Science.gov

Sample records for specific electronic signal

  1. Bottomside Ionospheric Electron Density Specification using Passive High Frequency Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Mackay, C.; Varney, R. H.; Kendall, E. A.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The vertical bottomside electron density profile is influenced by a variety of natural sources, most especially traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). These disturbances cause plasma to be moved up or down along the local geomagnetic field and can strongly impact the propagation of high frequency radio waves. While the basic physics of these perturbations has been well studied, practical bottomside models are not well developed. We present initial results from an assimilative bottomside ionosphere model. This model uses empirical orthogonal functions based on the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to develop a vertical electron density profile, and features a builtin HF ray tracing function. This parameterized model is then perturbed to model electron density perturbations associated with TIDs or ionospheric gradients. Using the ray tracing feature, the model assimilates angle of arrival measurements from passive HF transmitters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the model using angle of arrival data. Modeling results of bottomside electron density specification are compared against suitable ancillary observations to quantify accuracy of our model.

  2. Highly specific electronic signal transduction mediated by DNA/metal self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Pathak, Srikant

    2003-11-01

    Highly specific interactions between DNA could potentially be amplified if the DNA interactions were utilized to assemble large scale parts. Fluidic assembly of microsystem parts has the potential for rapid and accurate placement of otherwise difficult to handle pieces. Ideally, each part would have a different chemical interaction that allowed it to interact with the substrate only in specific areas. One easy way to obtain a multiple chemical permutations is to use synthetic DNA oligomers. Si parts were prepared using silicon-on-insulator technology microfabrication techniques. Several surface chemistry protocols were developed to react commercial oligonucleotides to the parts. However, no obvious assembly was achieved. It was thought that small defects on the surface did not allow the microparts to be in close enough proximity for DNA hybridization, and this was. in part, confirmed by interferometry. To assist in the hybridization, plastic, pliable parts were manufactured and a new chemistry was developed. However, assembly was still absent even with the application of force. It is presently thought that one of three mechanisms is preventing the assembly. The surfaces of the two solid substrates can not get in close enough proximity, the surface chemistry lacks sufficient density to keep the parts from separating, or DNA interactions in close proximity on solid substrates are forbidden. These possibilities are discussed in detail.

  3. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2017-03-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics interference experiments as analog signal processing converting quantum signals into experimentally observable quantities such as current averages and correlations. This point of view also gives us a procedure to obtain quantum information quantities from electron quantum optics coherences. We illustrate these ideas by discussing two mode entanglement in electron quantum optics. We also sketch how signal processing ideas may open new perspectives for representing electronic coherences in quantum conductors and understand the properties of the underlying many-body electronic state.

  4. Signal Peptidase Enzymology and Substrate Specificity Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dalbey, R E; Pei, D; Ekici, Ö D

    2017-01-01

    Signal peptidases are membrane proteases that play crucial roles in the protein transport pathway of bacteria. They cleave off the signal peptide from precursor proteins that are membrane inserted by the SecYEG or Tat translocons. Signal peptide cleavage releases the translocated protein from the inner membrane allowing the protein to be exported to the periplasm, outer membrane, or secreted into the medium. Signal peptidases are very important proteins to study. They are unique serine proteases with a Ser-Lys dyad, catalyze cleavage at the membrane surface, and are promising potential antibacterial drug targets. This chapter will focus on the isolation of signal peptidases and the preprotein substrates, as well as describe a peptide library approach for characterizing the substrate specificity.

  5. Hierarchical CAD Tools for Radiation Hardened Mixed Signal Electronic Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-28

    Mixed Signal simulator (see Figure 2), is based on the integration SmartSpice RadHard , a SPICE based analog simulator, in which radiation circuit...commercial simulator and adding only the features and physics required for the defined specification for the RadHard module. This approach allowed all...to the Radiation Hardened Mixed Signal Electronic Circuits program was similar in scope to our internal development of SmartSpice RadHard . We started

  6. Electronic intelligence: The interception of radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, R. G.

    Electronic intelligence (Elint) has its basis in the information extracted through analyses of signals transmitted by enemy radar systems and other noncommunications transmitters. This entails the process of signal interception, characterization, and recorded preservation to which attention is presently given. The accumulation of radar signal data in peacetime has grown with the development of modern weapons, many of which incorporate radar target detection and tracking. The present discussions range over the role of radar interception in electronic warfare, the effect of Low Probability of Intercept radar systems, Elint antennas and direction finders, emitter location, the characteristics of crystal, superheterodyne and instantaneous frequency measurement receivers, and such other Elint receivers as the channelized, acoustooptic, and microscan types.

  7. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are associated with ROS signaling and for the identification of suitable transcriptional indicators. Several online tools, such as Genevestigator and Expression Angler, have simplified the task to analyze, interpret, and visualize this wealth of data. Critical Issues: The analysis of the exact transcriptional responses to ROS requires the production of specific ROS in distinct subcellular compartments with precise timing, which is experimentally difficult. Analyses are further complicated by the effect of ROS production in one subcellular location on the ROS accumulation in other compartments. In addition, even subtle differences in the method of ROS production or treatment can lead to significantly different outcomes when various stimuli are compared. Future Directions: Due to the difficulty of inducing ROS production specifically with regard to ROS type, subcellular localization, and timing, we propose that the concept of a “ROS marker gene” should be re-evaluated. We suggest guidelines for the analysis of transcriptional data in ROS signaling. The use of “ROS signatures,” which consist of a set of genes that together can show characteristic and indicative responses, should be preferred over the use of individual marker genes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1422–1441. PMID:24180661

  8. Signal processing and electronic noise in LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaitan, D.

    2016-03-01

    The electronics of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, the 10-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), consists of low-noise dual-gain amplifiers and a 100-MHz, 14-bit data acquisition system for the TPC PMTs. Pre-prototypes of the analog amplifiers and the 32-channel digitizers were tested extensively with simulated pulses that are similar to the prompt scintillation light and the electroluminescence signals expected in LZ. These studies are used to characterize the noise and to measure the linearity of the system. By increasing the amplitude of the test signals, the effect of saturating the amplifier and the digitizers was studied. The RMS ADC noise of the digitizer channels was measured to be 1.19± 0.01 ADCC. When a high-energy channel of the amplifier is connected to the digitizer, the measured noise remained virtually unchanged, while the noise added by a low-energy channel was estimated to be 0.38 ± 0.02 ADCC (46 ± 2 μV). A test facility is under construction to study saturation, mitigate noise and measure the performance of the LZ electronics and data acquisition chain.

  9. Signal Processing and Electronic Noise in LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashish Khaitan, Dev

    2015-11-01

    The electronics of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, the 10-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), consists of low-noise dual-gain amplifiers and a 100-MHz, 14-bit data acquisition system for the TPC PMTs. Pre-prototypes of the analog amplifiers and the 32-channel digitizers were tested extensively with simulated pulses that are similar to the prompt scintillation light and the electroluminescence signals expected in LZ. These studies are used to characterize the noise and to measure the linearity of the system. By increasing the amplitude of the test signals, the effect of saturating the amplifier and the digitizers was studied. The RMS ADC noise of the digitizer channels was measured to be 1.19 $\\pm$ 0.01 ADCC. When a high-energy channel of the amplifier is connected to the digitizer, the measured noise remained virtually unchanged, while the noise added by a low-energy channel was estimated to be 0.38 $\\pm$ 0.02 ADCC (46 $\\pm$ 2$\\mu$V). A test facility is under construction to study saturation, mitigate noise and measure the performance of the LZ electronics and data acquisition chain.

  10. Specifications of CCITT Signalling System Number 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Unit (LSSU) F CK SF LlI {FSN I BSN F 8 16 8 or 16 2 6 1 7 1 7 8 First bit c. Format of a Fill In Signal Unit ( FISU ) transmitted F CK LII FNI BSN F...indication "out of service" SIPO - Status indication "processor outage" FISU - Fill-in signal unit MSU - Message signal unit BIBT - BIB to be...ABBREVIATIONS USED IN FIGURES A.6-1 to A.6-7 (Q.7o0) BSNT - Backward sequence number of next signal unit to be transmitted FISU - Fill-in signal unit FSNC

  11. Electronic signal regulator for constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seman, T. R.; Mallik, R. R.

    1999-06-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive ac signal regulator is described which facilitates constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Constant resolution is achieved by maintaining an approximately constant ac modulation voltage across IET junctions during spectral scans. The regulator circuit is based upon a field-effect transistor optoisolator with appropriate feedback control acting as a voltage comparator. It is modular in design and can easily be added in the signal path of existing IET spectrometers. A complete schematic diagram of the circuit is provided as well as a discussion on the theory of operation. IET spectra obtained from tunnel junctions with various degrees of nonlinear conductance-voltage behavior are presented with, and without, the circuit. Analysis of these spectra shows that the regulator increases the spectrometer's signal-to-noise ratio, produces no distortion and, in the case of severely nonlinear junctions, reveals spectral features at mid to high bias, which are otherwise difficult or impossible to detect. Additionally, the regulator offers approximately an order of magnitude increase in data acquisition rate over software algorithms for maintaining constant resolution via IEEE-488 control of spectrometer instrumentation. Our results suggest that such a modular analog regulator would be a valuable addition to IET spectrometers, especially for workers wishing to investigate severely nonlinear IET junctions.

  12. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  13. Low power signal processing electronics for wearable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Custom designed microchips, known as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), offer the lowest possible power consumption electronics. However, this comes at the cost of a longer, more complex and more costly design process compared to one using generic, off-the-shelf components. Nevertheless, their use is essential in future truly wearable medical devices that must operate for long periods of time from physically small, energy limited batteries. This presentation will demonstrate the state-of-the-art in ASIC technology for providing online signal processing for use in these wearable medical devices.

  14. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  15. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  20. Electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  1. Tissue-specific insulin signaling mediates female sexual attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Fedina, Tatyana Y; Arbuthnott, Devin; Rundle, Howard D; Promislow, Daniel E L; Pletcher, Scott D

    2017-08-01

    Individuals choose their mates so as to maximize reproductive success, and one important component of this choice is assessment of traits reflecting mate quality. Little is known about why specific traits are used for mate quality assessment nor about how they reflect it. We have previously shown that global manipulation of insulin signaling, a nutrient-sensing pathway governing investment in survival versus reproduction, affects female sexual attractiveness in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Here we demonstrate that these effects on attractiveness derive from insulin signaling in the fat body and ovarian follicle cells, whose signals are integrated by pheromone-producing cells called oenocytes. Functional ovaries were required for global insulin signaling effects on attractiveness, and manipulations of insulin signaling specifically in late follicle cells recapitulated effects of global manipulations. Interestingly, modulation of insulin signaling in the fat body produced opposite effects on attractiveness, suggesting a competitive relationship with the ovary. Furthermore, all investigated tissue-specific insulin signaling manipulations that changed attractiveness also changed fecundity in the corresponding direction, pointing to insulin pathway activity as a reliable link between fecundity and attractiveness cues. The cues themselves, cuticular hydrocarbons, responded distinctly to fat body and follicle cell manipulations, indicating independent readouts of the pathway activity from these two tissues. Thus, here we describe a system in which female attractiveness results from an apparent connection between attractiveness cues and an organismal state of high fecundity, both of which are created by lowered insulin signaling in the fat body and increased insulin signaling in late follicle cells.

  2. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative annular dark field electron microscopy using single electron signals.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R; Findlay, Scott D; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    One of the difficulties in analyzing atomic resolution electron microscope images is that the sample thickness is usually unknown or has to be fitted from parameters that are not precisely known. An accurate measure of thickness, ideally on a column-by-column basis, parameter free, and with single atom accuracy, would be of great value for many applications, such as matching to simulations. Here we propose such a quantification method for annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy by using the single electron intensity level of the detector. This method has the advantage that we can routinely quantify annular dark field images operating at both low and high beam currents, and under high dynamic range conditions, which is useful for the quantification of ultra-thin or light-element materials. To facilitate atom counting at the atomic scale we use the mean intensity in an annular dark field image averaged over a primitive cell, with no free parameters to be fitted. To illustrate the potential of our method, we demonstrate counting the number of Al (or N) atoms in a wurtzite-type aluminum nitride single crystal at each primitive cell over the range of 3-99 atoms.

  4. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  5. Electronic influences on an infrared detector signal: nonlinearity and amplification.

    PubMed

    Rahmelow, K

    1997-04-01

    For mercury-cadmium-telluride detectors, frequently used in Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, the recorded signal is a nonlinear function of the light intensity. This behavior depends on a series resistor in the electronic circuit and thus the illumination of the detector. This nonlinearity must be accounted for to avoid spectroscopic errors. The results of theoretically calculating the effect permit a correction that can be applied, with corresponding lower accuracy, even after a phase correction. Also the use of the amplification stages does influence the phase of the signal electronically. For an accurate nonlinearity correction, compensation of the amplification of the analog signal is advisable.

  6. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  7. Neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuits for optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeira, B.; Javaloyes, J.; Balle, S.; Piro, O.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, J. M. L.

    2014-08-01

    The ability to produce narrow optical pulses has been extensively investigated in laser systems with promising applications in photonics such as clock recovery, pulse reshaping, and recently in photonics artificial neural networks using spiking signal processing. Here, we investigate a neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuit (NOEIC) comprising a semiconductor laser driven by a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photo-detector operating at telecommunication (1550 nm) wavelengths capable of excitable spiking signal generation in response to optical and electrical control signals. The RTD-NOEIC mimics biologically inspired neuronal phenomena and possesses high-speed response and potential for monolithic integration for optical signal processing applications.

  8. Teaching resource. Beta-catenin signaling and axis specification.

    PubMed

    Moon, Randall T

    2004-06-29

    This animation provides a representation of the beta-catenin signaling pathway in response to fertilization and the process of axis specification that occurs early in development. The process shown is based on analysis of embryos of the amphibian Xenopus. This animation would be useful in illustrating events that occur early in embryogenesis and how embryos become polarized as a consequence of localized signaling processes.

  9. Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Perchuk, Barrett S; Siryaporn, Albert; Lubin, Emma A; Ashenberg, Orr; Goulian, Mark; Laub, Michael T

    2008-06-13

    Two-component signal transduction systems are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Bacteria often employ tens or hundreds of these paralogous signaling systems, comprised of histidine kinases (HKs) and their cognate response regulators (RRs). Faithful transmission of information through these signaling pathways and avoidance of detrimental crosstalk demand exquisite specificity of HK-RR interactions. To identify the determinants of two-component signaling specificity, we examined patterns of amino acid coevolution in large, multiple sequence alignments of cognate kinase-regulator pairs. Guided by these results, we demonstrate that a subset of the coevolving residues is sufficient, when mutated, to completely switch the substrate specificity of the kinase EnvZ. Our results shed light on the basis of molecular discrimination in two-component signaling pathways, provide a general approach for the rational rewiring of these pathways, and suggest that analyses of coevolution may facilitate the reprogramming of other signaling systems and protein-protein interactions.

  10. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  11. Electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits as GOVERNMENT SUPPORT This invention was made with U.S. Government support under Veterans Administration Contract VA KV 674P857 and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Grant No. NAG10-0040. The U.S. Government has certain rights in this invention.

  12. Signal-to-noise in femtosecond electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kealhofer, Catherine; Lahme, Stefan; Urban, Theresa; Baum, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Pump-probe electron diffraction can directly record atomic-scale motion within molecules or materials. However, the available current in femtosecond experiments is limited, making it challenging to reach the sensitivity required for detecting the fastest structural dynamics, which are encoded in time-dependent diffraction intensities. Here we present a unified analysis of signal-to-noise for an ultrafast electron diffraction apparatus. We characterize the noise of realistic ultrafast electron sources and detectors, test the performance on crystalline and polycrystalline samples and discuss practical approaches for improving measurement sensitivity. The analysis is found sufficient to predict the achievable signal-to-noise ratio in pump-probe electron diffraction before actually starting an investigation.

  13. Specific calcineurin isoforms are involved in Drosophila toll immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Xian; Dijkers, Pascale F

    2015-01-01

    Because excessive or inadequate responses can be detrimental, immune responses to infection require appropriate regulation. Networks of signaling pathways establish versatility of immune responses. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for dissecting conserved innate immune responses to infection. For example, the Toll pathway, which promotes activation of NF-κB transcription factors Dorsal/Dorsal-related immune factor (Dif), was first identified in Drosophila. Together with the IMD pathway, acting upstream of NF-κB transcription factor Relish, these pathways constitute a central immune signaling network. Inputs in these pathways contribute to specific and appropriate responses to microbial insults. Relish activity during infection is modulated by Ca(2+)-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, an important target of immunosuppressants in transplantation biology. Only one of the three Drosophila calcineurin isoforms, calcineurin A1, acts on Relish during infection. However, it is not known whether there is a role for calcineurin in Dorsal/Dif immune signaling. In this article, we demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms, protein phosphatase at 14D (Pp2B-14D)/calcineurin A at 14F (CanA-14F), in Toll-mediated immune signaling. These isoforms do not affect IMD signaling. In cell culture, pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin or RNA interference against homologous calcineurin isoforms Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F, but not against isoform calcineurin A1, decreased Toll-dependent Dorsal/Dif activity. A Pp2B-14D gain-of-function transgene promoted Dorsal nuclear translocation and Dorsal/Dif activity. In vivo, Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F RNA interference attenuated the Dorsal/Dif-dependent response to infection without affecting the Relish-dependent response. Altogether, these data identify a novel input, calcineurin, in Toll immune signaling and demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms in Drosophila NF-κB signaling. Copyright

  14. Collection and analysis of specific ELINT Signal Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lonnie A.

    1985-12-01

    This report was a followup to, Collection and Analysis of Specific ELINT Signal Parameters, DTIC A166507, 23 June 1985. The programs and hardware assembled for the above mentioned report were used to analyze two types of radar, the PPS-6 and the HOOD radars. The typical ELINT parameters of frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition rate were collected and analyzed.

  15. Collection and analysis of specific ELINT Signal Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lonnie A.

    1985-01-01

    This report was a followup to, Collection and Analysis of Specific ELINT Signal Parameters, DTIC A166507, 23 June 1985. The programs and hardware assembled for the above mentioned report were used to analyze two types of radar, the PPS-6 and the HOOD radars. The typical ELINT parameters of frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition rate were collected and analyzed.

  16. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a (13)C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched (13)C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a 13C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched 13C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions.

  18. Specific features of vowel-like signals of white whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'Kovich, V. M.; Kreichi, S. A.

    2004-05-01

    The set of acoustic signals of White-Sea white whales comprises about 70 types of signals. Six of them occur most often and constitute 75% of the total number of signals produced by these animals. According to behavioral reactions, white whales distinguish each other by acoustic signals, which is also typical of other animal species and humans. To investigate this phenomenon, signals perceived as vowel-like sounds of speech, including sounds perceived as a “bleat,” were chosen A sample of 480 signals recorded in June and July, 2000, in the White Sea within a reproductive assemblage of white whales near the Large Solovetskii Island was studied. Signals were recorded on a digital data carrier (a SONY minidisk) in the frequency range of 0.06 20 kHz. The purpose of the study was to reveal the perceptive and acoustic features specific to individual animals. The study was carried out using the methods of structural analysis of vocal speech that are employed in lingual criminalistics to identify a speaking person. It was demonstrated that this approach allows one to group the signals by coincident perceptive and acoustic parameters with assigning individual attributes to single parameters. This provided an opportunity to separate conditionally about 40 different sources of acoustic signals according to the totality of coincidences, which corresponded to the number of white whales observed visually. Thus, the application of this method proves to be very promising for the acoustic identification of white whales and other marine mammals, this possibility being very important for biology.

  19. Electronic specific heats for amorphous and crystallized alloys.

    PubMed

    Hou, Long; Mo, Jinyong; Liu, Qingling; Liu, Haishun; Yang, Weiming; Shen, Baolong

    2016-01-01

    The low temperature specific heats of (Fe0.5Co0.5)72B20Si4Nb4 amorphous and crystallized alloys are measured and analyzed from 1.4 to 110 K. Specific heats can be well fitted by electronic and phonon contribution terms. It is found that the electronic contribution term in specific heat for amorphous alloy is larger than that for crystallized one, and this phenomenon has been interpreted in detail. The research shows that the electronic density of states at the Fermi level and the localized loose "rattler" atoms in oversized cage structure may make contributions to the enhancement of electronic specific heat coefficient γ, and result in a larger electronic contribution term. This study is significant for further understanding the structure-property relationship for amorphous alloys at low temperature.

  20. Benzodiazepines: electron affinity, receptors and cell signaling - a multifaceted approach.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Ott, Nadia; Cooksy, Andrew L

    2013-12-01

    This report entails a multifaceted approach to benzodiazepine (BZ) action, involving electron affinity, receptors, cell signaling and other aspects. Computations of the electron affinities (EAs) of different BZs have been carried out to establish the effect of various substituents on their EA. These computations were undertaken to serve as a first step in determining what role electron transfer (ET) plays in BZ activity. The calculations were conducted on the premise that the nature of the substituent will either decrease or increase the electron density of the benzene ring, thus altering the ability of the molecule to accept an electron. Investigations were performed on the effect of drug protonation on EA. Similarities involving substituent effects in prior electrochemical studies are also discussed. As part of the multifaceted approach, EA is linked to ET, which appears to play a role in therapeutic activity and toxicity. There is extensive literature dealing with the role of receptors in BZ activity. Significant information on receptor involvement was reported more than 40 years ago. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to be importantly involved. GABA is a probable mediator of BZ effects. BZ and GABA receptors, although not identical, are physiologically linked. Cell signaling is known to play a part in the biochemistry of BZ action. Various factors participated, such as gene expression, allosteric influence, toxic effects and therapeutic action. Evidence points to involvement of EA and ET in the mode of action in cell signaling. Oxidative stress and antioxidant effects are also addressed.

  1. Spatial encoding of cyclic AMP signalling specificity by GPCR endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetanova, Nikoleta G.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to signal via cyclic AMP (cAMP) production at the plasma membrane, but it is now clear that various GPCRs also signal after internalization. Apart from its temporal impact through prolonging the cellular response, does the endosome-initiated signal encode any discrete spatial information? Using the beta2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) as a model, we show that endocytosis is required for the full repertoire of downstream cAMP-dependent transcriptional control. Next, we describe an orthogonal optogenetic approach to definitively establish that the location of cAMP production is indeed the critical variable determining the transcriptional response. Finally, our results suggest that this spatial encoding scheme helps cells functionally discriminate chemically distinct β2-AR ligands according to differences in their ability to promote receptor endocytosis. These findings reveal a discrete principle for achieving cellular signalling specificity, based on endosome-mediated spatial encoding of intracellular second messenger production and ‘location aware’ downstream transcriptional control. PMID:25362359

  2. Context Specificity in Causal Signaling Networks Revealed by Phosphoprotein Profiling.

    PubMed

    Hill, Steven M; Nesser, Nicole K; Johnson-Camacho, Katie; Jeffress, Mara; Johnson, Aimee; Boniface, Chris; Spencer, Simon E F; Lu, Yiling; Heiser, Laura M; Lawrence, Yancey; Pande, Nupur T; Korkola, James E; Gray, Joe W; Mills, Gordon B; Mukherjee, Sach; Spellman, Paul T

    2017-01-25

    Signaling networks downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases are among the most extensively studied biological networks, but new approaches are needed to elucidate causal relationships between network components and understand how such relationships are influenced by biological context and disease. Here, we investigate the context specificity of signaling networks within a causal conceptual framework using reverse-phase protein array time-course assays and network analysis approaches. We focus on a well-defined set of signaling proteins profiled under inhibition with five kinase inhibitors in 32 contexts: four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, UACC812, BT20, and BT549) under eight stimulus conditions. The data, spanning multiple pathways and comprising ∼70,000 phosphoprotein and ∼260,000 protein measurements, provide a wealth of testable, context-specific hypotheses, several of which we experimentally validate. Furthermore, the data provide a unique resource for computational methods development, permitting empirical assessment of causal network learning in a complex, mammalian setting. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An in-plane magnetic chiral dichroism approach for measurement of intrinsic magnetic signals using transmitted electrons.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Tavabi, Amir H; Li, Zi-An; Kovács, András; Rusz, Ján; Huang, Wenting; Richter, Gunther; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Zhu, Jing

    2017-05-15

    Electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism is a powerful technique that allows the local magnetic properties of materials to be measured quantitatively with close-to-atomic spatial resolution and element specificity in the transmission electron microscope. Until now, the technique has been restricted to measurements of the magnetic circular dichroism signal in the electron beam direction. However, the intrinsic magnetization directions of thin samples are often oriented in the specimen plane, especially when they are examined in magnetic-field-free conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Here, we introduce an approach that allows in-plane magnetic signals to be measured using electron magnetic chiral dichroism by selecting a specific diffraction geometry. We compare experimental results recorded from a cobalt nanoplate with simulations to demonstrate that an electron magnetic chiral dichroism signal originating from in-plane magnetization can be detected successfully.

  4. An in-plane magnetic chiral dichroism approach for measurement of intrinsic magnetic signals using transmitted electrons

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dongsheng; Tavabi, Amir H.; Li, Zi-An; Kovács, András; Rusz, Ján; Huang, Wenting; Richter, Gunther; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Zhu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism is a powerful technique that allows the local magnetic properties of materials to be measured quantitatively with close-to-atomic spatial resolution and element specificity in the transmission electron microscope. Until now, the technique has been restricted to measurements of the magnetic circular dichroism signal in the electron beam direction. However, the intrinsic magnetization directions of thin samples are often oriented in the specimen plane, especially when they are examined in magnetic-field-free conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Here, we introduce an approach that allows in-plane magnetic signals to be measured using electron magnetic chiral dichroism by selecting a specific diffraction geometry. We compare experimental results recorded from a cobalt nanoplate with simulations to demonstrate that an electron magnetic chiral dichroism signal originating from in-plane magnetization can be detected successfully. PMID:28504267

  5. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes for highly specific electronic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robert J.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Drouvalakis, Katerina A.; Wong Shi Kam, Nadine; Shim, Moonsub; Li, Yiming; Kim, Woong; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2003-04-01

    Novel nanomaterials for bioassay applications represent a rapidly progressing field of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Here, we present an exploration of single-walled carbon nanotubes as a platform for investigating surface-protein and protein-protein binding and developing highly specific electronic biomolecule detectors. Nonspecific binding on nanotubes, a phenomenon found with a wide range of proteins, is overcome by immobilization of polyethylene oxide chains. A general approach is then advanced to enable the selective recognition and binding of target proteins by conjugation of their specific receptors to polyethylene oxide-functionalized nanotubes. This scheme, combined with the sensitivity of nanotube electronic devices, enables highly specific electronic sensors for detecting clinically important biomolecules such as antibodies associated with human autoimmune diseases.

  6. Chaperone-mediated specificity in Ras and Rap signaling.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Mor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that share similar effector-binding domains but operate in a very different signaling networks; Ras has a dominant role in cell proliferation, while Rap mediates cell adhesion. Ras and Rap proteins are regulated by several shared processes such as post-translational modification, phosphorylation, activation by guanine exchange factors and inhibition by GTPase-activating proteins. Sub-cellular localization and trafficking of these proteins to and from the plasma membrane are additional important regulatory features that impact small GTPases function. Despite its importance, the trafficking mechanisms of Ras and Rap proteins are not completely understood. Chaperone proteins play a critical role in trafficking of GTPases and will be the focus of the discussion in this work. We will review several aspects of chaperone biology focusing on specificity toward particular members of the small GTPase family. Understanding this specificity should provide key insights into drug development targeting individual small GTPases.

  7. Attosecond metrology: from electron capture to future signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, Ferenc; Stockman, Mark I.

    2014-03-01

    The accurate measurement of time lies at the heart of experimental science, and is relevant to everyday life. Extending chronoscopy to ever shorter timescales has been the key to gaining real-time insights into microscopic phenomena, ranging from vital biological processes to the dynamics underlying high technologies. The generation of isolated attosecond pulses in 2001 allowed the fastest of all motions outside the nucleus -- electron dynamics in atomic systems -- to be captured. Attosecond metrology has provided access to several hitherto immeasurably fast electron phenomena in atoms, molecules and solids. The fundamental importance of electron processes for the physical and life sciences, technology and medicine has rendered the young field of attosecond science one of the most dynamically expanding research fields of the new millennium. Here, we review the basic concepts underlying attosecond measurement and control techniques. Among their many potential applications, we focus on the exploration of the fundamental speed limit of electronic signal processing. This endeavour relies on ultimate-speed electron metrology, as provided by attosecond technology.

  8. Calculations of specific cellular doses for low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Tung, C.-J.; Hu, Y. H.; Chou, C. M.; Chao, T. C.; Lee, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this work were to calculate the cellular doses and the lineal energies of low-energy electrons in liquid water for different source-target geometry in a cell. Calculated specific cellular doses and their variations were analyzed for the dependences on electron energy, source-target geometry, elastic interaction, and type of energy depositions, i.e. starter, stopper, insider and crosser. Two approaches, i.e. the probabilistic method and the mixed method, were applied. In the probabilistic method, the Monte Carlo Penelope code was used. In the mixed method, the range-energy relation and the sampling of electron paths were applied. It was found that for N ← Cy elastic interactions led to a change of the specific cellular dose by about 30% for electron energies below 10 keV. Here N ← Cy denotes electrons emitted from the source region, Cy (cytoplasm), to deposit energy in the target region, N (cell nucleus). The variation of specific cellular dose was found greater (more than 10%) for N ← Cy than N ← N, C ← C and C ← CS, where C and CS denote the cell and cell surface, respectively. The lineal energy distribution varied substantially with electron energy, source-target geometry, and target size. The maximum values of the relative dose-mean lineal energy for 1, 5 and 10 keV electrons, relative to 36 keV reference electrons used to define the relative biological effectiveness, occurred at target radii of several tens, hundreds and thousands nanometers, respectively.

  9. New Approach to Total Dose Specification for Spacecraft Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to total dose specification for spacecraft electronics. It is shown to have a significant impact. A new approach is developed for total dose requirements that replaces the radiation design margin concept with failure probability during a mission.

  10. Role of Mitochondrial Reverse Electron Transport in ROS Signaling: Potential Roles in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Scialò, Filippo; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J; Sanz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of aging and age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, mitochondria from old individuals have higher levels of ROS. However, ROS also participate in cellular signaling, are instrumental for several physiological processes and boosting ROS levels in model organisms extends lifespan. The current consensus is that low levels of ROS are beneficial, facilitating adaptation to stress via signaling, whereas high levels of ROS are deleterious because they trigger oxidative stress. Based on this model the amount of ROS should determine the physiological effect. However, recent data suggests that the site at which ROS are generated is also instrumental in determining effects on cellular homeostasis. The best example of site-specific ROS signaling is reverse electron transport (RET). RET is produced when electrons from ubiquinol are transferred back to respiratory complex I, reducing NAD+ to NADH. This process generates a significant amount of ROS. RET has been shown to be instrumental for the activation of macrophages in response to bacterial infection, re-organization of the electron transport chain in response to changes in energy supply and adaptation of the carotid body to changes in oxygen levels. In Drosophila melanogaster, stimulating RET extends lifespan. Here, we review what is known about RET, as an example of site-specific ROS signaling, and its implications for the field of redox biology.

  11. Heart failure-specific changes in protein kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kristina; Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Schmid, Evelyn; Eder, Petra; Cuello, Friederike

    2014-06-01

    Among the myriad of molecular alterations occurring in heart failure development, aggravation of the disease is often attributed to global or local changes in protein kinase activity, thus making protein kinases attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Since protein kinases do not only have maladaptive roles, but also contribute to the physiological integrity of cells, it is a challenging task to circumvent undesired inhibition of protein kinase activity. Identification of posttranslational modifications and/or protein-protein interactions that are exclusively apparent under pathophysiological conditions provides exciting information for alternative non-kinase inhibitory treatment strategies that eliminate maladaptive functions of a protein kinase, but preserve the beneficial ones. Here, we focus on the disease-specific regulation of a number of protein kinases, namely, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II isoform δ (CaMKIIδ), G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase D (PKD) and protein kinase C isoform β2 (PKCβ2), which are embedded in complex signal transduction pathways implicated in heart failure development, and discuss potential avenues for novel treatment strategies to combat heart disease.

  12. Fine specificity and molecular competition in SLAM family receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Timothy J; Garner, Lee I; Metcalfe, Clive; King, Elliott; Margraf, Stefanie; Brown, Marion H

    2014-01-01

    SLAM family receptors regulate activation and inhibition in immunity through recruitment of activating and inhibitory SH2 domain containing proteins to immunoreceptor tyrosine based switch motifs (ITSMs). Binding of the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2 to ITSMs in the cytoplasmic regions of SLAM family receptors is important for activation. We analysed the fine specificity of SLAM family receptor phosphorylated ITSMs and the conserved tyrosine motif in EAT-2 for SH2 domain containing signalling proteins. Consistent with the literature describing dependence of CRACC (SLAMF7) on EAT-2, CRACC bound EAT-2 (KD = 0.003 μM) with approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater affinity than SAP (KD = 0.44 μM). RNA interference in cytotoxicity assays in NK92 cells showed dependence of CRACC on SAP in addition to EAT-2, indicating selectivity of SAP and EAT-2 may depend on the relative concentrations of the two adaptors. The concentration of SAP was four fold higher than EAT-2 in NK92 cells. Compared with SAP, the significance of EAT-2 recruitment and its downstream effectors are not well characterised. We identified PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 as principal binding partners for the EAT-2 tail. Both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 are functionally important for cytotoxicity in NK92 cells through CD244 (SLAMF4), NTB-A (SLAMF6) and CRACC. Comparison of the specificity of SH2 domains from activating and inhibitory signalling mediators revealed a hierarchy of affinities for CD244 (SLAMF4) ITSMs. While binding of phosphatase SH2 domains to individual ITSMs of CD244 was weak compared with SAP or EAT-2, binding of tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 to longer peptides containing tandem phosphorylated ITSMs in human CD244 increased the affinity ten fold. The concentration of the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2 was in the order of a magnitude higher than the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2. These data demonstrate a mechanism for direct recruitment of phosphatases in inhibitory signalling by ITSMs, while explaining competitive

  13. Fine Specificity and Molecular Competition in SLAM Family Receptor Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Garner, Lee I.; Metcalfe, Clive; King, Elliott; Margraf, Stefanie; Brown, Marion H.

    2014-01-01

    SLAM family receptors regulate activation and inhibition in immunity through recruitment of activating and inhibitory SH2 domain containing proteins to immunoreceptor tyrosine based switch motifs (ITSMs). Binding of the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2 to ITSMs in the cytoplasmic regions of SLAM family receptors is important for activation. We analysed the fine specificity of SLAM family receptor phosphorylated ITSMs and the conserved tyrosine motif in EAT-2 for SH2 domain containing signalling proteins. Consistent with the literature describing dependence of CRACC (SLAMF7) on EAT-2, CRACC bound EAT-2 (KD = 0.003 μM) with approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater affinity than SAP (KD = 0.44 μM). RNA interference in cytotoxicity assays in NK92 cells showed dependence of CRACC on SAP in addition to EAT-2, indicating selectivity of SAP and EAT-2 may depend on the relative concentrations of the two adaptors. The concentration of SAP was four fold higher than EAT-2 in NK92 cells. Compared with SAP, the significance of EAT-2 recruitment and its downstream effectors are not well characterised. We identified PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 as principal binding partners for the EAT-2 tail. Both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 are functionally important for cytotoxicity in NK92 cells through CD244 (SLAMF4), NTB-A (SLAMF6) and CRACC. Comparison of the specificity of SH2 domains from activating and inhibitory signalling mediators revealed a hierarchy of affinities for CD244 (SLAMF4) ITSMs. While binding of phosphatase SH2 domains to individual ITSMs of CD244 was weak compared with SAP or EAT-2, binding of tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 to longer peptides containing tandem phosphorylated ITSMs in human CD244 increased the affinity ten fold. The concentration of the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2 was in the order of a magnitude higher than the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2. These data demonstrate a mechanism for direct recruitment of phosphatases in inhibitory signalling by ITSMs, while explaining competitive

  14. Stage-specific inductive signals in the Drosophila neuroectoderm control the temporal sequence of neuroblast specification.

    PubMed

    Berger, C; Urban, J; Technau, G M

    2001-09-01

    One of the initial steps of neurogenesis in the Drosophila embryo is the delamination of a stereotype set of neural progenitor cells (neuroblasts) from the neuroectoderm. The time window of neuroblast segregation has been divided into five successive waves (S1-S5) in which subsets of neuroblasts with specific identities are formed. To test when identity specification of the various neuroblasts takes place and whether extrinsic signals are involved, we have performed heterochronic transplantation experiments. Single neuroectodermal cells from stage 10 donor embryos (after S2) were transplanted into the neuroectoderm of host embryos at stage 7 (before S1) and vice versa. The fate of these cells was uncovered by their lineages at stage 16/17. Transplanted cells adjusted their fate to the new temporal situation. Late neuroectodermal cells were able to take over the fate of early (S1/S2) neuroblasts. The early neuroectodermal cells preferentially generated late (S4/S5) neuroblasts, despite their reduced time of exposure to the neuroectoderm. Furthermore, neuroblast fates are independent from divisions of neuroectodermal progenitor cells. We conclude from these experiments that neuroblast specification occurs sequentially under the control of non-cell-autonomous and stage-specific inductive signals that act in the neuroectoderm.

  15. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, Ian; Rielage, Keith Robert; Elliott, Steven Ray; Xu, Wenqin; Goett, John Jerome III

    2015-06-11

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed. The DEMONSTRATOR has a background goal of < 3 counts/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a one tonne experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This paper discusses the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  16. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A.S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, M.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Meijer, S. J.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Snyder, N; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K. [University of California Vorren, K. [University of North Carolina et al.

    2015-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0 nu beta beta) in Ge-76 using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of <3 counts/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to <1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  17. Low background signal readout electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E.; and others

    2015-08-17

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of < 3 count/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  18. Specific functions for ERK/MAPK signaling during PNS development

    PubMed Central

    Newbern, Jason M.; Li, Xiaoyan; Shoemaker, Sarah E.; Zhou, Jiang; Zhong, Jian; Wu, Yaohong; Bonder, Daniel; Hollenback, Steven; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Landreth, Gary E.; Snider, William D.

    2011-01-01

    We have established functions of the stimulus dependent MAPKs, ERK1/2 and ERK5 in DRG, motor neuron, and Schwann cell development. Surprisingly, many aspects of early DRG and motor neuron development were found to be ERK1/2 independent and Erk5 deletion had no obvious effect on embryonic PNS. In contrast, Erk1/2 deletion in developing neural crest resulted in peripheral nerves that were devoid of Schwann cell progenitors, and deletion of Erk1/2 in Schwann cell precursors caused disrupted differentiation and marked hypomyelination of axons. The Schwann cell phenotypes are similar to those reported in neuregulin-1 and ErbB mutant mice and neuregulin effects could not be elicited in glial precursors lacking Erk1/2. ERK/MAPK regulation of myelination was specific to Schwann cells, as deletion in oligodendrocyte precursors did not impair myelin formation, but reduced precursor proliferation. Our data suggest a tight linkage between developmental functions of ERK/MAPK signaling and biological actions of specific RTK-activating factors. PMID:21220101

  19. GSFC specification electronic data processing magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinari, D. F.; Perry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design requirements are given for magnetic oxide coated, electronic data processing tape, wound on reels. Magnetic recording tape types covered by this specification are intended for use on digital tape transports using the Non-Return-to-Zero-change-on-ones (NRZI) recording method for recording densities up to and including 800 characters per inch (cpi) and the Phase-Encoding (PE) recording method for a recording density of 1600 cpi.

  20. From electron energy-loss spectroscopy to multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Colliex, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This review intends to illustrate how electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques in the electron microscope column have evolved over the past 60 years. Beginning as a physicist tool to measure basic excitations in solid thin foils, EELS techniques have gradually become essential for analytical purposes, nowadays pushed to the identification of individual atoms and their bonding states. The intimate combination of highly performing techniques with quite efficient computational tools for data processing and ab initio modeling has opened the way to a broad range of novel imaging modes with potential impact on many different fields. The combination of Angström-level spatial resolution with an energy resolution down to a few tenths of an electron volt in the core-loss spectral domain has paved the way to atomic-resolved elemental and bonding maps across interfaces and nanostructures. In the low-energy range, improved energy resolution has been quite efficient in recording surface plasmon maps and from them electromagnetic maps across the visible electron microscopy (EM) domain, thus bringing a new view to nanophotonics studies. Recently, spectrum imaging of the emitted photons under the primary electron beam and the spectacular introduction of time-resolved techniques down to the femtosecond time domain, have become innovative keys for the development and use of a brand new multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

  1. Implications of non-specific strigolactone signaling in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2014-08-01

    Strigolactones produced by various plant species are involved in the development of different plant parts. They are also exuded by plant roots to the rhizosphere, where they are involved in the induction of seed germination of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche, hyphal branching of the symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and the symbiotic interaction with Rhizobium. In the present discussion paper, the essentialness of strigolactones as communication signals in these plant interactions is discussed in view of the existence of other plant-derived substances that are able to promote these plant interactions. In addition, the importance of strigolactones for determination of interaction specificity is discussed based on current knowledge on strigolactone composition, perception and delivery. The different activities of strigolactones in plant development and in the rhizosphere suggest their possible use in agriculture. However, despite efforts made in this direction, there is no current, practical implementation. Possible reasons for the encountered difficulties and suggested solutions to promote strigolactone use in agriculture are discussed.

  2. Electronic control of Ca2+ signalling in neuronal cells using an organic electronic ion pump.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Joakim; Kjäll, Peter; Nilsson, David; Robinson, Nathaniel D; Berggren, Magnus; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2007-09-01

    Cells and tissues use finely regulated ion fluxes for their intra- and intercellular communication. Technologies providing spatial and temporal control for studies of such fluxes are however, limited. We have developed an electrophoretic ion pump made of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to mediate electronic control of the ion homeostasis in neurons. Ion delivery from a source reservoir to a receiving electrolyte via a PEDOT:PSS thin-film channel was achieved by electronic addressing. Ions are delivered in high quantities at an associated on/off ratio exceeding 300. This induces physiological signalling events that can be recorded at the single-cell level. Furthermore, miniaturization of the device to a 50-microm-wide channel allows for stimulation of individual cells. As this technology platform allows for electronic control of ion signalling in individual cells with proper spatial and temporal resolution, it will be useful in further studies of communication in biological systems.

  3. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope.

  4. High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

  5. Site-specific labeling of proteins for electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M.; Lander, Gabriel C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is commonly employed to determine the subunit organization of large macromolecular assemblies. However, the field lacks a robust molecular labeling methodology for unambiguous identification of constituent subunits. We present a strategy that exploits the unique properties of an unnatural amino acid in order to enable site-specific attachment of a single, readily identifiable protein label at any solvent-exposed position on the macromolecular surface. Using this method, we show clear labeling of a subunit within the 19S proteasome lid subcomplex that has not been amenable to labeling by traditional approaches. PMID:26409249

  6. [Electronic medical record--interface specifications with medical informatics systems].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Mocanu, Mihai

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the initial efforts of description and implementation for a new scheme of electronic patients recording, based on distributed database for chronic ophthalmologic diseases. Structural specifications derived from principal system's goals are the implementation of an efficient and flexible way of patients' data administration, using actual Web technologies, permitting future extensions, without reducing in performances and without exponential cost increasing. A very important aspect, that must be take into consideration is their interfacing with other medical programs and systems, as the systems for recording clinical data, monitoring systems (Patient Administrations Systems - PAS) for demographical data, systems for monitoring of treatment (Hippocrates program), web systems, including wireless.

  7. Non-additive model for specific heat of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Silva, R.; Mello, V. D.

    2016-10-01

    By using non-additive Tsallis entropy we demonstrate numerically that one-dimensional quasicrystals, whose energy spectra are multifractal Cantor sets, are characterized by an entropic parameter, and calculate the electronic specific heat, where we consider a non-additive entropy Sq. In our method we consider an energy spectra calculated using the one-dimensional tight binding Schrödinger equation, and their bands (or levels) are scaled onto the [ 0 , 1 ] interval. The Tsallis' formalism is applied to the energy spectra of Fibonacci and double-period one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We analytically obtain an expression for the specific heat that we consider to be more appropriate to calculate this quantity in those quasiperiodic structures.

  8. Signal Digitizer and Cross-Correlation Application Specific Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranauskas, Dalius (Inventor); Baranauskas, Gytis (Inventor); Zelenin, Denis (Inventor); Kangaslahti, Pekka (Inventor); Tanner, Alan B. (Inventor); Lim, Boon H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    According to one embodiment, a cross-correlator comprises a plurality of analog front ends (AFEs), a cross-correlation circuit and a data serializer. Each of the AFEs comprises a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and a corresponding analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in which the VGA receives and modifies a unique analog signal associates with a measured analog radio frequency (RF) signal and the ADC produces digital data associated with the modified analog signal. Communicatively coupled to the AFEs, the cross-correlation circuit performs a cross-correlation operation on the digital data produced from different measured analog RF signals. The data serializer is communicatively coupled to the summing and cross-correlating matrix and continuously outputs a prescribed amount of the correlated digital data.

  9. Quantum dot layer-by-layer assemblies as signal amplification labels for ultrasensitive electronic detection of uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yun; Zhang, Haixia; Jiang, Bingying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2011-06-01

    The preparation and use of a new class of signal amplification label, quantum dot (QD) layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled polystyrene microsphere composite, for amplified ultrasensitive electronic detection of uropathogen-specific DNA sequences is described. The target DNA is sandwiched between the capture probes immobilized on the magnetic beads and the signaling probes conjugated to the QD LBL assembled polystyrene beads. Because of the dramatic signal amplification by the numerous QDs involved in each single DNA binding event, subfemtomolar level detection of uropathogen-specific DNA sequences is achieved, which makes our strategy among the most sensitive electronic approach for nucleic acid-based monitoring of pathogens. Our signal amplified detection scheme could be readily expanded to monitor other important biomolecules (e.g., proteins, peptides, amino acids, cells, etc.) in ultralow levels and thus holds great potential for early diagnosis of disease biomarkers.

  10. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Rusz, Jan; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y3Fe5O12, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique.

  11. Can dark matter-electron scattering explain the DAMA annual modulation signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.

    2014-12-01

    The annually modulating ˜keV scintillations observed in the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/Libra experiments might be due to dark matter-electron scattering. Such an explanation is now favored given the stringent constraints on nuclear recoil rates obtained by LUX, SuperCDMS, and other experiments. We suggest that multicomponent dark matter models featuring light dark matter particles of mass ˜MeV can potentially explain the data. A specific example, kinetically mixed mirror dark matter, is shown to have the right broad properties to consistently explain the experiments via dark matter-electron scattering. If this is the explanation of the annual modulation signal found in the DAMA experiments then a sidereal diurnal modulation signal is also anticipated. We point out that the data from the DAMA experiments show a diurnal variation at around 2.3 σ C.L. with phase consistent with that expected. This electron scattering interpretation of the DAMA experiments can potentially be probed in large xenon experiments (LUX, XENON1T,…), as well as in low threshold experiments (CoGeNT, CDEX, C4,…) by searching for annually and diurnally modulated electron recoils.

  12. Signal processing inspired from the olfactory bulb for electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ya-Qi; Meng, Qing-Hao; Qi, Pei-Feng; Zeng, Ming; Liu, Ying-Jie

    2017-01-01

    A bio-inspired signal processing method is proposed for electronic noses (e-noses). The proposed method contains an olfactory bulb model and a feature generation step. The structure of the olfactory bulb model is similar to the anatomical structure of mammals’ olfactory bulb. It consists of olfactory receptor neurons, mitral cells, granule cells, periglomerular cells, and short axon cells. This model uses gas sensors’ original response curves and transforms them to neuron spiking series no matter what kind the response curve is. This largely simplifies the follow-up feature generation step. Recurrence quantification analysis is employed to perform feature generation and the five most important features are selected. Finally, in order to verify the performance of the proposed method, seven kinds of Chinese liquors are tested and three classification methods are used to classify them. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a higher classification rate (99.05%) and also a steadier performance with the change of sensor number and types than the classic one.

  13. A nonlinear optoelectronic filter for electronic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Loh, William; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Ram, Rajeev J; Juodawlkis, Paul W

    2014-01-09

    The conversion of electrical signals into modulated optical waves and back into electrical signals provides the capacity for low-loss radio-frequency (RF) signal transfer over optical fiber. Here, we show that the unique properties of this microwave-photonic link also enable the manipulation of RF signals beyond what is possible in conventional systems. We achieve these capabilities by realizing a novel nonlinear filter, which acts to suppress a stronger RF signal in the presence of a weaker signal independent of their separation in frequency. Using this filter, we demonstrate a relative suppression of 56 dB for a stronger signal having a 1-GHz center frequency, uncovering the presence of otherwise undetectable weaker signals located as close as 3.5 Hz away. The capabilities of the optoelectronic filter break the conventional limits of signal detection, opening up new possibilities for radar and communication systems, and for the field of precision frequency metrology.

  14. Tissue-specific insulin signaling, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Summary Impaired insulin signaling is central to the development of the metabolic syndrome and can promote cardiovascular disease indirectly through development of abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension and a proinflammatory state. However, insulin action directly on vascular endothelium, atherosclerotic plaque macrophages, and in the heart, kidney, and retina has now been described, and impaired insulin signaling in these locations can alter progression of cardiovascular disease in the metabolic syndrome and affect development of microvascular complications of diabetes. Recent advances in our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of insulin’s effects on vascular tissues offer new opportunities for preventing these cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22895666

  15. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  16. Definition of a consensus transportin-specific nucleocytoplasmic transport signal.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, H P; Benson, R E; Truant, R; Herold, A; Phingbodhipakkiya, M; Cullen, B R

    1999-04-02

    The low cytoplasmic and high nuclear concentration of the GTP-bound form of Ran provides directionality for both nuclear protein import and export. Both import and export factors bind RanGTP directly, yet this interaction produces opposite effects; in the former case, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo release, whereas in the latter, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo assembly. Therefore, nuclear import and export receptors and their protein recognition sites are predicted to be distinct. Nevertheless, the approximately 38-amino acid M9 sequence present in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 has been reported to serve as both a nuclear localization signal and a nuclear export signal, even though only one protein, the nuclear import factor transportin, has been shown to bind M9 directly. We have used a combination of mutational randomization followed by selection for transportin binding to exhaustively define amino acids in M9 that are critical for transportin binding in vivo. As expected, the resultant approximately 12-amino acid transportin-binding consensus sequence is also predictive of nuclear localization signal activity. Surprisingly, however, this extensive mutational analysis failed to dissect M9 nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal function. Nevertheless, transportin appears unlikely to be the M9 export receptor, as RanGTP can be shown to block M9 binding by transportin not only in vitro, but also in the nucleus in vivo. This analysis therefore predicts the existence of a nuclear export receptor distinct from transportin that nevertheless shares a common protein-binding site on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

  17. Ubiquity and specificity of reinforcement signals throughout the human brain.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Timothy J; Chun, Marvin M; Lee, Daeyeol

    2011-10-06

    Reinforcements and punishments facilitate adaptive behavior in diverse domains ranging from perception to social interactions. A conventional approach to understanding the corresponding neural substrates focuses on the basal ganglia and its dopaminergic projections. Here, we show that reinforcement and punishment signals are surprisingly ubiquitous in the gray matter of nearly every subdivision of the human brain. Humans played either matching-pennies or rock-paper-scissors games against computerized opponents while being scanned using fMRI. Multivoxel pattern analysis was used to decode previous choices and their outcomes, and to predict upcoming choices. Whereas choices were decodable from a confined set of brain structures, their outcomes were decodable from nearly all cortical and subcortical structures. In addition, signals related to both reinforcements and punishments were recovered reliably in many areas and displayed patterns not consistent with salience-based explanations. Thus, reinforcement and punishment might play global modulatory roles in the entire brain.

  18. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, David I. H.; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system.

  19. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  20. Phosphatase specificity and pathway insulation in signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Michael A; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J

    2015-02-17

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase's substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A's adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  1. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ~10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  2. Direct Nanoscale Conversion of Biomolecular Signals into Electronic Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-22

    Dwight S. Seferos, Martin Moore, Daniel A. Lowy, Guillermo C. Bazan , James G. Kushmerick, and Nikolai Lebedev: Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer...Dwight S. Seferos, Martin Moore, Daniel A. Lowy, Guillermo C. Bazan , James G. Kushmerick, and Nikolai Lebedev: Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer...Guillermo C. Bazan , and Nikolai Lebedev: Heterogeneous electron transfer of quinone-hydroquinone in alkaline solutions at gold electrode surfaces

  3. Small Signal Analysis of the Induced Resonance Electron Cyclotron Maser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-20

    Gaponov, H. I. Petelin and V. K. Yulpatov, Radiophys. Quantum Electron. 10, 794 (1967). 7. V. L. Bratman, M. A. Moiseev, M. I. Petelin and R. E. Ern...Radiophys. Quantum Electron. 16, 474 (1973). 8. D. V. Kisel’, G. S. Korablev, V. G. Navel’yev, M. I. Petelin and Sh. Ye. Tsimring, Radio Eng. Electron. Phys...19, No. 4, 95 (1974). 9. N. I. Zaytsev, T. B. Pankratova, M. I. Petelin and V. A. Flyagin, Radio Eng. Electron. Phys. 19, No. 5, 103 (1974). 10. V

  4. Specific features of magnetostriction at electron topological transitions in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitik, G. P.; Sharlai, Yu. V.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of magnetostriction in metals are studied in cases when the chemical potential of electrons is close to the critical energy of the electron energy spectrum, at which there is an electron topological transition of 2½ or 3½ kind. It is shown that the experimental study of magnetostriction can be an effective method for detecting these transitions in metals.

  5. Rapid Prototyping of Application Specific Signal Processors Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-09

    design are available frcm numerous v-ndors, there is limited standardization and integration of tools exist at this level. Synthesis: Tools that support...case timing analysis I KLey Design Tasks Jxam• IQQ.To Design rule checks Check Mate (TI) Thermal analysis Pacific Numerics Test fault simulation...contracts will promote and fund the interdisciplinary activities of RASSP toward specific RASSP demonstration goals. Teaming between the numerous

  6. Rapid Prototyping of Application Specific Signal Processors (RASSP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Motorola MCM brokering standards n-Chip MCM technology CFI CAD framework database NKT MCM fabrication access and tool integration Micro Modules MCM...developments among competitors in aFigure 3.9-7 where Motorola is acting as a specific business area, the RASSP focus is more broker for MCM development under...processors and bridge connections to the Futurebus+ backplane. Raytheon ( M68040 ) provided identification and tracking of more than has selected the military

  7. Detectability and appraisal thresholds of split pulse signals for the MemoPatch™ device, an electronic skin patch intended to deliver tactile medication reminder signals (study TS-104).

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ivo; De Geest, Wim; De Geest, Jan; De Troy, Elke; MacDonald, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Patient non-adherence to prescribed medication regimens is a significant problem and affects clinical treatment outcomes. The MemoPatch™ medical device, currently in development, is an electronic skin patch intended to deliver tactile medication reminder signals. Fifty volunteers completed a laboratory experiment that evaluated the detectability and appraisal thresholds of five split signals; specifically, the current thresholds (in mA) at which a signal was detected (threshold T1), was considered sufficiently detectable to serve as a reminder signal (threshold T2), and became too strong as a reminder signal (threshold T3). Signals were selected under consideration of three data points: T1Max and T2Max (defined as, resp., the maximum current observed at T1 and T2) and T3Pct90 (the T3 current at the 90(th) percentile). A signal was considered to be useable in future versions of the MemoPatch™ device if it met the constraint that (T3Pct90-T2Max) should not be negative. One signal met the constraint requirement as its T3Pct90-T2Max=0.96mA.

  8. Photosynthetic electron flow affects H2O2 signaling by inactivation of catalase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ning; Beck, Christoph F; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2008-11-01

    A specific signaling role for H(2)O(2) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was demonstrated by the definition of a promoter that specifically responded to this ROS. Expression of a nuclear-encoded reporter gene driven by this promoter was shown to depend not only on the level of exogenously added H(2)O(2) but also on light. In the dark, the induction of the reporter gene by H(2)O(2) was much lower than in the light. This lower induction was correlated with an accelerated disappearance of H(2)O(2) from the culture medium in the dark. Due to a light-induced reduction in catalase activity, H(2)O(2) levels in the light remained higher. Photosynthetic electron transport mediated the light-controlled down-regulation of the catalase activity since it was prevented by 3-(3'4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosystem II. In the presence of light and DCMU, expression of the reporter gene was low while the addition of aminotriazole, a catalase inhibitor, led to a higher induction of the reporter gene by H(2)O(2) in the dark. The role of photosynthetic electron transport and thioredoxin in this regulation was investigated by using mutants deficient in photosynthetic electron flow and by studying the correlation between NADP-malate dehydrogenase and catalase activities. It is proposed that, contrary to expectations, a controlled down-regulation of catalase activity occurs upon a shift of cells from dark to light. This down-regulation apparently is necessary to maintain a certain level of H(2)O(2) required to activate H(2)O(2)-dependent signaling pathways.

  9. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  10. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Persson, Henrik H J; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Shadman, Khashayar; Schmid, Andreas K; Davis, Ronald W

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging.

  11. How do pleiotropic kinase hubs mediate specific signaling by TNFR superfamily members?

    PubMed Central

    Schröfelbauer, Bärbel; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members mediate the cellular response to a wide variety of biological inputs. The responses range from cell death, survival, differentiation, proliferation, to the regulation of immunity. All these physiological responses are regulated by a limited number of highly pleiotropic kinases. The fact that the same signaling molecules are involved in transducing signals from TNFR superfamily members that regulate different and even opposing processes raises the question of how their specificity is determined. Regulatory strategies that can contribute to signaling specificity include scaffolding to control kinase specificity, combinatorial use of several signal transducers, and temporal control of signaling. In this review, we discuss these strategies in the context of TNFR superfamily member signaling. PMID:22017429

  12. Equalization-enhanced phase noise for coherent-detection systems using electronic digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Shieh, William; Ho, Keang-Po

    2008-09-29

    In coherent optical systems employing electronic digital signal processing, the fiber chromatic dispersion can be gracefully compensated in electronic domain without resorting to optical techniques. Unlike optical dispersion compensator, the electronic equalizer enhances the impairments from the laser phase noise. This equalization-enhanced phase noise (EEPN) imposes a tighter constraint on the receive laser phase noise for transmission systems with high symbol rate and large electronically-compensated chromatic dispersion.

  13. Electronic filters, repeated signal charge conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  14. Cytoplasmic nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum are required for specific calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fameli, Nicola; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate how nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum (L-SR junctions) serve to couple lysosomal activation to regenerative, ryanodine receptor-mediated cellular Ca 2+ waves. In pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) it has been proposed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) triggers increases in cytoplasmic Ca 2+ via L-SR junctions, in a manner that requires initial Ca 2+ release from lysosomes and subsequent Ca 2+-induced Ca 2+ release (CICR) via ryanodine receptor (RyR) subtype 3 on the SR membrane proximal to lysosomes. L-SR junction membrane separation has been estimated to be < 400 nm and thus beyond the resolution of light microscopy, which has restricted detailed investigations of the junctional coupling process. The present study utilizes standard and tomographic transmission electron microscopy to provide a thorough ultrastructural characterization of the L-SR junctions in PASMCs. We show that L-SR nanojunctions are prominent features within these cells and estimate that the junctional membrane separation and extension are about 15 nm and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, we develop a quantitative model of the L-SR junction using these measurements, prior kinetic and specific Ca 2+ signal information as input data. Simulations of NAADP-dependent junctional Ca 2+ transients demonstrate that the magnitude of these signals can breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. By correlation analysis of live cell Ca 2+ signals and simulated Ca 2+ transients within L-SR junctions, we estimate that “trigger zones” comprising 60–100 junctions are required to confer a signal of similar magnitude. This is compatible with the 110 lysosomes/cell estimated from our ultrastructural observations. Most importantly, our model shows that increasing the L-SR junctional width above 50 nm lowers the magnitude of junctional [Ca 2+] such that there is a failure to breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. L-SR junctions are

  15. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches.

  16. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28248965

  17. Nuclear movement regulated by non-Smad Nodal signaling via JNK is associated with Smad signaling during zebrafish endoderm specification.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Shunya; Aoki, Shun; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2017-09-25

    Although asymmetric nuclear positioning is observed during animal development, the regulation and significance of this nuclear positioning in cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish blastulae, we provide evidence that nuclear movement toward the yolk syncytial layer, which comprises extraembryonic tissue, occurs in the first endoderm specified cells during endoderm specification. Nodal signaling is essential for nuclear movement, whereas nuclear envelope proteins are involved in the movement through the microtubule formation. The positioning of the microtubule organizing center, which is proposed to be critical for nuclear movement, is regulated by Nodal signaling and nuclear envelope proteins. The non-Smad JNK signaling pathway, which is downstream of Nodal signaling, regulates nuclear movement independent of the Smad pathway, and this nuclear movement is associated with Smad signal transduction toward the nucleus. Our study provides insights into the function of nuclear movement in Smad signaling toward the nucleus, and could be applied to the control of Transforming Growth Factor-β signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Mankos, Marian; Persson, Henrik H. J.; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; ...

    2016-05-05

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectronmore » and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. In conclusion, both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging.« less

  19. Quality improvement of environmental secondary electron detector signal using helium gas in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Yamazaki, Sadao

    2007-01-01

    The quality of the image signal obtained from the environmental secondary electron detector (ESED) employed in a variable pressure (VP) SEM can be dramatically improved by using helium gas. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases gradually in the range of the pressures that can be used in our modified SEM. This method is especially useful in low-voltage VP SEM as well as in a variety of SEM operating conditions, because helium gas can more or less maintain the amount of unscattered primary electrons. In order to measure the SNR precisely, a digital scan generator system for obtaining two images with identical views is employed as a precondition.

  20. Tissue-specific insulin signaling in the regulation of metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    In mammals, insulin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis and plays an essential role in metabolism, organ growth, development, fertility, and lifespan. The defects in this signaling pathway contribute to various metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. However, reducing the insulin signaling pathway has been found to increase longevity and delay the aging-associated diseases in various animals, ranging from nematodes to mice. These seemly paradoxical findings raise an interesting question as to how modulation of the insulin signaling pathway could be an effective approach to improve metabolism and aging. In this review, we summarize current understanding on tissue-specific functions of insulin signaling in the regulation of metabolism and lifespan. We also discuss the potential benefits and limitations in modulating tissue-specific insulin signaling pathway to improve metabolism and healthspan. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Tissue-specific Insulin Signaling in the Regulation of Metabolism and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, insulin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis and plays an essential role in metabolism, organ growth, development, fertility, and lifespan. Defects in this signaling pathway contribute to various metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. However, reducing the insulin signaling pathway has been found to increase longevity and delay the aging-associated diseases in various animals, ranging from nematodes to mice. These seemly paradoxical findings raise an interesting question as to how modulation of the insulin signaling pathway could be an effective approach to improve metabolism and aging. In this review, we summarize current understanding on tissue-specific functions of insulin signaling in the regulation of metabolism and lifespan. We also discuss potential benefits and limitations in modulating tissue-specific insulin signaling pathway to improve metabolism and healthspan. PMID:25087968

  2. Observations of enhanced OTR signals from a compressed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Sereno, N.S.; Borland, M.; Li, Y.; Nemeth, K.; Pasky, S.; /Argonne

    2008-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector complex includes an option for photocathode (PC) gun beam injection into the 450-MeV S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point, a 4-dipole chicane was used to compress the micropulse bunch length from a few ps to sub 0.5 ps (FWHM). Noticeable enhancements of the optical transition radiation (OTR) signal sampled after the APS chicane were then observed as has been reported in LCLS injector commissioning. A FIR CTR detector and interferometer were used to monitor the bunch compression process and correlate the appearance of localized spikes of OTR signal (5 to 10 times brighter than adjacent areas) within the beam image footprint. We have done spectral dependency measurements at 375 MeV with a series of band pass filters centered in 50-nm increments from 400 to 700 nm and observed a broadband enhancement in these spikes. Discussions of the possible mechanisms will be presented.

  3. Molecular Basis of Signaling Specificity of Insulin and IGF Receptors: Neglected Corners and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors utilize common phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways to mediate a broad spectrum of “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Specificity of insulin and IGF action in vivo must in part reflect expression of receptors and responsive pathways in different tissues but it is widely assumed that it is also determined by the ligand binding and signaling mechanisms of the receptors. This review focuses on receptor-proximal events in insulin/IGF signaling and examines their contribution to specificity of downstream responses. Insulin and IGF receptors may differ subtly in the efficiency with which they recruit their major substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2 and Shc) and this could influence effectiveness of signaling to “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Other substrates (Grb2-associated binder, downstream of kinases, SH2Bs, Crk), scaffolds (RACK1, β-arrestins, cytohesins), and pathways (non-receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide kinases, reactive oxygen species) have been less widely studied. Some of these components appear to be specifically involved in “metabolic” or “mitogenic” signaling but it has not been shown that this reflects receptor-preferential interaction. Very few receptor-specific interactions have been characterized, and their roles in signaling are unclear. Signaling specificity might also be imparted by differences in intracellular trafficking or feedback regulation of receptors, but few studies have directly addressed this possibility. Although published data are not wholly conclusive, no evidence has yet emerged for signaling mechanisms that are specifically engaged by insulin receptors but not IGF receptors or vice versa, and there is only limited evidence for differential activation of signaling mechanisms that are common to both receptors. Cellular context, rather than intrinsic receptor activity, therefore appears

  4. Tissue-specific roles for sonic hedgehog signaling in establishing thymus and parathyroid organ fate.

    PubMed

    Bain, Virginia E; Gordon, Julie; O'Neil, John D; Ramos, Isaias; Richie, Ellen R; Manley, Nancy R

    2016-11-01

    The thymus and parathyroids develop from third pharyngeal pouch (3rd pp) endoderm. Our previous studies show that Shh null mice have smaller, aparathyroid primordia in which thymus fate specification extends into the pharynx. SHH signaling is active in both dorsal pouch endoderm and neighboring neural crest (NC) mesenchyme. It is unclear which target tissue of SHH signaling is required for the patterning defects in Shh mutants. Here, we used a genetic approach to ectopically activate or delete the SHH signal transducer Smo in either pp endoderm or NC mesenchyme. Although no manipulation recapitulated the Shh null phenotype, manipulation of SHH signaling in either the endoderm or NC mesenchyme had direct and indirect effects on both cell types during fate specification and organogenesis. SHH pathway activation throughout pouch endoderm activated ectopic Tbx1 expression and partially suppressed the thymus-specific transcription factor Foxn1, identifying Tbx1 as a key target of SHH signaling in the 3rd pp. However, ectopic SHH signaling was insufficient to expand the GCM2-positive parathyroid domain, indicating that multiple inputs, some of which might be independent of SHH signaling, are required for parathyroid fate specification. These data support a model in which SHH signaling plays both positive and negative roles in patterning and organogenesis of the thymus and parathyroids. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules. PMID:25755281

  6. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Iwata, Junichi

    2015-05-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules.

  7. REWARD PREDICTION ERROR SIGNALING IN POSTERIOR DORSOMEDIAL STRIATUM IS ACTION-SPECIFIC

    PubMed Central

    Stalnaker, TA; Calhoon, GG; Ogawa, M; Roesch, MR; Schoenbaum, G

    2012-01-01

    Neural correlates of reward prediction errors (RPEs) have been found in dorsal striatum. Such signals may be important for updating associative action representations within striatum. In order that the appropriate representations can be updated, it might be important for the RPE signal to be specific for the action that led to that error. However, RPEs signaled by midbrain dopamine neurons, which project heavily to striatum, are not action-specific. Here we tested whether RPE-like activity in dorsal striatum is action-specific; we recorded single-unit activity in posterior dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum as rats performed a task in which the reward predictions associated with two different actions were repeatedly violated, thereby eliciting RPEs. We separately analyzed fast firing neurons (FFNs) and phasically firing neurons (PFNs) (total n = 1076). Only among FFNs recorded in posterior dorsomedial striatum did we find a population with RPE-like characteristics (19 of all 196 FFNs, 10%). This population showed a phasic increase in activity during unexpected rewards, a phasic decrease in activity during unexpected omission of rewards, and a phasic increase in activity during cues when they predicted high-value reward.. However, unlike a classical RPE signal, this signal was linked to the action that elicited the prediction error, in that neurons tended to signal RPEs only after their anti-preferred action. This action-specific RPE-like signal could provide a mechanism for updating specific associative action representations in posterior dorsomedial striatum. PMID:22836263

  8. Reward prediction error signaling in posterior dorsomedial striatum is action specific.

    PubMed

    Stalnaker, Thomas A; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G; Ogawa, Masaaki; Roesch, Matthew R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2012-07-25

    Neural correlates of reward prediction errors (RPEs) have been found in dorsal striatum. Such signals may be important for updating associative action representations within striatum. In order that the appropriate representations can be updated, it might be important for the RPE signal to be specific for the action that led to that error. However, RPEs signaled by midbrain dopamine neurons, which project heavily to striatum, are not action-specific. Here we tested whether RPE-like activity in dorsal striatum is action-specific; we recorded single-unit activity in posterior dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum as rats performed a task in which the reward predictions associated with two different actions were repeatedly violated, thereby eliciting RPEs. We separately analyzed fast firing neurons (FFNs) and phasically firing neurons (total n = 1076). Only among FFNs recorded in posterior dorsomedial striatum did we find a population with RPE-like characteristics (19 of all 196 FFNs, 10%). This population showed a phasic increase in activity during unexpected rewards, a phasic decrease in activity during unexpected omission of rewards, and a phasic increase in activity during cues when they predicted high-value reward. However, unlike a classical RPE signal, this signal was linked to the action that elicited the prediction error, in that neurons tended to signal RPEs only after their anti-preferred action. This action-specific RPE-like signal could provide a mechanism for updating specific associative action representations in posterior dorsomedial striatum.

  9. The 20 kilovolt rocket borne electron accelerator. [equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R.

    1973-01-01

    The accelerator system is a preprogrammed multi-voltage system capable of operating at a current level of 1/2 ampere at the 20 kilovolt level. The five major functional areas which comprise this system are: (1) Silver zinc battery packs; (2) the electron gun assembly; (3) gun control and opening circuits; (4) the telemetry conditioning section; and (5) the power conversion section.

  10. Spectral signals from electronic dynamics in sodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Calvayrac, F.; Reinhard, P.G.; Suraud, E.

    1997-03-01

    We study the dynamics of the electron cloud in sodium clusters for small and large amplitude excitations in the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA), without referring to linear approximations. In particular, we discuss the interpretation of strength function and power spectrum as obtained from dynamical calculations. We demonstrate the constructive and destructive interference contained in the various spectral states. We search for a special signature of nonlinear couplings in the large amplitude regime, but do not find pronounced effects. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  11. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Efremenko, Yuri; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Green, M. P.; Radford, D. C.; Romero-Romero, E.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Majorana,

    2015-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a planned 40 kg array of Germanium detectors intended to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a tonne-scale experiment that will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0 nu beta beta) in Ge-76. Such an experiment would require backgrounds of less than 1 count/tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest around the 2039 keV Q-value of the beta beta decay. Designing low-noise electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, presents a challenge to reaching this background target. This paper will discuss the MAJORANA collaboration's solutions to some of these challenges.

  12. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  13. Diversity and specificity: auxin perception and signaling through the TIR1/AFB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Renhou; Estelle, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Auxin is a versatile plant hormone that plays an essential role in most aspects of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates various growth processes by modulating gene transcription through a SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA-ARF nuclear signaling module. Recent work has generated clues as to how multiple layers of regulation of the auxin signaling components may result in diverse and specific response outputs. Finally, in particular, interaction and structural studies of key auxin signaling proteins have produced novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription and may lead to a refined auxin signaling model.

  14. Diversity and specificity: auxin perception and signaling through the TIR1/AFB pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Renhou; Estelle, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Auxin is a versatile plant hormone that plays an essential role in most aspects of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates various growth processes by modulating gene transcription through a SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA-ARF nuclear signaling module. Recent work has generated clues as to how multiple layers of regulation of the auxin signaling components may result in diverse and specific response outputs. Finally, in particular, interaction and structural studies of key auxin signaling proteins have produced novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription and may lead to a refined auxin signaling model.

  15. Signal transduction meets systems biology: deciphering specificity determinants for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Two recent papers [Gao et al. Mol. Microbiol. 69, 1358 (2008); Skerker et al. Cell 133, 1043 (2008)] describe investigations into the specificity of protein-protein interactions that occur during signal transduction by two-component regulatory systems. This MicroCommentary summarizes and provides context for the reported findings. The results offer insights into molecular determinants that provide specificity to maintain signal separation and thus prevent deleterious crosstalk between pathways, as well as the potential extent and nature of interactions that may combine signals to achieve beneficial cross regulation among pathways. The methods employed are suitable for application to other systems. PMID:18694439

  16. Spectra of equatorial total electron content derived from GPS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kamp, M. M. J. L.; Cannon, P. S.

    2009-05-01

    High cadence GPS TEC signals collected on Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, during sunspot minimum, and in Vanimo, Papua New Guinea, over half a solar cycle, have been analysed for their spectral properties. A new parameter Tk has been introduced to quantify the strength of TEC irregularities at a scale size of 1 km. The scintillation strength and the spectral index have been analysed as functions of each other, and of local time, season, location and sunspot number. The scintillation strength is highest in autumn and spring in both locations, although the quietest period is summer in Ascension and winter in Vanimo. The scintillation strength decreases with decreasing sunspot number, but is consistently lower in Vanimo than in Ascension. The spectral index decreases with scintillation strength, and increases during the hours of the evening. A method is developed to estimate Tk from the large data base of S4 measurements.

  17. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  18. Interpretation of the electron cyclotron emission signal from optically marginal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Muhammad Khawar; Yun, Gunsu S.; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.

    2017-02-01

    The interpretation of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal from the optically marginal region of magnetized plasma is presented. The density and the temperature fluctuations associated with the edge localized modes (ELMs) observed in the KSTAR tokamak are estimated by assuming an ELM filamentary structure as a flux tube bulges out like a ballooning mode instability. Synthetic ECE signals from the rotating ELM are calculated based on the measured electron temperature profile and an assumed electron density profile constrained by the measured line-averaged density, yielding an 0.02 relative fluctuation level in agreement with the experimental observations. The measured ECE signal is nearly in phase with the density modulation associated with the rotating ELM. This implies that the ECE signal corresponding to the ELM filaments has a significant contribution from the density fluctuations.

  19. Low background signal readout electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C-H; Yumatov, V.

    2015-05-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a planned 40 kg array of Germanium detectors intended to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a tonne-scale experiment that will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge. In such an experiment we require backgrounds of less than 1 count/tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest around the 2039 keV Q-value of the ββ decay. Moreover, designing low-noise electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, presents a challenge to reaching this background target. Finally, this paper will discuss the Majorana collaboration's solutions to some of these challenges.

  20. Low background signal readout electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    DOE PAGES

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T.; ...

    2015-05-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a planned 40 kg array of Germanium detectors intended to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a tonne-scale experiment that will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge. In such an experiment we require backgrounds of less than 1 count/tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest around the 2039 keV Q-value of the ββ decay. Moreover, designing low-noise electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, presents a challenge to reaching this background target. Finally, this paper will discuss the Majorana collaboration's solutions to some of these challenges.

  1. Effect of Rabi splitting on the low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance signal of anthracite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedaruk, Ryhor; Strzelczyk, Roman; Tadyszak, Krzysztof; Markevich, Siarhei A.; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria Aldona

    2017-01-01

    Specific distortions of the EPR signal of bulk anthracite are observed at low temperatures. They are accompanied by variations in the microwave oscillator frequency and are explained by the manifestation of the Rabi splitting due to the strong coupling between electron spins and the cavity, combined with the use of an automatic frequency-control (AFC) system. EPR signals are recorded at negligible saturation in the temperature range of 4-300 K with use of the AFC system to keep the oscillator frequency locked to the resonant frequency of the TM110 cylinder cavity loaded with the sample. For the sample with a mass of 3.6 mg the line distortions are observed below 50 K and increase with temperature lowering. The oscillator frequency variations are used to estimate the coupling strength as well as the number of spins in the sample. It is shown that the spin-cavity coupling strength is inversely proportional to temperature and can be used for the absolute determination of the number of spins in a sample. Our results indicate that at low temperatures even 1016 spins of the anthracite sample, with a mass of about 0.5 mg, can distort the EPR line.

  2. Control packet signaling mechanism using electronic code division multiple access for packet-based networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Nishaanthan

    2008-10-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of a control packet signaling technique using electronic code division multiple access for a wavelength division multiplexing packet-based network, whereby each wavelength channel is assigned a unique electronic code based label on a radio frequency subcarrier. Such a technique allows each wavelength channel to be electronically identified without requiring the use of a WDM demultiplexer. We experimentally demonstrate this technique with two wavelength channels each with 1.25 Gb/s baseband payload data and 10 Mb/s header coded onto an electronic code at 160 Mb/s. A performance study of the electronic code division multiple access based control signaling scheme in a wavelength division multiplexed packet-based access network is also performed in terms of the required power budget to monitor the electronic code division multiple access control signals in the presence of several sources of noise for error-free transmission of both payload data and electronic code division multiple access based control signals. It is shown that the modulation depth of each signal impacts the amount of required optical tap power. As the modulation depth of the electronic code division multiple access based control signal is increased, the required optical tap power is reduced. However, this increases the bit-error-rate for the payload data. Therefore, there lies a maximum and a minimum of the required tap optical power for the successful recovery of both signals. The lower bound of this range is usually determined by the successful recovery of electronic code division multiple access based control signal while the upper bound is determined by the successful recovery of payload data. The required optical tap power is analyzed for different transmission bit rates of the payload data for various receiver architecture scenarios without an optical amplifier at the receiver. The scalability analyses were repeated with an optical

  3. Position Sensor with Integrated Signal-Conditioning Electronics on a Printed Wiring Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A position sensor, such as a rotary position sensor, includes the signal-conditioning electronics in the housing. The signal-conditioning electronics are disposed on a printed wiring board, which is assembled with another printed wiring board including the sensor windings to provide a sub-assembly. A mu-metal shield is interposed between the printed wiring boards to prevent magnetic interference. The sub-assembly is disposed in the sensor housing adjacent to an inductor board which turns on a shaft. The inductor board emanates an internally or externally generated excitation signal that induces a signal in the sensor windings. The induced signal represents the rotary position of the inductor board relative to the sensor winding board.

  4. Position Sensor with Integrated Signal-Conditioning Electronics on a Printed Wiring Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A position sensor, such as a rotary position sensor, includes the signal-conditioning electronics in the housing. The signal-conditioning electronics are disposed on a printed wiring board, which is assembled with another printed wiring board including the sensor windings to provide a sub-assembly. A mu-metal shield is interposed between the printed wiring boards to prevent magnetic interference. The sub-assembly is disposed in the sensor housing adjacent to an inductor board which turns on a shaft. The inductor board emanates an internally or externally generated excitation signal that induces a signal in the sensor windings. The induced signal represents the rotary position of the inductor board relative to the sensor winding board.

  5. BMP signaling orchestrates photoreceptor specification in the zebrafish pineal gland in collaboration with Notch.

    PubMed

    Quillien, Aurélie; Blanco-Sanchez, Bernardo; Halluin, Caroline; Moore, John C; Lawson, Nathan D; Blader, Patrick; Cau, Elise

    2011-06-01

    A variety of signaling pathways have been shown to regulate specification of neuronal subtype identity. However, the mechanisms by which future neurons simultaneously process information from multiple pathways to establish their identity remain poorly understood. The zebrafish pineal gland offers a simple system with which to address questions concerning the integration of signaling pathways during neural specification as it contains only two types of neurons - photoreceptors and projection neurons. We have previously shown that Notch signaling inhibits the projection neuron fate. Here, we show that BMP signaling is both necessary and sufficient to promote the photoreceptor fate. We also demonstrate that crosstalk between BMP and Notch signaling is required for the inhibition of a projection neuron fate in future photoreceptors. In this case, BMP signaling is required as a competence factor for the efficient activation of Notch targets. Our results indicate that both the induction of a photoreceptor fate and the interaction with Notch relies on a canonical BMP/Smad5 pathway. However, the activation of Notch-dependent transcription does not require a canonical Smad5-DNA interaction. Our results provide new insights into how multiple signaling influences are integrated during cell fate specification in the vertebrate CNS.

  6. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  7. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  8. Frizzled-Dishevelled signaling specificity outcome can be modulated by Diego in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Jenny, Andreas; Mirkovic, Ivana; Mlodzik, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Frizzled (Fz) family of seven-pass transmembrane receptors are required for the transduction of both Wnt-Fz/β-catenin and Fz/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signals. Although both pathways transduce signals via interactions between Fz and the cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dsh), each pathway has specific and distinct effectors. One explanation for the pathway specificity is that signal-induced conformational changes result in unique Fz-Dsh interactions. Our mutational analyses of Fz-Dsh activities in vivo do however not support this model, since both pathways are affected by all mutations tested. Alternatively, the interaction of Fz or Dsh with other proteins could modulate the signaling outcome. We examined the role of a Dsh-binding PCP molecule, Diego (Dgo), in both Wnt-Fz/β-catenin and Fz/PCP signaling. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function results suggest that Dgo promotes Fz-Dsh/PCP signaling at the expense of Wnt-Fz/β-catenin signaling. Our data suggest that Dgo sequesters Dsh to a functionally distinct Fz/PCP signaling compartment within the cell. PMID:18065209

  9. Oligodendrocyte-specific activation of PERK signaling protects mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng; Li, Jin; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Way, Sharon W; Clayton, Benjamin; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2013-04-03

    There is compelling evidence that oligodendrocyte apoptosis, in response to CNS inflammation, contributes significantly to the development of the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, approaches designed to protect oligodendrocytes would likely have therapeutic value. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases cell survival under various cytotoxic conditions. Moreover, there is evidence that PERK signaling is activated in oligodendrocytes within demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis and EAE. Our previous study demonstrated that CNS delivery of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ before EAE onset protected mice against EAE, and this protection was dependent on PERK signaling. In our current study, we sought to elucidate the role of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes during EAE. We generated transgenic mice that allow for temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling, in the absence of ER stress, specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent activation of PERK signaling was not deleterious to oligodendrocyte viability or the myelin of adult animals. Importantly, we found that enhanced activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes significantly attenuated EAE disease severity, which was associated with reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. This effect was not the result of an altered degree of the inflammatory response in EAE mice. Our results provide direct evidence that activation of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes is cytoprotective, protecting mice against EAE.

  10. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication ‘bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours. PMID:28094788

  11. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication `bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  12. Specificity residues determine binding affinity for two-component signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Tiwari, Nitija; Müller, Susanne; Hummels, Katherine R; Houtman, Jon C D; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-05

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprise histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators and allow bacteria to sense and respond to a wide variety of signals. Histidine kinases (HKs) phosphorylate and dephosphorylate their cognate response regulators (RRs) in response to stimuli. In general, these reactions appear to be highly specific and require an appropriate association between the HK and RR proteins. The Myxococcus xanthus genome encodes one of the largest repertoires of signaling proteins in bacteria (685 open reading frames [ORFs]), including at least 127 HKs and at least 143 RRs. Of these, 27 are bona fide NtrC-family response regulators, 21 of which are encoded adjacent to their predicted cognate kinases. Using system-wide profiling methods, we determined that the HK-NtrC RR pairs display a kinetic preference during both phosphotransfer and phosphatase functions, thereby defining cognate signaling systems in M. xanthus. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicated that cognate HK-RR pairs interact with dissociation constants (Kd) of approximately 1 µM, while noncognate pairs had no measurable binding. Lastly, a chimera generated between the histidine kinase, CrdS, and HK1190 revealed that residues conferring phosphotransfer and phosphatase specificity dictate binding affinity, thereby establishing discrete protein-protein interactions which prevent cross talk. The data indicate that binding affinity is a critical parameter governing system-wide signaling fidelity for bacterial signal transduction proteins. Using in vitro phosphotransfer and phosphatase profiling assays and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have taken a system-wide approach to demonstrate specificity for a family of two-component signaling proteins in Myxococcus xanthus. Our results demonstrate that previously identified specificity residues dictate binding affinity and that phosphatase specificity follows phosphotransfer specificity for cognate HK-RR pairs. The data

  13. A New Wavelet Denoising Method for Experimental Time-Domain Signals: Pulsed Dipolar Electron Spin Resonance.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Madhur; Georgieva, Elka R; Freed, Jack H

    2017-03-30

    We adapt a new wavelet-transform-based method of denoising experimental signals to pulse-dipolar electron-spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS). We show that signal averaging times of the time-domain signals can be reduced by as much as 2 orders of magnitude, while retaining the fidelity of the underlying signals, in comparison with noiseless reference signals. We have achieved excellent signal recovery when the initial noisy signal has an SNR ≳ 3. This approach is robust and is expected to be applicable to other time-domain spectroscopies. In PDS, these time-domain signals representing the dipolar interaction between two electron spin labels are converted into their distance distribution functions P(r), usually by regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization. The significant improvements achieved by using denoised signals for this regularization are described. We show that they yield P(r)'s with more accurate detail and yield clearer separations of respective distances, which is especially important when the P(r)'s are complex. Also, longer distance P(r)'s, requiring longer dipolar evolution times, become accessible after denoising. In comparison to standard wavelet denoising approaches, it is clearly shown that the new method (WavPDS) is superior.

  14. [Security specifications for electronic medical records on the Internet].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Mihai; Mocanu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The extension for the Web applications of the Electronic Medical Record seems both interesting and promising. Correlated with the expansion of Internet in our country, it allows the interconnection of physicians of different specialties and their collaboration for better treatment of patients. In this respect, the ophthalmologic medical applications consider the increased possibilities for monitoring chronic ocular diseases and for the identification of some elements for early diagnosis and risk factors supervision. We emphasize in this survey some possible solutions to the problems of interconnecting medical information systems to the Internet: the achievement of interoperability within medical organizations through the use of open standards, the automated input and processing for ocular imaging, the use of data reduction techniques in order to increase the speed of image retrieval in large databases, and, last but not least, the resolution of security and confidentiality problems in medical databases.

  15. Targeting tissue-specific metabolic signaling pathways in aging: the promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that most of the age-related diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis are all closely related to metabolic dysfunction. On the other hand, interventions on metabolism such as calorie restriction or genetic manipulations of key metabolic signaling pathways such as the insulin and mTOR signaling pathways slow down the aging process and improve healthy aging. These findings raise an important question as to whether improving energy homeostasis by targeting certain metabolic signaling pathways in specific tissues could be an effective anti-aging strategy. With a more comprehensive understanding of the tissue-specific roles of distinct metabolic signaling pathways controlling energy homeostasis and the cross-talks between these pathways during aging may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions not only for metabolic dysfunction but also for aging.

  16. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Avignone, Frank T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-03-18

    The Majorana Demonstrator (MJD)[1] is an array of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors intended to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0vBB decay) in 76Ge. MJD will consist of 40 kg of detectors, 30 kg of which will be isotopically enriched to 87% 76Ge. The array will consist of 14 strings of four or ve detectors placed in two separate cryostats. One of the main goals of the experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a tonne-scale array of detectors to search for 0vBB decay with a much higher sensitivity. This involves acheiving backgrounds in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the BB decay of less than 1 count/ROI-t-y. Because many backgrounds will not directly scale with detector mass, the specific background goal of MJD is less than 3 counts/ROI-t-y.

  17. Cross-talk and specificity in two-component signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ruchi; Sahoo, Bikash Kumar; Saini, Deepak Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Two-component signaling systems (TCSs) are composed of two proteins, sensor kinases and response regulators, which can cross-talk and integrate information between them by virtue of high-sequence conservation and modular nature, to generate concerted and diversified responses. However, TCSs have been shown to be insulated, to facilitate linear signal transmission and response generation. Here, we discuss various mechanisms that confer specificity or cross-talk among TCSs. The presented models are supported with evidence that indicate the physiological significance of the observed TCS signaling architecture. Overall, we propose that the signaling topology of any TCSs cannot be predicted using obvious sequence or structural rules, as TCS signaling is regulated by multiple factors, including spatial and temporal distribution of the participating proteins.

  18. Smad phosphoisoform signaling specificity: the right place at the right time.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2011-11-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β antagonizes mitogenic Ras signaling during epithelial regeneration, but TGF-β and Ras act synergistically in driving tumor progression. Insights into these apparently contradictory effects have come from recent detailed analyses of the TGF-β signaling process. Here, we summarize the different modes of TGF-β/Ras signaling in normal epithelium and neoplasms and show how perturbation of TGF-β signaling by Ras may contribute to a shift from tumor-suppressive to protumorigenic TGF-β activity during tumor progression. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, have intermediate linker regions between conserved Mad homology (MH) 1 and MH2 domains. TGF-β Type I receptor and Ras-associated kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create C-terminally (C), linker (L) or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p) isoforms. In epithelial homeostasis, TGF-β-mediated pSmad3C signaling opposes proliferative responses induced by mitogenic signals. During carcinogenesis, activation of cytoplasmic Ras-associated kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinase confers a selective advantage on benign tumors by shifting Smad3 signaling from a tumor-suppressive pSmad3C to an oncogenic pSmad3L pathway, leading to carcinoma in situ. Finally, at the edges of advanced carcinomas invading adjacent tissues, nuclear Ras-associated kinases such as cyclin-dependent kinases, together with cytoplasmic kinases, alter TGF-β signals to more invasive and proliferative pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C signaling. Taken together, TGF-β signaling specificity arises from spatiotemporal dynamics of Smad phosphoisoforms. Based on these findings, we have reason to hope that pharmacologic inhibition of linker phosphorylation might suppress progression to human advanced carcinomas by switching from protumorigenic to tumor-suppressive TGF-β signaling.

  19. Development of a new model system to dissect isoform specific Akt signalling in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajno, Esi; McGraw, Timothy E; Gonzalez, Eva

    2015-06-15

    Protein kinase B (Akt) kinases are critical signal transducers mediating insulin action. Genetic studies revealed that Akt1 and Akt2 signalling differentially contribute to sustain lipid and glucose homoeostasis; however Akt isoform-specific effectors remain elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system to mechanistically interrogate Akt isoform-specific signalling. To overcome those technical limitations we developed a novel model system that provides acute and specific control of signalling by Akt isoforms. We generated mutants of Akt1 and Akt2 resistant to the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206. We then developed adipocyte cell lines, in which endogenous Akt1 or Akt2 has been replaced by their corresponding drug-resistant Akt mutant. Treatment of those cells with MK-2206 allowed for acute and specific control of either Akt1 or Akt2 function. Our data showed that Akt1(W80A) and Akt2(W80A) mutants are resistant to MK-2206, dynamically regulated by insulin and able to signal to Akt downstream effectors. Analyses of insulin action in this cellular system showed that Akt1 and Akt2 are both able to mediate insulin regulation of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), revealing a redundant role for these Akt kinases in the control of glucose transport into fat cells. In contrast, Akt1 signalling is uniquely required for adipogenesis, by controlling the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of pre-adipocytes that precedes white adipose cell differentiation. Our data provide new insights into the role of Akt kinases in glucose transport and adipogenesis and support our model system as a valuable tool for the biochemical characterization of signalling by specific Akt isoforms. © 2015 Authors.

  20. SoxB1-driven transcriptional network underlies neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signals.

    PubMed

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Ensterö, Mats; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2013-04-30

    The reiterative deployment of a small cadre of morphogen signals underlies patterning and growth of most tissues during embyogenesis, but how such inductive events result in tissue-specific responses remains poorly understood. By characterizing cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with genes regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), retinoids, or bone morphogenetic proteins in the CNS, we provide evidence that the neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signaling reflects a direct integration of these pathways with SoxB1 proteins at the CRM level. Moreover, expression of SoxB1 proteins in the limb bud confers on mesodermal cells the potential to activate neural-specific target genes upon Shh, retinoid, or bone morphogenetic protein signaling, and the collocation of binding sites for SoxB1 and morphogen-mediatory transcription factors in CRMs faithfully predicts neural-specific gene activity. Thus, an unexpectedly simple transcriptional paradigm appears to conceptually explain the neural-specific interpretation of pleiotropic signaling during vertebrate development. Importantly, genes induced in a SoxB1-dependent manner appear to constitute repressive gene regulatory networks that are directly interlinked at the CRM level to constrain the regional expression of patterning genes. Accordingly, not only does the topology of SoxB1-driven gene regulatory networks provide a tissue-specific mode of gene activation, but it also determines the spatial expression pattern of target genes within the developing neural tube.

  1. Tissue- and stage-specific modulation of Wingless signaling by the segment polarity gene lines

    PubMed Central

    Hatini, Victor; Bokor, Peter; Goto-Mandeville, Ryoko; DiNardo, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Wnt signaling controls a variety of developmental programs but the mechanisms by which the same signal leads to distinct outputs remain unclear. To address this question, we identified stage-specific modulators of Wingless (Wg) signaling in the Drosophila embryonic epidermis. We show that lines (lin) is essential for Wg-dependent patterning in dorsal epidermis. lin encodes a novel protein that acts cell-autonomously, downstream or in parallel to Armadillo (Arm) and upstream of Wg-dependent target genes. Lin can accumulate in nuclei of cells signaled by Wg, suggesting that signaling promotes entry of Lin into the nucleus, where it cooperates with Arm and Pangolin. Thus, a stage-specific modulator is used to mediate Wg signaling activity in dorsal patterning. Hedgehog (Hh) controls half of the parasegmental pattern dorsally and antagonizes Wg function to do so. Lin can accumulate in the cytoplasm of cells signaled by Hh, suggesting that Hh antagonizes Wg function by prohibiting Lin from entering the nucleus. PMID:10837029

  2. Wnt signaling balances specification of the cardiac and pharyngeal muscle fields.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amrita; Holowiecki, Andrew; Song, Yuntao Charlie; Waxman, Joshua S

    2017-02-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) signaling plays multiple conserved roles during fate specification of cardiac progenitors in developing vertebrate embryos. Although lineage analysis in ascidians and mice has indicated there is a close relationship between the cardiac second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscle (PM) progenitors, the signals underlying directional fate decisions of the cells within the cardio-pharyngeal muscle field in vertebrates are not yet understood. Here, we examined the temporal requirements of Wnt signaling in cardiac and PM development. In contrast to a previous report in chicken embryos that suggested Wnt inhibits PM development during somitogenesis, we find that in zebrafish embryos Wnt signaling is sufficient to repress PM development during anterior-posterior patterning. Importantly, the temporal sensitivity of dorso-anterior PMs to increased Wnt signaling largely overlaps with when Wnt signaling promotes specification of the adjacent cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we find that excess early Wnt signaling can cell autonomously promote expansion of the first heart field (FHF) progenitors at the expense of PM and SHF within the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM). Our study provides insight into an antagonistic developmental mechanism that balances the sizes of the adjacent cardiac and PM progenitor fields in early vertebrate embryos. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Precise measurement method for ionospheric total electron content using signals from GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imae, Michito; Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Akihiro; Hama, Shinichi; Miki, Chihiro

    1990-01-01

    A GPS codeless receiver called GTR-2 was for measuring total electron content (TEC) along the line of sight to the GPS satellite by using the cross correlation amplitude of the received P-code signals carried by L1(1575.42 MHz) and L2(1227.6 MHz). This equipment has the performance of uncertainty in the measurement of TEC of about 2 X 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m when a 10 dBi gain antenna was used. To increase the measurement performance, an upper version of GTR-2 called GTR-3 is planned which uses the phase information of the continuous signals obtained by making a cross correlation or multiplication of the received L1 and L2 P-code signals. By using the difference of these measured phases values, the ionospheric delay with the ambiguities of the periods of L1+L2 and L1-L2 signals can be estimated.

  4. Tbx2 regulates anterior neural specification by repressing FGF signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Park, Dong-Seok; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2017-01-15

    During early embryogenesis, FGF signals regulate the antero-posterior (AP) patterning of the neural plate by promoting posterior cell fates. In particular, BMP signal-mediated attenuation of FGF pathway plays a critical role in the determination of the anterior neural region. Here we show that Tbx2, a T-box transcriptional repressor regulates anterior neural specification by suppressing FGF8 signaling pathway in Xenopus embryo. Tbx2 is expressed in the anterior edge of the neural plate in early neurulae. Overexpression and knockdown of Tbx2 induce expansion and reduction in the expression of anterior neural markers, respectively. It also suppresses FGF8-induced ERK phosphorylation and neural caudalization. Tbx2, which is a target gene of BMP signal, down-regulates FGF8 signaling by inhibiting the expression of Flrt3, a positive regulator of this pathway. We found that Tbx2 binds directly to the T-box element located in the promoter region of Flrt3 gene, thereby interfering with the activity of the promoter. Consistently, Tbx2 augmentation of anterior neural formation is inhibited by co-expression of Flrt3. Furthermore, disruption of the anterior-most structures such as eyes in Tbx2-depleted embryos can be rescued by inhibition of Flrt3 function or FGF signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that Tbx2 mediates BMP signal to down-regulate FGF signaling pathway by repressing Flrt3 expression for anterior tissue formation.

  5. Comparisons of Electron and Muon Signals in the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeters with GEANT4 Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchekroun, D.; Karpetian, G.; Mazini, R.; Kiryunin, A.; Salihagic, D.; Strizenec, P.; Kish, J.; Kordas, K.; Parrour, G.; Leltchouk, M.; Negroni, S.; Seligman, W.; Loch, P.; Soukharev, A.

    2002-01-01

    Signals from electrons and muons taken at testbeams with different modules of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter have been compared to corresponding simulations using the GEANT4 toolkit. These simulations have also been compared in some detail with GEANT3 based predictions. Results for signal linearity, energy resolution, and shower shapes all generally indicate a good agreement between experiment and the two simulation packages, typically at the level of a few percent.

  6. A dynamic scanning method based on signal-statistics for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Timischl, F

    2014-01-01

    A novel dynamic scanning method for noise reduction in scanning electron microscopy and related applications is presented. The scanning method dynamically adjusts the scanning speed of the electron beam depending on the statistical behavior of the detector signal and gives SEM images with uniform and predefined standard deviation, independent of the signal value itself. In the case of partially saturated images, the proposed method decreases image acquisition time without sacrificing image quality. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown and compared to the conventional scanning method and median filtering using numerical simulations.

  7. Microwave signal amplification and Pierce instability on radial electron flows in cylindrical and spherical diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnavi, G.; Gratton, F.T. )

    1994-11-01

    Linear space charge perturbations of focused electron beams flowing between cylindrical and spherical electrodes on convergent or divergent trajectories are studied, and the amplification of high-frequency signals when the flow is modulated at one electrode is computed. It is shown that divergent beams give the largest amplification effect. The instability of electron beams drifting through grounded grids (Pierce instability in cylindrical or spherical diodes) is also considered. The instability threshold occurs at higher critical currents when the curvature of the electrodes is large. Results for planar electrodes are recovered in the limit of zero curvature devices. Spherical configurations have better signal amplification and stability properties than similar planar or cylindrical systems.

  8. SUMOylation of AMPKα1 by PIAS4 specifically regulates mTORC1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Ollila, Saara; Wong, Iris P. L.; Vallenius, Tea; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Vaahtomeri, Kari; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibits several anabolic pathways such as fatty acid and protein synthesis, and identification of AMPK substrate specificity would be useful to understand its role in particular cellular processes and develop strategies to modulate AMPK activity in a substrate-specific manner. Here we show that SUMOylation of AMPKα1 attenuates AMPK activation specifically towards mTORC1 signalling. SUMOylation is also important for rapid inactivation of AMPK, to allow prompt restoration of mTORC1 signalling. PIAS4 and its SUMO E3 ligase activity are specifically required for the AMPKα1 SUMOylation and the inhibition of AMPKα1 activity towards mTORC1 signalling. The activity of a SUMOylation-deficient AMPKα1 mutant is higher than the wild type towards mTORC1 signalling when reconstituted in AMPKα-deficient cells. PIAS4 depletion reduced growth of breast cancer cells, specifically when combined with direct AMPK activator A769662, suggesting that inhibiting AMPKα1 SUMOylation can be explored to modulate AMPK activation and thereby suppress cancer cell growth. PMID:26616021

  9. Specification, annotation, visualization and simulation of a large rule-based model for ERBB receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical/computational models are needed to understand cell signaling networks, which are complex. Signaling proteins contain multiple functional components and multiple sites of post-translational modification. The multiplicity of components and sites of modification ensures that interactions among signaling proteins have the potential to generate myriad protein complexes and post-translational modification states. As a result, the number of chemical species that can be populated in a cell signaling network, and hence the number of equations in an ordinary differential equation model required to capture the dynamics of these species, is prohibitively large. To overcome this problem, the rule-based modeling approach has been developed for representing interactions within signaling networks efficiently and compactly through coarse-graining of the chemical kinetics of molecular interactions. Results Here, we provide a demonstration that the rule-based modeling approach can be used to specify and simulate a large model for ERBB receptor signaling that accounts for site-specific details of protein-protein interactions. The model is considered large because it corresponds to a reaction network containing more reactions than can be practically enumerated. The model encompasses activation of ERK and Akt, and it can be simulated using a network-free simulator, such as NFsim, to generate time courses of phosphorylation for 55 individual serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues. The model is annotated and visualized in the form of an extended contact map. Conclusions With the development of software that implements novel computational methods for calculating the dynamics of large-scale rule-based representations of cellular signaling networks, it is now possible to build and analyze models that include a significant fraction of the protein interactions that comprise a signaling network, with incorporation of the site-specific details of the interactions

  10. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  11. Research on Materials and Components for Opto-Electronic Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    devices may potentially be integrated monolithically on the same chip. The advantages of integrated opto-electronic signal processing include high...epitaxially on InP substrates by LPE or by MBE methods. Potentially, optical and electronic devices can be monolithically integrated on InGaAs/InP or InGaAsP...planar waveguides, it is necessary to integrate , focus, collimate, image or Fourier-analyze guided wave beams by efficient and low cost lenses that have

  12. Batteryless wireless transmission system for electronic drum uses piezoelectric generator for play signal and power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Takemura, K.; Tanaka, A.; Douseki, T.

    2015-12-01

    A batteryless self-powered wireless transmission system has been developed that sends a signal from a drum pad to a synthesizer. The power generated by a piezoelectric generator functions both as the “Play” signal for the synthesizer and as the power source for the transmitter. An FM transmitter, which theoretically operates with zero latency, and a receiver with quick-response squelch of the received signal were developed for wireless transmission with a minimum system delay. Experimental results for an electronic drum without any connecting wires fully demonstrated the feasibility of self-powered wireless transmission with a latency of 900 μs.

  13. Negative regulation of IL-17-mediated signaling and inflammation by ubiquitin-specific protease 25

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bo; Liu, Xikui; Wang, Xiaohu; Chang, Seon Hee; Liu, Xindong; Wang, Aibo; Reynolds, Joseph M.; Dong, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) plays an important role in infection and autoimmunity; how it signals remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified ubiquitin-specific protease 25 (USP25) as a negative regulator of IL-17-mediated signaling and inflammation. Overexpression of USP25 inhibited IL-17-triggered signaling, while USP25 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of IκBα and Jnk, increased expression of chemokines and cytokines as well as prolonged half-life of Cxcl1 mRNA following IL-17 treatment. Consistently, Usp25-/- mice exhibited increased sensitivity to IL-17-dependent inflammation and autoimmunity in vivo. Mechanistically, IL-17 stimulation induced the association of USP25 with TRAF5 and TRAF6 and USP25 induced removal of Act1-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination in TRAF5 and TRAF6. Thus, our results demonstrate that USP25 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that negatively regulates IL-17-triggered signaling. PMID:23042150

  14. Molecular basis for specificity of the Met1-linked polyubiquitin signal.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul R

    2016-12-15

    The post-translational modification of proteins provides a rapid and versatile system for regulating all signalling pathways. Protein ubiquitination is one such type of post-translational modification involved in controlling numerous cellular processes. The unique ability of ubiquitin to form polyubiquitin chains creates a highly complex code responsible for different subsequent signalling outcomes. Specialised enzymes ('writers') generate the ubiquitin code, whereas other enzymes ('erasers') disassemble it. Importantly, the ubiquitin code is deciphered by different ubiquitin-binding proteins ('readers') functioning to elicit particular cellular responses. Ten years ago, the methionine1 (Met1)-linked (linear) polyubiquitin code was first identified and the intervening years have witnessed a seismic shift in our understanding of Met1-linked polyubiquitin in cellular processes, particularly inflammatory signalling. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of specificity determination within Met1-linked polyubiquitin signalling.

  15. Molecular basis for specificity of the Met1-linked polyubiquitin signal

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins provides a rapid and versatile system for regulating all signalling pathways. Protein ubiquitination is one such type of post-translational modification involved in controlling numerous cellular processes. The unique ability of ubiquitin to form polyubiquitin chains creates a highly complex code responsible for different subsequent signalling outcomes. Specialised enzymes (‘writers’) generate the ubiquitin code, whereas other enzymes (‘erasers’) disassemble it. Importantly, the ubiquitin code is deciphered by different ubiquitin-binding proteins (‘readers’) functioning to elicit particular cellular responses. Ten years ago, the methionine1 (Met1)-linked (linear) polyubiquitin code was first identified and the intervening years have witnessed a seismic shift in our understanding of Met1-linked polyubiquitin in cellular processes, particularly inflammatory signalling. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of specificity determination within Met1-linked polyubiquitin signalling. PMID:27913667

  16. Genome-wide association study reveals sex-specific selection signals against autosomal nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongchan; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to examine genetic associations of common autosomal nucleotide variants with sex in a Korean population with 4183 males and 4659 females. Nine genetic association signals were identified in four intragenic and five intergenic regions (P<5 × 10(-8)). Further analysis with an independent data set confirmed two intragenic association signals in the genes encoding protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 12B (PPP1R12B, intron 12, rs1819043) and dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 11 (DNAH11, intron 61, rs10255013), which are directly involved in the reproductive system. This study revealed autosomal genetic variants associated with sex ratio by GWAS for the first time. This implies that genetic variants in proximity to the association signals may influence sex-specific selection and contribute to sex ratio variation. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms underlying sex-specific selection.

  17. Brain-Region Specific Apoptosis Triggered by Eph/ephrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Soochul

    2013-09-01

    Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are abundantly expressed in neuroepithelial cells of the early embryonic brain. Overstimulation of Eph signaling in vivo increases apoptotic cell death of neuroepithelial cells, whereas null mutation of the Eph gene leads to the development of a larger brain during embryogenesis. Thus, it appears that Eph-ephrin signaling plays a role in regulating apoptotic cell death of neuroepithelial cells, thereby influencing brain size during embryonic development. Interestingly, Eph-ephrin signaling is bi-directional, with forward signaling from ephrin- to Eph-expressing cells and reverse signaling from Eph- to ephrin-expressing cells. However, it is not clear whether this forward or reverse signaling plays a role in regulating the size of the neuroepithelial cell population during early brain development. Also, Eph receptors and their corresponding ligands are mutually exclusive in their expression domains, and they encounter each other only at interfaces between their expression domains. This expression pattern may be a critical mechanism for preventing overstimulation of Eph-ephrin signaling. Nevertheless, Eph receptors are co-expressed with their corresponding ligands in certain brain regions. Recently, two studies demonstrated that brain region-specific apoptosis may be triggered by the overlapping expression of Eph and ephrin, a theme that will be explored in this mini-review.

  18. UV-radiation-induced electron emission by hormones. Hypothesis for specific communication mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2009-11-01

    The highlights of recently observed electron emission from electronically excited sexual hormones (17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone) and the phytohormone genistein in polar media are briefly reviewed. The electron yield, Q(e aq-), dependence from substrate concentration, hormone structure, polarity of solvent, absorbed energy and temperature are discussed. The hormones reactivity with e aq- and efficiency in electron transfer ensure them the ability to communicate with other biological systems in an organism. A hypothesis is presented for the explanation of the mechanisms of the distinct recognition of signals transmitted by electrons, originating from different types of hormones to receiving centres. Biological consequences of the electron emission in respect to cancer are mentioned.

  19. The effects of wiggler taper rate and signal field gain rate in free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. P.; Kevorkian, J.

    1988-04-01

    A dimensionless formulation of the motion of electrons in free-electron lasers (FEL) with tapered wigglers is derived that takes into account the cumulative effects of tapering and signal field gain. The mathematical problem involves three small parameters: epsilon, measuring the slowness of spatial variations of the wiggler field; mu, the ratio of signal wavelength to wiggler period, and kappa, the square of the ratio of the plasma frequency to signal frequency. Two limits governing the relation between mu and epsilon and three limits governing the relation between kappa and epsilon are identified. The mathematical problems which result consist of the solution of strictly nonlinear oscillators with slowly varying parameters and small perturbation terms. Techniques from the asymptotic theory of nonlinear oscillations are used to derive results pertinent for FEL problems.

  20. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients.

  1. Detecting electronic coherence by multidimensional broadband stimulated x-ray Raman signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-08-01

    Nonstationary molecular states which contain electronic coherences can be impulsively created and manipulated by using recently developed ultrashort optical and x-ray pulses via photoexcitation, photoionization, and Auger processes. We propose several stimulated-Raman detection schemes that can monitor the subsequent phase-sensitive electronic and nuclear dynamics. Three detection protocols of an x-ray broadband probe are compared: frequency-dispersed transmission, integrated photon number change, and total pulse energy change. In addition, each can be either linear or quadratic in the x-ray probe intensity. These various signals offer different gating windows into the molecular response, which is described by correlation functions of electronic polarizabilities. Off-resonant and resonant signals are compared.

  2. Specificity Residues Determine Binding Affinity for Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Jonathan W.; Tiwari, Nitija; Müller, Susanne; Hummels, Katherine R.; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Fuentes, Ernesto J.; Kirby, John R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two-component systems (TCS) comprise histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators and allow bacteria to sense and respond to a wide variety of signals. Histidine kinases (HKs) phosphorylate and dephosphorylate their cognate response regulators (RRs) in response to stimuli. In general, these reactions appear to be highly specific and require an appropriate association between the HK and RR proteins. The Myxococcus xanthus genome encodes one of the largest repertoires of signaling proteins in bacteria (685 open reading frames [ORFs]), including at least 127 HKs and at least 143 RRs. Of these, 27 are bona fide NtrC-family response regulators, 21 of which are encoded adjacent to their predicted cognate kinases. Using system-wide profiling methods, we determined that the HK-NtrC RR pairs display a kinetic preference during both phosphotransfer and phosphatase functions, thereby defining cognate signaling systems in M. xanthus. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicated that cognate HK-RR pairs interact with dissociation constants (Kd) of approximately 1 µM, while noncognate pairs had no measurable binding. Lastly, a chimera generated between the histidine kinase, CrdS, and HK1190 revealed that residues conferring phosphotransfer and phosphatase specificity dictate binding affinity, thereby establishing discrete protein-protein interactions which prevent cross talk. The data indicate that binding affinity is a critical parameter governing system-wide signaling fidelity for bacterial signal transduction proteins. PMID:24194534

  3. Analysis of circadian pattern reveals tissue-specific alternative transcription in leptin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been previously reported that most mammalian genes display a circadian oscillation in their baseline expression. Consequently, the phase and amplitude of each component of a signal transduction cascade has downstream consequences. Results Here, we report our analysis of alternative transcripts in the leptin signaling pathway which is responsible for the systemic regulation of macronutrient storage and energy balance. We focused on the circadian expression pattern of a critical component of the leptin signaling system, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). On an Affymetrix GeneChip 430A2 microarray, this gene is represented by three probe sets targeting different regions within the 3' end of the last exon. We demonstrate that in murine brown adipose tissue two downstream 3' probe sets experience circadian baseline oscillation in counter-phase to the upstream probe set. Such differences in expression patterns are a telltale sign of alternative splicing within the last exon of SOCS3. In contrast, all three probe sets oscillated in a common phase in murine liver and white adipose tissue. This suggests that the regulation of SOCS3 expression in brown fat is tissue specific. Another component of the signaling pathway, Janus kinase (JAK), is directly regulated by SOCS and has alternative transcript probe sets oscillating in counter-phase in a white adipose tissue specific manner. Conclusion We hypothesize that differential oscillation of alternative transcripts may provide a mechanism to maintain steady levels of expression in spite of circadian baseline variation. PMID:18047714

  4. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling critically regulates early lineage specification in mouse embryonic stem cells and embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Lili; Yang, Acong; Lin, Jiangwei; Tang, Fan; Jin, Shibo; Wei, Zhe; Li, Jinsong; Jin, Ying

    2011-01-07

    Self-renewal and pluripotency are hallmarks of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, the signaling pathways that trigger their transition from self-renewal to differentiation remain elusive. Here, we report that calcineurin-NFAT signaling is both necessary and sufficient to switch ESCs from an undifferentiated state to lineage-specific cells and that the inhibition of this pathway can maintain long-term ESC self-renewal independent of leukemia inhibitory factor. Mechanistically, this pathway converges with the Erk1/2 pathway to regulate Src expression and promote the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process required for lineage specification in response to differentiation stimuli. Furthermore, calcineurin-NFAT signaling is activated when the earliest differentiation event occurs in mouse embryos, and its inhibition disrupts extraembryonic lineage development. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the NFAT and Erk1/2 cascades form a signaling switch for early lineage segregation in mouse ESCs and provide significant insights into the regulation of the balance between ESC self-renewal and early lineage specification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell-specific STORM superresolution imaging reveals nanoscale organization of cannabinoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Szilárd I.; Szabadits, Eszter; Pintér, Balázs; Woodhams, Stephen G.; Henstridge, Christopher M.; Balla, Gyula Y.; Nyilas, Rita; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Matolcsi, Máté; Cervenak, Judit; Kacskovics, Imre; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sagheddu, Claudia; Melis, Miriam; Pistis, Marco; Soltesz, Ivan; Katona, István

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to determine the nanoscale position and quantity of signaling molecules in a cell-type-, and subcellular compartment-specific manner. We therefore developed a novel approach combining cell-specific physiological and anatomical characterization with superresolution imaging, and studied the molecular and structural parameters shaping the physiological properties of synaptic endocannabinoid signaling in the mouse hippocampus. We found that axon terminals of perisomatically-projecting GABAergic interneurons possess increased CB1 receptor number, active-zone complexity, and receptor/effector ratio compared to dendritically-projecting interneurons, in agreement with higher efficiency of cannabinoid signaling at somatic versus dendritic synapses. Furthermore, chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration, which reduces cannabinoid efficacy on GABA release, evoked dramatic CB1-downregulation in a dose-dependent manner. Full receptor recovery required several weeks after cessation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment. These findings demonstrate that cell-type-specific nanoscale analysis of endogenous protein distribution is possible in brain circuits, and identify novel molecular properties controlling endocannabinoid signaling and cannabis-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25485758

  6. Cell-specific STORM super-resolution imaging reveals nanoscale organization of cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Dudok, Barna; Barna, László; Ledri, Marco; Szabó, Szilárd I; Szabadits, Eszter; Pintér, Balázs; Woodhams, Stephen G; Henstridge, Christopher M; Balla, Gyula Y; Nyilas, Rita; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Matolcsi, Máté; Cervenak, Judit; Kacskovics, Imre; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sagheddu, Claudia; Melis, Miriam; Pistis, Marco; Soltesz, Ivan; Katona, István

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to determine the nanoscale position and quantity of signaling molecules in a cell type- and subcellular compartment-specific manner. We developed a new approach to this problem by combining cell-specific physiological and anatomical characterization with super-resolution imaging and studied the molecular and structural parameters shaping the physiological properties of synaptic endocannabinoid signaling in the mouse hippocampus. We found that axon terminals of perisomatically projecting GABAergic interneurons possessed increased CB1 receptor number, active-zone complexity and receptor/effector ratio compared with dendritically projecting interneurons, consistent with higher efficiency of cannabinoid signaling at somatic versus dendritic synapses. Furthermore, chronic Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol administration, which reduces cannabinoid efficacy on GABA release, evoked marked CB1 downregulation in a dose-dependent manner. Full receptor recovery required several weeks after the cessation of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment. These findings indicate that cell type-specific nanoscale analysis of endogenous protein distribution is possible in brain circuits and identify previously unknown molecular properties controlling endocannabinoid signaling and cannabis-induced cognitive dysfunction.

  7. The Legalities and Practicalities of Developing a Course-Specific Electronic Reserve Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary A.; Curran, Kent E.

    2002-01-01

    Advocates a course-specific electronic reserve for timely, simplified distribution of course readings. Provides guidelines for the copyright and fair use implications of electronic reserve, suggesting a password-protected site. Explains the logistics of file creation, software, and hardware. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  8. The Legalities and Practicalities of Developing a Course-Specific Electronic Reserve Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary A.; Curran, Kent E.

    2002-01-01

    Advocates a course-specific electronic reserve for timely, simplified distribution of course readings. Provides guidelines for the copyright and fair use implications of electronic reserve, suggesting a password-protected site. Explains the logistics of file creation, software, and hardware. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  9. Chronic FLT3-ITD Signaling in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Connected to a Specific Chromatin Signature

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; James, Sally R.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Ptasinska, Anetta; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Assi, Salam A.; Piper, Jason; Canestraro, Martina; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Raghavan, Manoj; Loke, Justin; Akiki, Susanna; Clokie, Samuel J.; Richards, Stephen J.; Westhead, David R.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Ott, Sascha; Bonifer, Constanze; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by recurrent mutations that affect the epigenetic regulatory machinery and signaling molecules, leading to a block in hematopoietic differentiation. Constitutive signaling from mutated growth factor receptors is a major driver of leukemic growth, but how aberrant signaling affects the epigenome in AML is less understood. Furthermore, AML cells undergo extensive clonal evolution, and the mutations in signaling genes are often secondary events. To elucidate how chronic growth factor signaling alters the transcriptional network in AML, we performed a system-wide multi-omics study of primary cells from patients suffering from AML with internal tandem duplications in the FLT3 transmembrane domain (FLT3-ITD). This strategy revealed cooperation between the MAP kinase (MAPK) inducible transcription factor AP-1 and RUNX1 as a major driver of a common, FLT3-ITD-specific gene expression and chromatin signature, demonstrating a major impact of MAPK signaling pathways in shaping the epigenome of FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:26212328

  10. A specific combination of substrates is involved in signal transduction by the kit-encoded receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lev, S; Givol, D; Yarden, Y

    1991-01-01

    The kit protooncogene encodes a transmembrane tyrosine kinase related to the receptors for the platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-R) and the macrophage growth factor (CSF1-R), and was very recently shown to bind a stem cell factor. To compare signal transduction by the kit kinase with signaling by homologous receptors we constructed a chimeric protein composed of the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of kit. We have previously shown that the chimeric receptor transmits potent mitogenic and transforming signals in response to the heterologous ligand. Here we demonstrate that upon ligand binding, the ligand-receptor complex undergoes endocytosis and degradation and induces short- and long-term cellular effects. Examination of the signal transduction pathway revealed that the activated kit kinase strongly associates with phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase activity and a phosphoprotein of 85 kd. In addition, the ligand-stimulated kit kinase is coupled to modifications of phospholipase C gamma and the Raf1 protein kinase. However, it does not lead to a significant change in the production of inositol phosphate. Comparison of our results with the known signaling pathways of PDGF-R and CSF1-R suggests that each receptor is coupled to a specific combination of signal transducers. Images PMID:1705885

  11. Reusable and specific proton transfer signalling by inorganic cyanide in solution and solid phase.

    PubMed

    Kaloo, Masood Ayoub; Sankar, Jeyaraman

    2015-10-04

    A highly specific cyanide mediated proton transfer signalling (PTS) is exhibited by a simple diaminomalenonitrile (DAMN) derivative 1. By virtue of the functional groups on it, the chromophore offered a rigid anchoring on a silica surface via a simple dip method, while retaining the recognition behaviour. The PTS triggered a prompt dual-modal display i.e., chromogenic and fluorogenic. The signal readout can be visualized even in micromolar concentrations. It is noteworthy that PTS can be reversed in both solution and solid phases. The remarkable sensitivity of 1 to detect CN(-) from the solution and solid phase envisages a pivotal step towards field-usable sensing.

  12. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  13. Sources of signals in electron paramagnetic resonance radiation biodosimetry in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Mark Allen

    1999-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry, or EPR, is a useful biomarker of radiation absorbed dose in bone and teeth because the tissue itself serves as the dosimeter, with each sample being self-calibrated in terms of its response. In actual cases of retrospective dose assessment, comparisons between EPR and traditional dosimetric methods have revealed both significant underestimations and overestimations of dose on the part of EPR. While radiation induced EPR signals in bone crystal eventually stabilize, the composite signal initially fades after dosing (IK85). Irradiation of the crystal structure of bone produces multiple signals, some stable and some transient. It is hypothesized that one of these unstable signals is responsible for the immediate fading of the radiation induced crystalline signal, thereby causing the widely observed deviations in dose estimations between EPR and other, well established dosimetric methods. To test this hypothesis, both untreated bone and bone treated with diethylenetriamine, a solvent used to deproteinate bone, were studied. Repeated measurements of the radiation induced signal in both untreated and deproteinated bone showed a partial fading of the primary signal used in EPR bone dosimetry. Spectral algebra identified the source of this instability to be the decay of an interfering signal in the bone crystal, also radiation induced, that overlaps the signal of interest. This work has produced four major results: (1)Sample preparation and treatment can generate extraneous signals that interfere with the proper measurement of the radiation induced EPR signal. (2)The interfering signal from another transient, radiogenic radical in hydroxyapatite, CO 33-, affects accurate measurement of the primary signal used in dosimetry, CO2-, causing underestimations at low doses and overestimations at high doses. A model devised to explain how this interfering signal actually distorts the dose estimation process was consistent with data

  14. Rapid electronic detection of probe-specific microRNAs using thin nanopore sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanunu, Meni; Dadosh, Tali; Ray, Vishva; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry; Drndić, Marija

    2010-11-01

    Small RNA molecules have an important role in gene regulation and RNA silencing therapy, but it is challenging to detect these molecules without the use of time-consuming radioactive labelling assays or error-prone amplification methods. Here, we present a platform for the rapid electronic detection of probe-hybridized microRNAs from cellular RNA. In this platform, a target microRNA is first hybridized to a probe. This probe:microRNA duplex is then enriched through binding to the viral protein p19. Finally, the abundance of the duplex is quantified using a nanopore. Reducing the thickness of the membrane containing the nanopore to 6 nm leads to increased signal amplitudes from biomolecules, and reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 3 nm allows the detection and discrimination of small nucleic acids based on differences in their physical dimensions. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by detecting picogram levels of a liver-specific miRNA from rat liver RNA.

  15. Design, development, and fabrication of a electronic analog microminiaturized electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Schuegraf, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    The microminiaturization of an electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter is presented. Discrete components and integrated circuits comprising the converter were assembled on a thin-film ceramic substrate containing nichrome resistors with gold interconnections. The finished assembly is enclosed in a flat package measuring 3.30 by 4.57 centimeters. The module can be used whenever conversion of analog to digital signals is required, in particular for the purpose of regulation by means of pulse modulation. In conjunction with a precision voltage reference, the module was applied to control the duty cycle of a switching regulator within a temperature range of -55 C to +125 C, and an input voltage range of 10V to 35V. The output-voltage variation was less than + or - 300 parts per million, i.e., less than + or - 3mV for a 10V output.

  16. Toll-like receptor recognition of bacteria in fish: ligand specificity and signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kong, Xianghui; Zhou, Chuanjiang; Li, Li; Nie, Guoxing; Li, Xuejun

    2014-12-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize the conserved molecular structure of pathogens and trigger the signaling pathways that activate immune cells in response to pathogen infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the first and best characterized innate immune receptors. To date, at least 20 TLR types (TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 5M, 5S, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26) have been found in more than a dozen of fish species. However, of the TLRs identified in fish, direct evidence of ligand specificity has only been shown for TLR2, TLR3, TLR5M, TLR5S, TLR9, TLR21, and TLR22. Some studies have suggested that TLR2, TLR5M, TLR5S, TLR9, and TLR21 could specifically recognize PAMPs from bacteria. In addition, other TLRs including TLR1, TLR4, TLR14, TLR18, and TLR25 may also be sensors of bacteria. TLR signaling pathways in fish exhibit some particular features different from that in mammals. In this review, the ligand specificity and signal pathways of TLRs that recognize bacteria in fish are summarized. References for further studies on the specificity for recognizing bacteria using TLRs and the following reactions triggered are discussed. In-depth studies should be continuously performed to identify the ligand specificity of all TLRs in fish, particularly non-mammalian TLRs, and their signaling pathways. The discovery of TLRs and their functions will contribute to the understanding of disease resistance mechanisms in fish and provide new insights for drug intervention to manipulate immune responses.

  17. Specification of spatial relationships in directed graphs of cell signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lipshtat, Azi; Neves, Susana R; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-03-01

    Graph theory provides a useful and powerful tool for the analysis of cellular signaling networks. Intracellular components such as cytoplasmic signaling proteins, transcription factors, and genes are connected by links, representing various types of chemical interactions that result in functional consequences. However, these graphs lack important information regarding the spatial distribution of cellular components. The ability of two cellular components to interact depends not only on their mutual chemical affinity but also on colocalization to the same subcellular region. Localization of components is often used as a regulatory mechanism to achieve specific effects in response to different receptor signals. Here we describe an approach for incorporating spatial distribution into graphs and for the development of mixed graphs where links are specified by mutual chemical affinity as well as colocalization. We suggest that such mixed graphs will provide more accurate descriptions of functional cellular networks and their regulatory capabilities and aid in the development of large-scale predictive models of cellular behavior.

  18. Coco regulates dorsoventral specification of germ layers via inhibition of TGFβ signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Thomas J. D.; Vonica, Alin; Heasman, Janet; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Bell, Esther

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest steps in embryonic development is the specification of the germ layers, the subdivision of the blastula embryo into endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. Maternally expressed members of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) family influence all three germ layers; the ligands are required to induce endoderm and mesoderm, whereas inhibitors are required for formation of the ectoderm. Here, we demonstrate a vital role for maternal Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGFβ signalling, in this process. We show that Coco is required to prevent Activin and Nodal signals in the dorsal marginal side of the embryo from invading the prospective ectoderm, thereby restricting endoderm- and mesoderm-inducing signals to the vegetal and marginal zones of the pre-gastrula Xenopus laevis embryo. PMID:24026124

  19. Coco regulates dorsoventral specification of germ layers via inhibition of TGFβ signalling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Thomas J D; Vonica, Alin; Heasman, Janet; Brivanlou, Ali H; Bell, Esther

    2013-10-01

    One of the earliest steps in embryonic development is the specification of the germ layers, the subdivision of the blastula embryo into endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. Maternally expressed members of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) family influence all three germ layers; the ligands are required to induce endoderm and mesoderm, whereas inhibitors are required for formation of the ectoderm. Here, we demonstrate a vital role for maternal Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGFβ signalling, in this process. We show that Coco is required to prevent Activin and Nodal signals in the dorsal marginal side of the embryo from invading the prospective ectoderm, thereby restricting endoderm- and mesoderm-inducing signals to the vegetal and marginal zones of the pre-gastrula Xenopus laevis embryo.

  20. Signaling, Regulation, and Specificity of the Type II p21-activated Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Hak; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of six serine/threonine kinases that act as key effectors of RHO family GTPases in mammalian cells. PAKs are subdivided into two groups: type I PAKs (PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3) and type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6). Although these groups are involved in common signaling pathways, recent work indicates that the two groups have distinct modes of regulation and have both unique and common substrates. Here, we review recent insights into the molecular level details that govern regulation of type II PAK signaling. We also consider mechanisms by which signal transduction is regulated at the level of substrate specificity. Finally, we discuss the implications of these studies for clinical targeting of these kinases. PMID:25855792

  1. Delivery of circulating lipoproteins to specific neurons in the Drosophila brain regulates systemic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Brankatschk, Marko; Dunst, Sebastian; Nemetschke, Linda; Eaton, Suzanne

    2014-10-02

    The Insulin signaling pathway couples growth, development and lifespan to nutritional conditions. Here, we demonstrate a function for the Drosophila lipoprotein LTP in conveying information about dietary lipid composition to the brain to regulate Insulin signaling. When yeast lipids are present in the diet, free calcium levels rise in Blood Brain Barrier glial cells. This induces transport of LTP across the Blood Brain Barrier by two LDL receptor-related proteins: LRP1 and Megalin. LTP accumulates on specific neurons that connect to cells that produce Insulin-like peptides, and induces their release into the circulation. This increases systemic Insulin signaling and the rate of larval development on yeast-containing food compared with a plant-based food of similar nutritional content.

  2. Hot electron generation under large-signal radio frequency operation of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre-Rey, Alvaro D.; Sabatti, Flavio F. M.; Albrecht, John D.; Saraniti, Marco

    2017-07-01

    In order to assess the underlying physical mechanisms of hot carrier-related degradation such as defect generation in millimeter-wave GaN power amplifiers, we have simulated the electron energy distribution function under large-signal radio frequency conditions in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors. Our results are obtained through a full band Monte Carlo particle-based simulator self-consistently coupled to a harmonic balance circuit solver. At lower frequency, simulations of a Class AB power amplifier at 10 GHz show that the peak hot electron generation is up to 43% lower under RF drive than it is under DC conditions, regardless of the input power or temperature of operation. However, at millimeter-wave operation up to 40 GHz, RF hot carrier generation reaches that from DC biasing and even exceeds it up to 75% as the amplifier is driven into compression. Increasing the temperature of operation also shows that degradation of DC and RF characteristics are tightly correlated and mainly caused by increased phonon scattering. The accurate determination of the electron energy mapping is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the extraction of compact models used in lifetime and reliability analysis.

  3. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  4. Plasma sheath: An equivalent nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmitted electromagnetic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Bo; Li, Xiaoping; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yanming; Lei, Fan; Zhu, Congying

    2017-10-01

    An experiment on the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) signals in continuous time-varying plasma is designed to establish the nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmission coefficient. The nonlinearity is confirmed from the theoretical and experimental results. The amplitude and phase can be considered nonlinear functions of electron density when the complex interaction between plasma and EM waves is ignored. Results show that amplitude and phase distributions are asymmetrical when electron density follows symmetric distribution. The skewness of amplitude is positive, whereas the skewness of phase is negative. The nonlinear degree is closely related to the ratio of plasma frequency to the incident wave frequency and the range of electron density. The conclusions are crucial to the modeling of plasma sheath channels and understanding the blackout problem.

  5. Tissue-Specific Gain of RTK Signalling Uncovers Selective Cell Vulnerability during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Audebert, Stéphane; Helmbacher, Françoise; Dono, Rosanna; Maina, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    The successive events that cells experience throughout development shape their intrinsic capacity to respond and integrate RTK inputs. Cellular responses to RTKs rely on different mechanisms of regulation that establish proper levels of RTK activation, define duration of RTK action, and exert quantitative/qualitative signalling outcomes. The extent to which cells are competent to deal with fluctuations in RTK signalling is incompletely understood. Here, we employ a genetic system to enhance RTK signalling in a tissue-specific manner. The chosen RTK is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met, an appropriate model due to its pleiotropic requirement in distinct developmental events. Ubiquitously enhanced Met in Cre/loxP-based Rosa26 stopMet knock-in context (Del-R26 Met) reveals that most tissues are capable of buffering enhanced Met-RTK signalling thus avoiding perturbation of developmental programs. Nevertheless, this ubiquitous increase of Met does compromise selected programs such as myoblast migration. Using cell-type specific Cre drivers, we genetically showed that altered myoblast migration results from ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme rather than in migrating myoblasts themselves. qRT-PCR analyses show that ectopic Met in limbs causes molecular changes such as downregulation in the expression levels of Notum and Syndecan4, two known regulators of morphogen gradients. Molecular and functional studies revealed that ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme does not alter HGF expression patterns and levels, but impairs HGF bioavailability. Together, our findings show that myoblasts, in which Met is endogenously expressed, are capable of buffering increased RTK levels, and identify mesenchymal cells as a cell type vulnerable to ectopic Met-RTK signalling. These results illustrate that embryonic cells are sensitive to alterations in the spatial distribution of RTK action, yet resilient to fluctuations in signalling levels of an RTK when occurring

  6. Cysteine-Specific Cu2+ Chelating Tags Used as Paramagnetic Probes in Double Electron Electron Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy F.; Shannon, Matthew D.; Putterman, Miriam R.; Arachchige, Rajith J.; Sengupta, Ishita; Gao, Min; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Saxena, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Double electron electron resonance (DEER) is an attractive technique that is utilized for gaining insight into protein structure and dynamics via nanometer-scale distance measurements. The most commonly used paramagnetic tag in these measurements is a nitroxide spin label, R1. Here, we present the application of two types of high-affinity Cu2+ chelating tags, based on the EDTA and cyclen metal-binding motifs as alternative X-band DEER probes, using the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1) as a model system. Both types of tags have been incorporated into a variety of protein secondary structure environments and exhibit high spectral sensitivity. In particular, the cyclen-based tag displays distance distributions with comparable distribution widths and most probable distances within 1–3 Å when compared to homologous R1 distributions. The results display the viability of the cyclen tag as an alternative to the R1 side chain for X-band DEER distance measurements in proteins. PMID:25608028

  7. Specification of the mouse cardiac conduction system in the absence of Endothelin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Lisa L.; Vedantham, Vasanth; Barnes, Ralston M.; Hu, Jianxin; Robinson, Ashley S.; Bressan, Michael; Srivastava, Deepak; Black, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated contraction of the heart is essential for survival and is regulated by the cardiac conduction system. Contraction of ventricular myocytes is controlled by the terminal part of the conduction system known as the Purkinje fiber network. Lineage analyses in chickens and mice have established that the Purkinje fibers of the peripheral ventricular conduction system arise from working myocytes during cardiac development. It has been proposed, based primarily on gain-of-function studies, that Endothelin signaling is responsible for myocyte-to-Purkinje fiber transdifferentiation during avian heart development. However, the role of Endothelin signaling in mammalian conduction system development is less clear, and the development of the cardiac conduction system in mice lacking Endothelin signaling has not been previously addressed. Here, we assessed the specification of the cardiac conduction system in mouse embryos lacking all Endothelin signaling. We found that mouse embryos that were homozygous null for both ednra and ednrb, the genes encoding the two Endothelin receptors in mice, were born at predicted Mendelian frequency and had normal specification of the cardiac conduction system and apparently normal electrocardiograms with normal QRS intervals. In addition, we found that ednra expression within the heart was restricted to the myocardium while ednrb expression in the heart was restricted to the endocardium and coronary endothelium. By establishing that ednra and ednrb are expressed in distinct compartments within the developing mammalian heart and that Endothelin signaling is dispensable for specification and function of the cardiac conduction system, this work has important implications for our understanding of mammalian cardiac development. PMID:25050930

  8. T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength controls arthritis severity in proteoglycan-specific TCR transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Olasz, K; Boldizsar, F; Kis-Toth, K; Tarjanyi, O; Hegyi, A; van Eden, W; Rauch, T A; Mikecz, K; Glant, T T

    2012-01-01

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the arthritogenic 5/4E8 epitope in the G1 domain of cartilage proteoglycan were generated and back-crossed into arthritis-prone BALB/c background. Although more than 90% of CD4+ T cells of all TCR-Tg lines were 5/4E8-specific, one (TCR-TgA) was highly sensitive to G1-induced or spontaneous arthritis, while another (TCR-TgB) was less susceptible. Here we studied whether fine differences in TCR signalling controlled the onset and severity of arthritis. Mice from the two TCR-Tg lines were immunized side by side with purified recombinant human G1 (rhG1) domain for G1 domain of cartilage proteoglycan (PG)-induced arthritis (GIA). TCR-TgA mice developed severe and early-onset arthritis, whereas TCR-TgB mice developed weaker arthritis with delayed onset, although TCR-TgB CD4+ T cells expressed approximately twice more TCR-Vβ4 chain protein. The more severe arthritis in TCR-TgA mice was associated with higher amounts of anti-G1 domain-specific antibodies, larger numbers of B cells and activated T helper cells. Importantly, TCR-TgB CD4+ T cells were more sensitive to in vitro activation-induced apoptosis, correlating with their higher TCR and CD3 expression and with the increased TCR signal strength. These findings indicate that TCR signal strength determines the clinical outcome of arthritis induction: ‘optimal’ TCR signal strength leads to strong T cell activation and severe arthritis in TCR-TgA mice, whereas ‘supra-optimal’ TCR signal leads to enhanced elimination of self-reactive T cells, resulting in attenuated disease. PMID:22236012

  9. Specification of the mouse cardiac conduction system in the absence of Endothelin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lisa L; Vedantham, Vasanth; Barnes, Ralston M; Hu, Jianxin; Robinson, Ashley S; Bressan, Michael; Srivastava, Deepak; Black, Brian L

    2014-09-15

    Coordinated contraction of the heart is essential for survival and is regulated by the cardiac conduction system. Contraction of ventricular myocytes is controlled by the terminal part of the conduction system known as the Purkinje fiber network. Lineage analyses in chickens and mice have established that the Purkinje fibers of the peripheral ventricular conduction system arise from working myocytes during cardiac development. It has been proposed, based primarily on gain-of-function studies, that Endothelin signaling is responsible for myocyte-to-Purkinje fiber transdifferentiation during avian heart development. However, the role of Endothelin signaling in mammalian conduction system development is less clear, and the development of the cardiac conduction system in mice lacking Endothelin signaling has not been previously addressed. Here, we assessed the specification of the cardiac conduction system in mouse embryos lacking all Endothelin signaling. We found that mouse embryos that were homozygous null for both ednra and ednrb, the genes encoding the two Endothelin receptors in mice, were born at predicted Mendelian frequency and had normal specification of the cardiac conduction system and apparently normal electrocardiograms with normal QRS intervals. In addition, we found that ednra expression within the heart was restricted to the myocardium while ednrb expression in the heart was restricted to the endocardium and coronary endothelium. By establishing that ednra and ednrb are expressed in distinct compartments within the developing mammalian heart and that Endothelin signaling is dispensable for specification and function of the cardiac conduction system, this work has important implications for our understanding of mammalian cardiac development.

  10. Tissue-Specific Suppression of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Various Mouse Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W. Edward; Barnhoorn, Sander; Ottaviani, Alexandre; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kaptein, Ellen; van Heerebeek, Ramona; van Toor, Hans; Garinis, George A.; Peeters, Robin P.; Medici, Marco; van Ham, Willy; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; de Waard, Monique C.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Kopchick, John J.; List, Edward O.; Melis, Joost P. M.; Darras, Veerle M.; Dollé, Martijn E. T.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Visser, Theo J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage contributes to the process of aging, as underscored by premature aging syndromes caused by defective DNA repair. Thyroid state changes during aging, but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Since thyroid hormone (TH) is a key regulator of metabolism, changes in TH signaling have widespread effects. Here, we reveal a significant common transcriptomic signature in livers from hypothyroid mice, DNA repair-deficient mice with severe (Csbm/m/Xpa-/-) or intermediate (Ercc1-/Δ-7) progeria and naturally aged mice. A strong induction of TH-inactivating deiodinase D3 and decrease of TH-activating D1 activities are observed in Csbm/m/Xpa-/- livers. Similar findings are noticed in Ercc1-/Δ-7, in naturally aged animals and in wild-type mice exposed to a chronic subtoxic dose of DNA-damaging agents. In contrast, TH signaling in muscle, heart and brain appears unaltered. These data show a strong suppression of TH signaling in specific peripheral organs in premature and normal aging, probably lowering metabolism, while other tissues appear to preserve metabolism. D3-mediated TH inactivation is unexpected, given its expression mainly in fetal tissues. Our studies highlight the importance of DNA damage as the underlying mechanism of changes in thyroid state. Tissue-specific regulation of deiodinase activities, ensuring diminished TH signaling, may contribute importantly to the protective metabolic response in aging. PMID:26953569

  11. Contribution of Physical Interactions to Signaling Specificity between a Diguanylate Cyclase and Its Effector

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Kurt M.; Giglio, Krista M.; Collins, Alan J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that controls multiple cellular processes. c-di-GMP networks have up to dozens of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that synthesize c-di-GMP along with many c-di-GMP-responsive target proteins that can bind and respond to this signal. For such networks to have order, a mechanism(s) likely exists that allow DGCs to specifically signal their targets, and it has been suggested that physical interactions might provide such specificity. Our results show a DGC from Pseudomonas fluorescens physically interacting with its target protein at a conserved interface, and this interface can be predictive of DGC-target protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that physical interaction is necessary for the DGC to maximally signal its target. If such “local signaling” is a theme for even a fraction of the DGCs used by bacteria, it becomes possible to posit a model whereby physical interaction allows a DGC to directly signal its target protein, which in turn may help curtail undesired cross talk with other members of the network. PMID:26670387

  12. Evolutionary Acquisition of Cysteines Determines FOXO Paralog-Specific Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, Harmjan R.; van Dorenmalen, Kim; de Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G.; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn M.T.; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reduction–oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein function until the local cellular redox environment has returned to the basal state. We have previously shown that this mechanism promotes the nuclear localization and activity of the Forkhead Box O4 (FOXO4) transcription factor. Aims: In this study, we sought to investigate whether redox signaling differentially controls the human FOXO3 and FOXO4 paralogs. Results: We present evidence that FOXO3 and FOXO4 have acquired paralog-specific cysteines throughout vertebrate evolution. Using a proteome-wide screen, we identified previously unknown redox-dependent FOXO3 interaction partners. The nuclear import receptors Importin-7 (IPO7) and Importin-8 (IPO8) form a disulfide-dependent heterodimer with FOXO3, which is required for its reactive oxygen species-induced nuclear translocation. FOXO4 does not interact with IPO7 or IPO8. Innovation and Conclusion: IPO7 and IPO8 control the nuclear import of FOXO3, but not FOXO4, in a redox-sensitive and disulfide-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that evolutionary acquisition of cysteines has contributed to regulatory divergence of FOXO paralogs, and that phylogenetic analysis can aid in the identification of cysteines involved in redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 15–28. PMID:25069953

  13. Global Analysis of Muscle-specific Kinase Signaling by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Dürnberger, Gerhard; Camurdanoglu, Bahar Z.; Tomschik, Matthias; Schutzbier, Michael; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Herbst, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The development of the neuromuscular synapse depends on signaling processes that involve protein phosphorylation as a crucial regulatory event. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is the key signaling molecule at the neuromuscular synapse whose activity is required for the formation of a mature and functional synapse. However, the signaling cascade downstream of MuSK and the regulation of the different components are still poorly understood. In this study we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to study the phosphorylation events and their temporal regulation downstream of MuSK. We identified a total of 10,183 phosphopeptides, of which 203 were significantly up- or down-regulated. Regulated phosphopeptides were classified into four different clusters according to their temporal profiles. Within these clusters we found an overrepresentation of specific protein classes associated with different cellular functions. In particular, we found an enrichment of regulated phosphoproteins involved in posttranscriptional mechanisms and in cytoskeletal organization. These findings provide novel insights into the complex signaling network downstream of MuSK and form the basis for future mechanistic studies. PMID:24899341

  14. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  15. Interactions in the pollen-specific receptor-like kinases-containing signaling network.

    PubMed

    Löcke, Susanne; Fricke, Inka; Mucha, Elena; Humpert, Marie-Luise; Berken, Antje

    2010-12-01

    The pollen-specific receptor-like kinases (PRKs) from Solanum lycopersicum, LePRK1 and LePRK2, are believed to be involved in the regulation of pollen germination and pollen tube growth. They appear to be part of a multimeric complex in which the transmembranic LePRKs presumably have a key position in transducing exogenous signals through the plasma membrane. Here, we focused on extra- and intracellular interactions involving the LePRKs. We show in yeast two-hybrid experiments a cross-interaction of putative PRK-ligands, the oligomerization of LePRK2 and a direct contact of LePRKs to activated Rho proteins of plants (ROPs). Moreover, we observed that pollen-specific RopGEFs, which catalyze ROP activation and may be regulated by PRK interaction, are active in vitro while autoinhibition seems to occur in vivo. We suggest that activation of RopGEFs as a checkpoint in PRK signal transduction is a more complex event including further components in planta. Our findings point to some new aspects in PRK-mediated signal transduction implying a LePRK2 complex with different signaling activity and a further direct control of LePRKs by activated ROP.

  16. Global analysis of muscle-specific kinase signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Dürnberger, Gerhard; Camurdanoglu, Bahar Z; Tomschik, Matthias; Schutzbier, Michael; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Herbst, Ruth

    2014-08-01

    The development of the neuromuscular synapse depends on signaling processes that involve protein phosphorylation as a crucial regulatory event. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is the key signaling molecule at the neuromuscular synapse whose activity is required for the formation of a mature and functional synapse. However, the signaling cascade downstream of MuSK and the regulation of the different components are still poorly understood. In this study we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to study the phosphorylation events and their temporal regulation downstream of MuSK. We identified a total of 10,183 phosphopeptides, of which 203 were significantly up- or down-regulated. Regulated phosphopeptides were classified into four different clusters according to their temporal profiles. Within these clusters we found an overrepresentation of specific protein classes associated with different cellular functions. In particular, we found an enrichment of regulated phosphoproteins involved in posttranscriptional mechanisms and in cytoskeletal organization. These findings provide novel insights into the complex signaling network downstream of MuSK and form the basis for future mechanistic studies. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Sex specific retinoic acid signaling is required for the initiation of urogenital sinus bud development

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Sarah L.; Francis, Jeffrey C.; Lokody, Isabel B.; Wang, Hong; Risbridger, Gail P.; Loveland, Kate L.; Swain, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian urogenital sinus (UGS) develops in a sex specific manner, giving rise to the prostate in the male and the sinus vagina in the embryonic female. Androgens, produced by the embryonic testis, have been shown to be crucial to this process. In this study we show that retinoic acid signaling is required for the initial stages of bud development from the male UGS. Enzymes involved in retinoic acid synthesis are expressed in the UGS mesenchyme in a sex specific manner and addition of ligand to female tissue is able to induce prostate-like bud formation in the absence of androgens, albeit at reduced potency. Functional studies in mouse organ cultures that faithfully reproduce the initiation of prostate development indicate that one of the roles of retinoic acid signaling in the male is to inhibit the expression of Inhba, which encodes the βA subunit of Activin, in the UGS mesenchyme. Through in vivo genetic analysis and culture studies we show that inhibition of Activin signaling in the female UGS leads to a similar phenotype to that of retinoic acid treatment, namely bud formation in the absence of androgens. Our data also reveals that both androgens and retinoic acid have extra independent roles to that of repressing Activin signaling in the development of the prostate during fetal stages. This study identifies a novel role for retinoic acid as a mesenchymal factor that acts together with androgens to determine the position and initiation of bud development in the male UGS epithelia. PMID:25261715

  18. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  19. Specification of the Transmitted Signal of the U.S. Marine Radiobeacon System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    ARD-R125 233 SPECIFICATION OF THE TRANSMITTED SIGNAL OF THE US i/i MARINE RADIOBEACON SYSEE?1(U) TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS CENTER CAMBRIDGE MA A E 0...O’Brien Transportation Systems Center Cambridge MA 02142 January 1983 Final Report This document is available to the public through the National Technical...TRAIS) U.S. Department of Transportation CG23512009 Research and Special Programs Administration 11. C or Giant N. Transportation Systems Center Cambridae

  20. Analysis of Technical Specifications of the Egyptian and French Electronic Storybooks (e-Storybook)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atta, Mohammed Mahmoud; Abd El Wahab, Shaimaa Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at analysing technical specifications in a sample of Egyptian and French electronic storybooks (e-storybooks), to identify similarities and differences in technical specifications of children's e-storybooks and create a verified analysis list to be used for evaluation of e-storybooks. For this purpose, 32 e-storybooks in CD…

  1. Analysis of Technical Specifications of the Egyptian and French Electronic Storybooks (e-Storybook)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atta, Mohammed Mahmoud; Abd El Wahab, Shaimaa Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at analysing technical specifications in a sample of Egyptian and French electronic storybooks (e-storybooks), to identify similarities and differences in technical specifications of children's e-storybooks and create a verified analysis list to be used for evaluation of e-storybooks. For this purpose, 32 e-storybooks in CD…

  2. OTULIN Antagonizes LUBAC Signaling by Specifically Hydrolyzing Met1-Linked Polyubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Keusekotten, Kirstin; Elliott, Paul Ronald; Glockner, Laura; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Damgaard, Rune Busk; Kulathu, Yogesh; Wauer, Tobias; Hospenthal, Manuela Kathrin; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Krappmann, Daniel; Hofmann, Kay; Komander, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The linear ubiquitin (Ub) chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is an E3 ligase that specifically assembles Met1-linked (also known as linear) Ub chains that regulate nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are key regulators of Ub signaling, but a dedicated DUB for Met1 linkages has not been identified. Here, we reveal a previously unannotated human DUB, OTULIN (also known as FAM105B), which is exquisitely specific for Met1 linkages. Crystal structures of the OTULIN catalytic domain in complex with diubiquitin reveal Met1-specific Ub-binding sites and a mechanism of substrate-assisted catalysis in which the proximal Ub activates the catalytic triad of the protease. Mutation of Ub Glu16 inhibits OTULIN activity by reducing kcat 240-fold. OTULIN overexpression or knockdown affects NF-κB responses to LUBAC, TNFα, and poly(I:C) and sensitizes cells to TNFα-induced cell death. We show that OTULIN binds LUBAC and that overexpression of OTULIN prevents TNFα-induced NEMO association with ubiquitinated RIPK1. Our data suggest that OTULIN regulates Met1-polyUb signaling. PMID:23746843

  3. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-16

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling.

  4. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  5. Combing signals from spontaneous reports and electronic health records for detection of adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; Vilar, Santiago; DuMouchel, William; Salmasian, Hojjat; Haerian, Krystl; Shah, Nigam H; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective Data-mining algorithms that can produce accurate signals of potentially novel adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a central component of pharmacovigilance. We propose a signal-detection strategy that combines the adverse event reporting system (AERS) of the Food and Drug Administration and electronic health records (EHRs) by requiring signaling in both sources. We claim that this approach leads to improved accuracy of signal detection when the goal is to produce a highly selective ranked set of candidate ADRs. Materials and methods Our investigation was based on over 4 million AERS reports and information extracted from 1.2 million EHR narratives. Well-established methodologies were used to generate signals from each source. The study focused on ADRs related to three high-profile serious adverse reactions. A reference standard of over 600 established and plausible ADRs was created and used to evaluate the proposed approach against a comparator. Results The combined signaling system achieved a statistically significant large improvement over AERS (baseline) in the precision of top ranked signals. The average improvement ranged from 31% to almost threefold for different evaluation categories. Using this system, we identified a new association between the agent, rasburicase, and the adverse event, acute pancreatitis, which was supported by clinical review. Conclusions The results provide promising initial evidence that combining AERS with EHRs via the framework of replicated signaling can improve the accuracy of signal detection for certain operating scenarios. The use of additional EHR data is required to further evaluate the capacity and limits of this system and to extend the generalizability of these results. PMID:23118093

  6. Combing signals from spontaneous reports and electronic health records for detection of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Vilar, Santiago; Dumouchel, William; Salmasian, Hojjat; Haerian, Krystl; Shah, Nigam H; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2013-05-01

    Data-mining algorithms that can produce accurate signals of potentially novel adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a central component of pharmacovigilance. We propose a signal-detection strategy that combines the adverse event reporting system (AERS) of the Food and Drug Administration and electronic health records (EHRs) by requiring signaling in both sources. We claim that this approach leads to improved accuracy of signal detection when the goal is to produce a highly selective ranked set of candidate ADRs. Our investigation was based on over 4 million AERS reports and information extracted from 1.2 million EHR narratives. Well-established methodologies were used to generate signals from each source. The study focused on ADRs related to three high-profile serious adverse reactions. A reference standard of over 600 established and plausible ADRs was created and used to evaluate the proposed approach against a comparator. The combined signaling system achieved a statistically significant large improvement over AERS (baseline) in the precision of top ranked signals. The average improvement ranged from 31% to almost threefold for different evaluation categories. Using this system, we identified a new association between the agent, rasburicase, and the adverse event, acute pancreatitis, which was supported by clinical review. The results provide promising initial evidence that combining AERS with EHRs via the framework of replicated signaling can improve the accuracy of signal detection for certain operating scenarios. The use of additional EHR data is required to further evaluate the capacity and limits of this system and to extend the generalizability of these results.

  7. Secondary signal imaging (SSI) electron tomography (SSI-ET): A new three-dimensional metrology for mesoscale specimens in transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Wan; Ortalan, Volkan

    2015-09-01

    We have demonstrated a new electron tomography technique utilizing the secondary signals (secondary electrons and backscattered electrons) for ultra thick (a few μm) specimens. The Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations reveal that the amount of backscattered electrons generated by 200 and 300keV incident electrons is a monotonic function of the sample thickness and this causes the thickness contrast satisfying the projection requirement for the tomographic reconstruction. Additional contribution of the secondary electrons emitted from the edges of the specimens enhances the visibility of the surface features. The acquired SSI tilt series of the specimen having mesoscopic dimensions are successfully reconstructed verifying that this new technique, so called the secondary signal imaging electron tomography (SSI-ET), can directly be utilized for 3D structural analysis of mesoscale structures.

  8. The structure of Escherichia coli signal recognition particle revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, Iain L; Beniac, Daniel R; Falkovskaia, Elena; Cleverley, Robert M; Gierasch, Lila M; Ottensmeyer, F Peter; Andrews, David W

    2006-12-01

    Structural studies on various domains of the ribonucleoprotein signal recognition particle (SRP) have not converged on a single complete structure of bacterial SRP consistent with the biochemistry of the particle. We obtained a three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli SRP by cryoscanning transmission electron microscopy and mapped the internal RNA by electron spectroscopic imaging. Crystallographic data were fit into the SRP reconstruction, and although the resulting model differed from previous models, they could be rationalized by movement through an interdomain linker of Ffh, the protein component of SRP. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments determined interdomain distances that were consistent with our model of SRP. Docking our model onto the bacterial ribosome suggests a mechanism for signal recognition involving interdomain movement of Ffh into and out of the nascent chain exit site and suggests how SRP could interact and/or compete with the ribosome-bound chaperone, trigger factor, for a nascent chain during translation.

  9. Adult mouse subventricular zones stimulate glioblastoma stem cells specific invasion through CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goffart, Nicolas; Kroonen, Jérôme; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Dedobbeleer, Matthias; Denne, Alexandre; Martinive, Philippe; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months. This catastrophic survival rate is the consequence of systematic relapses that could arise from remaining glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) left behind after surgery. We previously demonstrated that GSCs are able to escape the tumor mass and specifically colonize the adult subventricular zones (SVZs) after transplantation. This specific localization, away from the initial injection site, therefore represents a high-quality model of a clinical obstacle to therapy and relapses because GSCs notably retain the ability to form secondary tumors. Method In this work, we questioned the role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in the GSC-specific invasion of the SVZs. Results We demonstrated that both receptor and ligand are respectively expressed by different GBM cell populations and by the SVZ itself. In vitro migration bio-assays highlighted that human U87MG GSCs isolated from the SVZs (U87MG-SVZ) display stronger migratory abilities in response to recombinant CXCL12 and/or SVZ-conditioned medium (SVZ-CM) compared with cancer cells isolated from the tumor mass (U87MG-TM). Moreover, in vitro inhibition of the CXCR4 signaling significantly decreased the U87MG-SVZ cell migration in response to the SVZ-CM. Very interestingly, treating U87MG-xenografted mice with daily doses of AMD3100, a specific CXCR4 antagonist, prevented the specific invasion of the SVZ. Another in vivo experiment, using CXCR4-invalidated GBM cells, displayed similar results. Conclusion Taken together, these data demonstrate the significant role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in this original model of brain cancer invasion. PMID:25085362

  10. Signal acquisition and scale calibration for beam power density distribution of electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Li, Hongqiang; Shen, Chunlong; Guo, Shun; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Kehong

    2017-06-01

    The power density distribution of electron beam welding (EBW) is a key factor to reflect the beam quality. The beam quality test system was designed for the actual beam power density distribution of high-voltage EBW. After the analysis of characteristics and phase relationship between the deflection control signal and the acquisition signal, the Post-Trigger mode was proposed for the signal acquisition meanwhile the same external clock source was shared by the control signal and the sampling clock. The power density distribution of beam cross-section was reconstructed using one-dimensional signal that was processed by median filtering, twice signal segmentation and spatial scale calibration. The diameter of beam cross-section was defined by amplitude method and integral method respectively. The measured diameter of integral definition is bigger than that of amplitude definition, but for the ideal distribution the former is smaller than the latter. The measured distribution without symmetrical shape is not concentrated compared to Gaussian distribution.

  11. Research on Materials and Components for Opto-Electronic Signal Processing and Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-20

    and optical devices may potentially be integrated monolithically on the same chip. The advantages of integrated opto-electronic signal processing... monolithically integrated modulation/detector diode pair that has recently been fabricated based on sample MBE-533. MBE-533 consists of 50 periods... integrating monolithically photo diodes with MQW samples and have demonstrated that optical-optical interaction in a MQW detector/modulator pair is

  12. Electron specific absorbed fractions for the adult male and female ICRP/ICRU reference computational phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zankl, Maria; Schlattl, Helmut; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    The calculation of radiation dose from internally incorporated radionuclides is based on so-called absorbed fractions (AFs) and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs). SAFs for monoenergetic electrons were calculated for 63 source regions and 67 target regions using the new male and female adult reference computational phantoms adopted by the ICRP and ICRU and the Monte Carlo radiation transport programme package EGSnrc. The SAF values for electrons are opposed to the simplifying assumptions of ICRP Publication 30. The previously applied assumption of electrons being fully absorbed in the source organ itself is not always true at electron energies above approximately 300-500 keV. High-energy electrons have the ability to leave the source organ and, consequently, the electron SAFs for neighbouring organs can reach the same magnitude as those for photons for electron energies above 1 MeV. The reciprocity principle known for photons can be extended to electron SAFs as well, thus making cross-fire electron SAFs mass-independent. To quantify the impact of the improved electron dosimetry in comparison to the dosimetry using the simple assumptions of ICRP Publication 30, absorbed doses per administered activity of three radiopharmaceuticals were evaluated with and without explicit electron transport. The organ absorbed doses per administered activity for the two evaluation methods agree within 2%-3% for most organs for radionuclides with decay spectra having electron energies below a few hundred keV and within approximately 20% if higher electron energies are involved. An important exception is the urinary bladder wall, where the dose is overestimated by 60-150% using the simplified ICRP 30 approach for the radiopharmaceuticals of this study.

  13. ERK/MAPK Signaling Is Required for Pathway-Specific Striatal Motor Functions.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Scott R; Otis, James M; Kim, Erin M; Lamsal, Yashna; Stuber, Garret D; Snider, William D

    2017-08-23

    The ERK/MAPK intracellular signaling pathway is hypothesized to be a key regulator of striatal activity via modulation of synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. However, prior investigations into striatal ERK/MAPK functions have yielded conflicting results. Further, these studies have not delineated the cell-type-specific roles of ERK/MAPK signaling due to the reliance on globally administered pharmacological ERK/MAPK inhibitors and the use of genetic models that only partially reduce total ERK/MAPK activity. Here, we generated mouse models in which ERK/MAPK signaling was completely abolished in each of the two distinct classes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). ERK/MAPK deletion in D1R-MSNs (direct pathway) resulted in decreased locomotor behavior, reduced weight gain, and early postnatal lethality. In contrast, loss of ERK/MAPK signaling in D2R-MSNs (indirect pathway) resulted in a profound hyperlocomotor phenotype. ERK/MAPK-deficient D2R-MSNs exhibited a significant reduction in dendritic spine density, markedly suppressed electrical excitability, and suppression of activity-associated gene expression even after pharmacological stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of ERK/MAPK signaling in governing the motor functions of the striatal direct and indirect pathways. Our data further show a critical role for ERK in maintaining the excitability and plasticity of D2R-MSNs.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alterations in ERK/MAPK activity are associated with drug abuse, as well as neuropsychiatric and movement disorders. However, genetic evidence defining the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in striatum-related neurophysiology and behavior is lacking. We show that loss of ERK/MAPK signaling leads to pathway-specific alterations in motor function, reduced neuronal excitability, and the inability of medium spiny neurons to regulate activity-induced gene expression. Our results underscore the potential importance of the ERK/MAPK pathway in human movement disorders

  14. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. ); Higashi, R. . Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. )

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  15. IFNs-signaling effects on lung cancer: an up-to-date pathways-specific review.

    PubMed

    Galani, Vasiliki; Kastamoulas, Michalis; Varouktsi, Anna; Lampri, Evangeli; Mitselou, Antigoni; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2017-08-01

    IFNs have found important applications in clinical medicine, including the treatment of lung malignancies. The biological effect of the IFN-receptor signaling is regulated essentially by three factors: the expression profile of the IFN itself, the profile of the receptor, and the expression of target genes. IFNs initiate their signaling by binding to specific receptors. The activated IFNs can directly induce gene transcription and/or multiple downstream signaling that both induce diverse cellular responses including the cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis in tumor cells. We provided evidence that IFN-γ enhances the pro cell death effects of Fas/CD95 in human neoplastic alveolar epithelial cell line, A549. We also found that p27 protein plays a pivotal role in the inducing cell death of IFNγ-CH-11-treated A549 cells, since it is involved in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. This article discusses recent insights into these possible additional functions of IFNs in lung cancer treatment.

  16. Stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling in human neural development.

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Marta; Hříbková, Hana; Vařecha, Miroslav; Střítecká, Dana; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr; Sun, Yuh-Man

    2016-09-01

    This study elucidated the stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling during neural development using in-vitro human embryonic stem cell-based developmental modeling. We found that the dysregulation of FGF2 signaling prior to the onset of neural induction resulted in the malformation of neural rosettes (a neural tube-like structure), despite cells having undergone neural induction. The aberrant neural rosette formation may be attributed to the misplacement of ZO-1, which is a polarized tight junction protein and shown co-localized with FGF2/FGFR1 in the apical region of neural rosettes, subsequently led to abnormal neurogenesis. Moreover, the FGF2 signaling inhibition at the stage of neural rosettes caused a reduction in cell proliferation, an increase in numbers of cells with cell-cycle exit, and premature neurogenesis. These effects may be mediated by NUMB, to which expression was observed enriched in the apical region of neural rosettes after FGF2 signaling inhibition coinciding with the disappearance of PAX6(+)/Ki67(+) neural stem cells and the emergence of MAP2(+) neurons. Moreover, our results suggested that the hESC-based developmental system reserved a similar neural stem cell niche in vivo.

  17. NO signalling decodes frequency of neuronal activity and generates synapse-specific plasticity in mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kakizawa, Sho; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger regulating neuronal functions. To visualize NO signalling in the brain, we generated a novel fluorescent NO indicator, which consists of the heme-binding region (HBR) of soluble guanylyl cyclase and the green fluorescent protein. The indicator (HBR–GFP) was expressed in the Purkinje cells of the mouse cerebellum and we imaged NO signals in acute cerebellar slices upon parallel fibre (PF) activation with a train of burst stimulations (BS, each BS consisting of five pulses at 50 Hz). Our results showed that the intensity of synaptic NO signal decays steeply with the distance from the synaptic input near PF–Purkinje cell synapses and generates synapse-specific long-term potentiation (LTP). Furthermore, the NO release level has a bell-shaped dependence on the frequency of PF activity. At an optimal frequency (1 Hz), but not at a low frequency (0.25 Hz) of a train of 60 BS, NO release as well as LTP was induced. However, both NO release and LTP were significantly reduced at higher frequencies (2–4 Hz) of BS train due to cannabinoid receptor-mediated retrograde inhibition of NO generation at the PF terminals. These results suggest that synaptic NO signalling decodes the frequency of neuronal activity to mediate synaptic plasticity at the PF–Purkinje cell synapse. PMID:15919714

  18. Specific control of BMP signaling and mesenchymal differentiation by cytoplasmic phosphatase PPM1H

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhengmao; Xu, Ningyi; Duan, Xueyan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the TGF-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins that regulate a wide array of cellular functions. The key step in BMP signal transduction is the BMP receptor-mediated phosphorylation of transcription factors Smad1, 5, and 8 (collectively Smad1/5/8), which leads to the subsequent activation of BMP-induced gene transcription in the nucleus. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of PPM1H as a novel cytoplasm-localized Smad1/5/8-specific phosphatase. PPM1H directly interacts with Smad1/5/8 through its Smad-binding domain, and dephosphorylates phospho-Smad1/5/8 (P-Smad1/5/8) in the cytoplasm. Ectopic expression of PPM1H attenuates BMP signaling, whereas loss of PPM1H activity or expression greatly enhances BMP-dependent gene regulation and mesenchymal differentiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that PPM1H acts as a gatekeeper to prevent excessive BMP signaling through dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear exclusion of P-Smad1/5/8 proteins. PMID:24732009

  19. Detection of electron emission as DLTS signal in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y. M.; Cheng, Z.; Tan, X.; Misra, D.; Delahoy, A. E.; Chin, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    This work identifies an incongruity in the detection of the minority carrier signal in CdTe solar cells during the deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurement. Use of quasi-Fermi level instead of Fermi level of majority carriers to estimate the probability of emitting carriers seems to correct the ambiguity. During the experiment, signals from minority carrier traps (electron traps) were detected by using a long filling pulse time instead of an electron injection pulse. The DLTS measurements of CdTe solar cells observed a single electron trap with energy level EE1 = 0.47 eV, and two hole traps with energy levels, EH1 = 0.17 eV and EH2 = 0.27 eV. The possibility of any impact from the back contact was excluded, and the phenomenon was clarified by the simulation. It was further observed that when the condition of quasi-Fermi level is considered, the results of calculated probability were significantly different from that of the results that used only Fermi level of majority carriers. The simulations further aided the explanation of the defect behavior in DLTS measurements and the overlapping phenomenon of the capacitance spectrum of hole and electron traps.

  20. Comparative study of protein tyrosine phosphatase-epsilon isoforms: membrane localization confers specificity in cellular signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J N; Elson, A; Lammers, R; Rømer, J; Clausen, J T; Møller, K B; Møller, N P

    2001-01-01

    To study the influence of subcellular localization as a determinant of signal transduction specificity, we assessed the effects of wild-type transmembrane and cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) epsilon on tyrosine kinase signalling in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (BHK-IR). The efficiency by which differently localized PTPepsilon and PTPalpha variants attenuated insulin-induced cell rounding and detachment was determined in a functional clonal-selection assay and in stable cell lines. Compared with the corresponding receptor-type PTPs, the cytoplasmic PTPs (cytPTPs) were considerably less efficient in generating insulin-resistant clones, and exceptionally high compensatory expression levels were required to counteract phosphotyrosine-based signal transduction. Targeting of cytPTPepsilon to the plasma membrane via the Lck-tyrosine kinase dual acylation motif restored high rescue efficiency and abolished the need for high cytPTPepsilon levels. Consistent with these results, expression levels and subcellular localization of PTPepsilon were also found to determine the phosphorylation level of cellular proteins including focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Furthermore, PTPepsilon stabilized binding of phosphorylated FAK to Src, suggesting this complex as a possible mediator of the PTPepsilon inhibitory response to insulin-induced cell rounding and detachment in BHK-IR cells. Taken together, the present localization-function study indicates that transcriptional control of the subcellular localization of PTPepsilon may provide a molecular mechanism that determines PTPepsilon substrate selectivity and isoform-specific function. PMID:11237862

  1. JAK/STAT controls organ size and fate specification by regulating morphogen production and signalling

    PubMed Central

    Recasens-Alvarez, Carles; Ferreira, Ana; Milán, Marco

    2017-01-01

    A stable pool of morphogen-producing cells is critical for the development of any organ or tissue. Here we present evidence that JAK/STAT signalling in the Drosophila wing promotes the cycling and survival of Hedgehog-producing cells, thereby allowing the stable localization of the nearby BMP/Dpp-organizing centre in the developing wing appendage. We identify the inhibitor of apoptosis dIAP1 and Cyclin A as two critical genes regulated by JAK/STAT and contributing to the growth of the Hedgehog-expressing cell population. We also unravel an early role of JAK/STAT in guaranteeing Wingless-mediated appendage specification, and a later one in restricting the Dpp-organizing activity to the appendage itself. These results unveil a fundamental role of the conserved JAK/STAT pathway in limb specification and growth by regulating morphogen production and signalling, and a function of pro-survival cues and mitogenic signals in the regulation of the pool of morphogen-producing cells in a developing organ. PMID:28045022

  2. Translatome analyses capture of opposing tissue-specific brassinosteroid signals orchestrating root meristem differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vragović, Kristina; Sela, Ayala; Friedlander-Shani, Lilach; Fridman, Yulia; Hacham, Yael; Holland, Neta; Bartom, Elizabeth; Mockler, Todd C; Savaldi-Goldstein, Sigal

    2015-01-20

    The mechanisms ensuring balanced growth remain a critical question in developmental biology. In plants, this balance relies on spatiotemporal integration of hormonal signaling pathways, but the understanding of the precise contribution of each hormone is just beginning to take form. Brassinosteroid (BR) hormone is shown here to have opposing effects on root meristem size, depending on its site of action. BR is demonstrated to both delay and promote onset of stem cell daughter differentiation, when acting in the outer tissue of the root meristem, the epidermis, and the innermost tissue, the stele, respectively. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, a comprehensive spatiotemporal translatome mapping of Arabidopsis roots was performed. Analyses of wild type and mutants featuring different distributions of BR revealed autonomous, tissue-specific gene responses to BR, implying its contrasting tissue-dependent impact on growth. BR-induced genes were primarily detected in epidermal cells of the basal meristem zone and were enriched by auxin-related genes. In contrast, repressed BR genes prevailed in the stele of the apical meristem zone. Furthermore, auxin was found to mediate the growth-promoting impact of BR signaling originating in the epidermis, whereas BR signaling in the stele buffered this effect. We propose that context-specific BR activity and responses are oppositely interpreted at the organ level, ensuring coherent growth.

  3. Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 controls the localized inhibition, propagation, and transforming potential of ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kidger, Andrew M.; Rushworth, Linda K.; Stellzig, Julia; Davidson, Jane; Bryant, Christopher J.; Bayley, Cassidy; Caddye, Edward; Rogers, Tim; Keyse, Stephen M.; Caunt, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling drives cancer growth. Normally, ERK activity is self-limiting by the rapid inactivation of upstream kinases and delayed induction of dual-specificity MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs/DUSPs). However, interactions between these feedback mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that, although the MKP DUSP5 both inactivates and anchors ERK in the nucleus, it paradoxically increases and prolongs cytoplasmic ERK activity. The latter effect is caused, at least in part, by the relief of ERK-mediated RAF inhibition. The importance of this spatiotemporal interaction between these distinct feedback mechanisms is illustrated by the fact that expression of oncogenic BRAFV600E, a feedback-insensitive mutant RAF kinase, reprograms DUSP5 into a cell-wide ERK inhibitor that facilitates cell proliferation and transformation. In contrast, DUSP5 deletion causes BRAFV600E-induced ERK hyperactivation and cellular senescence. Thus, feedback interactions within the ERK pathway can regulate cell proliferation and transformation, and suggest oncogene-specific roles for DUSP5 in controlling ERK signaling and cell fate. PMID:28053233

  4. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  5. The glucocorticoid receptor dimer interface allosterically transmits sequence-specific DNA signals.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lisa C; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M; Schiller, Benjamin J; Gross, John D; Pufall, Miles A; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to genomic response elements and regulates gene transcription with cell and gene specificity. Within a response element, the precise sequence to which the receptor binds has been implicated in directing its structure and activity. Here, we use NMR chemical-shift difference mapping to show that nonspecific interactions with bases at particular positions in the binding sequence, such as those of the 'spacer', affect the conformation of distinct regions of the rat GR DNA-binding domain. These regions include the DNA-binding surface, the 'lever arm' and the dimerization interface, suggesting an allosteric pathway that signals between the DNA-binding sequence and the associated dimer partner. Disrupting this pathway by mutating the dimer interface alters sequence-specific conformations, DNA-binding kinetics and transcriptional activity. Our study demonstrates that GR dimer partners collaborate to read DNA shape and to direct sequence-specific gene activity.

  6. GDE2 regulates subtype specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-01-01

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here, we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons. PMID:21943603

  7. Investigation of contamination of correlation ECE signals by electron cyclotron heating at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M. M.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Sung, C.; Carter, T. A.

    2016-10-01

    Correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) is commonly used at DIII-D to extract localized electron temperature fluctuations from passive emission. Very long coherence length signals (10's of cm in length) have been found to contaminate CECE measurements on some plasma discharges using electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Temperature fluctuations levels are observed to increase by as much as 50% due to this effect. Unabsorbed radiation from ECH is under investigation as a possible cause. A simple 1D code modeling the CECE data is used to investigate and test the effects of long coherence length contamination on the temperature fluctuation calculation. Data analysis methods to mitigate this effect have been designed and show significant promise in correcting the final results. Supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Dynamics of the ions in liquid argon detectors and electron signal quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Luciano; Santorelli, Roberto; Montes, Bárbara

    2017-06-01

    A study of the dynamics of the positive charges in liquid argon has been carried out in the context of the future massive time projection chambers proposed for dark matter and neutrino physics. Given their small mobility coefficient in liquid argon, the ions spend a considerably longer time in the active volume with respect to the electrons. The positive charge density can be additionally increased by the injection, in the liquid volume, of the ions produced by the electron multiplying devices located in gas argon. The impact of the ion current on the uniformity of the field has been evaluated as well as the probability of the charge signal quenching due to the electron-ion recombination along the drift. The study results show some potential concerns for massive detectors with drift of many meters operated on surface.

  9. The legalities and practicalities of developing a course-specific electronic reserve room.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary A; Curran, Kent E

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses important issues related to maintaining the currency of readings in a nursing course. The development of a course-specific electronic reserve room is offered as a methodology for achieving both timeliness and simplified distribution of course readings. The article reviews legal issues related to the development of an electronic reserve room for internet access. In addition, hardware and software issues related to the transference of paper materials to a digital format are considered.

  10. Specific Interaction between Redox Phospholipid Polymers and Plastoquinone in Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenya; Kaneko, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Masahito; Kato, Souichiro; Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-04-19

    Redox phospholipid polymers added in culture media are known to be capable of extracting electrons from living photosynthetic cells across bacterial cell membranes with high cytocompatibility. In the present study, we identify the intracellular redox species that transfers electrons to the polymers. The open-circuit electrochemical potential of an electrolyte containing the redox polymer and extracted thylakoid membranes shift to positive (or negative) under light irradiation, when an electron transport inhibitor specific to plastoquinone is added upstream (or downstream) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The same trend is also observed for a medium containing living photosynthetic cells of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. These results clearly indicate that the phospholipid redox polymers extract photosynthetic electrons mainly from plastoquinone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structural insight into partner specificity and phosphoryl transfer in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2009-10-16

    The chief mechanism used by bacteria for sensing their environment is based on two conserved proteins: a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator (RR). The signal transduction process involves highly conserved domains of both proteins that mediate autokinase, phosphotransfer, and phosphatase activities whose output is a finely tuned RR phosphorylation level. Here, we report the structure of the complex between the entire cytoplasmic portion of Thermotoga maritima class I HK853 and its cognate, RR468, as well as the structure of the isolated RR468, both free and BeF(3)(-) bound. Our results provide insight into partner specificity in two-component systems, recognition of the phosphorylation state of each partner, and the catalytic mechanism of the phosphatase reaction. Biochemical analysis shows that the HK853-catalyzed autokinase reaction proceeds by a cis autophosphorylation mechanism within the HK subunit. The results suggest a model for the signal transduction mechanism in two-component systems.

  12. Crosstalk between NOTCH and AKT signaling during murine megakaryocyte lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Melanie G; Mabialah, Vinciane; Sykes, Stephen M; Khandan, Tulasi; Lo Celso, Cristina; Lopez, Cécile K; Rivera-Muñoz, Paola; Rameau, Philippe; Tothova, Zuzana; Aster, Jon C; DePinho, Ronald A; Scadden, David T; Gilliland, D Gary; Mercher, Thomas

    2011-08-04

    The NOTCH signaling pathway is implicated in a broad range of developmental processes, including cell fate decisions. However, the molecular basis for its role at the different steps of stem cell lineage commitment is unclear. We recently identified the NOTCH signaling pathway as a positive regulator of megakaryocyte lineage specification during hematopoiesis, but the developmental pathways that allow hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into the erythro-megakaryocytic lineages remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of downstream mediators of NOTCH during megakaryopoiesis and report crosstalk between the NOTCH and PI3K/AKT pathways. We demonstrate the inhibitory role of phosphatase with tensin homolog and Forkhead Box class O factors on megakaryopoiesis in vivo. Finally, our data annotate developmental mechanisms in the hematopoietic system that enable a decision to be made either at the hematopoietic stem cell or the committed progenitor level to commit to the megakaryocyte lineage, supporting the existence of 2 distinct developmental pathways.

  13. Crosstalk between NOTCH and AKT signaling during murine megakaryocyte lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Melanie G.; Mabialah, Vinciane; Sykes, Stephen M.; Khandan, Tulasi; Lo Celso, Cristina; Lopez, Cécile K.; Rivera-Muñoz, Paola; Rameau, Philippe; Tothova, Zuzana; Aster, Jon C.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Scadden, David T.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2011-01-01

    The NOTCH signaling pathway is implicated in a broad range of developmental processes, including cell fate decisions. However, the molecular basis for its role at the different steps of stem cell lineage commitment is unclear. We recently identified the NOTCH signaling pathway as a positive regulator of megakaryocyte lineage specification during hematopoiesis, but the developmental pathways that allow hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into the erythro-megakaryocytic lineages remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of downstream mediators of NOTCH during megakaryopoiesis and report crosstalk between the NOTCH and PI3K/AKT pathways. We demonstrate the inhibitory role of phosphatase with tensin homolog and Forkhead Box class O factors on megakaryopoiesis in vivo. Finally, our data annotate developmental mechanisms in the hematopoietic system that enable a decision to be made either at the hematopoietic stem cell or the committed progenitor level to commit to the megakaryocyte lineage, supporting the existence of 2 distinct developmental pathways. PMID:21653327

  14. EGF-receptor specificity for phosphotyrosine-primed substrates provides signal integration with Src.

    PubMed

    Begley, Michael J; Yun, Cai-hong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Johnson, Jared L; Coyle, Anthony J; Eck, Michael J; Apostolou, Irina; Cantley, Lewis C

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) contributes to many human cancers by activating the Ras-MAPK pathway and other pathways. EGFR signaling is augmented by Src-family kinases, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that human EGFR preferentially phosphorylates peptide substrates that are primed by a prior phosphorylation. Using peptides based on the sequence of the adaptor protein Shc1, we show that Src mediates the priming phosphorylation, thus promoting subsequent phosphorylation by EGFR. Importantly, the doubly phosphorylated Shc1 peptide binds more tightly than singly phosphorylated peptide to the Ras activator Grb2; this binding is a key step in activating the Ras-MAPK pathway. Finally, a crystal structure of EGFR in complex with a primed Shc1 peptide reveals the structural basis for EGFR substrate specificity. These results provide a molecular explanation for the integration of Src and EGFR signaling with downstream effectors such as Ras.

  15. Specifics of signal generation in receivers based on thermoelastic effect at multiple impulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevnina, Elena I.; Maraev, Anton A.; Ishanin, Gennady G.

    2016-04-01

    To provide operating supervision of the process there is a need of means of control with high temporal stability and resistance to radiation excess. Receivers based on the thermoelastic effect in crystalline quartz are designed for energy measurement of lasers in single impulse mode or for average power measurement in operation monitoring of industrial lasers. In the research we analyze work of the receiver at single impulse exposure. The heat storage time of the receiver is defined. Specifics of signal generation in receivers on thermoelastic effect at multiple impulse exposure are also analyzed. An algorithm for voltage calculation of the receiver with given parameters is developed. The modelling shows that generated signal growth in the detector exposed to an impulse consequence can influence the power measurement result and thus the ways to reduce the effect are proposed.

  16. Signal processing and display interface studies. [performance tests - design analysis/equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Signal processing equipment specifications, operating and test procedures, and systems design and engineering are described. Five subdivisions of the overall circuitry are treated: (1) the spectrum analyzer; (2) the spectrum integrator; (3) the velocity discriminator; (4) the display interface; and (5) the formatter. They function in series: (1) first in analog form to provide frequency resolution, (2) then in digital form to achieve signal to noise improvement (video integration) and frequency discrimination, and (3) finally in analog form again for the purpose of real-time display of the significant velocity data. The formatter collects binary data from various points in the processor and provides a serial output for bi-phase recording. Block diagrams are used to illustrate the system.

  17. Notch signaling alters sensory or neuronal cell fate specification of inner ear stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Fujioka, Masato; Kim, Shi-Chan; Edge, Albert S B

    2011-06-08

    Multipotent progenitor cells in the otic placode give rise to the specialized cell types of the inner ear, including neurons, supporting cells, and hair cells. The mechanisms governing acquisition of specific fates by the cells that form the cochleovestibular organs remain poorly characterized. Here we show that whereas blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor increased the conversion of inner ear stem cells to hair cells by a mechanism that involved the upregulation of bHLH transcription factor, Math1 (mouse Atoh1), differentiation to a neuronal lineage was increased by expression of the Notch intracellular domain. The shift to a neuronal lineage could be attributed in part to continued cell proliferation in cells that did not undergo sensory cell differentiation due to the high Notch signaling, but also involved upregulation of Ngn1. The Notch intracellular domain influenced Ngn1 indirectly by upregulation of Sox2, a transcription factor expressed in many neural progenitor cells, and directly by an interaction with an RBP-J binding site in the Ngn1 promoter/enhancer. The induction of Ngn1 was blocked partially by mutation of the RBP-J site and nearly completely when the mutation was combined with inhibition of Sox2 expression. Thus, Notch signaling had a significant role in the fate specification of neurons and hair cells from inner ear stem cells, and decisions about cell fate were mediated in part by a differential effect of combinatorial signaling by Notch and Sox2 on the expression of bHLH transcription factors.

  18. Activated N-Ras signaling regulates arterial-venous specification in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chun-Guang; Wang, Lei; Jia, Xiao-E; Liu, Yi-Jie; Dong, Zhi-Wei; Jin, Yi; Chen, Yi; Deng, Min; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Yi; Ren, Rui-Bao; Pan, Wei-Jun; Liu, Ting-Xi

    2013-05-12

    The aberrant activation of Ras signaling is associated with human diseases including hematological malignancies and vascular disorders. So far the pathological roles of activated Ras signaling in hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis are largely unknown. A conditional Cre/loxP transgenic strategy was used to mediate the specific expression of a constitutively active form of human N-Ras in zebrafish endothelial and hematopoietic cells driven by the zebrafish lmo2 promoter. The expression of hematopoietic and endothelial marker genes was analyzed both via whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) assay and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The embryonic vascular morphogenesis was characterized both by living imaging and immunofluorescence on the sections with a confocal microscopy, and the number of endothelial cells in the embryos was quantified by flow cytometry. The functional analyses of the blood circulation were carried out by fluorescence microangiography assay and morpholino injection. In the activated N-Ras transgenic embryos, the primitive hematopoiesis appeared normal, however, the definitive hematopoiesis of these embryos was completely absent. Further analysis of endothelial cell markers confirmed that transcription of arterial marker ephrinB2 was significantly decreased and expression of venous marker flt4 excessively increased, indicating the activated N-Ras signaling promotes the venous development at the expense of arteriogenesis during zebrafish embryogenesis. The activated N-Ras-expressing embryos showed atrophic axial arteries and expansive axial veins, leading to no definitive hematopoietic stem cell formation, the blood circulation failure and subsequently embryonic lethality. Our studies revealed for the first time that activated N-Ras signaling during the endothelial differentiation in vertebrates can disrupt the balance of arterial-venous specification, thus providing new insights into the pathogenesis of the congenital human vascular disease and

  19. NOTCH SIGNALING ALTERS SENSORY OR NEURONAL CELL FATE SPECIFICATION OF INNER EAR STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Fujioka, Masato; Kim, Shi-Chan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent progenitor cells in the otic placode give rise to the specialized cell types of the inner ear, including neurons, supporting cells and hair cells. The mechanisms governing acquisition of specific fates by the cells that form the cochleovestibular organs remain poorly characterized. Here we show that whereas blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor increased the conversion of inner ear stem cells to hair cells by a mechanism that involved the upregulation of bHLH transcription factor, Math1 (mouse Atoh1), differentiation to a neuronal lineage was increased by expression of the Notch intracellular domain. The shift to a neuronal lineage could be attributed in part to the continued cell proliferation in cells that did not undergo sensory cell differentiation due to the high Notch signaling, but also involved upregulation of Ngn1. The Notch intracellular domain influenced Ngn1 indirectly by upregulation of Sox2, a transcription factor expressed in many neural progenitor cells, and directly by an interaction with an RBP-J binding site in the Ngn1 promoter/enhancer. The induction of Ngn1 was blocked partially by mutation of the RBP-J site and nearly completely when the mutation was combined with inhibition of Sox2 expression. Thus Notch signaling had a significant role in the fate specification of neurons and hair cells from inner ear stem cells, and decisions about cell fate were mediated in part by a differential effect of combinatorial signaling by Notch and Sox2 on the expression of bHLH transcription factors. PMID:21653840

  20. Activated N-Ras signaling regulates arterial-venous specification in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aberrant activation of Ras signaling is associated with human diseases including hematological malignancies and vascular disorders. So far the pathological roles of activated Ras signaling in hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis are largely unknown. Methods A conditional Cre/loxP transgenic strategy was used to mediate the specific expression of a constitutively active form of human N-Ras in zebrafish endothelial and hematopoietic cells driven by the zebrafish lmo2 promoter. The expression of hematopoietic and endothelial marker genes was analyzed both via whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) assay and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The embryonic vascular morphogenesis was characterized both by living imaging and immunofluorescence on the sections with a confocal microscopy, and the number of endothelial cells in the embryos was quantified by flow cytometry. The functional analyses of the blood circulation were carried out by fluorescence microangiography assay and morpholino injection. Results In the activated N-Ras transgenic embryos, the primitive hematopoiesis appeared normal, however, the definitive hematopoiesis of these embryos was completely absent. Further analysis of endothelial cell markers confirmed that transcription of arterial marker ephrinB2 was significantly decreased and expression of venous marker flt4 excessively increased, indicating the activated N-Ras signaling promotes the venous development at the expense of arteriogenesis during zebrafish embryogenesis. The activated N-Ras-expressing embryos showed atrophic axial arteries and expansive axial veins, leading to no definitive hematopoietic stem cell formation, the blood circulation failure and subsequently embryonic lethality. Conclusions Our studies revealed for the first time that activated N-Ras signaling during the endothelial differentiation in vertebrates can disrupt the balance of arterial-venous specification, thus providing new insights into the pathogenesis of the

  1. Dendritic cell maturation: functional specialization through signaling specificity and transcriptional programming

    PubMed Central

    Dalod, Marc; Chelbi, Rabie; Malissen, Bernard; Lawrence, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of both protective immune responses and tolerance to self-antigens. Soon after their discovery in lymphoid tissues by Steinman and Cohn, as cells with the unique ability to prime naïve antigen-specific T cells, it was realized that DC can exist in at least two distinctive states characterized by morphological, phenotypic and functional changes—this led to the description of DC maturation. It is now well appreciated that there are several subsets of DC in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues of mammals, and these cells show remarkable functional specialization and specificity in their roles in tolerance and immunity. This review will focus on the specific characteristics of DC subsets and how their functional specialization may be regulated by distinctive gene expression programs and signaling responses in both steady-state and in the context of inflammation. In particular, we will highlight the common and distinctive genes and signaling pathways that are associated with the functional maturation of DC subsets. PMID:24737868

  2. Structural insights into TIR domain specificity of the bridging adaptor Mal in TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijie; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Weihong; Shen, Yuequan

    2012-01-01

    MyD88 adaptor-like protein (Mal) is a crucial adaptor that acts as a bridge to recruit the MyD88 molecule to activated TLR4 receptors in response to invading pathogens. The specific assembly of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of TLR4, Mal and MyD88 is responsible for proper signal transduction in the TLR4 signaling pathway. However, the molecular mechanism for the specificity of these TIR domains remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TIR domain of the human Mal molecule (Mal-TIR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Unexpectedly, Mal-TIR exhibits an extraordinarily long AB loop, but no αB helix or BB loop, distinguishing it from other TIR domains. More importantly, the Mal-TIR AB loop is capable of mediating direct binding to the TIR domains of TLR4 and MyD88 simultaneously. We also found that Mal-TIR can form a back-to-back dimer that may resemble the dimeric assembly of the entire Mal molecule. Our data demonstrate the bridge role of the Mal-TIR domain and provide important information about TIR domain specificity.

  3. Structural Insights into TIR Domain Specificity of the Bridging Adaptor Mal in TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhijie; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Weihong; Shen, Yuequan

    2012-01-01

    MyD88 adaptor-like protein (Mal) is a crucial adaptor that acts as a bridge to recruit the MyD88 molecule to activated TLR4 receptors in response to invading pathogens. The specific assembly of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of TLR4, Mal and MyD88 is responsible for proper signal transduction in the TLR4 signaling pathway. However, the molecular mechanism for the specificity of these TIR domains remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TIR domain of the human Mal molecule (Mal-TIR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Unexpectedly, Mal-TIR exhibits an extraordinarily long AB loop, but no αB helix or BB loop, distinguishing it from other TIR domains. More importantly, the Mal-TIR AB loop is capable of mediating direct binding to the TIR domains of TLR4 and MyD88 simultaneously. We also found that Mal-TIR can form a back-to-back dimer that may resemble the dimeric assembly of the entire Mal molecule. Our data demonstrate the bridge role of the Mal-TIR domain and provide important information about TIR domain specificity. PMID:22485159

  4. Interference in Ballistic Motor Learning: Specificity and Role of Sensory Error Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are capable of learning numerous motor skills, but newly acquired skills may be abolished by subsequent learning. Here we ask what factors determine whether interference occurs in motor learning. We speculated that interference requires competing processes of synaptic plasticity in overlapping circuits and predicted specificity. To test this, subjects learned a ballistic motor task. Interference was observed following subsequent learning of an accuracy-tracking task, but only if the competing task involved the same muscles and movement direction. Interference was not observed from a non-learning task suggesting that interference requires competing learning. Subsequent learning of the competing task 4 h after initial learning did not cause interference suggesting disruption of early motor memory consolidation as one possible mechanism underlying interference. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below movement threshold did not cause interference, whereas suprathreshold rTMS evoking motor responses and (re)afferent activation did. Finally, the experiments revealed that suprathreshold repetitive electrical stimulation of the agonist (but not antagonist) peripheral nerve caused interference. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that peripheral nerve stimulation may cause interference. The finding underscores the importance of sensory feedback as error signals in motor learning. We conclude that interference requires competing plasticity in overlapping circuits. Interference is remarkably specific for circuits involved in a specific movement and it may relate to sensory error signals. PMID:21408054

  5. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gα(s)-mediated), and inhibition (Gα(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway.

  6. CB1 Receptor Allosteric Modulators Display Both Agonist and Signaling Pathway Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Gemma L.; Horswill, James G.; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H.; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E.; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G.; Stephens, Gary J.; Pertwee, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB1 receptor agonist [3H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB1 receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB1 receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB1 receptor agonist–induced [35S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB1 agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [3H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gαs-mediated), and inhibition (Gαi-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB1 agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway. PMID:23160940

  7. Forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal specific to intralumenal detection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sovanlal; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    This work investigates a forward model associated with intra-lumenal detection of acoustic signal originated from transient thermal-expansion of the tissue. The work is specific to intra-lumenal thermo-acoustic tomography (TAT) which detects the contrast of tissue dielectric properties with ultrasonic resolution, but it is also extendable to intralumenal photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) which detects the contrast of light absorption properties of tissue with ultrasound resolution. Exact closed-form frequency-domain or time-domain forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal have been studied rigorously for planar geometry and two other geometries, including cylindrical and spherical geometries both of which is specific to external-imaging, i.e. breast or brain imaging using an externally-deployed applicator. This work extends the existing studies to the specific geometry of internal or intra-lumenal imaging, i.e., prostate imaging by an endo-rectally deployed applicator. In this intra-lumenal imaging geometry, both the source that excites the transient thermal-expansion of the tissue and the acoustic transducer that acquires the thermally-induced acoustic signal are assumed enclosed by the tissue and on the surface of a long cylindrical applicator. The Green's function of the frequency-domain thermo-acoustic equation in spherical coordinates is expanded to cylindrical coordinates associated with intra-lumenal geometry. Inverse Fourier transform is then applied to obtain a time-domain solution of the thermo-acoustic pressure wave for intra-lumenal geometry. Further employment of the boundary condition to the "convex" applicator-tissue interface would render an exact forward solution toward accurate reconstruction for intra-lumenal thermally-induced acoustic imaging.

  8. BMP/Smad signaling and embryonic cerebellum development: stem cell specification and heterogeneity of anterior rhombic lip.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ka Kui; Ma, Tsz Ching; Kwan, Kin Ming

    2015-02-01

    The canonical bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) signaling have been shown to mediate many embryonic developmental processes. Due to its complexity, there are still many unknowns about this signal pathway including the Smad usage and requirement. Cerebellum, one of the most studied neural organs in development biology, requires canonical BMP signaling for stem cell specification. Here we review the role of canonical BMP signaling during the embryonic cerebellum development. Also, we raise several unsolved issues concerning the BMP signaling including the co-Smad independency of this signaling pathway. Besides, we also propose two models for explaining the cerebellar anterior rhombic lip (ARL) specification mechanisms. In addition, we review the heterogeneity of the ARL stem cells, which may provide new insight into understanding the neural stem cell specification process of the embryonic cerebellum. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  9. Characterisation of the signal and noise transfer of CCD cameras for electron detection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R R; Kirkland, A I

    2000-05-01

    Methods to characterise the performance of CCD cameras for electron detection are investigated with particular emphasis on the difference between the transfer of signal and noise. Similar to the Modulation Transfer Function MTF, which describes the spatial frequency dependent attenuation of contrast in the image, we introduce a Noise Transfer Function NTF that describes the transfer of the Poisson noise that is inevitably present in any electron image. A general model for signal and noise transfer by an image converter is provided. This allows the calculation of MTF and NTF from Monte-Carlo simulations of the trajectories of electrons and photons in the scintillator and the optical coupling of the camera. Furthermore, accurate methods to measure the modulation and noise transfer functions experimentally are presented. The spatial-frequency dependent Detection Quantum Efficiency DQE, an important figure of merit of the camera which has so far not been measured experimentally, can be obtained from the measured MTF and NTF. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulations and show that the NTF at high spatial frequencies is in some cases by a factor of four higher than the MTF. This implies that the noise method, which is frequently used to measure the MTF, but in fact measures the NTF, gives over-optimistic results. Furthermore, the spatial frequency dependent DQE is lower than previously assumed.

  10. The plant non-specific phospholipase C gene family. Novel competitors in lipid signalling.

    PubMed

    Pokotylo, Igor; Pejchar, Přemysl; Potocký, Martin; Kocourková, Daniela; Krčková, Zuzana; Ruelland, Eric; Kravets, Volodymyr; Martinec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-specific phospholipases C (NPCs) were discovered as a novel type of plant phospholipid-cleaving enzyme homologous to bacterial phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and responsible for lipid conversion during phosphate-limiting conditions. The six-gene family was established in Arabidopsis, and growing evidence suggests the involvement of two articles NPCs in biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as phytohormone actions. In addition, the diacylglycerol produced via NPCs is postulated to participate in membrane remodelling, general lipid metabolism and cross-talk with other phospholipid signalling systems in plants. This review summarises information concerning this new plant protein family and focusses on its sequence analysis, biochemical properties, cellular and tissue distribution and physiological functions. Possible modes of action are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated module and gene-specific regulatory inference implicates upstream signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development.

  12. Dendritic cell specific targeting of MyD88 signalling pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. During infection, DCs recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. TLRs mainly signal via the adaptor protein MyD88. This signalling pathway is required for immune protection during many infections, which are lethal in the absence of MyD88. However, the cell type specific importance of this pathway during both innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens in vivo remains ill-defined. We discuss recent findings from conditional KO or gain-of-function mouse models targeting TLR/MyD88 signalling pathways in DCs and other myeloid cells during infection. While the general assumption that MyD88-dependent recognition by DCs is essential for inducing protective immunity holds true in some instances, the results surprisingly indicate a much more complex context-dependent requirement for this pathway in DCs and other myeloid or lymphoid cell-types in vivo. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of Cre-mediated DC targeting approaches and their possible limitations. We also present future perspectives on the development of new genetic mouse models to target distinct DC subsets in vivo. Such models will serve to understand the functional heterogeneity of DCs in vivo.

  13. RNAi screening identifies mediators of NOD2 signaling: Implications for spatial specificity of MDP recognition

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Simone; Grabe, Nils; Jacobs, Gunnar; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Till, Andreas; Häsler, Robert; Aden, Konrad; Paulsen, Maren; Arlt, Alexander; Kraemer, Lars; Hagemann, Nina; Erdmann, Kai Sven; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) receptor detects bacteria-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and activates the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we describe the regulatome of NOD2 signaling using a systematic RNAi screen. Using three consecutive screens, we identified a set of 20 positive NF-κB regulators including the known pathway members RIPK2, RELA, and BIRC4 (XIAP) as well as FRMPD2 (FERM and PDZ domain-containing 2). FRMPD2 interacts with NOD2 via leucine-rich repeats and forms a complex with the membrane-associated protein ERBB2IP. We demonstrate that FRMPD2 spatially assembles the NOD2-signaling complex, hereby restricting NOD2-mediated immune responses to the basolateral compartment of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. We show that genetic truncation of the NOD2 leucine-rich repeat domain, which is associated with Crohn disease, impairs the interaction with FRMPD2, and that intestinal inflammation leads to down-regulation of FRMPD2. These results suggest a structural mechanism for how polarity of epithelial cells acts on intestinal NOD-like receptor signaling to mediate spatial specificity of bacterial recognition and control of immune responses. PMID:23213202

  14. RNAi screening identifies mediators of NOD2 signaling: implications for spatial specificity of MDP recognition.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Simone; Grabe, Nils; Jacobs, Gunnar; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Till, Andreas; Häsler, Robert; Aden, Konrad; Paulsen, Maren; Arlt, Alexander; Kraemer, Lars; Hagemann, Nina; Erdmann, Kai Sven; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-12-26

    The intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) receptor detects bacteria-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and activates the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we describe the regulatome of NOD2 signaling using a systematic RNAi screen. Using three consecutive screens, we identified a set of 20 positive NF-κB regulators including the known pathway members RIPK2, RELA, and BIRC4 (XIAP) as well as FRMPD2 (FERM and PDZ domain-containing 2). FRMPD2 interacts with NOD2 via leucine-rich repeats and forms a complex with the membrane-associated protein ERBB2IP. We demonstrate that FRMPD2 spatially assembles the NOD2-signaling complex, hereby restricting NOD2-mediated immune responses to the basolateral compartment of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. We show that genetic truncation of the NOD2 leucine-rich repeat domain, which is associated with Crohn disease, impairs the interaction with FRMPD2, and that intestinal inflammation leads to down-regulation of FRMPD2. These results suggest a structural mechanism for how polarity of epithelial cells acts on intestinal NOD-like receptor signaling to mediate spatial specificity of bacterial recognition and control of immune responses.

  15. Integrated Module and Gene-Specific Regulatory Inference Implicates Upstream Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A.; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development. PMID:24146602

  16. Hepatic-Specific Accessibility of Igf1 Gene Enhancers Is Independent of Growth Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Mahalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    The diverse roles of IGF-1 in physiology include acting as the endocrine intermediate to elicit the anabolic actions of GH. The majority of serum IGF-1 is synthesized in liver, where GH stimulates Igf1 gene transcription via the transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)5b. We and others have identified multiple Stat5-binding domains at the Igf1 locus that function in gene regulation, but it remains unclear whether the roles of these domains are tissue specific. Survey of the chromatin landscape of regulatory domains can provide insight about mechanisms of gene regulation, with chromatin accessibility regarded as a hallmark feature of regulatory domains. We prepared chromatin from liver, kidney, and spleen of C57BL/6 mice, and used formaldehyde-associated isolation of regulatory elements to assess chromatin accessibility at the major Igf1 promoter and 7 -binding enhancers. Whereas the promoters of other prototypical tissue-specific genes are open in a tissue-specific way, the major Igf1 promoter is open in all 3 tissues, albeit moderately more so in liver. In contrast, chromatin accessibility at Igf1 Stat5-binding domains is essentially restricted to liver, indicating that the enhancers are driving extensive differences in tissue expression. Furthermore, studies with Ghrhrlit/lit mice reveal that prior GH exposure is not necessary to establish open chromatin at these domains. Lastly, formaldehyde-associated isolation of regulatory elements of human liver samples confirms open chromatin at IGF1 Promoter 1, but unexpectedly, homologous Stat5-binding motifs are not accessible. We conclude that robust GH-stimulated hepatic Igf1 gene transcription utilizes tissue-specific mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that are established independent of GH signaling. PMID:24109593

  17. Site-specific ionisation edge fine-structure of Rutile in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hetaba, Walid; Löffler, Stefan; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Schlögl, Robert; Schattschneider, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Combined Bloch-wave and density functional theory simulations are performed to investigate the effects of different channelling conditions on the fine-structure of electron energy-loss spectra. The simulated spectra compare well with experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that using this technique, the site-specific investigation of atomic orbitals is possible. This opens new possibilities for chemical analyses.

  18. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... National Standards Institute and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ANSI/IEEE) Standard 830-1998, ``IEEE Recommended Practice for Software Requirements Specifications.'' DATES: Submit comments by... Systems Of Nuclear Power Plants,'' dated September 1997. This RG endorses IEEE Standard 830-1998 with...

  19. Volatile organic compound specific detection by electrochemical signals using a cell-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Gwi; Kim, Jo Chun; Park, Chong-Ho; Ahn, Woong-Shick; Kim, Yong-Wan; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2008-01-01

    A cell-based in vitro exposure system was developed to determine whether oxidative stress plays a role in the cytotoxic effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene, xylene, and chlorobenzene, using human epithelial HeLa cells. Thin films based on cysteine-terminated synthetic oligopeptides were fabricated for immobilization of the HeLa cells on a gold (Au) substrate. In addition, an immobilized cell-based sensor was applied to the electrochemical detection of the VOCs. Layer formation and immobilization of the cells were investigated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The adhered living cells were exposed to VOCs; this caused a change in the SPR angle and the VOC-specific electrochemical signal. In addition, VOC toxicity was found to correlate with the degree of nitric oxide (NO) generation and EIS. The primary reason for the marked increase in impedance was the change of aqueous electrolyte composition as a result of cell responses. The p53 and NF-kappaB downregulation were closely related to the magnitude of growth inhibition associated with increasing concentrations of each VOC. Therefore, the proposed cell immobilization method, using a self-assembly technique and VOC-specific electrochemical signals, can be applied to construct a cell microarray for onsite VOC monitoring.

  20. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain.

    PubMed

    Miller, Miles A; Moss, Marcia L; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S; Griffith, Linda G; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-19

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, "decoy" antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling.

  1. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Miles A.; Moss, Marcia L.; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-10-01

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, “decoy” antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling.

  2. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Moss, Marcia L.; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, “decoy” antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling. PMID:26477568

  3. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J; Pérez-Rosello, Tamara; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Lara, Erika; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosun-moleculare (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RC), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI- AMPARs) and NMDARs. RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10 s), with intracellular injections of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (20 mM), and with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX(50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synaptic-specific Ca2+ signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  4. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Galván, E J; Pérez-Rosello, T; Gómez-Lira, G; Lara, E; Gutiérrez, R; Barrionuevo, G

    2015-04-02

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-molecular (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RCs), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI-AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10s), with intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20mM), and with the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX (50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synapse-specific Ca(2+) signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation.

  5. A crowd-sourcing approach for the construction of species-specific cell signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Erhan; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Melas, Ioannis N; Messinis, Dimitris E; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Iskandar, Anita; Blaese, Elise; Rice, John J; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Poussin, Carine

    2015-02-15

    Animal models are important tools in drug discovery and for understanding human biology in general. However, many drugs that initially show promising results in rodents fail in later stages of clinical trials. Understanding the commonalities and differences between human and rat cell signaling networks can lead to better experimental designs, improved allocation of resources and ultimately better drugs. The sbv IMPROVER Species-Specific Network Inference challenge was designed to use the power of the crowds to build two species-specific cell signaling networks given phosphoproteomics, transcriptomics and cytokine data generated from NHBE and NRBE cells exposed to various stimuli. A common literature-inspired reference network with 220 nodes and 501 edges was also provided as prior knowledge from which challenge participants could add or remove edges but not nodes. Such a large network inference challenge not based on synthetic simulations but on real data presented unique difficulties in scoring and interpreting the results. Because any prior knowledge about the networks was already provided to the participants for reference, novel ways for scoring and aggregating the results were developed. Two human and rat consensus networks were obtained by combining all the inferred networks. Further analysis showed that major signaling pathways were conserved between the two species with only isolated components diverging, as in the case of ribosomal S6 kinase RPS6KA1. Overall, the consensus between inferred edges was relatively high with the exception of the downstream targets of transcription factors, which seemed more difficult to predict. ebilal@us.ibm.com or gustavo@us.ibm.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  7. Demonstration of fundamental statistics by studying timing of electronics signals in a physics-based laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Shaun E.; Semkow, Thomas M.; Remling, David J.; Bradt, Clayton J.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed accessible methods to demonstrate fundamental statistics in several phenomena, in the context of teaching electronic signal processing in a physics-based college-level curriculum. A relationship between the exponential time-interval distribution and Poisson counting distribution for a Markov process with constant rate is derived in a novel way and demonstrated using nuclear counting. Negative binomial statistics is demonstrated as a model for overdispersion and justified by the effect of electronic noise in nuclear counting. The statistics of digital packets on a computer network are shown to be compatible with the fractal-point stochastic process leading to a power-law as well as generalized inverse Gaussian density distributions of time intervals between packets.

  8. Design and development of detector signal conditioning electronics for SST-1 Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Aruna; Kumar, Ajai; Thomas, Jinto; Chavda, Chhaya

    2008-09-15

    An IR enhanced thermoelectrically cooled Si-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) module is used for detection of scattered photons from plasma electrons. Present design of signal conditioning electronics for the APD has fast (50 MHz) and slow (500 kHz) channels to measure scattered and plasma background light, respectively. We report design analysis for different stages and their performance. The performance of fast channel is analyzed for two different group delays, speed, linearity, and its cross-talk with slow channel. Temperature dependence of APD's responsivity is studied in the wavelength range of 900-1060 nm. A minimum detection of {approx}25 photoelectrons (with S/N=1) in the range of 5 to 25 deg. C is achieved at an APD gain of 75 in the present design.

  9. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  10. Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Based on FPGAs for Electronic Skin Implementation †

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ali; Gastaldo, Paolo; Chible, Hussein; Valle, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Enabling touch-sensing capability would help appliances understand interaction behaviors with their surroundings. Many recent studies are focusing on the development of electronic skin because of its necessity in various application domains, namely autonomous artificial intelligence (e.g., robots), biomedical instrumentation, and replacement prosthetic devices. An essential task of the electronic skin system is to locally process the tactile data and send structured information either to mimic human skin or to respond to the application demands. The electronic skin must be fabricated together with an embedded electronic system which has the role of acquiring the tactile data, processing, and extracting structured information. On the other hand, processing tactile data requires efficient methods to extract meaningful information from raw sensor data. Machine learning represents an effective method for data analysis in many domains: it has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in processing tactile sensor data. In this framework, this paper presents the implementation of digital signal processing based on FPGAs for tactile data processing. It provides the implementation of a tensorial kernel function for a machine learning approach. Implementation results are assessed by highlighting the FPGA resource utilization and power consumption. Results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed implementation when real-time classification of input touch modalities are targeted. PMID:28287448

  11. Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Based on FPGAs for Electronic Skin Implementation †.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ali; Gastaldo, Paolo; Chible, Hussein; Valle, Maurizio

    2017-03-10

    Enabling touch-sensing capability would help appliances understand interaction behaviors with their surroundings. Many recent studies are focusing on the development of electronic skin because of its necessity in various application domains, namely autonomous artificial intelligence (e.g., robots), biomedical instrumentation, and replacement prosthetic devices. An essential task of the electronic skin system is to locally process the tactile data and send structured information either to mimic human skin or to respond to the application demands. The electronic skin must be fabricated together with an embedded electronic system which has the role of acquiring the tactile data, processing, and extracting structured information. On the other hand, processing tactile data requires efficient methods to extract meaningful information from raw sensor data. Machine learning represents an effective method for data analysis in many domains: it has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in processing tactile sensor data. In this framework, this paper presents the implementation of digital signal processing based on FPGAs for tactile data processing. It provides the implementation of a tensorial kernel function for a machine learning approach. Implementation results are assessed by highlighting the FPGA resource utilization and power consumption. Results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed implementation when real-time classification of input touch modalities are targeted.

  12. The Basic Biology of Redoxosomes in Cytokine-Mediated Signal Transduction and Implications for Disease-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Redox reactions have been established as major biological players in many cellular signaling pathways. Here we review mechanisms of redox signaling with an emphasis on redox-active signaling endosomes. Signals are transduced by relatively few reactive oxygen species (ROS), through very specific redox modifications of numerous proteins and enzymes. Although ROS signals are typically associated with cellular injury, these signaling pathways are also critical for maintaining cellular health at homeostasis. An important component of ROS signaling pertains to localization and tightly regulated signal transduction events within discrete microenvironments of the cell. One major aspect of this specificity is ROS compartmentalization within membrane-enclosed organelles such as redoxosomes (redox-active endosomes) and the nuclear envelope. Among the cellular proteins that produce superoxide are the NADPH oxidases (NOXes), transmembrane proteins that are implicated in many types of redox signaling. NOXes produce superoxide on only one side of a lipid bilayer; as such, their orientation dictates the compartmentalization of ROS and the local control of signaling events limited by ROS diffusion and/or movement through channels associated with the signaling membrane. NOX-dependent ROS signaling pathways can also be self-regulating, with molecular redox sensors that limit the local production of ROS required for effective signaling. ROS regulation of the Rac-GTPase, a required co-activator of many NOXes, is an example of this type of sensor. A deeper understanding of redox signaling pathways and the mechanisms that control their specificity will provide unique therapeutic opportunities for aging, cancer, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24555469

  13. Flower-specific jasmonate signaling regulates constitutive floral defenses in wild tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Wang, Ming; Wang, Yang; Schuman, Meredith C.; Weinhold, Arne; Schäfer, Martin; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo H.; Barthel, Andrea; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2017-01-01

    Optimal defense (OD) theory predicts that within a plant, tissues are defended in proportion to their fitness value and risk of predation. The fitness value of leaves varies greatly and leaves are protected by jasmonate (JA)-inducible defenses. Flowers are vehicles of Darwinian fitness in flowering plants and are attacked by herbivores and pathogens, but how they are defended is rarely investigated. We used Nicotiana attenuata, an ecological model plant with well-characterized herbivore interactions to characterize defense responses in flowers. Early floral stages constitutively accumulate greater amounts of two well-characterized defensive compounds, the volatile (E)-α-bergamotene and trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs), which are also found in herbivore-induced leaves. Plants rendered deficient in JA biosynthesis or perception by RNA interference had significantly attenuated floral accumulations of defensive compounds known to be regulated by JA in leaves. By RNA-seq, we found a JAZ gene, NaJAZi, specifically expressed in early-stage floral tissues. Gene silencing revealed that NaJAZi functions as a flower-specific jasmonate repressor that regulates JAs, (E)-α-bergamotene, TPIs, and a defensin. Flowers silenced in NaJAZi are more resistant to tobacco budworm attack, a florivore. When the defensin was ectopically expressed in leaves, performance of Manduca sexta larvae, a folivore, decreased. NaJAZi physically interacts with a newly identified NINJA-like protein, but not the canonical NINJA. This NINJA-like recruits the corepressor TOPLESS that contributes to the suppressive function of NaJAZi on floral defenses. This study uncovers the defensive function of JA signaling in flowers, which includes components that tailor JA signaling to provide flower-specific defense. PMID:28784761

  14. Flower-specific jasmonate signaling regulates constitutive floral defenses in wild tobacco.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wang, Ming; Wang, Yang; Schuman, Meredith C; Weinhold, Arne; Schäfer, Martin; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo H; Barthel, Andrea; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-22

    Optimal defense (OD) theory predicts that within a plant, tissues are defended in proportion to their fitness value and risk of predation. The fitness value of leaves varies greatly and leaves are protected by jasmonate (JA)-inducible defenses. Flowers are vehicles of Darwinian fitness in flowering plants and are attacked by herbivores and pathogens, but how they are defended is rarely investigated. We used Nicotiana attenuata, an ecological model plant with well-characterized herbivore interactions to characterize defense responses in flowers. Early floral stages constitutively accumulate greater amounts of two well-characterized defensive compounds, the volatile (E)-α-bergamotene and trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs), which are also found in herbivore-induced leaves. Plants rendered deficient in JA biosynthesis or perception by RNA interference had significantly attenuated floral accumulations of defensive compounds known to be regulated by JA in leaves. By RNA-seq, we found a JAZ gene, NaJAZi, specifically expressed in early-stage floral tissues. Gene silencing revealed that NaJAZi functions as a flower-specific jasmonate repressor that regulates JAs, (E)-α-bergamotene, TPIs, and a defensin. Flowers silenced in NaJAZi are more resistant to tobacco budworm attack, a florivore. When the defensin was ectopically expressed in leaves, performance of Manduca sexta larvae, a folivore, decreased. NaJAZi physically interacts with a newly identified NINJA-like protein, but not the canonical NINJA. This NINJA-like recruits the corepressor TOPLESS that contributes to the suppressive function of NaJAZi on floral defenses. This study uncovers the defensive function of JA signaling in flowers, which includes components that tailor JA signaling to provide flower-specific defense.

  15. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  16. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-20

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  17. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  18. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A.

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  19. Optical detection and ionization of donors in specific electronic and nuclear spin States.

    PubMed

    Yang, A; Steger, M; Karaiskaj, D; Thewalt, M L W; Cardona, M; Itoh, K M; Riemann, H; Abrosimov, N V; Churbanov, M F; Gusev, A V; Bulanov, A D; Kaliteevskii, A K; Godisov, O N; Becker, P; Pohl, H-J; Ager, J W; Haller, E E

    2006-12-01

    We resolve the remarkably sharp bound exciton transitions of highly enriched 28Si using a single-frequency laser and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, as well as photocurrent spectroscopy. Well-resolved doublets in the spectrum of the 31P donor reflect the hyperfine coupling of the electronic and nuclear donor spins. The optical detection of the nuclear spin state, and selective pumping and ionization of donors in specific electronic and nuclear spin states, suggests a number of new possibilities which could be useful for the realization of silicon-based quantum computers.

  20. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  1. Dissection of specific binding of HIV-1 Gag to the 'packaging signal' in viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Datta, Siddhartha Ak; Baker, Laura; Varma, Rajat; Gudla, Prabhakar R; Rein, Alan

    2017-07-20

    Selective packaging of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) requires the presence of a cis-acting RNA element called the 'packaging signal' (Ψ). However, the mechanism by which Ψ promotes selective packaging of the gRNA is not well understood. We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and quenching data to monitor the binding of recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein to Cy5-tagged 190-base RNAs. At physiological ionic strength, Gag binds with very similar, nanomolar affinities to both Ψ-containing and control RNAs. We challenged these interactions by adding excess competing tRNA; introducing mutations in Gag; or raising the ionic strength. These modifications all revealed high specificity for Ψ. This specificity is evidently obscured in physiological salt by non-specific, predominantly electrostatic interactions. This nonspecific activity was attenuated by mutations in the MA, CA, and NC domains, including CA mutations disrupting Gag-Gag interaction. We propose that gRNA is selectively packaged because binding to Ψ nucleates virion assembly with particular efficiency.

  2. Serial specification of diverse neuroblast identities from a neurogenic placode by Notch and Egfr signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Helen J.; Rulifson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We used the brain insulin-producing cell (IPC) lineage and its identified neuroblast (IPC NB) as a model to understand a novel example of serial specification of NB identities in the Drosophila dorsomedial protocerebral neuroectoderm. The IPC NB was specified from a small, molecularly identified group of cells comprising an invaginated epithelial placode. By progressive delamination of cells, the placode generated a series of NB identities, including the single IPC NB, a number of other canonical Type I NBs, and a single Type II NB that generates large lineages by transient amplification of neural progenitor cells. Loss of Notch function caused all cells of the placode to form as supernumerary IPC NBs, indicating that the placode is initially a fate equivalence group for the IPC NB fate. Loss of Egfr function caused all placodal cells to apoptose, except for the IPC NB, indicating a requirement of Egfr signaling for specification of alternative NB identities. Indeed, both derepressed Egfr activity in yan mutants and ectopic EGF activity produced supernumerary Type II NBs from the placode. Loss of both Notch and Egfr function caused all placode cells to become IPC NBs and survive, indicating that commitment to NB fate nullified the requirement of Egfr activity for placode cell survival. We discuss the surprising parallels between the serial specification of neural fates from this neurogenic placode and the fly retina. PMID:21653613

  3. Multiplexed Method to Calibrate and Quantitate Fluorescence Signal for Allergen-Specific IgE

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Margo R.; Reddington, Alexander P.; Collins, Austin D.; LaBoda, Craig; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Little, Frédéric F.; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2012-01-01

    Using a microarray platform for allergy diagnosis allows for testing of specific IgE sensitivity to a multitude of allergens, while requiring only small volumes of serum. However, variation of probe immobilization on microarrays hinders the ability to make quantitative, assertive, and statistically relevant conclusions necessary in immunodiagnostics. To address this problem, we have developed a calibrated, inexpensive, multiplexed, and rapid protein microarray method that directly correlates surface probe density to captured labeled secondary antibody in clinical samples. We have identified three major technological advantages of our calibrated fluorescence enhancement (CaFE) technique: (i) a significant increase in fluorescence emission over a broad range of fluorophores on a layered substrate optimized specifically for fluorescence; (ii) a method to perform label-free quantification of the probes in each spot while maintaining fluorescence enhancement for a particular fluorophore; and (iii) a calibrated, quantitative technique that combines fluorescence and label-free modalities to accurately measure probe density and bound target for a variety of antibody–antigen pairs. In this paper, we establish the effectiveness of the CaFE method by presenting the strong linear dependence of the amount of bound protein to the resulting fluorescence signal of secondary antibody for IgG, β-lactoglobulin, and allergen-specific IgEs to Ara h 1 (peanut major allergen) and Phl p 1 (timothy grass major allergen) in human serum. PMID:22060132

  4. Research for diagnosing electronic control fault of astronomical telescope's armature winding by step signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yulong; Yang, Shihai; Gu, Bozhong

    2016-10-01

    This paper puts forward a electronic fault diagnose method focusing on large-diameter astronomical telescope's armature winding, and ascertains if it is the resistance or inductance which is out of order. When it comes to armature winding's electronic fault, give the angular position a step signal, and compare the outputs of five models of normal, larger-resistance, smaller-resistance, larger-inductance and smaller-inductance, so we can position the fault. Firstly, we ascertain the transfer function of the angular position to the armature voltage, to analysis the output of armature voltage when the angular position's input is step signal. Secondly, ascertain the different armature currents' characteristics after armature voltage pass through different armature models. Finally, basing on the characteristics, we design two strategies of resistance and inductance separately. The author use MATLAB/Simulink function to model and emulate with the hardware parameters of the 2.5m-caliber telescope, which China and France developed cooperatively for Russia. Meanwhile, the author add a white noise disturbance to the armature voltage, the result shows its feasibility under a certain sized disturbance.

  5. Role of Glucose in IRS Signaling in Rat Pancreatic Islets: Specific Effects and Interplay with Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Maryline; Bernard-Kargar, Catherine; Vilar, José; Kassis, Nadim

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the possible interplay between insulin and glucose signaling pathways in rat pancreatic β-cell with a special focus on the role of glucose in IRS signaling in vivo. Three groups of rats were constituted by combining simultaneous infusion during 48 h either of glucose and/or insulin, or glucose+diazoxide: Hyperglycemic- Hyperinsulinemic (HGHI), euglycemic-Hyperinsulinemic (eGHI), Hyperglycemic-euinsulinemic (HGeI). Control rats were infused with 0,9% NaCl. In HGHI and HGeI rats plasma glucose levels were maintained at 20-22 mmol/l. In eGHI rats, plasma glucose was not different from that of controls, whereas plasma insulin was much higher than in controls. In HGHI rats, IRS-2 mRNA expression, total protein and phosphorylated protein amounts were increased compared to controls. In HGeI rats, only IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased. No change was observed in eGHI rats whatever the parameter considered. In all groups, mRNA concentration of IRS-1 was similar to that of controls. The quantity of total and phosphorylated IRS- 1 protein was dramatically increased in HGHI rats and to a lesser extent in eGHI rats. Neither mRNA nor IRS-1 protein expression were modified in HGeI rats. The data suggest that glucose and insulin play at once a specific and a complementary role in islet IRSs signaling. Especially, glucose stimulates IRS-2 mRNA expression whatever the insulin status and independently of the secretory process. The differential regulation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 expressions is in agreement with their supposed different involvement in the control of β-cell growth and function. PMID:15763940

  6. IL-20 receptor 2 signaling down-regulates antigen-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Christian; Müller, Werner; Leithäuser, Frank; Adler, Guido; Oswald, Franz; Reimann, Jörg; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Seier, Anne; Weiss, Johannes Martin; Prochnow, Blair; Wegenka, Ursula Maria

    2009-01-15

    The recently described cytokines IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 share structural homology with IL-10 and are therefore classified as members of the IL-10 family of cytokines. Although it has long been speculated that signaling by their heterodimeric receptor complexes (IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2) influences immunological processes, the target cells for this group of cytokines are still unclear. By generating a knockout mouse strain deficient for the common IL-20R beta-chain (IL-20R2), we show that IFN-gamma and IL-2 secretion is significantly elevated after stimulation of IL-20R2-/--deficient CD8 and CD4 T cells with Con A or anti-CD3/CD28 in vitro. IL-10 secretion by activated IL-20R2-/- CD4 cells was diminished. Consistent with our in vitro results, significantly more Ag-specific CD8 IFN-gamma+ and CD4 IFN-gamma+ T cells developed to locally applied DNA vaccines in IL-20R2-deficient mice. In a T cell-dependent model of contact hypersensitivity, IL-20R2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the contact allergen trinitro-chloro-benzene. Thus, IL-20R2 signaling directly regulates CD8 and CD4 T cell answers in vitro and in vivo. For the first time, we provide evidence that IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 are part of a signaling network that normally down-modulates T cell responses in mice.

  7. Strain-specific innate immune signaling pathways determine malaria parasitemia dynamics and host mortality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Tian, Linjie; Yu, Xiao; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wang, Mingjun; Yu, Weishi; Qi, Yanwei; Zeituni, Amir E; Nair, Sethu C; Crampton, Steve P; Orandle, Marlene S; Bolland, Silvia M; Qi, Chen-Feng; Long, Carole A; Myers, Timothy G; Coligan, John E; Wang, Rongfu; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-28

    Malaria infection triggers vigorous host immune responses; however, the parasite ligands, host receptors, and the signaling pathways responsible for these reactions remain unknown or controversial. Malaria parasites primarily reside within RBCs, thereby hiding themselves from direct contact and recognition by host immune cells. Host responses to malaria infection are very different from those elicited by bacterial and viral infections and the host receptors recognizing parasite ligands have been elusive. Here we investigated mouse genome-wide transcriptional responses to infections with two strains of Plasmodium yoelii (N67 and N67C) and discovered differences in innate response pathways corresponding to strain-specific disease phenotypes. Using in vitro RNAi-based gene knockdown and KO mice, we demonstrated that a strong type I IFN (IFN-I) response triggered by RNA polymerase III and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5, not Toll-like receptors (TLRs), binding of parasite DNA/RNA contributed to a decline of parasitemia in N67-infected mice. We showed that conventional dendritic cells were the major sources of early IFN-I, and that surface expression of phosphatidylserine on infected RBCs might promote their phagocytic uptake, leading to the release of parasite ligands and the IFN-I response in N67 infection. In contrast, an elevated inflammatory response mediated by CD14/TLR and p38 signaling played a role in disease severity and early host death in N67C-infected mice. In addition to identifying cytosolic DNA/RNA sensors and signaling pathways previously unrecognized in malaria infection, our study demonstrates the importance of parasite genetic backgrounds in malaria pathology and provides important information for studying human malaria pathogenesis.

  8. Electron mobility characterization in OLEDs from ac small signal optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Haichuan; Reddy, Indrani; Hunt, John; Severs, Phillip; Patil, Shirish

    2010-05-01

    This paper investigates the field dependence of electron mobility in tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) and bathocuproine (BCP) through ac small signal optical modulation on green light (ITO/PEDOT/NPD/Alq3/Ba/Ag) and blue light (ITO/PEDOT/NPD/BCP/Alq3/Ba/Ag) OLED. The electroluminescence (EL) transient time delay for the blue light OLED is much longer than for the green one. The electron mobility in BCP was extracted based on a Poole-Frenkel-like equation and EL transient time delay measurement, which is in the range (7-9) × 10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at an external electric field of 1530-1830 (V cm-1)1/2, comparable to the results from other published reports (Muckl et al 2000 Synth. Met. 111-112 91; Barth et al 2001 J. Appl. Phys. 89 3711; Nakamura H et al 1996 Int. Symp. on Inorganic and Organic Electroluminescence ed R H Mauch and H-E Gumlich (Berlin: Wissenschaft und Technik) p 95; Xie et al 2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 1477). The difference in EL transient time delay and electron mobility for green and blue light OLEDs was demonstrated by the results of direct modulation. The electron transit time shows similar field dependence in both Alq3 layers in green and blue OLEDs. Unlike Alq3, the field dependence of electron mobility in BCP did not fit the conventional organic semiconductor characteristics μ∞exp(βE1/2), and the excitons formation at the NPD/BCP interface for the blue OLEDs was demonstrated through the EL spectrum.

  9. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-05

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed.

  10. Pancreas-specific Pten deficiency causes partial resistance to diabetes and elevated hepatic AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zan; Fan, Yan; Zhang, Weiqi; Xu, Jun; Cheng, Jing; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2009-06-01

    PTEN, a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathway, is an important modulator of insulin signaling. To determine the metabolic function of pancreatic Pten, we generated pancreas-specific Pten knockout (PPKO) mice. PPKO mice had enlarged pancreas and elevated proliferation of acinar cells. They also exhibited hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and altered amino metabolism. Notably, PPKO mice showed delayed onset of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and sex-biased resistance to high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. To investigate the mechanism for the resistance to HFD-induced hyperglycemia in PPKO mice, we evaluated AKT phosphorylation in major insulin-responsive tissues: the liver, muscle, and fat. We found that Pten loss in the pancreas causes the elevation of AKT signaling in the liver. The phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream substrate GSK3beta was increased in the liver of PPKO mice, while PTEN level was decreased without detectable excision of Pten allele in the liver of PPKO mice. Proteomics analysis revealed dramatically decreased level of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in the liver of PPKO mice, which may also contribute to the lower blood glucose level of PPKO mice fed with HFD. Together, our findings reveal a novel response in the liver to pancreatic defect in metabolic regulation, adding a new dimension to understanding diabetes resistance.

  11. Axon Branch-Specific Semaphorin-1a Signaling in Drosophila Mushroom Body Development

    PubMed Central

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Goossens, Tim; Clements, Jason; Kang, Yuan Y.; Callaerts, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Correct wiring of the mushroom body (MB) neuropil in the Drosophila brain involves appropriate positioning of different axonal lobes, as well as the sister branches that develop from individual axons. This positioning requires the integration of various guidance cues provided by different cell types, which help the axons find their final positions within the neuropil. Semaphorins are well-known for their conserved roles in neuronal development and axon guidance. We investigated the role of Sema-1a in MB development more closely. We show that Sema-1a is expressed in the MBs as well as surrounding structures, including the glial transient interhemispheric fibrous ring, throughout development. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we show that the MB axons display lobe and sister branch-specific Sema-1a signaling, which controls different aspects of axon outgrowth and guidance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these effects are modulated by the integration of MB intrinsic and extrinsic Sema-1a signaling pathways involving PlexA and PlexB. Finally, we also show a role for neuronal- glial interaction in Sema-1a dependent β-lobe outgrowth. PMID:27656129

  12. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Albers, Peter H; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper B; Kristensen, Dorte E; Vind, Birgitte F; Baba, Otto; Nøhr, Jane; Højlund, Kurt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber type-specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and/or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared with type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1 domain family member 4 (TBC1D4), and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared with type II fibers, the phosphorylation response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1, and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS, and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I muscle fibers compared with type II fibers have a higher glucose-handling capacity but a similar sensitivity for phosphoregulation by insulin.

  13. The dynamic range and domain-specific signals of intracellular calcium in photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Szikra, T; Krizaj, D

    2006-08-11

    Vertebrate photoreceptors consist of strictly delimited subcellular domains: the outer segment, ellipsoid, cell body and synaptic terminal, each hosting crucial cellular functions, including phototransduction, oxidative metabolism, gene expression and transmitter release. We used optical imaging to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) signaling in non-outer segment regions of rods and cones. Sustained depolarization, designed to emulate photoreceptor activation in the darkness, evoked a standing Ca(2+) gradient in tiger salamander photoreceptors with spatially-averaged intracellular Ca(2+) concentration within synaptic terminals of approximately 2 microM and lower (approximately 750 nM) intracellular calcium concentration in the ellipsoid. Measurements from axotomized cell bodies and isolated ellipsoids showed that Ca(2+) enters the two compartments via both local L-type Ca(2+) channels and diffusion. The results from optical imaging studies were supported by immunostaining analysis. L-type voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases were highly expressed in synaptic terminals with progressively lower expression levels in the cell body and ellipsoid. These results show photoreceptor Ca(2+) homeostasis is controlled in a region-specific manner by direct Ca(2+) entry and diffusion as well as Ca(2+) extrusion. Moreover, quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium concentration levels in different photoreceptor compartments indicates that the dynamic range of Ca(2+) signaling in photoreceptors is approximately 40-fold, from approximately 50 nM in the light to approximately 2 microM in darkness.

  14. THE DYNAMIC RANGE AND DOMAIN-SPECIFIC SIGNALS OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM IN PHOTORECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SZIKRA, T.; KRIŽAJ, D.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors consist of strictly delimited subcellular domains: the outer segment, ellipsoid, cell body and synaptic terminal, each hosting crucial cellular functions, including phototransduction, oxidative metabolism, gene expression and transmitter release. We used optical imaging to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca2+ signaling in non-outer segment regions of rods and cones. Sustained depolarization, designed to emulate photoreceptor activation in the darkness, evoked a standing Ca2+ gradient in tiger salamander photoreceptors with spatially-averaged intracellular Ca2+ concentration within synaptic terminals of ∼2 μM and lower (∼750 nM) intracellular calcium concentration in the ellipsoid. Measurements from axotomized cell bodies and isolated ellipsoids showed that Ca2+ enters the two compartments via both local L-type Ca2+ channels and diffusion. The results from optical imaging studies were supported by immunostaining analysis. L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels and plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases were highly expressed in synaptic terminals with progressively lower expression levels in the cell body and ellipsoid. These results show photoreceptor Ca2+ homeostasis is controlled in a region-specific manner by direct Ca2+ entry and diffusion as well as Ca2+ extrusion. Moreover, quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium concentration levels in different photoreceptor compartments indicates that the dynamic range of Ca2+ signaling in photoreceptors is approximately 40-fold, from ∼50 nM in the light to ∼2 μM in darkness. PMID:16682126

  15. An integrated domain specific language for post-processing and visualizing electrophysiological signals in Java.

    PubMed

    Strasser, T; Peters, T; Jagle, H; Zrenner, E; Wilke, R

    2010-01-01

    Electrophysiology of vision - especially the electroretinogram (ERG) - is used as a non-invasive way for functional testing of the visual system. The ERG is a combined electrical response generated by neural and non-neuronal cells in the retina in response to light stimulation. This response can be recorded and used for diagnosis of numerous disorders. For both clinical practice and clinical trials it is important to process those signals in an accurate and fast way and to provide the results as structured, consistent reports. Therefore, we developed a freely available and open-source framework in Java (http://www.eye.uni-tuebingen.de/project/idsI4sigproc). The framework is focused on an easy integration with existing applications. By leveraging well-established software patterns like pipes-and-filters and fluent interfaces as well as by designing the application programming interfaces (API) as an integrated domain specific language (DSL) the overall framework provides a smooth learning curve. Additionally, it already contains several processing methods and visualization features and can be extended easily by implementing the provided interfaces. In this way, not only can new processing methods be added but the framework can also be adopted for other areas of signal processing. This article describes in detail the structure and implementation of the framework and demonstrate its application through the software package used in clinical practice and clinical trials at the University Eye Hospital Tuebingen one of the largest departments in the field of visual electrophysiology in Europe.

  16. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in midbrain dopaminergic neuron specification and neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Joksimovic, Milan; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2014-02-01

    Loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons underlies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Towards cell replacement, studies have focused on mechanisms underlying embryonic mDA production, as a rational basis for deriving mDA neurons from stem cells. We will review studies of β-catenin, an obligate component of the Wnt cascade that is critical to mDA specification and neurogenesis. mDA neurons have a unique origin--the midbrain floor plate (FP). Unlike the hindbrain and spinal cord FP, the midbrain FP is highly neurogenic and Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical to this difference in neurogenic potential. In β-catenin loss-of-function experiments, the midbrain FP resembles the hindbrain FP, and key mDA progenitor genes such as Otx2, Lmx1a, Msx1, and Ngn2 are downregulated whereas Shh is maintained. Accordingly, the neurogenic capacity of the midbrain FP is diminished, resulting in fewer mDA neurons. Conversely, in β-catenin gain-of-function experiments, the hindbrain FP expresses key mDA progenitor genes, and is highly neurogenic. Interestingly, when excessive β-catenin is supplied to the midbrain FP, less mDA neurons are produced suggesting that the dosage of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical. These studies of β-catenin have facilitated new protocols to derive mDA neurons from stem cells.

  17. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  18. A Physiological Signal Transmission Model to be Used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnosis methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio-mechano-electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  19. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-01

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment. PMID:28117323

  20. A neuron-specific cytoplasmic dynein isoform preferentially transports TrkB signaling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Junghoon; Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Myers, Kenneth R.; Carr, Tiffany M.; Humsi, Michael K.; Rasoul, Bareza A.; Segal, Rosalind A.; Pfister, K. Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the multisubunit motor protein for retrograde movement of diverse cargoes to microtubule minus ends. Here, we investigate the function of dynein variants, defined by different intermediate chain (IC) isoforms, by expressing fluorescent ICs in neuronal cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)–IC incorporates into functional dynein complexes that copurify with membranous organelles. In living PC12 cell neurites, GFP–dynein puncta travel in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. In cultured hippocampal neurons, neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) signaling endosomes are transported by cytoplasmic dynein containing the neuron-specific IC-1B isoform and not by dynein containing the ubiquitous IC-2C isoform. Similarly, organelles containing TrkB isolated from brain by immunoaffinity purification also contain dynein with IC-1 but not IC-2 isoforms. These data demonstrate that the IC isoforms define dynein populations that are selectively recruited to transport distinct cargoes. PMID:18559670

  1. Microscopic functional specificity can be predicted from fMRI signals in ventral visual areas.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daehun; Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan

    2014-10-01

    Functional areas specialized for recognition can be activated by a non-preferred stimulus as well as a preferred stimulus. The functional magnetic resonance imaging signals detected in response to different stimuli in an area may have the same or different amplitudes. However, it is uncertain whether the responses originate from the same neuronal populations or heterogeneous ones. To address this concern, we propose a novel method that uses multi-echo echo-planar imaging sequences to evaluate changes in the transverse relaxation profile caused by stimulation. According to this method, the areas related with visual recognition, i.e. fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area, have different transverse relaxation profiles to preferred and non-preferred stimuli, which can be considered as reflecting a difference in neuronal population processing stimuli in those areas. The proposed method can be useful for probing the microscopic functional specificity of brain areas.

  2. Evaluation of superconducting quantum interference devices interfaced with digital signal processing electronics for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Pang-Jen, Flynn, E.R.; Bracht, R.R.; Lewis, P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a dc-SQUID magnetometer driven by both analog electronics and digital signal processors are investigated and compared for biomagnetic applications. Low-noise ( < 5 {mu} {Phi} {sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 1 Hz) dc-SQUIDs were fabricated by Conductus, Inc. using the all-refractory Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb process on silicon substrates with on-chip modulation coils and integral washer damping resistors. A second-order gradiometer was magnetically coupled to the input coil of the SQUID to maximize the detected signal strength. The readout of this SQUID gradiometer was achieved using a conventional flux-locked loop (FLL) circuit to provide a linearized voltage output that was proportional to the flux applied to the SQUID. A shielded cylinder was constructed to house the magnetometer to reduce ambient field noise. To realize the digital feedback loop, the analog FLL is replaced except for the preamplifier by a digital signal processing board with dual 16-bit A/D and D/A converters. This approach shows several advantages over the analog scheme including operational flexibility, cost reduction, and possibly, the enhancement of dynamic ranges and slew rates.

  3. Application of cell-specific isolation to the study of dopamine signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Iyer, Srividya Chandramouli; Cox, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission accounts for a number of important brain functions across species including memory formation, the anticipation of reward, cognitive facilities, and drug addiction. Despite this functional significance, relatively little is known of the cellular pathways associated with drug-induced molecular adaptations within individual neurons. Due to its genetic tractability, simplicity, and economy of scale, Drosophila melanogaster has become an important tool in the study of neurological disease states, including drug addiction. To facilitate high-resolution functional analyses of dopamine signaling, it is highly advantageous to obtain genetic material, such as RNA or protein, from a homogeneous cell source. This process can be particularly challenging in most organisms including small model system organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. Magnetic bead-based cell sorting has emerged as a powerful tool that can be used to isolate select populations of cells, from a whole organism or tissue such as the brain, for genomic as well as proteomic expression profiling. Coupled with the temporal and spatial specificity of the GAL4/UAS system, we demonstrate the application of magnetic bead-based cell sorting towards the isolation of dopaminergic neurons from the Drosophila adult nervous system. RNA derived from these neurons is of high quality and suitable for downstream applications such as microarray expression profiling or quantitative rtPCR. The versatility of this methodology stems from the fact that the cell-specific isolation method employed can be used under a variety of experimental conditions designed to survey molecular adaptations in dopamine signaling neurons including in response to drugs of abuse.

  4. Reversing the Signaled Magnitude Effect in Delayed Matching to Sample: Delay-Specific Remembering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. Geoffrey; Brown, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons performed a delayed matching-to-sample task in which large or small reinforcers for correct remembering were signaled during the retention interval. Accuracy was low when small reinforcers were signaled, and high when large reinforcers were signaled (the signaled magnitude effect). When the reinforcer-size cue was switched from small to…

  5. Glucose-specific signaling effects on delay discounting in intertemporal choice.

    PubMed

    Wang, X T Xiao-Tian; Huangfu, Gang

    2017-02-01

    We propose that decisions related to resource management (e.g., intertemporal choice between a smaller-and-sooner reward and a larger-and-later reward) are sensitive to and regulated by fluctuating blood glucose levels. Circulating glucose affects intertemporal choice by means of signaling body energy condition instead of serving as a replenishing resource for effortful cognitive processing. We intend to dissociate calorie-supplying functions from glucose-unique anticipatory effects on behavioral resource management, measured by delay discounting in making intertemporal choices. Regarding the anticipatory functions of the glucose-insulin system in regulating the degree of delay discounting, we tested three predictions: First, we predict that the signaling effects of circulating glucose on delay discounting do not need to be dose-dependent as long as glucose fluctuation indicates a directional trend in body energy budget. Second, such effects of glucose fluctuation on delay discounting are phagic (appetite related) instead of dipsian (thirst related). Third, this glucose-insulin signaling system requires glucose as the specific input, thus is insensitive to other forms of sugar that are not insulin regulated. In Study 1, fasting participants were randomly assigned to one of five groups: water consumption, zero-consumption, and three glucose consumption (18g, 36g, and 72g cane sugar/250ml water) groups. The participants competed two sets of intertemporal choice questions with varying delay discounting rates before and after a beverage intervention. The results showed that the rate of delay discounting was negatively correlated to blood glucose levels. The effects of circulating glucose on delay discounting closely followed the changes in blood glucose levels showing a plateau on both dose-response curves (i.e., the sugar dose-blood glucose level curve and the sugar does-delay discounting curve). Secondly, the effects of circulating glucose on delay discounting were

  6. Electronic working length determination in primary teeth by ProPex and Digital Signal Processing.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Lucisano, Marcela Pacífico; Leonardo, Mário Roberto; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; da Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of electronic apex locators Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and ProPex, for root canal length determination in primary teeth. Fifteen primary molars (a total of 34 root canals) were divided into two groups: Group I - without physiological resorption (n = 16); and Group II - with physiological resorption (n = 18). The length of each canal was measured by introducing a file until its tip was visible and then it was retracted 1 mm. For electronic measurement, the devices were set to 1 mm short of the apical resorption. The data were analysed statistically using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results showed that the ICC was high for both electronic apex locators in all situations - with (ICC: DSP = 0.82 and Propex = 0.89) or without resorption (ICC: DSP = 0.92 and Propex = 0.90). Both apex locators were extremely accurate in determining the working length in primary teeth, both with or without physiological resorption.

  7. Interaction between photosynthetic electron transport and chloroplast sinks triggers protection and signalling important for plant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Peter J.; Lima-Melo, Yugo; Tiwari, Arjun; Tikkanen, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    The photosynthetic light reactions provide energy that is consumed and stored in electron sinks, the products of photosynthesis. A balance between light reactions and electron consumption in the chloroplast is vital for plants, and is protected by several photosynthetic regulation mechanisms. Photosystem I (PSI) is particularly susceptible to photoinhibition when these factors become unbalanced, which can occur in low temperatures or in high light. In this study we used the pgr5 Arabidopsis mutant that lacks ΔpH-dependent regulation of photosynthetic electron transport as a model to study the consequences of PSI photoinhibition under high light. We found that PSI damage severely inhibits carbon fixation and starch accumulation, and attenuates enzymatic oxylipin synthesis and chloroplast regulation of nuclear gene expression after high light stress. This work shows that modifications to regulation of photosynthetic light reactions, which may be designed to improve yield in crop plants, can negatively impact metabolism and signalling, and thereby threaten plant growth and stress tolerance. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement’. PMID:28808104

  8. Interaction between photosynthetic electron transport and chloroplast sinks triggers protection and signalling important for plant productivity.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Lima-Melo, Yugo; Tiwari, Arjun; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2017-09-26

    The photosynthetic light reactions provide energy that is consumed and stored in electron sinks, the products of photosynthesis. A balance between light reactions and electron consumption in the chloroplast is vital for plants, and is protected by several photosynthetic regulation mechanisms. Photosystem I (PSI) is particularly susceptible to photoinhibition when these factors become unbalanced, which can occur in low temperatures or in high light. In this study we used the pgr5 Arabidopsis mutant that lacks ΔpH-dependent regulation of photosynthetic electron transport as a model to study the consequences of PSI photoinhibition under high light. We found that PSI damage severely inhibits carbon fixation and starch accumulation, and attenuates enzymatic oxylipin synthesis and chloroplast regulation of nuclear gene expression after high light stress. This work shows that modifications to regulation of photosynthetic light reactions, which may be designed to improve yield in crop plants, can negatively impact metabolism and signalling, and thereby threaten plant growth and stress tolerance.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Core Community Specifications for Electron Microprobe Operating Systems: Software, Quality Control, and Data Management Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournelle, John; Carpenter, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Modem electron microprobe systems have become increasingly sophisticated. These systems utilize either UNIX or PC computer systems for measurement, automation, and data reduction. These systems have undergone major improvements in processing, storage, display, and communications, due to increased capabilities of hardware and software. Instrument specifications are typically utilized at the time of purchase and concentrate on hardware performance. The microanalysis community includes analysts, researchers, software developers, and manufacturers, who could benefit from exchange of ideas and the ultimate development of core community specifications (CCS) for hardware and software components of microprobe instrumentation and operating systems.

  10. `Rapidly Appearing' molybdenum electron-paramagnetic-resonance signals from reduced xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bray, R. C.; Vänngård, T.

    1969-01-01

    Further electron-paramagnetic-resonance studies relating to the role of molybdenum in the enzymic mechanisms of xanthine oxidase were carried out. The classification of the various molybdenum signals obtained on reducing the enzyme is briefly discussed. The group of `Rapidly appearing' signals, which are obtained with all substrates within the turnover time and which show interaction with exchangeable protons, were studied in detail. Signals with salicylaldehyde, purine and xanthine in H2O and in 95% D2O were examined at 9 and 35GHz and interpreted with the help of computer simulation. Molybdenum atoms in a number of different chemical environments are involved, each substrate giving rise to two superimposed spectra with slightly different parameters; g values and proton splittings were determined. The spectrum with salicylaldehyde is believed to represent the reduced enzyme alone not in the form of a complex with substrate and its two constituents are believed to represent the two molybdenum atoms bonded slightly differently within the enzyme molecule. With purine and xanthine the spectra are thought to represent complexes of reduced enzyme with substrate molecules. With xanthine one signal-giving species shows coupling to two equivalent protons, whereas in all the other species observed two non-equivalent protons are involved. The origin of the protons is discussed in the light of the direct hydrogen-transfer mechanism implicated earlier for the enzyme. It is concluded that the proton derived from the substrate is located at least 3å from the molybdenum atom with which it interacts. PMID:4310055

  11. A rapidly diverging EGF protein regulates species-specific signal transduction in early sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Kamei, N; Swanson, W J; Glabe, C G

    2000-09-15

    receptor for EGF4. Thus, species-specific events of gastrulation and early development may be controlled by these rapidly diverging EGF molecules, through a novel species-specific signal transduction pathway.

  12. Phosphate is a specific signal for induction of osteopontin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Beck, G R; Zerler, B; Moran, E

    2000-07-18

    Osteopontin is a phosphorylated glycoprotein secreted to the mineralizing extracellular matrix by osteoblasts during bone development. It is believed to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to the extracellular matrix, allowing them to perform their respective functions during osteogenesis. Several other functions have been suggested for this protein, and its up-regulation is associated with various disease states related to calcification, including arterial plaque formation and the formation of kidney stones. Although expression of this gene has been demonstrated in multiple tissues, its regulation is not well understood. Our previous studies on the roles of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and p300/CBP in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation revealed a link between osteopontin induction and the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase. In this paper, we describe results specifically linking induction of osteopontin to the enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase in the medium, which results in the generation of free phosphate. This elevation of free phosphate in the medium is sufficient to signal induction of osteopontin RNA and protein. The strong and specific induction of osteopontin in direct response to increased phosphate levels provides a mechanism to explain how expression of this product is normally regulated in bone and suggests how it may become up-regulated in damaged tissue.

  13. Sequence-Specific DNA Detection at 10 fM by Electromechanical Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Target DNA fragments at 10 fM concentration (approximately 6 × 105 molecules) were detected against a DNA background simulating the noncomplementary genomic DNA present in real samples using a simple, PCR-free, optics-free approach based on electromechanical signal transduction. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is highly desired for a range of diverse applications. We previously described a potentially low-cost device for sequence-specific nucleic acid detection based on conductance change measurement of a pore blocked by electrophoretically mobilized bead-(peptide nucleic acid probe) conjugates upon hybridization with target nucleic acid. Here, we demonstrate the operation of our device with longer DNA targets, and we describe the resulting improvement in the limit of detection (LOD). We investigated the detection of DNA oligomers of 110, 235, 419, and 1613 nucleotides at 1 pM to 1 fM and found that the LOD decreased as DNA length increased, with 419 and 1613 nucleotide oligomers detectable down to 10 fM. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with noncomplementary, control DNA fragments of similar length. The 1613-base DNA oligomer is similar in size to 16S rRNA, which suggests that our device may be useful for detection of pathogenic bacteria at clinically relevant concentrations based on recognition of species-specific 16S rRNA sequences. PMID:25203740

  14. Enteroviruses infect human enteroids and induce antiviral signaling in a cell lineage-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Coyne G; Bolock, Alexa M; Ma, Congrong; Luke, Cliff J; Good, Misty; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2017-02-14

    Enteroviruses are among the most common viral infectious agents of humans and are primarily transmitted by the fecal-oral route. However, the events associated with enterovirus infections of the human gastrointestinal tract remain largely unknown. Here, we used stem cell-derived enteroids from human small intestines to study enterovirus infections of the intestinal epithelium. We found that enteroids were susceptible to infection by diverse enteroviruses, including echovirus 11 (E11), coxsackievirus B (CVB), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), and that contrary to an immortalized intestinal cell line, enteroids induced antiviral and inflammatory signaling pathways in response to infection in a virus-specific manner. Furthermore, using the Notch inhibitor dibenzazepine (DBZ) to drive cellular differentiation into secretory cell lineages, we show that although goblet cells resist E11 infection, enteroendocrine cells are permissive, suggesting that enteroviruses infect specific cell populations in the human intestine. Taken together, our studies provide insights into enterovirus infections of the human intestine, which could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and/or strategies to prevent or treat infections by these highly clinically relevant viruses.

  15. Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (Ryr2)-mediated Calcium Signals Specifically Promote Glucose Oxidation via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bround, Michael J; Wambolt, Rich; Cen, Haoning; Asghari, Parisa; Albu, Razvan F; Han, Jun; McAfee, Donald; Pourrier, Marc; Scott, Nichollas E; Bohunek, Lubos; Kulpa, Jerzy E; Chen, S R Wayne; Fedida, David; Brownsey, Roger W; Borchers, Christoph H; Foster, Leonard J; Mayor, Thibault; Moore, Edwin D W; Allard, Michael F; Johnson, James D

    2016-11-04

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (Ryr2) Ca(2+) release channels and cellular metabolism are both disrupted in heart disease. Recently, we demonstrated that total loss of Ryr2 leads to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction, arrhythmia, and reduced heart rate. Acute total Ryr2 ablation also impaired metabolism, but it was not clear whether this was a cause or consequence of heart failure. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Ca(2+) flux into the mitochondria helps pace oxidative metabolism, but there is limited in vivo evidence supporting this concept. Here, we studied heart-specific, inducible Ryr2 haploinsufficient (cRyr2Δ50) mice with a stable 50% reduction in Ryr2 protein. This manipulation decreased the amplitude and frequency of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals in isolated cardiomyocytes, without changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Remarkably, in the context of well preserved contractile function in perfused hearts, we observed decreased glucose oxidation, but not fat oxidation, with increased glycolysis. cRyr2Δ50 hearts exhibited hyperphosphorylation and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the key Ca(2+)-sensitive gatekeeper to glucose oxidation. Metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic analyses revealed additional functional networks associated with altered metabolism in this model. These results demonstrate that Ryr2 controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics and plays a specific, critical role in promoting glucose oxidation in cardiomyocytes. Our findings indicate that partial RYR2 loss is sufficient to cause metabolic abnormalities seen in heart disease.

  16. Polymer coatings that display specific biological signals while preventing nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Thomas; Fransen, Peter; Bean, Penny; Johnson, Graham; Pereira, Suzanne; Evans, Richard A; Thissen, Helmut; Meagher, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. It can only be achieved if interactions that are mediated by nonspecifically adsorbed serum proteins are minimized and if cells instead respond to specific ligand molecules presented on the surface. Here, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the covalent coupling and presentation of specific biological signals on coatings which have significantly reduced nonspecific biointerfacial interactions. To achieve this we synthesized bottle brush type copolymers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and (meth)acrylates providing activated NHS ester groups as well as different spacer lengths between the NHS groups and the polymer backbone. Copolymers containing different molar ratios of these monomers were grafted to amine functionalized polystyrene cell culture substrates, followed by the covalent immobilization of the cyclic peptides cRGDfK and cRADfK using residual NHS groups. Polymers were characterized by GPC and NMR and surface modification steps were analyzed using XPS. The cellular response was evaluated using HeLa cell attachment experiments. The results showed strong correlations between the effectiveness of the control over biointerfacial interactions and the polymer architecture. They also demonstrate that optimized fully synthetic copolymer coatings, which can be applied to a wide range of substrate materials, provide excellent control over biointerfacial interactions.

  17. Compartment and signal-specific codependence in the transcriptional control of Salmonella periplasmic copper homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pezza, Alejandro; Pontel, Lucas B.; López, Carolina; Soncini, Fernando C.

    2016-01-01

    Copper homeostasis is essential for bacterial pathogen fitness and infection, and has been the focus of a number of recent studies. In Salmonella, envelope protection against copper overload and macrophage survival depends on CueP, a major copper-binding protein in the periplasm. This protein is also required to deliver the metal ion to the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase SodCII. The Salmonella-specific CueP-coding gene was originally identified as part of the Cue regulon under the transcriptional control of the cytoplasmic copper sensor CueR, but its expression differs from the rest of CueR-regulated genes. Here we show that cueP expression is controlled by the concerted action of CueR, which detects the presence of copper in the cytoplasm, and by CpxR/CpxA, which monitors envelope stress. Copper-activated CueR is necessary for the appropriate spatial arrangement of the −10 and −35 elements of the cueP promoter, and CpxR is essential to recruit the RNA polymerase. The integration of two ancestral sensory systems—CueR, which provides signal specificity, and CpxR/CpxA, which detects stress in the bacterial envelope—restricts the expression of this periplasmic copper resistance protein solely to cells encountering surplus copper that disturbs envelope homeostasis, emulating the role of the CusR/CusS regulatory system present in other enteric bacteria. PMID:27679850

  18. Electronically forbidden (5σu-->kσu) photoionization of CS2: Mode-specific electronic-vibrational coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, John D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2005-02-01

    Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the CS2+(BΣu +2) state is used to show how nontotally symmetric vibrations "activate" a forbidden electronic transition in the photoionization continuum, specifically, a 5σu→kσu shape resonance, that would be inaccessible in the absence of a symmetry breaking vibration. This electronic channel is forbidden owing to inversion symmetry selection rules, but it can be accessed when a nonsymmetric vibration is excited, such as bending or antisymmetric stretching. Photoelectron spectra are acquired for photon energies 17⩽hν⩽72eV, and it is observed that the forbidden vibrational transitions are selectively enhanced in the region of a symmetry-forbidden continuum shape resonance centered at hν ≈42eV. Schwinger variational calculations are performed to analyze the data, and the theoretical analysis demonstrates that the observed forbidden transitions are due to photoelectron-mediated vibronic coupling, rather than interchannel Herzberg-Teller mixing. We observe and explain the counterintuitive result that some vibrational branching ratios vary strongly with energy in the region of the resonance, even though the resonance position and width are not appreciably influenced by geometry changes that correspond to the affected vibrations. In addition, we find that another resonant channel, 5σu→kπg, influences the symmetric stretch branching ratio. All of the observed effects can be understood within the framework of the Chase adiabatic approximation, i.e., the Born-Oppenheimer approximation applied to photoionization.

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  20. Characterization of Drug-Specific Signaling Between Primary Human Hepatocytes and Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogese, Monday O; Faulkner, Lee; Jenkins, Roz E; French, Neil S; Copple, Ian M; Antoine, Daniel J; Elmasry, Mohamed; Malik, Hasan; Goldring, Christopher E; Park, Brian Kevin; Betts, Catherine J; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-07-01

    It is now apparent that antigen-specific T-cells are activated in certain patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Since cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells is likely to be critical in determining the outcome of drug exposure, the aim of this study was to profile the signals released by drug-treated hepatocytes and to characterize the impact of these molecules on dendritic cells. Human hepatocytes were exposed to 3 drugs (flucloxacillin, amoxicillin, and isoniazid) associated with DILI potentially mediated by the adaptive immune system as drug-specific T-cells have been isolated from DILI patients, and the metabolite nitroso-sulfamethoxazole (SMX-NO). Hepatocyte toxicity, cytokine release and activation of oxidative stress pathways were measured. Supernatants were transferred to monocyte-derived dendritic cells and cell phenotype and function were assessed. High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and lactate dehydrogenase release as well as adenosine triphosphate depletion occurred in a drug-, time-, and concentration-dependent manner with SMX-NO and flucloxacillin, whereas isoniazid and amoxicillin were nontoxic. Furthermore, drug-induced activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 marker genes was observed when hepatocytes were exposed to test drugs. The disulfide isoform of HMGB1 stimulated dendritic cell cytokine release and enhanced the priming of naive T-cells. Incubation of dendritic cells with supernatant from drug-treated hepatocytes resulted in 2 distinct cytokine profiles. SMX-NO/flucloxacillin stimulated secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1-β. Isoniazid which did not induce significant hepatocyte toxicity, compared with SMX-NO and flucloxacillin, stimulated the release of a panel of cytokines including the above and IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-17A, IP-10, and IL-10. Collectively, our study identifies drug-specific signaling pathways between hepatocytes and immune cells that could influence whether drug exposure will

  1. Transcriptome analysis reveals specific modulation of abscisic acid signaling by ROP10 small GTPase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zeyu; Zhao, Yihong; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2005-11-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a hormone that modulates a variety of agronomically important growth and developmental processes and various stresses responses, but its signal transduction pathways remain poorly understood. ROP10, a member of ROP small GTPases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is a plasma membrane-associated protein specifically involved in negative regulation of ABA responses. To dissect the ROP10-mediated ABA signaling, we carried out transcriptome analysis using the Arabidopsis full-genome chip. Our analysis revealed a total of 262 and 125 genes that were, respectively, up- and down-regulated (> or =2-fold cutoff) by 1 mum ABA in wild type (Wassilewskija [Ws]); 42 up-regulated and 38 down-regulated genes have not been identified in other studies. Consistent with the nonpleiotropic phenotypes of rop10-1, only three genes were altered in rop10-1 in the absence of ABA treatment. In response to 1 microm ABA, 341 and 127 genes were, respectively, activated and repressed in rop10-1. Interestingly, a particular subset of 21 genes that were not altered by 1 microm ABA in Ws but only activated in rop10-1 was identified. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the existence of three distinct categories of ABA dose-response patterns. One novel category is characterized by their ABA unresponsiveness in Ws and activation in rop10-1 at 1 microm but not 10 and 100 microm of ABA. This indicates that ROP10 gates the expression of genes that are specific to low concentrations of ABA. Furthermore, almost all of these 21 genes are known to be highly induced by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Consequently, we found that rop10-1 enhanced the sensitivity of seed germination inhibition to mannitol and sodium chloride. Our results suggest that ROP10 negatively regulates ABA responses by specifically and differentially modulating the ABA sensitivity of a subset of genes including protein kinases and zinc-finger family proteins.

  2. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-24

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events.

  3. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  4. Interferon signaling in Peromyscus leucopus confers a potent and specific restriction to vector-borne flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Izuogu, Adaeze O; McNally, Kristin L; Harris, Stephen E; Youseff, Brian H; Presloid, John B; Burlak, Christopher; Munshi-South, Jason; Best, Sonja M; Taylor, R Travis

    2017-01-01

    Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs), including Powassan virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus cause encephalitis or hemorrhagic fevers in humans with case-fatality rates ranging from 1-30%. Despite severe disease in humans, TBFV infection of natural rodent hosts has little noticeable effect. Currently, the basis for resistance to disease is not known. We hypothesize that the coevolution of flaviviruses with their respective hosts has shaped the evolution of potent antiviral factors that suppress virus replication and protect the host from lethal infection. In the current study, we compared virus infection between reservoir host cells and related susceptible species. Infection of primary fibroblasts from the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, a representative host) with a panel of vector-borne flaviviruses showed up to a 10,000-fold reduction in virus titer compared to control Mus musculus cells. Replication of vesicular stomatitis virus was equivalent in P. leucopus and M. musculus cells suggesting that restriction was flavivirus-specific. Step-wise comparison of the virus infection cycle revealed a significant block to viral RNA replication, but not virus entry, in P. leucopus cells. To understand the role of the type I interferon (IFN) response in virus restriction, we knocked down signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1) by RNA interference. Loss of IFNAR1 or STAT1 significantly relieved the block in virus replication in P. leucopus cells. The major IFN antagonist encoded by TBFV, nonstructural protein 5, was functional in P. leucopus cells, thus ruling out ineffective viral antagonism of the host IFN response. Collectively, this work demonstrates that the IFN response of P. leucopus imparts a strong and virus-specific barrier to flavivirus replication. Future identification of the IFN-stimulated genes responsible for virus restriction specifically in P. leucopus will yield mechanistic insight into

  5. Interferon signaling in Peromyscus leucopus confers a potent and specific restriction to vector-borne flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Izuogu, Adaeze O.; McNally, Kristin L.; Harris, Stephen E.; Youseff, Brian H.; Burlak, Christopher; Best, Sonja M.

    2017-01-01

    Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs), including Powassan virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus cause encephalitis or hemorrhagic fevers in humans with case-fatality rates ranging from 1–30%. Despite severe disease in humans, TBFV infection of natural rodent hosts has little noticeable effect. Currently, the basis for resistance to disease is not known. We hypothesize that the coevolution of flaviviruses with their respective hosts has shaped the evolution of potent antiviral factors that suppress virus replication and protect the host from lethal infection. In the current study, we compared virus infection between reservoir host cells and related susceptible species. Infection of primary fibroblasts from the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, a representative host) with a panel of vector-borne flaviviruses showed up to a 10,000-fold reduction in virus titer compared to control Mus musculus cells. Replication of vesicular stomatitis virus was equivalent in P. leucopus and M. musculus cells suggesting that restriction was flavivirus-specific. Step-wise comparison of the virus infection cycle revealed a significant block to viral RNA replication, but not virus entry, in P. leucopus cells. To understand the role of the type I interferon (IFN) response in virus restriction, we knocked down signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1) by RNA interference. Loss of IFNAR1 or STAT1 significantly relieved the block in virus replication in P. leucopus cells. The major IFN antagonist encoded by TBFV, nonstructural protein 5, was functional in P. leucopus cells, thus ruling out ineffective viral antagonism of the host IFN response. Collectively, this work demonstrates that the IFN response of P. leucopus imparts a strong and virus-specific barrier to flavivirus replication. Future identification of the IFN-stimulated genes responsible for virus restriction specifically in P. leucopus will yield mechanistic insight into

  6. Evaluation of the Contribution of Signals Originating from Large Blood Vessels to Signals of Functionally Specific Brain Areas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun-Young; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is known to play a pivotal role in face processing. The FFA is located in the ventral region, at the base of the brain, through which large blood vessels run. The location of the FFA via functional MRI (fMRI) may be influenced by these large blood vessels. Responses of large blood vessels may not exactly correspond to neuronal activity in a target area, because they may be diluted and influenced by inflow effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of large blood vessels in the FFA, that is, whether the FFA includes large blood vessels and/or whether inflow signals contribute to fMRI signals of the FFA. For this purpose, we used susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequences to visualize large blood vessels and dual-echo gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) to measure inflow effects. These results showed that the location and response signals of the FFA were not influenced by large blood vessels or inflow effects, although large blood vessels were located near the FFA. Therefore, the data from the FFA obtained by individual analysis were robust to large blood vessels but leaving a warning that the data obtained by group analysis may be prone to large blood vessels.

  7. Evaluation of the Contribution of Signals Originating from Large Blood Vessels to Signals of Functionally Specific Brain Areas

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jun-Young; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is known to play a pivotal role in face processing. The FFA is located in the ventral region, at the base of the brain, through which large blood vessels run. The location of the FFA via functional MRI (fMRI) may be influenced by these large blood vessels. Responses of large blood vessels may not exactly correspond to neuronal activity in a target area, because they may be diluted and influenced by inflow effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of large blood vessels in the FFA, that is, whether the FFA includes large blood vessels and/or whether inflow signals contribute to fMRI signals of the FFA. For this purpose, we used susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequences to visualize large blood vessels and dual-echo gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) to measure inflow effects. These results showed that the location and response signals of the FFA were not influenced by large blood vessels or inflow effects, although large blood vessels were located near the FFA. Therefore, the data from the FFA obtained by individual analysis were robust to large blood vessels but leaving a warning that the data obtained by group analysis may be prone to large blood vessels. PMID:26413511

  8. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  9. Inhibition of a novel specific neuroglial integrin signaling pathway increases STAT3-mediated CNTF expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression is repressed in astrocytes by neuronal contact in the CNS and is rapidly induced by injury. Here, we defined an inhibitory integrin signaling pathway. Results The integrin substrates laminin, fibronectin and vitronectin, but not collagen, thrombospondin or fibrinogen, reduced CNTF expression in C6 astroglioma cells. Antibodies against αv and β5, but not α6 or β1, integrin induced CNTF. Together, the ligand and antibody specificity suggests that CNTF is repressed by αvβ5 integrin. Antibodies against Thy1, an abundant neuronal surface protein whose function is unclear, induced CNTF in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures indicating that it is a neuroglial CNTF repressor. Inhibition of the integrin signaling molecule Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) or the downstream c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) or p38 MAPK, greatly induced CNTF mRNA and protein expression within 4 hours. This selective inhibitory pathway phosphorylated STAT3 on its inhibitory ser-727 residue interfering with activity of the pro-transcription Tyr-705 residue. STAT3 can activate CNTF transcription because it bound to its promoter and FAK antagonist-induced CNTF was reduced by blocking STAT3. Microinjection of FAK inhibitor directly into the brain or spinal cord in adult mice rapidly induced CNTF mRNA and protein expression. Importantly, systemic treatment with FAK inhibitors over 3 days induced CNTF in the subventricular zone and increased neurogenesis. Conclusions Neuron-astroglia contact mediated by integrins serves as a sensor to enable rapid neurotrophic responses and provides a new pharmacological avenue to exploit the neuroprotective properties of endogenous CNTF. PMID:23693126

  10. Joint Analysis of Band-Specific Functional Connectivity and Signal Complexity in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Yasser; Bloy, Luke; Edgar, J. Christopher; Blaskey, Lisa; Verma, Ragini

    2013-01-01

    Examination of resting state brain activity using electrophysiological measures like complexity as well as functional connectivity is of growing interest in the study of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present paper jointly examined complexity and connectivity to obtain a more detailed characterization of resting state brain activity in ASD. Multi-scale entropy was computed to quantify the signal complexity, and synchronization likelihood was used to evaluate functional connectivity (FC), with node strength values providing a sensor-level measure of connectivity to facilitate comparisons with complexity. Sensor level analysis of complexity and connectivity was performed at different frequency bands computed from resting state MEG from 26 children with ASD and 22 typically developing controls (TD). Analyses revealed band-specific group differences in each measure that agreed with other functional studies in fMRI and EEG: higher complexity in TD than ASD, in frontal regions in the delta band and occipital-parietal regions in the alpha band, and lower complexity in TD than in ASD in delta (parietal regions), theta (central and temporal regions) and gamma (frontal-central boundary regions); increased short-range connectivity in ASD in the frontal lobe in the delta band and long-range connectivity in the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes in the alpha band. Finally, and perhaps most strikingly, group differences between ASD and TD in complexity and FC appear spatially complementary, such that where FC was elevated in ASD, complexity was reduced (and vice versa). The correlation of regional average complexity and connectivity node strength with symptom severity scores of ASD subjects supported the overall complementarity (with opposing sign) of connectivity and complexity measures, pointing to either diminished connectivity leading to elevated entropy due to poor inhibitory regulation or chaotic signals prohibiting effective measure of connectivity. PMID

  11. Nonlinear least squares regression for single image scanning electron microscope signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Norhisham, S

    2016-11-01

    A new method based on nonlinear least squares regression (NLLSR) is formulated to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The estimation of SNR value based on NLLSR method is compared with the three existing methods of nearest neighbourhood, first-order interpolation and the combination of both nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. Samples of SEM images with different textures, contrasts and edges were used to test the performance of NLLSR method in estimating the SNR values of the SEM images. It is shown that the NLLSR method is able to produce better estimation accuracy as compared to the other three existing methods. According to the SNR results obtained from the experiment, the NLLSR method is able to produce approximately less than 1% of SNR error difference as compared to the other three existing methods. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. State-specific transport properties of partially ionized flows of electronically excited atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    State-to-state approach for theoretical study of transport properties in atomic gases with excited electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species is developed. The dependence of atomic radius on the electronic configuration of excited atoms is taken into account in the transport algorithm. Different cutoff criteria for increasing atomic radius are discussed and the limits of applicability for these criteria are evaluated. The validity of a Slater-like model for the calculation of state-resolved transport coefficients in neutral and ionized atomic gases is shown. For ionized flows, a method of evaluation for effective cross-sections of resonant charge-transfer collisions is suggested. Accurate kinetic theory algorithms for modelling the state-specific transport properties are applied for the prediction of transport coefficients in shock heated flows. Based on the numerical observations, different distributions over electronic states behind the shock front are considered. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 14,000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the partial thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found for both neutral and ionized atomic gases: increasing radius of excited atoms causes a strong decrease in these transport coefficients. Similarly, the presence of electronically excited states with increased atomic radii leads to reduced diffusion coefficients. Nevertheless the overall impact of increasing effective cross-sections on the transport properties just behind the shock front under hypersonic reentry conditions is found to be minor since the populations of high-lying electronic energy levels behind the shock waves are low.

  13. The function of vestigial in Drosophila wing development: how are tissue-specific responses to signalling pathways specified?

    PubMed

    de Celis, J F

    1999-07-01

    The activities of conserved signal transduction pathways are central to the development of Drosophila wings, legs, and eyes. Yet, all these structures have characteristic morphologies, suggesting that additional factors provide organ-specific information. One excellent candidate for such a function is Vestigial, which activity promotes the formation of wings. The biochemical function of Vestigial is unknown, however, since no homologies with other proteins have been identified. Two recent reports show that Vestigial interacts with the transcription factor Scalloped, forming an active complex that binds to specific DNA sequences and regulates gene expression in cooperation with several signalling pathways. These results illustrate how tissue-specific transcription factors cooperate with general signalling pathways to regulate gene expression in a tissue-specific manner.

  14. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  15. Conflict and disfluency as aversive signals: context-specific processing adjustments are modulated by affective location associations.

    PubMed

    Dreisbach, Gesine; Reindl, Anna-Lena; Fischer, Rico

    2016-11-08

    Context-specific processing adjustments are one signature feature of flexible human action control. However, up to now the precise mechanisms underlying these adjustments are not fully understood. Here it is argued that aversive signals produced by conflict- or disfluency-experience originally motivate such context-specific processing adjustments. We tested whether the efficiency of the aversive conflict signal for control adaptation depends on the affective nature of the context it is presented in. In two experiments, high vs. low proportions of aversive signals (Experiment 1: conflict trials; Experiment 2: disfluent trials) were presented either above or below the screen center. This location manipulation was motivated by existing evidence that verticality is generally associated with affective valence with up being positive and down being negative. From there it was hypothesized that the aversive signals would lose their trigger function for processing adjustments when presented at the lower (i.e., more negative) location. This should then result in a reduced context-specific proportion effect when the high proportion of aversive signals was presented at the lower location. Results fully confirmed the predictions. In both experiments, the location-specific proportion effects were only present when the high proportion of aversive signals occurred at the more positive location above but were reduced (Experiment 1) or even eliminated (Experiment 2) when the high proportion occurred at the more negative location below. This interaction of processing adjustments with affective background contexts can thus be taken as further hint for an affective origin of control adaptations.

  16. Signal acquisition in Cherenkov-type diagnostics of electron beams within tokamak facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiński, Marek; Jakubowski, Lech; Sadowski, Marek J.; Żebrowski, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Marcin J.; Malinowski, Karol; Mirowski, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents feasibility and design studies of Cherenkov-type probes, a development of the measuring head construction designed for different tokamak devices, and in particular the acquisition of optical signals to a data storage system. In order to lower the energy threshold of the electron detection the authors applied radiators with the highest values of the refractive index. Different radiator materials, such as aluminium nitride and CVD diamond were applied. Several versions of measuring heads and different manipulators, e.g., a movable vacuum-tight shaft or a fast-moving reciprocating probe, were manufactured and used. The practical application of the Cherenkov probes required also a consideration of spectral characteristics of optical fibres and photomultipliers. The Cherenkov radiation, as generated inside the radiators, is lead out through separate fibres (optical cables) to the atmospheric pressure side. The emitted radiation in the blue (near ultraviolet) spectrum range should be collected and delivered through appropriate optical cables to a control room, amplified within photomultipliers and recorded in a digital form. In order to investigate an electron energy distribution the multi-channel probes have also been designed and applied.

  17. Characterization of Terfestatin A, a New Specific Inhibitor for Auxin Signaling1[w

    PubMed Central

    Yamazoe, Atsushi; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kepinski, Stefan; Leyser, Ottoline; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Terfestatin A (TrfA), terphenyl-β-glucoside, was isolated from Streptomyces sp. F40 in a forward screen for compounds that inhibit the expression of auxin-inducible genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). TrfA specifically and competitively inhibited the expression of primary auxin-inducible genes in Arabidopsis roots, but did not affect the expression of genes regulated by other plant hormones such as abscisic acid and cytokinin. TrfA also blocked the auxin-enhanced degradation of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor proteins without affecting the auxin-stimulated interaction between Aux/IAAs and the F-box protein TIR1. TrfA treatment antagonized auxin responses in roots, including primary root inhibition, lateral root initiation, root hair promotion, and root gravitropism, but had only limited effects on shoot auxin responses. Taken together, these results indicate that TrfA acts as a modulator of Aux/IAA stability and thus provides a new tool for dissecting auxin signaling. PMID:16183831

  18. Fear, disgust, and information processing in specific phobia: the application of signal detection theory.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Craig N; Meunier, Suzanne A; Lohr, Jeffrey M; Westendorf, David H

    2002-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that individuals with small animal and blood-injection-injury (BII) phobias respond to phobia-relevant stimuli with a combination of fear and disgust. Despite the recognition that disgust may serve a functional role in phobic avoidance behavior, little is known about biased information processing for disgust-related material. Two studies examined recognition memory, using signal detection analyses, for phobia-relevant and general disgust pictures. Study I failed to find differences between spider phobics, BII phobics, and nonphobics in discrimination ability (d') and response bias (c) for spider, surgical, and two categories of general disgust pictures. Results indicated that all participants responded in a liberal manner toward surgical and disgust pictures, whereas they responded more conservatively when judging spider pictures. Study 2 also failed to find differences between BII phobics and nonphobics in discrimination ability and response bias for surgical and disgust pictures presented at 500 and 50 ms exposure durations. All participants again adopted a liberal response bias toward surgical and disgust pictures, although only under the 500 ms stimulus presentation condition. These results do not suggest the presence of preferential information processing of phobia-relevant or general disgust elicitors among phobic participants. The functional value of disgust-mediated information processing biases is questioned given the available literature. Implications and suggestions for continued information processing research for fearful and disgusting stimuli in specific phobia are outlined.

  19. Speaker specificity in speech perception: the importance of what is and is not in the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Delphine; Scarborough, Rebecca A.

    2005-09-01

    In some American English dialects, /ae/ before /g/ (but not before /k/) raises to a vowel approaching [E], in effect reducing phonetic overlap between (e.g.) ``bag'' and ``back.'' Here, participants saw four written words on a computer screen (e.g., ``bag,'' ``back,'' ``dog,'' ``dock'') and heard a spoken word. Their task was to indicate which word they heard. Participants' eye movements to the written words were recorded. Participants in the ``ae-raising'' group heard identity-spliced ``bag''-like words containing the raised vowel [E] participants in the ``control'' group heard cross-spliced ``bag''-like words containing standard [ae]. Acoustically identical ``back''-like words were subsequently presented to both groups. The ae-raising-group participants identified ``back''-like words faster and more accurately, and made fewer fixations to the competitor ``bag,'' than control-group participants did. Thus, exposure to ae-raised realizations of ``bag'' facilitated the identification of ``back'' because of the reduced fit between the input and the altered representation of the competing hypothesis ``bag.'' This demonstrates that listeners evaluate the spoken input with respect to what is, but also what is not, in the signal, and that this evaluation involves speaker-specific representations. [Work supported by NSF Human and Social Dynamics 0433567.

  20. Dendritic space-filling requires a neuronal type-specific extracellular permissive signal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Poe, Amy R; Tang, Lingfeng; Wang, Bei; Li, Yun; Sapar, Maria L; Han, Chun

    2017-09-19

    Neurons sometimes completely fill available space in their receptive fields with evenly spaced dendrites to uniformly sample sensory or synaptic information. The mechanisms that enable neurons to sense and innervate all space in their target tissues are poorly understood. Using Drosophila somatosensory neurons as a model, we show that heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) Dally and Syndecan on the surface of epidermal cells act as local permissive signals for the dendritic growth and maintenance of space-filling nociceptive C4da neurons, allowing them to innervate the entire skin. Using long-term time-lapse imaging with intact Drosophila larvae, we found that dendrites grow into HSPG-deficient areas but fail to stay there. HSPGs are necessary to stabilize microtubules in newly formed high-order dendrites. In contrast to C4da neurons, non-space-filling sensory neurons that develop in the same microenvironment do not rely on HSPGs for their dendritic growth. Furthermore, HSPGs do not act by transporting extracellular diffusible ligands or require leukocyte antigen-related (Lar), a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) and the only known Drosophila HSPG receptor, for promoting dendritic growth of space-filling neurons. Interestingly, another RPTP, Ptp69D, promotes dendritic growth of C4da neurons in parallel to HSPGs. Together, our data reveal an HSPG-dependent pathway that specifically allows dendrites of space-filling neurons to innervate all target tissues in Drosophila.

  1. Lipid-Sorting Specificity Encoded in K-Ras Membrane Anchor Regulates Signal Output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Prakash, Priyanka; Liang, Hong; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Hancock, John F

    2017-01-12

    K-Ras is targeted to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal membrane anchor that comprises a farnesyl-cysteine-methyl-ester and a polybasic domain. We used quantitative spatial imaging and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to examine molecular details of K-Ras plasma membrane binding. We found that the K-Ras anchor binds selected plasma membrane anionic lipids with defined head groups and lipid side chains. The precise amino acid sequence and prenyl group define a combinatorial code for lipid binding that extends beyond simple electrostatics; within this code lysine and arginine residues are non-equivalent and prenyl chain length modifies nascent polybasic domain lipid preferences. The code is realized by distinct dynamic tertiary structures of the anchor on the plasma membrane that govern amino acid side-chain-lipid interactions. An important consequence of this specificity is the ability of such anchors when aggregated to sort subsets of phospholipids into nanoclusters with defined lipid compositions that determine K-Ras signaling output.

  2. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  3. Zinc is a potent and specific inhibitor of IFN-λ3 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Read, Scott A.; O'Connor, Kate S.; Suppiah, Vijay; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L. E.; Obeid, Stephanie; Cook, Kristina M.; Cunningham, Anthony; Douglas, Mark W.; Hogg, Philip J.; Booth, David; George, Jacob; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2017-01-01

    Lambda interferons (IFNL, IFN-λ) are pro-inflammatory cytokines important in acute and chronic viral infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs12979860 and rs8099917 within the IFNL gene locus predict hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance, as well as inflammation and fibrosis progression in viral and non-viral liver disease. The underlying mechanism, however, is not defined. Here we show that the rs12979860 CC genotype correlates with increased hepatic metallothionein expression through increased systemic zinc levels. Zinc interferes with IFN-λ3 binding to IFNL receptor 1 (IFNLR1), resulting in decreased antiviral activity and increased viral replication (HCV, influenza) in vitro. HCV patients with high zinc levels have low hepatocyte antiviral and inflammatory gene expression and high viral loads, confirming the inhibitory role of zinc in vivo. We provide the first evidence that zinc can act as a potent and specific inhibitor of IFN-λ3 signalling and highlight its potential as a target of therapeutic intervention for IFN-λ3-mediated chronic disease. PMID:28513591

  4. Dynamic temporal and cell type-specific expression of Wnt signaling components in the developing midbrain

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Castelo-Branco, Goncalo; Sousa, Kyle M.; Kele, Julianna; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Okano, Hideyuki; Arenas, Ernest . E-mail: Ernest.Arenas@ki.se

    2006-05-15

    Wnt1 and -5a have been shown to modulate the proliferation and differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. However, it is not known whether other Wnts or which Frizzled (Fz) receptors are expressed in the developing midbrain. We found that 13 out of 19 Wnts, all 10 Fzs, and several intracellular Wnt signaling modulators, including Axin, FRAT, Naked, Par-1, and Ltap are developmentally regulated between embryonic days (E) 10.5 and 15.5. Next, we studied whether Fzs are differentially expressed in different cell types and examined neuronal-progenitor- or glial-enriched cultures and DA neurons isolated from TH-GFP reporter mice. We found that Fz8 is expressed at high levels in DA neurons at E11.5 and E13.5. Fz6 and -7 are the predominant transcripts in glial precursors, and Fz9, which is absent in DA neurons at E11.5, is the main receptor expressed in neuronal precursors. We therefore examined the function of Fz9 in DA cells and found that overexpression of Fz9 reduced Wnt5a- but not Wnt3a-induced hyperphosphorylation of Dishevelled. Thus, our results show that Fzs are developmentally regulated and differentially expressed in VM precursors, DA neurons, and glia. These findings suggest that Fz expression contributes to provide specificity to Wnt-mediated effects.

  5. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Regulates Adipose Tissue-specific FGF21 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jager, Jennifer; Wang, Fenfen; Fang, Bin; Lim, Hee-Woong; Peed, Lindsey C; Steger, David J; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Adams, Andrew C; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2016-05-13

    FGF21 is an atypical member of the FGF family that functions as a hormone to regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrate that the actions of FGF21 in mouse adipose tissue, but not in liver, are modulated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a potent transcriptional repressor. Interrogation of genes induced in the absence of Rev-erbα for Rev-erbα-binding sites identified βKlotho, an essential coreceptor for FGF21, as a direct target gene of Rev-erbα in white adipose tissue but not liver. Rev-erbα ablation led to the robust elevated expression of βKlotho. Consequently, the effects of FGF21 were markedly enhanced in the white adipose tissue of mice lacking Rev-erbα. A major Rev-erbα-controlled enhancer at the Klb locus was also bound by the adipocytic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, which regulates its activity in the opposite direction. These findings establish Rev-erbα as a specific modulator of FGF21 signaling in adipose tissue. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The DNA electronic specific heat at low temperature: The role of aperiodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Mendes, G. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Ujsághy, O.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic specific heat spectra at constant volume (CV) of a long-range correlated extended ladder model, mimicking a DNA molecule, is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of a double-stranded structure made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. The role of the aperiodicity on CV is discussed, considering two different nucleotide arrangements with increasing disorder, namely the Fibonacci and the Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic structures. Comparisons are made for different values of the band fillings, considering also a finite segment of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  7. Early spatiotemporal-specific changes in intermediate signals are predictive of cytotoxic sensitivity to TNFα and co-treatments

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Bougen-Zhukov, Nicola Michelle; Tan, Wei-Ling Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Signaling pathways can generate different cellular responses to the same cytotoxic agents. Current quantitative models for predicting these differential responses are usually based on large numbers of intracellular gene products or signals at different levels of signaling cascades. Here, we report a study to predict cellular sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) using high-throughput cellular imaging and machine-learning methods. We measured and compared 1170 protein phosphorylation events in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines based on different signals, subcellular regions, and time points within one hour of TNFα treatment. We found that two spatiotemporal-specific changes in an intermediate signaling protein, p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), are sufficient to predict the TNFα sensitivity of these cell lines. Our models could also predict the combined effects of TNFα and other kinase inhibitors, many of which are not known to target RSK directly. Therefore, early spatiotemporal-specific changes in intermediate signals are sufficient to represent the complex cellular responses to these perturbations. Our study provides a general framework for the development of rapid, signaling-based cytotoxicity screens that may be used to predict cellular sensitivity to a cytotoxic agent, or identify co-treatments that may sensitize or desensitize cells to the agent. PMID:28272488

  8. Early spatiotemporal-specific changes in intermediate signals are predictive of cytotoxic sensitivity to TNFα and co-treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Bougen-Zhukov, Nicola Michelle; Tan, Wei-Ling Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    Signaling pathways can generate different cellular responses to the same cytotoxic agents. Current quantitative models for predicting these differential responses are usually based on large numbers of intracellular gene products or signals at different levels of signaling cascades. Here, we report a study to predict cellular sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) using high-throughput cellular imaging and machine-learning methods. We measured and compared 1170 protein phosphorylation events in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines based on different signals, subcellular regions, and time points within one hour of TNFα treatment. We found that two spatiotemporal-specific changes in an intermediate signaling protein, p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), are sufficient to predict the TNFα sensitivity of these cell lines. Our models could also predict the combined effects of TNFα and other kinase inhibitors, many of which are not known to target RSK directly. Therefore, early spatiotemporal-specific changes in intermediate signals are sufficient to represent the complex cellular responses to these perturbations. Our study provides a general framework for the development of rapid, signaling-based cytotoxicity screens that may be used to predict cellular sensitivity to a cytotoxic agent, or identify co-treatments that may sensitize or desensitize cells to the agent.

  9. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiak, Matthew G.; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans was developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics of C. elegans in combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components in C. elegans. PMID:26907690

  10. DC and small-signal physical models for the AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarker, J. C.; Purviance, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models are developed for the microwave small-signal performance, such as transconductance, gate-to-source capacitance, current gain cut-off frequency and the optimum cut-off frequency of the AlGaAs/GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT), in both normal and compressed transconductance regions. The validated I-V characteristics and the small-signal performances of four HeMT's are presented.

  11. Design of a conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometer based on an electron multiplier. Evaluation of the mean-escape-depth of the detected signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Fernando; Rojas, Carlos; D'Onofrio, Lisseta

    2010-01-01

    A Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectrometer to be used for the characterization of Fe-containing metal surfaces was designed and installed in an Ultra High Vacuum chamber. The design is based in the use of a Channeltron electron multiplier for the detection of electrons emerging from the sample after an incident γ-Ray is absorbed by resonant nuclear excitation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for electron trajectories in solids the mean-escape-depth of the detected Mössbauer signal from a metallic iron sample was estimated to be 80 nm, assuming that the main signals being detected correspond to the Fe(M), Fe(L) and Fe(K) conversion electrons as well as the Fe(KLM), Fe(KLL) and Fe(LMM) Auger electrons. The sensitivity to the surface region was also estimated experimentally by acquiring Mössbauer spectra from a series of Fe films of different thickness deposited by magnetron sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates.

  12. Activation of focal adhesion kinase enhances the adhesion of Fusarium solani to human corneal epithelial cells via the tyrosine-specific protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaojing; Wang, Ye; Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hao; Xie, Lixin

    2011-03-05

    To determine the role of the integrin-FAK signaling pathway triggered by the adherence of F. solani to human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). After pretreatment with/without genistein, HCECs were incubated with F. solani spores at different times (0-24 h). Cell adhesion assays were performed by optical microscopy. Changes of the ultrastructure were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression of F-actin and Paxillin (PAX) were detected by immunofluorescence and western blotting to detect the expression of these key proteins with/without genistein treatment. Cell adhesion assays showed that the number of adhered spores began to rise at 6 h after incubation and peaked at 8 h. SEM and TEM showed that the HCECs exhibited a marked morphological alteration induced by the attachment and entry of the spores. The expression of PAX increased, while the expression of F-actin decreased by stimulation with F. solani. The interaction of F. solani with HCECs causes actin rearrangement in HCECs. Genistein strongly inhibited FAK phosphorylation and the activation of the downstream protein (PAX). F. solani-induced enhancement of cell adhesion ability was inhibited along with the inhibition of FAK phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the integrin-FAK signaling pathway is involved in the control of F. solani adhesion to HCECs and that the activation of focal adhesion kinase enhances the adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells to F. solani via the tyrosine-specific protein kinase signaling pathway.

  13. Electronic Specific Heat and Dissipative Viscosity of Hole-Doped Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2011-03-01

    We investigate a d-density wave (DDW) mean field model Hamiltonian in the momentum space suitable for the hole-doped cuprates, such as YBCO, in the pseudo-gap phase to obtain the Fermi surface(FS)topologies, including the elastic scattering by disorder potential (| v 0 |) . For the chemical potential μ = - 0.27 eV (at 10% doping level), and | v 0 | >= | t | (where | t | = 0.25 eV is the first neighbor hopping), at zero/non-zero magnetic field (B) the FS on the first Brillouin zone is found to correspond to electron pockets around anti-nodal regions and barely visible patches around nodal regions. We next relate our findings regarding FS to the entropy per particle(S), the electronic specific heat Cel and the dissipative viscosity (η) . The magneto-quantum oscillations in Cel are shown to take place in the moderate disorder regime (| v 0 | ~ 0.2 eV) only for B ~ 40 T. For the density of viscosity η (k) on the first Brillouin zone, we find that whereas the negative contribution arises from the electron pockets in the anti-nodal region, the positive contributions are from the hole-pockets in the nodal region. The KSS bound (η /S >= h/ 4 π k B) is easily satisfied for the moderately strong disorder potential. The viscosity is found to be proportional to the magnetic field up to B ~ 50 T.

  14. Identification of a Novel Gene for Biosynthesis of a Bacteroid-Specific Electron Carrier Menaquinone

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuli; Cheng, Guojun; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhi; Lei, Lei; Li, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ) has been considered as an electron mediator in electron transfer that generates ATP in Rhizobium under both free-living and symbiosis conditions. When mutated, the dmtH gene has a symbiotic phenotype of forming ineffective nodules on Astragalus sinicus. The gene was isolated from a Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R transposon-inserted mutant library. The DNA sequence and conserved protein domain analyses revealed that dmtH encodes demethylmenaquinone (DMK) methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal step of menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis. Comparative analysis indicated that dmtH homologs were present in only a few Rhizobia. Real-time quantitative PCR showed dmtH is a bacteroid-specific gene. The highest expression was seen at 25 days after inoculation of strain 7653R. Gene disruption and complementation tests demonstrated that the dmtH gene was essential for bacteroid development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability. MK and UQ were extracted from the wild type strain 7653R and mutant strain HK116. MK-7 was accumulated under microaerobic condition and UQ-10 was accumulated under aerobic condition in M. huakuii 7653R. The predicted function of DmtH protein was confirmed by the measurement of methyltransferase activity in vitro. These results revealed that MK-7 was used as an electron carrier instead of UQ in M. huakuii 7653R bacteroids. PMID:22194970

  15. Identification of a novel gene for biosynthesis of a bacteroid-specific electron carrier menaquinone.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuli; Cheng, Guojun; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhi; Lei, Lei; Li, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ) has been considered as an electron mediator in electron transfer that generates ATP in Rhizobium under both free-living and symbiosis conditions. When mutated, the dmtH gene has a symbiotic phenotype of forming ineffective nodules on Astragalus sinicus. The gene was isolated from a Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R transposon-inserted mutant library. The DNA sequence and conserved protein domain analyses revealed that dmtH encodes demethylmenaquinone (DMK) methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal step of menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis. Comparative analysis indicated that dmtH homologs were present in only a few Rhizobia. Real-time quantitative PCR showed dmtH is a bacteroid-specific gene. The highest expression was seen at 25 days after inoculation of strain 7653R. Gene disruption and complementation tests demonstrated that the dmtH gene was essential for bacteroid development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability. MK and UQ were extracted from the wild type strain 7653R and mutant strain HK116. MK-7 was accumulated under microaerobic condition and UQ-10 was accumulated under aerobic condition in M. huakuii 7653R. The predicted function of DmtH protein was confirmed by the measurement of methyltransferase activity in vitro. These results revealed that MK-7 was used as an electron carrier instead of UQ in M. huakuii 7653R bacteroids.

  16. Oral keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells: specific markers, molecular signaling pathways and potential uses.

    PubMed

    Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Caruntu, Constantin; Tanase, Cristiana; Battino, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Oral keratinocyte stem cells reside in the basal layers of the oral epithelium, representing a minor population of cells with a great potential to self-renew and proliferate over the course of their lifetime. As a result of the potential uses of oral keratinocyte stem cells in regenerative medicine and the key roles they play in tissue homeostasis, inflammatory conditions, wound healing and tumor initiation and progression, intense scientific efforts are currently being undertaken to identify, separate and reprogram these cells. Although currently there is no specific marker that can characterize and isolate oral keratinocyte stem cells, several suggestions have been made. Thus, different stem/progenitor-cell subpopulations have been categorized based on combinations of positive and/or negative membrane-surface markers, which include integrins, clusters of differentiation and cytokeratins. Important advances have also been made in understanding the molecular pathways that govern processes such as self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation, wound healing and programmed cell death. A thorough understanding of stem-cell biology and the molecular players that govern cellular fate is paramount in the quest for using stem-cell-derived therapies in the treatment of various oral pathologies. The current review focuses on recent advances in understanding the molecular signaling pathways coordinating the behavior of these cells and in identifying suitable markers used for their isolation and characterization. Special emphasis will also be placed on the roles played by oral keratinocyte stem and progenitor cells in normal and diseased oral tissues and on their potential uses in the fields of general medicine and dentistry.

  17. ROS/redox signaling regulates bone turnover in an age-specific manner in female mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In bone, oxidant signaling through NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important stimulus for osteoclast differentiation and activity. ROS signaling has been suggested to increase RANKL mRNA and protein expression, thus enha...

  18. DFT calculations on atom-specific electronic properties of G/SiC(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajihara, M.; Suzuki, T.; Shahed, S. M. F.; Komeda, T.; Minamitani, E.; Watanabe, S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the atom-specific interfacial electronic properties of the epitaxial graphene on Si-terminated SiC substrate using density functional theory (DFT) calculation with van der Waals interaction correction, focusing on the dependency of the local electronic state on the chemical environment. The band structure projected on the respective atomic orbitals of the carbon atoms in the buffer layer and uppermost Si atoms demonstrates that the dangling bonds of these atoms form band structures around the Fermi level. The contribution of each atom to the dangling bond states strongly depends on the chemical environment, i.e., the presence/absence of the interlayer Si-C covalent bond. This difference also affects the atom-specific local density of states of the top-layer graphene through its interaction with the substrate/buffer layer. We demonstrate that the bias voltage dependency of the scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) mapping image clearly reflects the presence of the dangling bonds of the buffer layer carbon or uppermost Si atom in the substrate, which would enable the detection of the buried dangling bond with an atomic spatial resolution via STS.

  19. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  20. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-05-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  1. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  2. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  3. A Probabilistic Boolean Network Approach for the Analysis of Cancer-Specific Signalling: A Case Study of Deregulated PDGF Signalling in GIST

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Monique; Bahlawane, Christelle; Haan, Serge; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Signal transduction networks are increasingly studied with mathematical modelling approaches while each of them is suited for a particular problem. For the contextualisation and analysis of signalling networks with steady-state protein data, we identified probabilistic Boolean network (PBN) as a promising framework which could capture quantitative changes of molecular changes at steady-state with a minimal parameterisation. Results and Conclusion In our case study, we successfully applied the PBN approach to model and analyse the deregulated Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) signalling pathway in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST). We experimentally determined a rich and accurate dataset of steady-state profiles of selected downstream kinases of PDGF-receptor-alpha mutants in combination with inhibitor treatments. Applying the tool optPBN, we fitted a literature-derived candidate network model to the training dataset consisting of single perturbation conditions. Model analysis suggested several important crosstalk interactions. The validity of these predictions was further investigated experimentally pointing to relevant ongoing crosstalk from PI3K to MAPK signalling in tumour cells. The refined model was evaluated with a validation dataset comprising multiple perturbation conditions. The model thereby showed excellent performance allowing to quantitatively predict the combinatorial responses from the individual treatment results in this cancer setting. The established optPBN pipeline is also widely applicable to gain a better understanding of other signalling networks at steady-state in a context-specific fashion. PMID:27232499

  4. Impact of age on T cell signaling: a general defect or specific alterations?

    PubMed

    Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham; Wong, Siew Cheng; Goldeck, David; Tai, June Jing-Yi; Fulop, Tamas

    2011-07-01

    Decreased immune responsiveness associated with aging is generally termed "immunosenescence". Several theories have been proposed to explain age-related declines in immune responses. Here, we will focus on and describe potential defects in T cell signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, leading to changes in the type, intensity and duration of the response as a major factor contributing to immunosenescence. We will first detail T cell signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR), CD28 and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and then discuss the observed age-related alterations to these signaling pathways. The role of membrane rafts in T cell signaling and T cell aging will be described. These factors will be considered in the context of the notion that age-related changes to T cell signaling may be attributed to changes in the functionality of the T cells due to shifts in T cell subpopulations with age. For this reason, we conclude by highlighting the application of multiparametric signaling analysis in leukocyte subsets using flow cytometry as a means to obtain a clearer picture with respect to age-related changes to immune signaling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Elwy M; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H; Dranoff, Jonathan A

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca(2+) signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca(2+) chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca(2+) signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca(2+) signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis.

  6. The state-specific expansion approach to the solution of the time-dependent many-electron problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2016-12-01

    The ab initio, non-perturbative solution of the many-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the time-resolved description of electron excitations, correlations and rearrangements in atoms and molecules on femtosecond and attosecond scales, may be characterized as a new frontier of many-electron physics and of quantum chemistry. I outline elements of the theory and applications of the state-specific expansion approach to the solution of such time-dependent many-electron problems involving arbitrary electronic structures.

  7. Epithelial BMP signaling is required for proper specification of epithelial cell lineages and gastric endocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Maloum, Faïza; Allaire, Joannie M.; Gagné-Sansfaçon, Jessica; Roy, Evelyne; Belleville, Karine; Sarret, Philippe; Morisset, Jean; Carrier, Julie C.; Mishina, Yuji; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling within the gastrointestinal tract is complex. BMP ligands and their receptors are expressed in both epithelial and mesenchymal compartments, suggesting bidirectional signaling between these two entities. Despite an increasing interest in BMP signaling in gut physiology and pathologies, the distinct contribution of BMP signaling in the epithelium vs. the mesenchyme in gastrointestinal homeostasis remains to be established. We aimed to investigate the role of epithelial BMP signaling in gastric organogenesis, gland morphogenesis, and maintenance of epithelial cell functions. Using the Cre/loxP system, we generated a mouse model with an early deletion during development of BMP receptor 1A (Bmpr1a) exclusively in the foregut endoderm. Bmpr1aΔGEC mice showed no severe abnormalities in gastric organogenesis, gland epithelial proliferation, or morphogenesis, suggesting only a minor role for epithelial BMP signaling in these processes. However, early loss of BMP signaling in foregut endoderm did impact on gastric patterning, leading to an anteriorization of the stomach. In addition, numbers of parietal cells were reduced in Bmpr1aΔGEC mice. Epithelial BMP deletion significantly increased the numbers of chromogranin A-, ghrelin-, somatostatin-, gastrin-, and serotonin-expressing gastric endocrine cells. Cancer never developed in young adult (<100 days) Bmpr1a-inactivated mice although a marker of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia was upregulated. Using this model, we have uncovered that BMP signaling negatively regulates the proliferation and commitment of endocrine precursor cells. Our data also indicate that loss of BMP signaling in epithelial gastric cells alone is not sufficient to induce gastric neoplasia. PMID:21415412

  8. Myeloid-Specific Blockade of Notch Signaling Attenuates Choroidal Neovascularization through Compromised Macrophage Infiltration and Polarization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Guo-Rui; Li, Na; Chang, Tian-Fang; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Xiang; Yan, Xian-Chun; Liang, Liang; Han, Hua; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have been recognized as an important inflammatory component in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). However, it is unclear how these cells are activated and polarized, how they affect angiogenesis and what the underlining mechanisms are during CNV. Notch signaling has been implicated in macrophage activation. Previously we have shown that inducible disruption of RBP-J, the critical transcription factor of Notch signaling, in adult mice results in enhanced CNV, but it is unclear what is the role of macrophage-specific Notch signaling in the development of CNV. In the current study, by using the myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mouse model combined with the laser-induced CNV model, we show that disruption of Notch signaling in macrophages displayed attenuated CNV growth, reduced macrophage infiltration and activation, and alleviated angiogenic response after laser induction. The inhibition of CNV occurred with reduced expression of VEGF and TNF-α in infiltrating inflammatory macrophages in myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mice. These changes might result in direct inhibition of EC lumen formation, as shown in an in vitro study. Therefore, clinical intervention of Notch signaling in CNV needs to pinpoint myeloid lineage to avoid the counteractive effects of global inhibition. PMID:27339903

  9. Distinct tyrosine residues within the interleukin-2 receptor beta chain drive signal transduction specificity, redundancy, and diversity.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Lai, S Y; Ha, M; Liu, X; Hennighausen, L; Greene, W C; Goldsmith, M A

    1996-08-30

    To explore the basis for interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling specificity, the roles of tyrosine-based sequences located within the cytoplasmic tails of the beta and gammac chains were examined in the murine helper T cell line HT-2. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, cellular proliferation, and the induction of various genes were monitored. All four of the cytoplasmic tyrosine residues as well as the distal portion of the gammac proved dispensable for the entire spectrum of IL-2R signaling responses studied. Conversely, select tyrosine residues within the beta chain were essential and differentially required for various signaling events. Specifically, activation of c-fos gene expression was found to occur exclusively through the most membrane proximal tyrosine, Tyr-338, whereas proliferation and the activation of STAT-5 were induced either through Tyr-338 or through the two C-terminal tyrosine residues, Tyr-392 and Tyr-510. These tyrosine residues mediated the induction of two different STAT-5 isoforms, which were found to form heterodimers upon receptor activation. In contrast to the tyrosine dependence of c-fos and STAT-5 induction, bcl-2 gene induction proceeded independently of all IL-2Rbeta tyrosine residues. Thus, the tyrosine-based modules present within the IL-2Rbeta cytoplasmic tail play a critical role in IL-2R signaling, mediating specificity, redundancy, and multifunctionality.

  10. Autoregressive linear least square single scanning electron microscope image signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kok Swee; NorHisham, Syafiq

    2016-11-01

    A technique based on linear Least Squares Regression (LSR) model is applied to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. In order to test the accuracy of this technique on SNR estimation, a number of SEM images are initially corrupted with white noise. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the original and the corrupted SEM images are formed to serve as the reference point to estimate the SNR value of the corrupted image. The LSR technique is then compared with the previous three existing techniques known as nearest neighbourhood, first-order interpolation, and the combination of both nearest neighborhood and first-order interpolation. The actual and the estimated SNR values of all these techniques are then calculated for comparison purpose. It is shown that the LSR technique is able to attain the highest accuracy compared to the other three existing techniques as the absolute difference between the actual and the estimated SNR value is relatively small. SCANNING 38:771-782, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  12. Core binding factors are necessary for natural killer cell development and cooperate with Notch signaling during T-cell specification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yalin; Maillard, Ivan; Chakraborti, Sankhamala; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2008-01-01

    CBFβ is the non-DNA binding subunit of the core binding factors (CBFs). Mice with reduced CBFβ levels display profound, early defects in T-cell but not B-cell development. Here we show that CBFβ is also required at very early stages of natural killer (NK)–cell development. We also demonstrate that T-cell development aborts during specification, as the expression of Gata3 and Tcf7, which encode key regulators of T lineage specification, is substantially reduced, as are functional thymic progenitors. Constitutively active Notch or IL-7 signaling cannot restore T-cell expansion or differentiation of CBFβ insufficient cells, nor can overexpression of Runx1 or CBFβ overcome a lack of Notch signaling. Therefore, the ability of the prethymic cell to respond appropriately to Notch is dependent on CBFβ, and both signals converge to activate the T-cell developmental program. PMID:18390836

  13. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  14. Wnt Isoform-Specific Interactions with Coreceptor Specify Inhibition or Potentiation of Signaling by LRP6 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I.; Liu, Bob Y.; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C.; Carano, Richard A. D.; Ernst, James A.; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N.; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  15. Spatiotemporal distributions of the electron density in the ionosphere by records of the total electron content and phase of VLF radio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Zetser, Yu. I.; Lyakhov, A. N.; Poklad, Yu. V.; Ryakhovskii, I. A.

    2017-07-01

    Features of the structure and dynamics of the ionospheric plasma are studied in a comparison the ionospheric total electron content measurements with the phase and amplitude measurements of VLF-LF radio signals on global and regional paths. The ionospheric structure over Europe is reconstructed. The spatiotemporal dynamics of moving ionospheric disturbances under conditions of a powerful geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015, is examined based on the reconstruction results. Analysis of the phase variation of VLF radio signals, together with the TEC measurement data, is not only an additional tool in the study of the dynamics of ionospheric disturbances; it also makes it possible to estimate electron density disturbances in different ionospheric layers.

  16. Heuristic Chemistry--A Qualitative Study on Teaching Domain-Specific Strategies for the Six-Electron Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graulich, Nicole; Tiemann, Rudiger; Schreiner, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the efficiency of domain-specific heuristic strategies in mastering and predicting pericyclic six-electron rearrangements. Based on recent research findings on these types of reactions a new concept has been developed that should help students identify and describe six-electron rearrangements more readily in complex molecules. The…

  17. Heuristic Chemistry--A Qualitative Study on Teaching Domain-Specific Strategies for the Six-Electron Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graulich, Nicole; Tiemann, Rudiger; Schreiner, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the efficiency of domain-specific heuristic strategies in mastering and predicting pericyclic six-electron rearrangements. Based on recent research findings on these types of reactions a new concept has been developed that should help students identify and describe six-electron rearrangements more readily in complex molecules. The…

  18. Constructing Patient Specific Clinical Trajectories from Electronic Healthcare Reimbursement Claims using Sequential Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Hobson, Tanner C

    2015-01-01

    We examine the use of electronic healthcare reimbursement claims (EHRC) for analyzing healthcare delivery and practice patterns across the United States (US). By analyzing over 1 billion EHRCs, we track patterns of clinical procedures administered to patients with heart disease (HD) using sequential pattern mining algorithms. Our analyses reveal that the clinical procedures performed on HD patients are highly varied leading up to and after the primary diagnosis. The discovered clinical procedure sequences reveal significant differences in the overall costs incurred across different parts of the US, indicating significant heterogeneity in treating HD patients. We show that a data-driven approach to understand patient specific clinical trajectories constructed from EHRC can provide quantitative insights into how to better manage and treat patients.

  19. The temporal and spatial separation of specific syntheses in the process of chondrogenesis (electron microscopic investigation).

    PubMed

    Kerkis, A Y; Kristolyubova, N B

    1975-05-01

    The ultrastructural of the chondroblasts was investigated in vitro by the methods of light and electron microscopy, determining the degree of differentiation of the individual cells. It was found that in the process of differentiation, the surface area of the membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum undergoes a five-fold increase, while the concentration of free ribosomes in the cytoplasm decreases. The total concentration of free ribosomes and those attached to the membranes per unit volume is unchanged and is approximately 5500 ribosomes per mu3. The use of H3-proline showed that collagen is synthesized on free polyribosomes in the cytoplasm, and not on the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A hypothesis was advanced on the temporal and spatial separation of specific syntheses in the cartilage, playing an important role in the differentiation of the chondroblasts.

  20. New pediatric vision screener, part II: electronics, software, signal processing and validation.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Irsch, Kristina; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2016-02-04

    We have developed an improved pediatric vision screener (PVS) that can reliably detect central fixation, eye alignment and focus. The instrument identifies risk factors for amblyopia, namely eye misalignment and defocus. The device uses the birefringence of the human fovea (the most sensitive part of the retina). The optics have been reported in more detail previously. The present article focuses on the electronics and the analysis algorithms used. The objective of this study was to optimize the analog design, data acquisition, noise suppression techniques, the classification algorithms and the decision making thresholds, as well as to validate the performance of the research instrument on an initial group of young test subjects-18 patients with known vision abnormalities (eight male and 10 female), ages 4-25 (only one above 18) and 19 controls with proven lack of vision issues. Four statistical methods were used to derive decision making thresholds that would best separate patients with abnormalities from controls. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method, and the most suitable one was selected. Both the central fixation and the focus detection criteria worked robustly and allowed reliable separation between normal test subjects and symptomatic subjects. The sensitivity of the instrument was 100 % for both central fixation and focus detection. The specificity was 100 % for central fixation and 89.5 % for focus detection. The overall sensitivity was 100 % and the overall specificity was 94.7 %. Despite the relatively small initial sample size, we believe that the PVS instrument design, the analysis methods employed, and the device as a whole, will prove valuable for mass screening of children.

  1. Specific absorbed fractions of electrons and photons for Rad-HUMAN phantom using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Cheng, Meng-Yun; Long, Peng-Cheng; Hu, Li-Qin

    2015-07-01

    The specific absorbed fractions (SAF) for self- and cross-irradiation are effective tools for the internal dose estimation of inhalation and ingestion intakes of radionuclides. A set of SAFs of photons and electrons were calculated using the Rad-HUMAN phantom, which is a computational voxel phantom of a Chinese adult female that was created using the color photographic image of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data set by the FDS Team. The model can represent most Chinese adult female anatomical characteristics and can be taken as an individual phantom to investigate the difference of internal dose with Caucasians. In this study, the emission of mono-energetic photons and electrons of 10 keV to 4 MeV energy were calculated using the Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code MCNP. Results were compared with the values from ICRP reference and ORNL models. The results showed that SAF from the Rad-HUMAN have similar trends but are larger than those from the other two models. The differences were due to the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The SAFs based on the Rad-HUMAN phantom provide an accurate and reliable data for internal radiation dose calculations for Chinese females. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03040000), National Natural Science Foundation of China (910266004, 11305205, 11305203) and National Special Program for ITER (2014GB112001)

  2. In situ detection of specific gene expression during and immediately after transcription at electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Kitazawa, Riko

    2006-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a widely applied technique used for visualizing specific nucleic acid sequences at chromosomal, cytologic, and histologic levels. It sometimes fails, however, to demonstrate precise cell identity, early stages of gene expression and variants of alternative splicing because of its limited resolution. To overcome this shortcoming, we have developed an improved ISH technique at the electron microscopic (EM) level by conducting en bloc hybridization before embedding (pre-embedding) and immuno-EM detection after ultra-thin sectioning (post-embedding). We applied this technique to demonstrate both the dynamic expression of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA immediately after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, and the static expression of osteonectin mRNA in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage. Tissue samples were diced into 1mm cubes, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and then successively hybridized en bloc with the digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled single-stranded probe measuring 200-300 bp with the aid of microwave treatment. After washing, for EM observation, the cubes were embedded in epon for ultra-thin sectioning, and a gold-colloid-labeled anti-DIG antibody was used for post-embedding immuno-EM; some of the cubes was directly incubated with anti-DIG antibody and developed en bloc for stereoscopic and light microscopic observation. IL-6 mRNA during and immediately after transcription was demonstrated in the nuclei of the alveolar macrophages and in neutrophils of mouse lung tissue as early as 15 min after LPS treatment, which was of better sensitivity than that by Northern blot or nuclear run-on techniques. Moreover, in mouse calvaria tissue, osteonectin mRNA both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm was observed in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage in a differentiation-specific manner. This technique is useful in identifying specific cell types during and immediately after transcribing specific mRNA based on ultrastructural morphology.

  3. μ-δ opioid receptor heteromer-specific signaling in the striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kabli, Noufissa; Fan, Theresa; O'Dowd, Brian F; George, Susan R

    2014-07-18

    The μ-δ opioid receptor heteromer activates the pertussis toxin-resistant Gαz GTP-binding protein following stimulation by the δ-agonist deltorphin-II whereas μ- and δ-receptors activate the pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi3 protein following stimulation by μ- and δ-agonists, respectively. Although the regulation of the μ-δ heteromer is being investigated extensively in vitro, its physiological relevance remains elusive owing to a lack of available molecular tools. We investigated μ-δ heteromer signaling under basal conditions and following prolonged morphine treatment in rodent brain regions highly co-expressing μ- and δ-receptors and Gαz. Deltorphin-II induced Gαz activation in the striatum and hippocampus, demonstrating the presence of μ-δ heteromer signaling in these brain regions. Prolonged morphine treatment, which desensitizes μ- and δ-receptor function, had no effect on μ-δ heteromer signaling in the brain. Our data demonstrate that μ-δ heteromer signaling does not desensitize and is regulated differently from μ- and δ-receptor signaling following prolonged morphine treatment.

  4. A Program of Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion Reactions Is Activated by Specific Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vincent T.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2001-01-01

    Successful establishment of Yersinia infections requires the type III machinery, a protein transporter that injects virulence factors (Yops) into macrophages. It is reported here that the Yersinia type III pathway responds to environmental signals by transporting proteins to distinct locations. Yersinia enterocolitica cells sense an increase in extracellular amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and asparagine) that results in the activation of the type III pathway. Another signal, provided by serum proteins such as albumin, triggers the secretion of YopD into the extracellular medium. The third signal, a decrease in calcium concentration, appears to be provided by host cells and causes Y. enterocolitica to transport YopE and presumably other virulence factors across the eukaryotic plasma membrane. Mutations in several genes encoding regulatory molecules (lcrG, lcrH, tyeA, yopD, yopN, yscM1, and yscM2) bypass the signal requirement of the type III pathway. Together these results suggest that yersiniae may have evolved distinct secretion reactions in response to environmental signals. PMID:11489848

  5. Layer specific and general requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; Larsen, Rylan S; Bjorklund, George Reed; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaohong; Philpot, Benjamin D; Snider, William D; Newbern, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK (ERK/MAPK) pathway causes pathology in a family of neurodevelopmental disorders known as 'RASopathies' and is implicated in autism pathogenesis. Here, we have determined the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in developing neocortical excitatory neurons. Our data reveal a critical requirement for ERK/MAPK signaling in the morphological development and survival of large Ctip2+ neurons in layer 5. Loss of Map2k1/2 (Mek1/2) led to deficits in corticospinal tract formation and subsequent corticospinal neuron apoptosis. ERK/MAPK hyperactivation also led to reduced corticospinal axon elongation, but was associated with enhanced arborization. ERK/MAPK signaling was dispensable for axonal outgrowth of layer 2/3 callosal neurons. However, Map2k1/2 deletion led to reduced expression of Arc and enhanced intrinsic excitability in both layers 2/3 and 5, in addition to imbalanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. These data demonstrate selective requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in layer 5 circuit development and general effects on cortical pyramidal neuron excitability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11123.001 PMID:26848828

  6. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-07-22

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  7. High-Field fMRI for Human Applications: An Overview of Spatial Resolution and Signal Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Olman, Cheryl A; Yacoub, Essa

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, dozens of 7 Tesla scanners have been purchased or installed around the world, while 3 Tesla systems have become a standard. This increased interest in higher field strengths is driven by a demonstrated advantage of high fields for available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the magnetic resonance signal. Functional imaging studies have additional advantages of increases in both the contrast and the spatial specificity of the susceptibility based BOLD signal. One use of this resultant increase in the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for functional MRI studies at high field is increased image resolution. However, there are many factors to consider in predicting exactly what kind of resolution gains might be made at high fields, and what the opportunity costs might be. The first part of this article discusses both hardware and image quality considerations for higher resolution functional imaging. The second part draws distinctions between image resolution, spatial specificity, and functional specificity of the fMRI signals that can be acquired at high fields, suggesting practical limitations for attainable resolutions of fMRI experiments at a given field, given the current state of the art in imaging techniques. Finally, practical resolution limitations and pulse sequence options for studies in human subjects are considered. PMID:22216080

  8. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  9. Correlation of Radiation and Electron and Neutron Signals at PF-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.; Barvir, P.; Klir, D.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Tomaszewski, K.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Bienkowska, B.; Karpinski, L.; Ryc, L.; Juha, L.; Krasa, J.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Jakubowski, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Malinowski, K.; Schmidt, H.

    2006-01-01

    At the signals of x-rays usually 2 peaks were observed. The first peak corresponded to the time of the minimum diameter of the imploding plasma sheath (pinch phase) recorded by the visible frames. The second peak occurred 150-200 ns later at the time of the development of instabilities. High-energy electrons registered in the upstream and downstream directions differed in the intensity (ratio 3:1) and in the time of production. Their peaks correlated with x-rays. The energy of neutrons and time of their generation were determined by time-of-flight method from the pulses of seven scintillation detectors positioned in the axial direction. At the rise-time, each neutron pulse has registered downstream energies in range of 2.7-3.2 MeV. The final part of neutron pulse has isotropic energy distribution with energies up to 2.6-2.7 MeV. The evolution of the neutron pulses correlates with the visible frames. The first pulse correlates with the fast downstream zipper-effect of the dense plasma in the pinch and with the forming of the radiating ball-shaped structure at the bottom of the dilating plasma sheath. The second neutron pulse correlates with the second pinching and exploding of the plasma of lower density and with existence of the structure of the dense plasma positioned at the bottom of the dilating current sheath, similarly to the first pulse. The neutrons have a non-thermal beam-target origin. A possible influence of the zipper-effect on the acceleration of deuterons and on the plasma heating is discussed.

  10. The chloroplast Rieske iron-sulfur protein. At the crossroad of electron transport and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    de Vitry, Catherine; Ouyang, Yexin; Finazzi, Giovanni; Wollman, Francis-André; Kallas, Toivo

    2004-10-22

    We have addressed the functional and structural roles of three domains of the chloroplast Rieske iron-sulfur protein; that is, the flexible hinge that connects the transmembrane helix to the soluble cluster-bearing domain, the N-terminal stromal protruding domain, and the transmembrane helix. To this aim mutants were generated in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Their capacities to assemble the cytochrome b6f complex, perform plastoquinol oxidation, and signal redox-induced activation of the light-harvesting complex II kinase during state transition were tested in vivo. Deletion of one residue and extensions of up to five residues in the flexible hinge had no significant effect on complex accumulation or electron transfer efficiency. Deletion of three residues (Delta3G) dramatically decreased reaction rates by a factor of approximately 10. These data indicate that the chloroplast iron-sulfur protein-linking domain is much more flexible than that of its counterpart in mitochondria. Despite greatly slowed catalysis in the Delta3G mutant, there was no apparent delay in light-harvesting complex II kinase activation or state transitions. This indicates that conformational changes occurring in the Rieske protein did not represent a limiting step for kinase activation within the time scale tested. No phenotype could be associated with mutations in the N-terminal stromal-exposed domain. In contrast, the N17V mutation in the Rieske protein transmembrane helix resulted in a large decrease in the cytochrome f synthesis rate. This reveals that the Rieske protein transmembrane helix plays an active role in assembly-mediated control of cytochrome f synthesis. We propose a structural model to interpret this phenomenon based on the C. reinhardtii cytochrome b6f structure.

  11. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2013-08-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  12. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2013-08-21

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  13. Cell signaling (mechanism and reproductive toxicity): redox chains, radicals, electrons, relays, conduit, electrochemistry, and other medical implications.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Pozos, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    This article deals with a novel, simple, integrated approach to cell signaling involving basic biochemical principles, and their relationship to reproductive toxicity. Initially, an overview of the biological aspects is presented. According to the hypothetical approach, cell signaling entails interaction of redox chains, involving initiation, propagation, and termination. The messengers are mainly radicals and electrons that are generated during electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen atom abstraction reactions. Termination and initiation processes in the chain occur at relay sites occupied by redox functionalities, including quinones, metal complexes, and imines, as well as redox amino acids. Conduits for the messengers, comprising species with nonbonding electrons, are omnipresent. Details are provided for the various electron transfer processes. In relation to the varying rates of cell communication, rationale is based on electrons and size of radicals. Another fit is similarly seen in inspection of endogenous precursors of reactive oxygen species (ROS); namely, proteins bearing redox moieties, lipid oxidation products, and carbohydrate radicals. A hypothesis is advanced in which electromagnetic fields associated with mobile radicals and electrons play a role. Although radicals have previously been investigated as messengers, the area occupies a minor part of the research, and it has not attracted broad consensus as an important component. For the first time, an integrated framework is presented composed of radicals, electrons, relays, conduits, and electrical fields. The approach is in keeping with the vast majority of experimental observations. Cell signaling also plays an important role in reproductive toxicity. The main classes that cause birth defects, including ROS, radiation, metal compounds, medicinals, abused drugs, and miscellaneous substances, are known to participate in the signaling process. A unifying basis exists, in that both signaling and

  14. Systematic Dissection and Trajectory-Scanning Mutagenesis of the Molecular Interface That Ensures Specificity of Two-Component Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Emma A.; Ashenberg, Orr; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Laub, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems enable bacteria to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Sensor histidine kinases transmit signals to their cognate response regulators via phosphorylation. The faithful transmission of information through two-component pathways and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk require exquisite specificity of histidine kinase-response regulator interactions to ensure that cells mount the appropriate response to external signals. To identify putative specificity-determining residues, we have analyzed amino acid coevolution in two-component proteins and identified a set of residues that can be used to rationally rewire a model signaling pathway, EnvZ-OmpR. To explore how a relatively small set of residues can dictate partner selectivity, we combined alanine-scanning mutagenesis with an approach we call trajectory-scanning mutagenesis, in which all mutational intermediates between the specificity residues of EnvZ and another kinase, RstB, were systematically examined for phosphotransfer specificity. The same approach was used for the response regulators OmpR and RstA. Collectively, the results begin to reveal the molecular mechanism by which a small set of amino acids enables an individual kinase to discriminate amongst a large set of highly-related response regulators and vice versa. Our results also suggest that the mutational trajectories taken by two-component signaling proteins following gene or pathway duplication may be constrained and subject to differential selective pressures. Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk. PMID:21124821

  15. PLC-γ1 signaling plays a subtype-specific role in postbinding cell entry of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Host signaling pathways and cellular proteins play important roles in the influenza viral life cycle and can serve as antiviral targets. In this study, we report the engagement of host phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ1 (PLC-γ1) in mediating cell entry of influenza virus H1N1 but not H3N2 subtype. Both PLC-γ1-specific inhibitor and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strongly suppress the replication of H1N1 but not H3N2 viruses in cell culture, suggesting that PLC-γ1 plays an important subtype-specific role in the influenza viral life cycle. Further analyses demonstrate that PLC-γ1 activation is required for viral postbinding cell entry. In addition, H1N1, but not H3N2, infection leads to the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 at Ser 1248 immediately after infection and independent of viral replication. We have further shown that H1N1-induced PLC-γ1 activation is downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Interestingly, both H1N1 and H3N2 infections activate EGFR, but only H1N1 infection leads to PLC-γ1 activation. Taking our findings together, we have identified for the first time the subtype-specific interplay of host PLC-γ1 signaling and H1N1 virus that is critical for viral uptake early in the infection. Our study provides novel insights into how virus interacts with the cellular signaling network by demonstrating that viral determinants can regulate how the host signaling pathways function in virally infected cells.

  16. PLC-γ1 Signaling Plays a Subtype-Specific Role in Postbinding Cell Entry of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liqian; Ly, Hinh

    2014-01-01

    Host signaling pathways and cellular proteins play important roles in the influenza viral life cycle and can serve as antiviral targets. In this study, we report the engagement of host phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ1 (PLC-γ1) in mediating cell entry of influenza virus H1N1 but not H3N2 subtype. Both PLC-γ1-specific inhibitor and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strongly suppress the replication of H1N1 but not H3N2 viruses in cell culture, suggesting that PLC-γ1 plays an important subtype-specific role in the influenza viral life cycle. Further analyses demonstrate that PLC-γ1 activation is required for viral postbinding cell entry. In addition, H1N1, but not H3N2, infection leads to the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 at Ser 1248 immediately after infection and independent of viral replication. We have further shown that H1N1-induced PLC-γ1 activation is downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Interestingly, both H1N1 and H3N2 infections activate EGFR, but only H1N1 infection leads to PLC-γ1 activation. Taking our findings together, we have identified for the first time the subtype-specific interplay of host PLC-γ1 signaling and H1N1 virus that is critical for viral uptake early in the infection. Our study provides novel insights into how virus interacts with the cellular signaling network by demonstrating that viral determinants can regulate how the host signaling pathways function in virally infected cells. PMID:24155396

  17. Concerted hydrogen atom and electron transfer mechanism for catalysis by lysine-specific demethylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Higashi, Masahiro; Cembran, Alessandro; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-07-18

    We calculate the free energy profile for the postulated hydride transfer reaction mechanism for the catalysis of lysine demethylation by lysine-specific demethylase LSD1. The potential energy surface is obtained by using combined electrostatically embedded multiconfiguration molecular mechanics (EE-MCMM) and single-configuration molecular mechanics (MM). We employ a constant valence bond coupling term to obtain analytical energies and gradients of the EE-MCMM subsystem, which contains 45 quantum mechanics (QM) atoms and which is parametrized with density functional calculations employing specific reaction parameters obtained by matching high-level wave function calculations. In the MM region, we employ the Amber ff03 and TIP3P force fields. The free energy of activation at 300 K is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) umbrella sampling on a system with 102,090 atoms as the maximum of the free energy profile along the reaction coordinate as obtained by the weighted histogram analysis method with 17 umbrella sampling windows. This yields a free energy of activation of only 10 kcal/mol, showing that the previously postulated direct hydride transfer reaction mechanism is plausible, although we find that it is better interpreted as a concerted transfer of a hydrogen atom and an electron.

  18. A CD4+ T cell antagonist epitope down-regulates activating signaling proteins, up-regulates inhibitory signaling proteins and abrogates HIV-specific T cell function.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Evan S; Persad, Desmond; Ran, Longsi; Danesh, Ali; Heitman, John W; Deng, Xutao; Cameron, Mark J; Kelvin, David J; Norris, Philip J

    2014-07-05

    CD4+ T cells are critically important in HIV infection, being both the primary cells infected by HIV and likely playing a direct or indirect role in helping control virus replication. Key areas of interest in HIV vaccine research are mechanisms of viral escape from the immune response. Interestingly, in HIV infection it has been shown that peptide sequence variation can reduce CD4+ T cell responses to the virus, and small changes to peptide sequences can transform agonist peptides into antagonist peptides. We describe, at a molecular level, the consequences of antagonism of HIV p24-specific CD4+ T cells. Antagonist peptide exposure in the presence of agonist peptide caused a global suppression of agonist-induced gene expression and signaling molecule phosphorylation. In addition to down-regulation of factors associated with T cell activation, a smaller subset of genes associated with negative regulation of cell activation was up-regulated, including KFL-2, SOCS-1, and SPDEY9P. Finally, antagonist peptide in the absence of agonist peptide also delivered a negative signal to T cells. Small changes in p24-specific peptides can result in T cell antagonism and reductions of both T cell receptor signaling and activation. These changes are at least in part mediated by a dominant negative signal delivered by antagonist peptide, as evidenced by up-regulation of negative regulatory genes in the presence of agonist plus antagonist stimulation. Antagonism can have dramatic effects on CD4+ T cell function and presents a potential obstacle to HIV vaccine development.

  19. Controlling quantum-beating signals in 2D electronic spectra by packing synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Griffin, Graham B.; Zhang, Alice; Zhai, Feng; Williams, Nicholas E.; Jordan, Richard F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2017-03-01

    In multidimensional spectroscopy, dynamics of coherences between excited states report on the interactions between electronic states and their environment. The prolonged coherence lifetimes revealed through beating signals in the spectra of some systems may result from vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited states, and recent observations confirm the existence of such coupling in both model systems and photosynthetic complexes. Understanding the origin of beating signals in the spectra of photosynthetic complexes has been given considerable attention; however, strategies to generate them in artificial systems that would allow us to test the hypotheses in detail are still lacking. Here we demonstrate control over the presence of quantum-beating signals by packing structurally flexible synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes, and thereby restrict the motions of chromophores. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we find that both limiting the relative rotation of chromophores and tuning the energy difference between the two electronic transitions in the dimer to match a vibrational mode of the lower-energy monomer are necessary to enhance the observed quantum-beating signals.

  20. Hallucinogens recruit specific cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated signaling pathways to affect behavior.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Zhou, Mingming; Chan, Pokman; Ivic, Lidija; Ang, Rosalind; Lira, Alena; Bradley-Moore, Maria; Ge, Yongchao; Zhou, Qiang; Sealfon, Stuart C; Gingrich, Jay A

    2007-02-01

    Hallucinogens, including mescaline, psilocybin, and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), profoundly affect perception, cognition, and mood. All known drugs of this class are 5-HT(2A) receptor (2AR) agonists, yet closely related 2AR agonists such as lisuride lack comparable psychoactive properties. Why only certain 2AR agonists are hallucinogens and which neural circuits mediate their effects are poorly understood. By genetically expressing 2AR only in cortex, we show that 2AR-regulated pathways on cortical neurons are sufficient to mediate the signaling pattern and behavioral response to hallucinogens. Hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic 2AR agonists both regulate signaling in the same 2AR-expressing cortical neurons. However, the signaling and behavioral responses to the hallucinogens are distinct. While lisuride and LSD both act at 2AR expressed by cortex neurons to regulate phospholipase C, LSD responses also involve pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G(i/o) proteins and Src. These studies identify the long-elusive neural and signaling mechanisms responsible for the unique effects of hallucinogens.

  1. Specific features of waveguide heating due to transmission of high-power microwave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Gotselyuk, O. B.; Novikov, E. S.; Demin, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Waveguide heating due to transmission of microwave signals is studied. Mathematical models are developed to evaluate heat liberation, and differential equations of thermal balance are derived with allowance for different working conditions of waveguides. The results prove the necessity of the further study of the effect of heat liberation in waveguides on strength and functional characteristics.

  2. Futsal and continuous exercise induce similar changes in specific skeletal muscle signalling proteins.

    PubMed

    Serpiello, F R; McKenna, M J; Coratella, G; Markworth, J F; Tarperi, C; Bishop, D; Stepto, N K; Cameron-Smith, D; Schena, F

    2014-09-01

    Exercise elicits skeletal-muscle adaptations which are important for improved health outcomes. We compared the effects of a futsal game (FUT) and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MOD), on the skeletal-muscle protein signalling responses in young, healthy individuals. 16 men undertook an incremental exercise test and a resting muscle biopsy performed >48 h apart. They were then randomly allocated to either FUT (n=12) consisting of 2 x 20 min halves, or MOD (n=8) consisting of a work-matched running bout performed at an intensity corresponding to the individual ventilatory threshold 1. Work matching was achieved by means of triaxial accelerometers. Immediately after FUT and MOD, participants underwent a second biopsy to assess exercise-induced changes in protein signalling. Total and phosphorylated protein abundance was assessed via western blotting. Both FUT and MOD altered signalling responses in skeletal muscle. FUT increased total ATF2 protein abundance (p=0.048) and phosphorylation (p=0.029), while no changes occurred with MOD. Both exercise regimes increased ACC phosphorylation (p=0.01) and returned a trend for increased p38MAPK phosphorylation. Futsal may be employed as an alternative to continuous exercise to elicit muscle adaptations which may be associated with improved health outcomes. As only FUT increased ATF2 activation, this protein might be a target of future investigation on exercise-induced signalling. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Interplay of Specific Trans- and Juxtamembrane Interfaces in Plexin A3 Dimerization and Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Barton, Rachael; Khakbaz, Pouyan; Bera, Indrani; Klauda, Jeffery B; Iovine, M Kathryn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-09-06

    Plexins are transmembrane proteins that serve as guidance receptors during angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, neuronal development, and zebrafish fin regeneration, with a putative role in cancer metastasis. Receptor dimerization or clustering, induced by extracellular ligand binding but modulated in part by the plexin transmembrane (TM) and juxtamembrane (JM) domains, is thought to drive plexin activity. Previous studies indicate that isolated plexin TM domains interact through a conserved, small-x3-small packing motif, and the cytosolic JM region interacts through a hydrophobic heptad repeat; however, the roles and interplay of these regions in plexin signal transduction remain unclear. Using an integrated experimental and simulation approach, we find disruption of the small-x3-small motifs in the Danio rerio Plexin A3 TM domain enhances dimerization of the TM-JM domain by enhancing JM-mediated dimerization. Furthermore, mutations of the cytosolic JM heptad repeat that disrupt dimerization do so even in the presence of TM domain mutations. However, mutations to the small-x3-small TM interfaces also disrupt Plexin A3 signaling in a zebrafish axonal guidance assay, indicating the importance of this TM interface in signal transduction. Collectively, our experimental and simulation results demonstrate that multiple TM and JM interfaces exist in the Plexin A3 homodimer, and these interfaces independently regulate dimerization that is important in Plexin A3 signal transduction.

  4. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. l-lysine, l-histidine and l-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike l-histidine, l-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and d-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, l-Asp-γ-l-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of l-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1Y395C by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1K9R,K16R. Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes. PMID:24852066

  5. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  6. Domain Specificity of MAP3K Family Members, MLK and Tak1, for JNK Signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Beth; Lennox, Ashley L.; Garlena, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    A highly diverse set of protein kinases functions as early responders in the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase (MAPK/SAPK) signaling pathways. For instance, humans possess 14 MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks) that activate Jun kinase (JNK) signaling downstream. A major challenge is to decipher the selective and redundant functions of these upstream MAP3Ks. Taking advantage of the relative simplicity of Drosophila melanogaster as a model system, we assessed MAP3K signaling specificity in several JNK-dependent processes during development and stress response. Our approach was to generate molecular chimeras between two MAP3K family members, the mixed lineage kinase, Slpr, and the TGF-β activated kinase, Tak1, which share 32% amino acid identity across the kinase domain but otherwise differ in sequence and domain structure, and then test the contributions of various domains for protein localization, complementation of mutants, and activation of signaling. We found that overexpression of the wild-type kinases stimulated JNK signaling in alternate contexts, so cells were capable of responding to both MAP3Ks, but with distinct outcomes. Relative to wild-type, the catalytic domain swaps compensated weakly or not at all, despite having a shared substrate, the JNK kinase Hep. Tak1 C-terminal domain-containing constructs were inhibitory in Tak1 signaling contexts, including tumor necrosis factor-dependent cell death and innate immune signaling; however, depressing antimicrobial gene expression did not necessarily cause phenotypic susceptibility to infection. These same constructs were neutral in the context of Slpr-dependent developmental signaling, reflecting differential subcellular protein localization and by inference, point of activation. Altogether, our findings suggest that the selective deployment of a particular MAP3K can be attributed in part to its inherent sequence differences, cellular localization, and binding partner availability. PMID:24429281

  7. Transmembrane signal transduction in archaeal phototaxis: the sensory rhodopsin II-transducer complex studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Bordignon, Enrica; Engelhard, Martin; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    Archaeal photoreceptors, together with their cognate transducer proteins, mediate phototaxis by regulating cell motility through two-component signal transduction pathways. This sensory pathway is closely related to the bacterial chemotactic system, which has been studied in detail during the past 40 years. Structural and functional studies applying site-directed spin labelling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy on the sensory rhodopsin II/transducer (NpSRII/NpHtrII) complex of Natronomonas pharaonis have yielded insights into the structure, the mechanisms of signal perception, the signal transduction across the membrane and provided information about the subsequent information transfer within the transducer protein towards the components of the intracellular signalling pathway. Here, we provide an overview about the findings of the last decade, which, combined with the wealth of data from research on the Escherichia coli chemotaxis system, served to understand the basic principles microorganisms use to adapt to their environment. We document the time course of a signal being perceived at the membrane, transferred across the membrane and, for the first time, how this signal modulates the dynamic properties of a HAMP domain, a ubiquitous signal transduction module found in various protein classes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Temperature Specific Heat in Lightly Mn-Substituted Electron-Doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Hata, Hiroto; Eto, Takahiro; Sobaru, Shogo; Oda, Ryosuke; Noda, Masaaki; Kuwahara, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    We found large changes in the low-temperature specific heat (low-T C) in the lightly Mn-substituted electron-doped perovskites Sr0.95La0.05Ti1-yMnzO3 with y = 0.02 and 0.04 by applying magnetic fields up to 9 T. The changes in the low-T C are qualitatively well explained by the Schottky specific heat (CSch) of localized spins of the Mn 3d electrons in weak internal magnetic fields via itinerant electrons. However, the actual numbers of localized spins estimated from CSch are about 30% smaller than the expected values. Part of the localized spins of the Mn 3d electrons may disappear due to Kondo coupling with the itinerant electrons.

  9. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jay Prakash; Deshpande, Girish; Shashidhara, L S

    2017-03-01

    The role of the Notch pathway during the lateral inhibition that underlies binary cell fate choice is extensively studied, but the context specificity that generates diverse outcomes is less well understood. In the peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, differential Notch signaling between cells of the proneural cluster orchestrates sensory organ specification. Here we report functional analysis of Drosophila Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 (A2BP1) during this process. Its human ortholog is linked to type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia and other complex neuronal disorders. Downregulation of Drosophila A2BP1 in the proneural cluster increases adult sensory bristle number, whereas its overexpression results in loss of bristles. We show that A2BP1 regulates sensory organ specification by potentiating Notch signaling. Supporting its direct involvement, biochemical analysis shows that A2BP1 is part of the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] complex in the presence and absence of Notch. However, in the absence of Notch signaling, the A2BP1 interacting fraction of Su(H) does not associate with the repressor proteins Groucho and CtBP. We propose a model explaining the requirement of A2BP1 as a positive regulator of context-specific Notch activity.

  10. Bone quantitative susceptibility mapping using a chemical species-specific R2* signal model with ultrashort and conventional echo data.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Alexey V; Liu, Zhe; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R; Du, Jiang; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-05

    To develop quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) of bone using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) gradient echo (GRE) sequence for signal acquisition and a bone-specific effective transverse relaxation rate ( R2*) to model water-fat MR signals for field mapping. Three-dimensional radial UTE data (echo times ≥ 40 μs) was acquired on a 3 Tesla scanner and fitted with a bone-specific signal model to map the chemical species and susceptibility field. Experiments were performed ex vivo on a porcine hoof and in vivo on healthy human subjects (n = 7). For water-fat separation, a bone-specific model assigning R2* decay mostly to water was compared with the standard models that assigned the same decay for both fat and water. In the ex vivo experiment, bone QSM was correlated with CT. Compared with standard models, the bone-specific R2* method significantly reduced errors in the fat fraction within the cortical bone in all tested data sets, leading to reduced artifacts in QSM. Good correlation was found between bone CT and QSM values in the porcine hoof (R(2)  = 0.77). Bone QSM was successfully generated in all subjects. The QSM of bone is feasible using UTE with a conventional echo time GRE acquisition and a bone-specific R2* signal model. Magn Reson Med 000:000-000, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Detectability and acceptability of continuous pulse signals for the MemoPatch(®) device, an electronic skin patch intended to deliver tactile medication reminder signals.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ivo; De Geest, Jan; De Geest, Wim; De Troy, Elke; MacDonald, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Unintended forgetfulness is the most common cause of medication nonadherence. MemoPatch(®) is an electronic skin patch intended to deliver discreet tactile medication reminder stimuli. This study aimed 1) to evaluate, within an experimental setup, the detectability and acceptability of fifteen continuous bipolar pulse signals; 2) to identify variables, if any, associated with differential perception of the candidate reminder signals; and 3) to collect safety data as reported by subjects or observed by staff. This was a laboratory experiment involving 147 healthy adult volunteers (55.1% female, 98.0% Caucasian, with age 41.8±16.0 years, body mass index [BMI] 24.7±4.4, upper body adiposity 28.5%±8.3% body fat, and skin impedance 367.6±140.8 Ω) and using an experimental version of the MemoPatch(®). Following four training signals administered in fixed order, subjects were exposed to a set of fifteen randomly sequenced signals varying in rise and fall time, width, and current, to be rated in terms of detectability ("too weak", "appropriate", or "too strong") and acceptability. Ratings of "appropriate" were virtually independent of such variables as sex, BMI, upper body adiposity, and skin impedance at the patch location. Five signals were rated as "appropriate" by ≥67% of subjects and acceptable by ≥95% of subjects, virtually independently of the indicators of interest, and were retained as candidate signals for use in next stages of development and commercialization. Nine adverse events, none serious, were observed in six subjects. This study yielded five effective and safe candidate signals for potential use in the MemoPatch(®) device, all equally considered to be of appropriate detectability and high acceptability, in an experimental context. The signals were independent from, and therefore highly robust relative to, sex, BMI, upper body adiposity, and skin impedance at the patch site, lending additional generalizability to the signals and hence their

  12. Low temperature specific heat anomaly in electron doped R2-xCexCuO4 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, S. P.; Rout, G. C.

    2014-04-01

    The electron doped rare earth copper oxide superconductors R2-xCexCuO4 exhibit anomalous heavy fermion behavior at low temperature with large Sommerfeld specific heat coefficient which is different from the conventional heavy fermion systems. The system is described by a model Hamiltonian consisting of staggered magnetic field in the two sub-lattices of the copper sites in presence of hybridization between the localized 4f electrons of Nd atom and the conduction electrons as well as the f-electron kinetic energy term. The Hamiltonian is solved by Zubarev's Green's function technique and the sub-lattice magnetization is calculated and solved self-consistently. The entropy and specific heat are calculated from the free energy of the system. The temperature dependent entropy and specific heat are numerically evaluated by successive differentiations of sub-lattice magnetization and temperature dependent entropy. It is observed that when the position of the f-level of Nd atom is of the order of hybridization strength, the sub-lattice magnetization is destroyed drastically at lower temperatures. As a result, the specific heat exhibits a large enhancement at low temperatures suggesting the enhancement of the electron density of states and the effective mass of the itinerant electrons exhibiting the heavy fermion character. Similarly, the specific heat shows anomalously sharp jump near the Néel temperature.

  13. The Circadian Neuropeptide PDF Signals Preferentially through a Specific Adenylate Cyclase Isoform AC3 in M Pacemakers of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Laura B.; Taghert, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R) is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells—the PDF-R(+) LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s) is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into “circadian signalosomes,” whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types. PMID:22679392

  14. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Laura B; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R) is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+) LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s) is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  15. Intracellular cytoplasm-specific delivery of SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP inhibits TcR-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Moon, Jae-Seung; Yu, JiSang; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2015-05-08

    Signaling events triggered by T cell receptor (TcR) stimulation are important targets for the development of common therapeutics for various autoimmune diseases. SLAP is a negative regulator of TcR-mediated signaling cascade via targeting TcR zeta chain for degradation through recruiting the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. In this study, we generated a transducible form of SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP (ctSLAPΔC) which can be specifically targeted to the cytoplasm of a cell. ctSLAPΔC inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling mediators such as ZAP-70 and LAT involved in T cell activation, and effectively suppressed transcriptional activity of NFAT and NFκB upon TcR stimulation. The transduced ctSLAPΔC in T cells blocked the secretion of T cell-specific cytokines such as IL-2, IFNγ, IL-17A, and IL-4 and induced the expression of CD69 and CD25 on effector T cells without influencing the cell viability. Inhibition of TcR-mediated signaling via SLAP blocked the differentiation of naïve T cells into Th1, Th2 or Treg cells with different sensitivity, suggesting that qualitative and quantitative intensity of TcR-mediated signaling in the context of polarizing cytokines environment may be a critical factor to determine the differentiation fate of naïve T cells. These results suggest that cytoplasm-specific transduction of the SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP has a therapeutic potential of being an immunosuppressive reagent for the treatment of various autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue- and fibre-specific modifications of insulin-signalling molecules in cardiac and skeletal muscle of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ekladous, Demiana; Mehdi, Mohamad Z; Costa, Myriam; Srivastava, Ashok K; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Coderre, Lise

    2008-08-01

    1. Levels of insulin-signalling molecules are altered in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, a model of Type 1 diabetes. However, the tissue-specific regulation of these changes and the effect of insulin supplementation on signalling molecule protein levels have not been well characterized. 2. In the present study, we evaluated the level of proximal insulin-signalling intermediates in the heart and in red and white gastrocnemius muscles of 2 week diabetic rats and diabetic rats supplemented with insulin. 3. Diabetes augmented levels of the insulin receptor and the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the red gastrocnemius, but not in the white gastrocnemius or the heart. Furthermore, diabetes reduced insulin receptor substrate-1 levels in both the red and white gastrocnemius, but not in the heart. Examination of the levels and basal activities of distal insulin-signalling intermediates (protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)) also failed to reveal a specific pattern in these changes. Thus, diabetes reduced basal ERK1/2 and PKB/Akt phosphorylation in the heart and white gastrocnemius, respectively, whereas it augmented basal p38 MAPK activity in the red gastrocnemius. Insulin supplementation normalized the levels and activities of some but not all proteins. 4. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate that adaptation to STZ-induced diabetes varies among skeletal muscle fibre types and the heart, emphasizing the complex tissue-specific responses to diabetes.

  17. Science Signaling Podcast for 2 August 2016: Patient-specific protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Adam G; Neier, Steven C; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-08-02

    This Podcast features an interview with Adam Schrum and Steven Neier, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 2 August 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a method for identifying protein-protein interactions in patient tissue samples. The authors used this method to compare signaling complexes downstream of the T cell receptor in T cells from healthy skin with those in T cells from the skin of patients with the autoimmune disease alopecia areata. The study revealed differences in the relative abundance of some protein complexes between T cells from the control and patient groups. This technique could be adapted for use as a diagnostic tool to stratify patients by molecular phenotype and predict the therapeutic strategy that is likely to work best for each patient.Listen to Podcast. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  19. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  20. CqsA-CqsS quorum-sensing signal-receptor specificity in Photobacterium angustum

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C.; Ng, Wai-Leung; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, detection, and population-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The QS system commonly found in vibrios and photobacteria consists of the CqsA synthase/CqsS receptor pair. Vibrio cholerae CqsA/S synthesizes and detects (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one (C10-CAI-1), whereas Vibrio harveyi produces and detects a distinct but similar molecule, (Z)-3-aminoundec-2-en-4-one (Ea-C8-CAI-1). To understand the signaling properties of the larger family of CqsA-CqsS pairs, here, we characterize the Photobacterium angustum CqsA/S system. Many photobacterial cqsA genes harbor a conserved frameshift mutation that abolishes CAI-1 production. By contrast, their cqsS genes are intact. Correcting the P. angustum cqsA reading frame restores production of a mixture of CAI-1 moieties, including C8-CAI-1, C10-CAI-1, Ea-C8-CAI-1 and Ea-C10-CAI-1. This signal production profile matches the P. angustum CqsS receptor ligand-detection capability. The receptor exhibits a preference for molecules with 10-carbon tails, and the CqsS Ser168 residue governs this preference. P. angustum can overcome the cqsA frameshift to produce CAI-1 under particular limiting growth conditions presumably through a ribosome slippage mechanism. Thus, we propose that P. angustum uses CAI-1 signaling for adaptation to stressful environments. PMID:24372841

  1. Identification and Characterization of Internalization Signal of the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    melanosomal membrane protein tyrosinase (H-Ining et al., 1996). It is possible that these adaptors might bind to the cytoplasmic tail of PSMA and might be...direct them to the endocytic pathway are excellent cancer inhibitors (Hurwitz et al., 1995). Increased expression of PSMA in high grade and metastatic...cytoplasmic sequence in human tyrosinase defines a second class of di-leucine-based sorting signals for late

  2. Introduction of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to pre-embedding nanogold-silver staining at the electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-won; Lee, Song Eun; Ko, Seong Hyuk; Hong, Eun Kyoung; Nam, Kwang Il; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Imayama, Shuhei; Park, Yeong-Joon; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Bae, Choon Sang; Kim, Baik Yoon; Park, Sung Sik

    2005-02-01

    The tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique has been shown to detect scarce tissue antigens in light and electron microscopy. In this study we applied the TSA technique at the electron microscopic level to pre-embedding immunocytochemistry. This protocol was compared to the non-amplified protocol. With the TSA protocol, the labeling of GM130, a cis-Golgi matrix protein, was tested in a cell line and found to be highly sensitive and more enhanced than that with the simple protocol. Moreover, the gold particles were well localized to the cis-side of the Golgi apparatus in both the TSA and the simple protocol.

  3. SPEAKING IN LIGHT - Jupiter radio signals as deflections of light-emitting electron beams in a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, K.

    2015-10-01

    Light emitting electron beam generated in a vacuum chamber is used as a medium for visualizing Jupiter's electromagnetic radiation. Dual dipole array antenna is receiving HF radio signals that are next amplified to radiate a strong electromagnetic field capable of influencing the propagation of electron beam in plasma. Installation aims to provide a platform for observing the characteristics of light emitting beam in 3D, as opposed to the experiments with cathode ray tubes in 2-dimensional television screens. Gas giant 'speaking' to us by radio waves bends the light in the tube, allowing us to see and hear the messages of Jupiter - God of light and sky.

  4. Weight Perturbation Alters Leptin Signal Transduction in a Region-Specific Manner throughout the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Michael V.; Ravussin, Yann; Mueller, Bridget R.; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Foo, Kylie S.; Lee, Samuel X.; Lehmann, Anders; Hjorth, Stephan; Zeltser, Lori M.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2017-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) resulting from consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) attenuates normal neuronal responses to leptin and may contribute to the metabolic defense of an acquired higher body weight in humans; the molecular bases for the persistence of this defense are unknown. We measured the responses of 23 brain regions to exogenous leptin in 4 different groups of weight- and/or diet-perturbed mice. Responses to leptin were assessed by quantifying pSTAT3 levels in brain nuclei 30 minutes following 3 mg/kg intraperitoneal leptin. HFD attenuated leptin sensing throughout the brain, but weight loss did not restore central leptin signaling to control levels in several brain regions important in energy homeostasis, including the arcuate and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Effects of diet on leptin signaling varied by brain region, with results dependent on the method of weight loss (restriction of calories of HFD, ad lib intake of standard mouse chow). High fat diet attenuates leptin signaling throughout the brain, but some brain regions maintain their ability to sense leptin. Weight loss restores leptin sensing to some degree in most (but not all) brain regions, while other brain regions display hypersensitivity to leptin following weight loss. Normal leptin sensing was restored in several brain regions, with the pattern of restoration dependent on the method of weight loss. PMID:28107353

  5. Accounting for Photophysical Processes and Specific Signal Intensity Changes in Fluorescence-Detected Sedimentation Velocity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence detected sedimentation velocity (FDS-SV) has emerged as a powerful technique for the study of high-affinity protein interactions, with hydrodynamic resolution exceeding that of diffusion-based techniques, and with sufficient sensitivity for binding studies at low picomolar concentrations. For the detailed quantitative analysis of the observed sedimentation boundaries, it is necessary to adjust the conventional sedimentation models to the FDS data structure. A key consideration is the change in the macromolecular fluorescence intensity during the course of the experiment, caused by slow drifts of the excitation laser power, and/or by photophysical processes. In the present work, we demonstrate that FDS-SV data have inherently a reference for the time-dependent macromolecular signal intensity, resting on a geometric link between radial boundary migration and plateau signal. We show how this new time-domain can be exploited to study molecules exhibiting photobleaching and photoactivation. This expands the application of FDS-SV to proteins tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, organic dyes, or nanoparticles, such as those recently introduced for subdiffraction microscopy and enables FDS-SV studies of their interactions and size distributions. At the same time, we find that conventional fluorophores undergo minimal photobleaching under standard illumination in the FDS. These findings support the application of a high laser power density for the detection, which we demonstrate can further increase the signal quality. PMID:25136929

  6. Neuron-type-specific signals for reward and punishment in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremiah Y; Haesler, Sebastian; Vong, Linh; Lowell, Bradford B; Uchida, Naoshige

    2012-01-18

    Dopamine has a central role in motivation and reward. Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) signal the discrepancy between expected and actual rewards (that is, reward prediction error), but how they compute such signals is unknown. We recorded the activity of VTA neurons while mice associated different odour cues with appetitive and aversive outcomes. We found three types of neuron based on responses to odours and outcomes: approximately half of the neurons (type I, 52%) showed phasic excitation after reward-predicting odours and rewards in a manner consistent with reward prediction error coding; the other half of neurons showed persistent activity during the delay between odour and outcome that was modulated positively (type II, 31%) or negatively (type III, 18%) by the value of outcomes. Whereas the activity of type I neurons was sensitive to actual outcomes (that is, when the reward was delivered as expected compared to when it was unexpectedly omitted), the activity of type II and type III neurons was determined predominantly by reward-predicting odours. We 'tagged' dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons with the light-sensitive protein channelrhodopsin-2 and identified them based on their responses to optical stimulation while recording. All identified dopaminergic neurons were of type I and all GABAergic neurons were of type II. These results show that VTA GABAergic neurons signal expected reward, a key variable for dopaminergic neurons to calculate reward prediction error.

  7. TISSUE SPECIFIC RESPONSES TO ABERRANT FGF SIGNALING IN COMPLEX HEAD PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Motch, Susan M.; Pankratz, Talia L.; Wang, Yingli; Aldridge, Kristina; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of fibroblast growth factor and receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling in bone development is well studied, partly because mutations in FGFRs cause human diseases of achondroplasia and FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon syndrome. The FGFR2c C342Y mutation is a frequent cause of Crouzon syndrome, characterized by premature cranial vault suture closure, midfacial deficiency and neurocranial dysmorphology. Here, using newborn Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mice, we tested whether the phenotypic effects of this mutation go beyond the skeletal tissues of the skull, altering the development of other non-skeletal head tissues including the brain, the eyes, the nasopharynx and the inner ears. Results Quantitative analysis of 3D multimodal imaging (high resolution micro computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopic images) revealed local differences in skull morphology and coronal suture patency between Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice and unaffected littermates, as well as changes in brain shape but not brain size, significant reductions in nasopharyngeal and eye volumes, and no difference in inner ear volume in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice. Conclusion These findings provide an expanded catalogue of clinical phenotypes in Crouzon syndrome caused by aberrant FGF/FGFR signaling and evidence of the broad role for FGF/FGFR signaling in development and evolution of the vertebrate head. PMID:23172727

  8. Weight Perturbation Alters Leptin Signal Transduction in a Region-Specific Manner throughout the Brain.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Michael V; Ravussin, Yann; Mueller, Bridget R; Skowronski, Alicja A; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Foo, Kylie S; Lee, Samuel X; Lehmann, Anders; Hjorth, Stephan; Zeltser, Lori M; LeDuc, Charles A; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2017-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) resulting from consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) attenuates normal neuronal responses to leptin and may contribute to the metabolic defense of an acquired higher body weight in humans; the molecular bases for the persistence of this defense are unknown. We measured the responses of 23 brain regions to exogenous leptin in 4 different groups of weight- and/or diet-perturbed mice. Responses to leptin were assessed by quantifying pSTAT3 levels in brain nuclei 30 minutes following 3 mg/kg intraperitoneal leptin. HFD attenuated leptin sensing throughout the brain, but weight loss did not restore central leptin signaling to control levels in several brain regions important in energy homeostasis, including the arcuate and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Effects of diet on leptin signaling varied by brain region, with results dependent on the method of weight loss (restriction of calories of HFD, ad lib intake of standard mouse chow). High fat diet attenuates leptin signaling throughout the brain, but some brain regions maintain their ability to sense leptin. Weight loss restores leptin sensing to some degree in most (but not all) brain regions, while other brain regions display hypersensitivity to leptin following weight loss. Normal leptin sensing was restored in several brain regions, with the pattern of restoration dependent on the method of weight loss.

  9. The Role of Specific Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascades in the Regulation of Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.; Stocco, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) comprise a family of serine/threonine kinases that are activated by a large variety of extracellular stimuli and play integral roles in controlling many cellular processes, from the cell surface to the nucleus. The MAPK family includes four distinct MAPK cascades, that is, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase or stress-activated protein kinase, and ERK5. These MAPKs are essentially operated through three-tiered consecutive phosphorylation events catalyzed by a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. MAPKs lie in protein kinase cascades. The MAPK signaling pathways have been demonstrated to be associated with events regulating the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and steroidogenesis in steroidogenic tissues. However, it has become clear that the regulation of MAPK-dependent StAR expression and steroid synthesis is a complex process and is context dependent. This paper summarizes the current level of understanding concerning the roles of the MAPK signaling cascades in the regulation of StAR expression and steroidogenesis in different steroidogenic cell models. PMID:21637381

  10. Genetic interaction of PGE2 and Wnt signaling regulates developmental specification of stem cells and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E.; Loewer, Sabine; Lord, Allegra M.; Lee, Sang; Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L.; Weidinger, Gilbert; Puder, Mark; Daley, George Q.; Moon, Randall T.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Interactions between developmental signaling pathways govern the formation and function of stem cells. Prostaglandin (PG) E2 regulates vertebrate hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Similarly, the Wnt signaling pathway controls HSC self-renewal and bone marrow repopulation. Here, we show that wnt reporter activity in zebrafish HSCs is responsive to PGE2 modulation, demonstrating a direct interaction in vivo. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis blocked wnt-induced alterations in HSC formation. PGE2 modified the wnt signaling cascade at the level of β-catenin degradation through cAMP/PKA-mediated stabilizing phosphorylation events. The PGE2/Wnt interaction regulated murine stem and progenitor populations in vitro in hematopoietic ES cell assays and in vivo following transplantation. The relationship between PGE2 and Wnt was also conserved during regeneration of other organ systems. Our work provides the first in vivo evidence that Wnt activation in stem cells requires PGE2, and suggests the PGE2/Wnt interaction is a master regulator of vertebrate regeneration and recovery. PMID:19303855

  11. Gender specific differences in oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling in healthy term neonates and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Castro, Javier; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Moreno-Fernandez, Jorge; Kajarabille, Naroa; de Paco, Catalina; Garrido-Sanchez, Maria; Prados, Sonia; Ochoa, Julio J

    2016-10-01

    Gender is a crucial determinant of life span, but little is known about gender differences in free radical homeostasis and inflammatory signaling. The aim of the study was to determine gender-related differences concerning oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling of healthy neonates and mothers. Fifty-six mothers with normal gestational course and spontaneous delivery were selected. Blood samples were collected from the mother (at the beginning of delivery and start of expulsive period) and from neonate (from umbilical cord vein and artery). The mothers of girls featured a higher total antioxidant status and lower plasma hydroperoxides than the mother of boys. Regarding the neonates, the girls featured a higher total antioxidant status and lower plasma membrane hydroperoxides in umbilical cord artery together with higher catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities. Lower levels of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and prostaglandin E2 were observed in the mothers of girls and higher level of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II. In the neonates, lower levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were observed in umbilical artery and higher soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II in umbilical cord vein and artery of girls. An association between gender, oxidative stress, and inflammation signaling exists, leading to a renewed interest in the neonate's sex as a potential risk factor to several alterations.

  12. Involvement of IKAP in Peripheral Target Innervation and in Specific JNK and NGF Signaling in Developing PNS Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Abashidze, Anastasia; Gold, Veronica; Anavi, Yaron; Greenspan, Hayit; Weil, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the ikbkap gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we attempted to elucidate the role of IKAP in PNS development in the chick embryo and found that IKAP is required for proper axonal outgrowth, branching, and peripheral target innervation. Moreover, we demonstrate that IKAP colocalizes with activated JNK (pJNK), dynein, and β-tubulin at the axon terminals of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, and may be involved in transport of specific target derived signals required for transcription of JNK and NGF responsive genes in the nucleus. These results suggest the novel role of IKAP in neuronal transport and specific signaling mediated transcription, and provide, for the first time, the basis for a molecular mechanism behind the FD phenotype. PMID:25409162

  13. Involvement of IKAP in peripheral target innervation and in specific JNK and NGF signaling in developing PNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Abashidze, Anastasia; Gold, Veronica; Anavi, Yaron; Greenspan, Hayit; Weil, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the ikbkap gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we attempted to elucidate the role of IKAP in PNS development in the chick embryo and found that IKAP is required for proper axonal outgrowth, branching, and peripheral target innervation. Moreover, we demonstrate that IKAP colocalizes with activated JNK (pJNK), dynein, and β-tubulin at the axon terminals of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, and may be involved in transport of specific target derived signals required for transcription of JNK and NGF responsive genes in the nucleus. These results suggest the novel role of IKAP in neuronal transport and specific signaling mediated transcription, and provide, for the first time, the basis for a molecular mechanism behind the FD phenotype.

  14. Germ cell-specific sustained activation of Wnt signalling perturbs spermatogenesis in aged mice, possibly through non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Atkins, Joshua; Cairns, Murray; Ali, Ayesha; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated Wnt signalling is associated with human infertility and testicular cancer. However, the role of Wnt signalling in male germ cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed the activity of Wnt signalling in mouse, dog and human testes. To determine the physiological importance of the Wnt pathway, we developed a mouse model with germ cell-specific constitutive activation of βcatenin. In young mutants, similar to controls, germ cell development was normal. However, with age, mutant testes showed defective spermatogenesis, progressive germ cell loss, and flawed meiotic entry of spermatogonial cells. Flow sorting confirmed reduced germ cell populations at the leptotene/zygotene stages of meiosis in mutant group. Using thymidine analogues-based DNA double labelling technique, we further established decline in germ cell proliferation and differentiation. Overactivation of Wnt/βcatenin signalling in a spermatogonial cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation, viability and colony formation. RNA sequencing analysis of testes revealed significant alterations in the non-coding regions of mutant mouse genome. One of the novel non-coding RNAs was switched on in mutant testes compared to controls. QPCR analysis confirmed upregulation of this unique non-coding RNA in mutant testis. In summary, our results highlight the significance of Wnt signalling in male germ cells. PMID:27992363

  15. Chondrocyte-Specific Inhibition of β-Catenin Signaling Leads to Dysplasia of the Caudal Vertebrae in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Bing; Li, Tian-Fang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Tang, De-Zhi; Zhang, Yejia; Shi, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. To inhibit β-catenin specifically signaling in chondrocytes Col2-ICAT transgenic mice were generated. Anomalies in caudal vertebrae were detected during embryonic and postnatal stages of Col2-ICAT transgenic mice. Objective. To determine the role of canonical β-catenin signaling in caudal vertebral development. Summary of Background Data. β-catenin signaling plays a critical role in skeletal development. Col2-ICAT transgenic mice were generated to selectively block β-catenin signaling by overexpression of the ICAT gene in chondrocytes. Methods. Tails of E16.5 transgenic embryos and adult Col2-ICAT transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates were collected and analyzed. Skeletal preparation, 3-dimensional micro-computed tomographic and histological analyses were performed to evaluate changes in the structure of caudal vertebrae. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling was performed to evaluate changes in chondrocyte proliferation in caudal vertebrae. Results. Skeletal preparation and 3-dimensional micro-computed tomographic analyses revealed bone deformation and angulated deformities in tail tissue in Col2-ICAT transgenic mice. Histological studies revealed abnormal bone development and dysplastic caudal vertebrae in Col2-ICAT transgenic mice. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling in cartilage resulted in vertebral dysplasia leading to aberrant resegmenting process. Thus, 2 poorly developed sclerotomes failed to fuse to form a complete vertebrae. BrdU labeling revealed a decreased chondrocyte proliferation in both cartilageous templates of transgenic embryos and the growth plate of adult Col2-ICAT transgenic mice. Conclusion. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in vertebral development. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling in chondrocytes results in caudal vertebra deformity in mice, which may occur as early as in the stage of sclerotome formation. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID:24026150

  16. Stretchable Multichannel Electromyography Sensor Array Covering Large Area for Controlling Home Electronics with Distinguishable Signals from Multiple Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namyun; Lim, Taehoon; Song, Kwangsun; Yang, Sung; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-17

    Physiological signals provide important information for biomedical applications and, more recently, in the form of wearable electronics for active interactions between bodies and external environments. Multiple physiological sensors are often required to map distinct signals from multiple points over large areas for more diverse applications. In this paper, we present a reusable, multichannel, surface electromyography (EMG) sensor array that covers multiple muscles over relatively large areas, with compliant designs that provide different levels of stiffness for repetitive uses, without backing layers. Mechanical and electrical characteristics along with distinct measurements from different muscles demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. The results should be useful to actively control devices in the environment with one array of wearable sensors, as demonstrated with home electronics.

  17. Identification of nuclear import and export signals within Fli-1: roles of the nuclear import signals in Fli-1-dependent activation of megakaryocyte-specific promoters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Philips, Alana S; Kwok, Juliana C; Eisbacher, Michael; Chong, Beng H

    2005-04-01

    The Ets factor Friend leukemia integration 1 (Fli-1) is an important regulator of megakaryocytic (Mk) differentiation. Here, we demonstrate two novel nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within Fli-1: one (NLS1) is located at the N terminus, and another (NLS2) is within the Ets domain. Nuclear accumulation of Fli-1 reflected the combined functional effects of the two discrete NLSs. Each NLS can independently direct nuclear transport of a carrier protein, with mutations within the NLSs affecting nuclear accumulation. NLS1 has a bipartite motif, whereas the NLS2 region contains a nonclassical NLS. Both NLSs bind importin alpha (IMPalpha) and IMPbeta, with NLS1 and NLS2 being predominantly recognized by IMPalpha and IMPbeta, respectively. Fli-1 also contains one nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B abolished its cytoplasmic accumulation, showing CRM1 dependency. We demonstrate that Ets domain binding to specific target DNA effectively blocks IMP binding, indicating that the targeted DNA binding plays a role in localizing Fli-1 to its destination and releasing IMPs for recycling back to the cytoplasm. Finally, by analyzing full-length Fli-1 carrying NLS1, NLS2, and combined NLS1-NLS2 mutations, we conclude that two functional NLSs exist in Fli-1 and that each NLS is sufficient to target Fli-1 to the nucleus for activation of Mk-specific genes.

  18. Escargot controls the sequential specification of two tracheal tip cell types by suppressing FGF signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Miao, Guangxia; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2016-11-15

    Extrinsic branching factors promote the elongation and migration of tubular organs. In the Drosophila tracheal system, Branchless (Drosophila FGF) stimulates the branching program by specifying tip cells that acquire motility and lead branch migration to a specific destination. Tip cells have two alternative cell fates: the terminal cell (TC), which produces long cytoplasmic extensions with intracellular lumen, and the fusion cell (FC), which mediates branch connections to form tubular networks. How Branchless controls this specification of cells with distinct shapes and behaviors is unknown. Here we report that this cell type diversification involves the modulation of FGF signaling by the zinc-finger protein Escargot (Esg), which is expressed in the FC and is essential for its specification. The dorsal branch begins elongation with a pair of tip cells with high FGF signaling. When the branch tip reaches its final destination, one of the tip cells becomes an FC and expresses Esg. FCs and TCs differ in their response to FGF: TCs are attracted by FGF, whereas FCs are repelled. Esg suppresses ERK signaling in FCs to control this differential migratory behavior.

  19. Escargot controls the sequential specification of two tracheal tip cell types by suppressing FGF signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    Extrinsic branching factors promote the elongation and migration of tubular organs. In the Drosophila tracheal system, Branchless (Drosophila FGF) stimulates the branching program by specifying tip cells that acquire motility and lead branch migration to a specific destination. Tip cells have two alternative cell fates: the terminal cell (TC), which produces long cytoplasmic extensions with intracellular lumen, and the fusion cell (FC), which mediates branch connections to form tubular networks. How Branchless controls this specification of cells with distinct shapes and behaviors is unknown. Here we report that this cell type diversification involves the modulation of FGF signaling by the zinc-finger protein Escargot (Esg), which is expressed in the FC and is essential for its specification. The dorsal branch begins elongation with a pair of tip cells with high FGF signaling. When the branch tip reaches its final destination, one of the tip cells becomes an FC and expresses Esg. FCs and TCs differ in their response to FGF: TCs are attracted by FGF, whereas FCs are repelled. Esg suppresses ERK signaling in FCs to control this differential migratory behavior. PMID:27742749

  20. Physical therapists’ treatment choices for non-specific low back pain in Florida: an electronic survey

    PubMed Central

    Ladeira, Carlos E; Samuel Cheng, M; Hill, Cheryl J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: No study has described low back pain (LBP) treatment choices among physical therapists (PTs) in the United States (US) in the new millennium. Intervention for LBP in the new millennium is largely based on evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe PTs' preferences for treating acute and subacute non-specific LBP in Florida and to compare these preferences to EBP guideline recommendations and (b) to compare outpatient musculoskeletal therapist (MSPT) choices for management of acute and subacute LBP to non-outpatient musculoskeletal therapist (NMSPT) choices. Methods: The data were collected with an electronic survey. Study participants selected treatment choices for acute and subacute LBP clinical vignettes. Results: A total of 327 PTs participated in the study, of which 128 worked in outpatient musculoskeletal settings. The most common treatment choices for acute and subacute LBP were home exercise program, exercise in the clinic, back care education, joint mobilization, ice/heat, and interferential current. The EBP adherence rate for acute LBP was 30% for MSPTs and 15% for NMSPTs. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of MSPTs and 30% of NMSPTs adhered to EBP guidelines for subacute LBP. Discussion: The EBP adherence rate for management of acute and subacute LBP was low. Spinal manipulation was underutilized for management of acute LBP, and passive therapeutic procedures were overutilized for subacute LBP. Physical Therapy schools and professional associations should reemphasize the benefits of spinal manipulation to manage non-specific acute LBP and active interventional procedures to manage subacute LBP. PMID:26109832

  1. Improving metastable impact electron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy signals by means of a modified time-of-flight separation

    SciTech Connect

    Spirkl, Florian M.; Kunz, Sebastian; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Farnbacher, Adrian N.; Schroeter, Richard; Heiz, Ulrich

    2012-01-15

    The separation of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) is usually performed by a time-of-flight (ToF) separation using pre-set ToF for both types of signal. In this work, we present a new, improved ex situ signal separation method for the separation of MIES and UPS for every single measurement. Signal separation issues due to changes of system parameters can be overcome by changing the ToF separation and therefore allowing for the application of a wider range of measuring conditions. The method also enables to identify and achieve separation of the two signals without any time consuming calibration and the use of any special material for the calibration. Furthermore, changes made to the discharge source are described that enable to operate an existing MIES/UPS source over a broader range of conditions. This allows for tuning of the yield of UV photons and metastable rare gas atoms leading to an improved signal to noise ratio. First results of this improved setup are well in agreement with spectra reported in literature and show increased resolution and higher signal intensities for both MIE and UP spectra compared to the previous, non-optimized setup.

  2. Electronic post-compensation of WDM transmission impairments using coherent detection and digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Chen, Xin; Goldfarb, Gilad; Mateo, Eduardo; Kim, Inwoong; Yaman, Fatih; Li, Guifang

    2008-01-21

    A universal post-compensation scheme for fiber impairments in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) systems is proposed based on coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Transmission of 10 x 10 Gbit/s binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals at a channel spacing of 20 GHz over 800 km dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) has been demonstrated numerically.

  3. Time-resolved photoelectron signals from bifurcating electron wavepackets propagated across conical intersection in path-branching dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    A computational scheme of energy- and geometry-dependent photoelectron signals from the dynamics near a conical intersection based on a simplified path-branching representation of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics is proposed. Taking the NO2 X / A conical intersection as an example, the results of the present scheme compared to those from previous study based on the method of full quantum vibrational wavepacket shows qualitative agreement suggesting promising application to computation in larger systems intractable to full quantum exact methods.

  4. Electronic Connection Between the Quinone and Cytochrome c Redox Pools and Its Role in Regulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration, an important bioenergetic process, relies on operation of four membranous enzymatic complexes linked functionally by mobile, freely diffusible elements: quinone molecules in the membrane and water-soluble cytochromes c in the intermembrane space. One of the mitochondrial complexes, complex III (cytochrome bc1 or ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase), provides an electronic connection between these two diffusible redox pools linking in a fully reversible manner two-electron quinone oxidation/reduction with one-electron cytochrome c reduction/oxidation. Several features of this homodimeric enzyme implicate that in addition to its well-defined function of contributing to generation of proton-motive force, cytochrome bc1 may be a physiologically important point of regulation of electron flow acting as a sensor of the redox state of mitochondria that actively responds to changes in bioenergetic conditions. These features include the following: the opposing redox reactions at quinone catalytic sites located on the opposite sides of the membrane, the inter-monomer electronic connection that functionally links four quinone binding sites of a dimer into an H-shaped electron transfer system, as well as the potential to generate superoxide and release it to the intermembrane space where it can be engaged in redox signaling pathways. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding how cytochrome bc1 may accomplish this regulatory physiological function, what is known and remains unknown about catalytic and side reactions within the quinone binding sites and electron transfers through the cofactor chains connecting those sites with the substrate redox pools. We also discuss the developed molecular mechanisms in the context of physiology of mitochondria. PMID:25540143

  5. Apoptotic Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cells and Interferon Signaling Intersect in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Helene; Citro, Alessandra; Martire, Carmela; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Accapezzato, Daniele; Piconese, Silvia; De Marzio, Paolo; Cavallari, Eugenio N; Calvo, Ludovica; Rizzo, Fabiana; Severa, Martina; Coccia, Eliana M; Grazi, Gian Luca; Di Filippo, Simona; Sidney, John; Vullo, Vincenzo; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    CD8(+) T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells represent a principal player in chronic immune activation. Here, we found that both apoptotic epitope-specific and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) T cells were mostly confined within the effector memory (EM) or terminally differentiated EM CD45RA(+) cell subsets expressing a dysfunctional T-helper 1-like signature program in chronic HCV infection. However, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells produced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 2 at the intrahepatic level significantly more than HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, despite both populations expressing high levels of programmed death 1 receptor. Contextually, only apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells correlated with both interferon-stimulated gene levels in T cells and hepatic fibrosis score. Together, these data suggest that, compared with HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells can better sustain chronic immune activation, owing to their capacity to produce tumor necrosis factor α, and exhibit greater resistance to inhibitory signals during chronic HCV infection.

  6. Shadow-cast electron microscopy of fibrinogen with antibody fragments bound to specific regions.

    PubMed Central

    Price, T M; Strong, D D; Rudee, M L; Doolittle, R F

    1981-01-01

    Specimens of human fibrinogen mixed with Fab fragments of antibodies that were specific for various portions of the fibrinogen molecule were tungsten shadow-cast and examined by electron microscopy. Typical trinodular fibrinogen molecules were observed when Fab fragments were omitted or when fragments from nonimmune sera were used. In the experimental fibrinogen-Fab preparations, a significant number of molecules were found with an extra nodule. In the case of Fab fragments from antibodies directed to fragment E, the additional nodule was attached to the central sphere of the fibrinogen molecule. Similarly, anti-fragment D preparations yielded molecules that were derivatized on the terminal spheres. Fragments from antibodies raised against a cyanogen bromide fragment of fibrinogen alpha chains (residues 241-476) also led to exclusive derivatization of the terminal domains, although in these cases the additional material was often separated discretely from the terminal sphere by a gap. These experiments confirm longstanding notions that the central domain of a trinodular fibrinogen molecule corresponds to the plasmin-derived fragment E and that the terminal spheres correspond to fragments D. Moreover, the carboxy-terminal two-thirds of alpha chains protrude from the extremities of the molecule, as had been inferred on the basis of indirect biochemical data. Images PMID:6941244

  7. Layer-specific interference with cholinergic signaling in the prefrontal cortex by smoking concentrations of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Poorthuis, Rogier B; Bloem, Bernard; Verhoog, Matthijs B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-03-13

    Adolescence is a period in which the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC) is sensitive to maladaptive changes when exposed to nicotine. Nicotine affects PFC function and repeated exposure to nicotine during adolescence impairs attention performance and impulse control during adulthood. Nicotine concentrations experienced by smokers are known to desensitize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but the impact thereof on PFC circuits is poorly understood. Here, we investigated how smoking concentrations of nicotine (100-300 nm) interfere with cholinergic signaling in the mouse PFC. nAChR desensitization depends on subunit composition. Since nAChR subunits are differentially expressed across layers of the PFC neuronal network, we hypothesized that cholinergic signaling through nAChRs across layers would suffer differentially from exposure to nicotine. Throughout the PFC, nicotine strongly desensitized responses to ACh in neurons expressing β2* nAChRs, whereas ACh responses mediated by α7 nAChRs were not hampered. The amount of desensitization of β2* nAChR currents depended on neuron type and cortical layer. β2*-mediated responses of interneurons in LII-III and LVI completely desensitized, while cholinergic responses in LV interneurons and LVI pyramidal cells showed less desensitization. This discrepancy depended on α5 subunit expression. Two-photon imaging of neuronal population activity showed that prolonged exposure to nicotine limited cholinergic signaling through β2* nAChRs to deep PFC layers where α5 subunits were expressed. Together, our results demonstrate a layer-dependent decrease in cholinergic activation of the PFC through nAChRs by nicotine. These mechanisms may be one of the first steps leading up to the pathophysiological changes associated with nicotine exposure during adolescence.

  8. Initial specification of the epibranchial placode in zebrafish embryos depends on the fibroblast growth factor signal.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Masataka; Doi, Kazunao; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Yamasu, Kyo

    2007-02-01

    In vertebrates, cranial sensory ganglia are mainly derived from ectodermal placodes, which are focal thickenings at characteristic positions in the embryonic head. Here, we provide the first description of the early development of the epibranchial placode in zebrafish embryos using sox3 as a molecular marker. By the one-somite stage, we saw a pair of single sox3-expressing domains appear lateral to the future hindbrain. The sox3 domain, which is referred to here as the early lateral placode, is segregated during the early phase of segmentation to form a pax2a-positive medial area and a pax2a-negative lateral area. The medial area subsequently developed to form the otic placode, while the lateral area was further segregated along the anteroposterior axis, giving rise to four sox3-positive subdomains by 26 hr postfertilization. Given their spatial relationship with the expression of the markers for the epibranchial ganglion, as well as their positions and temporal changes, we propose that these four domains correspond to the facial, glossopharyngeal, vagal, and posterior lateral line placodes in an anterior-to-posterior order. The expression of sox3 in the early lateral placode was absent in mutants lacking functional fgf8, while implantation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) beads restored the sox3 expression. Using SU5402, which inhibits the FGF signal, we were able to demonstrate that formation of both the early lateral domains and later epibranchial placodes depends on the FGF signal operating at the beginning of somitogenesis. Together, these data provide evidence for the essential role of FGF signals in the development of the epibranchial placodes.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Striated Muscle-Specific Gab1 Isoform as a Critical Signal Transducer for Neuregulin-1/ErbB Signaling in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Taku; Masaki, Takeshi; Arita, Yoh; Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Okazawa, Makoto; Oka, Toru; Shioyama, Wataru; Yamauchi-Takihara, Keiko; Komuro, Issei; Sakata, Yasushi; Nakaoka, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Grb2-associated binder (Gab) docking proteins regulate signals downstream of a variety of growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1), a member of epidermal growth factor family, plays a critical role for cardiomyocyte proliferation and prevention of heart failure via ErbB receptors. We previously reported that Gab1 and Gab2 in the myocardium are essential for maintenance of myocardial function in the postnatal heart via transmission of NRG-1/ErbB-signaling through analysis of Gab1/Gab2 cardiomyocyte-specific double knockout mice. In that study, we also found that there is an unknown high-molecular weight (high-MW) Gab1 isoform (120 kDa) expressed exclusively in the heart, in addition to the ubiquitously expressed low-MW (100 kDa) Gab1. However, the high-MW Gab1 has been molecularly ill-defined to date. Here, we identified the high-MW Gab1 as a striated muscle-specific isoform. The high-MW Gab1 has an extra exon encoding 27 amino acid residues between the already-known 3rd and 4th exons of the ubiquitously expressed low-MW Gab1. Expression analysis by RT-PCR and immunostaining with the antibody specific for the high-MW Gab1 demonstrate that the high-MW Gab1 isoform is exclusively expressed in striated muscle including heart and skeletal muscle. The ratio of high-MW Gab1/ total Gab1 mRNAs increased along with heart development. The high-MW Gab1 isoform in heart underwent tyrosine-phosphorylation exclusively after intravenous administration of NRG-1, among several growth factors. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of the high-MW Gab1 induces more sustained activation of AKT after stimulation with NRG-1 in cardiomyocytes compared with that of β-galactosidase. On the contrary, siRNA-mediated knockdown of the high-MW Gab1 significantly attenuated AKT activation after stimulation with NRG-1 in cardiomyocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that the striated muscle-specific high-MW isoform of Gab1 has a crucial role for NRG-1/ErbB signaling

  10. Performance of signal-to-noise ratio estimation for scanning electron microscope using autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Lim, M S; Yeap, Z X

    2016-07-01

    A new technique to quantify signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is proposed. This technique is known as autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion (ACLDR) model. To test the performance of this technique, the SEM image is corrupted with noise. The autocorrelation function of the original image and the noisy image are formed. The signal spectrum based on the autocorrelation function of image is formed. ACLDR is then used as an SNR estimator to quantify the signal spectrum of noisy image. The SNR values of the original image and the quantified image are calculated. The ACLDR is then compared with the three existing techniques, which are nearest neighbourhood, first-order linear interpolation and nearest neighbourhood combined with first-order linear interpolation. It is shown that ACLDR model is able to achieve higher accuracy in SNR estimation.

  11. Region-specific alterations of AMPA receptor phosphorylation and signaling pathways in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mark William; Lopes, Samantha Cristiane; Costa, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Eyng, Helena; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Nunes, Jean Costa; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2015-08-01

    Disturbances in glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways have been associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. However, the profile of these alterations within specific regions of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex has not yet been examined. The pilocarpine model in rodents reproduces the main features of TLE in humans. The present study aims to characterize specific alterations of the glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways in the dorsal (DH) and ventral hippocampus (VH) and temporal cortex (Ctx) of male adult Wistar rats 60 days after pilocarpine treatment (chronic period). The western blotting analyzes show a decrease of AMPA glutamate receptor subunit (GluA1)-Ser(845) phosphorylation; reduction of ERK1 and PKA activity; up-regulation of GFAP and down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 expression in the DH. In contrast, in the VH it was observed a decrease of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and JNKp54 and PKC activity. In the Ctx, only ERK1 phosphorylation/activity decreased. The level of GluA1-Ser(845) phosphorylation and PKA activity (DH) and the level of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and PKC activity (VH) appear to be correlated, respectively. These findings suggest a differential imbalance of the signaling pathways involved in the site-specific phosphorylation of AMPA receptor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we suggest that dorsal hippocampus is probably more susceptible to the impairment of glutamate uptake and gliose, since only this area displayed a significant decrease of EAAT2 and increment of GFAP. Taken together, our study suggests that specific neurochemical alterations take place in hippocampal sub regions. This approach may be valuable for understanding the onset of seizures and the alterations of neuronal excitability in specific regions and may help to establish therapeutic targets for treatment of this neuropathology.

  12. The relationship between oscillatory EEG activity and the laminar-specific BOLD signal

    PubMed Central

    Scheeringa, René; Koopmans, Peter J.; van Mourik, Tim; Jensen, Ole; Norris, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings in animals have indicated that visual cortex γ-band oscillatory activity is predominantly observed in superficial cortical layers, whereas α- and β-band activity is stronger in deep layers. These rhythms, as well as the different cortical layers, have also been closely related to feedforward and feedback streams of information. Recently, it has become possible to measure laminar activity in humans with high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI). In this study, we investigated whether these different frequency bands show a differential relation with the laminar-resolved blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal by combining data from simultaneously recorded EEG and fMRI from the early visual cortex. Our visual attention paradigm allowed us to investigate how variations in strength over trials and variations in the attention effect over subjects relate to each other in both modalities. We demonstrate that γ-band EEG power correlates positively with the superficial layers’ BOLD signal and that β-power is negatively correlated to deep layer BOLD and α-power to both deep and superficial layer BOLD. These results provide a neurophysiological basis for human laminar fMRI and link human EEG and high-resolution fMRI to systems-level neuroscience in animals. PMID:27247416

  13. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-05-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  14. Identifying ligand-specific signalling within biased responses: focus on δ opioid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, I; Audet, N; Bagheri Tudashki, H; Pineyro, G

    2015-01-01

    Opioids activate GPCRs to produce powerful analgesic actions but at the same time induce side effects and generate tolerance, which restrict their clinical use. Reducing this undesired response profile has remained a major goal of opioid research and the notion of ‘biased agonism’ is raising increasing interest as a means of separating therapeutic responses from unwanted side effects. However, to fully exploit this opportunity, it is necessary to confidently identify biased signals and evaluate which type of bias may support analgesia and which may lead to undesired effects. The development of new computational tools has made it possible to quantify ligand-dependent signalling and discriminate this component from confounders that may also yield biased responses. Here, we analyse different approaches to identify and quantify ligand-dependent bias and review different types of confounders. Focus is on δ opioid receptor ligands, which are currently viewed as promising agents for chronic pain management. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24665881

  15. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics.

    PubMed

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2016-05-24

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate - in analogy to sound - at velocities controlled by the interface's compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  16. Critical role of segment-specific packaging signals in genetic reassortment of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Essere, Boris; Yver, Matthieu; Gavazzi, Cyrille; Terrier, Olivier; Isel, Catherine; Fournier, Emilie; Giroux, Fabienne; Textoris, Julien; Julien, Thomas; Socratous, Clio; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Lina, Bruno; Marquet, Roland; Moules, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The fragmented nature of the influenza A genome allows the exchange of gene segments when two or more influenza viruses infect the same cell, but little is known about the rules underlying this process. Here, we studied genetic reassortment between the A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2, MO) virus originally isolated from human and the avian A/Finch/England/2051/91 (H5N2, EN) virus and found that this process is strongly biased. Importantly, the avian HA segment never entered the MO genetic background alone but always was accompanied by the avian PA and M fragments. Introduction of the 5′ and 3′ packaging sequences of HAMO into an otherwise HAEN backbone allowed efficient incorporation of the chimerical viral RNA (vRNA) into the MO genetic background. Furthermore, forcing the incorporation of the avian M segment or introducing five silent mutations into the human M segment was sufficient to drive coincorporation of the avian HA segment into the MO genetic background. These silent mutations also strongly affected the genotype of reassortant viruses. Taken together, our results indicate that packaging signals are crucial for genetic reassortment and that suboptimal compatibility between the vRNA packaging signals, which are detected only when vRNAs compete for packaging, limit this process. PMID:24043788

  17. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies.

  18. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    PubMed Central

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-01-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations. PMID:27216038

  19. Building Specific Signals from Frequency Chaos Game and Revealing Periodicities Using a Smoothed Fourier Analysis.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Imen; Elloumi-Oueslati, Afef; Lachiri, Zied

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the roles and functions of DNA within genomes is becoming a primary focus of genomic research. Thus, the research works are moving towards cooperation between different scientific disciplines which aims at facilitating the interpretation of genetic information. In order to characterize the DNA of living organisms, signal processing tools appear to be very suitable for such study. However, a DNA sequence must be converted into a numerical sequence before processing; which defines the concept of DNA coding. In line with this, we propose a new one dimensional model based on the chaos game representation theory called Frequency Chaos Game Signal: FCGS. Then, we perform a Smoothed Fourier Transform to enhance hidden periodicities in the C.elegans DNA sequences. Through this study, we demonstrate the performance of our coding approach in highlighting characteristic periodicities. Indeed, several periodicities are shown to be involved in the 1D spectra and the 2D spectrograms of FCGSs. To investigate further about the contribution of our method in the enhancement of characteristic spectral attributes, a comparison with a range of binary indicators is established.

  20. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  1. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    PubMed

    Perdigoto, Carolina N; Dauber, Katherine L; Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J; Zhao, Dejian; Zheng, Deyou; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  2. Primary Respiratory Chain Disease Causes Tissue-Specific Dysregulation of the Global Transcriptome and Nutrient-Sensing Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Tsukikawa, Mai; Peng, Min; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ostrovsky, Julian; McCormack, Shana; Place, Emily; Clarke, Colleen; Reiner, Gail; McCormick, Elizabeth; Rappaport, Eric; Haas, Richard; Baur, Joseph A.; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s) by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5′-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3′-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common pathogenesis

  3. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  4. A study of specific features of the electronic spectrum of quantum dots in CdSe semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. I.; Kabanov, V. F.; Gorbachev, I. A.; Glukhovskoi, E. G.

    2016-08-01

    Monolayers of CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) formed on the aqueous subphase and transferred to solid substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett method have been studied. The samples obtained were examined by transmission electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, and scanning tunnel microscopy. The structure of the QD monolayer obtained on the substrate was analyzed. Specific features of the electronic spectrum of the quantum objects formed in the samples under study were determined.

  5. Fate Specification of Neural Plate Border by Canonical Wnt Signaling and Grhl3 is Crucial for Neural Tube Closure.

    PubMed

    Kimura-Yoshida, Chiharu; Mochida, Kyoko; Ellwanger, Kristina; Niehrs, Christof; Matsuo, Isao

    2015-06-01

    During primary neurulation, the separation of a single-layered ectodermal sheet into the surface ectoderm (SE) and neural tube specifies SE and neural ectoderm (NE) cell fates. The mechanisms underlying fate specification in conjunction with neural tube closure are poorly understood. Here, by comparing expression profiles between SE and NE lineages, we observed that uncommitted progenitor cells, expressing stem cell markers, are present in the neural plate border/neural fold prior to neural tube closure. Our results also demonstrated that canonical Wnt and its antagonists, DKK1/KREMEN1, progressively specify these progenitors into SE or NE fates in accord with the progress of neural tube closure. Additionally, SE specification of the neural plate border via canonical Wnt signaling is directed by the grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) transcription factor. Thus, we propose that the fate specification of uncommitted progenitors in the neural plate border by canonical Wnt signaling and its downstream effector Grhl3 is crucial for neural tube closure. This study implicates that failure in critical genetic factors controlling fate specification of progenitor cells in the neural plate border/neural fold coordinated with neural tube closure may be potential causes of human neural tube defects.

  6. Fate Specification of Neural Plate Border by Canonical Wnt Signaling and Grhl3 is Crucial for Neural Tube Closure

    PubMed Central

    Kimura-Yoshida, Chiharu; Mochida, Kyoko; Ellwanger, Kristina; Niehrs, Christof; Matsuo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    During primary neurulation, the separation of a single-layered ectodermal sheet into the surface ectoderm (SE) and neural tube specifies SE and neural ectoderm (NE) cell fates. The mechanisms underlying fate specification in conjunction with neural tube closure are poorly understood. Here, by comparing expression profiles between SE and NE lineages, we observed that uncommitted progenitor cells, expressing stem cell markers, are present in the neural plate border/neural fold prior to neural tube closure. Our results also demonstrated that canonical Wnt and its antagonists, DKK1/KREMEN1, progressively specify these progenitors into SE or NE fates in accord with the progress of neural tube closure. Additionally, SE specification of the neural plate border via canonical Wnt signaling is directed by the grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) transcription factor. Thus, we propose that the fate specification of uncommitted progenitors in the neural plate border by canonical Wnt signaling and its downstream effector Grhl3 is crucial for neural tube closure. This study implicates that failure in critical genetic factors controlling fate specification of progenitor cells in the neural plate border/neural fold coordinated with neural tube closure may be potential causes of human neural tube defects. PMID:26288816

  7. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected cells

  8. Experimental finding on the electromagnetic information transfer of specific molecular signals mediated through the aqueous system on two human cellular models.

    PubMed

    Foletti, Alberto; Ledda, Mario; D'Emilia, Enrico; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2012-03-01

    Recently the authors reported the experimental evidence of the developing concept of Electro Magnetic Information Transfer (EMIT) of specific molecular signals directly and continuously on target cell picking up the molecular signals from the source chemical effector. This was in agreement with the pioneering work of Jaques Benveniste suggesting that the electronic transmission of the 4-phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) signals could be transferred to target neutrophils by an oscillator when coupled to two electromagnetic coils demonstrating the same biologic activity and so mimicking the biologic function of the original chemical active molecule. The present work is the further development of recent research designed to verify the hypotheses that water could record and replay the EMIT from biologic active chemical molecules. Retinoic acid, a well-known chemical differentiating agent, was placed at room temperature in the input coil connected to an oscillator (VEGA select 719), while culture medium for human neuroblastoma cell (LAN-5) and NT2/D1 stem teratocarcinoma human cells was placed into the output coil and exposed to signals for 1 hour. At the end the oscillator was switched off and LAN-5 neuroblastoma and NT2/D1 stem teratocarcinoma cells were seeded, respectively, into the medium conditioned as reported into an incubator under controlled conditions. After 5 days of incubations, cells were examined by different strategies such as morphological and biochemical parameters. It was demonstrated that the electromagnetic signals coming from the retinoic acid molecule could be recorded and stored by the aqueous system of the cell culture medium. Cells seeded in the electronically conditioned medium received physical information generating a statistically significant decrease in metabolic activity and changes in phenotypical structure with protrusion typical of differentiated neuronal cells. These experimental results provide some evidence that water could be

  9. Phosphatidylinositol (3,4) bisphosphate-specific phosphatases and effector proteins: A distinct branch of PI3K signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhao; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-09-01

    The ubiquitously expressed phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) family of lipid kinases control diverse cellular functions including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism and migration. Class I PI3Ks generate two distinct 3-phosphoinositide lipid messengers, PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and PI(3,4)P2, that recruit signaling effectors such as pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins. Historically, the function of PI3K signaling has often been attributed to PIP3, with PI(3,4)P2 considered an inconsequential byproduct of PIP3 hydrolysis by SHIP phosphatases. However, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that PI(3,4)P2 directs a distinct branch of the PI3K pathway that regulates a variety of cellular processes with relevance to health and disease, such as B cell activation and autoantibody production, insulin sensitivity, neuronal dynamics, endocytosis and cell migration. Signaling through PI(3,4)P2 can be negatively regulated by inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatases (INPP4A and INPP4B), which selectively degrade PI(3,4)P2. A number of signaling proteins that specifically bind to PI(3,4)P2 have been characterized, including the tandem PH domain-containing proteins (TAPP1 and TAPP2) and lamellipodin/RAPH1. A number of PIP3-binding proteins also bind to PI(3,4)P2, such as the protein kinase Akt/PKB, the most studied effector of PI3K signaling. Here, we review the current progress in understanding the functions and mechanisms of action of the PI(3,4)P2-specific phosphatases and binding proteins. A summary of available data addressing the relative contribution of PI(3,4)P2 versus PIP3 in regulation of Akt is provided to highlight the potential independent role of PI(3,4)P2 in regulating some PIP3-binding proteins. In summary, PI(3,4)P2-specific phosphatases and binding proteins are now firmly established players in cell biology, and this "neglected" phosphoinositide needs to take its place as one of the central components of the PI3K signaling pathway.

  10. Specificity of insulin signalling in human skeletal muscle as revealed by small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Krook, A; Zierath, J R

    2009-07-01

    Insulin action on metabolically active tissues is a complex process involving positive and negative feedback regulation to control whole body glucose homeostasis. At the cellular level, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as protein synthesis, are controlled through canonical insulin signalling cascades. The discovery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) allows for the molecular dissection of critical components of the regulation of metabolic and gene regulatory events in insulin-sensitive tissues. The application of siRNA to tissues of human origin allows for the molecular dissection of the mechanism(s) regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Penetration of the pathways controlling insulin action in human tissue may aid in discovery efforts to develop diabetes prevention and treatment strategies. This review will focus on the use of siRNA to validate critical regulators controlling insulin action in human skeletal muscle, a key organ important for the control of whole body insulin-mediated glucose uptake and metabolism.

  11. Bioluminescent signals spatially amplified by wavelength-specific diffusion through the shell of a marine snail

    PubMed Central

    Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2011-01-01

    Some living organisms produce visible light (bioluminescence) for intra- or interspecific visual communication. Here, we describe a remarkable bioluminescent adaptation in the marine snail Hinea brasiliana. This species produces a luminous display in response to mechanical stimulation caused by encounters with other motile organisms. The light is produced from discrete areas on the snail's body beneath the snail's shell, and must thus overcome this structural barrier to be viewed by an external receiver. The diffusion and transmission efficiency of the shell is greater than a commercial diffuser reference material. Most strikingly, the shell, although opaque and pigmented, selectively diffuses the blue-green wavelength of the species bioluminescence. This diffusion generates a luminous display that is enlarged relative to the original light source. This unusual shell thus allows spatially amplified outward transmission of light communication signals from the snail, while allowing the animal to remain safely inside its hard protective shell. PMID:21159673

  12. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  13. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochond