are used for constructing the resulting cDNA library. Results We demonstrate the efficiency of the ISSH method by generating a brain cDNA library enriched in fast evolving transcripts of a non-model catfish species as well as a control, non-enriched library. Our results indicate that the enriched library contains effectively more fast evolving sequences than the control library. Gene annotation analyses also indicate enrichment in genes with low expression levels and non-ubiquitously expressed genes, both categories encompassing the majority of fast evolving genes. Furthermore, most of the identified transcripts show higher sequence divergence between two closely related catfish species as compared to recognized fast evolving DNA markers. Conclusions The ISSH method offers a simple, inexpensive and efficient way to screen the transcriptome for isolating fast evolving genes. This method opens new opportunities in the investigation of biological mechanisms that include fast evolving genes, such as the evolution of lineage specific processes and traits responsible for species adaptation to their environment. PMID:20175901

  20. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  1. Magnetic bead-liposome hybrids enable sensitive and portable detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using personal glucose meter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youna; Xue, Qingwang; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2017-01-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in maintaining genome methylation patterns, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. This encouraged the need to develop highly sensitive, simple, and robust assays for DNA MTase detection and inhibitor screening. Herein, a simple, sensitive, and specific DNA MTase activity assay was developed based on magnetic beads-liposome hybrids combined with personal glucose meter (PGM) for quantitative detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. First, a magnetic beads-liposome hybrid probe is designed by the hybridization of p1DNA-functionalized magnetic bead with p2DNA-functionalized glucoamylase-encapsulated liposome (GEL). It integrates target recognition, magnetic separation and signal amplification within one multifunctional design. Then, in the presence of Dam MTase, the hybrids probe was methylated, and cleaved by methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, making liposome separated from magnetic bead by magnetic separation. Finally, the separated liposome was decomposed, liberating the encapsulated glucoamylase to catalyze the hydrolysis of the signal substrate amylose with multiple turnovers, producing a large amount of glucose for quantitative readout by the PGM. In the proposed assay, the magnetic beads-liposome hybrids offered excellent sensitivity due to primary amplification via releasing numerous glucoamylase from a liposome followed by a secondary enzymatic amplification. The use of portable quantitative device PGM bypasses the requirement of complicated instruments and sophisticated operations, making the method simple and feasible for on-site detection. Moreover, the proposed assay was successfully applied in complex biological matrix and screen suitable inhibitor drugs for DAM for disease(s) treatment. The results reveal that the approach provides a simple, sensitive, and robust platform for DNA MTases detection and screening potential drugs in medical research and

  2. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  3. Poliovirus genome RNA hybridizes specifically to higher eukaryotic rRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, M A; Perrault, J

    1985-01-01

    The RNA genome of poliovirus hybridizes to 28S and 18S rRNAs of higher eukaryotes under stringent conditions. The hybridization detected by Northern blot analyses is specific since little or no signal was detected for yeast or prokaryotic rRNAs or other major cellular RNAs. Southern blot analysis of DNA clones of mouse rRNA genes leads us to conclude that several regions of 28S rRNA, and at least one region in 18S rRNA, are involved in the hybridization to polio RNA, and that G/C regions are not responsible for this phenomenon. We have precisely mapped one of these hybridizing regions in both molecules. Computer analysis confirms that extensive intermolecular base-pairing (81 out of 104 contiguous bases in the rRNA strand) could be responsible for this one particular site of interaction (polio genome, bases 5075-5250; 28S rRNA, bases 1097-1200). We discuss the possible functional and/or evolutionary significance of this novel type of interaction. Images PMID:2997728

  4. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  5. Remote electronic control of DNA hybridization through inductive coupling to an attached metal nanocrystal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Schwartz, John J.; Santos, Aaron T.; Zhang, Shuguang; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly detailed structural and dynamic studies are highlighting the precision with which biomolecules execute often complex tasks at the molecular scale. The efficiency and versatility of these processes have inspired many attempts to mimic or harness them. To date, biomolecules have been used to perform computational operations and actuation, to construct artificial transcriptional loops that behave like simple circuit elements and to direct the assembly of nanocrystals. Further development of these approaches requires new tools for the physical and chemical manipulation of biological systems. Biomolecular activity has been triggered optically through the use of chromophores, but direct electronic control over biomolecular `machinery' in a specific and fully reversible manner has not yet been achieved. Here we demonstrate remote electronic control over the hybridization behaviour of DNA molecules, by inductive coupling of a radio-frequency magnetic field to a metal nanocrystal covalently linked to DNA. Inductive coupling to the nanocrystal increases the local temperature of the bound DNA, thereby inducing denaturation while leaving surrounding molecules relatively unaffected. Moreover, because dissolved biomolecules dissipate heat in less than 50picoseconds (ref. 16), the switching is fully reversible. Inductive heating of macroscopic samples is widely used, but the present approach should allow extension of this concept to the control of hybridization and thus of a broad range of biological functions on the molecular scale.

  6. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  7. The microwave sensing of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotubes decorated with gold nanoislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismaru, Alina; Dragoman, Mircea; Radoi, Antonio; Dinescu, A.; Dragoman, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    The hybridization of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is detected with the help of electromagnetic band gap resonator. The resonance frequency of the unloaded resonator f0=16.07 GHz is shifted to the left at 11.49 GHz when the resonator is loaded with single-stranded DNA anchored to gold nanoislands decorating bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes deposited on the resonator. Further, single stranded DNA is hybridized and the resonator frequency is shifted to 14.16 GHz for double-stranded DNA. So, the frequency span of the two DNA states are separated by a span of 2.6 GHz in the band 11.5-16.07 GHz due to the very different electrical permittivity values of single- and double-stranded DNA. Thus, the hybridization of DNA is detected unambiguously.

  8. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis.

  9. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. DNA microarrays for comparative genomic hybridization based on DOP-PCR amplification of BAC and PAC clones.

    PubMed

    Fiegler, Heike; Carr, Philippa; Douglas, Eleanor J; Burford, Deborah C; Hunt, Sarah; Scott, Carol E; Smith, James; Vetrie, David; Gorman, Patricia; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Carter, Nigel P

    2003-04-01

    We have designed DOP-PCR primers specifically for the amplification of large insert clones for use in the construction of DNA microarrays. A bioinformatic approach was used to construct primers that were efficient in the general amplification of human DNA but were poor at amplifying E. coli DNA, a common contaminant of DNA preparations from large insert clones. We chose the three most selective primers for use in printing DNA microarrays. DNA combined from the amplification of large insert clones by use of these three primers and spotted onto glass slides showed more than a sixfold increase in the human to E. coli hybridization ratio when compared to the standard DOP-PCR primer, 6MW. The microarrays reproducibly delineated previously characterized gains and deletions in a cancer cell line and identified a small gain not detected by use of conventional CGH. We also describe a method for the bulk testing of the hybridization characteristics of chromosome-specific clones spotted on microarrays by use of DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes. Finally, we describe a set of clones selected from the publicly available Golden Path of the human genome at 1-Mb intervals and a view in the Ensembl genome browser from which data required for the use of these clones in array CGH and other experiments can be downloaded across the Internet.

  11. Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive subtractive hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Kathleen G; Lamonica, Janine M; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Williams, Leanne E; Bishara, Joanne; Lewandowski, Anna; Redkar, Rajendra; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2004-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives. PMID:15028116

  12. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  13. Microvalve and micropump controlled shuttle flow microfluidic device for rapid DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Li, Chunyu; Lin, Bingcheng; Qin, Jianhua

    2010-11-07

    We present a novel microfluidic device integrated with microvalves and micropumps for rapid DNA hybridization using shuttle flow. The device is composed of 48 hybridization units containing 48 microvalves and 96 micropumps for the automation of shuttle flow. We used four serotypes of Dengue Virus genes (18mer) to demonstrate that the automatic shuttle flow shortened the hybridization time to 90 s, reduced sample consumption to 1 μL and lowered detection limit to 100 pM (100 amol in a 1 μL sample). Moreover, we applied this device to realize single base discrimination and analyze 48 samples containing different DNA targets, simultaneously. For kinetic measurements of nucleotide hybridization, on-line monitoring of the processes was carried out. This rapid hybridization device has the ability for accommodating the entire hybridization process (i.e., injection, hybridization, washing, detection, signal acquisition) in an automated and high-throughput fashion.

  14. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  15. Identification of persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structures within the origin of replication of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Prichard, M N; Jairath, S; Penfold, M E; St Jeor, S; Bohlman, M C; Pari, G S

    1998-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic-phase DNA replication initiates at the cis-acting origin of replication, oriLyt. oriLyt is a structurally complex region containing repeat elements and transcription factor binding sites. We identified two site-specific alkali-labile regions within oriLyt which flank an alkali-resistant DNA segment. These alkali-sensitive regions were the result of the degradation of two RNA species embedded within oriLyt and covalently linked to viral DNA. The virus-associated RNA, vRNA, was identified by DNase I treatment of HCMV DNA obtained from sucrose gradient purified virus. This heterogeneous population of vRNA was end labeled and used as a hybridization probe to map the exact location of vRNAs within oriLyt. vRNA-1 is localized between restriction endonuclease sites XhoI at nucleotide (nt) 93799 and SacI at nt 94631 and is approximately 500 bases long. The second vRNA, vRNA-2, lies within a region which exhibits a heterogeneous restriction pattern located between the SphI (nt 92636) and BamHI (nt 93513) and is approximately 300 bases long. This region was previously shown to be required for oriLyt replication (D. G. Anders, M. A. Kacica, G. S. Pari, and S. M. Punturieri, J. Virol. 66:3373-3384, 1992). RNase H analysis determined that vRNA-2 forms a persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structure in the context of the viral genome and in an oriLyt-containing plasmid used in the transient-replication assay.

  16. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zaffino, R L; Mir, M; Samitier, J

    2014-03-14

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50 nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  17. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  19. T-Specific DNA Polymorphisms among Wild Mice from Israel and Spain

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, F.; Neufeld, E.; Ritte, U.; Klein, J.

    1988-01-01

    Lehrach and his coworkers have isolated a series of DNA probes that specifically hybridize with different regions of mouse chromosome 17 within the t complex. The probes display restriction fragment length polymorphisms, RFLPs, which are specific for the t haplotypes in all laboratory mouse strains tested thus far. Some of these probes have been used to test wild mice populations for these t-associated DNA forms. It is demonstrated that populations from Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia, Australia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela contain chromosomes in which all the tested DNA loci display the t-specific polymorphisms. The frequency of mice carrying these chromosomes is as high as 31%. Wild mice from Israel and Spain, on the other hand, carry chromosomes displaying t-specific DNA forms only at one or two of the probed loci, while the other loci carry the wild-type (+) forms. These chromosomes thus resemble the partial t haplotypes known from the study of laboratory mice. One possible interpretation of these findings is that these DNA polymorphisms contributed to the assembly of the complete t haplotypes and that these haplotypes may have originated in the Middle East. PMID:3165081

  20. Sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA: oligodeoxynucleotide-EDTA X Fe(II).

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, G B; Dervan, P B

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a DNA hybridization probe 19 nucleotides in length, equipped with the metal chelator EDTA at C-5 of thymidine in position 10 (indicated by T*) is described. DNA-EDTA 1 has the sequence 5'-T-A-A-C-G-C-A-G-T*-C-A-G-G-C-A-C-C-G-T-3', which is complementary to a 19-nucleotide sequence in the plasmid pBR322. In the presence of Fe(II), O2, and dithiothreitol, DNA-EDTA 1 affords specific cleavage (25 degrees C, pH 7.4, 60 min) at its complementary sequence in a heat-denatured 167-base-pair restriction fragment. Cleavage occurs over a range of 16 nucleotides at the site of hybridization of 1, presumably due to a diffusible reactive species. No other cleavage sites are observed in the 167-base-pair restriction fragment. The procedure used to synthesize DNA-EDTA probes is based on the incorporation of a thymidine modified at C-5 with the triethyl ester of EDTA. By using routine phosphoramidite procedures, thymidine-EDTA can be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides of any desired length and sequence. Because the efficiency of the DNA cleavage reaction is dependent on the addition of both Fe(II) and reducing agent (dithiothreitol), the initiation of the cleavage reaction can be controlled. These DNA-EDTA X Fe(II) probes should be useful for the sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA (and most likely RNA) under mild conditions. Images PMID:3919391

  1. Cell specificity in DNA binding and repair of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, J A; Rickert, D E; Baranyi, B L; Goodman, J I

    1983-01-01

    Many animal models for organ specific neoplasia have been developed and used to study the pathogenesis of cancer. Morphologic studies have usually concentrated on the response of target cells, whereas biochemical investigations have usually employed whole organ homogenates. Since hepatocytes comprise nearly 90% of the liver's mass and 70-80% of its DNA, alterations in DNA replication, covalent binding and DNA repair of nonparenchymal cells are usually obscured when whole organ homogenates are used. By utilizing cell separation methods, we have been able to demonstrate differences between hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell replication. DNA damage and repair following exposure to a variety of hepatocarcinogen. Differences in removal of simple O6-alkylguanine and DNA replication correlate with cell specific carcinogenesis of simply alkylating agents. For several other procarcinogens, including 2-acetylaminofluorene and dinitroluene, cell specificity appears to reside primarily in the differential metabolic competence of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. This results in greater covalent binding of the carcinogen to hepatocyte DNA, although the DNA adducts are removed at a similar rate in both cell types. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6832089

  2. Combined immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes allows quantification and differentiation of ex vivo generated dendritic cells, leukemia-derived dendritic cells and clonal leukemic cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Kufner, Stefanie; Konhaeuser, Elke; Kroell, Tanja; Hausmann, Andreas; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Schmetzer, Helga

    2013-06-01

    Antileukemic T-cell responses induced by leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)) are variable, due to varying DC/DC(leu) composition/quality. We studied DC/DC(leu) composition/quality after blast culture in four DC media by flow cytometry (FC) and combined fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunophenotyping analysis (FISH-IPA). Both methods showed that DC methods produce variable proportions of DC subtypes. FISH-IPA is an elaborate method to study clonal aberrations in blast/DC cells on slides, however without preselection of distinct cell populations for FISH analysis. FISH-IPA data proved previous FC data: not every clonal/blast cell is converted to DC(leu) (resulting in various proportions of DC(leu)) and not every detectable DC is of clonal/leukemic origin. Preselection of the best of four DC methods for "best" DC/DC(leu) generation is necessary. DC(leu) proportions correlate with the antileukemic functionality of DC/DC(leu)-stimulated T-cells, thereby proving the necessity of studying the quality of DC/DC(leu) after culture. FC is the superior method to quantify DC/DC(leu), since a blast phenotype is available in every given patient, even with low/no proportions of clonal aberrations, and can easily be used to study cellular compositions after DC culture.

  3. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  4. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids activate the cGAS-STING axis.

    PubMed

    Mankan, Arun K; Schmidt, Tobias; Chauhan, Dhruv; Goldeck, Marion; Höning, Klara; Gaidt, Moritz; Kubarenko, Andrew V; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Hornung, Veit

    2014-12-17

    Intracellular recognition of non-self and also self-nucleic acids can result in the initiation of potent pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokine responses. Most recently, cGAS was shown to be critical for the recognition of cytoplasmic dsDNA. Binding of dsDNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP(2'-5'), which then binds to the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein STING. This initiates a signaling cascade that triggers the induction of an antiviral immune response. While most studies on intracellular nucleic acids have focused on dsRNA or dsDNA, it has remained unexplored whether cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are also sensed by the innate immune system. Studying synthetic RNA:DNA hybrids, we indeed observed a strong type I interferon response upon cytosolic delivery of this class of molecule. Studies in THP-1 knockout cells revealed that the recognition of RNA:DNA hybrids is completely attributable to the cGAS-STING pathway. Moreover, in vitro studies showed that recombinant cGAS produced cGAMP upon RNA:DNA hybrid recognition. Altogether, our results introduce RNA:DNA hybrids as a novel class of intracellular PAMP molecules and describe an alternative cGAS ligand next to dsDNA.

  5. DNA elimination in embryogenic development of Pennisetum glaucum x Pennisetum purpureum (Poaceae) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J D; Azevedo, A L S; Pereira, A V; Paula, C M P; Campos, J M S; Lédo, F J S; Santos, V B

    2013-10-22

    Interspecific hybridization between Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), which is widely grown in Brazil for cattle forage, and pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) has been used as a breeding strategy for the development of improved cultivars. However, the hybrid between these two species is sterile due to its triploid condition (2n = 3x = 21 chromosomes), which hinders its use in crop breeding programs. It is known that genomic alterations result from the hybridization process. In order to measure the loss of DNA during embryo development, we used flow cytometry to estimate the nuclear DNA content of triploid and tetraploid embryos produced by interspecific hybridization between Napier grass and pearl millet. The triploid and tetraploid hybrids had a mean DNA content of 4.99-4.87 and 5.25-4.84 pg, at 10 and 30 days after pollination, respectively. The mean reduction in DNA content was higher in the tetraploid hybrids. The flow cytometry results revealed progressive genomic instability in these triploid and tetraploid hybrids, with this instability causing significant alterations in the DNA content of the hybrids.

  6. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James A.; Pastrana, Cesar L.; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J.; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed. PMID:25572315

  7. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with gel-immobilized oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Livshits, M A; Mirzabekov, A D

    1996-01-01

    A new method of DNA sequencing by hybridization using a microchip containing a set of immobilized oligonucleotides is being developed. A theoretical analysis is presented of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with deoxynucleotide molecules chemically tethered in a polyacrylamide gel layer. The analysis has shown that long-term evolution of the spatial distribution and of the amount of DNA bound in a hybridization cell is governed by "retarded diffusion," i.e., diffusion of the DNA interrupted by repeated association and dissociation with immobile oligonucleotide molecules. Retarded diffusion determines the characteristic time of establishing a final equilibrium state in a cell, i.e., the state with the maximum quantity and a uniform distribution of bound DNA. In the case of cells with the most stable, perfect duplexes, the characteristic time of retarded diffusion (which is proportional to the equilibrium binding constant and to the concentration of binding sites) can be longer than the duration of the real hybridization procedure. This conclusion is indirectly confirmed by the observation of nonuniform fluorescence of labeled DNA in perfect-match hybridization cells (brighter at the edges). For optimal discrimination of perfect duplexes from duplexes with mismatches the hybridization process should be brought to equilibrium under low-temperature nonsaturation conditions for all cells. The kinetic differences between perfect and nonperfect duplexes in the gel allow further improvement in the discrimination through additional washing at low temperature after hybridization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913616

  8. Plant somatic hybrid cytoplasmic DNA characterization by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Hernández-Garrido, María; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2007-06-01

    Unlike maternal inheritance in sexual hybridization, plant somatic hybridization allows transfer, mixing and recombination of cytoplasmic genomes. In addition to the use of somatic hybridization in plant breeding programs, application of this unique tool should lead to a better understanding of the roles played by the chloroplastic and mitochondrial genomes in determining agronomically important traits. The nucleotide sequences of cytoplasmic genomes are much more conserved than those of nuclear genomes. Cytoplasmic DNA composition in somatic hybrids is commonly elucidated either by length polymorphism analysis of restricted genome regions amplified with universal primers (PCR-RF) or by hybridization of total DNA using universal cytoplasmic probes. In this study, we demonstrate that single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is a powerful, quick and easy alternative method for cytoplasmic DNA characterization of somatic hybrids, especially for mitochondrial DNA. The technique allows detection of polymorphisms based on both size and sequence of amplified targets. Twenty-two species of the subfamily Aurantioideae were analyzed with eight universal primers (four from chloroplastic and four from mitochondrial regions). Differences in chloroplastic DNA composition were scored in 98% of all possible two-parent combinations, and different mitochondrial DNA profiles were found in 87% of them. Analysis by SSCP was also successfully used to characterize somatic hybrids and cybrids obtained by fusion of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. and C. excelsa Wester protoplasts.

  9. Selective, controllable, and reversible aggregation of polystyrene latex microspheres via DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Phillip H; Michel, Eric; Bauer, Carl A; Vanderet, Stephen; Hansen, Daniel; Roberts, Bradley K; Calvez, Antoine; Crews, Jackson B; Lau, Kwok O; Wood, Alistair; Pine, David J; Schwartz, Peter V

    2005-06-07

    The directed three-dimensional self-assembly of microstructures and nanostructures through the selective hybridization of DNA is the focus of great interest toward the fabrication of new materials. Single-stranded DNA is covalently attached to polystyrene latex microspheres. Single-stranded DNA can function as a sequence-selective Velcro by only bonding to another strand of DNA that has a complementary sequence. The attachment of the DNA increases the charge stabilization of the microspheres and allows controllable aggregation of microspheres by hybridization of complementary DNA sequences. In a mixture of microspheres derivatized with different sequences of DNA, microspheres with complementary DNA form aggregates, while microspheres with noncomplementary sequences remain suspended. The process is reversible by heating, with a characteristic "aggregate dissociation temperature" that is predictably dependent on salt concentration, and the evolution of aggregate dissociation with temperature is observed with optical microscopy.

  10. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results.

  11. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  12. Development of swine-specific DNA markers for biosensor-based halal authentication.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Kashif, M; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-06-29

    The pig (Sus scrofa) mitochondrial genome was targeted to design short (15-30 nucleotides) DNA markers that would be suitable for biosensor-based hybridization detection of target DNA. Short DNA markers are reported to survive harsh conditions in which longer ones are degraded into smaller fragments. The whole swine mitochondrial-genome was in silico digested with AluI restriction enzyme. Among 66 AluI fragments, five were selected as potential markers because of their convenient lengths, high degree of interspecies polymorphism and intraspecies conservatism. These were confirmed by NCBI blast analysis and ClustalW alignment analysis with 11 different meat-providing animal and fish species. Finally, we integrated a tetramethyl rhodamine-labeled 18-nucleotide AluI fragment into a 3-nm diameter citrate-tannate coated gold nanoparticle to develop a swine-specific hybrid nanobioprobe for the determination of pork adulteration in 2.5-h autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures. This hybrid probe detected as low as 1% pork in deliberately contaminated autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures and no cross-species detection was recorded, demonstrating the feasibility of this type of probe for biosensor-based detection of pork adulteration of halal and kosher foods.

  13. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  14. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  15. Base pair opening kinetics study of the aegPNA:DNA hydrid duplex containing a site-specific GNA-like chiral PNA monomer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lim, Jisoo; Lee, Eun-Hae; Ok, Taedong; Yoon, Juyoung; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are one of the most widely used synthetic DNA mimics where the four bases are attached to a N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (aeg) backbone instead of the negative-charged phosphate backbone in DNA. We have developed a chimeric PNA (chiPNA), in which a chiral GNA-like γ(3)T monomer is incorporated into aegPNA backbone. The base pair opening kinetics of the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrid duplexes were studied by NMR hydrogen exchange experiments. This study revealed that the aegPNA:DNA hybrid is much more stable duplex and is less dynamic compared to DNA duplex, meaning that base pairs are opened and reclosed much more slowly. The site-specific incorporation of γ(3)T monomer in the aegPNA:DNA hybrid can destabilize a specific base pair and its neighbors, maintaining the thermal stabilities and dynamic properties of other base pairs. Our hydrogen exchange study firstly revealed the unique kinetic features of base pairs in the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrids, which will provide an insight into the development of methodology for specific DNA recognition using PNA fragments.

  16. Predicting DNA-Binding Specificities of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Adrian; Eichner, Johannes; Supper, Jochen; Eichner, Jonas; Wanke, Dierk; Henneges, Carsten; Zell, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Today, annotated amino acid sequences of more and more transcription factors (TFs) are readily available. Quantitative information about their DNA-binding specificities, however, are hard to obtain. Position frequency matrices (PFMs), the most widely used models to represent binding specificities, are experimentally characterized only for a small fraction of all TFs. Even for some of the most intensively studied eukaryotic organisms (i.e., human, rat and mouse), roughly one-sixth of all proteins with annotated DNA-binding domain have been characterized experimentally. Here, we present a new method based on support vector regression for predicting quantitative DNA-binding specificities of TFs in different eukaryotic species. This approach estimates a quantitative measure for the PFM similarity of two proteins, based on various features derived from their protein sequences. The method is trained and tested on a dataset containing 1 239 TFs with known DNA-binding specificity, and used to predict specific DNA target motifs for 645 TFs with high accuracy. PMID:21152420

  17. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device.

  18. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking.

  19. Evolutionary history of asexual hybrid loaches (Cobitis: Teleostei) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Janko, K; Kotlík, P; Ráb, P

    2003-11-01

    Reconstruction of the evolutionary history of asexual lineages undermines their suitability as models for the studies of evolutionary consequences of sexual reproduction. Using molecular tools we addressed the origin, age and maternal ancestry of diploid and triploid asexual lineages arisen through the hybridization between spiny loaches Cobitis elongatoides, C. taenia and C. tanaitica. Reconstructions of the phylogenetic relationships among mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes, revealed by sequence analyses, suggest that both hybrid complexes (C. elongatoides-taenia and C. elongatoides-tanaitica) contained several asexual lineages of independent origin. Cobitis elongatoides was the exclusive maternal ancestor of all the C. elongatoides-tanaitica hybrids, whereas within the C. elongatoides-taenia complex, hybridization was reciprocal. In both complexes the low haplotype divergences were consistent with a recent origin of asexual lineages. Combined mtDNA and allozyme data suggest that the triploids arose through the incorporation of a haploid sperm genome into unreduced ova produced by diploid hybrids.

  20. Specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-11-01

    The specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of single-stranded DNA made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T arranged in the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic sequences, with the aim to compare them with those related with a genomic DNA sequence. The energy spectra are calculated using the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a tight-binding approximation with the on-site energy exhibiting long-range disorder and nonrandom hopping amplitudes.

  1. Gene- and protein-delivered zinc finger-staphylococcal nuclease hybrid for inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP-SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses.

  2. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5′-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:24135881

  3. Cloning and characterization of seven human forkhead proteins: binding site specificity and DNA bending.

    PubMed Central

    Pierrou, S; Hellqvist, M; Samuelsson, L; Enerbäck, S; Carlsson, P

    1994-01-01

    The forkhead domain is a monomeric DNA binding motif that defines a rapidly growing family of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. Genetic and biochemical data suggest a central role in embryonic development for genes encoding forkhead proteins. We have used PCR and low stringency hybridization to isolate clones from human cDNA and genomic libraries that represent seven novel forkhead genes, freac-1 to freac-7. The spatial patterns of expression for the seven freac genes range from specific for a single tissue to nearly ubiquitous. The DNA binding specificities of four of the FREAC proteins were determined by selection of binding sites from random sequence oligonucleotides. The binding sites for all four FREAC proteins share a core sequence, RTAAAYA, but differ in the positions flanking the core. Domain swaps between two FREAC proteins identified two subregions within the forkhead domain as responsible for creating differences in DNA binding specificity. Applying a circular permutation assay, we show that binding of FREAC proteins to their cognate sites results in bending of the DNA at an angle of 80-90 degrees. Images PMID:7957066

  4. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  5. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization and interspecies representational difference analysis reveal gross DNA differences between humans and great apes.

    PubMed

    Toder, R; Xia, Y; Bausch, E

    1998-09-01

    Comparative chromosome G-/R-banding, comparative gene mapping and chromosome painting techniques have demonstrated that only few chromosomal rearrangements occurred during great ape and human evolution. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization (CGH), used here in this study, between human, gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee revealed species-specific regions in all three species. In contrast to the human, a far more complex distribution of species-specific blocks was detected with CGH in gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee. Most of these blocks coincide with already described heterochromatic regions on gorilla and chimpanzee chromosomes. Representational difference analysis (RDA) was used to subtract the complex genome of gorilla against human in order to enrich gorilla-specific DNA sequences. Gorilla-specific clones isolated with this technique revealed a 32-bp repeat unit. These clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the telomeric regions of gorilla chromosomes that had been shown by interspecies CGH to contain species-specific sequences.

  6. DNA-directed mutations. Leading and lagging strand specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinden, R. R.; Hashem, V. I.; Rosche, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    The fidelity of replication has evolved to reproduce B-form DNA accurately, while allowing a low frequency of mutation. The fidelity of replication can be compromised, however, by defined order sequence DNA (dosDNA) that can adopt unusual or non B-DNA conformations. These alternative DNA conformations, including hairpins, cruciforms, triplex DNAs, and slipped-strand structures, may affect enzyme-template interactions that potentially lead to mutations. To analyze the effect of dosDNA elements on spontaneous mutagenesis, various mutational inserts containing inverted repeats or direct repeats were cloned in a plasmid containing a unidirectional origin of replication and a selectable marker for the mutation. This system allows for analysis of mutational events that are specific for the leading or lagging strands during DNA replication in Escherichia coli. Deletions between direct repeats, involving misalignment stabilized by DNA secondary structure, occurred preferentially on the lagging strand. Intermolecular strand switch events, correcting quasipalindromes to perfect inverted repeats, occurred preferentially during replication of the leading strand.

  7. Unrepaired DNA damage facilitates elimination of uniparental chromosomes in interspecific hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yin, Hao; Lv, Lei; Feng, Yingying; Chen, Shaopeng; Liang, Junting; Huang, Yun; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Hanwei; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Wu, Lijun; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Elimination of uniparental chromosomes occurs frequently in interspecific hybrid cells. For example, human chromosomes are always eliminated during clone formation when human cells are fused with mouse cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we show that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells is accompanied by continued cell division at the presence of DNA damage on human chromosomes. Deficiency in DNA damage repair on human chromosomes occurs after cell fusion. Furthermore, increasing the level of DNA damage on human chromosomes by irradiation accelerates human chromosome loss in hybrid cells. Our results indicate that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells results from unrepaired DNA damage on human chromosomes. We therefore provide a novel mechanism underlying chromosome instability which may facilitate the understanding of carcinogenesis.

  8. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of Bison bison and bison-cattle hybrids: function and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kory C; Halbert, Natalie D; Kolenda, Claire; Childers, Christopher; Hunter, David L; Derr, James N

    2011-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from 43 bison and bison-cattle hybrids were sequenced and compared with other bovids. Selected animals reflect the historical range and current taxonomic structure of bison. This study identified regions of potential nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibilities in hybrids, provided a complete mtDNA phylogenetic tree for this species, and uncovered evidence of bison population substructure. Seventeen bison haplotypes defined by 66 polymorphic sites were discovered, whereas 728 fixed differences and 86 non-synonymous mutations were identified between bison and bison-cattle hybrid sequences. The potential roles of the mtDNA genome in the function of hybrid animals and bison taxonomy are discussed.

  9. Hybrid nano-composites made of ss-DNA/wrapped carbon nanotubes and titania.

    PubMed

    Romio, Martina; Mesa, Camillo La

    2017-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNTs, are stabilized thanks to the surface wrapping of single-strand DNA, ss-DNA; the resulting adducts are kinetically and thermodynamically stable Such entities build up nano-hybrids with titania, TiO2, nano-particles, in presence of surfactant as an adjuvant. The conditions leading to TiO2 adsorption onto ss-DNA/CNTs were investigated, by optimizing the concentration of adducts, nano-particles (NPs), and of the cationic surfactant (CTAB). Controlling the working conditions makes possible to get homogeneously organized hybrids. Characterization by DLS, electro-phoretic mobility, SEM and AFM clarified the surfactant-assisted association modes between adducts and CTAB-functionalized TiO2. Nano-particles' clustering onto DNA-wrapped adducts gives hybrids trough electrostatic interactions. Surface coverage by TiO2 is significant and homogeneous. It is expected that the reported hybrids can be useful for applications in heterogeneous catalysis.

  10. DNA-Assisted Solubilization of Carbon Nanotubes and Construction of DNA-MWCNT Cross-Linked Hybrid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Taki, Yosuke; Sergeyev, Vladimir G.; Murata, Shizuaki

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for preparation of DNA-carbon nanotubes hybrid hydrogel based on a two-step procedure including: (i) solubilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous solution of DNA, and (ii) chemical cross-linking between solubilized MWCNT via adsorbed DNA and free DNA by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether is reported. We show that there exists a critical concentration of MWCNT below which a homogeneous dispersion of MWCNT in hybrid hydrogel can be achieved, while at higher concentrations of MWCNT the aggregation of MWCNT inside hydrogel occurs. The strengthening effect of carbon nanotube in the process of hydrogel shrinking in solutions with high salt concentration was demonstrated and significant passivation of MWCNT adsorption properties towards low-molecular-weight aromatic binders due to DNA adsorption on MWCNT surface was revealed.

  11. Titantium Dioxide Nanoparticles Assembled by DNA Molecules Hybridization and Loading of DNA Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Brown, Eric M B; Babbo, Angela; Cruz, Cecille; Aslam, Mohamed; Dravid, Vinayak; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the assembly of TiO(2) nanoparticles with attached DNA oligonucleotides into a 3D mesh structure by allowing base pairing between oligonucleotides. A change of the ratio of DNA oligonucleotide molecules and TiO(2) nanoparticles regulates the size of the mesh as characterized by UV-visible light spectra, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. This type of 3D mesh, based on TiO(2)-DNA oligonucleotide nanoconjugates, can be used for studies of nanoparticle assemblies in material science, energy science related to dye-sensitized solar cells, environmental science as well as characterization of DNA interacting proteins in the field of molecular biology. As an example of one such assembly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) was cloned, its activity verified, and the protein was purified, loaded onto double strand DNA oligonucleotide-TiO(2) nanoconjugates, and imaged by atomic force microscopy. This type of approach may be used to sample and perhaps quantify and/or extract specific cellular proteins from complex cellular protein mixtures affinity based on their affinity for chosen DNA segments assembled into the 3D matrix.

  12. Computer programs used to aid in the selection of DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, R E

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a package of three programs which used together aid in selecting the best possible sequence to be used as a DNA hybridization probe. This system searches an amino acid sequence for four adjacent amino acids with the fewest possible corresponding mRNA sequences, calculates their probability of occurrence, and locates the positions of wobbles and mismatches between the DNA hybridization probe and the possible mRNA sequences. PMID:6546442

  13. Maternal transmission of cytoplasmic DNA in interspecific hybrids of peat mosses, Sphagnum (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Natcheva, R; Cronberg, N

    2007-07-01

    The progeny of spontaneous interspecific hybrid sporophytes of Sphagnum were used to analyse the inheritance of cytoplasmic DNA. The analysis showed that only the female parent donated chloroplasts and mitochondria in Sphagnum hybrids. Thus, this is the first study demonstrating maternal cytoplasmic inheritance in a nonvascular land plant. This finding has important implications for phylogenetic reconstructions utilizing chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequences as well as for the evolution of cytoplasmic inheritance in relation to the life cycle of land plants.

  14. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent.

  15. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-12-10

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples.

  16. A Hybrid DNA Extraction Method for the Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Communities from Poultry Production Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rothrock, Michael J.; Hiett, Kelli L.; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C.; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M.; Caporaso, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the “gold standard” enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  17. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases.

  18. Isolation by genomic subtraction of DNA probes specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.

    PubMed Central

    Darrasse, A; Kotoujansky, A; Bertheau, Y

    1994-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica is a pathogen of potatoes in Europe because of its ability to induce blackleg symptoms early in the growing season. However, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora is not able to produce such severe symptoms under the same conditions. On the basis of the technique described by Straus and Ausubel (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:1889-1893, 1990), we isolated DNA sequences of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica 86.20 that were absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26. Six DNA fragments ranging from ca. 180 to 400 bp were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. Each fragment was further hybridized with 130 microorganisms including 87 E. carotovora strains. One probe was specific for typical E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains, two probes hybridized with all E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains and with a few E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains, and two probes recognized only a subset of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains. The last probe was absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26 but was present in the genomes of many strains, including those of other species and genera. This probe is homologous to the putP gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a proline carrier. Further use of the probes is discussed. Images PMID:8117082

  19. Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Arun Kumar; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Detection of disease-related gene expression by DNA hybridization is a useful diagnostic method. In this study a monolayer graphene field effect transistor (GFET) was fabricated for the detection of a particular single-stranded DNA (target DNA). The probe DNA, which is a single-stranded DNA with a complementary nucleotide sequence, was directly immobilized onto the graphene surface without any linker. The VDirac was shifted to the negative direction in the probe DNA immobilization. A further shift of VDirac in the negative direction was observed when the target DNA was applied to GFET, but no shift was observed upon the application of non-complementary mismatched DNA. Direct immobilization of double-stranded DNA onto the graphene surface also shifted the VDirac in the negative direction to the same extent as that of the shift induced by the immobilization of probe DNA and following target DNA application. These results suggest that the further shift of VDirac after application of the target DNA to the GFET was caused by the hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA.

  20. Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Arun Kumar; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Detection of disease-related gene expression by DNA hybridization is a useful diagnostic method. In this study a monolayer graphene field effect transistor (GFET) was fabricated for the detection of a particular single-stranded DNA (target DNA). The probe DNA, which is a single-stranded DNA with a complementary nucleotide sequence, was directly immobilized onto the graphene surface without any linker. The VDirac was shifted to the negative direction in the probe DNA immobilization. A further shift of VDirac in the negative direction was observed when the target DNA was applied to GFET, but no shift was observed upon the application of non-complementary mismatched DNA. Direct immobilization of double-stranded DNA onto the graphene surface also shifted the VDirac in the negative direction to the same extent as that of the shift induced by the immobilization of probe DNA and following target DNA application. These results suggest that the further shift of VDirac after application of the target DNA to the GFET was caused by the hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA. PMID:28179957

  1. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Sarah J; Meaburn, Emma L; Dempster, Emma L; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L; Smith, Rebecca G; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood.

  2. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  3. Short thio-multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Au nanoparticles enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a thio group (MWNTs-SH) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for covalent DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is described. The key step for developing this novel DNA biosensor is to cut the pristine MWNT into short and generate lots of active sites simultaneously. With this approach, the target DNA could be quantified in a linear range from 8.5×10-10 to 1.5×10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.67×10-11 mol/L by 3σ.

  4. Specific DNA recognition mediated by a type IV pilin

    PubMed Central

    Cehovin, Ana; Simpson, Peter J.; McDowell, Melanie A.; Brown, Daniel R.; Noschese, Rossella; Pallett, Mitchell; Brady, Jacob; Baldwin, Geoffrey S.; Lea, Susan M.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Natural transformation is a dominant force in bacterial evolution by promoting horizontal gene transfer. This process may have devastating consequences, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance or the emergence of highly virulent clones. However, uptake and recombination of foreign DNA are most often deleterious to competent species. Therefore, model naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria, including the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, have evolved means to preferentially take up homotypic DNA containing short and genus-specific sequence motifs. Despite decades of intense investigations, the DNA uptake sequence receptor in Neisseria species has remained elusive. We show here, using a multidisciplinary approach combining biochemistry, molecular genetics, and structural biology, that meningococcal type IV pili bind DNA through the minor pilin ComP via an electropositive stripe that is predicted to be exposed on the filaments surface and that ComP displays an exquisite binding preference for DNA uptake sequence. Our findings illuminate the earliest step in natural transformation, reveal an unconventional mechanism for DNA binding, and suggest that selective DNA uptake is more widespread than previously thought. PMID:23386723

  5. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes.

  6. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  7. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  8. Hybridization and Introgression among Species of Sunfish (Lepomis): Analysis by Mitochondrial DNA and Allozyme Markers

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Saunders, Nancy C.

    1984-01-01

    We explore the potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, alone and in conjunction with allozymes, to study low-frequency hybridization and introgression phenomena in natural populations. MtDNAs from small samples of nine species of sunfish (Lepomis, Centrarchidae) were purified and digested with each of 13 informative restriction enzymes. Digestion profiles for all species were highly distinct: estimates of overall fragment homology between pairs of species ranged from 0–36%. Allozymes encoded by nine nuclear genes also showed large frequency differences among species and together with mtDNA provided many genetic markers for hybrid identification. A genetic analysis of 277 sunfish from two locations in north Georgia revealed the following: (1) a low frequency of interspecific hybrids, all of which appeared to be F1's; (2) the involvement of five sympatric Lepomis species in the production of these hybrids; (3) no evidence for introgression between species in our study locales (although for rare hybridization, most later-generation backcrosses would not be reliably distinguished from parentals); (4) a tendency for hybridizations to take place preferentially between parental species differing greatly in abundance; (5) a tendency for the rare species in a hybrid cross to provide the female parent. Our data suggest that absence of conspecific pairing partners and mating stimuli for females of rarer species may be important factors in increasing the likelihood of interspecific hybridization. The maternal inheritance of mtDNA offers at least two novel advantages for hybridization analysis: (1) an opportunity to determine direction in hybrid crosses; and (2) due to the linkage among mtDNA markers, an increased potential to distinguish effects of introgression from symplesiomorphy or character convergence. PMID:6090268

  9. pH-dependent specific binding and combing of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Jullien, L; Bensimon, A; Croquette, V

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the rapid sequencing, mapping, and analysis of DNA rely on the specific binding of DNA to specially treated surfaces. We show here that specific binding of DNA via its unmodified extremities can be achieved on a great variety of surfaces by a judicious choice of the pH. On hydrophobic surfaces the best binding efficiency is reached at a pH of approximately 5.5. At that pH a approximately 40-kbp DNA is 10 times more likely to bind by an extremity than by a midsegment. A model is proposed to account for the differential adsorption of the molecule extremities and midsection as a function of pH. The pH-dependent specific binding can be used to align anchored DNA molecules by a receding meniscus, a process called molecular combing. The resulting properties of the combed molecules will be discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9336201

  10. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the Toll-like Receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confront many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistance to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed from hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to 1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and 2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26947116

  11. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Huang, Xiaohua; Choo, Yen; Church, George M.

    2001-01-01

    A key step in the regulation of networks that control gene expression is the sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to their DNA recognition sites. A more complete understanding of these DNA–protein interactions will permit a more comprehensive and quantitative mapping of the regulatory pathways within cells, as well as a deeper understanding of the potential functions of individual genes regulated by newly identified DNA-binding sites. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based method to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage display library, prepared by randomizing critical amino acid residues in the second of three fingers of the mouse Zif268 domain, provided a rich source of zinc-finger proteins with variant DNA-binding specificities. Microarrays containing all possible 3-bp binding sites for the variable zinc fingers permitted the quantitation of the binding site preferences of the entire library, pools of zinc fingers corresponding to different rounds of selection from this library, as well as individual Zif268 variants that were isolated from the library by using specific DNA sequences. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays for genome-wide identification of putative transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:11404456

  12. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid.

  13. Species-Specific Identification from Incomplete Sampling: Applying DNA Barcodes to Monitoring Invasive Solanum Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiaohong; Zhu, Shuifang; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Lianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive sampling is crucial to DNA barcoding, but it is rarely performed because materials are usually unavailable. In practice, only a few rather than all species of a genus are required to be identified. Thus identification of a given species using a limited sample is of great importance in current application of DNA barcodes. Here, we selected 70 individuals representing 48 species from each major lineage of Solanum, one of the most species-rich genera of seed plants, to explore whether DNA barcodes can provide reliable specific-species discrimination in the context of incomplete sampling. Chloroplast genes ndhF and trnS-trnG and the nuclear gene waxy, the commonly used markers in Solanum phylogeny, were selected as the supplementary barcodes. The tree-building and modified barcode gap methods were employed to assess species resolution. The results showed that four Solanum species of quarantine concern could be successfully identified through the two-step barcoding sampling strategy. In addition, discrepancies between nuclear and cpDNA barcodes in some samples demonstrated the ability to discriminate hybrid species, and highlights the necessity of using barcode regions with different modes of inheritance. We conclude that efficient phylogenetic markers are good candidates as the supplementary barcodes in a given taxonomic group. Critically, we hypothesized that a specific-species could be identified from a phylogenetic framework using incomplete sampling–through this, DNA barcoding will greatly benefit the current fields of its application. PMID:23409092

  14. Design and testing of a functional group-specific DNA probe for the study of natural populations of acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, C R; Hui, Y

    1991-01-01

    The acetogens, although phylogenetically diverse, can be characterized by their possession of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, a key enzyme of the acetyl-CoA pathway, was previously cloned from the thermophilic acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum and has now been tested as a group-specific probe for acetogens. Stable hybrids were formed between the probe and single DNA fragments from eight known acetogens representing six genera. A hybrid was also formed between the probe and a DNA fragment from one sulfate reducer known to be capable of both autotrophic CO2 fixation and acetate catabolism. No such hybrid was formed between the probe and DNA from a homoacetate fermenter not known to use the acetyl-CoA pathway, with two known formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase-producing purine fermenters, or with DNA from 27 other species representing 16 genera of organisms that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway. DNA purified from cells extracted from horse manure was also screened with the acetogen probe. Six hybrids, indicating at least six detectable acetogen "strains," were observed. Images PMID:1768134

  15. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  16. Brain-specific expression of MAP2 detected using a cloned cDNA probe

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding mouse microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), using an anti-MAP antiserum to screen a mouse brain cDNA expression library cloned in bacteriophage lambda gt11. The authenticity of these clones was established by the following criteria: (a) three non-identical clones each expressing a MAP2 immunoreactive fusion protein were independently isolated from the expression library; each of these clones cross-hybridized at the nucleic acid level; (b) anti-MAP antiserum was affinity purified using nitrocellulose-bound fusion protein; these antibodies detected only MAP2 in an immunoblot experiment of whole brain microtubule protein; (c) a series of cDNA "walking" experiments was done so as to obtain a non-overlapping cloned fragment corresponding to a different part of the same mRNA molecule. Upon subcloning this non-overlapping fragment into plasmid expression vectors, a fusion protein was synthesized that was immunoreactive with an anti-MAP2 specific antiserum. Thus, a single contiguous cloned mRNA molecule encodes at least two MAP2-specific epitopes; (d) the cloned cDNA probes detect an mRNA species in mouse brain that is of a size (approximately 9 kb) consistent with the coding capacity required by a 250,000-D protein. The MAP2-specific cloned cDNA probes were used in RNA blot transfer experiments to assay for the presence of MAP2 mRNA in a variety of mouse tissues. Though brain contained abundant quantities of MAP2 mRNA, no corresponding sequences were detectable in RNA prepared from liver, kidney, spleen, stomach, or thymus. We conclude that the expression of MAP2 is brain-specific. Use of the MAP2 specific cDNA probes in genomic Southern blot transfer experiments showed the presence of a single gene encoding MAP2 in mouse. The microheterogeneity of MAP2 is therefore ascribable either to alternative splicing within a single gene, or to posttranslational modification(s), or both. Under conditions of low

  17. A Hybrid Computer Simulation to Generate the DNA Distribution of a Cell Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, John L.; Adams, William S.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a method of simulating the formation of a DNA distribution, on which statistical results and experimentally measured parameters from DNA distribution and percent-labeled mitosis studies are combined. An EAI-680 and DECSystem-10 Hybrid Computer configuration are used. (Author/CS)

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotubes-polymer modified graphite electrodes for DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Muti, Mihrican; Kuralay, Filiz; Erdem, Arzum

    2012-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)-poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF(+)) modified pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) were developed in our study for the electrochemical monitoring of a sequence-selective DNA hybridization event. Firstly, SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGE, PVF(+) modified PGE and unmodified PGE were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical behavior of these electrodes was then investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGEs were optimized for improved DNA sensing ability by measuring the guanine oxidation signal. In order to obtain the full coverage immobilization of the DNA probe following the optimum working conditions, the effect of amino-linked, thiol-linked and, bare oligonucleotides (ODNs), and the concentration of the DNA probe on the response of the modified electrode were examined. After optimization studies, the sequence-selective DNA hybridization was evaluated in the case of hybridization between an amino-linked probe and its complementary (target), a noncomplementary (NC) sequence, calf thymus double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and target/mismatch (MM) mixtures in the ratio of 1:1. SWCNT-PVF(+) modified PGEs presented very effective discrimination of DNA hybridization owing to their superior selectivity and sensitivity.

  19. Hybrid Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: DNA Origami/Gold Nanoparticle Dimer/Graphene.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Julia; Matković, Aleksandar; Pešić, Jelena; Gajić, Radoš; Bald, Ilko

    2016-10-01

    A combination of three innovative materials within one hybrid structure to explore the synergistic interaction of their individual properties is presented. The unique electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties of graphene are combined with the plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers, which are assembled using DNA origami nanostructures. This novel hybrid structure is characterized by means of correlated atomic force microscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is demonstrated that strong interactions between graphene and AuNPs result in superior SERS performance of the hybrid structure compared to their individual components. This is particularly evident in efficient fluorescence quenching, reduced background, and a decrease of the photobleaching rate up to one order of magnitude. The versatility of DNA origami structures to serve as interface for complex and precise arrangements of nanoparticles and other functional entities provides the basis to further exploit the potential of the here presented DNA origami-AuNP dimer-graphene hybrid structures.

  20. Remote toehold: a mechanism for flexible control of DNA hybridization kinetics.

    PubMed

    Genot, Anthony J; Zhang, David Yu; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2011-02-23

    Hybridization of DNA strands can be used to build molecular devices, and control of the kinetics of DNA hybridization is a crucial element in the design and construction of functional and autonomous devices. Toehold-mediated strand displacement has proved to be a powerful mechanism that allows programmable control of DNA hybridization. So far, attempts to control hybridization kinetics have mainly focused on the length and binding strength of toehold sequences. Here we show that insertion of a spacer between the toehold and displacement domains provides additional control: modulation of the nature and length of the spacer can be used to control strand-displacement rates over at least 3 orders of magnitude. We apply this mechanism to operate displacement reactions in potentially useful kinetic regimes: the kinetic proofreading and concentration-robust regimes.

  1. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine.

  2. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  3. A controlled microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip for label-free diffusion-restricted DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-02-15

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for electrochemical analysis of DNA hybridization events offer a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care. Here, we present a microfluidic LOC, with 3 × 3 arrayed electrochemical sensors for the analysis of DNA hybridization events. A new dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system is integrated providing controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis. This feature improves the repeatability, accuracy, and overall sensing performance (Fig. 1). The electrochemical activity of the fabricated microfluidic device is validated and demonstrated repeatable and reversible Nernstian characteristics. System design required detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation as our sensing modeling involves diffusion-related electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of DNA hybridization on the calculated charge transfer resistance and the diffusional resistance components is evaluated. We demonstrate a specific device with an average cross-reactivity value of 27.5%. The device yields semilogarithmic dose response and enables a theoretical detection limit of 1 nM of complementary ssDNA target. This limit is lower than our previously reported non-valved device by 74% due to on-chip valve integration providing controlled and accurate assay capabilities.

  4. RNaseH1 regulates TERRA-telomeric DNA hybrids and telomere maintenance in ALT tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajika; Lee, Yongwoo; Wischnewski, Harry; Brun, Catherine M; Schwarz, Tobias; Azzalin, Claus M

    2014-10-21

    A fraction of cancer cells maintain telomeres through the telomerase-independent, 'Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres' (ALT) pathway. ALT relies on homologous recombination (HR) between telomeric sequences; yet, what makes ALT telomeres recombinogenic remains unclear. Here we show that the RNA endonuclease RNaseH1 regulates the levels of RNA-DNA hybrids between telomeric DNA and the long noncoding RNA TERRA, and is a key mediator of telomere maintenance in ALT cells. RNaseH1 associated to telomeres specifically in ALT cells and its depletion led to telomeric hybrid accumulation, exposure of single-stranded telomeric DNA, activation of replication protein A at telomeres and abrupt telomere excision. Conversely, overexpression of RNaseH1 weakened the recombinogenic nature of ALT telomeres and led to telomere shortening. Altering cellular RNaseH1 levels did not perturb telomere homoeostasis in telomerase-positive cells. RNaseH1 maintains regulated levels of telomeric RNA-DNA hybrids at ALT telomeres to trigger HR without compromising telomere integrity too severely.

  5. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  6. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-09-19

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms.

  7. Label-free and real-time sequence specific DNA detection based on supramolecular self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanli; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Whitten, David G

    2010-05-04

    A new label-free, optical method was developed to detect sequence-specific DNA based on supramolecular self-assembly. A cationic phenylene ethynylene oligomer with two pairs of positively charged side chains (OPE-2) can form a J-dimer or J-aggregate with negatively charged DNA by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. At microM concentrations of dsDNA (number of bases in ssDNA ranges from 8 to 32), the optimum supramolecular self-assembly occurs between OPE-2 and dsDNA and is characterized by a new absorption peak emerging at 418 nm and an increase in fluorescence intensity (about 4.5-fold for dsDNA(1)). In contrast, the self-assembled complexes between OPE-2 and ssDNA are less readily formed under the same conditions. Interestingly, the induced circular dichroism (CD) signal for OPE-2/ssDNA is quite strong, likely owing to the self-assembly onto ssDNA simultaneously templating helix formation. In contrast, the induced CD signal for OPE-2/dsDNA is weak, likely because the dsDNA is in a double helix conformation, and OPE-2 associated with the dsDNA should be outside of the helix. In fact, there is a steady decrease in the induced CD signal for ssDNA with the addition of equimolar complementary ssDNA over time that allows the monitoring of DNA hybridization in real time. Introduction of mismatched bases into the target DNA sequence prevents the full hybridization between ssDNA and the target DNA. For these cases, the decrease in the induced CD signals occurs more slowly and to a lesser extent, as some of the unhybridized portions may remain in helical association with OPE-2. In view of these observed signal changes, sequence specific DNA and single nucleotide mismatch can be detected in a very simple and sensitive manner without any modification of the DNA.

  8. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vikash; Mallik, Leena; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Skiniotis, Georgios; Joglekar, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting ‘architecture-function’ analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis. PMID:26348722

  9. Microwave-Induced Inactivation of DNA-Based Hybrid Catalyst in Asymmetric Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Shen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based hybrid catalysts have gained strong interests in asymmetric reactions. However, to maintain the high enantioselectivity, these reactions are usually conducted at relatively low temperatures (e.g. < 5 °C) for 2–3 days. Aiming to improve the reaction’s turnover rate, we evaluated microwave irradiation with simultaneous cooling as potential energy source since this method has been widely used to accelerate various chemical and enzymatic reactions. However, our data indicated that microwave irradiation induced an inactivation of DNA-based hybrid catalyst even at low temperatures (such as 5 °C). Circular dichroism (CD) spectra and gel electrophoresis of DNA suggest that microwave exposure degrades DNA molecules and disrupts DNA double-stranded structures, causing changes of DNA–metal ligand binding properties and thus poor DNA catalytic performance. PMID:26712696

  10. Phenol emulsion-enhanced DNA-driven subtractive cDNA cloning: isolation of low-abundance monkey cortex-specific mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, G.H.; Sutcliffe, J.G.

    1988-03-01

    To isolate cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs expressed in monkey cerebral cortex but absent from cerebellum, the authors developed an improved subtractive cDNA cloning procedure that requires only modest quantities of mRNA. Plasmid DNA from a monkey cerebellum cDNA library was hybridized in large excess to radiolabeled monkey cortex cDNA in a phenol emulsion-enhanced reaction. The unhybridized cortex cDNA was isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and used to probe colonies from a monkey cortex cDNA library. Of 60,000 colonies screened, 163 clones were isolated and confirmed by colony hybridization or RNA blotting to represent mRNAs, ranging from 0.001% to 0.1% abundance, specific to or highly enriched in cerebral cortex relative to cerebellum. Clones of one medium-abundance mRNA were recovered almost quantitatively. Two of the lower-abundance mRNAs were expressed at levels reduced by a factor of 10 in Alzheimer disease relative to normal human cortex. One of these was identified as the monkey preprosomatostatin I mRNA.

  11. Detection and analysis of leptospiral DNA in early Leptospirosis by polymerase chain reaction and DNA hybridization with Digoxingenin-AMPPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Lang; Yu, Ye-Rong; Terpstra, W. J.

    1994-07-01

    Fourteen serum specimens from patients with early Leptospirosis proven by blood culture and serological test were detected by PCR with the oligonucleotide primers obtained from a genomic library of leptospira interrogans. The amplified DNA were hybridized with the homologous DNA probe labeling with Digoxingenin-AMPPD. All of the samples revealed the presence of leptospira and the strong signals were visualized with homologous DNA probes hybridization. Negative and positive controls appeared correctly. The DNA fragment generated from PCR amplification homologically hybridized with the DNA of 16 strains of leptospira. The single recognized band (about 400 bps) from 6 out of the 16 strains has come out which are representative of the principal strains in Sichuan, China. The results demonstrated that PCR is an advanced diagnostic technique for early Leptospirosis. The treatment of samples is easy and has little risk of DNA loss and contamination. This is a considerable advantage over other detective techniques and can be available especially in China and other developing countries.

  12. Specific DNA replication mutations affect telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A K; Holm, C

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the DNA replication apparatus and the control of telomere length, we examined the effects of several DNA replication mutations on telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that a mutation in the structural gene for the large subunit of DNA replication factor C (cdc44/rfc1) causes striking increases in telomere length. A similar effect is seen with mutations in only one other DNA replication gene: the structural gene for DNA polymerase alpha (cdc17/pol1) (M.J. Carson and L. Hartwell, Cell 42:249-257, 1985). For both genes, the telomere elongation phenotype is allele specific and appears to correlate with the penetrance of the mutations. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis reveals that those alleles that cause elongation also exhibit a slowing of DNA replication. To determine whether elongation is mediated by telomerase or by slippage of the DNA polymerase, we created cdc17-1 mutants carrying deletions of the gene encoding the RNA component of telomerase (TLC1). cdc17-1 strains that would normally undergo telomere elongation failed to do so in the absence of telomerase activity. This result implies that telomere elongation in cdc17-1 mutants is mediated by the action of telomerase. Since DNA replication involves transfer of the nascent strand from polymerase alpha to replication factor C (T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1950-1960, 1991; T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1961-1968, 1991; S. Waga and B. Stillman, Nature [London] 369:207-212, 1994), one possibility is that this step affects the regulation of telomere length. PMID:8756617

  13. Identification of Rhizobium spp. in peat-based inoculants by DNA hybridization and PCR and its application in inoculant quality control.

    PubMed Central

    Tas, E; Saano, A; Leinonen, P; Lindström, K

    1995-01-01

    Procedures based on DNA hybridization and PCR were developed for quality control of Rhizobium inoculants. Inoculants for pea and goat's rue were produced by Elomestari Ltd., Juva, Finland, in sterile dry fine peat by the standard procedure used by the company. The inoculants contained Rhizobium galegae HAMBI 1174 and HAMBI 1207 and an R. leguminosarum biovar vicia strain, 16HSA, either solely or in combinations of two or three strains. DNA was isolated from 1-g samples of each peat inoculant and analyzed by nonradioactive DNA-DNA hybridization and by PCR. The hybridization probes were total DNAs from pure cultures of R. galegae HAMBI 1207 and R. leguminosarum biovar viciae 16HSA and a 264-bp strain-specific fragment from the genome of R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The total DNA probes distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae or R. leguminosarum, and the strain-specific probe distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The hybridization results for R. galegae were verified in a PCR experiment by amplifying an R. galegae species-specific fragment and an R. galegae HAMBI 1174 strain-specific fragment in the same reaction. When suitable probes and primers are available, the methods described here offer promising alternatives for the quality control of peat-based inoculants. PMID:7646020

  14. Matching base-pair number dependence of the kinetics of DNA-DNA hybridization studied by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Keiko; Yao, Danfeng; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2005-08-15

    Two single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides consisting of complementary base-pairs can form double strands. This phenomenon is well studied in solutions, however, in order to clarify the physical mechanism of the hybridization occurring at a solid/solution interface, we studied the kinetics by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS): one single-stranded oligo-DNA (probe-DNA) was immobilized on the substrate, the other one (target-DNA) labelled with a fluorescent probe was added to the flow cell. After hybridization, the chromophores could be excited by the surface plasmon mode and their fluorescence detected with high sensitivity. The dependence of the k(on) and k(off) rate constants on the length of the hybridizing oligonucleotides was investigated by using a MM0 series (no mismatch) and the kinetics was found to be well described by a Langmuir adsorption model. From these measurements we found that also in the case of surface hybridization the affinity of the duplexes decreases as the number of matching base-pairs decreases from 15 to 10. In order to show that SPFS is the powerful technique with high sensitivity, the hybridization process for mixed target-oligos was measured by SPFS and analyzed by an expanded Langmuir model in which two components of target-oligo can bind to probe-DNA at the sensor surface competitively. Two sets of the k(on) and k(off) obtained from the experiment are successfully consistent with the k(on) and k(off) obtained from experiments for single (pure) target-DNA.

  15. Magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor with DNA-modified carbon nanotubes as recognition elements for detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Po; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang; Ling, Jian; Liu, Yu Ling; Fei, Liang Run; Xie, Jian Ping

    2008-03-01

    In this contribution, we design a visual sensor for DNA hybridization with DNA probe-modified magnetic particles (MPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) without involving a visual recognition element such as fluorescent/chemiluminescent reagents. It was found that DNA probe-modified MWNTs, which could be dispersed in aqueous medium and have strong light scattering signals under the excitation of a light beam in the UV-vis region, could connect with DNA probe-modified MPs together in the presence of perfectly complementary target DNA and form a sandwich structure. In a magnetic field, the formed MP-MWNT species can easily be removed from the solution, resulting in a decrease of light scattering signals. Thus, a magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor could be developed to detect DNA hybridization by measuring the light scattering signals with DNA-modified MWNTs as recognition elements. Experiments showed that the DNA-modified MPs sensor could be reused at least 17 times and was stable for more than 6 months.

  16. TAL nucleases (TALNs): hybrid proteins composed of TAL effectors and FokI DNA-cleavage domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Wright, David; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks enhance homologous recombination in cells and have been exploited for targeted genome editing through use of engineered endonucleases. Here we report the creation and initial characterization of a group of rare-cutting, site-specific DNA nucleases produced by fusion of the restriction enzyme FokI endonuclease domain (FN) with the high-specificity DNA-binding domains of AvrXa7 and PthXo1. AvrXa7 and PthXo1 are members of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector family whose central repeat units dictate target DNA recognition and can be modularly constructed to create novel DNA specificity. The hybrid FN-AvrXa7, AvrXa7-FN and PthXo1-FN proteins retain both recognition specificity for their target DNA (a 26 bp sequence for AvrXa7 and 24 bp for PthXo1) and the double-stranded DNA cleaving activity of FokI and, thus, are called TAL nucleases (TALNs). With all three TALNs, DNA is cleaved adjacent to the TAL-binding site under optimal conditions in vitro. When expressed in yeast, the TALNs promote DNA homologous recombination of a LacZ gene containing paired AvrXa7 or asymmetric AvrXa7/PthXo1 target sequences. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of creating a tool box of novel TALNs with potential for targeted genome modification in organisms lacking facile mechanisms for targeted gene knockout and homologous recombination.

  17. The Human RecQ helicases, BLM and RECQ1, display distinct DNA substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Bachrati, Csanád Z; Muzzolini, Laura; Mosedale, Georgina; Costantini, Silvia; Giacomini, Elisa; Hickson, Ian D; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2008-06-27

    RecQ helicases maintain chromosome stability by resolving a number of highly specific DNA structures that would otherwise impede the correct transmission of genetic information. Previous studies have shown that two human RecQ helicases, BLM and WRN, have very similar substrate specificities and preferentially unwind noncanonical DNA structures, such as synthetic Holliday junctions and G-quadruplex DNA. Here, we extend this analysis of BLM to include new substrates and have compared the substrate specificity of BLM with that of another human RecQ helicase, RECQ1. Our findings show that RECQ1 has a distinct substrate specificity compared with BLM. In particular, RECQ1 cannot unwind G-quadruplexes or RNA-DNA hybrid structures, even in the presence of the single-stranded binding protein, human replication protein A, that stimulates its DNA helicase activity. Moreover, RECQ1 cannot substitute for BLM in the regression of a model replication fork and is very inefficient in displacing plasmid D-loops lacking a 3'-tail. Conversely, RECQ1, but not BLM, is able to resolve immobile Holliday junction structures lacking an homologous core, even in the absence of human replication protein A. Mutagenesis studies show that the N-terminal region (residues 1-56) of RECQ1 is necessary both for protein oligomerization and for this Holliday junction disruption activity. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain or the higher order oligomer formation promoted by the N terminus is essential for the ability of RECQ1 to disrupt Holliday junctions. Collectively, our findings highlight several differences between the substrate specificities of RECQ1 and BLM (and by inference WRN) and suggest that these enzymes play nonoverlapping functions in cells.

  18. 'Specific' oligonucleotides often recognize more than one gene: the limits of in situ hybridization applied to GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, M; Didelon, F; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-05-15

    As exquisite probes for gene sequences, oligonucleotides are one of the most powerful tools of recombinant molecular biology. In studying the GABA receptor subunits in the neonatal hippocampus we have used oligonucleotide probes in in situ hybridization and cloning techniques. The oligonucleotides used and assumed to be specific for the target gene, actually recognized more than one gene, leading to surprising and contradictory results. In particular, we found that a GABA(A)-rho specific oligonucleotide recognized an abundant, previously unknown, transcription factor in both in situ and library screening, while oligos 'specific' for GABA(A) subunits were able to recognize 30 additional unrelated genes in library screening. This suggests that positive results obtained with oligonucleotides should be interpreted with caution unless confirmed by identical results with oligonucleotides from different parts of the same gene, or cDNA library screening excludes the presence of other hybridizing species.

  19. DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as a Detection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Su-Moon

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in label free DNA hybridization sensors employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a detection tool are reviewed. These sensors are based on the modulation of the blocking ability of an electrode modified with a probe DNA by an analyte, i.e., target DNA. The probe DNA is immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer, a conducting polymer film, or a layer of nanostructures on the electrode such that desired probe DNA would selectively hybridize with target DNA. The rate of charge transfer from the electrode thus modified to a redox indicator, e.g., [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−, which is measured by EIS in the form of charge transfer resistance (Rct), is modulated by whether or not, as well as how much, the intended target DNA is selectively hybridized. Efforts made to enhance the selectivity as well as the sensitivity of DNA sensors and to reduce the EIS measurement time are briefly described along with brief future perspectives in developing DNA sensors. PMID:22303136

  20. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of circulating tumor DNA using hybridization chain reaction and the pivot of triplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruimin; Zou, Li; Luo, Yanwei; Zhang, Manjun; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-03-01

    This work presents an amplified colorimetric biosensor for circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), which associates the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification with G-Quadruplex DNAzymes activity through triplex DNA formation. In the presence of ctDNA, HCR occurs. The resulting HCR products are specially recognized by one sequence to include one GGG repeat and the other containing three GGG repeats, through the synergetic effect of triplex DNA and asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex forming. Such design takes advantage of the amplification property of HCR and the high peroxidase-like catalytic activity of asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex DNAzymes by means of triplex DNA formation, which produces color signals in the presence of ctDNA. Nevertheless, in the absence of ctDNA, no HCR happens. Thus, no triplex DNA and G-Quadruplex structure is formed, producing a negligible background. The colorimetric sensing platform is successfully applied in complex biological environments such as human blood plasma for ctDNA detection, with a detection limit corresponding to 0.1 pM. This study unambiguously uses triplex DNA forming as the pivot to integrate nucleic acid amplification and DNAzymes for producing a highly sensitive signal with low background.

  1. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of circulating tumor DNA using hybridization chain reaction and the pivot of triplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruimin; Zou, Li; Luo, Yanwei; Zhang, Manjun; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an amplified colorimetric biosensor for circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), which associates the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification with G-Quadruplex DNAzymes activity through triplex DNA formation. In the presence of ctDNA, HCR occurs. The resulting HCR products are specially recognized by one sequence to include one GGG repeat and the other containing three GGG repeats, through the synergetic effect of triplex DNA and asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex forming. Such design takes advantage of the amplification property of HCR and the high peroxidase-like catalytic activity of asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex DNAzymes by means of triplex DNA formation, which produces color signals in the presence of ctDNA. Nevertheless, in the absence of ctDNA, no HCR happens. Thus, no triplex DNA and G-Quadruplex structure is formed, producing a negligible background. The colorimetric sensing platform is successfully applied in complex biological environments such as human blood plasma for ctDNA detection, with a detection limit corresponding to 0.1 pM. This study unambiguously uses triplex DNA forming as the pivot to integrate nucleic acid amplification and DNAzymes for producing a highly sensitive signal with low background. PMID:28276503

  2. Distribution of 45S rDNA in Modern Rose Cultivars (Rosa hybrida), Rosa rugosa, and Their Interspecific Hybrids Revealed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Ting-Liang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Le; Yu, Chao; Dong, Gui-Min; Pan, Hui-Tang; Zhang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of the location and number of rDNA loci in the process of polyploidization in the genus Rosa, we examined 45S rDNA sites in the chromosomes of 6 modern rose cultivars (R. hybrida), 5 R. rugosa cultivars, and 20 hybrid progenies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Variation in the number of rDNA sites in parents and their interspecific hybrids was detected. As expected, 4 rDNA sites were observed in the genomes of 4 modern rose cultivars, while 3 hybridization sites were observed in the 2 others. Two expected rDNA sites were found in 2 R. rugosa cultivars, while in the other 3 R. rugosa cultivars 4 sites were present. Among the 20 R. hybrida × R. rugosa offspring, 13 carried the expected number of rDNA sites, and 1 had 6 hybridization sites, which exceeded the expected number by far. The other 6 offspring had either 2 or 3 hybridization sites, which was less than expected. Differences in the number of rDNA loci were observed in interspecific offspring, indicating that rDNA loci exhibit instability after distant hybridization events. Abnormal chromosome pairing may be the main factor explaining the variation in rDNA sites during polyploidization.

  3. Cadmium sulfide nanocluster-based electrochemical stripping detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningning; Zhang, Aiping; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2003-03-01

    A novel, sensitive electrochemical DNA hybridization detection assay, using cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoclusters as the oligonucleotide labeling tag, is described. The assay relies on the hybridization of the target DNA with the CdS nanocluster oligonucleotide DNA probe, followed by the dissolution of the CdS nanoclusters anchored on the hybrids and the indirect determination of the dissolved cadmium ions by sensitive anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) at a mercury-coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that only a complementary sequence could form a double-stranded dsDNA-CdS with the DNA probe and give an obvious electrochemical response. A three-base mismatch sequence and non-complementary sequence had negligible response. The combination of the large number of cadmium ions released from each dsDNA hybrid with the remarkable sensitivity of the electrochemical stripping analysis for cadmium at mercury-film GCE allows detection at levels as low as 0.2 pmol L(-1) of the complementary sequence of DNA.

  4. Does interspecies hybridization affect the host specificity of parasites in cyprinid fish?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Host specificity varies among parasite species. Some parasites are strictly host-specific, others show a specificity for congeneric or non-congeneric phylogenetically related host species, whilst some others are non-specific (generalists). Two cyprinids, Cyprinus carpio and Carassius gibelio, plus their respective hybrids were investigated for metazoan parasites. The aim of this study was to analyze whether interspecies hybridization affects host specificity. The different degrees of host specificity within a phylogenetic framework were taken into consideration (i.e. strict specialist, intermediate specialist, and intermediate generalist). Methods Fish were collected during harvesting the pond and identified using meristic traits and molecular markers. Metazoan parasite species were collected. Host specificity of parasites was determined using the following classification: strict specialist, intermediate specialist, intermediate generalist and generalist. Parasite species richness was compared between parental species and their hybrids. The effect of host species on abundance of parasites differing in host specificity was tested. Results Hybrids harbored more different parasite species but their total parasite abundance was lower in comparison with parental species. Interspecies hybridization affected the host specificity of ecto- and endoparasites. Parasite species exhibiting different degrees of host specificity for C. carpio and C. gibelio were also present in hybrids. The abundance of strict specialists of C. carpio was significantly higher in parental species than in hybrids. Intermediate generalists parasitizing C. carpio and C. gibelio as two phylogenetically closely related host species preferentially infected C. gibelio when compared to C. carpio, based on prevalence and maximum intensity of infection. Hybrids were less infected by intermediate generalists when compared to C. gibelio. Conclusions This finding does not support strict co

  5. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  6. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  7. DNA-specific autoantibody cleaves DNA by hydrolysis of phosphodiester and glycosidic bond.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hang Thi Thu; Jang, Young-Ju; Jeong, Sunjoo; Yu, Jaehoon

    2003-11-21

    The DNA-recognizing autoantibodies were prepared in milligram scale and their catalytic activities were investigated using various standard substrates for hydrolysis of natural biomolecules such as DNA, carbohydrates, and proteins. Only phosphatase and glycosidase activity was found and no peptidase, sulfatase, or esterase activity was detected in most of anti-DNA monoclonal autoantibodies we tested. Antibody G1-2 showed the highest catalytic activities and its enzymatic characteristics were further investigated. The antibody showed phosphatase activity with sub-millimolar substrate specificity and 10(4)-10(5) rate enhancements. However, Ab G1-2 showed low micro-molar specificity with p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamide with 10(4)-10(5) rate enhancements. Both of the catalytic activities showed pH maximum at 4-5, suggesting that the carboxylate(s) in antigen-binding site is involved in the catalytic mechanism. Chemical protection of carboxylate(s) with diazoacetamide showed much reduced activity of the Ab, confirming that the catalytic activity comes from carboxylate(s) in the Ag-binding region. The activities of phosphatase and glycosidase were thoroughly inhibited by DNA with almost identical K(i) values. These data suggest that DNA-binding site(s) is the enzymatic active site of the catalytic Abs. Capabilities of the DNA recognition might make it possible to confer the Ab the catalytic activity of phosphate and glycosidic bond hydrolysis, which can be the main cause of DNA cleavage.

  8. Automation of cDNA microarray hybridization and washing yields improved data quality.

    PubMed

    Yauk, Carole; Berndt, Lynn; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R

    2005-07-29

    Microarray technology allows the analysis of whole-genome transcription within a single hybridization, and has become a standard research tool. It is extremely important to minimize variation in order to obtain high quality microarray data that can be compared among experiments and laboratories. The majority of facilities implement manual hybridization approaches for microarray studies. We developed an automated method for cDNA microarray hybridization that uses equivalent pre-hybridization, hybridization and washing conditions to the suggested manual protocol. The automated method significantly decreased variability across microarray slides compared to manual hybridization. Although normalized signal intensities for buffer-only spots across the chips were identical, significantly reduced variation and inter-quartile ranges were obtained using the automated workstation. This decreased variation led to improved correlation among technical replicates across slides in both the Cy3 and Cy5 channels.

  9. In vivo specificity of EcoRI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D W; Crowder, S W; Reich, N O

    1992-01-01

    The EcoRI adenine DNA methyltransferase forms part of a bacterial restriction/modification system; the methyltransferase modifies the second adenine within the canonical site GAATTC, thereby preventing the EcoRI endonuclease from cleaving this site. We show that five noncanonical EcoRI sites (TAATTC, CAATTC, GTATTC, GGATTC and GAGTTC) are not methylated in vivo under conditions when the canonical site is methylated. Only when the methyltransferase is overexpressed is partial in vivo methylation of the five sites detected. Our results suggest that the methyltransferase does not protect host DNA against potential endonuclease-mediated cleavage at noncanonical sites. Our related in vitro analysis of the methyltransferase reveals a low level of sequence-discrimination. We propose that the high in vivo specificity may be due to the active removal of methylated sequences by DNA repair enzymes (J. Bacteriology (1987), 169 3243-3250). Images PMID:1461739

  10. The use of BrCN for assembling modified DNA duplexes and DNA-RNA hybrids; comparison with water-soluble carbodiimide.

    PubMed Central

    Dolinnaya, N G; Sokolova, N I; Ashirbekova, D T; Shabarova, Z A

    1991-01-01

    Both cyanogen bromide (BrCN) and 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide may be used as coupling reagents for the template-directed assembly of DNA duplexes containing the sugar-phosphate backbone modification. Both reagents show similar ligation site structure-specific trend. Practical recommendations are given for selection of the condensing reagent depending on the properties of the duplex. Based on 31P NMR spectroscopy data, a scheme is suggested for BrCN activation of the nucleotide phosphomonoester group. Using both condensing reagents, we studied the condensation of oligonucleotides containing ribo-segments (from mononucleotide residue to full sequence) on the DNA template. Efficiency of the chemical ligation of RNA oligomers was shown to be much lower than that of DNA analogues. The coupling yield depends on the position of the RNA segment in the hybrid duplexes and on the position of the phosphate group in the nick. Images PMID:1711679

  11. A bacterial one-hybrid selection system for interrogating zinc finger-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Durai, Sundar; Bosley, Allen; Abulencia, Alice Bridgeman; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Ostermeier, Marc

    2006-05-01

    We have developed two bacterial one-hybrid systems for interrogating and selecting zinc finger-DNA interactions. Our systems utilize two plasmids: a zinc finger-plasmid containing the gene for the zinc finger fused to a fragment of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase and a reporter plasmid where the zinc finger-binding site is located upstream of a reporter gene-either the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Binding of the zinc finger domain to the target binding site results in a 10-fold increase in chloramphenicol resistance with the CAT reporter and an 8- to 22-fold increase in total cell fluorescence with the GFP reporter. The CAT reporter allows for sequence specific zinc fingers to be isolated in a single selection step whereas the GFP reporter enables quantitative evaluation of libraries using flow cytometry and theoretically allows for both negative and positive selection. Both systems have been used to select for zinc fingers that have affinity for the motif 5'-GGGGCAGAA-3' from a library of approximately 2 x 10(5) variants. The systems have been engineered to report on zinc finger-DNA binding with dissociation constants less than about 1 microM in order to be most applicable for evaluating binding specificity in an in vivo setting.

  12. High specific surface gold electrode on polystyrene substrate: Characterization and application as DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiliu; Liu, Yichen; Lu, Wei; Yuan, Qingpan; Wang, Wei; Pu, Qiaosheng; Yao, Bo

    2016-05-15

    In the past decades, many efforts have been made to improve the sensitivity and specificity of electrochemical DNA biosensors. However, it is still strongly required to develop disposable and reliable DNA biosensors for wide and practical application. In this article, we reported superior electrochemical properties of an integrated plastic-gold electrode (PGE) fabricated in-house by chemical plating on polystyrene substrate. PGEs were found having extremely high capacity of DNA immobilization compared with gold electrodes fabricated by standard sputtering based photolithography. Unique nano-structured surface was observed on PGEs through morphology techniques, which would to some extend give an explanation to higher capacity of DNA immobilization on PGEs. A probable mechanism of carboxylic acid produced on polystyrene substrate after exposure to UV irradiation was proposed and discussed for the first time. This biosensor was applied to detection and manipulate of DNA hybridization. Detection limit of 7.2×10(-11) M and 1-500 nM of linearity range was obtained.

  13. Low molecular weight DNA replication intermediates in Escherichia coli: mechanism of formation and strand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Amado, Luciana; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication intermediates, revealed in ligase-deficient conditions in vivo, are of low molecular weight independently of the organism, suggesting discontinuous replication of both the leading and the lagging DNA strands. Yet, in vitro experiments with purified enzymes replicating sigma-structured substrates show continuous synthesis of the leading DNA strand in complete absence of ligase, supporting the textbook model of semi-discontinuous DNA replication. The discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro results is rationalized by proposing that various excision repair events nick continuously-synthesized leading strands after synthesis, producing the observed low molecular weight intermediates. Here we show that, in an E. coli ligase-deficient strain with all known excision repair pathways inactivated, new DNA is still synthesized discontinuously. Furthermore, hybridization to strand-specific targets demonstrates that the low molecular weight replication intermediates come from both the lagging and the leading strands. These results support the model of discontinuous leading strand synthesis in E. coli. PMID:23876705

  14. Unique base-pair breathing dynamics in PNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Leijon, M; Sehlstedt, U; Nielsen, P E; Gräslund, A

    1997-08-22

    Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, derived from 1H-NMR measurements of the imino proton exchange rates upon titration with the exchange catalyst ammonia, are reported for two mixed-sequence peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA hybrids and their counterpart DNA duplex. The exchange times of the imino protons in the PNA strands extrapolate to very short base-pair lifetimes in the limit of infinite exchange catalyst concentration. This is not due to generally less stable base-pairs in PNA-DNA hybrids, since the lifetimes, apparent dissociation constants and thermodynamic stability (DeltaG degrees ) of the innermost DNA guanine imino protons are similar in the hybrid duplexes and in the DNA duplex. In addition, the apparent dissociation constants determined for PNA bases of the hybrids are of the same order as those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. An exchange process from the closed state was found to be inconsistent with the experimental data. From these results, we conclude that opening and closing rates of the PNA guanine and thymine bases are at least two orders of magnitude higher than those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. Unusual kinetics in the hybrids is also evident from the destabilization of the complementary DNA strand thymine bases, which exhibit base-pair dissociation constants increased by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to what is observed in the DNA duplex, while the DNA strand guanine bases are largely unaffected. The general pattern of the base-pair dynamics in the hybrids obtained when using trimethylamine as an exchange catalyst is the same as when using ammonia. However, the long base-pair lifetimes i. e. those of the DNA duplex and the guanine bases of the DNA strands in the hybrids, are approximately three to five times longer than when using ammonia. Thus, all opening events sensed by ammonia are not accessible to trimethylamine. These observations are discussed in regard to the mechanism of base

  15. DNA sequencing by hybridization to microchip octa-and decanucleotides extended by stacked pentanucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Parinov, S; Barsky, V; Yershov, G; Kirillov, E; Timofeev, E; Belgovskiy, A; Mirzabekov, A

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of sequencing by hybridization to an oligonucleotide microchip grows with an increase in the number and in the length of the oligonucleotides; however, such increases raise enormously the complexity of the microchip and decrease the accuracy of hybridization. We have been developing the technique of contiguous stacking hybridization (CSH) to circumvent these shortcomings. Stacking interactions between adjacent bases of two oligonucleotides stabilize their contiguous duplex with DNA. The use of such stacking increases the effective length of microchip oligonucleotides, enhances sequencing accuracy and allows the sequencing of longer DNA. The effects of mismatches, base composition, length and other factors on the stacking are evaluated. Contiguous stacking hybridization of DNA with immobilized 8mers and one or two 5mers labeled with two different fluorescent dyes increases the effective length of sequencing oligonucleotides from 8 to 13 and 18 bases, respectively. The incorporation of all four bases or 5-nitroindole as a universal base into different positions of the 5mers permitted a decrease in the number of additional rounds of hybridization. Contiguous stacking hybridization appears to be a promising approach to significantly increasing the efficiency of sequencing by hybridization. PMID:8760885

  16. Enhanced electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization with carbon nanotube modified paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Nie, Libo; Guo, Huishi; He, Quanguo; Chen, Jianrong; Miao, Yuqing

    2007-02-01

    A novel electrochemical genesensor using twice hybridization enhancement of gold nanoparticles based on carbon paste modified electrode is described. The carbon nanotube modified carbon paste electrode (CNTPE) and mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-15 modified carbon paste electrode (MSCPE) were investigated. The assay relies on the immobilization of streptavidin-biotin labeled target oligonucleotides onto the electrode surface and its hybridization to the gold nanoparticle-labeled DNA probe. After twice hybridization enhanced connection of gold nanoparticles to the hybridized system, the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal of total gold nanoparticles was monitored. It was found that the adsorption of oligonucleotide and hybridized DPV signal on CNTPE were both enhanced in comparison with that of pure carbon paste electrode (CPE). But this trend was reverse on MSCPE. The DPV detection of twice hybridized gold nanoparticles indicated that the sensitivity of the genesensor enhanced about one order of magnitude compared with one-layer hybridization. One-base mismatched DNA and complementary DNA could be distinguished clearly. However, no distinct advantage of MSCPE over CPE was found.

  17. Microfabrication of encoded microparticle array for multiplexed DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Shouhei; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2005-05-21

    A strategy for the high-sensitivity, high-selectivity, and multiplexed detection of oligonucleotide hybridizations has been developed with an encoded Ni microparticle random array that was manufactured by a "top-down" approach using micromachining and microfabrication techniques.

  18. DNA fingerprinting of Kentucky bluegrass cultivars and hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a high polyploidy, apomictic, self-incompatible, perennial grass, Kentucky bluegrass has such complex genetic architecture that conducting standard Mendelian genetic selection is currently impossible. One large hurdle is the inability to differentiate true hybrids from other apomictic progenies....

  19. Layered zirconium phosphonate with inorganic–organic hybrid structure: Preparation and its assembly with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Min; Lu, Guo-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-07-01

    An aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate (Zr(O{sub 3}POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), abbreviated as ZrRP (R=OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}), with layered structure has been synthesized. This layered compound possesses the characteristic of inorganic–organic hybrid, due to the covalently linked aminoethoxy in the host layer. The anion exchanged property of this zirconium phosphonate is suitable for the direct intercalation of negatively charged DNA, which is different from these reported zirconium phosphates or zirconium phosphonates. As a precursor, this prepared zirconium phosphonate was utilized to fabricate a novel DNA/ZrRP binary hybrid via a delamination-reassembly procedure. The release behavior of DNA from the DNA/ZrRP composite was investigated at different medium pH, because the combination between zirconium phosphonate sheets and DNA was pH-dependent sensitively. Moreover, the helical conformation of DNA was almost retained after the intercalation and release process. These properties of the DNA/ZrRP composite suggested the potential application of layered zirconium phosphonate as a non-viral vector in gene delivery. - Graphical abstract: The intercalation of DNA into zirconium phosphonate and the release of DNA from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. - Highlights: ●A layered aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate has been synthesized. ●DNA was intercalated directly into the prepared zirconium phosphonate. ●A novel zirconium phosphonate/DNA binary hybrid was fabricated. ●DNA can be reversibly released from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. ●The intercalation/release processes do not induce the denaturalization of DNA.

  20. Graphene coated fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the DNA hybridization detection: Simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shushama, Kamrun Nahar; Rana, Md. Masud; Inum, Reefat; Hossain, Md. Biplob

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a graphene coated optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is presented for the detection of DNA Hybridization. For the proposed sensor, a four layer model (fiber core /metal /sensing layer /sample) where a sheet of graphene (biomolecular recognition elements (BRE)) acting as a sensing layer is coated around the gold film because graphene enhances the sensitivity of fiber optic SPR biosensor. Numerical analysis shows the variation of resonance wavelength and spectrum of transmitted power for mismatched DNA strands and for complementary DNA strands. For mismatched DNA strands variation is negligible whereas for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Proposed sensor successfully distinguishes hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by observing the variation level of resonance wavelength and spectrum of transmitted power.

  1. Clamped Hybridization Chain Reactions for the Self-Assembly of Patterned DNA Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbang; Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Willner, Itamar; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-02-13

    DNA hydrogels hold great potential for biological and biomedical applications owing to their programmable nature and macroscopic sizes. However, most previous studies involve spontaneous and homogenous gelation procedures in solution, which often lack precise control. A clamped hybridization chain reaction (C-HCR)-based strategy has been developed to guide DNA self-assembly to form macroscopic hydrogels. Analogous to catalysts in chemical synthesis or seeds in crystal growth, we introduced DNA initiators to induce the gelation process, including crosslinked self-assembly and clamped hybridization in three dimensions with spatial and temporal control. The formed hydrogels show superior mechanical properties. The use of printed, surface-confined DNA initiators was also demonstrated for fabricating 2D hydrogel patterns without relying on external confinements. This simple method can be used to construct DNA hydrogels with defined geometry, composition, and order for various bioapplications.

  2. Specific glucocorticoid receptor binding to DNA reconstituted in a nucleosome.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmann, T; Wrange, O

    1988-01-01

    We have reconstituted a nucleosome with core histones from rat liver using a restriction fragment containing a sequence from the mouse mammary tumour virus (MTV) long terminal repeat (LTR). This sequence harbours glucocorticoid responsive elements (GREs) which mediate glucocorticoid hormone induction of transcription from the MTV promoter via glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding. Exonuclease III and DNase I footprinting demonstrated that the reconstituted nucleosome was specifically located between positions -219 and -76. A nucleosome was previously shown to be located at a similar or identical position in the MTV promoter in situ and to be structurally altered upon glucocorticoid hormone induction. We demonstrated, by DNase I footprinting, that GR is able to bind sequence specifically to the DNA in the in vitro assembled nucleosome. No evidence for unfolding of the nucleosome was obtained, but the DNase I footprinting pattern demonstrated GR induced local alterations in the DNA. Images PMID:2846275

  3. Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation: sequence specific duplex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, H E; Schimke, R T

    1982-01-01

    Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation conditions allow low stability duplexes to be detected in prokaryotic, plant, fish, avian, mammalian, and primate genomes. Highly diverged families of sequences can be detected in avian, mouse, and human unique sequence dNAs. Such a family has been described among twelve species of birds; based on species specific melting profiles and fractionation of sequences belonging to this family, it was concluded that permissive reassociation conditions did not artifactually produce low stability structures (1). We report S1 nuclease and optical melting experiments, and further fractionation of the diverged family to confirm sequence specific DNA reassociation at 50 degrees in 0.5 M phosphate buffer. PMID:6278429

  4. Construction of a normalized cDNA library by introduction of a semi-solid mRNA-cDNA hybridization system.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Y F; Ayusawa, D; Oishi, M

    1994-01-01

    We report a novel procedure to construct a normalized (equalized) cDNA library. By introduction of the highly efficient self-hybridization system between a whole mRNA population and their corresponding cDNA immobilized on latex beads, which involves relatively simple manipulations, we were able to generate an mRNA population in which the copy number of abundant species was reduced while that of rare species was enriched. In a typical experiment, after several cycles of self-hybridization on the beads, the ratio of the most to the least abundant marker mRNA species dropped by a factor of 300 (from 10,000 to 30) while the complexity and length of mRNAs in the population remained unchanged. The procedure should provide a potent tool for the expression cloning of cDNA and also facilitate the construction of whole cDNA catalogs from specific tissues (or cell types) from higher organisms. Images PMID:8152931

  5. Isolation and characterization of species-specific DNA probes from Taenia solium and Taenia saginata and their use in an egg detection assay.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A; Vallejo, V; Mossie, K G; Ortiz, D; Agabian, N; Flisser, A

    1995-05-01

    Cysticercosis results from ingestion of the eggs of the tapeworm Taenia solium. Reduction of the incidence of human and swine cysticercosis requires identification and treatment of individuals who carry the adult tapeworm. T. solium and Taenia saginata eggs cannot be differentiated on the basis of morphology; thus, in order to improve existing methods for the diagnosis of taeniasis, we have developed highly sensitive, species-specific DNA probes which differentiate T. solium and T. saginata. Recombinant clones containing repetitive DNA sequences which hybridize specifically with genomic DNAs from either species were isolated and characterized. T. solium-specific DNA sequences contained complete and truncated forms of a tandemly repeated 158-bp DNA sequence. An unrelated T. saginata DNA sequence was also characterized and shown to encode a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. T. solium- and T. saginata-specific DNA probes did not hybridize in dot blot assays either with genomic DNA from the platyhelminths Taenia hydatigena, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia taeniaeformis, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistosoma mansoni or with genomic DNA from other eukaryotes, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, Cryptosporidium parvum, Entamoeba histolytica, Trypanosoma gambiense, Trypanosoma brucei, and Giardia lamblia, Caenorhabditis elegans, and human DNA. By using these T. solium and T. saginata DNA probes, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific dot blot assay for the detection of T. solium eggs was developed.

  6. Genotyping male-specific RNA coliphages by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, F C; Shieh, Y S; van Duin, J; Beekwilder, M J; Sobsey, M D

    1995-01-01

    F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages are prevalent in sewage and other fecal wastes of humans and animals. There are four antigenically distinct serogroups of F+ RNA coliphages, and those predominating in humans (groups II and III) differ from those predominating in animals (groups I and IV). Hence, it may be possible to distinguish between human and animal wastes by serotyping F+ RNA coliphage isolates. Because serotyping is laborious and requires scarce antiserum reagents, we investigated genotyping using synthetic oligonucleotide probes as an alternative approach to distinguishing the four groups of F+ RNA coliphages. Oligoprobes I, II, III, IV, A, and B were selected to detect group I, II, III, IV, I plus II, and III plus IV phages, respectively. Methods for phage transfer from zones of lysis on a host cell lawn to candidate membrane filters and fixation of genomic nucleic acid on the membranes were optimized. The oligoprobes, which were end labeled with digoxigenin, were applied in DNA-RNA hybridization, and hybrids were observed by colorimetric, immunoenzymatic detection. Of 203 isolates of F+ RNA coliphages from environmental samples of water, wastes, and shellfish, 99.5 and 96.6% could be classified into each group by serotyping and genotyping, respectively. Probes A and B correctly identified 100% of the isolates. On the basis of these results, this method for genotyping F+ RNA coliphages appears to be practical and reliable for typing isolates in field samples. PMID:8526509

  7. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains. PMID:9212417

  8. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-07-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains.

  9. Impact parameters on hybridization process in detecting influenza virus (type A) using conductimetric-based DNA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Van Hieu, Nguyen; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-08-01

    This paper report various impact parameters on hybridization of probe/target DNA to detect the influenza virus (type A-H5N1) such as hybridization temperature, probe concentration, mismatch target and hybridization time. The DNA probe was attached to sensor surface by means of covalent bonding between amine of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) and phosphate group of DNA sequence. The hybridization of probe/target DNA strands were detected by changing the surface conductance of sensors, which leads to the change in output signal of the system. The results reveal that the DNA sensor can detect as low as 0.5 nM of target DNA in real samples. The response time of DNA sensor is approximately 4 min, and the sensitivity of DNA sensor is about 0.03 mV/nM.

  10. Quantum dot-based DNA hybridization by electrochemiluminescence and anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiping; Li, Jingjing; Tan, Yanglan; Zhou, Jinjun; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2010-07-01

    Simple and convenient assays with quantum dots (QDs) as the labels for DNA detection are developed. The probe DNA modified with thiol was first immobilized on a pretreated Au electrode, and then the complementary DNA (cDNA) oligonucleotides were hybridized with the immobilized probes by immersing the probe-modified Au electrode into the cDNA oligonucleotide solution. Finally, the avidin-modified QDs were bound to the biosensor in the presence of biotin-modified cDNA. The fabrication process for the biosensor was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Different from the traditional sandwich-structure strategy, the QDs bind to the target DNA directly via the biotin-avidin-system. By observing the ECL signal and determination of the cadmium component in QDs, the DNA hybridization event was detected by ECL and square wave anodic stripping voltammetric technique (SWASV) respectively. For SWASV detection, the signal linearly increased with the increase of the logarithm of the cDNA concentration over the range of 50 nM-5 microM. The minimum detectable concentration is 50 pM. For ECL, it showed wider linearity range over 5 nM-5 microM and lower detectable concentration of 10 pM. This indicated that the ECL assay could be comparable to the conventional electrochemical assay. Furthermore, this biosensor possesses high selectivity over different sequences of target DNA oligonucleotides.

  11. Application of DNA hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugess in Thailand. [Shigella; Escherichia coli; Campylobacter; Cryptosporidium

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.N.; Echeverria, P.; Pitarangsi, C.; Seriwatana, J.; Sethabutr, O.; Bodhidatta, L.; Brown, C.; Herrmann, J.E.; Blacklow, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    The epidemiology and etiology of acute diarrheal disease were determined in a Hmong refugee camp on the Thai-Laotian border from April 11 to May 14, 1985. DNA hybridization techniques were used to detect Shigella species, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli. A monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect rotavirus, and standard microbiology was used to detect other enteropathogens. The age-specific diarrheal disease rates were 47 episodes per month per 1000 children less than five years old and 113 episodes per month per 1000 children less than one year old. Rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Campylobacter, and Cryptosporidium were the predominant pathogens in children less than two years old. The DNA probe hybridized with 94% of 31 specimens identified as enterotoxigenic E. coli by the standard assays and with none of the specimens in which the standard assays were negative. The probe for Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli hybridized in eight of 10 stools that contained Shigella and four of 314 stools from which Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli were not isolated. The use of DNA probes allows specimens to be collected in remote areas with a minimum amount of equipment and technical expertise so that they can be easily transported to a central laboratory for further processing.

  12. Parallel Characterization of Anaerobic Toluene- and Ethylbenzene-Degrading Microbial Consortia by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, RNA-DNA Membrane Hybridization, and DNA Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Saïd; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis. PMID:12088997

  13. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  14. DNA hybridization assay for detection of gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus in infected gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L. ) larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, S.T.; Burand, J.P.; Elkinton, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Radiolabeled Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA probes were used in a DNA hybridization assay to detect the presence of viral DNA in extracts from infected larvae. Total DNA was extracted from larvae, bound to nitrocellulose filters, and assayed for the presence of viral DNA by two methods: slot-blot vacuum filtration and whole-larval squashes. The hybridization results were closely correlated with mortality observed in reared larvae. Hybridization of squashes of larvae frozen 4 days after receiving the above virus treatments also produced accurate measures of the incidence of virus infection.

  15. Nanoporous niobium oxide for label-free detection of DNA hybridization events.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinsub; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rho, Sangchul; Jahng, Deokjin; Lee, Jaeyoung; Kim, Kyung Ja

    2008-01-15

    We found that DNA probes can be immobilized on anodically prepared porous niobium oxide without a chemical modification of both the DNA probes and the substrate. By using the porous niobium oxide with a positive surface charge, DNA hybridization events are detected on the basis of the blue-shift of a maximum absorption peak in UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The blue-shift is ascribed to the change of surface charge upon single- or double-stranded DNA. The method does not require a label and shows high sensitivity with the detection limit of the concentration of 1nM.

  16. E-Predict: a computational strategy for species identification based on observed DNA microarray hybridization patterns.

    PubMed

    Urisman, Anatoly; Fischer, Kael F; Chiu, Charles Y; Kistler, Amy L; Beck, Shoshannah; Wang, David; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    DNA microarrays may be used to identify microbial species present in environmental and clinical samples. However, automated tools for reliable species identification based on observed microarray hybridization patterns are lacking. We present an algorithm, E-Predict, for microarray-based species identification. E-Predict compares observed hybridization patterns with theoretical energy profiles representing different species. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm to viral detection in a set of clinical samples and discuss its relevance to other metagenomic applications.

  17. LINE-1 repetitive DNA probes for species-specific cloning from Mus spretus and Mus domesticus genomes.

    PubMed

    Rikke, B A; Hardies, S C

    1991-12-01

    Mus domesticus and Mus spretus mice are closely related subspecies. For genetic investigations involving hybrid mice, we have developed a set of species-specific oligonucleotide probes based on the detection of LINE-1 sequence differences. LINE-1 is a repetitive DNA family whose many members are interspersed among the genes. In this study, library screening experiments were used to fully characterize the species specificity of four M. domesticus LINE-1 probes and three M. spretus LINE-1 probes. It was found that the nucleotide differences detected by the probes define large, species-specific subfamilies. We show that collaborative use of such probes can be employed to selectively detect thousands of species-specific library clones. Consequently, these probes could be exploited to monitor and access almost any given species-specific region of interest within hybrid genomes.

  18. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, April F.; Farin, Fred M.; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Siscovick, David S.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these

  19. Specific DNA recognition by the Antp homeodomain: MD simulations of specific and nonspecific complexes.

    PubMed

    Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Billeter, Martin

    2004-12-01

    Four molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of complexes between the wild-type or a mutant Antennapedia homeodomain and 2 DNA sequences were generated in order to probe the mechanisms governing the specificity of DNA recognition. The starting point was published affinity measurements showing that a single protein mutation combined with a replacement of 2 base pairs yields a new high-affinity complex, whereas the other combinations, with changes on only 1 macromolecule, exhibited lower affinity. The simulations of the 4 complexes yielded fluctuating networks of interaction. On average, these networks differ significantly, explaining the switch of affinity caused by the alterations in the macromolecules. The network of mostly hydrogen-bonding interactions involving several water molecules, which was suggested both by X-ray and NMR structures of the wild-type homeodomain and its DNA operator sequence, could be reproduced in the trajectory. More interestingly, the high-affinity complex with alterations in both the protein and the DNA yielded again a dynamic but very tight network of intermolecular interactions, however, attributing a significantly stronger role to direct hydrophobic interactions at the expense of water bridges. The other 2 homeodomain-DNA complexes, with only 1 molecule altered, show on average over the trajectories a clearly reduced number of protein-DNA interactions. The observations from these simulations suggest specific experiments and thus close the circle formed by biochemical, structural, and computational studies. The shift from a water-dominated to a more "dry" interface may prove important in the design of proteins binding DNA in a specific manner.

  20. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of species-specific repetitive DNA sequences from Beta corolliflora, a wild relative of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Schmidt, T; Jung, C

    2000-12-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences have been isolated from a Sau3AI plasmid library of tetraploid Beta corolliflora (2n = 4x = 36), a wild relative of sugar beet (B. vulgaris). The library was screened by differential hybridization with genomic DNA of B. corolliflora and B. vulgaris. When used as probes for Southern hybridization of genomic DNA, six clones were determined to represent highly repetitive DNA families present only in the B. corolliflora genome. Five other sequences were highly repetitive in B. corolliflora and low or single copy in B. vulgaris. The insert size varied between 43 bp and 448 bp. Two sequences pBC1279 and pBC1944 displayed strong homology to a previously cloned satellite DNA from B. nana. With one exception, sequences are tandemly arranged as revealed by a typical ladder pattern after genomic Southern hybridization. The chromosomal distribution of five probes was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of mitotic metaphases from B. corolliflora and a triploid hybrid between B. vulgaris and B. corolliflora. Three sequences were spread along all chromosome arms of B. corolliflora while one sequence was present on only six chromosomes. The chromosome-specific sequence pBC216 was found in close vicinity to the 5S rDNA located on B. corolliflora chromosome IV. This set of species-specific sequences has the potential to be used as probes for the identification of monosomic alien addition lines and for marker-assisted gene transfer from wild beet to cultivated beet.

  1. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Denisenko, M.F.; Venkatachalam, S.; Wani, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/10{sup 3}kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes.

  2. Reciprocal controlled crosses between Pinus sylvestris and P. mugo verified by a species-specific cpDNA marker.

    PubMed

    Wachowiak, Witold; Lewandowski, Andrzej; Prus-Głowacki, Wiesław

    2005-01-01

    A species-specific marker of cpDNA (paternally inherited in pines) was used to verify the hybrid origin of seedlings from controlled reciprocal crosses between Pinus sylvestris and P. mugo. A very low degree of compatibility between those two species has been revealed. In the three consecutive years of experiments, no filled seeds were obtained in the combination with P. mugo as the seed parent. From P. sylvestris as the seed parent and P. mugo as the pollen donor, we succeeded to obtain four filled seeds (about 1 %), but only in one year. The seedling obtained from the seeds had cpDNA haplotypes specific to P. mugo, which proves their hybrid origin. This method enables verification of the result of controlled crosses. The importance of the results has been discussed in the aspect of postulated natural hybridisation in sympatric populations of the two species.

  3. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: towards a new DNA biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Werz, Emma; Korneev, Sergei; Montilla-Martinez, Malayko; Wagner, Richard; Hemmler, Roland; Walter, Claudius; Eisfeld, Jörg; Gall, Karsten; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2012-02-01

    A novel technique is described which comprises a base-specific DNA duplex formation at a lipid bilayer-H(2) O-phase boundary layer. Two different probes of oligonucleotides both carrying a double-tailed lipid at the 5'-terminus were incorporated into stable artificial lipid bilayers separating two compartments (cis/trans-channel) of an optically transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Both the cis- and trans-channels are filled with saline buffer. Injection of a cyanine-5-labeled target DNA sequence, which is complementary to only one of the oligonucleotide probes, into the cis-channel, followed by a thorough perfusion, leads to an immobilization of the labeled complementary oligonucleotide on the membrane as detected by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. In the case of fluorescent but non-complementary DNA sequences, no immobilized fluorescent oligonucleotide duplex could be detected on the membrane. This clearly verifies a specific duplex formation at the membrane interface.

  4. Near-infrared silver cluster optically signaling oligonucleotide hybridization and assembling two DNA hosts.

    PubMed

    Petty, Jeffrey T; Nicholson, David A; Sergev, Orlin O; Graham, Stuart K

    2014-09-16

    Silver clusters with ~10 atoms form within DNA strands, and the conjugates are chemical sensors. The DNA host hybridizes with short oligonucleotides, and the cluster moieties optically respond to these analytes. Our studies focus on how the cluster adducts perturb the structure of their DNA hosts. Our sensor is comprised of an oligonucleotide with two components: a 5'-cluster domain that complexes silver clusters and a 3'-recognition site that hybridizes with a target oligonucleotide. The single-stranded sensor encapsulates an ~11 silver atom cluster with violet absorption at 400 nm and with minimal emission. The recognition site hybridizes with complementary oligonucleotides, and the violet cluster converts to an emissive near-infrared cluster with absorption at 730 nm. Our key finding is that the near-infrared cluster coordinates two of its hybridized hosts. The resulting tertiary structure was investigated using intermolecular and intramolecular variants of the same dimer. The intermolecular dimer assembles in concentrated (~5 μM) DNA solutions. Strand stoichiometries and orientations were chromatographically determined using thymine-modified complements that increase the overall conjugate size. The intramolecular dimer develops within a DNA scaffold that is founded on three linked duplexes. The high local cluster concentrations and relative strand arrangements again favor the antiparallel dimer for the near-infrared cluster. When the two monomeric DNA/violet cluster conjugates transform to one dimeric DNA/near-infrared conjugate, the DNA strands accumulate silver. We propose that these correlated changes in DNA structure and silver stoichiometry underlie the violet to near-infrared cluster transformation.

  5. Yeast one-hybrid screens for detection of transcription factor DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2011-01-01

    The yeast one-hybrid system is widely recognized as a valuable and straightforward technique to study interactions between transcription factors and DNA. By means of one-hybrid screens, transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins, expressed from cDNA expression libraries, can be identified due to the interactions with a DNA sequence-of-interest that is linked to a reporter gene, such as the yeast HIS3 gene. Usually, the library is constructed in an E. coli-yeast shuttle vector designed for production of hybrid proteins consisting of a library protein and the trans-activating domain (AD) from the yeast GAL4 transcription factor. Here, we describe an optimized system of vectors for one-hybrid screenings together with detailed step-wise protocols, an elaborate trouble-shooting guide and many technical tips to conduct successful screenings. This system and other yeast genetic selection procedures derived from one-hybrid methodology proved highly useful to help understanding the regulatory networks controlling expression of the genome.

  6. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  7. Development of an SH-SAW sensor for detection of DNA immobilization and hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Yongrae; Woo, Jeongdong; Hur, Youngjune; Pak, Yukeun E.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed SH (shear horizontal) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for detection of the immobilization and hybrdization of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) on the gold coated delay line of transverse SAW devices. The experiments of DNA immobilization and hybridization were performed with 15-mer oligonucleotides (probe and complementary target DNA). The sensor consists of twin SAW delay line oscillators (sensing channel and reference channel) operating at 100 MHz fabricated on 36° rotated Y-cut X-propagation LiTaO3 piezoelectric single crystals. The relative change in the frequency of the two oscillators was monitored to detect the immobilization of probe DNA with thiol group on the Au coated delay line and the hybridization between target DNA and immobilized probe DNA in a pH 7.4 PBS (phosphate buffered saline) solution. The measurement results showed a good response of the sensor to the mass loading effects of the DNA immobilization and hybridization with the sensitivity up to 1.5 ng/ml/Hz.

  8. Hierarchical coassembly of DNA-triptycene hybrid molecular building blocks and zinc protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Singh, Sumit; Monisha, Mohan; Bhowmick, Sourav; Roy, Anindya; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe the successful construction of composite DNA nanostructures by the self-assembly of complementary symmetrical 2,6,14-triptycenetripropiolic acid (TPA)-DNA building blocks and zinc protoporphyrin IX (Zn PpIX). DNA-organic molecule scaffolds for the composite DNA nanostructure were constructed through covalent conjugation of TPA with 5'-C12-amine-terminated modified single strand DNA (ssDNA) and its complementary strand. The repeated covalent conjugation of TPA with DNA was confirmed by using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF). The biologically relevant photosensitizer Zn PpIX was used to direct the hybridization-mediated self-assembly of DNA-TPA molecular building blocks as well as a model guest molecule within the DNA-TPA supramolecular self-assembly. The formation of fiber-like composite DNA nanostructures was observed. Native PAGE, circular dichroism (CD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been utilized for analyzing the formation of DNA nanofibers after the coassembly. Computational methods were applied to discern the theoretical dimension of the DNA-TPA molecular building block of the nanofibers. A notable change in photocatalytic efficiency of Zn PpIX was observed when it was inside the TPA-DNA scaffold. The significant increase in ROS generation by Zn PpIX when trapped in this biocompatible DNA-TPA hybrid nanofiber may be an effective tool to explore photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications as well as photocatalytic reactions.

  9. Fiber optofluidic biosensor for the label-free detection of DNA hybridization and methylation based on an in-line tunable mode coupler.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ran; Lu, Dan-Feng; Cheng, Jin; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Lan; Xu, Jian-Dong; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-12-15

    An optical fiber optofluidic biosensor for the detection of DNA hybridization and methylation has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An in-line fiber Michelson interferometer was formed in the photonic crystal fiber. A micrhole in the collapsed region, which combined the tunable mode coupler and optofluidic channel, was fabricated by using femtosecond laser micromachining. The mode field diameter of the guided light is changed with the refractive index in the optofluidic channel, which results in the tunable coupling ratio. Label-free detections of the DNA hybridization and methylation have been experimentally demonstrated. The probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was bound with the surface of the optofluidic channel through the Poly-l-lysine layer, and the hybridization between a short 22-mer probe ssDNA and a complementary target ssDNA was carried out and detected by interrogating the fringe visibility of the reflection spectrum. Then, the DNA methylation was also detected through the binding between the methylated DNA and the 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) monoclonal antibody. The experiments results demonstrate that the limit of detection of 5nM is achieved, establishing the tunable mode coupler as a sensitive and versatile biosensor. The sensitive optical fiber optofluidic biosensor possesses high specificity and low temperature cross-sensitivity.

  10. Visual, base-specific detection of nucleic acid hybridization using polymerization-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Johnson, Leah M; Bowman, Christopher N

    2009-03-15

    Polymerization-based signal amplification offers sensitive visualization of biotinylated biomolecules functionalized to glass microarrays in a manner suitable for point-of-care use. Here we report using this method for visual detection of multiplexed nucleic acid hybridizations from complex media and develop an application toward point mutation detection and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. Primer extension reactions were employed to label selectively and universally all complementary surface DNA hybrids with photoinitiators, permitting simultaneous and dynamic photopolymerization from positive sites to 0.5-nM target concentrations. Dramatic improvements in signal ratios between complementary and mismatched hybrids enabled visual discrimination of single base differences in KRAS codon-12 biomarkers.

  11. Probing the role of interfacial waters in protein-DNA recognition using a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Bradley, Philip

    2013-08-01

    When proteins bind to their DNA target sites, ordered water molecules are often present at the protein-DNA interface bridging protein and DNA through hydrogen bonds. What is the role of these ordered interfacial waters? Are they important determinants of the specificity of DNA sequence recognition, or do they act in binding in a primarily nonspecific manner, by improving packing of the interface, shielding unfavorable electrostatic interactions, and solvating unsatisfied polar groups that are inaccessible to bulk solvent? When modeling details of structure and binding preferences, can fully implicit solvent models be fruitfully applied to protein-DNA interfaces, or must the individualistic properties of these interfacial waters be accounted for? To address these questions, we have developed a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model that specifically accounts for the locations and orientations of small numbers of DNA-bound water molecules, while treating the majority of the solvent implicitly. Comparing the performance of this model with that of its fully implicit counterpart, we find that explicit treatment of interfacial waters results in a modest but significant improvement in protein side-chain placement and DNA sequence recovery. Base-by-base comparison of the performance of the two models highlights DNA sequence positions whose recognition may be dependent on interfacial water. Our study offers large-scale statistical evidence for the role of ordered water for protein-DNA recognition, together with detailed examination of several well-characterized systems. In addition, our approach provides a template for modeling explicit water molecules at interfaces that should be extensible to other systems.

  12. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex

    PubMed Central

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel ‘recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4–Met28–Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity. PMID:22146299

  13. Ultrasensitive Multiplexed Immunoassay for Tumor Biomarkers Based on DNA Hybridization Chain Reaction Amplifying Signal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhao, Junqing; Guo, Zilin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-03-23

    In this work, a novel electrochemical immunoassay protocol has been reported for simultaneous determination of multiple tumor biomarkers based on DNA hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were selected as model biomarkers. The immunoassay protocol contained primary antibodies immobilized on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), secondary antibodies conjugated with DNA concatemer from HCR of primer, auxiliary probe, and signal probe labeled with signal molecules (methyleneblue (MB) and ferrocene (Fc)). In the presence of target biomarkers, the sandwich immunocomplex was formed between the primary antibodies and secondary antibodies bioconjugates carrying numerous signal molecules. As a result, two well-resolved reduction peaks, one was at -0.35 V (corresponding to MB) and other was at 0.33 V (corresponding to Fc; both vs SCE), were obtained in differential pulse voltammetry, and peak currents changed were related to the level of biomarkers. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide linear response range (0.5 pg mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1)) and low detection limits (PSA, 0.17 pg mL(-1); AFP, 0.25 pg mL(-1)) (at S/N = 3). In addition, the immunoassay was evaluated by analyzing simulate human serum sample, and the recoveries obtained were within 99.4-107.6% for PSA and 97.9-108.2% for AFP, indicating the immnuoassay could be applied to the simultaneous detection of AFP and PSA in human serum samples.

  14. Hybrid Magnetic-DNA Directed Immobilisation Approach for Efficient Protein Capture and Detection on Microfluidic Platforms.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Elaheh; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Soleimani, Masoud

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a hybrid magnetic-DNA directed immobilisation approach is presented to enhance protein capture and detection on a microfluidic platform. DNA-modified magnetic nanoparticles are added in a solution to capture fluorescently labelled immunocomplexes to be detected optically. A magnetic set-up composed of cubic permanent magnets and a microchannel was designed and implemented based on finite element analysis results to efficiently concentrate the nanoparticles only over a defined area of the microchannel as the sensing zone. This in turn, led to the fluorescence emission localisation and the searching area reduction. Also, compared to processes in which the immunocomplex is formed directly on the surface, the proposed approach provides a lower steric hindrance, higher mass transfer, lower equilibrium time, and more surface concentration of the captured targets leading to a faster and more sensitive detection. As a proof-of-concept, the set-up is capable of detecting prostate-specific membrane antigen with concentrations down to 0.7 nM. Our findings suggest that the approach holds a great promise for applications in clinical assays and disease diagnosis.

  15. Quantification of DNA cleavage specificity in Hi-C experiments.

    PubMed

    Meluzzi, Dario; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-01-08

    Hi-C experiments produce large numbers of DNA sequence read pairs that are typically analyzed to deduce genomewide interactions between arbitrary loci. A key step in these experiments is the cleavage of cross-linked chromatin with a restriction endonuclease. Although this cleavage should happen specifically at the enzyme's recognition sequence, an unknown proportion of cleavage events may involve other sequences, owing to the enzyme's star activity or to random DNA breakage. A quantitative estimation of these non-specific cleavages may enable simulating realistic Hi-C read pairs for validation of downstream analyses, monitoring the reproducibility of experimental conditions and investigating biophysical properties that correlate with DNA cleavage patterns. Here we describe a computational method for analyzing Hi-C read pairs to estimate the fractions of cleavages at different possible targets. The method relies on expressing an observed local target distribution downstream of aligned reads as a linear combination of known conditional local target distributions. We validated this method using Hi-C read pairs obtained by computer simulation. Application of the method to experimental Hi-C datasets from murine cells revealed interesting similarities and differences in patterns of cleavage across the various experiments considered.

  16. Principles Governing DNA Methylation during Neuronal Lineage and Subtype Specification

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ali; Klein, Shifra S.; Barboza, Luendreo; Lohdi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although comprehensively described during early neuronal development, the role of DNA methylation/demethylation in neuronal lineage and subtype specification is not well understood. By studying two distinct neuronal progenitors as they differentiate to principal neurons in mouse hippocampus and striatum, we uncovered several principles governing neuronal DNA methylation during brain development. (1) The program consists of three stages: an initial genome-wide methylation during progenitor proliferation is followed by loss of methylation during the transition of regional progenitors to “young” hippocampal/striatal neurons, which is then reversed by gain in methylation during maturation to subtype-specific neurons. (2) At the first two stages, gain and loss of methylation are limited to CpGs, whereas during the third maturation stage, methylation also occurs at non-CpG sites in both lineages. (3) Methylation/demethylation, similar to transcription, are initially highly similar in the two lineages, whereas diversification in methylation and transcription during maturation creates subtype-specific methylation differences. (4) Initially, methylation targets all genomic locations, whereas later, during early and late differentiation, the preferred targets are intronic/intergenic sequences with enhancer-like activity. (5) Differentially methylated genes are enriched in sequential neurodevelopmental functions (such as progenitor proliferation, migration, neuritogenesis, and synaptic transmission); upregulated genes represent current and consecutive stage-specific functions, and downregulated genes represent preceding functions that are no longer required. The main conclusion of our work is that the neuronal methylation/demethylation program is predominantly developmental with minimal lineage specificity, except in the final stage of development when neuron subtype-specific differences also emerge. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our work is the first to describe a set of

  17. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  18. GENE EXPRESSION IN INTERSPECIFIC HYBRIDS, I. DNA SYNTHESIS IN THE LETHAL CROSS ARBACIA LIXULA [unk] × PARACENTROTUS LIVIDUS [unk

    PubMed Central

    Denis, H.; Brachet, J.

    1969-01-01

    The technique of molecular hybridization has been used to determine in what proportion the DNA's of paternal and maternal origin are present in the lethal hybrid obtained by fertilizing the eggs of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus with the sperm of another sea urchin species, Arbacia lixula. The ability of the hybridization technique to recognize DNA molecules from A. lixula and P. lividus was examined and proved to be satisfactory. Labeled DNA's from A. lixula and P. lividus were found to hybridize respectively ten and seven times as well with DNA of their own species as with DNA of the other species. Labeled DNA from arrested hybrid embryos hybridized 1.7 times to twice as well with P. lividus as with A. lixula DNA. We conclude that the interspecific hybrid contains about 2.5 times as much DNA of maternal origin as DNA of paternal origin. The lower content of A. lixula DNA probably results from a partial elimination of the paternal chromosomes during the late cleavage stages. PMID:5253657

  19. Gene expression in interspecific hybrids. I. DNA synthesis in the lethal cross Arbacia lixula male X Paracentrotus lividus female.

    PubMed

    Denis, H; Brachet, J

    1969-01-01

    The technique of molecular hybridization has been used to determine in what proportion the DNA's of paternal and maternal origin are present in the lethal hybrid obtained by fertilizing the eggs of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus with the sperm of another sea urchin species, Arbacia lixula. The ability of the hybridization technique to recognize DNA molecules from A. lixula and P. lividus was examined and proved to be satisfactory. Labeled DNA's from A. lixula and P. lividus were found to hybridize respectively ten and seven times as well with DNA of their own species as with DNA of the other species. Labeled DNA from arrested hybrid embryos hybridized 1.7 times to twice as well with P. lividus as with A. lixula DNA. We conclude that the interspecific hybrid contains about 2.5 times as much DNA of maternal origin as DNA of paternal origin. The lower content of A. lixula DNA probably results from a partial elimination of the paternal chromosomes during the late cleavage stages.

  20. A chelating dendritic ligand capped quantum dot: preparation, surface passivation, bioconjugation and specific DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dejian; Li, Yang; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Abell, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has stronger fluorescence than that capped by a monodendate single-chain thiol, 3-mercapto-propionic acid (MPA-QD). In addition, the fluorescence of the CDL-QD can be enhanced by 2.5-fold by treatments with Zn2+ or S2- ions, presumably due to effective passivation of the surface defects. This level of fluorescence enhancement obtained for the CDL-QD is much greater than that for the MPA-QD. Further, by coupling a short single-stranded DNA target to the QD via the CDL carboxylic acidgroup, a functional QD-DNA conjugate that can resist non-specific adsorption and hybridize quickly to its complementary DNAprobe has been obtained. This functional QD-DNA conjugate is suitable for specific quantification of short, labelled complementary probes at the low DNAprobe:QD copy numbers via a QD-sensitised dyefluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) response with 500 pM sensitivity on a conventional fluorimeter.Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has

  1. Ultrasensitive non enzymatic multiple immunosensor for tumor markers detection by coupling DNA hybridization chain reaction with intercalated molecules.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhang, Junjun; Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we tried coupling the small signal molecules that could intercalate into DNA double helix with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) technique to fabricate a multiple immunosensor. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DXH) and methylene blue (MB) were used as signal molecules and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were selected as model biomarkers. The immunosensor mainly consists of three parts as follows: First, two different primary antibodies (Ab1) immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs); Second, secondary antibodies (Ab2) conjugated with DNA primer; Third, long DNA concatemers from HCR were used as a carrier to intercalate amounts of signal molecules (DXH or MB). A sandwich immunocomplex was formed among primary antibodies, target biomarkers and secondary antibodies conjugated with DNA primer via specific recognition reaction. Afterwards, DNA concatemers intercalating amounts of DXH or MB were linked to DNA primer via DNA hybridization. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was employed to record the response signals from electroactive molecules DXH and MB, and two distinguishable signals were obtained, which peak potentials were at about -0.30V (corresponding to MB) and -0.70V (corresponding to DXH, both vs SCE), respectively. The signal intensities of MB and DXH were linearly related to the logarithm of biomarkers concentration in the range of 0.05pgmL(-1)-25ngmL(-1), and the limit of detection were 0.03pgmL(-1) for CEA and 0.02pgmL(-1) for AFP (at S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the immunosensor exhibited a sensitive electrochemical response to biomarkers in human serum samples and the results obtained were in accordance with reference method, indicating the immunosensor can be applied to real sample analysis in clinic diagnosis.

  2. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Lysov, Yuri Petrovich; Dubley, Svetlana A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  3. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Lysov, Y.P.; Dubley, S.A.

    1999-05-18

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between the cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting the extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to the extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from the array. 14 figs.

  4. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  5. Electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization by using a zirconia modified renewable carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Ling-Fan; Yuan, Hui-Hui; Lan, Min-Bo; Lawrance, Geoffrey A; Wei, Gang

    2009-02-01

    A simple, polishable and renewable DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a zirconia modified carbon paste electrode. Zirconia was mixed with graphite powder and paraffin wax to produce the paste for the electrode, and response-optimized at 56% graphite powder, 19% ZrO(2) and 25% paraffin wax. An oligonucleotide probe with a terminal 5'-phosphate group was attached to the surface of the electrode via the strong affinity of zirconia for phosphate groups. DNA immobilization and hybridization were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry, using methylene blue as indicator. Examination of changes in response with complementary or non-complementary DNA sequences showed that the developed biosensor had a high selectivity and sensitivity towards hybridization detection (< or =2x10(-10) M complementary DNA detectable). The surface of the biosensor can be renewed quickly and reproducibly (signal RSD+/-4.6% for five successive renewals) by a simple polishing step.

  6. Dynamic changes in the higher-level chromatin organization of specific sequences revealed by in situ hybridization to nuclear halos

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach to study the higher level packaging of specific DNA sequences has been developed by coupling high-resolution fluorescence hybridization with biochemical fractionation to remove histones and distend DNA loops to form morphologically reproducible nuclear "halos." Results demonstrate consistent differences in the organization of specific sequences, and further suggest a relationship to functional activity. Pulse-incorporated bromodeoxyuridine representing nascent replicating DNA localized with the base of the chromatin loops in discrete clustered patterns characteristic of intact cells, whereas at increasing chase times, the replicated DNA was consistently found further out on the extended region of the halo. Fluorescence hybridization to unique loci for four transcriptionally inactive sequences produced long strings of signal extending out onto the DNA halo or "loop," whereas four transcriptionally active sequences remained tightly condensed as single spots within the residual nucleus. In contrast, in non-extracted cells, all sequences studied typically remained condensed as single spots of fluorescence signal. Interestingly, two transcriptionally active, tandemly repeated gene clusters exhibited strikingly different packaging by this assay. Analysis of specific genes in single cells during the cell cycle revealed changes in packaging between S-phase and non S-phase cells, and further suggested a dramatic difference in the structural associations in mitotic and interphase chromatin. These results are consistent with and suggestive of a loop domain organization of chromatin packaging involving both stable and transient structural associations, and provide precedent for an approach whereby different biochemical fractionation methods may be used to unravel various aspects of the complex higher-level organization of the genome. PMID:8034736

  7. Real-time detection of DNA hybridization and melting on oligonucleotide arrays by using optical wave guides.

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, D I; Hoijer, J V; Hsieh, W T; Jou, C; Gordon, J; Theriault, T; Gamble, R; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1995-01-01

    The challenge of the Human Genome Project is to increase the rate of DNA sequence acquisition by two orders of magnitude to complete sequencing of the human genome by the year 2000. The present work describes a rapid detection method using a two-dimensional optical wave guide that allows measurement of real-time binding or melting of a light-scattering label on a DNA array. A particulate label on the target DNA acts as a light-scattering source when illuminated by the evanescent wave of the wave guide and only the label bound to the surface generates a signal. Imaging/visual examination of the scattered light permits interrogation of the entire array simultaneously. Hybridization specificity is equivalent to that obtained with a conventional system using autoradiography. Wave guide melting curves are consistent with those obtained in the liquid phase and single-base discrimination is facile. Dilution experiments showed an apparent lower limit of detection at 0.4 nM oligonucleotide. This performance is comparable to the best currently known fluorescence-based systems. In addition, wave guide detection allows manipulation of hybridization stringency during detection and thereby reduces DNA chip complexity. It is anticipated that this methodology will provide a powerful tool for diagnostic applications that require rapid cost-effective detection of variations from known sequences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7603999

  8. Improvements in visualisation and localisation of human papillomavirus DNA in CaSki cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization, laser scanning confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Usson, Y; Chignol, M C; Chardonnet, Y

    1994-07-01

    The visual interpretation and localisation of specific DNA sequences in three dimensions in cell nuclei was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) using CaSki cells containing 600 copies per cell of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA type 16 integrated in cellular DNA. Biotinylated DNA probes were used and DNA-DNA hybrids were revealed by a three-step reaction involving a rabbit anti-biotin antibody, a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody and a streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate complex. The DNA from cell nuclei was counterstained with propidium iodide. With standard fluorescence microscopy, some dense fluorescent spots were seen in the cell nuclei. Similarly, with LSCM, some hybridization spots were observed in the cell nuclei but they were at different levels of the nuclei as shown by successive nuclear sections taken along the z axis. The visualisation of multiple hybridization spots confirmed the presence of multiple integration sites of HPV 16 DNA in CaSki cells. Association of LSCM with three-dimensional reconstructions lead to spatial images of hybridization spots obtained by stacking (x,y) images from consecutive confocal planes. Rotation of the reconstructed cell nuclei around the y axis makes it possible to distinguish closely adjacent spots. The combination of these techniques improves the detection of hybridization spots and may be of interest to further determine whether the HPV DNA is episomal or integrated in infected cells.

  9. Electrochemical Detection of Hybridized DNA Using Reduction of Methylene Blue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Amplified microgravimetric quartz crystal-microbalance analyses of oligonucleotide complexes: a route to a Tay - Sachs biosensor device,” Chemical...Abstract - One of the important roles of a DNA sensor is the capability of detecting genetic diseases or mutations by analyzing DNA sequence. The...intercalator I. INTRODUCTION With the progress of biotechnology, the efforts of detecting genetic diseases and mutations for improving functions of

  10. Homologous PNA Hybridization to Noncanonical DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kormuth, Karen A; Woolford, John L; Armitage, Bruce A

    2016-03-29

    Potential guanine (G) quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) found throughout the genomes and transcriptomes of organisms have emerged as biologically relevant structures. These G-quadruplexes represent novel opportunities for gene regulation at the DNA and RNA levels. Recently, the definition of functional QFSs has been expanding to include a variety of unconventional motifs, including relatively long loop sequences (i.e., >7 nucleotides) separating adjacent G-tracts. We have identified a QFS within the 25S rDNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisae that features a long loop separating the two 3'-most G-tracts. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence, QFS3, folds into a stable G-quadruplex in vitro. We have studied the interaction between QFS3 and several loop mutants with a small, homologous (G-rich) peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer that is designed to form a DNA/PNA heteroquadruplex. The PNA successfully invades the DNA quadruplex target to form a stable heteroquadruplex, but with surprisingly high PNA:DNA ratios based on surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometric results. A model for high stoichiometry PNA-DNA heteroquadruplexes is proposed, and the implications for quadruplex targeting by G-rich PNA are discussed.

  11. Microfluidic extraction and stretching of chromosomal DNA from single cell nuclei for DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Bernardin, Evans; Gilbert, David M; Chella, Ravindran; Guan, Jingjiao

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for genetic characterization of single cells by integrating microfluidic stretching of chromosomal DNA and fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this method, individually isolated cell nuclei were immobilized in a microchannel. Chromosomal DNA was released from the nuclei and stretched by a pressure-driven flow. We analyzed and optimized flow conditions to generate a millimeter-long band of stretched DNA from each nucleus. Telomere fiber FISH was successfully performed on the stretched chromosomal DNA. Individual telomere fiber FISH signals from single cells could be resolved and their lengths measured, demonstrating the ability of the method to quantify genetic features at the level of single cells.

  12. Protocol for sortase-mediated construction of DNA-protein hybrids and functional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Koussa, Mounir A; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P

    2014-05-15

    Recent methods in DNA nanotechnology are enabling the creation of intricate nanostructures through the use of programmable, bottom-up self-assembly. However, structures consisting only of DNA are limited in their ability to act on other biomolecules. Proteins, on the other hand, perform a variety of functions on biological materials, but directed control of the self-assembly process remains a challenge. While DNA-protein hybrids have the potential to provide the best-of-both-worlds, they can be difficult to create as many of the conventional techniques for linking proteins to DNA render proteins dysfunctional. We present here a sortase-based protocol for covalently coupling proteins to DNA with minimal disturbance to protein function. To accomplish this we have developed a two-step process. First, a small synthetic peptide is bioorthogonally and covalently coupled to a DNA oligo using click chemistry. Next, the DNA-peptide chimera is covalently linked to a protein of interest under protein-compatible conditions using the enzyme sortase. Our protocol allows for the simple coupling and purification of a functional DNA-protein hybrid. We use this technique to form oligos bearing cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 protein fragments. Upon incorporation into a linear M13 scaffold, these protein-DNA hybrids serve as the gate to a binary nanoswitch. The outlined protocol is reliable and modular, facilitating the construction of libraries of oligos and proteins that can be combined to form functional DNA-protein nanostructures. These structures will enable a new class of functional nanostructures, which could be used for therapeutic and industrial processes.

  13. Broad specificity profiling of TALENs results in engineered nucleases with improved DNA-cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Guilinger, John P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith; Liu, David R

    2014-04-01

    Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can be designed to cleave chosen DNA sequences, TALENs have activity against related off-target sequences. To better understand TALEN specificity, we profiled 30 unique TALENs with different target sites, array length and domain sequences for their abilities to cleave any of 10(12) potential off-target DNA sequences using in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing. Computational analysis of the selection results predicted 76 off-target substrates in the human genome, 16 of which were accessible and modified by TALENs in human cells. The results suggest that (i) TALE repeats bind DNA relatively independently; (ii) longer TALENs are more tolerant of mismatches yet are more specific in a genomic context; and (iii) excessive DNA-binding energy can lead to reduced TALEN specificity in cells. Based on these findings, we engineered a TALEN variant that exhibits equal on-target cleavage activity but tenfold lower average off-target activity in human cells.

  14. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-02

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  15. Single and multiple molecular beacon probes for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiaojing; Tan, Weihong

    1999-05-01

    Surface immobilizable molecular beacons have been developed for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass plate. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotide probes that have a loop-and-stem structure with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to the two ends of the stem. They only emit intense fluorescence when hybridize to their target molecules. This provides an excellent selectivity for the detection of DNA molecules. We have designed biotinylated molecular beacons which can be immobilized onto a solid surface. The molecular beacon is synthesized using DABCYL as the quencher and an optical stable dye, tetramethylrhodamine, as the fluorophore. Mass spectrometry is used to confirm the synthesized molecular beacon. The molecular beacons have been immobilized onto a silica surface through biotin-avidin binding. The surface immobilized molecular beacons have been used for the detection of target DNA with subnanomolar analytical sensitivity. have also immobilized two different molecular beacons on a silica surface in spatially resolved microscopic regions. The hybridization study of these two different molecular beacon probes has shown excellent selectivity for their target sequences. The newly designed molecular beacons are intended for DNA molecular interaction studies at an interface and for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors for a variety of applications including disease diagnosis, disease mechanism studies, new drug development, and in the investigation of molecular interactions between DNA molecules and other interesting biomolecules.

  16. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  17. Nanomaterial-Assisted Signal Enhancement of Hybridization for DNA Biosensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinhuai; Liu, Jinyun; Yang, Liangbao; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Meiyun; Meng, Fanli; Luo, Tao; Li, Minqiang

    2009-01-01

    Detection of DNA sequences has received broad attention due to its potential applications in a variety of fields. As sensitivity of DNA biosensors is determined by signal variation of hybridization events, the signal enhancement is of great significance for improving the sensitivity in DNA detection, which still remains a great challenge. Nanomaterials, which possess some unique chemical and physical properties caused by nanoscale effects, provide a new opportunity for developing novel nanomaterial-based signal-enhancers for DNA biosensors. In this review, recent progress concerning this field, including some newly-developed signal enhancement approaches using quantum-dots, carbon nanotubes and their composites reported by our group and other researchers are comprehensively summarized. Reports on signal enhancement of DNA biosensors by non-nanomaterials, such as enzymes and polymer reagents, are also reviewed for comparison. Furthermore, the prospects for developing DNA biosensors using nanomaterials as signal-enhancers in future are also indicated. PMID:22399999

  18. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Body fluid identification by integrated analysis of DNA methylation and body fluid-specific microbial DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ajin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-01-01

    Identification of body fluids found at crime scenes provides important information that can support a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. Previous studies have reported that DNA methylation analysis at several tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) enables successful identification of semen, and the detection of certain bacterial DNA can allow for identification of saliva and vaginal fluid. In the present study, a method for detecting bacterial DNA was integrated into a previously reported multiplex methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-polymerase chain reaction. The developed multiplex PCR was modified by the addition of a new semen-specific marker and by including amplicons for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of saliva- and vaginal fluid-specific bacteria to improve the efficacy to detect a specific type of body fluid. Using the developed multiplex system, semen was distinguishable by unmethylation at the USP49, DACT1, and PFN3 tDMRs and by hypermethylation at L81528, and saliva could be identified by detection of saliva-specific bacteria, Veillonella atypica and/or Streptococcus salivarius. Additionally, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood were differentiated from other body fluids by hypomethylation at the PFN3 tDMR and the presence of vaginal fluid-specific bacteria, Lactobacillus crispatus and/or Lactobacillus gasseri. Because the developed multiplex system uses the same biological source of DNA for individual identification profiling and simultaneously analyses various types of body fluid in one PCR reaction, this method will facilitate more efficient body fluid identification in forensic casework.

  20. A Micrograting Sensor for DNA Hybridization and Antibody Human Serum Albumin-Antigen Human Serum Albumin Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chathirat, Naphat; Atthi, Nithi; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Leasen, Suthisa; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Hodak, Jose H.

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor structure comprising silicon nitride (Si3N4) micrograting arrays coated with a spin-on-glass (SOG) material was investigated. This grating structure was located on a silicon groove, which was etched by a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The biosensor was used as a specific detector of DNA molecules and antibody-antigen interactions. In our DNA sensing experiments, the first step was the activation of the grating surface with amine functional groups, followed by attachment of a 23-base oligonucleotide probe layer for hybridization with a complementary target DNA. The sensing device was tested for detecting specific antigen/antibody interactions for human serum albumin (HSA) and antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). The readout system consisted of a white light lamp that illuminated a small spot on the grating surface at normal incidence through a fiber optic probe with a spectrometer used to collect the reflected light through a second fiber. We show that these sensing devices have the capability to detect DNA as well as antigen-antibody binding for HSA. The detection sensitivity for HSA was better than that for DNA mainly owing to the larger size and concomitant refractive index changes upon binding to the sensor. We show that it is possible to quantify the amount of biomolecules bound to the grating surface by measuring the wavelength shift of the reflectance spectra upon exposure to the samples.

  1. Prokaryotic suppression subtractive hybridization PCR cDNA subtraction, a targeted method to identify differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    De Long, Susan K; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology tools can be used to monitor and optimize biological treatment systems, but the application of nucleic acid-based tools has been hindered by the lack of available sequences for environmentally relevant biodegradation genes. The objective of our work was to extend an existing molecular method for eukaryotes to prokaryotes, allowing us to rapidly identify differentially expressed genes for subsequent sequencing. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) PCR cDNA subtraction is a technique that can be used to identify genes that are expressed under specific conditions (e.g., growth on a given pollutant). While excellent methods for eukaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction are available, to our knowledge, no methods previously existed for prokaryotes. This work describes our methodology for prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction, which we validated using a model system: Pseudomonas putida mt-2 degrading toluene. cDNA from P. putida mt-2 grown on toluene (model pollutant) or acetate (control substrate) was subjected to our prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction protocol to generate subtraction clone libraries. Over 90% of the sequenced clones contained gene fragments encoding toluene-related enzymes, and 20 distinct toluene-related genes from three key operons were sequenced. Based on these results, prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction shows promise as a targeted method for gene identification.

  2. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  3. Isolation and characterization of a complementary DNA specific for human aromatase-system cytochrome P-450 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C T; Ledesma, D B; Schulz, T Z; Simpson, E R; Mendelson, C R

    1986-01-01

    A cloned complementary DNA sequence has been isolated from a human placental cDNA library in the bacteriophage expression vector lambda gt11 after screening with polyclonal antibodies against human placental aromatase-system cytochrome P-450 (P-450Arom). A single recombinant clone, lambda hAROM1, was characterized by its ability to generate a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that reacted independently with polyclonal antibodies raised against beta-galactosidase and cytochrome P-450Arom and with monoclonal antibodies specific for cytochrome P-450Arom. The cDNA insert, which was found to be 1.8 kilobases in length, was radiolabeled and used to analyze poly(A)+ RNA isolated from human placenta and total RNA isolated from human adipose stromal cells cultured in the absence or presence of regulatory factors. The radiolabeled cDNA hybridized to several size species of mRNA in both placental and adipose stromal cell RNA fractions. Changes in the levels of adipose stromal cell RNA that hybridized to the cDNA insert were associated with comparable changes in the levels of translatable cytochrome P-450Arom mRNA and aromatase system activity. These findings are indicative that lambda hAROM1 contains DNA sequences complementary to human cytochrome P-450Arom mRNA and are suggestive that regulatory factors affect aromatase activity by altering the transcriptional activity of the cytochrome P-450Arom gene. Images PMID:3018730

  4. Dendritic structure DNA for specific metal ion biosensor based on catalytic hairpin assembly and a sensitive synergistic amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianmin; Jing, Pei; Xue, Shuyan; Xu, Wenju

    2017-01-15

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemical biosensing to Pb(2+) was proposed based on the high specificity of DNAzymes to Pb(2+). The response signal was efficiently amplified by the catalytic hairpin assembly induced by strand replacement reaction and the formation of dendritic structure DNA (DSDNA) by layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, in the presence of Pb(2+), the substrate strand (S1) of the Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes was specifically cleaved by Pb(2+). Secondly, one of the two fragments (rS1) introduced into the electrode surface was hybridized with a hairpin DNA (H1) and further replaced by another hairpin DNA (H2) by the hybridization reaction of H1 with H2. The released rS1 then induced the next hybridization with H1. After repeated cycles, the catalytic recycling assembly of H2 with H1 was completed. Thirdly, two bioconjugates of Pt@Pd nanocages (Pt@PdNCs) labeled with DNA S3/S4 and electroactive toluidine blue (Tb) (Tb-S3-Pt@PdNCs and Tb-S4-Pt@PdNCs) were captured onto the resultant electrode surface through the hybridization of S3 and H2, S3 and S4, resulting in the formation of DSDNA triggered by layer-by-layer assembly. This formed DSDNA greatly facilitated the immobilization of manganese(III) meso-tetrakis (4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) as mimicking enzyme. Under the synergistic catalysis of Pt@PdNCs and MnTMPyP to H2O2 reduction, the effective signal amplification of the developed Pb(2+) biosensor was achieved. As a result, the sensitive detection of the proposed electrochemical strategy for Pb(2+) was greatly improved in the range of 0.1pM-200nM with a detection limit of 0.033pM.

  5. DNA sequence similarity recognition by hybridization to short oligomers

    DOEpatents

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    1999-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences. Data is generated by hybridizing sets of oligomers with target nucleic acids. The data thus generated is manipulated simultaneously with respect to both (i) matching between oligomers and (ii) matching between oligomers and putative reference sequences available in databases. Using data compression methods to manipulate this mutual information, sequences for the target can be constructed.

  6. Inter-specific territoriality in a Canis hybrid zone: spatial segregation between wolves, coyotes, and hybrids.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) generally exhibit intraspecific territoriality manifesting in spatial segregation between adjacent packs. However, previous studies have found a high degree of interspecific spatial overlap between sympatric wolves and coyotes. Eastern wolves (Canis lycaon) are the most common wolf in and around Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada and hybridize with sympatric gray wolves and coyotes. We hypothesized that all Canis types (wolves, coyotes, and hybrids) exhibit a high degree of spatial segregation due to greater genetic, morphologic, and ecological similarities between wolves and coyotes in this hybrid system compared with western North American ecosystems. We used global positioning system telemetry and probabilistic measures of spatial overlap to investigate spatial segregation between adjacent Canis packs. Our hypothesis was supported as: (1) the probability of locating wolves, coyotes, and hybrids within home ranges ([Formula: see text] = 0.05) or core areas ([Formula: see text] < 0.01) of adjacent packs was low; and (2) the amount of shared space use was negligible. Spatial segregation did not vary substantially in relation to genotypes of adjacent packs or local environmental conditions (i.e., harvest regulations or road densities). We provide the first telemetry-based demonstration of spatial segregation between wolves and coyotes, highlighting the novel relationships between Canis types in the Ontario hybrid zone relative to areas where wolves and coyotes are reproductively isolated. Territoriality among Canis may increase the likelihood of eastern wolves joining coyote and hybrid packs, facilitate hybridization, and could play a role in limiting expansion of the genetically distinct APP eastern wolf population.

  7. Active microelectronic array system for DNA hybridization, genotyping and pharmacogenomic applications.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Ron; Heller, Michael J; Tu, Eugene; Forster, Anita H; Radtkey, Ray

    2002-12-01

    Microelectronic arrays have been developed for DNA hybridization analysis of point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, short tandem repeats and gene expression. In addition to a variety of molecular biology and genomic research applications, such devices will also be used for infectious disease detection, genetic and cancer diagnostics, and pharmacogenomic applications. These microelectronic array devices are able to produce defined electric fields on their surfaces that allow charged molecules and other entities to be transported to or from any test site or micro-location on the planar surface of the device. These molecules and entities include DNA, RNA, proteins, enzymes, antibodies and cells. Electronic-based molecule addressing and hybridization can then be carried out, where the electric field is now used to greatly accelerate the hybridization reactions that occur on the selected test sites. When reversed, the electric field can be used to provide an additional parameter for improved hybridization. Special low-conductance buffers have been developed that provide for the rapid transport of the DNA molecules and facilitate the electronic hybridization reactions under conditions that do not support hybridization. Important to the device function is the permeation layer that overcoats the underlying microelectrodes. Generally composed of a porous hydrogel material impregnated with attachment chemistry, this permeation layer prevents the destruction of analytes at the active microelectrode surface, ameliorates the adverse effects of electrolysis products on the sensitive hybridization and affinity reactions, and serves as a support structure for attaching DNA probes and other molecules to the array. The microelectronic chip or array device is incorporated into a cartridge package (NanoChip trade mark cartridge) that provides the electronic, optical, and fluidic interfacing. A complete instrument system (NanoChip trade mark Molecular Biology Workstation

  8. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  9. Development of a diagnostic test for Johne's disease using a DNA hybridization probe.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, S S; Splitter, G A; Welch, R A

    1989-01-01

    A DNA probe, M13 mpHAW71, that detects Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in the fecal material of infected animals was developed for use in the diagnosis of Johne's disease. The probe detected as few as 10(5) M. paratuberculosis when hybridized under stringent conditions to total genomic DNA purified from bovine fecal material. When the probe was used diagnostically, it did not differentiate members of the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare-M. paratuberculosis complex. Compared with culturing, the DNA probe identified 34.4% more mycobacterium-containing fecal samples, and testing took only 72 h to complete. Images PMID:2768445

  10. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  11. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  12. Disposable magnetic DNA sensors for the determination at the attomolar level of a specific enterobacteriaceae family gene.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Oscar A; Campuzano, Susana; Pedrero, María; Pividori, M Isabel; García, Pedro; Pingarrón, José M

    2008-11-01

    Disposable magnetic DNA sensors using an enzyme-amplified strategy for the specific detection of a gene related to the Enterobacteriaceae bacterial family, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated lacZ gene target sequences, has been developed. A biotinylated 25-mer capture probe was attached to streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxidase polymer was attached to the biotinylated target, and the resulting modified magnetic beads were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) modified gold screen-printed electrodes (Au/SPEs). The amperometric response obtained at -0.15 V after the addition of hydrogen peroxide was used to detect the hybridization process. In order to improve the sensitivity of the determination and reduce the assay time, different variables of the assay protocol were optimized. A low detection limit (5.7 fmol) with good stability (RSD = 7.1%, n = 10) was obtained. The DNA nonspecific adsorption at the magnetic beads was negligible, the obtained results thus demonstrating the possibility to detect the hybridization event with great specificity and sensitivity. The developed method was used for the analysis of Escherichia coli DNA fragments (326 bases) in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons extracted from a cell culture. As low as 2.5 aM asymmetric PCR product could be detected with the developed methodology.

  13. Y chromosome--specific DNA sequences in Turner-syndrome mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Gemmill, R M; Pearce-Birge, L; Bixenman, H; Hecht, B K; Allanson, J E

    1987-01-01

    Phenotypic females with Y-chromosomal material in their genome have an increased risk for development of gonadal malignancy. The detection and identification of Y-chromosomal material in these cases can be of critical importance for medical management. Chromosome analysis in four patients with Turner syndrome revealed the characteristic 45,X chromosome complement together with a second cell population containing a small marker chromosome (46,X, + mar). Molecular-hybridization analyses utilizing cloned, Y chromosome-specific DNA sequences were performed to determine whether Y-chromosomal material was present in each patient. Three cases contained some Y chromosome-specific sequences, whereas one case was negative with all four probes that we used. These results were compared with detailed cytogenetic studies--including G-, Q-, and G-11-banding--of the marker chromosomes. In one case in which Y chromosome-specific DNA sequences were demonstrated, the marker chromosome was G-11 negative. These results demonstrate that cytogenetic analysis alone can lead to misidentification of some Y chromosome-derived markers. The combination of cytogenetic and molecular analyses permits a more accurate characterization of anomalous Y chromosomes and in turn provides additional information that can be crucial to the correct medical management of Turner-syndrome patients. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3475977

  14. Specific identification of human papillomavirus type in cervical smears and paraffin sections by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes: a preliminary communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, J.; Gendelman, H.E.; Naghashfar, Z.; Gupta, P.; Rosenshein, N.; Sawada, E.; Woodruff, J.D.; Shah, K.

    1985-01-01

    Cervical Papanicolaou smears and paraffin sections of biopsy specimens obtained from women attending dysplasia clinics were examined for viral DNA sequences by in situ hybridization technique using TVS-labeled cloned recombinant DNA probes of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, and 16. These and one unrelated DNA probe complementary to measles virus RNA were labeled by nick translation using either one or two TVS-labeled nucleotides. Paraffin sections and cervical smears were collected on pretreated slides, hybridized with the probes under stringent or nonstringent conditions for 50 h, and autoradiographed. Additional cervical specimens from the same women were examined for the presence of genus-specific papillomavirus capsid antigen by the immunoperoxidase technique. Preliminary results may be summarized as follows. The infecting virus could be identified in smears as well as in sections. Viral DNA sequences were detected only when there were condylomatous cells in the specimen and in only a proportion of the condylomatous cells. Even under stringent conditions, some specimens reacted with both HPV-6 and HPV-11. In some instances, the cells did not hybridize with any of the three probes even when duplicate specimens contained frankly condylomatous, capsid antigen-positive cells. In situ hybridization of Papanicolaou smears or of tissue sections is a practical method for diagnosis and follow-up of specific papillomavirus infection using routinely collected material.

  15. Shape Analysis of DNA-Au Hybrid Particles by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Urban, Maximilan J; Holder, Isabelle T; Schmid, Marius; Fernandez Espin, Vanesa; Garcia de la Torre, Jose; Hartig, Jörg S; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-08-23

    Current developments in nanotechnology have increased the demand for nanocrystal assemblies with well-defined shapes and tunable sizes. DNA is a particularly well-suited building block in nanoscale assemblies because of its scalable sizes, conformational variability, and convenient self-assembly capabilities via base pairing. In hybrid materials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be assembled into nanoparticle structures with programmable interparticle distances by applying appropriate DNA sequences. However, the development of stoichiometrically defined DNA/NP structures is still challenging since product mixtures are frequently obtained and their purification and characterization is the rate-limiting step in the development of DNA-NP hybrid assemblies. Improvements in nanostructure fractionation and characterization techniques offer great potential for nanotechnology applications in general. This study reports the application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for the characterization of anisotropic DNA-linked metal-crystal assemblies. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy data and the DNA primary sequence, hydrodynamic bead models are set up for the interpretation of the measured frictional ratios and sedimentation coefficients. We demonstrate that the presence of single DNA strands on particle surfaces as well as the shape factors of multiparticle structures in mixtures can be quantitatively described by AUC. This study will significantly broaden the possibilities to analyze mixtures of shape-anisotropic nanoparticle assemblies. By establishing insights into the analysis of nanostructure mixtures based on fundamental principles of sedimentation, a wide range of potential applications in basic research and industry become accessible.

  16. An impedimetric study of DNA hybridization on paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Petri; Pettersson, Fredrik; Pesonen, Markus; Viitala, Tapani; Määttänen, Anni; Österbacka, Ronald; Peltonen, Jouko

    2014-03-07

    In this study, two different supramolecular recognition architectures for impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization have been formed on disposable paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes. The gold electrodes were fabricated using a gold nanoparticle based ink. The first recognition architecture consists of subsequent layers of biotinylated self-assembly monolayer (SAM), streptavidin and biotinylated DNA probe. The other recognition architecture is constructed by immobilization of thiol-functionalized DNA probe (HS-DNA) and subsequent backfill with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUOH) SAM. The binding capacity and selectivity of the recognition architectures were examined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. SPR results showed that the HS-DNA/MUOH system had a higher binding capacity for the complementary DNA target. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the hybridization can be detected with impedimetric spectroscopy in picomol range for both systems. EIS signal indicated a good selectivity for both recognition architectures, whereas SPR showed very high unspecific binding for the HS-DNA/MUOH system. The factors affecting the impedance signal were interpreted in terms of the complexity of the supramolecular architecture. The more complex architecture acts as a less ideal capacitive sensor and the impedance signal is dominated by the resistive elements.

  17. An impedimetric study of DNA hybridization on paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Pettersson, Fredrik; Pesonen, Markus; Viitala, Tapani; Määttänen, Anni; Österbacka, Ronald; Peltonen, Jouko

    2014-03-01

    In this study, two different supramolecular recognition architectures for impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization have been formed on disposable paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes. The gold electrodes were fabricated using a gold nanoparticle based ink. The first recognition architecture consists of subsequent layers of biotinylated self-assembly monolayer (SAM), streptavidin and biotinylated DNA probe. The other recognition architecture is constructed by immobilization of thiol-functionalized DNA probe (HS-DNA) and subsequent backfill with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUOH) SAM. The binding capacity and selectivity of the recognition architectures were examined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. SPR results showed that the HS-DNA/MUOH system had a higher binding capacity for the complementary DNA target. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the hybridization can be detected with impedimetric spectroscopy in picomol range for both systems. EIS signal indicated a good selectivity for both recognition architectures, whereas SPR showed very high unspecific binding for the HS-DNA/MUOH system. The factors affecting the impedance signal were interpreted in terms of the complexity of the supramolecular architecture. The more complex architecture acts as a less ideal capacitive sensor and the impedance signal is dominated by the resistive elements.

  18. Oligonucleotide-directed self-assembly of proteins: semisynthetic DNA--streptavidin hybrid molecules as connectors for the generation of macroscopic arrays and the construction of supramolecular bioconjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, C M; Sano, T; Smith, C L; Cantor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Modified biomolecules were used for the non-covalent assembly of novel bioconjugates. Hybrid molecules were synthesized from short single-stranded DNA and streptavidin by chemical methods using a heterobispecific crosslinker. The covalent attachment of an oligonucleotide moiety to streptavidin provides a specific recognition domain for a complementary nucleic acid sequence, in addition to the four native biotin-binding sites. These bispecific binding capabilities allow the hybrid molecules to serve as versatile connectors in a variety of applications. Bifunctional constructs have been prepared from two complementary hybrid molecules, each previously conjugated to biotinylated immunoglobulin G or alkaline phosphatase. The use of nucleic acid sequences as a template for the formation of an array of proteins is further demonstrated on two size scales. A macroscopic DNA array on a microtiter plate has been transformed into a comparable protein chip. A nano-scale array was made by hybridizing DNA-tagged proteins to specific positions along a RNA or DNA sequence. The generation of supramolecular bioconjugates was shown by quantitative measurements and gel-retardation assays. Images PMID:7530841

  19. High Density Data Storage Systems by DNA Complexes and Nano-Particles from DNA Hybrid Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-20

    Research 2 In-situ Intercalation of Phtharocyanine dye with DNA 11 Intercalation of DNA by various photochromic dyes into... photochromic dyes which are intercalated into DNA double helical structures. It was reported in 2005 that photochromic dyes such as spiropyran derivatives...enhance photochromic responces in DNA wave guide which had a grating structure by using refractive resonances through the wave guide. The design is

  20. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and quantitative microscopy with a charge coupled device camera improve detection of human papillomavirus DNA revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Chignol, M C; Souchier, C; Schmitt, D; Chardonnet, Y

    1994-04-01

    Epithelial cervical CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells containing respectively 600 copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA type 16, 1-2 copies of HPV DNA type 16 and 10-50 copies of HPV DNA type 18 were used as model to detect different quantities of integrated HPV genome. The HPV DNA was identified on cell deposits with specific biotinylated DNA probes either by enzymatic in situ hybridization (EISH) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) involving successively a rabbit anti-biotin antibody, a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody and streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase complex or streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate complex. With brightfield microscopy and EISH, hybridization spots were observed in CaSki and HeLa cells but hardly any in SiHa cells. With fluorescence microscopy and FISH, hybridization spots were clearly seen only on CaSki cell nuclei. In an attempt to improve the detection of low quantities of HPV DNA signals revealed by FISH, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and quantitative microscopy with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera were used. With both LSCM and quantitative microscopy, as few as 1-2 copies of HPV DNA were detected and found to be confined to cell nuclei counterstained with propidium iodide. Under Nomarski phase contrast, a good preservation of the cell structure was observed. With quantitative microscopy, differences in the number, size, total area and integrated fluorescence intensity of hybridization spots per nucleus were revealed between CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Role for RNA:DNA hybrids in origin-independent replication priming in a eukaryotic system

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Ruth; García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Aguilera, Andrés; Wellinger, Ralf Erik

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at defined replication origins along eukaryotic chromosomes, ensuring complete genome duplication within a single S-phase. A key feature of replication origins is their ability to control the onset of DNA synthesis mediated by DNA polymerase-α and its intrinsic RNA primase activity. Here, we describe a novel origin-independent replication process that is mediated by transcription. RNA polymerase I transcription constraints lead to persistent RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops) that prime replication in the ribosomal DNA locus. Our results suggest that eukaryotic genomes have developed tools to prevent R-loop–mediated replication events that potentially contribute to copy number variation, particularly relevant to carcinogenesis. PMID:25902524

  2. Asymmetric hybridization and gene flow between Joshua trees (Agavaceae: Yucca) reflect differences in pollinator host specificity.

    PubMed

    Starr, Tyler N; Gadek, Katherine E; Yoder, Jeremy B; Flatz, Ramona; Smith, Christopher I

    2013-01-01

    The angiosperms are by far the largest group of terrestrial plants. Their spectacular diversity is often attributed to specialized pollination. Obligate pollination mutualisms where both a plant and its pollinator are dependent upon one another for reproduction are thought to be prone to rapid diversification through co-evolution and pollinator isolation. However, few studies have evaluated the degree to which pollinators actually mediate reproductive isolation in these systems. Here, we examine evidence for hybridization and gene flow between two subspecies of Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia brevifolia and Yucca brevifolia jaegeriana) pollinated by two sister species of yucca moth. Previous work indicated that the pollinators differ in host specificity, and DNA sequence data suggested asymmetric introgression between the tree subspecies. Through intensive sampling in a zone of sympatry, a large number of morphologically intermediate trees were identified. These included trees with floral characters typical of Y. b. jaegeriana, but vegetative features typical of Y. b. brevifolia. The opposite combination-Y. b. brevifolia flowers with Y. b. jaegeriana vegetative morphology-never occurred. Microsatellite genotyping revealed a high frequency of genetically admixed, hybrid trees. Coalescent-based estimates of migration indicated significant gene flow between the subspecies and that the direction of gene flow matches differences in pollinator host fidelity. The data suggest that pollinator behaviour determines the magnitude and direction of gene flow between the two subspecies, but that specialized pollination alone is not sufficient to maintain species boundaries. Natural selection may be required to maintain phenotypic differences in the face of ongoing gene flow.

  3. A novel immobilization strategy for electrochemical detection of cancer biomarkers: DNA-directed immobilization of aptamer sensors for sensitive detection of prostate specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhugen; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Goggins, Sean; Frost, Christopher G; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-04-21

    We report on a novel strategy for DNA aptamer immobilization to develop sensitive electrochemical detection of a protein biomarker, with prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a case biomarker. Thiolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was co-immobilized with 3-mercapto-1-propanol on gold electrodes, and used as a scaffold for DNA aptamer attachment through hybridization of the aptamer overhang (so-called "DNA-directed immobilization aptamer sensors", DDIAS). In the approach, the complementary DNA aptamer against PSA was assembled by the probe ssDNA onto the electrode to detect PSA; or the probe ssDNA directly hybridized with a complementary DNA aptamer/PSA complex following their pre-incubation in solution, so-called 'on-chip' and 'in-solution' methods, respectively. A double stranded DNA intercalator with a ferrocenyl (Fc) redox marker was synthesized to evaluate the feasibility of the strategy. The results demonstrate that the 'in-solution' method offers a favourable medium (in a homogeneous solution) for the binding between the aptamer and PSA, which shows to be more efficient than the 'on-chip' approach. DDIAS shows promising analytical performance under optimized conditions, with a limit of detection in the range of fM and low non-specific adsorption.

  4. A microfluidic-based electrochemical biochip for label-free DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-09-10

    Miniaturization of analytical benchtop procedures into the micro-scale provides significant advantages in regards to reaction time, cost, and integration of pre-processing steps. Utilizing these devices towards the analysis of DNA hybridization events is important because it offers a technology for real time assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care for various diseases. However, when the device footprint decreases the dominance of various physical phenomena increases. These phenomena influence the fabrication precision and operation reliability of the device. Therefore, there is a great need to accurately fabricate and operate these devices in a reproducible manner in order to improve the overall performance. Here, we describe the protocols and the methods used for the fabrication and the operation of a microfluidic-based electrochemical biochip for accurate analysis of DNA hybridization events. The biochip is composed of two parts: a microfluidic chip with three parallel micro-channels made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and a 3 x 3 arrayed electrochemical micro-chip. The DNA hybridization events are detected using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The EIS analysis enables monitoring variations of the properties of the electrochemical system that are dominant at these length scales. With the ability to monitor changes of both charge transfer and diffusional resistance with the biosensor, we demonstrate the selectivity to complementary ssDNA targets, a calculated detection limit of 3.8 nM, and a 13% cross-reactivity with other non-complementary ssDNA following 20 min of incubation. This methodology can improve the performance of miniaturized devices by elucidating on the behavior of diffusion at the micro-scale regime and by enabling the study of DNA hybridization events.

  5. A Microfluidic-based Electrochemical Biochip for Label-free DNA Hybridization Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H.; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturization of analytical benchtop procedures into the micro-scale provides significant advantages in regards to reaction time, cost, and integration of pre-processing steps. Utilizing these devices towards the analysis of DNA hybridization events is important because it offers a technology for real time assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care for various diseases. However, when the device footprint decreases the dominance of various physical phenomena increases. These phenomena influence the fabrication precision and operation reliability of the device. Therefore, there is a great need to accurately fabricate and operate these devices in a reproducible manner in order to improve the overall performance. Here, we describe the protocols and the methods used for the fabrication and the operation of a microfluidic-based electrochemical biochip for accurate analysis of DNA hybridization events. The biochip is composed of two parts: a microfluidic chip with three parallel micro-channels made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and a 3 x 3 arrayed electrochemical micro-chip. The DNA hybridization events are detected using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The EIS analysis enables monitoring variations of the properties of the electrochemical system that are dominant at these length scales. With the ability to monitor changes of both charge transfer and diffusional resistance with the biosensor, we demonstrate the selectivity to complementary ssDNA targets, a calculated detection limit of 3.8 nM, and a 13% cross-reactivity with other non-complementary ssDNA following 20 min of incubation. This methodology can improve the performance of miniaturized devices by elucidating on the behavior of diffusion at the micro-scale regime and by enabling the study of DNA hybridization events. PMID:25285529

  6. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    PubMed

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids.

  7. The minimal amount of starting DNA for Agilent’s hybrid capture-based targeted massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jongsuk; Son, Dae-Soon; Jeon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Gahee; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Targeted capture massively parallel sequencing is increasingly being used in clinical settings, and as costs continue to decline, use of this technology may become routine in health care. However, a limited amount of tissue has often been a challenge in meeting quality requirements. To offer a practical guideline for the minimum amount of input DNA for targeted sequencing, we optimized and evaluated the performance of targeted sequencing depending on the input DNA amount. First, using various amounts of input DNA, we compared commercially available library construction kits and selected Agilent’s SureSelect-XT and KAPA Biosystems’ Hyper Prep kits as the kits most compatible with targeted deep sequencing using Agilent’s SureSelect custom capture. Then, we optimized the adapter ligation conditions of the Hyper Prep kit to improve library construction efficiency and adapted multiplexed hybrid selection to reduce the cost of sequencing. In this study, we systematically evaluated the performance of the optimized protocol depending on the amount of input DNA, ranging from 6.25 to 200 ng, suggesting the minimal input DNA amounts based on coverage depths required for specific applications. PMID:27220682

  8. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  9. DNA Hybridization-Mediated Liposome Fusion at the Aqueous Liquid Crystal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Patrick S.; Mohan, Praveena; Goodwin, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of receptor-mediated bilayer fusion in cellular biology motivates development of biomimetic strategies for studying fusogenic mechanisms. An approach is reported here for monitoring receptor-mediated fusion that exploits the unique physical and optical properties of liquid crystals (LC). PEG-functionalized lipids are used to create an interfacial environment capable of inhibiting spontaneous liposome fusion with an aqueous/LC interface. Then, DNA hybridization between oligonucleotides within bulk phase liposomes and a PEG-lipid monolayer at an aqueous/LC interface is exploited to induce receptor-mediated liposome fusion. These hybridization events induce strain within the liposome bilayer, promote lipid mixing with the LC interface, and consequently create an interfacial environment favoring re-orientation of the LC to a homeotropic (perpendicular) state. Furthermore, the bi-functionality of aptamers is exploited to modulate DNA hybridization-mediated liposome fusion by regulating the availability of the appropriate ligand (i.e., thrombin). Here, a LC-based approach for monitoring receptor (i.e., DNA hybridization)-mediated liposome fusion is demonstrated, liposome properties that dictate fusion dynamics are explored, and an example of how this approach may be used in a biosensing scheme is provided. PMID:25506314

  10. Design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins using hybrid SVM-PSSM method.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shinn-Ying; Yu, Fu-Chieh; Chang, Chia-Yun; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences. As a result, we propose a hybrid method using support vector machine (SVM) in conjunction with evolutionary information of amino acid sequences in terms of their position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) for prediction of DNA-binding sites. Considering the numbers of binding and non-binding residues in proteins are significantly unequal, two additional weights as well as SVM parameters are analyzed and adopted to maximize net prediction (NP, an average of sensitivity and specificity) accuracy. To evaluate the generalization ability of the proposed method SVM-PSSM, a DNA-binding dataset PDC-59 consisting of 59 protein chains with low sequence identity on each other is additionally established. The SVM-based method using the same six-fold cross-validation procedure and PSSM features has NP=80.15% for the training dataset PDNA-62 and NP=69.54% for the test dataset PDC-59, which are much better than the existing neural network-based method by increasing the NP values for training and test accuracies up to 13.45% and 16.53%, respectively. Simulation results reveal that SVM-PSSM performs well in predicting DNA-binding sites of novel proteins from amino acid sequences.

  11. Variability of ribosomal DNA sites in Festuca pratensis, Lolium perenne, and their intergeneric hybrids, revealed by FISH and GISH.

    PubMed

    Ksiazczyk, T; Taciak, M; Zwierzykowski, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the variability of chromosomal location and number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites in some diploid and autotetraploid Festuca pratensis and Lolium perenne cultivars, as well as on identification of rDNA-bearing chromosomes in their triploid and tetraploid F. pratensis × L. perenne hybrids. The rDNA loci were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 25S rDNA probes, and the origin of parental genomes was verified by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) with L. perenne genomic DNA as a probe, and F. pratensis genomic DNA as a block. FISH detected variation in the number and chromosomal location of both 5S and 45S rDNA sites. In F. pratensis mostly additional signals of 5S rDNA loci occurred, as compared with standard F. pratensis karyotypes. Losses of 45S rDNA loci were more frequent in L. perenne cultivars and intergeneric hybrids. Comparison of the F. pratensis and L. perenne genomes approved a higher number of rDNA sites as well as variation in chromosomal rDNA location in L. perenne. A greater instability of F. pratensis-genome-like and L. perenne-genome-like chromosomes in tetraploid hybrids was revealed, indicating gains and losses of rDNA loci, respectively. Our data indicate that the rDNA loci physically mapped on chromosomes 2 and 3 in F. pratensis and on chromosome 3 in L. perenne are useful markers for these chromosomes in intergeneric Festuca × Lolium hybrids.

  12. DNA hairpins destabilize duplexes primarily by promoting melting rather than by inhibiting hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, John S.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Šulc, Petr; Shaw, Liam P.; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. Using oxDNA, a nucleotide level coarse-grained model of DNA, we study how hairpins influence the rate and reaction pathways of DNA hybridzation. We compare to experimental systems studied by Gao et al. (1) and find that 3-base pair hairpins reduce the hybridization rate by a factor of 2, and 4-base pair hairpins by a factor of 10, compared to DNA with limited secondary structure, which is in good agreement with experiments. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ∼100 and ∼2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, and significantly lower the free energy barrier for dissociation. These results should assist experimentalists in designing sequences to be used in DNA nanotechnology, by putting limits on the suppression of hybridization reaction rates through the use of hairpins and offering the possibility of deliberately increasing dissociation rates by incorporating hairpins into single strands. PMID:26056172

  13. PNA-DNA hybridization study using labeled streptavidin by voltammetry and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Tiefenauer, Louis; Tian, Shengjun; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    Using ferrocene-streptavidin conjugates as amplifiers, we recently have demonstrated the simultaneous detection of DNA hybridization to peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-modified gold surfaces at the femtomole level by electrochemical and surface plasmon resonance techniques (Liu, J.; Tian, S.; Tiefenauer, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Knoll, W. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 2756-2761). In this paper, a detailed study of the binding behavior of PNA-DNA is presented by square wave voltammetry and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The different binding constants for fully matched and single-mismatched DNA were obtained. The effect of the buffer concentration on the PNA-DNA hybrids was investigated using labeled streptavidin by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and SPFS. At high ionic strength, both the CV and SPFS signals were restrained dramatically, which is most probably due to a conformational change of the short-strand PNA-DNA helices on the surface. We conclude that the combination of electrochemical techniques with SPFS is very useful for the study of short DNA structure transformation.

  14. Human chromosome-specific DNA libraries: construction and availability

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.; Albright, K.L.; Allen, N.A.; Aubuchon, M.R.; Bartholdi, M.F.; Brown, N.C.; Campbell, E.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Clark, L.M.; Cram, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    The goal of the National Laboratory Gene Library Project at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories is the production of chromosome-specific human gene libraries and their distribution to the scientific community for studies of the molecular biology of genes and chromosomes, and for the study and diagnosis of genetic disease. The specific aim of Phase I of the project is the production of complete digest (4 kb average insert size) libraries from each of the 24 human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting. The bacteriophage vector is Charon 21A, which has both Eco R1 and Hind III insertion sites accommodating human DNA fragments up to 9.1 kb in size. Each laboratory has undertaken production of a complete set of chromosome-specific libraries, Los Alamos with Eco R1 and Livermore with Hind III; most of this task has now been accomplished. Close to 1200 library aliquots have been sent to about 300 laboratories world-wide through February 1986, at which time repository and distribution functions were transferred to the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Following Phase I, libraries will be constructed with large inserts in a more advanced, recently developed bacteriophage vector (about 20 kb inserts) or in a cosmid vector (about 40 kb inserts), and with characteristics better suited to basic studies of gene structure and function.

  15. Label-free DNA hybridization detection and single base-mismatch discrimination using CE-ICP-MS assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Shao-kai; Yang, Jia-lin; Jiang, Yan

    2011-12-07

    Detecting a specific DNA sequence and discriminating single base-mismatch is critical to clinical diagnosis, paternity testing, forensic sciences, food and drug industry, pathology, genetics, environmental monitoring, and anti-bioterrorism. To this end, capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method is developed using the displacing interaction between the target ssDNA and the competitor Hg(2+) for the first time. The thymine-rich capture ssDNA 1 is interacted with the competitor Hg(2+), forming an assembled complex in a hairpin-structure between the thymine bases arrangement at both sides of the capture ssDNA 1. In the presence of a target ssDNA with stronger affinity than that of the competitor Hg(2+), the energetically favorable hybridization between capture ssDNA 1 and the target ssDNA destroys the hairpin-structure and releases the competitor as free Hg(2+), which was then read out and accurately quantified by CE-ICP-MS assay. Under the optimal CE separation conditions, free Hg(2+) ions and its capture ssDNA 1 adduct were baseline separated and detected on-line by ICP-MS; the increased peak intensity of free Hg(2+) against the concentration of perfectly complementary target ssDNA was linear over the concentration range of 30-600 nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 8 nmol L(-1) (3s, n = 11) in the pre-incubated mixture containing 1 μmol L(-1) Hg(2+) and 0.2 μmol L(-1) capture ssDNA 1. This new assay method is simple in design since any target ssDNA binding can in principle result in free Hg(2+) release by 6-fold Hg(2+) signal amplification, avoiding oligonucleotide labeling or assistance by excess signal transducer and signal reporter to read out the target. Due to element-specific detection of ICP-MS in our assay procedure, the interference from the autofluorescence of substrata was eliminated.

  16. An enzyme-free surface plasmon resonance biosensing strategy for detection of DNA and small molecule based on nonlinear hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Yujian; Wu, Jiangling; Li, Xinmin; Cheng, Quan; Ding, Shijia

    2017-01-15

    A label-free and enzyme-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing strategy has been developed for highly sensitive and specific detection of target DNA by employing the nonlinear hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification. Nonlinear HCR is a hairpin-free system in which double-stranded DNA monomers could dendritically assemble into highly branched nanostructure upon introducing a trigger sequence. The target DNA partly hybridizes with capture probe on the gold sensing chip and the unpaired fragment of target DNA works as a trigger to initiate the nonlinear HCR, forming a chain-branching growth of DNA dendrimer by self-assembly. Real-time amplified SPR response is observed upon the introduction of nonlinear HCR system. The method is capable of detecting target DNA at the concentration down to 0.85 pM in 60min with a dynamic range from 1 pM to 1000 pM, and could discriminate target DNA from mismatched sequences. This biosensing strategy exhibits good reproducibility and precision, and has been successfully applied for detection of target DNA in complex sample matrices. In addition, the nonlinear HCR based SPR biosensing methodology is extended to the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by aptamer recognition. Thus, the versatile method might become a potential alternative tool for biomolecule detection in medical research and early clinical diagnosis.

  17. Molecular genetic survey of European mistletoe (Viscum album) subspecies with allele-specific and dCAPS type markers specific for chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Stefanowicz, Justyna; ŁUczkiewicz, Maria

    2003-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative content of mistletoe metabolites, and bioactivity of extracts is related to the subspecies of Viscum album L. These were indicated to be genetically distinct and host specific. We aimed to check (i) whether the specificity is strict and (ii) how frequently hybridization occurs among the subspecies. We designed two sets of allele-specific and dCAPS molecular genetic markers that would facilitate identification of Viscum album L. subspecies and their hybrid derivatives on the basis of chloroplast trnH(GUG)- trnK(UUU) and nuclear rDNA ITS1&2 sequences. Out of 118 plants surveyed, 103 displayed characteristics that confirmed strict host specificity of the subspecies, in addition, the results were compliant between nuclear and chloroplast markers showing no indication of hybridization among subspecies. From 15 samples that showed deviations from this model 13 came from the Mediterranean Sea basin, and only two originated from Central and Western Europe. Abbreviations. dCAPS:derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence ITS1&2:Internal Transcribed Spacers 1&2 MAMA:Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay

  18. Hybridization, mitochondrial DNA phylogeography, and prediction of the early stages of reproductive isolation: lessons from New Zealand cicadas (genus Kikihia).

    PubMed

    Marshall, David C; Hill, Kathy B R; Cooley, John R; Simon, Chris

    2011-07-01

    One of the major tenets of the modern synthesis is that genetic differentiation among subpopulations is translated over time into genetic differentiation among species. Phylogeographic exploration is therefore essential to the study of speciation because it can reveal the presence of subpopulations that may go on to become species or that may already represent cryptic species. Acoustic species-specific mating signals provide a significant advantage for the recognition of cryptic or incipient species. Because the majority of species do not have such easily recognized premating signals, data from acoustically signaling species can serve as a valuable heuristic tool. Acoustic signals are also convenient tools for recognizing hybridization events. Here, we demonstrate that evidence of hybridization in the form of intermediate song phenotypes is present in many contact zones between species of the New Zealand grass cicadas of the Kikihia muta species complex and that recurring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression has created misleading patterns that make it difficult to identify certain taxa using song or mtDNA alone. In one case, introgression appears to have occurred between allopatric taxa by dispersal of introgressed populations of an intermediary species ("hybridization by proxy"). We also present a comparison of mtDNA-tree- and song-based taxonomies obtained for the K. muta complex. We find that 12 mtDNA candidate species are identified using shifts in phylogenetic branching rate found by a single-threshold mixed Yule-coalescent lineage model, while only 7 candidate species are identified using songs. Results from the Yule-coalescent model are dependent on factors such as the number of modeled thresholds and the inclusion of duplicate haplotypes. Genetic distances within song species reach a maximum at about 0.028 substitutions/site when likely cases of hybridization and introgression are excluded. Large genetic breaks or "gaps" are not observed between some

  19. Hybrid origin of Baltic salmon-specific parasite Gyrodactylus salaris: a model for speciation by host switch for hemiclonal organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuusela, Jussi; Zietara, Marek S; Lumme, J

    2007-12-01

    Host switching explains the high species number of ectoparasitic, viviparous, mainly parthenogenetic but potentially hermaphroditic flatworms of the genus Gyrodactylus. The starlike mitochondrial phylogeny of Gyrodactylus salaris suggested parallel divergence of several clades on grayling (also named as Gyrodactylus thymalli) and an embedded sister clade on Baltic salmon. The hypothesis that the parasite switched from grayling to salmon during the glacial diaspora was tested using a 493-bp nuclear DNA marker ADNAM1. The parasites on salmon in lakes Onega and Ladoga were heterozygous for divergent ADNAM1 alleles WS1 and BS1, found as nearly fixed in grayling parasites in the White Sea and Baltic Sea basins, respectively. In the Baltic salmon-specific mtDNA clade, the WS/BS heterozygosity was maintained in 23 out of the 24 local clones. The permanently heterozygous clade was endemic in the Baltic Sea basin, and it had accumulated variation in mtDNA (31 variable sites on 1600 bp) and in the alleles of the nuclear locus (two point mutations and three nucleotide conversions along 493 bp). Mendelian shuffling of the nuclear alleles between the local clones indicated rare sex within the clade, but the WS/BS heterozygosity was lost in only one salmon hatchery clone, which was heterozygous WS1/WS3. The Baltic salmon-specific G. salaris lineage was monophyletic, descending from a single historical hybridization and consequential host switch, frozen by permanent heterozygosity. A possible time for the hybridization of grayling parasite strains from the White Sea and Baltic Sea basins was during the Eemian interglacial 132 000 years bp. Strains having a separate divergent mtDNA observed on farmed rainbow trout, and on salmon in Russian lake Kuito were suggested to be clones derived from secondary and tertiary recombination events.

  20. Nuclear corroboration of DNA-DNA hybridization in deep phylogenies of hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines: the phylogenetic utility of ZENK (ii).

    PubMed

    Chubb, Alison L

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents the phylogenetic utility of ZENK at the avian intra-ordinal level using hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines as case studies. ZENK sequences (1.7 kb) were used to reconstruct separate gene trees containing the major lineages of each group, and the three trees were examined for congruence with existing DNA-DNA hybridization trees. The results indicate both that ZENK is an appropriate nuclear marker for resolving relationships deep in the avian tree, and that many relationships within these three particular groups are congruent among the different datasets. Specifically, within hummingbirds there was topological agreement that the major hummingbird lineages diverged in a graded manner from the "hermits," to the "mangoes," to the "coquettes," to the "emeralds," and finally to a sister relationship between the "mountain-gems" and the "bees." Concerning swifts, the deepest divergences were congruent: treeswifts (Hemiprocnidae) were sister to the typical swifts (Apodidae), and the subfamily Apodinae was monophyletic relative to Cypseloidinae. Within Apodinae, however, were short, unresolved branches among the swiftlets, spinetails, and more typical swifts; a finding which coincides with other datasets. Within passerine birds, there was congruent support for monophyly of sub-oscines and oscines, and within sub-oscines, for monophyly of New World groups relative to the Old World lineages. New World sub-oscines split into superfamilies Furnaroidea and Tyrannoidea, with the Tyrannoid relationships completely congruent among ZENK and DNA-DNA hybridization trees. Within Furnaroidea, however, there was some incongruence regarding the positions of Thamnophilidae and Formicariidae. Concerning oscine passerines, both datasets showed a split between Corvida and Passerida and confirmed the traditional membership of passerid superfamilies Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea. Monophyly of Sylvioidea, however, remained uncertain, as did the relationships among the

  1. A hybrid all-atom/coarse grain model for multiscale simulations of DNA.

    PubMed

    Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Dans, Pablo Daniel; Pantano, Sergio

    2011-10-28

    Hybrid simulations of molecular systems, which combine all-atom (AA) with simplified (or coarse grain, CG) representations, propose an advantageous alternative to gain atomistic details on relevant regions while getting profit from the speedup of treating a bigger part of the system at the CG level. Here we present a reduced set of parameters derived to treat a hybrid interface in DNA simulations. Our method allows us to forthrightly link a state-of-the-art force field for AA simulations of DNA with a CG representation developed by our group. We show that no modification is needed for any of the existing residues (neither AA nor CG). Only the bonding parameters at the hybrid interface are enough to produce a smooth transition of electrostatic, mechanic and dynamic features in different AA/CG systems, which are studied by molecular dynamics simulations using an implicit solvent. The simplicity of the approach potentially permits us to study the effect of mutations/modifications as well as DNA binding molecules at the atomistic level within a significantly larger DNA scaffold considered at the CG level. Since all the interactions are computed within the same classical Hamiltonian, the extension to a quantum/classical/coarse-grain multilayer approach using QM/MM modules implemented in widely used simulation packages is straightforward.

  2. Demonstration of paternal inheritance of plastids in Picea (Pinaceae). [Hybridization of cloned, sup 32 -P labeled, petunia cpDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was purified from Picea glauca, P. pungens, P. engelmannii, and P. omorika, and was digested with several restriction endonucleases. Interspecific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of cpDNA were identified. The RFLPs were identified as cpDNA by the hybridization of cloned, {sup 32}-P labeled, petunia cpDNA to the polymorphic bands, and by the lack of hybridization of a cloned and labeled mtDNA probe from maize. Chloroplast DNA RFLPs that showed no intraspecific variation when examined across the natural range for each species, were used as markers to follow the inheritance of plastids in interspecific hybrids. The inheritance of plastids was determined for F{sub 1}-hybrids from reciprocal crosses of P. glauca and P. pungens, P. glauca and P. omorika, and F{sub 1}-hybrids of P. engelmannii x pungens. All 31 F{sub 1}-hybrids examined showed the cpDNA genotypes of the pollen parent, or the paternal species.

  3. A hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora x P. sylvestris hybrids inferred from sequence analysis of chloroplast DNA and morphological characters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To confirm a hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora × P. sylvestris in Jilin, China and to study whether shoot apex morphology of 4-year old seedlings can be correlated with the sequence of a chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat marker (cpDNA SSR), needles and seeds from P. densiflora, P. syl...

  4. Biologically meaningful expression profiling across species using heterologous hybridization to a cDNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Renn, Susan CP; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Hofmann, Hans A

    2004-01-01

    Background Unravelling the path from genotype to phenotype, as it is influenced by an organism's environment, is one of the central goals in biology. Gene expression profiling by means of microarrays has become very prominent in this endeavour, although resources exist only for relatively few model systems. As genomics has matured into a comparative research program, expression profiling now also provides a powerful tool for non-traditional model systems to elucidate the molecular basis of complex traits. Results Here we present a microarray constructed with ~4500 features, derived from a brain-specific cDNA library for the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni (Perciformes). Heterologous hybridization, targeting RNA to an array constructed for a different species, is used for eight different fish species. We quantified the concordance in gene expression profiles across these species (number of genes and fold-changes). Although most robust when target RNA is derived from closely related species (<10 MA divergence time), our results showed consistent profiles for other closely related taxa (~65 MA divergence time) and, to a lesser extent, even very distantly related species (>200 MA divergence time). Conclusion This strategy overcomes some of the restrictions imposed on model systems that are of importance for evolutionary and ecological studies, but for which only limited sequence information is available. Our work validates the use of expression profiling for functional genomics within a comparative framework and provides a foundation for the molecular and cellular analysis of complex traits in a wide range of organisms. PMID:15238158

  5. Neighboring genes for DNA-binding proteins rescue male sterility in Drosophila hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Liénard, Marjorie A.; Araripe, Luciana O.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Crosses between closely related animal species often result in male hybrids that are sterile, and the molecular and functional basis of genetic factors for hybrid male sterility is of great interest. Here, we report a molecular and functional analysis of HMS1, a region of 9.2 kb in chromosome 3 of Drosophila mauritiana, which results in virtually complete hybrid male sterility when homozygous in the genetic background of sibling species Drosophila simulans. The HMS1 region contains two strong candidate genes for the genetic incompatibility, agt and Taf1. Both encode unrelated DNA-binding proteins, agt for an alkyl-cysteine-S-alkyltransferase and Taf1 for a subunit of transcription factor TFIID that serves as a multifunctional transcriptional regulator. The contribution of each gene to hybrid male sterility was assessed by means of germ-line transformation, with constructs containing complete agt and Taf1 genomic sequences as well as various chimeric constructs. Both agt and Taf1 contribute about equally to HMS1 hybrid male sterility. Transgenes containing either locus rescue sterility in about one-half of the males, and among fertile males the number of offspring is in the normal range. This finding suggests compensatory proliferation of the rescued, nondysfunctional germ cells. Results with chimeric transgenes imply that the hybrid incompatibilities result from interactions among nucleotide differences residing along both agt and Taf1. Our results challenge a number of preliminary generalizations about the molecular and functional basis of hybrid male sterility, and strongly reinforce the role of DNA-binding proteins as a class of genes contributing to the maintenance of postzygotic reproductive isolation. PMID:27357670

  6. Hybrid Origins of Citrus Varieties Inferred from DNA Marker Analysis of Nuclear and Organelle Genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tokurou; Kitajima, Akira; Nonaka, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Goto, Shingo; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Mochizuki, Takako; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2016-01-01

    Most indigenous citrus varieties are assumed to be natural hybrids, but their parentage has so far been determined in only a few cases because of their wide genetic diversity and the low transferability of DNA markers. Here we infer the parentage of indigenous citrus varieties using simple sequence repeat and indel markers developed from various citrus genome sequence resources. Parentage tests with 122 known hybrids using the selected DNA markers certify their transferability among those hybrids. Identity tests confirm that most variant strains are selected mutants, but we find four types of kunenbo (Citrus nobilis) and three types of tachibana (Citrus tachibana) for which we suggest different origins. Structure analysis with DNA markers that are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deduce three basic taxa coinciding with the current understanding of citrus ancestors. Genotyping analysis of 101 indigenous citrus varieties with 123 selected DNA markers infers the parentages of 22 indigenous citrus varieties including Satsuma, Temple, and iyo, and single parents of 45 indigenous citrus varieties, including kunenbo, C. ichangensis, and Ichang lemon by allele-sharing and parentage tests. Genotyping analysis of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes using 11 DNA markers classifies their cytoplasmic genotypes into 18 categories and deduces the combination of seed and pollen parents. Likelihood ratio analysis verifies the inferred parentages with significant scores. The reconstructed genealogy identifies 12 types of varieties consisting of Kishu, kunenbo, yuzu, koji, sour orange, dancy, kobeni mikan, sweet orange, tachibana, Cleopatra, willowleaf mandarin, and pummelo, which have played pivotal roles in the occurrence of these indigenous varieties. The inferred parentage of the indigenous varieties confirms their hybrid origins, as found by recent studies.

  7. Hybrid Origins of Citrus Varieties Inferred from DNA Marker Analysis of Nuclear and Organelle Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Akira; Nonaka, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Goto, Shingo; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Mochizuki, Takako; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2016-01-01

    Most indigenous citrus varieties are assumed to be natural hybrids, but their parentage has so far been determined in only a few cases because of their wide genetic diversity and the low transferability of DNA markers. Here we infer the parentage of indigenous citrus varieties using simple sequence repeat and indel markers developed from various citrus genome sequence resources. Parentage tests with 122 known hybrids using the selected DNA markers certify their transferability among those hybrids. Identity tests confirm that most variant strains are selected mutants, but we find four types of kunenbo (Citrus nobilis) and three types of tachibana (Citrus tachibana) for which we suggest different origins. Structure analysis with DNA markers that are in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium deduce three basic taxa coinciding with the current understanding of citrus ancestors. Genotyping analysis of 101 indigenous citrus varieties with 123 selected DNA markers infers the parentages of 22 indigenous citrus varieties including Satsuma, Temple, and iyo, and single parents of 45 indigenous citrus varieties, including kunenbo, C. ichangensis, and Ichang lemon by allele-sharing and parentage tests. Genotyping analysis of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes using 11 DNA markers classifies their cytoplasmic genotypes into 18 categories and deduces the combination of seed and pollen parents. Likelihood ratio analysis verifies the inferred parentages with significant scores. The reconstructed genealogy identifies 12 types of varieties consisting of Kishu, kunenbo, yuzu, koji, sour orange, dancy, kobeni mikan, sweet orange, tachibana, Cleopatra, willowleaf mandarin, and pummelo, which have played pivotal roles in the occurrence of these indigenous varieties. The inferred parentage of the indigenous varieties confirms their hybrid origins, as found by recent studies. PMID:27902727

  8. Quantitative high-resolution sensing of DNA hybridization using magnetic tweezers with evanescent illumination.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Piercen M; Park, Jin Seon; Vezenov, Dmitri

    2011-02-01

    We applied the combined approach of evanescent nanometry and force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers to quantify the degree of hybridization of a single synthetic single-stranded DNA oligomer to a resolution approaching a single-base. In this setup, the 200 nucleotide long DNA was covalently attached to the surface of an optically transparent solid support at one end and to the surface of a superparamagnetic fluorescent microsphere (force probe) at the other end. The force was applied to the probes using an electromagnet. The end-to-end molecular distance (i.e. out-of-image-plane position of the force probe) was determined from the intensity of the probe fluorescence image observed with total-internal reflectance microscopy. An equation of state for single stranded DNA molecules under tension (extensible freely jointed chain) was used to derive the penetration depth of the evanescent field and to calibrate the magnetic properties of the force probes. The parameters of the magnetic response of the force probes obtained from the equation of state remained constant when changing the penetration depth, indicating a robust calibration procedure. The results of such a calibration were also confirmed using independently measured probe-surface distances for probes mounted onto cantilevers of an atomic force microscope. Upon hybridization of the complementary 50 nucleotide-long oligomer to the surface-bound 200-mer, the changes in the force-distance curves were consistent with the quantitative conversion of 25% of the original single-stranded DNA to its double-stranded form, which was modeled as an elastic rod. The method presented here for quantifying the hybridization state of the single DNA molecules has potential for determining the degree of hybridization of individual molecules in a single molecule array with high accuracy.

  9. The first determination of DNA sequence of a specific gene.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Masayori

    2016-05-10

    How and when the first DNA sequence of a gene was determined? In 1977, F. Sanger came up with an innovative technology to sequence DNA by using chain terminators, and determined the entire DNA sequence of the 5375-base genome of bacteriophage φX 174 (Sanger et al., 1977). While this Sanger's achievement has been recognized as the first DNA sequencing of genes, we had determined DNA sequence of a gene, albeit a partial sequence, 11 years before the Sanger's DNA sequence (Okada et al., 1966).

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  11. Partial replication of UV-irradiated T4 bacteriophage DNA results in amplification of specific genetic areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, S.; Vogelbacker, H.H.; Restifo, L.L.; Mattson, T.; Kozinski, A.W.

    1981-11-01

    Upon infection of Escherichia coli with bormodeoxyuridine-labeled T4 phage that had received 10 lethal hits of UV irradiation, a sizable amount of phage DNA was synthesized (approximately 36 phage equivalent units of DNA per infected bacterium), although very little multiplicity reactivation occurs. This progeny DNA was isolated and analyzed. This DNA was biased in its genetic representation, as shown by hybridization to cloned segments of the T4 genome immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. Preferentially amplified areas corresponded to regions containing origins of T4 DNA replication. The size of the progeny DNA increased with time after infection, possibly due to recombination between partial replicas and nonreplicated subunits or due to the gradual overcoming of the UV damage. As the size of the progeny DNA increased, all of the genes were more equally represented, resulting in a decrease in the genetic bias. Amplification of specific genetic areas was also observed upon infection with UV-irradiated, non-bromo-deoxyuridine-substituted (light) phage. However, the genetic bias observed in this case was not as great as that observed with bromodeoxyuridine-substituted phage. This is most likely due to the higher efficiency of multiplicity reactivation of the light phage.

  12. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis.