Science.gov

Sample records for specific speed centrifugal

  1. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  2. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  3. Optimization on the impeller of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump for hydraulic performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Wang, Wenjie; Yuan, Shouqi; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to widen the high-efficiency operating range of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, an optimization process for considering efficiencies under 1.0Q d and 1.4Q d is proposed. Three parameters, namely, the blade outlet width b 2, blade outlet angle β 2, and blade wrap angle φ, are selected as design variables. Impellers are generated using the optimal Latin hypercube sampling method. The pump efficiencies are calculated using the software CFX 14.5 at two operating points selected as objectives. Surrogate models are also constructed to analyze the relationship between the objectives and the design variables. Finally, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to calculate the surrogate model to determine the best combination of the impeller parameters. The results show that the performance curve predicted by numerical simulation has a good agreement with the experimental results. Compared with the efficiencies of the original impeller, the hydraulic efficiencies of the optimized impeller are increased by 4.18% and 0.62% under 1.0Q d and 1.4Q d, respectively. The comparison of inner flow between the original pump and optimized one illustrates the improvement of performance. The optimization process can provide a useful reference on performance improvement of other pumps, even on reduction of pressure fluctuations.

  4. Multi-objective optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump using an evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhao; Zhounian, Lai; Peng, Wu; Linlin, Cao; Dazhuan, Wu

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the shape optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump at the design point. The target pump has already been manually modified on the basis of empirical knowledge. A genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) with certain enhancements is adopted to improve its performance further with respect to two goals. In order to limit the number of design variables without losing geometric information, the impeller is parametrized using the Bézier curve and a B-spline. Numerical simulation based on a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent model is done in parallel to evaluate the flow field. A back-propagating neural network is constructed as a surrogate for performance prediction to save computing time, while initial samples are selected according to an orthogonal array. Then global Pareto-optimal solutions are obtained and analysed. The results manifest that unexpected flow structures, such as the secondary flow on the meridian plane, have diminished or vanished in the optimized pump.

  5. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  6. Experimental research on internal flow in impeller of a low specific speed centrifugal pump by PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. F.; Wang, Y. F.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of investigating the influence of two different impellers, one is with splitter blades and the other one is without splitter blades, on a low-specific centrifugal pump. The experimental investigation in impellers was conducted at different conditions and phases by means of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) to study the internal flow. Meanwhile, the absolute and relative velocity distributions in impellers were obtained. Experimental results show that the head value is higher in the impeller with splitter blades and both two head curves appear hump phenomena at small flow rate. The absolute velocity value increases with radius and from pressure side to suction side at the same radius gradually. The splitter blades can scour the wake, making outlet velocity distribution more uniform and improving the internal flow. The velocity distribution becomes less even in the process of closing to tongue due to reinforced interference of tongue on internal flow.

  7. Secondary Containment Design for a High Speed Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.W.

    1999-03-01

    Secondary containment for high speed rotating machinery, such as a centrifuge, is extremely important for operating personnel safety. Containment techniques can be very costly, ungainly and time consuming to construct. A novel containment concept is introduced which is fabricated out of modular sections of polycarbonate glazed into a Unistrut metal frame. A containment study for a high speed centrifuge is performed which includes the development of parameters for secondary containment design. The Unistrut/polycarbonate shield framing concept is presented including design details and proof testing procedures. The economical fabrication and modularity of the design indicates a usefulness for this shielding system in a wide variety of containment scenarios.

  8. Numerical study of a high-speed miniature centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi

    A miniature centrifugal compressor is a key component of reverse Brayton cycle cryogenic cooling system. The system is commonly used to generate a low cryogenic temperature environment for electronics to increase their efficiency, or generate, store and transport cryogenic liquids, such as liquid hydrogen and oxygen, where space limit is also an issue. Because of space limitation, the compressor is composed of a radial IGV, a radial impeller and an axial-direction diffuser (which reduces the radial size because of smaller diameter). As a result of reduction in size, rotating speed of the impeller is as high as 313,000 rpm, and Helium is used as the working fluid, in order to obtain the required static pressure ratio/rise. Two main characteristics of the compressor---miniature and high-speed, make it distinct from conventional compressors. Higher compressor efficiency is required to obtain a higher COP (coefficient of performance) system. Even though miniature centrifugal compressors start to draw researchers' attention in recent years, understanding of the performance and loss mechanism is still lacking. Since current experimental techniques are not advanced enough to capture details of flow at miniature scale, numerical methods dominate miniature turbomachinery study. This work numerically studied a high speed miniature centrifugal compressor with commercial CFD code. The overall performance of the compressor was predicted with consideration of interaction between blade rows by using sliding mesh model. The law of similarity of turbomachinery was validated for small scale machines. It was found that the specific ratio effect needs to be considered when similarity law is applied. But Reynolds number effect can be neglected. The loss mechanism of each component was analyzed. Loss due to turning bend was significant in each component. Tip leakage loss of small scale turbomachines has more impact on the impeller performance than that of large scale ones. Because the

  9. Effect of Speed (Centrifugal Load) on Gear Crack Propagation Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rotational speed (centrifugal force) on gear crack propagation direction was explored. Gears were analyzed using finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The analysis was validated with crack propagation experiments performed in a spur gear fatigue rig. The effects of speed, rim thickness, and initial crack location on gear crack propagation direction were investigated. Crack paths from the finite element method correlated well with those deduced from gear experiments. For the test gear with a backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) of nib = 0.5, cracks initiating in the tooth fillet propagated to rim fractures when run at a speed of 10,000 rpm and became tooth fractures for speeds slower than 10,000 rpm for both the experiments and anal sis. From additional analysis, speed had little effect on crack propagation direction except when initial crack locations were near the tooth/rim fracture transition point for a given backup ratio. When at that point, higher speeds tended to promote rim fracture while lower speeds (or neglecting centrifugal force) produced tooth fractures.

  10. A wireless high-speed data acquisition system for geotechnical centrifuge model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, C.; White, D. J.; Boylan, N.; Breen, J.; Brown, T.; DeCatania, S.; Hortin, P.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes a novel high-speed wireless data acquisition system (WDAS) developed at the University of Western Australia for operation onboard a geotechnical centrifuge, in an enhanced gravitational field of up to 300 times Earth's gravity. The WDAS system consists of up to eight separate miniature units distributed around the circumference of a 0.8 m diameter drum centrifuge, communicating with the control room via wireless Ethernet. Each unit is capable of powering and monitoring eight instrument channels at a sampling rate of up to 1 MHz at 16-bit resolution. The data are stored within the logging unit in solid-state memory, but may also be streamed in real-time at low frequency (up to 10 Hz) to the centrifuge control room, via wireless transmission. The high-speed logging runs continuously within a circular memory (buffer), allowing for storage of a pre-trigger segment of data prior to an event. To suit typical geotechnical modelling applications, the system can record low-speed data continuously, until a burst of high-speed acquisition is triggered when an experimental event occurs, after which the system reverts back to low-speed acquisition to monitor the aftermath of the event. Unlike PC-based data acquisition solutions, this system performs the full sequence of amplification, conditioning, digitization and storage on a single circuit board via an independent micro-controller allocated to each pair of instrumented channels. This arrangement is efficient, compact and physically robust to suit the centrifuge environment. This paper details the design specification of the WDAS along with the software interface developed to control the units. Results from a centrifuge test of a submarine landslide are used to illustrate the performance of the new WDAS.

  11. NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.; Adam, P. W.; Buggele, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor facility being built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described; its purpose is to obtain benchmark experimental data for internal flow code verification and modeling. The facility will be heavily instrumented with standard pressure and temperature probes and have provisions for flow visualization and laser Doppler velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and will be rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage for testing is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Design exit tip speed for the initial stage is 500 ft/sec with a pressure ratio of 1.17. The rotor exit backsweep is 55 deg from radial.

  12. [The analytical setting of rotary speed of centrifuge rotor and centrifugation time in chemical, biochemical and microbiological practice].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, K V

    2012-08-01

    The researchers happen to face with suspensions in their chemical, biochemical and microbiological practice. The suspensions are the disperse systems with solid dispersed phase and liquid dispersion medium and with dispersed phase particle size > 100 nm (10-7 m). Quite often the necessity occurs to separate solid particles from liquid. To use for this purpose the precipitation in gravitation field can make the process to progress too long. In this respect an effective mode is the precipitation in the field of centrifugal forces--the centrifugation. The rotary speed of centrifuge rotor and centrifugation time can be set analytically using regularities of general dynamics and hydrodynamics. To this effect, should be written and transformed the equation of First and Second Newton Laws for suspension particle being in the field of centrifugal forces and forces of resistance of liquid and vessel wall. The force of liquid resistance depends on particle motion condition in liquid. To determine the regimen the Archimedes and Reynolds numerical dimensionless criteria are to be applied. The article demonstrates the results of these transformations as analytical inverse ratio dependence of centrifugation time from rotary speed. The calculation of series of "rate-time" data permits to choose the optimal data pair on the assumption of centrifuge capacity and practical reasonability. The results of calculations are validated by actual experimental data hence the physical mathematical apparatus can be considered as effective one. The setting progress depends both from parameter (Reynolds criterion) and data series calculation. So, the most convenient way to apply this operation is the programming approach. The article proposes to use the program Microsoft Excel and VBA programming language for this purpose. The possibility to download the file from Internet to use it for fast solution is proposed. PMID:23097986

  13. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  14. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1994-02-15

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation. 4 figures.

  15. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-15

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  16. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  17. Specific Yield--Column drainage and centrifuge moisture content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.; Prill, R.C.; Morris, D.A.

    1963-01-01

    The specific yield of a rock or soil, with respect to water, is the ratio of (1) the volume of water which, after being saturated, it will yield by gravity to (2) its own volume. Specific retention represents the water retained against gravity drainage. The specific yield and retention when added together are equal to the total interconnected porosity of the rock or soil. Because specific retention is more easily determined than specific yield, most methods for obtaining yield first require the determination of specific retention. Recognizing the great need for developing improved methods of determining the specific yield of water-bearing materials, the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Department of Water Resources initiated a cooperative investigation of this subject. The major objectives of this research are (1) to review pertinent literature on specific yield and related subjects, (2) to increase basic knowledge of specific yield and rate of drainage and to determine the most practical methods of obtaining them, (3) to compare and to attempt to correlate the principal laboratory and field methods now commonly used to obtain specific yield, and (4) to obtain improved estimates of specific yield of water-bearing deposits in California. An open-file report, 'Specific yield of porous media, an annotated bibliography,' by A. I. Johnson, D. A. Morris, and R. C. Prill, was released in 1960 in partial fulfillment of the first objective. This report describes the second phase of the specific-yield study by the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Laboratory at Denver, Colo. Laboratory research on column drainage and centrifuge moisture equivalent, two methods for estimating specific retention of porous media, is summarized. In the column-drainage study, a wide variety of materials was packed into plastic columns of 1- to 8-inch diameter, wetted with Denver tap water, and drained under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The effects of cleaning the

  18. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  19. Review of the gas centrifuge until 1962. Part II: Principles of high-speed rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Stanley

    1984-01-01

    The principles of the separation physics of the gas centrifuge were described in Part I of this review. In this second section the principles involved in spinning the rotors of these centrifuges are described. Three types of rotor can be identified, depending on the ratio of length to diameter. If the rotor is very short, length-diameter ratio less than one, it is gyroscopically stable and easy to spin. If the length-diameter ratio is in the region of 4 or 5, the rotor behaves as a rigid body and is relatively easy to accelerate to speed; however, it has a tendency at full speed to exhibit gyroscopic precessions. Finally, if the length-diameter ratio is very large, the rotor becomes easy to stabilize gyroscopically, but it is difficult to get it to speed because long rotors are very flexible and have resonant frequencies of flexure lower than the operating speed. The problems of these three types of centrifuge (the rotor dynamics, the bearings used to support the rotor, and the stress analysis of the rotating components) were investigated in the last century as part of classical mechanics because of the emergence of steam turbines during the latter part of the industrial revolution. These early principles are briefly reviewed, with particular reference to the work of De Laval, who invented the principle of self-balancing, Reynolds and Evershed, who developed hydrodynamic and magnetic bearing, respectively, and Chree, who did the most extensive early work on the stress analysis of tubes and discs. The work is described as it applies to the centrifuges developed in America and Germany during the war and in the Soviet Union after the war. The work of Beams in America is described in most detail, since he and his colleagues developed all three types of centrifuge during the Manhattan Project. The other work described is that of Groth and Beyerle, who developed subcritical machines in Germany during the war, and of Steenbeck and Zippe, who helped to develop both

  20. Critical cavitation coefficient analysis of a space low specific centrifugal pump with micro gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, Y.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, C.; Wu, Y. L.

    2016-05-01

    Centrifugal pump was used in the loop as a baselined unit. The flow rate of the pump was very small, while the head was high. This space pump must work stable for a long time (more than a year), so the performance of the pump attracted public attention. The rotational speed of the impeller was limited for stability, so the pump belonged to low specific centrifugal pump. In this paper, a single-phase centrifugal pump, which was designed for single-phase fluid loops in satellites, was modeled for numerical simulation. The hydraulic region of the pump was discretized by structured mesh. Three dimensional (3-D) flow in the pump was studied by the use of computational fluid dynamics. Partially-Averaged Navier- Stokes (PANS) model based on RNG k-ε turbulence model was developed for the simulation of the unsteady flow. Velocity inlet and pressure outlet was used as the boundary conditions. Interface was used between the impeller and the casing, as well as the impeller and inlet pipe. Performances and pressure fluctuation of the pump were investigated. The dominant frequency of the pressure fluctuation is blade passing frequency at the region close to the tongue of the casing, while it is twice of blade passing frequency at the other region.

  1. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  2. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  3. CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    Damping bearings for use on the shafts of an ultracentrifuge were designed which are capable of passing through critical angular speeds. The shaft extending from one end of the rotor is journaled in fixed-plain bearings mounted on annular resilient shock-absorbing elements to dampen small vibrations. The shaft at the other end of the rotor is journaled in two damper-bearing assemblies which are so spaced on the shaft that a vibration node can at no time exist at both bearing assemblies. These bearings are similar to the other bearings except that the bearing housings are slidably mounted on the supporting structure for movement transverse to the rotational axis of the rotor.

  4. Quality evaluation of energy consumed in flow regulation method by speed variation in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, S.; Culman, M.; Acevedo, C.; Rey, C.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, energy efficiency and the Electric Power Quality are two inseparable issues in the evaluation of three-phase induction motors, framed within the program of Rational and Efficient Use of Energy (RUE).The use of efficient energy saving devices has been increasing significantly in RUE programs, for example the use of variable frequency drives (VFD) in pumping systems.The overall objective of the project was to evaluate the impact on power quality and energy efficiency in a centrifugal pump driven by an induction three-phase motor, using the flow control method of speed variation by VFD. The fundamental purpose was to test the opinions continuously heard about the use of flow control methods in centrifugal pumps, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages that have been formulated deliberately in order to offer support to the industry in taking correct decisions. The VFD changes the speed of the motor-pump system increasing efficiency compared to the classical methods of regulation. However, the VFD originates conditions that degrade the quality of the electric power supplied to the system and therefore its efficiency, due to the nonlinearity and presence of harmonic currents. It was possible to analyze the power quality, ensuring that the information that comes to the industry is generally biased.

  5. In-Situ Observation of Horizontal Centrifugal Casting using a High-Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaka, Hisao; Kawai, Kohsuke; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Shinozuka, Kei

    2012-07-01

    In order to understand the solidification process of horizontal centrifugal casting, experimental equipment for in-situ observation using transparent organic substance has been constructed. Succinonitrile-1 mass% water alloy was filled in the round glass cell and the glass cell was completely sealed. To observe the movement of equiaxed grains more clearly and to understand the effect of movement of free surface, a high-speed camera has been installed on the equipment. The most advantageous point of this equipment is that the camera rotates with mold, so that one can observe the same location of the glass cell. Because the recording rate could be increased up to 250 frames per second, the quality of movie was dramatically modified and this made easier and more precise to pursue the certain equiaxed grain. The amplitude of oscillation of equiaxed grain ( = At) decreased as the solidification proceeded.

  6. High speed stereovision setup for position and motion estimation of fertilizer particles leaving a centrifugal spreader.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Bilal; Cool, Simon; Vangeyte, Jürgen; Mertens, Koen C; Cointault, Frédéric; Paindavoine, Michel; Pieters, Jan G

    2014-01-01

    A 3D imaging technique using a high speed binocular stereovision system was developed in combination with corresponding image processing algorithms for accurate determination of the parameters of particles leaving the spinning disks of centrifugal fertilizer spreaders. Validation of the stereo-matching algorithm using a virtual 3D stereovision simulator indicated an error of less than 2 pixels for 90% of the particles. The setup was validated using the cylindrical spread pattern of an experimental spreader. A 2D correlation coefficient of 90% and a Relative Error of 27% was found between the experimental results and the (simulated) spread pattern obtained with the developed setup. In combination with a ballistic flight model, the developed image acquisition and processing algorithms can enable fast determination and evaluation of the spread pattern which can be used as a tool for spreader design and precise machine calibration.

  7. An Investigation of Surge in a High-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Using Digital PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bright, Michelle M.; Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Compressor stall is a catastrophic breakdown of the flow in a compressor, which can lead to a loss of engine power, large pressure transients in the inlet/nacelle and engine flameout. The implementation of active or passive strategies for controlling rotating stall and surge can significantly extend the stable operating range of a compressor without substantially sacrificing performance. It is crucial to identify the dynamic changes occurring in the flow field prior to rotating stall and surge in order to successfully control these events. Generally, pressure transducer measurements are made to capture the transient response of a compressor prior to rotating stall. In this investigation, Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) is used in conjunction with dynamic pressure transducers to simultaneously capture transient velocity and pressure measurements in the non-stationary flow field during compressor surge. DPIV is an instantaneous, planar measurement technique which is ideally suited for studying transient flow phenomena in high speed turbomachinery and has been used previously to successfully map the stable operating point flow field in the diffuser of a high speed centrifugal compressor. Through the acquisition of both DPIV images and transient pressure data, the time evolution of the unsteady flow during surge is revealed.

  8. Optical Flow-Field Techniques Used for Measurements in High-Speed Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The overall performance of a centrifugal compressor depends on the performance of the impeller and diffuser as well as on the interactions occurring between these components. Accurate measurements of the flow fields in each component are needed to develop computational models that can be used in compressor design codes. These measurements must be made simultaneously over an area that covers both components so that researchers can understand the interactions occurring between the two components. Optical measurement techniques are being used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the velocity fields present in both the impeller and diffuser of a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor operating at several conditions ranging from design flow to surge. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the intrablade flows present in the impeller, and the results were compared with analyses obtained from two three-dimensional viscous codes. The development of a region of low throughflow velocity fluid within this high-speed impeller was examined and compared with a similar region first observed in a large low-speed centrifugal impeller at Lewis. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a relatively new technique that has been applied to measuring the diffuser flow fields. PIV can collect data rapidly in the diffuser while avoiding the light-reflection problems that are often encountered when LDV is used. The Particle Image Velocimeter employs a sheet of pulsed laser light that is introduced into the diffuser in a quasi-radial direction through an optical probe inserted near the diffuser discharge. The light sheet is positioned such that its centerline is parallel to the hub and shroud surfaces and such that it is parallel to the diffuser vane, thereby avoiding reflections from the solid surfaces. Seed particles small enough to follow the diffuser flow are introduced into the compressor at an upstream location. A high-speed charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera is

  9. Development of the seeding system used for laser velocimeter surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Hathaway, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    An atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of seed material was developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field. The seeding system and the major concerns that were addressed during its development are described. Of primary importance were that the seed material be dispersed as single particles and that the liquid carrier used be completely evaporated before entering the compressor.

  10. The effects of the centrifugation speed on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kapı, Emin; Şirinoğlu, Hakan; Güvercin, Emre; Filinte, Gaye Taylan; Filinte, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The most important problem in fat transplantation is the durability, which is closely associated with the applied technique. This study includes the comparison of different centrifugation speeds on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in rats. Materials and methods Forty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups and the left inguinal fat pad was extracted and re-implanted under the scalp after performing appropriate preparation processes. In the first group the fatty tissue was re-implanted in en-bloc fashion and in the second group it was re-implanted after trimming. After trimming, centrifugation with a G-force of 111.8 (1000 rpm) was performed in the third group, 447.2 (2000 rpm) in the fourth group, 1006.2 (3000 rpm) in the fifth group, 1788.8 (4000 rpm) in the sixth group, and 2795 (5000 rpm) in the seventh group for 4 minutes. The fat grafts were taken after 3 months and histopathological and statistical evaluations were performed. Results The rate of viable fat grafts was significantly higher in the 4th and 5th groups comparing to the first three groups. Total weight and volume amounts of the 4th and 5th groups were also significantly higher comparing to the first three groups. Conclusion Maximal long-term durability and fat cell viability results were obtained in the groups with 2000 rpm or 447.2 G-force/4 minutes and 3000 rpm or 1006.2 G-force/4 minutes centrifugation speed, indicating that 4 minutes centrifugation with an average G-force of 698.75 or 2500 rpm provides the best results for the survival of autogenous fat grafts. PMID:26898924

  11. Measurement of rock-core capillary pressure curves using a single-speed centrifuge and one-dimensional magnetic-resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2005-06-01

    Capillary pressure curves are widely used in materials, soil, and environmental sciences, and especially in the petroleum industry. The traditional (Hassler-Brunner) interpretation of centrifugal capillary pressure data is based on several assumptions. These assumptions are known to lead to significant errors in the measurement of capillary pressure curves. In this work, we propose a new "single-shot" method to measure the capillary pressure curve of a long sedimentary rock core using a single-speed centrifuge experiment and magnetic-resonance imaging to directly determine the water saturation distribution along the length of the sample. Since only a single moderate centrifuge speed is employed, the effect of gravity can be ignored and the outlet boundary condition of the core plug was maintained. The capillary pressure curve obtained by the single-shot method is remarkably consistent with results determined with conventional mercury-intrusion methods. The proposed method is much faster and more precise than traditional centrifuge methods.

  12. Low speed centrifugal casting of Functionally Graded solid cast ingot by anomalous particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mer, K. K. S.; Ray, S.

    2011-12-01

    Functionally graded cylindrical ingot of Al-Al2O3 composite synthesized by centrifugal casting shows particle distribution and hardness decreasing radially from the outer radius to inner radius. The progressive decrease in alumina content and hardness from the outer radius towards the center may be attributed to higher centrifugal force acting on relatively denser alumina particles during rotation, as compared to that acting on lighter alloy melt. It is also observed, as one moves down from the top to the bottom of cast ingot the alumina content decreases. This is surprising in view of higher density of alumina particles relative to the melt. The particle settling should have resulted at more particles towards the bottom, but distribution observed is in contradiction.

  13. The Use of a "Qual" Centrifuge for Greatly Simplifying and Speeding the Study of Milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Quentin R.

    1996-09-01

    Laboratory study of the constituents of milk is almost always slowed by difficult separation of relatively large amounts of curd and whey by filtration. In the two-and-one-half hour experiment described, only 5 mL of skim milk is used and the curd is separated from the whey by using a simple "qual" centrifuge. Casein and serum proteins are quickly isolated as solids in essentially-quantitative yields in a procedure utilizing only two 13 x 100 mm test tubes and a 50 mL beaker along with the centrifuge and a hotplate. Protein solutions are prepared in the test tubes in which they were isolated and subjected to a variety of classical tests, the most dramatic of which is the Hopkins-Cole test which shows the presence of tryptophan in casein and its absence in serum protein. An essentially-quantitative yield of solid lactose is obtained by evaporation of the supernatant liquid obtained from the serum protein centrifugation. A lactose solution is subjected to Benedict's and Barfoed's tests, identifying it as a disaccharide. Sufficient time is available to compare the fat and enzyme contents of raw milk and skim milk.

  14. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  15. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction of the 3-D turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation for high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modelling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  16. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Three-Dimensional Rotor Flow Field in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    A laser anemometer system was used to provide detailed surveys of the three-dimensional velocity field within the NASA low-speed centrifugal impeller operating with a vaneless diffuser. Both laser anemometer and aerodynamic performance data were acquired at the design flow rate and at a lower flow rate. Floor path coordinates, detailed blade geometry, and pneumatic probe survey results are presented in tabular form. The laser anemometer data are presented in the form of pitchwise distributions of axial, radial, and relative tangential velocity on blade-to-blade stream surfaces at 5-percent-of-span increments, starting at 95-percent-of-span from the hub. The laser anemometer data are also presented as contour and wire-frame plots of throughflow velocity and vector plots of secondary velocities at all measurement stations through the impeller.

  17. PIV measurement of internal flow characteristics of very low specific speed semi-open impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.-D.; Nishino, K.; Kurokawa, J.; Matsui, J.

    2004-11-01

    Detailed particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow fields inside semi-open impellers have been performed to understand better the internal flow patterns that are responsible for the unique performance of these centrifugal pumps operated in the range of very low specific speed. Two impellers, one equipped with six radial blades (impeller A) and the other with four conventional backward-swept blades (impeller B), are tested in a centrifugal pump designed to be operated at a non-dimensional specific speed of ns=0.24. Complex flow patterns captured by PIV are discussed in conjunction with the overall pump performance measured separately. It is revealed that impeller A achieves higher effective head than impeller B even though the flow patterns in impeller A are more complex, exhibiting secondary flows and reverse flows in the impeller passage. It is shown that both the localized strong outward flow at the pressure side of each blade outlet and the strong outward through-flow along the suction side of each blade are responsible for the better head performance of impeller A.

  18. High-speed, high-purity separation of gold nanoparticle-DNA origami constructs using centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung Hyeon; Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Patrone, Paul N; Stavis, Samuel M; Starr, Francis W; Douglas, Jack F; Liddle, J Alexander

    2014-10-01

    DNA origami is a powerful platform for assembling gold nanoparticle constructs, an important class of nanostructure with numerous applications. Such constructs are assembled by the association of complementary DNA oligomers. These association reactions have yields of <100%, requiring the development of methods to purify the desired product. We study the performance of centrifugation as a separation approach by combining optical and hydrodynamic measurements and computations. We demonstrate that bench-top microcentrifugation is a simple and efficient method of separating the reaction products, readily achieving purities of >90%. The gold nanoparticles play a number of critical roles in our system, functioning not only as integral components of the purified products, but also as hydrodynamic separators and optical indicators of the reaction products during the purification process. We find that separation resolution is ultimately limited by the polydispersity in the mass of the gold nanoparticles and by structural distortions of DNA origami induced by the gold nanoparticles. Our study establishes a methodology for determining the design rules for nanomanufacturing DNA origami-nanoparticle constructs.

  19. An investigational study of minimum rotational pump speed to avoid retrograde flow in three centrifugal blood pumps in a pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joseph B; Guan, Yulong; McCoach, Robert; Kunselman, Allen R; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2011-05-01

    During extracorporeal life support with centrifugal blood pumps, retrograde pump flow may occur when the pump revolutions decrease below a critical value determined by the circuit resistance and the characteristics of the pump. We created a laboratory model to evaluate the occurrence of retrograde flow in each of three centrifugal blood pumps: the Rotaflow, the CentriMag, and the Bio-Medicus BP-50. At simulated patient pressures of 60, 80, and 100 mmHg, each pump was evaluated at speeds from 1000 to 2200 rpm and flow rates were measured. Retrograde flow occurred at low revolution speeds in all three centrifugal pumps. The Bio-Medicus pump was the least likely to demonstrate retrograde flow at low speeds, followed by the Rotaflow pump. The CentriMag pump showed the earliest transition to retrograde flow, as well as the highest degree of retrograde flow. At every pump speed evaluated, the Bio-Medicus pump delivered the highest antegrade flow and the CentriMag pump delivered the least.

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  4. Novel speed test for evaluation of badminton-specific movements.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian M; Karlsen, Anders; Nybo, Lars

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we developed a novel badminton-specific speed test (BST). The test was designed to mimic match play. The test starts in the center of the court and consists of 5 maximal actions to sensors located in each of the 4 corners of the court. The 20 actions are performed in randomized order as dictated by computer screen shots displayed 1 second after completion of the previous action. We assessed day-to-day variation in elite players, and specificity of the test was evaluated by comparing 30-m sprint performance and time to complete the BST in 20 elite players, 21 skilled players, and 20 age-matched physical active subjects (non-badminton players). Sprint performance was similar across groups, whereas the elite players were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) faster in the BST (total test time: 32.3 ± 1.1 seconds; average: 1.6 seconds per action) than the skilled (34.1 ± 2.0 seconds) and non-badminton players (35.7 ± 1.7 seconds). Day-to-day coefficient of variation (CV) of the BST was 0.7% for the elite players, whereas CV for repeated tests on the same day was 1.7% for elite, 2.6% for skilled, and 2.5% for non-badminton players. On this basis, we suggest that the BST may be valuable for evaluation of short-term maximal movement speed in badminton players. Thus, the BST seems to be sport specific, as it may discriminate between groups (elite, less trained players, and non-badminton players) with similar sprinting performance, and the low test-retest variation may allow for using the BST to evaluate longitudinal changes, for example, training effects or seasonal variations.

  5. Fluid forces on rotating centrifugal impeller with whirling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, H.; Ohashi, H.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller, whose rotating axis whirls with a constant speed, were calculated by using unsteady potential theory. Calculations were performed for various values of whirl speed, number of impeller blades and angle of blades. Specific examples as well as significant results are given.

  6. Correlations between adolescent processing speed and specific spindle frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Rebecca S.; Smith, Carlyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are waxing and waning thalamocortical oscillations with accepted frequencies of between 11 and 16 Hz and a minimum duration of 0.5 s. Our research has suggested that there is spindle activity in all of the sleep stages, and thus for the present analysis we examined the link between spindle activity (Stage 2, rapid eye movement (REM) and slow wave sleep (SWS)) and waking cognitive abilities in 32 healthy adolescents. After software was used to filter frequencies outside the desired range, slow spindles (11.00–13.50 Hz), fast spindles (13.51–16.00 Hz) and spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) were observed in Stage 2, SWS and REM sleep. Our analysis suggests that these specific EEG frequencies were significantly related to processing speed, which is one of the subscales of the intelligence score, in adolescents. The relationship was prominent in SWS and REM sleep. Further, the spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) that occurred during SWS was strongly related to processing speed. Results suggest that the ability of adolescents to respond to tasks in an accurate, efficient and timely manner is related to their sleep quality. These findings support earlier research reporting relationships between learning, learning potential and sleep spindle activity in adults and adolescents. PMID:25709575

  7. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  8. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Huo, Y. W.; Pan, Z. B.; Zhou, W. C.; He, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  10. Development of the Seeding System Used for Laser Velocimeter Surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.; Hathaway, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Consideration is given to an atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of polystyrene latex (PSL) seed material developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Compressor flow field. Complete evaporation of the liquid carrier before the flow entering the compressor was of primary concern for the seeder system design. It is argued that the seed nozzle should incorporate a needle valve that can mechanically dislodge accumulated PSL seed material when the nozzle is turned off. Water is less expensive as the liquid carrier and should be used whenever adequate residence times are available to ensure complete evaporation. PSL agglomerates over time and needs to be mixed or blended before use. Arrangement of the spray nozzles needs to be adjustable to provide maximum seeding at the laser probe volume.

  11. Isolation of α-Amylase Inhibitors from Kadsura longipedunculata Using a High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography Target Guided by Centrifugal Ultrafiltration with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yin; Xiao, Aiping; Chen, Xiaoqing; Liu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) separation method target guided by centrifugal ultrafiltration with high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (CU-LC-MS) was proposed. This method was used to analyze α-amylase inhibitors from Kadsura longipedunculata extract. According to previous screening with CU-LC-MS, two screened potential α-amylase inhibitors was successfully isolated from Kadsura longipedunculata extract using HSCCC under the optimized experimental conditions. The isolated two target compounds (with purities of 92.3% and 94.6%) were, respectively, identified as quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) based on the MS, UV, and ¹H-NMR spectrometry data. To verify the inhibition of screened compounds, the inhibitory activities of quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) on α-amylase were tested, and it demonstrated that the experimental IC50 values of quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) were 28.8 and 12.5 μmol/L. These results proved that the hyphenated technique using CU-LC-MS and HSCCC was a rapid, competent, and reproductive method to screen and separate potential active compounds, like enzyme inhibitors from the extract of herbal medicines.

  12. Isolation of α-Amylase Inhibitors from Kadsura longipedunculata Using a High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography Target Guided by Centrifugal Ultrafiltration with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yin; Xiao, Aiping; Chen, Xiaoqing; Liu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) separation method target guided by centrifugal ultrafiltration with high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (CU-LC-MS) was proposed. This method was used to analyze α-amylase inhibitors from Kadsura longipedunculata extract. According to previous screening with CU-LC-MS, two screened potential α-amylase inhibitors was successfully isolated from Kadsura longipedunculata extract using HSCCC under the optimized experimental conditions. The isolated two target compounds (with purities of 92.3% and 94.6%) were, respectively, identified as quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) based on the MS, UV, and ¹H-NMR spectrometry data. To verify the inhibition of screened compounds, the inhibitory activities of quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) on α-amylase were tested, and it demonstrated that the experimental IC50 values of quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and protocatechuic acid (2) were 28.8 and 12.5 μmol/L. These results proved that the hyphenated technique using CU-LC-MS and HSCCC was a rapid, competent, and reproductive method to screen and separate potential active compounds, like enzyme inhibitors from the extract of herbal medicines. PMID:27617987

  13. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  14. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  15. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system field data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.

  16. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  17. A step in embryonic axis specification in Xenopus laevis is simulated by cytoplasmic displacements elicited by gravity and centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Steven D.

    Determination of the body pattern in Xenopus embryos is known to involve at least six steps. One of these steps can be experimentally simulated by inclining the fertilized egg with respect to gravity or centrifugal force (10-30 g × 4 min, directed 90° to the animal-vegetal axis). In these eggs, the dorsal structures of the body axis form from the side of the egg that was uppermost in the gravitational or centrifugal field. This topography is seen even if the sperm entry point side (the prospective ventral side in control eggs) was uppermost. In addition, conjoined twin embryos form at very high frequencies in response to certain conditions of single or double centrifugation. Cytological analysis shows that the dorsal structures invariably form from the side(s) of the egg away from which vegetal cytoplasm was displaced. This is similar to the situation in the unperturbed egg, where the subcortical cytoplasm of the vegetal hemisphere rotates some 30° relative to the surface, and the dorsal structures form from the side of the egg away from which the subcortical cytoplasm moved. The displacements elicited by centrifugation probably substitute for the normal displacements brought about by the subcortical rotation. These and other data suggest that the subcortical rotation is a crucial step in the process of axis determination. The subcortical rotation is an autonomous activity of the activated egg, and can displace cytoplasm against gravity. I believe that the subcortical rotation will function normally at microgravity, and I expect that overall development and axis polarity at microgravity will be normal. This will be tested in spaceflight.

  18. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  19. Rotational speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on rotational speed control are presented. The Centrifuge Facility Systems Study - 2.5 m centrifuge is shown. A life sciences centrifuge is scheduled to fly aboard Space Station Freedom. Live animal and plant specimens will be carried on the rotor and compared with microgravity specimens in racks.

  20. Changing the demand on specific muscle groups affects the walk-run transition speed.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jamie L; Kram, Rodger

    2008-04-01

    It has been proposed that muscle-specific factors trigger the human walk-run transition. We investigated if changing the demand on trigger muscles alters the preferred walk-run transition speed. We hypothesized that (1) reducing the demand on trigger muscles would increase the transition speed and (2) increasing the demand on trigger muscles would decrease the transition speed. We first determined the normal preferred walk-run transition speed (PTS) using a step-wise protocol with a randomized speed order. We then determined PTS while subjects walked with external devices that decreased or increased the demand on specific muscle groups. We concurrently measured the electromyographic activity of five leg muscles (tibialis anterior, soleus, rectus femoris, medial and lateral gastrocnemius) at each speed and condition. For this study, we developed a dorsiflexor assist device that aids the dorsiflexor muscles. A leg swing assist device applied forward pulling forces at the feet thus aiding the hip flexors during swing. A third device applied a horizontal force near the center of mass, which impedes or aids forward progression thus overloading or unloading the plantarflexor muscles. We found that when demand was decreased in the muscles measured, the PTS significantly increased. Conversely, when muscle demand was increased in the plantar flexors, the PTS decreased. However, combining assistive devices did not produce an even faster PTS. We conclude that altering the demand on specific muscles can change the preferred walk-run transition speed. However, the lack of a summation effect with multiple external devices, suggests that another underlying factor ultimately determines the preferred walk-run transition speed.

  1. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Particles leving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E x B drift. This effect which we refer to as 'centrifugal trapping' appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E x B drift speed) plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  2. Can reading-specific training stimuli improve the effect of perceptual learning on peripheral reading speed?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jean-Baptiste; Arunkumar, Amit; Chung, Susana T L

    2012-08-01

    In a previous study, Chung, Legge, and Cheung (2004) showed that training using repeated presentation of trigrams (sequences of three random letters) resulted in an increase in the size of the visual span (number of letters recognized in a glance) and reading speed in the normal periphery. In this study, we asked whether we could optimize the benefit of trigram training on reading speed by using trigrams more specific to the reading task (i.e., trigrams frequently used in the English language) and presenting them according to their frequencies of occurrence in normal English usage and observers' performance. Averaged across seven observers, our training paradigm (4 days of training) increased the size of the visual span by 6.44 bits, with an accompanied 63.6% increase in the maximum reading speed, compared with the values before training. However, these benefits were not statistically different from those of Chung, Legge, and Cheung (2004) using a random-trigram training paradigm. Our findings confirm the possibility of increasing the size of the visual span and reading speed in the normal periphery with perceptual learning, and suggest that the benefits of training on letter recognition and maximum reading speed may not be linked to the types of letter strings presented during training.

  3. Assessing specific deterrence effects of increased speeding penalties using four measures of recidivism.

    PubMed

    Watson, B; Siskind, V; Fleiter, J J; Watson, A; Soole, D

    2015-11-01

    Traffic law enforcement sanctions can impact on road user behaviour through general and specific deterrence mechanisms. The manner in which specific deterrence can influence recidivist behaviour can be conceptualised in different ways. While any reduction in speeding will have road safety benefits, the ways in which a 'reduction' is determined deserves greater methodological attention and has implications for countermeasure evaluation more generally. The primary aim of this research was to assess the specific deterrent impact of penalty increases for speeding offences in Queensland, Australia, in 2003 on two cohorts of drivers detected for speeding prior to and after the penalty changes were investigated. Since the literature is relatively silent on how to assess recidivism in the speeding context, the secondary research aim was to contribute to the literature regarding ways to conceptualise and measure specific deterrence in the speeding context. We propose a novel way of operationalising four measures which reflect different ways in which a specific deterrence effect could be conceptualised: (1) the proportion of offenders who re-offended in the follow up period; (2) the overall frequency of re-offending in the follow up period; (3) the length of delay to re-offence among those who re-offended; and (4) the average number of re-offences during the follow up period among those who re-offended. Consistent with expectations, results suggested an absolute deterrent effect of penalty changes, as evidenced by significant reductions in the proportion of drivers who re-offended and the overall frequency of re-offending, although effect sizes were small. Contrary to expectations, however, there was no evidence of a marginal specific deterrent effect among those who re-offended, with a significant reduction in the length of time to re-offence and no significant change in the average number of offences committed. Additional exploratory analyses investigating potential

  4. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  5. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  6. Experiences with the hydraulic design of the high specific speed Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovsky, J.; Zouhar, J.

    2014-03-01

    The high specific speed Francis turbine is still suitable alternative for refurbishment of older hydro power plants with lower heads and worse cavitation conditions. In the paper the design process of such kind of turbine together with the results comparison of homological model tests performed in hydraulic laboratory of ČKD Blansko Engineering is introduced. The turbine runner was designed using the optimization algorithm and considering the high specific speed hydraulic profile. It means that hydraulic profiles of the spiral case, the distributor and the draft tube were used from a Kaplan turbine. The optimization was done as the automatic cycle and was based on a simplex optimization method as well as on a genetic algorithm. The number of blades is shown as the parameter which changes the resulting specific speed of the turbine between ns=425 to 455 together with the cavitation characteristics. Minimizing of cavitation on the blade surface as well as on the inlet edge of the runner blade was taken into account during the design process. The results of CFD analyses as well as the model tests are mentioned in the paper.

  7. X-ray microtomography analysis of soil structure deformation caused by centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Leuther, F.; Vogler, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugation provides a fast method to measure soil water retention curves over a wide moisture range. However, deformation of soil structure may occur at high rotation speed in the centrifuge. These changes in soil structure were analyzed with X-ray microtomography. A detailed analysis of the pore space reveals an interplay between shrinkage due to drying and soil compaction due to compression. While volume changes due to swelling clay minerals are immanent to any drying process, the compaction of soil is a specific drawback of the centrifugation method. A new protocol for digital volume correlation was developed to analyze the spatial heterogeneity of deformation. The displacement of soil constituents is highest in the top part of the sample and exhibits high lateral variability explained by the spatial distribution of macropores in the sample. Centrifugation should therefore only be applied after the completion all other hydraulic or thermal experiments, or any other analysis that depends on the integrity of soil structure.

  8. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  9. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-04-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  10. Gender-specific influences of balance, speed, and power on agility performance.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Damir; Spasic, Miodrag; Mirkov, Dragan; Cavar, Mile; Sattler, Tine

    2013-03-01

    The quick change of direction (i.e., agility) is an important athletic ability in numerous sports. Because of the diverse and therefore hardly predictable manifestations of agility in sports, studies noted that the improvement in speed, power, and balance should result in an improvement of agility. However, there is evident lack of data regarding the influence of potential predictors on different agility manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-specific influence of speed, power, and balance on different agility tests. A total of 32 college-aged male athletes and 31 college-aged female athletes (age 20.02 ± 1.89 years) participated in this study. The subjects were mostly involved in team sports (soccer, team handball, basketball, and volleyball; 80% of men, and 75% of women), martial arts, gymnastics, and dance. Anthropometric variables consisted of body height, body weight, and the body mass index. Five agility tests were used: a t-test (T-TEST), zig-zag test, 20-yard shuttle test, agility test with a 180-degree turn, and forward-backward running agility test (FWDBWD). Other tests included 1 jumping ability power test (squat jump, SQJ), 2 balance tests to determine the overall stability index and an overall limit of stability score (both measured by Biodex Balance System), and 2 running speed tests using a straight sprint for 10 and 20 m (S10 and S20, respectively). A reliability analysis showed that all the agility tests were reliable. Multiple regression and correlation analysis found speed and power (among women), and balance (among men), as most significant predictors of agility. The highest Pearson's correlation in both genders is found between the results of the FWDBWD and S10M tests (0.77 and 0.81 for men and women, respectively; p < 0.05). Power, measured using the SQJ, is significantly (p < 0.05) related to FWDBWD and T-TEST results but only for women (-0.44; -0.41). The balance measures were significantly related to the agility

  11. Advanced centrifugal contactor development

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Ladd, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), compact centrifugal contactors were designed and prototypes were built for the Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) facility. These contactors were designed for a nominal throughput of 0.1 metric tons of heavy metal per day. While construction of BRET has been put on indefinite hold, development of the 5.5-cm-diam rotor centrifugal contactors has advanced due to their broad applicability in other areas of reprocessing. Development has been concentrated in three areas: (1) mass transfers, (2) hydraulics, and (3) fabrication. Mass transfer development has involved determining how the stage efficiency is affected by the rotor speed, phase ratio, and feed flow rate. Hydraulic efforts have focused on the cascade operation with individual stage failures. Fabrication development has resulted in reducing the number of rotor components from seven to four. This paper discusses the results of these development efforts. 20 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  13. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  14. Visual tracking speed is related to basketball-specific measures of performance in NBA players.

    PubMed

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Wells, Adam J; Gonzalez, Adam M; Rogowski, Joseph P; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Beyer, Kyle S; Bohner, Jonathan D; Pruna, Gabriel J; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between visual tracking speed (VTS) and reaction time (RT) on basketball-specific measures of performance. Twelve professional basketball players were tested before the 2012-13 season. Visual tracking speed was obtained from 1 core session (20 trials) of the multiple object tracking test, whereas RT was measured by fixed- and variable-region choice reaction tests, using a light-based testing device. Performance in VTS and RT was compared with basketball-specific measures of performance (assists [AST]; turnovers [TO]; assist-to-turnover ratio [AST/TO]; steals [STL]) during the regular basketball season. All performance measures were reported per 100 minutes played. Performance differences between backcourt (guards; n = 5) and frontcourt (forward/centers; n = 7) positions were also examined. Relationships were most likely present between VTS and AST (r = 0.78; p < 0.003), STL (r = 0.77; p < 0.003), and AST/TO (r = 0.78; p < 0.003), whereas a likely relationship was also observed with TO (r = 0.49; p < 0.109). Reaction time was not related to any of the basketball-specific performance measures. Backcourt players were most likely to outperform frontcourt players in AST and very likely to do so for VTS, TO, and AST/TO. In conclusion, VTS seems to be related to a basketball player's ability to see and respond to various stimuli on the basketball court that results in more positive plays as reflected by greater number of AST and STL and lower turnovers.

  15. Visual tracking speed is related to basketball-specific measures of performance in NBA players.

    PubMed

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Wells, Adam J; Gonzalez, Adam M; Rogowski, Joseph P; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Beyer, Kyle S; Bohner, Jonathan D; Pruna, Gabriel J; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between visual tracking speed (VTS) and reaction time (RT) on basketball-specific measures of performance. Twelve professional basketball players were tested before the 2012-13 season. Visual tracking speed was obtained from 1 core session (20 trials) of the multiple object tracking test, whereas RT was measured by fixed- and variable-region choice reaction tests, using a light-based testing device. Performance in VTS and RT was compared with basketball-specific measures of performance (assists [AST]; turnovers [TO]; assist-to-turnover ratio [AST/TO]; steals [STL]) during the regular basketball season. All performance measures were reported per 100 minutes played. Performance differences between backcourt (guards; n = 5) and frontcourt (forward/centers; n = 7) positions were also examined. Relationships were most likely present between VTS and AST (r = 0.78; p < 0.003), STL (r = 0.77; p < 0.003), and AST/TO (r = 0.78; p < 0.003), whereas a likely relationship was also observed with TO (r = 0.49; p < 0.109). Reaction time was not related to any of the basketball-specific performance measures. Backcourt players were most likely to outperform frontcourt players in AST and very likely to do so for VTS, TO, and AST/TO. In conclusion, VTS seems to be related to a basketball player's ability to see and respond to various stimuli on the basketball court that results in more positive plays as reflected by greater number of AST and STL and lower turnovers. PMID:24875429

  16. Vortex design of a diagonal flow impeller with high specific speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Sumio; Sasaki, Kazuto; Inoue, Masahiro

    1986-09-01

    The 'vortex design' method applied to an axial flow compressor stage has been extended to a diagonal flow impeller with high specific speed. For a given type of vortex flow, the through flow problem is solved by the streamline curvature method, and a blade element is determined on the basis of this solution. However, for any vortex type except free vortex, the exit flow condition changes due to a secondary flow induced by vortices shed from the trailing edges. The given vortex type can be obtained by correcting this effect with a so-called secondary flow theory.The validity of this method has been examined in experiments on three kinds of vortex flows: free vortex type, and constant tangential velocity types with or without correction of the secondary flow effects.

  17. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl- KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested.

  18. Active pneumatic control of centrifugal microfluidic flows for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Clime, Liviu; Brassard, Daniel; Geissler, Matthias; Veres, Teodor

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports a novel method of controlling liquid motion on a centrifugal microfluidic platform based on the integration of a regulated pressure pump and a programmable electromechanical valving system. We demonstrate accurate control over the displacement of liquids within the system by pressurizing simultaneously multiple ports of the microfluidic device while the platform is rotating at high speed. Compared to classical centrifugal microfluidic platforms where liquids are solely driven by centrifugal and capillary forces, the method presented herein adds a new degree of freedom for fluidic manipulation, which represents a paradigm change in centrifugal microfluidics. We first demonstrate how various core microfluidic functions such as valving, switching, and reverse pumping (i.e., against the centrifugal field) can be easily achieved by programming the pressures applied at dedicated access ports of the microfluidic device. We then show, for the first time, that the combination of centrifugal force and active pneumatic pumping offers the possibility of mixing fluids rapidly (~0.1 s) and efficiently based on the creation of air bubbles at the bottom of a microfluidic reservoir. Finally, the suitability of the developed platform for performing complex bioanalytical assays in an automated fashion is demonstrated in a DNA harvesting experiment where recovery rates of about 70% were systematically achieved. The proposed concept offers the interesting prospect to decouple basic microfluidic functions from specific material properties, channel dimensions and fabrication tolerances, surface treatments, or on-chip active components, thus promoting integration of complex assays on simple and low-cost microfluidic cartridges.

  19. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  20. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  1. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  2. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  3. Optimization of Centrifugal Pump Characteristic Dimensions for Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Rezaienia, Mohammad A; Paul, Gordon M; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin T; Mozafari, Sahand

    2016-01-01

    The application of artificial mechanical pumps as heart assist devices impose power and size limitations on the pumping mechanism, and therefore requires careful optimization of pump characteristics. Typically new pumps are designed by relying on the performance of other previously designed pumps of known performance using concepts of fluid dynamic similarity. Such data are readily available for industrial pumps, which operate in Reynolds numbers region of 10. Heart assist pumps operate in Reynolds numbers of 10. There are few data available for the design of centrifugal pumps in this characteristic range. This article develops specific speed versus specific diameter graphs suitable for the design and optimization of these smaller centrifugal pumps concentrating in dimensions suitable for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. A combination of experimental and numerical techniques was used to measure and analyze the performance of 100 optimized pumps designed for this application. The data are presented in the traditional Cordier diagram of nondimensional specific speed versus specific diameter. Using these data, nine efficient designs were selected to be manufactured and tested in different operating conditions of flow, pressure, and rotational speed. The nondimensional results presented in this article enable preliminary design of centrifugal pumps for VADs and MCS devices. PMID:27258221

  4. Optimization of Centrifugal Pump Characteristic Dimensions for Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Rezaienia, Mohammad A; Paul, Gordon M; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin T; Mozafari, Sahand

    2016-01-01

    The application of artificial mechanical pumps as heart assist devices impose power and size limitations on the pumping mechanism, and therefore requires careful optimization of pump characteristics. Typically new pumps are designed by relying on the performance of other previously designed pumps of known performance using concepts of fluid dynamic similarity. Such data are readily available for industrial pumps, which operate in Reynolds numbers region of 10. Heart assist pumps operate in Reynolds numbers of 10. There are few data available for the design of centrifugal pumps in this characteristic range. This article develops specific speed versus specific diameter graphs suitable for the design and optimization of these smaller centrifugal pumps concentrating in dimensions suitable for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. A combination of experimental and numerical techniques was used to measure and analyze the performance of 100 optimized pumps designed for this application. The data are presented in the traditional Cordier diagram of nondimensional specific speed versus specific diameter. Using these data, nine efficient designs were selected to be manufactured and tested in different operating conditions of flow, pressure, and rotational speed. The nondimensional results presented in this article enable preliminary design of centrifugal pumps for VADs and MCS devices.

  5. Centrifugal innervation of the mammalian olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Shinji; Yamamoto, Noboru

    2008-12-01

    Although it has been known for decades that the mammalian olfactory bulb receives a substantial number of centrifugal inputs from other regions of the brain, relatively few data have been available on the function of the centrifugal olfactory system. Knowing the role of the centrifugal projection and how it works is of critical importance to fully understanding olfaction. The centrifugal fibers can be classified into two groups, a group that release neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin, or acetylcholine, and a group originating in the olfactory cortex. Accumulating evidence suggests that centrifugal neuromodulatory inputs are associated with acquisition of odor memory. Because the distribution of the terminals on these fibers is diffuse and widespread, the neuromodulatory inputs must affect diverse subsets of bulbar neurons at the same time. In contrast, knowledge of the role of centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortical areas is limited. Judging from recent morphological evidence, these fibers may modify the activity of neurons located in sparse and discrete loci in the olfactory bulb. Given the modular organization of the olfactory bulb, centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortex may help coordinate the activities of restricted subsets of neurons belonging to distinct functional modules in an odor-specific manner. Because the olfactory cortex receives inputs from limbic and neocortical areas in addition to inputs from the bulb, the centrifugal inputs from the cortex can modulate odor processing in the bulb in response to non-olfactory as well as olfactory cues.

  6. Naming Speed as a Clinical Marker in Predicting Basic Calculation Skills in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleemans, Tijs; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of naming speed in predicting the basic calculation skills (i.e., addition and subtraction) of kindergartners with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), when compared to a group of Normal Language Achieving (NLA) children. Fifty-three kindergartners with SLI and 107 kindergartners with NLA were tested on…

  7. Increasing reading speed by using colours: issues concerning reliability and specificity, and their theoretical and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Arnold J; Sihra, Nirmal; Myers, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    By using techniques for precision ophthalmic tinting, individuals who report perceptual distortion of text can often find a colour of illumination that eliminates the distortions and increases reading speed. Most individuals choose green or blue hues, but there is considerable variability. We investigated how specific the colour has to be to obtain optimal reading speed. Individuals who habitually wear coloured filters for reading were asked to read text illuminated by coloured light (without using their filters). Reading speed was measured repeatedly with light of different colours. The colour (chromaticity) at which reading was fastest was consistent from one test session to the next. It was different from one individual to another, but highly specific for each individual: departures of colour from optimum by about 6 JNDs eliminated most of the speed advantage conferred by the optimal colour. It was difficult to attribute the consistency and specificity simply to familiarity with the tint or immediate memory for the colour of illumination. A consecutive sample of 1000 tint prescriptions was analysed numerically. For most prescriptions the variation in chromaticity with different types of lighting was not such as to remove all the potential benefit of the tint, as judged from a model of the effect of chromaticity on reading speed. The exceptions were the few tints that were weakly saturated or purple in colour. Across participants, reading speed was not consistently related to the scotopic energy, to the energy captured by any cone class, or to opponent colour processes. The reading was generally slowest with white light, and not with the colour complementary to the optimum. Explanations in terms of magnocellular deficits and cortical hyperexcitability are briefly discussed.

  8. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  9. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  10. Cognitive Risk Factors for Specific Learning Disorder: Processing Speed, Temporal Processing, and Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Moll, Kristina; Göbel, Silke M; Gooch, Debbie; Landerl, Karin; Snowling, Margaret J

    2016-01-01

    High comorbidity rates between reading disorder (RD) and mathematics disorder (MD) indicate that, although the cognitive core deficits underlying these disorders are distinct, additional domain-general risk factors might be shared between the disorders. Three domain-general cognitive abilities were investigated in children with RD and MD: processing speed, temporal processing, and working memory. Since attention problems frequently co-occur with learning disorders, the study examined whether these three factors, which are known to be associated with attention problems, account for the comorbidity between these disorders. The sample comprised 99 primary school children in four groups: children with RD, children with MD, children with both disorders (RD+MD), and typically developing children (TD controls). Measures of processing speed, temporal processing, and memory were analyzed in a series of ANCOVAs including attention ratings as covariate. All three risk factors were associated with poor attention. After controlling for attention, associations with RD and MD differed: Although deficits in verbal memory were associated with both RD and MD, reduced processing speed was related to RD, but not MD; and the association with RD was restricted to processing speed for familiar nameable symbols. In contrast, impairments in temporal processing and visuospatial memory were associated with MD, but not RD. PMID:25124507

  11. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  12. System analysis of plasma centrifuges and sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    System analyses of cylindrical plasma centrifuges are presented, for which the velocity field and electromagnetic fields are calculated. The effects of different electrode geometrics, induced magnetic fields, Hall-effect, and secondary flows are discussed. It is shown that speeds of 10000 m/sec can be achieved in plasma centrifuges, and that an efficient separation of U238 and U235 in uranium plasmas is feasible. The external boundary-value problem for the deposition of sputtering products is reduced to a Fredholm integral equation, which is solved analytically by means of the method of successive approximations.

  13. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  14. Small centrifugal pumps for low-thrust rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Six small, low specific speed centrifugal pump configurations were designed, fabricated, and tested. The configurations included shrouded, and 25 and 100% admission open face impellers with 2 inch tip diameters; 25, 50, and 100% emission vaned diffusers; and volutes with conical exits. Impeller tip widths varied from 0.030 inch to 0.052 inch. Design specific speeds (N sub s = RPM*GPM**0.5.FT**0.75) were 430 (four configurations) and 215 (two configurations). The six configurations were tested with water as the pumped fluid. Noncavitating performance results are presented for the design speed of 24,500 rpm over a flowrate range from 1 to 6 gpm for the N sub s = 430 configurations and test speeds up to 29,000 rpm over a flowrate range from 0.3 to 1.2 gpm for the N sub s = 215 configurations. Cavitating performance results are presented over a flowrate range from 60 to 120% of design flow. Fabrication of the small pump conponents is also discussed.

  15. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  16. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  17. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  18. Action-Specific Effects in a Social Context: Others' Abilities Influence Perceived Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila; Taylor, J. Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    According to the action-specific account of perception, perceivers see the environment relative to their ability to perform the intended action. For example, in a modified version of the computer game Pong, balls that were easier to block looked to be moving slower than balls that were more difficult to block (Witt & Sugovic, 2010). It is unknown,…

  19. Operating and maintenance guidelines for screenbowl centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnig, W.S.R.; Bratton, R.; Luttrell, G.

    2009-01-15

    Plant dewatering circuits equipped with screenbowl centrifuges need to be well designed, properly operated, and adequately maintained to maximize the dewatering performance. The most important 'feed variables' are particle size, dry solids feed rate and slurry flow rate. The most important 'machine variables' include pool depth, rotational speed and gearbox ratio. The article discusses the effect of these parameters and offers some maintenance guidelines. The article was adapted from a paper presented at CoalPrep 2008. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  1. Characteristic analysis on the pressure fluctuation in the impeller of a low specific speed mixed flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. W.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zhu, B. S.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the pressure fluctuation characteristics of a low speed specific speed mixed flow pump caused by rotor-stator interaction, the unsteady flow was simulated with CFX for the whole flow passage of a mixed flow pump with a specific speed of 148.8. The structured mesh of the computation domain was generated with ICEM CFD and TurboGrid, and mesh-independent analysis was done in the design condition. Through the comparison with the experiment data, the reliability of the simulation was verified. In different locations of the impeller passage, monitoring points were set. With Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), the characteristic analysis on the pressure fluctuation in the impeller passage was done for three flow rate conditions (0.75Qd, Qd, 1.25Qd). The results show that the pressure fluctuation amplitude increases from the inlet to the outlet. And the maximum values in different flow rates exist near the hub of the outlet; The pressure fluctuation is small in the design condition, but the largest in the small flow rate condition, accompanied by the secondary dominant frequencies with large amplitudes; In the small flow rate condition and design condition, the dominant frequency varies from the inlet to the outlet because the combine action of the impeller and guide vane; while in the large flow rate condition, the pressure fluctuation in the whole impeller passage is affected significantly by the guide vane, and the domain frequency is 8 times the rotational frequency of impeller. In addition, the change of pressure fluctuation from the pressure surface to the suction surface in the off-design conditions is investigated, and the results demonstrates that the intensity of the pressure fluctuation in the impeller passage is closely related with the impeller as well as the distribution of the vorticity and the pressure.

  2. Quasi-three dimensional hydraulic design and performance calculation of high specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, J. Y.; Hou, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    According to the basic parameters of 211-80 high specific speed mixed-flow pump, based on the quasi-three dimensional flow theory, the hydraulic design of impeller and its matching spaced guide vanes for high specific speed mixed flow pump was completed, in which the iterative calculation of S 1, S 2 stream surfaces was employed to obtain meridional flow fields and the point-by-point integration method was employed to draw blade camber lines. Blades are thickened as well as blade leading edges are smoothed in the conformal mapping surface. Subsequently the internal fields of the whole flow passage of the designed pump were simulated by using RANS equations with RNG k-ε two-equation turbulent model. The results show that, compared with the 211-80 model, the hydraulic efficiency of the designed pump at the optimal flow rate increases 9.1%. The hydraulic efficiency of designed pump in low flow rate condition (78% designed flow rate) increases 6.46%. The hydraulic efficiency in high flow rate areas increases obviously and there is no bad phenomenon of suddenly decrease of hydraulic efficiency in model pump. From the distributions of velocity and pressure fields, it can be seen that the flow in impeller is uniform and the increase of pressure is gentle. There are no obvious impact phenomenon on impeller inlet and obvious wake shedding vortex phenomenon from impeller outlet to guide vanes inlet.

  3. Solvent-free cleaning using a centrifugal cryogenic pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    An advanced centrifuge that accelerates frozen CO{sub 2} pellets to high speeds for surface cleaning and paint removal is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The centrifuge-based accelerator was designed, fabricated, and tested under a program sponsored by the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air ``sandblast`` pellet accelerators, the centrifugal accelerator system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as energy efficient. Furthermore, the use of frozen CO{sub 2} pellets instead of conventional metal, plastic, sand, or other abrasive materials that remain solid at room temperature, minimizes the waste stream. This apparatus has been used to demonstrate cleaning of various surfaces, including removal of paint, oxide coatings, metal coatings, organic coatings, and oil and grease coatings from a variety of surfaces. The design and operation of the apparatus is discussed.

  4. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INSULIN-RESISTANCE PROCESSING SPEED AND SPECIFIC EXECUTIVE FUNCTION PROFILES IN NEUROLOGICALLY-INTACT OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Darvis T.; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Dutt, Shubir; Patel, Nihar; Mungas, Dan; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Kramer, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the relationship between insulin-resistance and constituent components of executive function in a sample of neurologically-intact older adult subjects using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and latent factors of working memory, cognitive control and processing speed derived from confirmatory factor analysis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), along with body mass index (BMI) and white matter hypointensity (WMH) were used to control for vascular risk factors, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury. Methods The study included 119 elderly subjects recruited from the University of California, San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. Subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment, fasting blood draw and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the HOMA-IR-executive function relationship. Results Pearson correlation adjusting for age showed a significant relationship between HOMA-IR and working memory (rp=−.18, p=.047), a trend with cognitive control (rp=−.17, p=.068), and no relationship with processing speed (rp=.013, p=.892). Linear regression models adjusting for demographic factors (age, education and gender), LDL, MAP, BMI and WMH indicated that HOMA-IR was negatively associated with cognitive control (r=−.256; p=.026) and working memory (r=−.234; p=.054). Conclusions These results suggest a greater level of peripheral insulin-resistance is associated with decreased cognitive control and working memory. After controlling for demographic factors, vascular risk, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury, HOMA-IR remained significantly associated with cognitive control, with working memory showing a trend. These findings substantiate the insulin-resistance-executive function hypothesis and suggest a complex interaction, demonstrated by the differential impact of insulin-resistance on processing speed and specific aspects of

  6. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  7. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  8. Centrifugal inertia effects in two-phase face seal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, P.; Hughes, W. F.; Beeler, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified, semianalytical model has been developed to analyze the effect of centrifugal inertia in two-phase face seals. The model is based on the assumption of isothermal flow through the seal, but at an elevated temperature, and takes into account heat transfer and boiling. Using this model, seal performance curves are obtained with water as the working fluid. It is shown that the centrifugal inertia of the fluid reduces the load-carrying capacity dramatically at high speeds and that operational instability exists under certain conditions. While an all-liquid seal may be starved at speeds higher than a 'critical' value, leakage always occurs under boiling conditions.

  9. Supernatant decanting on a centrifugal platform.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yuan, Wei-Li; Chiang, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hui

    2011-03-30

    This study presents a novel approach to decant supernatant on a centrifugal platform. By manipulating the centrifugally induced pressure and the elastic deformation of the plastic lids in the decanting chamber, fixed amounts of the supernatant can be decanted into the detection chamber at lower rotational speeds. The experimental results showed that decanted volume is affected by the volume of deformation and the operating parameters. Factors that influence the decanting ratio are also discussed. This approach has the advantages of simple design and low manufacturing cost; further, it has no need of surface modification. It has been applied to on-disk separation of plasma from whole blood, and the results showed good stability and repeatability.

  10. Air stripping of volatile organic compounds from groundwater: An evaluation of a centrifugal vapor-liquid contractor

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of a centrifugal vapor-liquid contactor equipped with high specific surface area packing (>2,000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) was evaluated for air stripping of jet fuel components from groundwater. Hydraulic test data indicated that the Sherwood flooding correlation which has been proposed for use in designing centrifugal vapor-liquid contactors overestimates the rotational speeds at which flooding occurs. For the mass transfer performance, a concept of area of a transfer unit (ATU) was introduced to account for the change in fluid loading with radius of the packing torus. The ATU was found to be a strong function of the specific surface area of the packing and to a lesser extent a function of rotor speed and liquid flow rate. A correlation based on the specific surface area of the packing is proposed for predicting the ATU. A simple empirical model is also proposed for determining the power consumed in turning the packing torus at various operating conditions. Previous claims in the literature that centrifugal vapor-liquid contactor is resistant to fouling because of high shear force were found not to be valid for groundwater with high iron content.

  11. The Energetics of Centrifugal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, W. K.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A recent study has argued that the California Undercurrent, and poleward eastern boundary currents in general, generate mixing events through centrifugal instability (CI). Conditions favorable for CI are created by the strong horizontal shears developed in turbulent bottom layers of currents flowing in the direction of topographic waves. At points of abrupt topographic change, like promontories and capes, the coastal current separates from the boundary and injects gravitationally stable but dynamically unstable flow into the interior. The resulting finite amplitude development of the instability involves overturnings and diabatic mixing. The purpose of this study is to examine the energetics of CI in order to characterize it as has been done for other instabilities and develop a framework in which to estimate its regional and global impacts. We argue that CI is roughly twice as efficient at mixing as is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and that roughly 10% of the initial energy in a CUC-like current is lost to either local mixing or the generation of unbalanced flows. The latter probably leads to non-local mixing. Thus centrifugal instability is an effective process by which energy is lost from the balanced flow and spent in mixing neighboring water masses. We argue the importance of the mixing is regional in nature, but of less importance to the global budgets given its regional specificity.

  12. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  13. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  14. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  15. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  16. The American Gas Centrifuge Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Dean

    2004-09-15

    The art of gas centrifugation was born in 1935 at the University of Virginia when Dr. Jesse Beams demonstrated experimentally the separation of chlorine isotopes using an ultra-high speed centrifuge. Dr. Beam’s experiment initiated work that created a rich history of scientific and engineering accomplishment in the United States in the art of isotope separation and even large scale biological separation by centrifugation. The early history of the gas centrifuge development was captured in a lecture and documented by Dr. Jesse Beams in 1975. Much of Dr. Beams lecture material is used in this paper up to the year 1960. Following work by Dr. Gernot Zippe at the University of Virginia between 1958 and 1960, the US government embarked on a centrifuge development program that ultimately led to the start of construction of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant in Piketon Ohio in the late 1970’s. The government program was abandoned in 1985 after investing in the construction of two of six planned process buildings, a complete supply chain for process and centrifuge parts, and the successful manufacture and brief operation of an initial complement of production machines that would have met 15 percent of the planned capacity of the constructed process buildings. A declining market for enriched uranium, a glut of uranium enrichment capacity worldwide, and the promise of a new laser based separation process factored in the decision to stop the government program. By the late 1990’s it had become evident that gas centrifugation held the best promise to produce enriched uranium at low cost. In1999, the United States Enrichment Corporation undertook an initiative to revive the best of the American centrifuge technology that had been abandoned fourteen years earlier. This is an exciting story and one that when complete will enable the United States to maintain its domestic supply and to be highly competitive in the world market for this important energy commodity. (auth)

  17. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  18. The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-08-04

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

  19. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  20. Latex micro-balloon pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Madou, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-step processes on a single microfluidic disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping mechanisms have been designed to study the pump performance at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data show that the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, a desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon.

  1. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  2. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  3. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  4. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  5. Gait-specific metabolic costs and preferred speeds in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), with implications for the scaling of locomotor costs.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Matthew C

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic costs of resting and locomotion have been used to gain novel insights into the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide range of primates; however, most previous studies have not considered gait-specific effects. Here, metabolic costs of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) walking, cantering and galloping are used to test for gait-specific effects and a potential correspondence between costs and preferred speeds. Metabolic costs, including the net cost of locomotion (COL) and net cost of transport (COT), change as a curvilinear function of walking speed and (at least provisionally) as a linear function of cantering and galloping speeds. The baseline quantity used to calculate net costs had a significant effect on the magnitude of speed-specific estimates of COL and COT, especially for walking. This is because non-locomotor metabolism constitutes a substantial fraction (41-61%, on average) of gross metabolic rate at slow speeds. The slope-based estimate of the COT was 5.26 J kg(-1) m(-1) for all gaits and speeds, while the gait-specific estimates differed between walking (0.5 m s(-1) : 6.69 J kg(-1) m(-1) ) and cantering/galloping (2.0 m s(-1) : 5.61 J kg(-1) m(-1) ). During laboratory-based overground locomotion, ring-tailed lemurs preferred to walk at ~0.5 m s(-1) and canter/gallop at ~2.0 m s(-1) , with the preferred walking speed corresponding well to the COT minima. Compared with birds and other mammals, ring-tailed lemurs are relatively economical in walking, cantering, and galloping. These results support the view that energetic optima are an important movement criterion for locomotion in ring-tailed lemurs, and other terrestrial animals.

  6. Gait-specific metabolic costs and preferred speeds in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), with implications for the scaling of locomotor costs.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Matthew C

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic costs of resting and locomotion have been used to gain novel insights into the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide range of primates; however, most previous studies have not considered gait-specific effects. Here, metabolic costs of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) walking, cantering and galloping are used to test for gait-specific effects and a potential correspondence between costs and preferred speeds. Metabolic costs, including the net cost of locomotion (COL) and net cost of transport (COT), change as a curvilinear function of walking speed and (at least provisionally) as a linear function of cantering and galloping speeds. The baseline quantity used to calculate net costs had a significant effect on the magnitude of speed-specific estimates of COL and COT, especially for walking. This is because non-locomotor metabolism constitutes a substantial fraction (41-61%, on average) of gross metabolic rate at slow speeds. The slope-based estimate of the COT was 5.26 J kg(-1) m(-1) for all gaits and speeds, while the gait-specific estimates differed between walking (0.5 m s(-1) : 6.69 J kg(-1) m(-1) ) and cantering/galloping (2.0 m s(-1) : 5.61 J kg(-1) m(-1) ). During laboratory-based overground locomotion, ring-tailed lemurs preferred to walk at ~0.5 m s(-1) and canter/gallop at ~2.0 m s(-1) , with the preferred walking speed corresponding well to the COT minima. Compared with birds and other mammals, ring-tailed lemurs are relatively economical in walking, cantering, and galloping. These results support the view that energetic optima are an important movement criterion for locomotion in ring-tailed lemurs, and other terrestrial animals. PMID:22976581

  7. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

  8. A straight path centrifugal blood pump concept in the Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Amano, N; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1993-07-01

    This article describes comparative studies of a newly developed "straight path" centrifugal pump (Capiox centrifugal pump) targeted for open-heart surgery and circulatory support. A unique straight path design of the rotor was very effective in reducing the pump's rotational speed and prime volume. This pump was evaluated for hydraulics, hemolysis, depriming characteristics, cavitation, and heat generation. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone-type pump and the Sarns 3M impeller-type pump, were used as controls. The new pump required the lowest pump speed to produce the same flow rates under the same pressure loads and demonstrated the lowest hemolysis and the lowest temperature rise with the outlet clamped. The air volume required to deprime the new pump was one-third to one-half that for the other pumps, and no sign of cavitation was observed even if a small amount of air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg.

  9. Lack of sex-specific movement patterns in an alien species at its invasion front - consequences for invasion speed.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Ivar; Melis, Claudia; Åhlén, Per-Arne; Dahl, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    Efficient targeting of actions to reduce the spread of invasive alien species relies on understanding the spatial, temporal, and individual variation of movement, in particular related to dispersal. Such patterns may differ between individuals at the invasion front compared to individuals in established and dense populations due to differences in environmental and ecological conditions such as abundance of conspecifics or sex-specific dispersal affecting the encounter rate of potential mates. We assessed seasonal and diurnal variation in movement pattern (step length and turning angle) of adult male and female raccoon dog at their invasion front in northern Sweden using data from Global Positioning System (GPS)-marked adult individuals and assessed whether male and female raccoon dog differed in their movement behavior. There were few consistent sex differences in movement. The rate of dispersal was rather similar over the months, suggesting that both male and female raccoon dog disperse during most of the year, but with higher speed during spring and summer. There were diurnal movement patterns in both sexes with more directional and faster movement during the dark hours. However, the short summer nights may limit such movement patterns, and long-distance displacement was best explained by fine-scale movement patterns from 18:00 to 05:00, rather than by movement patterns only from twilight and night. Simulation of dispersing raccoon dogs suggested a higher frequency of male-female encounters that were further away from the source population for the empirical data compared to a scenario with sex differences in movement pattern. The lack of sex differences in movement pattern at the invasion front results in an increased likelihood for reproductive events far from the source population. Animals outside the source population should be considered potential reproducing individuals, and a high effort to capture such individuals is needed throughout the year to prevent

  10. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  11. Centrifugal microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gorkin, Robert; Park, Jiwoon; Siegrist, Jonathan; Amasia, Mary; Lee, Beom Seok; Park, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Madou, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2010-07-21

    The centrifugal microfluidic platform has been a focus of academic and industrial research efforts for almost 40 years. Primarily targeting biomedical applications, a range of assays have been adapted on the system; however, the platform has found limited commercial success as a research or clinical tool. Nonetheless, new developments in centrifugal microfluidic technologies have the potential to establish wide-spread utilization of the platform. This paper presents an in-depth review of the centrifugal microfluidic platform, while highlighting recent progress in the field and outlining the potential for future applications. An overview of centrifugal microfluidic technologies is presented, including descriptions of advantages of the platform as a microfluidic handling system and the principles behind centrifugal fluidic manipulation. The paper also discusses a history of significant centrifugal microfluidic platform developments with an explanation of the evolution of the platform as it pertains to academia and industry. Lastly, we review the few centrifugal microfluidic-based sample-to-answer analysis systems shown to date and examine the challenges to be tackled before the centrifugal platform can be more broadly accepted as a new diagnostic platform. In particular, fully integrated, easy to operate, inexpensive and accurate microfluidic tools in the area of in vitro nucleic acid diagnostics are discussed.

  12. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  13. Aerodynamic and mechanical design of an 8:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, C.; Runstadler, P. W., Jr.; Stacy, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A high-pressure-ratio, low-mass-flow centrifugal compressor stage was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design followed specifications that the stage be representative of state-of-the-art performance and that the stage is to be used as a workhorse compressor for planned experiments using laser Doppler velocimeter equipment. The final design is a 75,000-RPM, 19-blade impeller with an axial inducer and 30 degrees of backward leaning at the impeller tip. The compressor design was tested for two- and/or quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic and stress characteristics. Critical speed analyses were performed for the high speed rotating impeller assembly. An optimally matched, 17-channel vane island diffuser was also designed and built.

  14. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  15. The fractionation of nuclei from mammalian cells by zonal centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Pennington, F.; Ridge, D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Purified liver nuclei from adult rats separate into two main zones when centrifuged in the slow-speed zonal rotor. One zone contains diploid nuclei, the other tetraploid. 2. The effect of age on the pattern of rat liver ploidy was examined. Tetraploid nuclei are virtually absent from young animals. They increase in proportion steadily with age. Partial hepatectomy disturbs the pattern of ploidy. 3. The zonal centrifuge permits the separation of diploid, tetraploid, octaploid and hexadecaploid nuclei from mouse liver. 4. Rat liver nuclei are isopycnic with sucrose solutions of density 1·35 at 5°. ImagesFig. 1.PLATE 1Fig. 9. PMID:4876099

  16. On the characteristics of centrifugal-reciprocating machines. [cryogenic coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method of compressing helium gas for cryogenic coolers is presented which uses centrifugal force to reduce the forces on the connecting rod and crankshaft in the usual reciprocating compressor. This is achieved by rotating the piston-cylinder assembly at a speed sufficient for the centrifugal force on the piston to overcome the compressional force due to the working fluid. The rotating assembly is dynamically braked in order to recharge the working space with fluid. The intake stroke consists of decelerating the rotating piston-cylinder assembly and the exhaust stroke consists of accelerating the assembly.

  17. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  18. Oil-free centrifugal hydrogen compression technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, Hooshang

    2014-05-31

    One of the key elements in realizing a mature market for hydrogen vehicles is the deployment of a safe and efficient hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can compete economically with current fuels. The challenge, however, is that hydrogen, being the lightest and smallest of gases with a lower viscosity and density than natural gas, readily migrates through small spaces and is difficult to compresses efficiently. While efficient and cost effective compression technology is crucial to effective pipeline delivery of hydrogen, the compression methods used currently rely on oil lubricated positive displacement (PD) machines. PD compression technology is very costly, has poor reliability and durability, especially for components subjected to wear (e.g., valves, rider bands and piston rings) and contaminates hydrogen with lubricating fluid. Even so called “oil-free” machines use oil lubricants that migrate into and contaminate the gas path. Due to the poor reliability of PD compressors, current hydrogen producers often install duplicate units in order to maintain on-line times of 98-99%. Such machine redundancy adds substantially to system capital costs. As such, DOE deemed that low capital cost, reliable, efficient and oil-free advanced compressor technologies are needed. MiTi’s solution is a completely oil-free, multi-stage, high-speed, centrifugal compressor designed for flow capacity of 500,000 kg/day with a discharge pressure of 1200 psig. The design employs oil-free compliant foil bearings and seals to allow for very high operating speeds, totally contamination free operation, long life and reliability. This design meets the DOE’s performance targets and achieves an extremely aggressive, specific power metric of 0.48 kW-hr/kg and provides significant improvements in reliability/durability, energy efficiency, sealing and freedom from contamination. The multi-stage compressor system concept has been validated through full scale

  19. Propeller charts for the determination of the rotational speed for the maximum ratio of the propulsive efficiency to the specific fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, David; Conway, Robert N

    1942-01-01

    A set of propeller operating efficiency charts, based on a coefficient from which the propeller rotational speed has been eliminated, is presented. These charts were prepared with data obtained from tests of full-size metal propellers in the NACA propeller-research tunnel. Working charts for nine propeller-body combinations are presented, including results from tests of dual-rotating propellers. These charts are to be used in the calculation of the range and the endurance of airplanes equipped with constant-speed propellers in which, for given flight conditions, it is desired to determine the propeller revolution speed that gives the maximum ratio of the propulsive efficiency to the specific fuel consumption. The coefficient on which the charts are based may be written in the form of a thrust coefficient or a thrust-power coefficient. A method of using the charts is outlined and sample computations for a typical airplane are included.

  20. Splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impeller designed for automotive gas turbine application. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pampreen, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical design and fabrication of two splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impellers were completed for rig testing at NASA Lewis Research Center. These impellers were designed for automotive gas turbine application. The mechanical design was based on NASA specifications for blade-shape and flowpath configurations. The contractor made engineering drawings and performed calculations for mass and center-of-gravity, for stress and vibration analyses, and for shaft critical speed analysis. One impeller was machined to print; the other had a blade height and exit radius of 2.54 mm larger than print dimensions.

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Study on Circular Disk Particles Suspended in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Tanaka, Satoyuki; Yano, Toshiaki; Iino, Naoko

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies are performed on suspension particle motion in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environment, i.e., in both an axially rotating drum and a stable liquid tank. The particle velocity of circular disks is measured by PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) method and is predicted by BBO (Basset-Boussinesq-Ossen) equation. It is found that (1) as time progresses, one side of the disk in the axially rotating drum is attracted toward the drum wall and its velocity is affected by the rotating speed, (2) when the particle moves in the Stokes' regime, its velocity is linearly increased with the distance from the center of the drum, (3) in contrast, the autorotation of the disk occurs in the non-centrifugal force field, and (4) the corresponding drag coefficient in the low Reynolds number region is in good agreement with the theoretical value of the sphere.

  2. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  3. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  4. Rules governing the classification of coal slurries for filtering centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Gol'berg; Y.B. Rubinshtein; S.A. Osadchii

    2008-07-01

    The feasibility of using filtering centrifuges for the cleaning of a coking-coal slurry is confirmed in principle, and regime operating parameters which ensure the production of a concentrate of conditioned quality are determined on the basis of results of experimental-industrial tests of a new procedure for this operation at the Neryungrinskaya Concentrating Mill. An equation is proposed for determination of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent, which completely satisfactorily (with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8) describes the dependence of the parameter in question on the solid content in the centrifuge feed, and on its content of -0.2-mm material. It is noted that special investigations to determine the effect of the speed of the rotor and shape of the particles on the amount of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent are required for construction of a model describing the size reduction of solid-phase particles in the effluent during centrifuge filtration.

  5. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  6. Adjusting for car occupant injury liability in relation to age, speed limit, and gender-specific driver crash involvement risk.

    PubMed

    Keall, Michael; Frith, William

    2004-12-01

    It is well established that older drivers' fragility is an important factor associated with higher levels of fatal crash involvement for older drivers. There has been less research on age-related fragility with respect to the sort of minor injuries that are more common in injury crashes. This study estimates a quantity that is related to injury fragility: the probability that a driver or a passenger of that driver will be injured in crashes involving two cars. The effects of other factors apart from drivers' fragility are included in this measure, including the fragility of the passengers, the crashworthiness of cars driven, seatbelt use by the occupants, and characteristics of crashes (including configuration and impact speed). The car occupant injury liability estimates appropriately includes these factors to adjust risk curves by age, gender, and speed limit accounting for overrepresentation in crashes associated with fragility and these other factors. PMID:15545071

  7. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  8. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  9. Application of Individualized Speed Thresholds to Interpret Position Specific Running Demands in Elite Professional Rugby Union: A GPS Study.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Cillian; Tobin, Daniel P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have used GPS technology to categorise rugby union locomotive demands. However, the utility of the results of these studies is confounded by small sample sizes, sub-elite player status and the global application of absolute speed thresholds to all player positions. Furthermore, many of these studies have used GPS units with low sampling frequencies. The aim of the present study was to compare and contrast the high speed running (HSR) demands of professional rugby union when utilizing micro-technology units sampling at 10 Hz and applying relative or individualised speed zones. The results of this study indicate that application of individualised speed zones results in a significant shift in the interpretation of the HSR demands of both forwards and backs and positional sub-categories therein. When considering the use of an absolute in comparison to an individualised HSR threshold, there was a significant underestimation for forwards of HSR distance (HSRD) (absolute = 269 ± 172.02, individualised = 354.72 ± 99.22, p < 0.001), HSR% (absolute = 5.15 ± 3.18, individualised = 7.06 ± 2.48, p < 0.001) and HSR efforts (HSRE) (absolute = 18.81 ± 12.25; individualised = 24.78 ± 8.30, p < 0.001). In contrast, there was a significant overestimation of the same HSR metrics for backs with the use of an absolute threshold (HSRD absolute = 697.79 ± 198.11, individualised = 570.02 ± 171.14, p < 0.001; HSR% absolute = 10.85 ± 2.82, individualised = 8.95 ± 2.76, p < 0.001; HSRE absolute = 41.55 ± 11.25; individualised = 34.54 ± 9.24, p < 0.001). This under- or overestimation associated with an absolute speed zone applies to varying degrees across the ten positional sub-categories analyzed and also to individuals within the same positional sub-category. The results of the present study indicated that although use of an individulised HSR threshold improves the interpretation of the HSR demands on a positional basis, inter-individual variability in maximum

  10. Application of Individualized Speed Thresholds to Interpret Position Specific Running Demands in Elite Professional Rugby Union: A GPS Study

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Cillian; Tobin, Daniel P.; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have used GPS technology to categorise rugby union locomotive demands. However, the utility of the results of these studies is confounded by small sample sizes, sub-elite player status and the global application of absolute speed thresholds to all player positions. Furthermore, many of these studies have used GPS units with low sampling frequencies. The aim of the present study was to compare and contrast the high speed running (HSR) demands of professional rugby union when utilizing micro-technology units sampling at 10 Hz and applying relative or individualised speed zones. The results of this study indicate that application of individualised speed zones results in a significant shift in the interpretation of the HSR demands of both forwards and backs and positional sub-categories therein. When considering the use of an absolute in comparison to an individualised HSR threshold, there was a significant underestimation for forwards of HSR distance (HSRD) (absolute = 269 ± 172.02, individualised = 354.72 ± 99.22, p < 0.001), HSR% (absolute = 5.15 ± 3.18, individualised = 7.06 ± 2.48, p < 0.001) and HSR efforts (HSRE) (absolute = 18.81 ± 12.25; individualised = 24.78 ± 8.30, p < 0.001). In contrast, there was a significant overestimation of the same HSR metrics for backs with the use of an absolute threshold (HSRD absolute = 697.79 ± 198.11, individualised = 570.02 ± 171.14, p < 0.001; HSR% absolute = 10.85 ± 2.82, individualised = 8.95 ± 2.76, p < 0.001; HSRE absolute = 41.55 ± 11.25; individualised = 34.54 ± 9.24, p < 0.001). This under- or overestimation associated with an absolute speed zone applies to varying degrees across the ten positional sub-categories analyzed and also to individuals within the same positional sub-category. The results of the present study indicated that although use of an individulised HSR threshold improves the interpretation of the HSR demands on a positional basis, inter-individual variability in maximum

  11. Column-centrifugation method for determining water retention curves of soils and disperse sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    A new instrumental method was proposed for the rapid estimation of the water-retention capacity of soils and sediments. The method is based on the use of a centrifugal field to remove water from distributed soil columns. In distinction from the classical method of high columns, the use of a centrifugal force field stronger than the gravity field allowed reducing the height of the soil samples from several meters to 10-20 cm (the typical size of centrifuge bags). In distinction from equilibrium centrifugation, the proposed method obtained an almost continuous water retention curve during the rotation of the soil column only at one-two centrifuge speeds. The procedure was simple in use, had high accuracy, and obtained reliable relationships between the capillary-sorption water potential and the soil water content in a wide range from the total water capacity to the wilting point.

  12. Analysis of cantilever NEMS in centrifugal-fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen-Nia, Mohsen; Abadian, Fateme; Abadian, Naeime; Dehkordi, Keivan Mosaiebi; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical nanocantilevers are promising for using as sensors/detectors in centrifugal-fluidic systems. For this application, the presence of angular speed and electrolyte environment should be considered in the theoretical analysis. Herein, the pull-in instability of the nanocantilever incorporating the effects of angular velocity and liquid media is investigated using a size-dependent continuum theory. Using d’Alembert principle, the angular speed is transformed into an equivalent centrifugal force. The electrochemical and dispersion forces are incorporated considering the corrections due to the presence of electrolyte media. Two different approaches, i.e., the Rayleigh-Ritz method (RRM) and proposing a lumped parameter model (LPM), were applied to analyze the system. The models are validated with the results presented in literature. Impacts of the angular velocity, electrolyte media, dispersion forces, and size effect on the instability characteristics of the nanocantilever are discussed.

  13. Expression of myosin heavy-chain mRNA in cultured myoblasts induced by centrifugal force.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Katsuhide; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Naito, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kazunori; Takeda, Tomotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2008-11-01

    Ballistic muscle training leads to hypertrophy of fast type fibers and training for endurance induces that of slow type fibers. Numerous studies have been conducted on electrical, extending and magnetic stimulation of cells, but the effect of centrifugal force on cells remains to be investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of stimulating cultured myoblasts with centrifugal force at different speeds on cell proliferation and myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) mRNA expression in muscle fiber. Stimulation of myoblasts was carried out at 2 different speeds for 20 min using the Himac CT6D, a desk centrifuge, and cells were observed at 1, 3 and 5 days later. Number of cells 1 and 5 days after centrifugal stimulation was significantly larger in the 62.5 x g and 4,170 x g stimulation groups than in the control group. Expression of MyHC-2b mRNA 1 day after centrifugal stimulation was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. Almost no expression of MyHC-2a was observed in any group at 1 and 3 days after centrifugal stimulation. However, 5 days after stimulation, MyHC-2a was strongly expressed in the 2 stimulation groups in comparison to the control group. Three days after centrifugal stimulation, expression of MyHC-1 was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. The results of this study clarified the effect of different centrifugal stimulation speeds on muscle fiber characteristics, and suggest that centrifugal stimulation of myoblasts enhances cell proliferation.

  14. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-09-23

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine which consists of: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; an idling spring for urging the tension lever against radially outward displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack, and another end adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam; a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever; a control lever; a floating lever interlocking with the control lever; and spring force adjusting means arranged at one end of the idling spring.

  15. Algorithm for Controlling a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for controlling a centrifugal compressor that serves as the prime mover in a heatpump system. Experimental studies have shown that the operating conditions for maximum compressor efficiency are close to the boundary beyond which surge occurs. Compressor surge is a destructive condition in which there are instantaneous reversals of flow associated with a high outlet-to-inlet pressure differential. For a given cooling load, the algorithm sets the compressor speed at the lowest possible value while adjusting the inlet guide vane angle and diffuser vane angle to maximize efficiency, subject to an overriding requirement to prevent surge. The onset of surge is detected via the onset of oscillations of the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, associated with surge-induced oscillations of the torque exerted by and on the compressor rotor. The algorithm can be implemented in any of several computer languages.

  16. Velocity thresholds for women's soccer matches: sex specificity dictates high-speed running and sprinting thresholds - Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM).

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Vescovi, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    There is no methodological standardization of velocity thresholds for the quantification of distances covered in various locomotor activities for women's soccer matches, especially for high-speed running and sprinting. Applying velocity thresholds used for motion analysis of men's soccer has likely created skewed observations about high-intensity movement demands for the women's game because these thresholds do not accurately reflect the capabilities of elite female players. Subsequently, a cohesive view of the locomotor characteristics of women's soccer does not yet exist. The aim of this commentary is to provide suggestions for standardizing high-speed running and sprint velocity thresholds specific to women's soccer. The authors also comment on using generic vs individualized thresholds, as well as age-related considerations, to establish velocity thresholds.

  17. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  18. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  19. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories 8. 8 metre (29-foot) and 10. 7-metre (35-foot) centrifuge facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, P.H.; Ault, R.L.; Fulton, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report outlines the capabilities and limitations of the two centrifuges and gives other details which must be considered in preparing test specifications and designing fixtures, gives the theory and terminology of centrifuge testing, and describes the layout, operating principles, support functions, and reference material for each facility.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices in draft tube of low specific speed Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tani, K.; Okamoto, N.

    2014-03-01

    At both partial and full load of Francis turbines, the unsteady behavior of cavitating draft tube vortices occurs and leads to undesirable matters such as power house vibration, noise and power swing in some cases. This paper presents the investigation of the interaction between the flow pattern at runner outlet and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices in draft tube with experimental and numerical approaches. On the experimental research, the pressure pulsation in the draft tube is measured and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices is taken pictures with a high speed camera in the model test. On the numerical research, by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) adopting a two-phase unsteady analysis, the analysis domain from the guide vane to the draft tube is carried out for investigating the interaction between the runner outlet flow and the vortex pattern. The pressure pulsation at the upper draft tube and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices obtained from CFD results are similar to those obtained in the model test. Detailed analysis of CFD results at overload indicates the repeat of expansion and contraction of cavitating vortices, which were shaped helical vortices with opposite direction of runner rotation, and the corresponding flow pattern in every time step of the pressure pulsations.

  2. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives - Motor Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Alternating current electric motors rotate at a nearly constant speed that is determined by motor design and line frequency. Energy savings of 50% or more may be available when fixed speed systems are modified to allow the motor speed to match variable load requirements of a centrifugal fan or pump.

  3. Pressure data from a 64A010 airfoil at transonic speeds in heavy gas media of ratio of specific heats from 1.67 to 1.12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, A. R.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A NACA 64A010 pressure-instrumented airfoil was tested at transonic speeds over a range of angle of attack from -1 to 12 degrees at various Reynolds numbers ranging from 2 to 6 million in air, argon, Freon 12, and a mixture of argon and Freon 12 having a ratio of specific heats corresponding to air. Good agreement of results is obtained for conditions where compressibility is not significant and for the air and comparable argon-Freon 12 mixture. Comparison of heavy gas results with air, when adjusted for transonic similarity, show improved, but less than desired agreement.

  4. Why have we stopped research on liquid centrifugal separation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.

    1996-05-28

    Using high-temperature high-speed liquid centrifuges for lanthanides and actinides separation was originally proposed as a physical separation method in the Los Alamos ADTT/ATW concept [C. Bowman, LA-UR-92-1065 (1992)]. The authors investigated centrifugal separation in a concerted effort of experiments, theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. They discovered that owing to the ionic-composition-dependence of the sedimentation coefficients for the fission products and actinides, separation by grouping of molecular densities would not work in general in the molten salt environment. Alternatively the lanthanides and actinides could be transferred to a liquid metal carrier (e.g. bismuth) via reductive extraction and then separated by liquid centrifuges, but the material and technical challenges are severe. Meanwhile the authors have established that the reductive extraction procedure itself can be used for desired separations. Unlike conventional aqueous-based reprocessing technologies, reductive extraction separation uses only reagent (Li) that reconstitutes carrier salts (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) and a processing medium (Bi) that can be continuously recycled and reused, with a nearly-pure fission products waste stream. The processing units are compact and reliable, and can be built at relatively low cost while maintaining high throughput. Therefore the research effort on developing liquid centrifuges for separations in ADTT/ATW was terminated in late 1995. This paper will discuss the various aspects involved in reaching this decision.

  5. Quasi-steady centrifuge method for unsaturated hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, M.C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] We have developed the quasi-steady centrifuge (QSC) method as a variation of the steady state centrifuge method that can be implemented simply and inexpensively with greater versatility in terms of sample size and other features. It achieves these advantages by somewhat relaxing the criterion for steadiness of flow through the sample. This compromise entails an increase in measurement uncertainty but to a degree that is tolerable in most applications. We have tested this new approach with an easily constructed apparatus to establish a quasi-steady flow of water in unsaturated porous rock samples spinning in a centrifuge, obtaining measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention that agree with results of other methods. The QSC method is adaptable to essentially any centrifuge suitable for hydrogeologic applications, over a wide range of sizes and operating speeds. The simplified apparatus and greater adaptability of this method expands the potential for exploring situations that are common in nature but have been the subject of few laboratory investigations. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American... holder of materials licenses SNM-7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade...

  7. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  8. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  9. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  10. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  11. Centrifugal loop-mediated isothermal amplification microdevice for rapid, multiplex and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Jun; Park, Byung Hyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Choi, Goro; Lee, Doh C; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-01-15

    We present a centrifugal microfluidic device which enables multiplex foodborne pathogen identification by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric detection using Eriochrome Black T (EBT). Five identical structures were designed in the centrifugal microfluidic system to perform the genetic analysis of 25 pathogen samples in a high-throughput manner. The sequential loading and aliquoting of the LAMP cocktail, the primer mixtures, and the DNA sample solutions were accomplished by the optimized zigzag-shaped microchannels and RPM control. We targeted three kinds of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and detected the amplicons of the LAMP reaction by the EBT-mediated colorimetric method. For the limit-of-detection (LOD) test, we carried out the LAMP reaction on a chip with serially diluted DNA templates of E. coli O157:H7, and could observe the color change with 380 copies. The used primer sets in the LAMP reaction were specific only to the genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7, enabling the on-chip selective, sensitive, and high-throughput pathogen identification with the naked eyes. The entire process was completed in 60min. Since the proposed microsystem does not require any bulky and expensive instrumentation for end-point detection, our microdevice would be adequate for point-of-care (POC) testing with high simplicity and high speed, providing an advanced genetic analysis microsystem for foodborne pathogen detection.

  12. Dynamic considerations in the development of centrifugal separators used for reprocessing nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Strunk, W.D.; Singh, S.P.; Tuft, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The development of centrifugal separators has been a key ingredient in improving the process used for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The separators are used to segregate uranium and plutonium from the fission products produced by a controlled nuclear reaction. The separators are small variable speed centrifuges, designed to operate in a harsh environment. Dynamic problems were detected by vibration analysis and resolved using modal analysis and trending. Problems with critical speeds, resonances in the base, balancing, weak components, precision manufacturing, and short life have been solved.

  13. Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Law, Jack D.; Garn, Troy G.; Todd, Terry A.; Macaluso, Lawrence L.

    2012-03-20

    Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods are described. More particularly, fluid transfer connections for a centrifugal separator system having support assemblies with a movable member coupled to a connection tube and coupled to a fixed member, such that the movable member is constrained to movement along a fixed path relative to the fixed member are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems including such fluid transfer connections are described. Additionally, methods of installing, removing and/or replacing centrifugal separators from centrifugal separator systems are described.

  14. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  15. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  16. Fabrication of silk fibroin film using centrifugal casting technique for corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Jung-Ho; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Su Hyeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Films prepared from silk fibroin have shown potential as biomaterials in tissue engineering applications for the eye. Here, we present a novel process for fabrication of silk fibroin films for corneal application. In this work, fabrication of silk fibroin films was simply achieved by centrifugal force. In contrast to the conventional dry casting method, we carried out the new process in a centrifuge with a rotating speed of 4000 rpm, where centrifugal force was imposed on an aluminum tube containing silk fibroin solution. In the present study, we also compared the surface roughness, mechanical properties, transparency, and cell proliferation between centrifugal and dry casting method. In terms of surface morphology, films fabricated by the centrifugal casting have less surface roughness than those by the dry casting. For elasticity and transparency, silk fibroin films obtained from the centrifugal casting had favorable results compared with those prepared by dry casting. Furthermore, primary human corneal keratocytes grew better in films prepared by the centrifugal casting. Therefore, our results suggest that this new fabrication process for silk fibroin films offers important potential benefits for corneal tissue regeneration.

  17. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  18. Practical considerations in realizing a magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-12-15

    The magnetic centrifugal mass filter concept represents a variation on the plasma centrifuge, with applications that are particularly promising for high-throughput separation of ions with large mass differences. A number of considerations, however, constrain the parameter space in which this device operates best. The rotation speed, magnetic field intensity, and ion temperature are constrained by the ion confinement requirements. Collisions must also be large enough to eject ions, but small enough not to eject them too quickly. The existence of favorable regimes meeting these constraints is demonstrated by a single-particle orbit code. As an example of interest, it is shown that separation factors of about 2.3 are achievable in a single pass when separating Aluminum from Strontium ions.

  19. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7998882

  20. Waves in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Impact of the pulsed braking force on the axial gas circulation and gas content in centrifuges for uranium isotope separation was investigated by the method of numerical simulation. Pulsed brake of the rotating gas by the momentum source results into generation of the waves which propagate along the rotor of the centrifuge. The waves almost doubles the axial circulation flux in the working camera in compare with the case of the steady state breaking force with the same average power in the model under the consideration. Flux through the hole in the bottom baffle on 15% exceeds the flux in the stationary case for the same pressure and temperature in the model. We argue that the waves reduce the pressure in the GC on the same 15%.

  1. Comparative hemolysis study of clinically available centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Naito, K; Suenaga, E; Cao, Z L; Suda, H; Ueno, T; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T

    1996-06-01

    Centrifugal pumps have become important devices for cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory assistance. Five types of centrifugal pumps are clinically available in Japan. To evaluate the blood trauma caused by centrifugal pumps, a comparative hemolysis study was performed under identical conditions. In vitro hemolysis test circuits were constructed to operate the BioMedicus BP-80 (Medtronic, BioMedicus), Sarns Delphin (Sarns/3M Healthcare), Isoflow (St. Jude Medical [SJM]), HPM-15 (Nikkiso), and Capiox CX-SP45 (Terumo). The hemolysis test loop consisted of two 1.5 m lengths of polyvinyl chloride tubing with a 3/8-inch internal diameter, a reservoir with a sampling port, and a pump head. All pumps were set to flow at 6 L/min against the total pressure head of 120 mm Hg. Experiments were conducted simultaneously for 6 h at room temperature (21 degrees C) with fresh bovine blood. Blood samples for plasma-free hemoglobin testing were taken, and the change in temperature at the pump outlet port was measured during the experiment. The mean pump rotational speeds were 1,570, 1,374, 1,438, 1,944, and 1,296 rpm, and the normalized indexes of hemolysis were 0.00070, 0.00745, 0.00096, 0.00066, 0.00090 g/100 L for the BP-80, Sarns, SJM, Nikkiso, and Terumo pumps, respectively. The change in temperature at the pump outlet port was the least for the Nikkiso pump (1.8 degrees C) and the most with the SJM pump (3.8 degrees C). This study showed that there is no relationship between the pump rotational speed (rpm) and the normalized index of hemolysis in 5 types of centrifugal pumps. The pump design and number of impellers could be more notable factors in blood damage.

  2. Unsymmetrical flow in a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, S. H.

    1984-09-01

    The differential equations for a centrifuge sector are discussed in which cylinder whose cross section is a slice of pie is presumed to be mud. Three boundary layers are considered: the cylindrical wall layer, Ekman layers at the ends and the buoyancy layers on the theta = constant walls. It is suggested that the cylinder is most of the time infinitely long, and that the atmospheric scale height is of the order of the bowl radius all of the time. Both restrictions are relaxed.

  3. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  4. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit it to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.

  5. Centrifugal separators and related devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Law, Jack D.; Garn, Troy G.; Macaluso, Lawrence L.; Todd, Terry A.

    2012-03-06

    Centrifugal separators and related methods and devices are described. More particularly, centrifugal separators comprising a first fluid supply fitting configured to deliver fluid into a longitudinal fluid passage of a rotor shaft and a second fluid supply fitting sized and configured to sealingly couple with the first fluid supply fitting are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems comprising a manifold having a drain fitting and a cleaning fluid supply fitting are described, wherein the manifold is coupled to a movable member of a support assembly. Additionally, methods of cleaning centrifugal separators are described.

  6. A strategy for high-speed countercurrent chromatography purification of specific antioxidants from natural products based on on-line HPLC method with radical scavenging assay.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Baba, Erika; Hino, Tomoaki; Oka, Hisao

    2012-10-15

    We have proposed a novel and first strategy of high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) purification for the efficient and effective discovery of antioxidant from natural product based on on-line HPLC method with radical scavenging assay. To achieve a strategy for HSCCC purification, the antioxidants in materials are identified by on-line HPLC with DPPH radical scavenging assay. Then, the optimal condition of target peaks would be investigated for the two-phase solvent system, and purified by HSCCC. In this study, the specific antioxidants in red cabbage, perilla and elderberry pigments were evaluated by on-line HPLC with DPPH radical scavenging assay, and purified by HSCCC technique. Specific antioxidants could be rapidly pinpointed in complex mixtures by on-line HPLC with DPPH radical scavenging assay. Then, the optimal two-phase solvent systems were investigated using these HPLC peaks. Finally, the purification of these nine antioxidants form three mixtures were performed by HSCCC. Using mass spectrometric analysis, these antioxidants were confirmed to cyanidin-based anthocyanin from red cabbage and elderberry pigments, and luteolin-based flavones from perrilla pigment. Due to the advantages derived from on-line HPLC with DPPH radical scavenging assay and HSCCC technique, a rapid, efficient and effective strategy has been developed for the discovery of antioxidants from natural products.

  7. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkoshi, M.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a centrifugal governor for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam pivotable about and relative to a fulcrum shaft thereof and having a cam surface including a cam surface portion determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack; the sensor lever having another end disposed to engage with the cam surface portion of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to permit displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever to cause pivoting of the torque cam about the fulcrum shaft thereof in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface portion of the torque cam. The improvement is described comprising biasing means for forcibly pivotally displacing, immediately before operation of a starter of the engine, the torque cam in one direction against the urging force of the cancelling spring to a predetermined position.

  8. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-08-12

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable about a stationary fulcrum in response to the radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack and another end disposed for engagement with the cam surface of the torque cam, the sensor lever being adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to cause displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and spring means interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface of the torque cam; the spring means comprising first and second springs, one of the first and second springs being formed of a thermosensitive material having a smaller spring constant at a low temperature below a predetermined value, and a larger spring constant at a temperature above the predetermined value; and the first and second springs of the spring means comprising coiled springs disposed concentrically with each other.

  9. Centrifugal quantum states of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a method for observation of the quasistationary states of neutrons localized near a curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable “quantum bouncer” problem that can be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop a formalism that describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.

  10. The jetting behavior of viscoelastic Boger fluids during centrifugal spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmayev, Yevgen; Divvela, Mounica Jyothi; Ruo, An-Cheng; Huang, Tao; Joo, Yong Lak

    2015-12-01

    We present an experimental visualization study of centrifugal spinning, which is a novel method of producing nanofibers. The investigation was conducted using Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids to study the effect of viscoelasticity, driving force, and the flow rate on the initial thinning behavior, jet contour shapes, and radii. Boger fluids based on Newtonian polybutene and viscoelastic polyisobutylene were utilized as test fluids in the current study. Our results reveal that increasing the viscoelasticity leads to a faster initial thinning of the polymer jet. However, the effect is strongly coupled with the rotation speed, and due to a faster increase in extensional viscosity for highly viscoelastic fluids, the thinning slows down with the increase in the angular velocity. Initial thinning is shown to be faster for the lower flow rates. Viscoelasticity and centrifugal force have a significant influence on the jet contour radii. The maximum radius will decrease for more viscoelastic fluids, and with the increase in angular velocity due to the development of the elastic hoop stress. The comparison of experiments with the discretized element modeling with the FENE-P model confirms the model predictive potential for the thinning behavior. Finally, the centrifugal spinning experiments are compared to electrospinning in order to observe a qualitative similarity.

  11. Modelling of horizontal centrifugal casting of work roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhian; Song, Nannan; Tol, Rob Val; Luan, Yikun; Li, Dianzhong

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model to simulate horizontal centrifugal roll castings is presented in this paper. In order to simulate the flow fluid and solidification of horizontal centrifugal roll casting correctly, the model uses a body fitted mesh technique to represent the geometry. This new method maps a plate layer mesh to a circular mesh. The smooth body fitted mesh method gives more accurate calculation results for cylindrical geometries. A velocity depending on the angular velocity and inner radius of the mould is set up as a velocity boundary condition. The fluid flow coupled with heat transfer and solidification in a rapidly rotating roll is simulated. A gravity free falling method is applied as a pouring condition. A moveable pouring system is also used in the simulations. High speed steel is used to produce the work roll. Two different gating positions and a moveable gating system are simulated in this paper. Results show that the position of pouring system has a significant influence on the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution at a fixed central pouring system is more favourable than the distribution from a side pouring system. A moving gating system method is a better way to obtain a uniform temperature field in centrifugal casting and offers an alternative for existing techniques.

  12. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Register on November 17, 2010 (75 FR 70300), including a notice of opportunity to request a hearing, or to... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order... licenses numbers SNM- 7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead...

  13. 'What price speed', revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, S.; Proodian, R. E.

    1980-02-01

    An attempt is made to examine fuel transport effectiveness as a function of vehicle cruise velocity, when studying limits in speed beyond which a particular form of locomotion becomes inefficient and economically unattractive. Attention is given to the Dix-Riddell relationship and to the specific fuel energy expenditure ratio. It is concluded that for each value of speed at which useful work is carried out, there is an experiential maximum that sets the standard for fuel transport effectiveness at that speed.

  14. Thickening of ultrafine coal-water slurries in a solid-bowl centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, A.P.; Klima, M.S.; Morrison, J.L.; Miller, B.G.

    1999-07-01

    As part of a study being conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) to evaluate ultrafine coal dewatering technologies, testing was carried out to investigate the use of a solid-bowl (high-g) centrifuge for thickening ultrafine coalwater slurries. The objective of this study was to increase the solids concentration to a level suitable for use as a coal-water slurry fuel, while maximizing overall solids recovery. Feed material was collected from the combined discharge (centrate) streams from several screen-bowl centrifuges. These devices are currently being used in a commercial coal cleaning facility to dewater the clean coal product from a froth flotation circuit. Current plant practice is to discharge the centrate to settling ponds. The screen bowl centrate averages 5% solids by weight and contains nearly 60% material finer than 10 {mu}m. The current study examined the effects of operating conditions on centrifuge performance. The test conditions included centrifuge bowl and scroll speeds and volumetric feed rate. In addition to thickening, some cleaning was also achieved, because the finest particles (e.g. < 3 {micro}m), which contained a large percentage of liberated clays, were removed with the bulk of the water. The centrifuge products were analyzed for solids concentration, particle size distribution, and ash content. Size selectivity curves were also used to evaluate centrifuge performance.

  15. Integration of reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification with an immunochromatographic strip on a centrifugal microdevice for influenza A virus identification.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Park, B H; Oh, S J; Choi, G; Seo, T S

    2015-02-01

    A novel centrifugal microdevice which could perform reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) and immunochromatographic strip (ICS) based amplicon detection was demonstrated for simple and cost-effective influenza A virus identification. The proposed centrifugal microdevice consists of the sample and running buffer loading reservoirs, the RT-LAMP chamber, and the ICS for detecting gene expression. The entire process could be completed sequentially and automatically by simply controlling the rotation speed and by optimizing the microfluidic design. Monoplex and multiplex RT-LAMP reactions targeting H1 and/or M gene were executed at 66 °C for 40 min, and the resultant amplicons were successfully analysed on the ICS within 15 min. Influenza A H1N1 virus was subtyped by detecting H1 and M gene on the ICS even with 10 copies of viral RNAs. Highly specific and multiplex viral typing of the integrated RT-LAMP-ICS microdevice was also demonstrated. The combination of the rapid isothermal amplification with the simple colorimetric detection on a strip in a single centrifugal microdevice will provide an advanced genetic analysis platform in the field of on-site pathogen diagnostics.

  16. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  17. Motion of a Probe Ball in the Fluid under Centrifugal Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyrkova, I. A.; Semenov, A. N.; Khokhlov, A. R.; Linliu, K.; Chu, B.

    1997-11-01

    The viscosity of a fluid can be measured by observing the motion of a probe sphere (or ball) in a centrifuge tube filled with this fluid. The hydrodynamic behavior of the probe ball moving in the centrifuge tube has been solved theoretically. We have got the universal relationship (for balls of a given material andsize in a given tube) between the terminal ball velocity, the fluid viscosity and the centrifuge acceleration using the only adjustable parameter — the rotational friction coefficient between the ball and the tube. The rotation of the centrifuge tube in the horizontal plane induces an inertia force which is counterbalanced by the friction force acting on the ball. As a result, the ball moves along the tube with some characteristic speed, which is a measure of the viscosity of the fluid. This speed was calculated in the lubrication approximation. The gravitational acceleration causes the ball to move very close to the bottom of the centrifuge tube. In this situation, the gravity is balanced by a “levitation” force introduced and calculated in the present paper. The origin of this force is the formation of the “bubble” behind and below the moving ball. The theoretical development on the terminal velocity for the ball moving very near the bottom of the horizontal centrifuge tube is tested by using a specially designed centrifuge for two types of balls and a wide set of viscosity standards. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment suggests that we have developed a new approach to measure high viscosities of fluids at low shear rates which might be especially useful for the investigation of polymer melts.

  18. Astronaut Gordon Cooper in centrifuge for tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, is strapped into the gondola while undergoing tests in the centrifuge at the Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The centrifuge is used to investigate by simulation the pilot's capability to control the vehicle during the actual flight in its booster and reentry profile.

  19. Apparatus for centrifugal separation of coal particles

    DOEpatents

    Dickie, William; Cavallaro, Joseph A.; Killmeyer, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric cell for centrifugal separation of fine coal by density has a cylindrical body and a butterfly valve or other apparatus for selectively sealing the body radially across the approximate center of the cylinder. A removable top is provided which seals the cylinder in the centrifuge and in unvented areas.

  20. Evaluation and prediction of blade-passing frequency noise generated by a centrifugal blower

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Y.; Outa, E.; Tajima, K.

    1996-07-01

    The blade-passing frequency noise, abbreviated to BPF noise, of a low-specific-speed centrifugal blower is analyzed by separating the frequency response of the transmission passage and the intensity of the noise source. Frequency response has previously been evaluated by the authors using a one-dimensional linear wave model, and the results have agreed well with the experimental response in a practical range of the blower speed. In the present study, the intensity of the noise source is estimated by introducing the quasi-steady model of the blade wake impingement on the scroll surface. The effective location of the noise source is determined by analyzing the cross-correlation between measured data of the blower suction noise and pressure fluctuation on the scroll surface. Then, the surface density distribution of a dipole noise source is determined from pressure fluctuations expressed in terms of quasi-steady dynamic pressure of the traveling blade wake. Finally, the free-field noise level is predicted by integrating the density spectrum of the noise source over the effective source area. The sound pressure level of the blower suction noise is easily predicted by multiplying the free-field noise level by the frequency-response characteristics of the noise transmission passage.

  1. Isolation of Lipid Droplets from Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Wolins, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets are organelles found in most mammalian cells, as well as in various plant tissues and yeast. They are composed of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a membrane monolayer of phospholipids and cholesterol in which specific proteins are embedded. This unit provides protocols for isolating lipid droplets from mammalian cells by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580706

  2. Simulator sickness provoked by a human centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Voge, V M

    1991-10-01

    Simulator sickness is now a well-recognized entity. It is recognized as a form of motion sickness, having a higher incidence in the more sophisticated simulators. Human centrifuges (dynamic simulators) are the newest innovation in aircrew training devices. Simulator sickness has never been reported in human centrifuges. We are reporting on a case of delayed simulator sickness in a pilot-subject after a centrifuge experience. A review of the "psycho-physiological" problems routinely experienced by subjects on human centrifuges indicates such problems are due to simulator sickness, although they are not reported as such. In this paper, we give a brief overview of simulator sickness and briefly discuss simulator sickness, as related to the human centrifuge experience.

  3. Cavitation Performance of a Centrifugal Pump with Water and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.; Barton, R. K.; Cramer, V. F.; Robinson, M. J.

    1961-01-01

    The cavitation performance of a given centrifugal pump with water (hot and cold) and mercury is compared. It is found that there are significant scale effects with all fluids tested, with the Thoma cavitation parameter decreasing in all cases for increased pump speed or fluid Reynolds' number. The data for a fixed flow coefficient fall into a single curve when plotted against pump speed (or fluid velocity), rather than against Reynolds' number. Conversely, the Thoma parameter for a given Reynolds' number is approximately twice as large for mercury as for water. The direction of this variation is as predicted from consideration of the cavitation thermodynamic parameters which vary by a factor of 10(exp 7) between these fluids. No difference in cavitation performance between hot and cold water (approximately 160 F and 80 F) was observed, However, the thermodynamic parameters vary only by a factor of 5.

  4. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  5. Improved method for measurement of inorganic phosphate in serum with a centrifugal analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wentz, P W; Savory, J; Cross, R E

    1976-02-01

    A direct mehtod [Clin. Chim. Acta 46, 113 (1973)] for determination of inorganic phosphate in serum was adapted for use with a centrifugal analyzer. Contamination is minimized and analysis rate maximized by doing the reaction in the reagent wells of the transfer disc and by utilizing the high-speed spectrophotometric and data-reduction capabilities of the centrifugal analyzer. Hemolysis, icterus, and moderate lipemia cause no interference. Grossly lipemic sera and sera from patients with plasma cell dyscrasias can be analyzed by incorporating appropriate blanking and dilution techniques. The method exhibits excellent sensitivity and precision and results correlate well with those from a continuous-flow procedure.

  6. Dual centrifuge system with flocculation improves barite recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Neidhardt, D.

    1993-03-15

    A mud-treatment system using two centrifuges and chemical flocculation to recover barite can return almost clean brine to the mud system and maintain low-gravity solids below 8.5%. The system requires no dilution to combat ultrafine particles and provides substantial cost savings on mud products, personnel, and disposal. Many conventional waste water treatment systems are useful but limited-pit volumes are reduced but not eliminated. Waste water treatment systems can help solve water supply and waste water problems for drillers. To achieve pitless, closed-loop drilling, the new method uses two centrifuges, each with dual hydraulic controls for bowl speed and scroll speed, and chemical flocculents for treatment of weighted and unweighted mud systems. This setup allows stringent control of low-gravity solids, barite recovery, and drilling waste disposal volumes. On many drilling operations, mud costs can typically be the third largest drilling cost. Thus, application of this type of barite-recovery system can provide significant cost savings and operational improvements, even if mud disposal is not a major concern.

  7. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  8. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  9. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  10. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  11. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  12. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  13. Water Containment Systems for Testing High-Speed Flywheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trase, Larry; Thompson, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Water-filled containers are used as building blocks in a new generation of containment systems for testing high-speed flywheels. Such containment systems are needed to ensure safety by trapping high-speed debris in the event of centrifugal breakup or bearing failure. Traditional containment systems for testing flywheels consist mainly of thick steel rings. The effectiveness of this approach to shielding against high-speed debris was demonstrated in a series of tests.

  14. Meteor Crater: Energy of formation - Implications of centrifuge scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Recent work on explosive cratering has demonstrated the utility of performing subscale experiments on a geotechnic centrifuge to develop scaling rules for very large energy events. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of this technique to impact cratering. Experiments have been performed using a projectile gun mounted directly on the centrifuge rotor to launch projectiles into a suitable soil container undergoing centripetal accelerations in excess of 500 G. The pump tube of a two-stage light-gas gun was used to attain impact velocities of approximately 2 km/sec. The results of the experiments indicate that the energy of formation of any large impact crater depends upon the impact velocity. This dependence, shown for the case of Meteor Crater, is consistent with analogous results for the specific energy dependence of explosives and is expected to persist to impact velocities in excess of 25 km/sec.

  15. Estimating soil hydraulic parameters from transient flow experiments in a centrifuge using parameter optimization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simunek, J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A modified version of the Hydrus software package that can directly or inversely simulate water flow in a transient centrifugal field is presented. The inverse solver for parameter estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters is then applied to multirotation transient flow experiments in a centrifuge. Using time-variable water contents measured at a sequence of several rotation speeds, soil hydraulic properties were successfully estimated by numerical inversion of transient experiments. The inverse method was then evaluated by comparing estimated soil hydraulic properties with those determined independently using an equilibrium analysis. The optimized soil hydraulic properties compared well with those determined using equilibrium analysis and steady state experiment. Multirotation experiments in a centrifuge not only offer significant time savings by accelerating time but also provide significantly more information for the parameter estimation procedure compared to multistep outflow experiments in a gravitational field. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. High Technology Centrifugal Compressor for Commercial Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckes, John

    2006-04-15

    R&D Dynamics, Bloomfield, CT in partnership with the State of Connecticut has been developing a high technology, oil-free, energy-efficient centrifugal compressor called CENVA for commercial air conditioning systems under a program funded by the US Department of Energy. The CENVA compressor applies the foil bearing technology used in all modern aircraft, civil and military, air conditioning systems. The CENVA compressor will enhance the efficiency of water and air cooled chillers, packaged roof top units, and other air conditioning systems by providing an 18% reduction in energy consumption in the unit capacity range of 25 to 350 tons of refrigeration The technical approach for CENVA involved the design and development of a high-speed, oil-free foil gas bearing-supported two-stage centrifugal compressor, CENVA encompassed the following high technologies, which are not currently utilized in commercial air conditioning systems: Foil gas bearings operating in HFC-134a; Efficient centrifugal impellers and diffusers; High speed motors and drives; and System integration of above technologies. Extensive design, development and testing efforts were carried out. Significant accomplishments achieved under this program are: (1) A total of 26 builds and over 200 tests were successfully completed with successively improved designs; (2) Use of foil gas bearings in refrigerant R134a was successfully proven; (3) A high speed, high power permanent magnet motor was developed; (4) An encoder was used for signal feedback between motor and controller. Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, the compressor could not operate at higher speed and in turn at higher pressure. In order to alleviate this problem a unique sensorless controller was developed; (5) This controller has successfully been tested as stand alone; however, it has not yet been integrated and tested as a system; (6) The compressor successfully operated at water cooled condensing temperatures Due to temperature

  17. Illusory movement of stationary stimuli in the visual periphery: evidence for a strong centrifugal prior in motion processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruyuan; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Tadin, Duje

    2013-03-01

    Visual input is remarkably diverse. Certain sensory inputs are more probable than others, mirroring statistical regularities of the visual environment. The visual system exploits many of these regularities, resulting, on average, in better inferences about visual stimuli. However, by incorporating prior knowledge into perceptual decisions, visual processing can also result in perceptions that do not match sensory inputs. Such perceptual biases can often reveal unique insights into underlying mechanisms and computations. For example, a prior assumption that objects move slowly can explain a wide range of motion phenomena. The prior on slow speed is usually rationalized by its match with visual input, which typically includes stationary or slow moving objects. However, this only holds for foveal and parafoveal stimulation. The visual periphery tends to be exposed to faster motions, which are biased toward centrifugal directions. Thus, if prior assumptions derive from experience, peripheral motion processing should be biased toward centrifugal speeds. Here, in experiments with human participants, we support this hypothesis and report a novel visual illusion where stationary objects in the visual periphery are perceived as moving centrifugally, while objects moving as fast as 7°/s toward fovea are perceived as stationary. These behavioral results were quantitatively explained by a Bayesian observer that has a strong centrifugal prior. This prior is consistent with both the prevalence of centrifugal motions in the visual periphery and a centrifugal bias of direction tuning in cortical area MT, supporting the notion that visual processing mirrors its input statistics.

  18. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  19. Isotope Separation in Concurrent Gas Centrifuges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.

    An analytical equation defining separative power of an optimized concurrent gas centrifuge is obtained for an arbitrary binary mixture of isotopes. In the case of the uranium isotopes the equation gives δU= 12.7(V/700 m/s)2(300 K/T)L, kg SWU/yr, where L and V are the length and linear velocity of the rotor of the gas centrifuge, T is the temperature. This formula well agrees with an empirical separative power of counter current gas centrifuges.

  20. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions.

  1. The use of a solid-bowl centrifuge for ultrafine coal thickening

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, A.P.; Klima, M.S.; Morrison, J.L.; Miller, B.G.

    2000-07-01

    Testing was carried out to investigate the use of a solid-bowl (decanter) centrifuge for thickening ultrafine coal-water slurries. This study was conducted for Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) to evaluate ultrafine dewatering technologies. The objective was to increase the solids concentration of an ultrafine coal discard stream to a level suitable for use as a coal-water slurry fuel, while maximizing overall solids recovery. The feed material was collected from the combined discharge (centrate) streams from several screen-bowl centrifuges, which are currently being used in a commercial coal cleaning facility to dewater froth flotation product. The centrate averages 5% solids by weight and contains nearly 60% material finer than 10 {micro}m. This study examined the effects of operating conditions on centrifuge performance, including centrifuge bowl and scroll speeds, and feed solids concentration. The effects of flocculation addition on centrifuge performance and slurry rheology were also examined. The results indicated that solids concentrations exceeding 55% were obtained in nearly all cases.

  2. A novel centrifuge for animal physiological researches in hypergravity and variable gravity forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Inoue, Katarzyna; Zeredo, . Jorge; Kimiya Narikiyo, .; Maezawa, Yukio; Yuuki Watanabe, .; Aou, Shuji

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the physiological responses to altered gravitational environments is essential for space exploration and long-term human life in space. Currently available centrifuges restrict experimentation due to limited space for laboratory equipments. We developed a medium-sized disc-type centrifuge to conduct ground-based studies on animal physiological response to hypergravity and variable gravity forces, which features the following advantages: 1) It enables simultaneous examination into the effects of various gravity levels including rotation control. 2) Beside the constant G force, variable G forces (delta-G) can be loaded to generate gravitational acceleration and deceleration. 3) Multiple imaging techniques can be used, such as high-speed video (16 channels wireless) and photography, X-ray, and infra-red imaging. 4) Telemetry is available on the disc table of the centrifuge through 128-channel analog and 32-channel digital signals, with sampling rate of 100 kHz for 2 hours. Our dynamic-balanced centrifuge can hold payloads of 600 kg that enable experimentation on various models of living organisms, from cells to animals and plants. We use this novel centrifuge for neurochemical and neurophysiological approaches such as microdialysis and telemetrical recording of neuronal activity in the rat brain. Financial supports from JSPS to K. Hasegawa (2011) and from JAXA to Y. Kumei (2011).

  3. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    DOEpatents

    Dancy, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses comprising a vertical tubular rotor, means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into said rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor, a first bearing means supporting said rotor at one end for rotational movement, a support, a damping bearing mounted on said support, a shaft fixed to said rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting said rotor to said damping bearing, a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with said shaft, the open end of said tube extending away from said rotor and the closed end of said tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor, an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on said support so as to be disposed within said tube and around said shaft, and a second annular magnetic core with coils arranged thereon to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of said tube, fixedly mounted on said support so as to surround said tube, the size of said first annular core and said second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of said shaft and said tube.

  4. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  5. Isolation of symbiotic dinoflagellates by centrifugal elutriation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.E.; Quinn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation, a method combining centripetal liquid flow with centrifugal force, has been used to isolate symbiotic dinoflagellates from a cnidarian host. The elutriated cells were shown to be viable by photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and low release of photosynthetic products into the incubation medium. The level of contamination by clinging debris was low and by host solids was negligible.

  6. Centrifugal Separation of Antiprotons and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Zielinski, M.; Sefzick, T.; Borbely, J. S.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  7. Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  8. Geotechnical Centrifuge Studies of Unsaturated Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Mattson, E. D.; Palmer, C. D.

    2007-12-01

    Improved understanding of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media is required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. A geotechnical centrifuge provides an experimental approach to explore vadose zone transport over a wide range of relevant conditions in time frames not possible for conventional bench-top experiments. Our research to date resulted in the design, construction, and testing of in-flight experimental apparatus allowing the replication of traditional bench top unsaturated transport experiments using the 2-meter radius geotechnical centrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. Additionally we conducted a series of unsaturated 1-dimenstional column experiments using conservative tracers to evaluate the effects of increased centrifugal acceleration on derived transport properties and assessing the scaling relationships for these properties. Our experimental results indicated that breakthrough times for a conservative tracer decreased significantly and systematically as a function of increased centrifugal acceleration. Differences between these experimental results and estimates based on predictive scaling rules are due to slight moisture content differences between experiments at different centrifugal accelerations. In contrast, dispersion coefficients varied systemically with centrifugal acceleration in accordance with predictive scaling rules. The results we obtained in this study indicate that the centrifuge technique is a viable experimental method for the study of subsurface processes where gravitational acceleration is important. The geotechnical centrifuge allows experiments to be completed more quickly than tests conducted at 1-gravity and can be used to experimentally address important scaling issues, and permits experiments under a range of conditions that

  9. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  10. Clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Demmy, T L; Boley, T M; Schmaltz, R A; Goss, C F; Wagner-Mann, C C

    1993-07-01

    Since October 1986, we have had experience with 96 Sarns centrifugal pumps in 72 patients (pts). Heparinless left atrial to femoral artery or aorta bypass was used in 14 pts undergoing surgery on the thoracic aorta with 13 survivors (93%). No paraplegia or device-related complications were observed. In 57 patients, the Sarns centrifugal pump was used as a univentricular (27 pts) or biventricular (30 pts) cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. In these patients, cardiac assist duration ranged from 2 to 434 h with a hospital survival rate of 29% in those requiring left ventricular assist and 13% in those requiring biventricular assist. Although complications were ubiquitous in this mortally ill patient population, in 5,235 pump-hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. Hospital survivors followed for 4 months to 6 years have enjoyed an improved functional class. We conclude that the Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective cardiac assist device when used to salvage patients otherwise unweanable from cardiopulmonary bypass. Partial left ventricular bypass using a centrifugal pump has become our procedure of choice for unloading the left ventricle and for maintenance of distal aortic perfusion pressure when performing surgery on the thoracic aorta. This clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump appears to be similar to that reported with other centrifugal assist devices.

  11. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 106 copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics. PMID:26556354

  12. Plasma centrifugation does not influence thrombin-antithrombin and plasmin-antiplasmin levels but determines platelet microparticles count

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyński, Krzysztof; Kapusta, Przemysław; Kowalik, Artur; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Centrifugation is an essential step for plasma preparation to remove residual elements in plasma, especially platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs). Our working hypothesis was that centrifugation as a preanalytical step may influence some coagulation parameters. Materials and methods Healthy young men were recruited (N = 17). For centrifugation, two protocols were applied: (A) the first centrifugation at 2500 x g for 15 min and (B) at 2500 x g for 20 min at room temperature with a light brake. In protocol (A), the second centrifugation was carried out at 2500 x g for 15 min, whereas in protocol (B), the second centrifugation involved a 10 min spin at 13,000 x g. Thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) and plasmin-antiplasmin (PAP) complexes concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMPs were stained with CD41 antibody and annexin V, and analyzed by flow cytometry method. Procoagulant activity was assayed by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method as a slope of thrombin formation (CAT velocity). Results Median TAT and PAP concentrations did not differ between the centrifugation protocols. The high speed centrifugation reduced the median (IQR) PMP count in plasma from 1291 (841-1975) to 573 (391-1010) PMP/µL (P = 0.001), and CAT velocity from 2.01 (1.31-2.88) to 0.97 (0.82-1.73) nM/min (P = 0.049). Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed correlation between TAT and PMPs in the protocol A plasma which was (rho = 0.52, P < 0.050) and between PMPs and CAT for protocol A (rho = 0.74, P < 0.050) and protocol B (rho = 0.78, P < 0.050). Conclusion Centrifugation protocols do not influence the markers of plasminogen (PAP) and thrombin (TAT) generation but they do affect the PMP count and procoagulant activity. PMID:26110034

  13. Rotary Speed Sensor for Antilocking Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Sensor based on fluidic principles produces negative pressure approximately proportional to rotational speed. Sensor developed as part of antilocking brake system for motorcycles. Uses inlet pressure rather than outlet pressure as braking-control signal, eliminating pressure pulsations caused by pump vanes and ensuring low-noise signal. Sensor is centrifugal air pump turned by one of motorcycle wheels. Air enters pump through orifice plates, and suction taken off through port in pump inlet plenum.

  14. Linear and Logarithmic Speed-Accuracy Trade-Offs in Reciprocal Aiming Result from Task-Specific Parameterization of an Invariant Underlying Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongers, Raoul M.; Fernandez, Laure; Bootsma, Reinoud J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the origins of linear and logarithmic speed-accuracy trade-offs from a dynamic systems perspective on motor control. In each experiment, participants performed 2 reciprocal aiming tasks: (a) a velocity-constrained task in which movement time was imposed and accuracy had to be maximized, and (b) a distance-constrained task in…

  15. Runtime and Inversion Impacts on Estimation of Moisture Retention Relations by Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigda, J. M.; Wilson, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Standard laboratory methods in soil physics for measuring the moisture retention relation (drainage matric potential-volumetric moisture content relation) are each limited to only part of the moisture content range. Centrifuge systems allow intensive accurate measurements across much of the saturation range, and typically require much less time than traditional laboratory methods. An initially liquid-saturated sample is subjected to a stepwise-increasing series of angular velocities while carefully monitoring changes in liquid content. Angular velocity is held constant until the capillary and centrifugal forces equilibrate, forcing liquid flux to zero, and then a final average liquid content is noted. The procedure is repeated after increasing the angular velocity. Centrifuge measurement time is greatly reduced because the centrifugal body force gradient can far exceed the driving forces utilized in standard lab methods. Widely-used in the petroleum industry for decades, centrifuge measurement of moisture retention relations is seldom encountered in the soil physics or vadose hydrology literatures. Yet there is a need to better understand and improve the experimental methodology given the increasing number of centrifuges employed in these fields. Errors in centrifuge measurement of moisture retention relations originate from both experimental protocol and from data inversion. Like standard methods, centrifuge methods assume equilibrium conditions, and so are sensitive to errors introduced by insufficient runtimes. Unlike standard methods, centrifuge experiments require inversion of the angular velocity and average sample moisture content data to a location-specific pair of matric potential and moisture content values, The force balance causes matric potential and moisture content to vary with sample length while the sample is spinning. Numerous data inversion techniques exist, each yielding different moisture retention relations. We present analyses demonstrating

  16. Rotor-to-stator rub vibration in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, J. J.; Qi, Q. M.

    1985-01-01

    One example of excessive vibration encountered during loading of a centrifugal compressor train (H type compressor with HP casing) is discussed. An investigation was made of the effects of the dynamic load on the bearing stiffness and the rotor-bearing system critical speed. The high vibration occurred at a "threshold load," but the machine didn't run smoothly due to rubs even when it had passed through the threshold load. The acquisition and discussion of the data taken in the field as well as a description of the case history which utilizes background information to identify the malfunction conditions is presented. The analysis shows that the failures, including full reverse precession rub and exact one half subharmonic vibration, were caused by the oversize bearings and displacement of the rotor center due to foundation deformation and misalignment between gear shafts, etc. The corrective actions taken to alleviate excessive vibration and the problems which remain to be solved are also presented.

  17. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are

  18. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-03-11

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF{sub 2} salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 135}Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10{sup 7} and the fraction of {sup 137}CS in {sup 133}Cs being as low as a few parts in 10{sup 5}. A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components.

  19. Liquid egg white pasteurization using a centrifugal UV irradiator.

    PubMed

    Geveke, David J; Torres, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Studies are limited on UV nonthermal pasteurization of liquid egg white (LEW). The objective of this study was to inactivate Escherichia coli using a UV irradiator that centrifugally formed a thin film of LEW on the inside of a rotating cylinder. The LEW was inoculated with E. coli K12 to approximately 8 log cfu/ml and was processed at the following conditions: UV intensity 1.5 to 9.0 mW/cm²; cylinder rotational speed 450 to 750 RPM, cylinder inclination angle 15° to 45°, and flow rate 300 to 900 ml/min, and treatment time 1.1 to 3.2s. Appropriate dilutions of the samples were pourplated with tryptic soy agar (TSA). Sublethal injury was determined using TSA+4% NaCl. The regrowth of surviving E. coli during refrigerated storage for 28 days was investigated. The electrical energy of the UV process was also determined. The results demonstrated that UV processing of LEW at a dose of 29 mJ/cm² at 10°C reduced E. coli by 5 log cfu/ml. Inactivation significantly increased with increasing UV dose and decreasing flow rate. The results at cylinder inclination angles of 30° and 45° were similar and were significantly better than those at 15°. The cylinder rotational speed had no significant effect on inactivation. The occurrence of sublethal injury was detected. Storage of UV processed LEW at 4° and 10°C for 21 days further reduced the population of E. coli to approximately 1 log cfu/ml where it remained for an additional 7 days. The UV energy applied to the LEW to obtain a 5 log reduction of E. coli was 3.9 J/ml. These results suggest that LEW may be efficiently pasteurized, albeit at low flow rates, using a nonthermal UV device that centrifugally forms a thin film.

  20. Development of an autoflow cruise control system for a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Beppu, T; Nakajima, M; Nishinaka, T; Nakatani, H; Ihashi, K; Katsumata, T; Kitamura, M; Aomi, S; Endo, M

    1995-07-01

    To improve the ease of driving a centrifugal pump that is afterload dependent, we have developed an automatic flow control system for the Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system. This system consists of an autoflow cruise control system with a safety cutoff. The Capiox Pump Console 3000 was controlled by a personal computer through a serial communication line. In the usual manual mode, the motor speed knob works as a pump speed control, and in the autoflow mode, the same knob works as a blood flow rate control. After selecting and obtaining the desired flow rate, the mode was changed from manual to autoflow mode. In the autoflow mode, the computer compares the desired flow rate with the actual flow measured by an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter and adjusts the motor rotational speed accordingly. During both in vivo and in vitro testing, this autoflow mode was able to return the changed flow that was disrupted by either clamping and declamping of the tubing or by the bolus injection of a vasomotor drug to the selected flow rate within 10 s without any significant fluctuation. In conclusion, the newly developed computer controlled autoflow system was able to produce a reliable and effective flow regulation for a centrifugal pump.

  1. Invited Review Article: Review of centrifugal microfluidic and bio-optical disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.

    2009-10-01

    Spinning biodisks have advantages that make them attractive for specialized biochip applications. The two main classes of spinning biodisks are microfluidic disks and bio-optical compact disks (BioCD). Microfluidic biodisks take advantage of noninertial pumping for lab-on-a-chip devices using noninertial valves and switches under centrifugal and Coriolis forces to distribute fluids about the disks. BioCDs use spinning-disk interferometry, under the condition of common-path phase quadrature, to perform interferometric label-free detection of molecular recognition and binding. The optical detection of bound molecules on a disk is facilitated by rapid spinning that enables high-speed repetitive sampling to eliminate 1/f noise through common-mode rejection of intensity fluctuations and extensive signal averaging. Multiple quadrature classes have been developed, such as microdiffraction, in-line, phase contrast, and holographic adaptive optics. Thin molecular films are detected through the surface dipole density with a surface height sensitivity for the detection of protein spots that is approximately 1 pm. This sensitivity easily resolves a submonolayer of solid-support immobilized antibodies and their antigen targets. Fluorescence and light scattering provide additional optical detection techniques on spinning disks. Immunoassays have been applied to haptoglobin using protein A/G immobilization of antibodies and to prostate specific antigen. Small protein spots enable scalability to many spots per disk for high-throughput and highly multiplexed immonoassays.

  2. Centrifugal and Axial Pump Design and Off-Design Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1995-01-01

    A meanline pump-flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling pumps of cryogenic rocket engines. Based on this method, a meanline pump-flow code PUMPA was written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The design-point rotor efficiency and slip factors are obtained from empirical correlations to rotor-specific speed and geometry. The pump code can model axial, inducer, mixed-flow, and centrifugal pumps and can model multistage pumps in series. The rapid input setup and computer run time for this meanline pump flow code make it an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map-generation capabilities of the code provide the information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code. The off-design and multistage modeling capabilities of PUMPA permit the user to do parametric design space exploration of candidate pump configurations and to provide head-flow maps for engine system evaluation.

  3. 26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T. T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Once the molasses was separated from the sugar crystals it flowed through the spouts in the base of the centrifugals. The centrifugals' pulleys can be seen underneath the centrifugal. The centrifugal on the right has been reinforced with seven metal bands. The handles for the clutch mechanism are located above the centrifugal. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  4. SPEEDES benchmarking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capella, Sebastian J.; Steinman, Jeffrey S.; McGraw, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    SPEEDES, the Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation, is a software framework that supports simulation applications across parallel and distributed architectures. SPEEDES is used as a simulation engine in support of numerous defense projects including the Joint Simulation System (JSIMS), the Joint Modeling And Simulation System (JMASS), the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program's (HPCMP) development of a High Performance Computing (HPC) Run-time Infrastructure, and the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) development of a Human Behavioral Representation (HBR) Testbed. This work documents some of the performance metrics obtained from benchmarking the SPEEDES Simulation Framework with respect to the functionality found in the summer of 2001. Specifically this papers the scalability of SPEEDES with respect to its time management algorithms and simulation object event queues with respect to the number of objects simulated and events processed.

  5. Update on plasma arc centrifugal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.E.; Paulson, W.S.; Eschenbach, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last eight years, Retech has developed a plasma-powered system for destroying organics and stabilizing metal oxides in a non-leaching slag. The system, termed Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT), can handle a variety of waste streams such as contaminated soils, sludges, ion-exchange resins, incinerator bottom and fly-ash and drummed waste among others. This paper will review recent commercial applications of the technology. Three Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment systems having an eight-foot diameter centrifuge (PACT-8) are in the construction phase. One will be used in the Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT) system for remediating Pit 9 at the Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEL). A second unit will be located at the Retech plant in Ukiah, California. The third unit will be located at a site in Munster, Germany.

  6. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  7. Colloid centrifugation selects normal spermatozoa from polymorphic bull ejaculates: a case study.

    PubMed

    Morrell, J M; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Andersson, M

    2014-04-01

    Semen from a Western Finncattle bull exhibiting a highly polymorphic spermiogram was processed by colloid centrifugation using Androcoll-B, a species-specific silane-coated silica colloid. In the first experiment, Single Layer Centrifugation (SLC) was used to identify which density colloids were needed to separate different cell populations. Colloids of the two chosen densities were then used in a density gradient resulting in two sperm subpopulations, one containing nearly all normally sized spermatozoa and the other enriched for the macrocephalic spermatozoa. Microcephalic spermatozoa did not appear in either of the selected subpopulations. Using a combination of SLC and DGC with this species-specific colloid, it was possible to separate the spermatozoa into different subpopulations, that is, a subpopulation containing nearly all normally sized spermatozoa, and another one enriched for the macrocephalic spermatozoa. Thus, colloid centrifugation could be used to select sufficient normal spermatozoa from a highly polymorphic ejaculate for AI, if desired.

  8. Experimental on-stream elimination of resonant whirl in a large centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. I.; Eierman, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Resonant whirl condition during operation of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor at higher than anticipated speeds and loads was reported. The condition was diagnosed by a large scale computerized Machinery Condition Monitoring System (MACMOS). This computerized system verified that the predominant subsynchronous whirl frequency locked in on the first resonant frequency of the compressor rotor and did not vary with compressor speed. Compressor stability calculations showed the rotor system had excessive hearing stiffness and inadequate effective damping. An optimum bearing design which was developed to minimize the unbalance response and to maximize the stability threshold is presented.

  9. The influence of blade profile and slots on the performance of a centrifugal impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    As part of the program of studies on centrifugal impellers, the problem of instability at low flows was investigated. The major cause was found to be flow detachment from the impeller vanes. Slotted blades were found to be the most effective means of delaying this detachment, and extending the working range of the blower. Low speed studies were confirmed by a test program on a high speed machine, where it was demonstrated that the improved flow range was accompanied by a general increase of efficiency. The design and placement of the slots is discussed.

  10. Influence of flow patterns on chromatographic efficiency in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Marchal, L; Foucaul, A; Patissier, G; Rosant, J M; Legrand, J

    2000-02-11

    Visualization of flow patterns in centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was performed with an asynchronous camera and a stroboscope triggered by the CPC rotor, allowing a channel to be selected and observed regardless of rotational speed. Three main types of flow states were noted as a function of rotational speed and flow-rate: jets stuck along channel walls, broken jets and atomization. Our observations emphasize the importance of Coriolis force on flow shape. Chromatographic efficiency was related to the dispersion of the mobile phase in the stationary phase.

  11. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  12. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  13. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-02-15

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation, have been developed and allow automation and integration of complex assay protocols in lab-on-a-disc systems. Besides liquid handling, the detection strategy for reading out the assay is crucial for developing a fully integrated system. In this review, we focus on biosensors and readout methods for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles.

  14. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  15. Rhie-Chow interpolation in strong centrifugal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    Rhie-Chow interpolation formulas are derived from the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. These formulas are generalized to gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields (as high as 106 g) occurring in gas centrifuges.

  16. An Experimental Study of Cavitation Detection in a Centrifugal Pump Using Envelope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chek Zin; Leong, M. Salman

    Cavitation represents one of the most common faults in pumps and could potentially lead to a series of failure in mechanical seal, impeller, bearing, shaft, motor, etc. In this work, an experimental rig was setup to investigate cavitation detection using vibration envelope analysis method, and measured parameters included sound, pressure and flow rate for feasibility of cavitation detection. The experiment testing included 3 operating points of the centrifugal pump (B.E.P, 90% of B.E.P and 80% of B.E.P). Suction pressure of the centrifugal pump was decreased gradually until the inception point of cavitation. Vibration measurements were undertaken at various locations including casing, bearing, suction and discharge flange of the centrifugal pump. Comparisons of envelope spectrums under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions were presented. Envelope analysis was proven useful in detecting cavitation over the 3 testing conditions. During the normal operating condition, vibration peak synchronous to rotational speed was more pronounced. It was however during cavitation condition, the half order sub-harmonic vibration component was clearly evident in the envelope spectrums undertaken at all measurement locations except at the pump bearing. The possible explanation of the strong sub-harmonic (½ of BPF) during cavitation existence in the centrifugal pump was due to insufficient time for the bubbles to collapse completely before the end of the single cycle.

  17. Continuous back extraction operation by a single liquid-liquid centrifugal extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakase, M.; Takeshita, K.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a small, high-performance liquid-liquid countercurrent centrifugal extractor for the nuclear fuel cycle. The single extractor allows extraction with many multiple theoretical stages due to the formation of Taylor vortices. We have previously demonstrated multistage extraction for a forward extraction system. In this study, we have applied the centrifugal extractor to a continuous back extraction system with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid. We examined the performance of our concept of the centrifugal extractor by varying the rotational speeds of the inner rotor and the nitric acid concentration in the stripping solution. The dispersion behavior, flow characteristics were determined and the back extraction performance was examined for a single chemical species and for multiple species. Complete back extraction by continuous process was achieved and it showed the possibility to minimize the volume and nitric acid concentration of the stripping solution. Our centrifugal extractors may provide a more effective separation system than the conventional separation process that uses many continuously connected extractors. (authors)

  18. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc.

  19. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc. PMID:26736977

  20. SPEEDE Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Barbara H.; Wei, P. Betty

    1993-01-01

    A nontechnical overview of electronic data interchange (EDI) and of the SPEEDE/ExPRESS Project, which uses EDI to transmit transcripts between schools and colleges, is presented. It explores the fundamental value of the technology, specific costs and benefits, and its potential to transform the delivery of academic support services. (Author/MSE)

  1. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  2. Centrifugal forces within usually-used magnitude elicited a transitory and reversible change in proliferation and gene expression of osteoblastic cells UMR-106.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Lingyong; Liao, Ga; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Songjiao; Zhao, Zhihe

    2009-02-01

    Centrifugation is an important step in biochemical and molecular biological researches. But the effects of centrifugal stress on cells are still unclear. In this study, osteoblastic cells UMR-106 were subjected to a moderate centrifugal stress at 209 x g for 10 min. Then the cell proliferation and gene transcription after centrifugation were analyzed with flow cytometry and Real-time RT-PCR techniques, respectively. The result showed that the cell proliferation and mRNA expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, Collagen I and osteocalcin changed shortly after centrifugal loading, but recovered to pre-load levels within 24 h. A dose-response study of exposure cells to centrifugal force at 209, 253 and 301 x g showed that the centrifugal forces within usually-used range can rapidly influenced the mRNA expression of the osteoblast-specific genes, but no statistical differences were found among the three centrifugal magnitudes. And the fast regulation in the investigated genes was proved to be related to increased c-fos mRNA levels and subsequent activation of RTK and integrity of cytoskeleton construction. The result showed that the osteoblastic cells displayed a fast auto-regulation to usually-used centrifugal stress through multiple signal pathways.

  3. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  8. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  9. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  10. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  11. Mass Transfer in 12-CM Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chesna, J.C.

    2001-06-26

    One eight-stage unit (8-pack) of centrifugal contactors was tested in both extraction and stripping modes. Efficiencies approaching 100 percent were obtained in both modes. The contactors were operated successfully at a wide range of combined flow rates, including the HEF conditions. This report discusses the results of that test.

  12. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  13. Research centrifuge accommodations on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, Roger D.; Horkachuk, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Life sciences research using plants and animals on the Space Station Freedom requires the ability to maintain live subjects in a safe and low stress environment for long durations at microgravity and at one g. The need for a centrifuge to achieve these accelerations is evident. Programmatic, technical, and cost considerations currently favor a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge located either in the end cone of a Space Station Freedom node or in a separate module. A centrifuge facility could support a mix of rodent, plant, and small primate habitats. An automated cage extractor could be used to remove modular habitats in pairs without stopping the main rotor, minimizing the disruption to experiment protocols. The accommodation of such a centrifuge facility on the Space Station represents a significant demand on the crew time, power, data, volume, and logistics capability. It will contribute to a better understanding of the effects of space flight on humans, an understanding of plant growth in space for the eventual production of food, and an understanding of the role of gravity in biological processes.

  14. A centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Goro; Jung, Jae Hwan; Park, Byung Hyun; Oh, Seung Jun; Seo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-06-21

    In this study, we developed a centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria contaminated milk samples. The microdevice was designed to contain identical triplicate functional units and each unit has four reaction chambers, thereby making it possible to perform twelve direct-RPA reactions simultaneously. The integrated microdevice consisted of two layers: RPA reagents were injected in the top layer, while spiked milk samples with food poisoning bacteria were loaded into sample reservoirs in the bottom layer. For multiplex bacterial detection, the target gene-specific primers and probes were dried in each reaction chamber. The introduced samples and reagents could be equally aliquoted and dispensed into each reaction chamber by centrifugal force, and then the multiplex direct-RPA reaction was executed. The target genes of bacteria spiked in milk could be amplified at 39 °C without a DNA extraction step by using the direct-RPA cocktails, which were a combination of a direct PCR buffer and RPA enzymes. As the target gene amplification proceeded, the increased fluorescence signals coming from the reaction chambers were recorded in real-time at an interval of 2 min. The entire process, including the sample distribution, the direct-RPA reaction, and the real-time analysis, was accomplished with a custom-made portable genetic analyzer and a miniaturized optical detector. Monoplex, duplex, and triplex food poisoning bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) detection was successfully performed with a detection sensitivity of 4 cells per 3.2 μL of milk samples within 30 min. By implementing the direct-PRA on the miniaturized centrifugal microsystem, the on-site food poisoning bacteria analysis would be feasible with high speed, sensitivity, and multiplicity.

  15. A centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Goro; Jung, Jae Hwan; Park, Byung Hyun; Oh, Seung Jun; Seo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-06-21

    In this study, we developed a centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria contaminated milk samples. The microdevice was designed to contain identical triplicate functional units and each unit has four reaction chambers, thereby making it possible to perform twelve direct-RPA reactions simultaneously. The integrated microdevice consisted of two layers: RPA reagents were injected in the top layer, while spiked milk samples with food poisoning bacteria were loaded into sample reservoirs in the bottom layer. For multiplex bacterial detection, the target gene-specific primers and probes were dried in each reaction chamber. The introduced samples and reagents could be equally aliquoted and dispensed into each reaction chamber by centrifugal force, and then the multiplex direct-RPA reaction was executed. The target genes of bacteria spiked in milk could be amplified at 39 °C without a DNA extraction step by using the direct-RPA cocktails, which were a combination of a direct PCR buffer and RPA enzymes. As the target gene amplification proceeded, the increased fluorescence signals coming from the reaction chambers were recorded in real-time at an interval of 2 min. The entire process, including the sample distribution, the direct-RPA reaction, and the real-time analysis, was accomplished with a custom-made portable genetic analyzer and a miniaturized optical detector. Monoplex, duplex, and triplex food poisoning bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) detection was successfully performed with a detection sensitivity of 4 cells per 3.2 μL of milk samples within 30 min. By implementing the direct-PRA on the miniaturized centrifugal microsystem, the on-site food poisoning bacteria analysis would be feasible with high speed, sensitivity, and multiplicity. PMID:27216297

  16. Membrane characteristics and osmotic fragility of red cells, fractionated with anglehead centrifugation and counterflow centrifugation.

    PubMed

    van der Vegt, S G; Ruben, A M; Werre, J M; de Gier, J; Staal, G E

    1985-11-01

    Red cell populations were separated on the basis of differences in density using anglehead centrifugation and on the basis of differences in mean cell volume using counterflow centrifugation. In the different fractions, mean surface area was calculated, phospholipid and cholesterol content determined as well as the osmotic behaviour in hypotonic salt solutions. Older red cells appeared to be more resistant to hypotonic salt solutions, due to favourable surface area to volume ratio. PMID:4063204

  17. Pretreatment of plasma samples by a novel hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration technique for the determination of plasma protein binding of three coumarins using acetone as protein binding releasing agent.

    PubMed

    Li, Junmei; Shi, Qingwen; Jiang, Ye; Liu, Yan

    2015-09-15

    A novel and practical sample pretreatment method based on hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration (HFCF-UF) was developed to determine plasma protein binding by using HPLC. The samples for analyzing unbound and total concentrations could be prepared in parallel simultaneously by the same device. It only required centrifugation for a short time and the filtrate could be injected directly for HPLC analysis without further treatment. Coumarins were selected as the model drugs. Acetone was chosen as the releasing agent to free the binding drug from the drug-protein complex for the total drug concentration determination. Non-specific bindings (NSBs) between the analytes and hollow fiber membrane materials were investigated. The type and volume of protein binding releaser were optimized. Additionally, centrifugal speed and centrifugal time were considered. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute recovery rates of the unbound and total concentrations were in the range of 97.5-100.9% for the three analytes. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0135-0.0667μgmL(-1). In vitro plasma protein binding of the three coumarins was determined at three concentrations using the validated method and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 3.4%. Compared with traditional method, the HFCF-UF method is simple to run, no specialized equipment requirement and is a more accurate plasma pretreatment procedure with almost excellent drug-protein binding equilibrium. Therefore, this method can be applied to determine the plasma protein binding in clinical practice. It also provides a reliable alternative for accurate monitoring of unbound or total drug concentration in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).

  18. Mass Purification of Nucleopolyhedrosis Virus Inclusion Bodies in the K-Series Centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Breillatt, J. P.; Brantley, J. N.; Mazzone, H. M.; Martignoni, M. E.; Franklin, J. E.; Anderson, N. G.

    1972-01-01

    Nucleopolyhedrosis virus inclusion bodies specific for Hemerocampa pseudotsugata, Neodiprion sertifer, Porthetria dispar, and Heliothis zea have been purified by using a continuous-sample-flow-with-isopycnic-banding centrifuge in quantities up to 6 × 1013 polyhedral inclusion bodies per day. Continuous-flow methods for S-ρ type purification have been evolved to deal with mass isolation of bioparticles. PMID:5031562

  19. Centrifugal fragmentation of a dinuclear system in the process of its evolution toward a compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V. V.

    2007-12-15

    The centrifugal fragmentation of a dinuclear system in the process of evolution toward a compound nucleus is examined. If the angular momentum in the collision of primary nuclei is quite high, centrifugal forces become dominant at the final stage of the evolution of the dinuclear system formed, causing the decay of this dinuclear system to two strongly asymmetric nuclear fragments. Experimental data in which this specific nuclear process manifests itself are presented. Centrifugal fragmentation makes it possible to reveal the cluster facet of the evolution of a dinuclear system toward a compound nucleus. The possibility of this fragmentation process is a logical consequence of the concept of a dinuclear system for the complete fusion of nuclei.

  20. Effects of bedrest and centrifugation of humans on serum thyroid function tests.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in plasma volume and protein concentration have been reported when normal subjects are bedrested or centrifuged. Since thyroid hormones are transported by specific plasma proteins, each of these procedures could be expected to change plasma levels of these hormones. In this study centrifugation of normal healthy human subjects produced an increased concentration of total protein and albumin. When these same subjects were bedrested for six days, no change in total protein, albumin or thyroxine binding globulin were found although there was an eight per cent decrease in plasma volume. Centrifugation and, to a lesser extent, bedrest produced changes in serum T-4 levels and the T-3 test results. The direction of these changes (decreased % T-3 values and increased T-4 levels) indicate that these two situations produce an increased plasma concentration of thyroxine binding sites.

  1. Centrifugal governor for injection type internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M

    1989-05-23

    A centrifugal governor for an injection type internal combustion engine, comprising: a housing in which a cam shaft is rotatably supported at its lower section and a fuel injection pump is disposed above the cam shaft; a flyweight disposed at an end of the cam shaft so as to be displaced in accordance with a rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever rotatable upon a driving force of the flyweight with an intermediate fixed shaft as a pivot; a governor spring assembly supported so as not to exert any supporting load between a housing side spring seat and another spring seat provided to the tension lever, and so as to be compressed upon rotation of the tension lever; a guide lever and a floating lever, both rotatable with a pin provided at a lower end of the tension lever as a pivot, and normally connected to each other as an integrated element by a cancellation spring surrounding the pin; the speed lever have a shaped like bell crank, rotatably supported at one end with a shaft connecting the control lever as a pivot, and engaged with an intermediated guide of the guide lever at the other end.

  2. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  3. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of heat flow, segregation, and interface shape of gradient-freeze crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, C. W.; Tu, C. Y.

    2001-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) heat flow, dopant segregation, and interface shape during crystal growth by a gradient freeze technique in a centrifuge are analyzed by a finite volume method. The basic flow patterns for a fixed geometry (with a concave interface) at different configurations agree well with the previous report (Friedrich et al., J. Crystal Growth 167 (1996) 45). However, the self-consistent analysis allows us for the first time to further investigate the role of the Coriolis force and centrifugal acceleration on the heat and mass transfer and the interface, simultaneously. Furthermore, the rotation speed found for the weakest convection, where the Coriolis force balances the gravitational and centrifugal forces, turns out to have larger radial segregation, despite having a larger effective segregation coefficient. Rotation about the growth axis is also investigated. For this configuration, it is found that both axial and radial segregation could be reduced under certain conditions.

  5. Effects of Impeller-Diffuser Interaction on Centrifugal Compressor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.

    2003-01-01

    This research program focuses on characterizing the effect of impeller-diffuser interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage on its performance using unsteady threedimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The computed results show that the interaction between the downstream diffuser pressure field and the impeller tip clearance flow can account for performance changes in the impeller. The magnitude of performance change due to this interaction was examined for an impeller with varying tip clearance followed by a vaned or vaneless diffuser. The impact of unsteady impeller-diffuser interaction, primarily through the impeller tip clearance flow, is reflected through a time-averaged change in impeller loss, blockage and slip. The results show that there exists a tip clearance where the beneficial effect of the impeller-diffuser interaction on the impeller performance is at a maximum. A flow feature that consists of tip flow back leakage was shown to occur at design speed for the centrifugal compressor stage. This flow phenomenon is described as tip flow that originates in one passage, flows downstream of the impeller trailing edge and then returns to upstream of the impeller trailing edge of a neighboring passage. Such a flow feature is a source of loss in the impeller. A hypothesis is put forth to show that changing the diffuser vane count and changing impeller-diffuser gap has an analogous effect on the impeller performance. The centrifugal compressor stage was analyzed using diffusers of different vane counts, producing an impeller performance trend similar to that when the impeller-diffuser gap was varied, thus supporting the hypothesis made. This has the implication that the effect impeller performance associated with changing the impeller-diffuser gap and changing diffuser vane count can be described by the non-dimensional ratio of impeller-diffuser gap to diffuser vane pitch. A procedure is proposed and developed for isolating impeller passage

  6. 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest winner: Visualizing unsteady vortical behavior of a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Otto, Mathias; Kuhn, Alexander; Engelke, Wito; Theisel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    In the 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest, the dataset represented a high-resolution simulation of a centrifugal pump operating below optimal speed. The goal was to find suitable visualization techniques to identify regions of rotating stall that impede the pump's effectiveness. The winning entry split analysis of the pump into three parts based on the pump's functional behavior. It then applied local and integration-based methods to communicate the unsteady flow behavior in different regions of the dataset. This research formed the basis for a comparison of common vortex extractors and more recent methods. In particular, integration-based methods (separation measures, accumulated scalar fields, particle path lines, and advection textures) are well suited to capture the complex time-dependent flow behavior. This video (http://youtu.be/oD7QuabY0oU) shows simulations of unsteady flow in a centrifugal pump.

  7. Wirelessly addressable heater array for centrifugal microfluidics and Escherichia coli sterilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Song, Lele; Assadsangabi, Babak; Fang, Jie; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Sultan; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Localized temperature control and heater interface remain challenges in centrifugal microfluidics and integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper presents a new wireless heating method that enables selective activation of micropatterned resonant heaters using external radiofrequency (RF) fields and its applications. The wireless heaters in an array are individually activated by modulating the frequency of the external field. Temperature of 93 °C is achieved in the heater when resonated with a 0.49-W RF output power. The wireless method is demonstrated to be fully effective for heating samples under spinning at high speeds, showing its applicability to centrifugal systems. Selective sterilization of Escherichia coli through the wireless heating is also demonstrated. Healthcare applications with a focus on wound sterilization are discussed along with preliminary experiments, showing promising results.

  8. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100--1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  9. Achieved slime flotation in centrifugal force field by float-hydrocyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Guode Xuzhanxian; Gaozhenshen Songzhiwei

    1997-12-31

    Based on the theory of intensifying flotation in a centrifugal force field, float-hydrocyclone (FH) is developed, which is a new type of equipment for slime flotation and consists of an air bubble generator and the cylindrical section of a hydrocyclone. The combination of pulp and air bubbles is fed into the FH tangentially at a high speed to effect the separation of slime in the centrifugal force field. It offers many advantages over mechanically agitated flotation cells. Commercial test results show that slime, especially fine slime, can be perfectly floated in the FH with rapid flotation and fine froth size. The quality and quantity of concentrate and tailings can be adjusted conveniently within a certain range according to different requirements.

  10. Wirelessly addressable heater array for centrifugal microfluidics and Escherichia coli sterilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Song, Lele; Assadsangabi, Babak; Fang, Jie; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Sultan; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Localized temperature control and heater interface remain challenges in centrifugal microfluidics and integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper presents a new wireless heating method that enables selective activation of micropatterned resonant heaters using external radiofrequency (RF) fields and its applications. The wireless heaters in an array are individually activated by modulating the frequency of the external field. Temperature of 93 °C is achieved in the heater when resonated with a 0.49-W RF output power. The wireless method is demonstrated to be fully effective for heating samples under spinning at high speeds, showing its applicability to centrifugal systems. Selective sterilization of Escherichia coli through the wireless heating is also demonstrated. Healthcare applications with a focus on wound sterilization are discussed along with preliminary experiments, showing promising results. PMID:24110983

  11. Discussion on back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor compact design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Lei; Liu, Huoxing

    2013-12-01

    Design a small flow back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor in the aviation turbocharger, the compressor is compact structure, small axial length, light weighted. Stationary parts have a great influence on their overall performance decline. Therefore, the stationary part of the back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor should pay full attention to the diffuser, bend, return vane and volute design. Volute also impact downstream return vane, making the flow in circumferential direction is not uniformed, and several blade angle of attack is drastically changed in downstream of the volute with the airflow can not be rotated to required angle. Loading of high-pressure rotor blades change due to non-uniformed of flow in circumferential direction, which makes individual blade load distribution changed, and affected blade passage load decreased to reduce the capability of work, the tip low speed range increases.

  12. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  13. A vibration model for centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Wasserman, M.O.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1992-11-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, we created the Excel worksheet ``Beam`` for analyzing vibrations in centrifugal contactors. With this worksheet, a user can calculate the first natural frequency of the motor/rotor system for a centrifugal contactor. We determined a typical value for the bearing stiffness (k{sub B}) of a motor after measuring the k{sub B} value for three different motors. The k{sub B} value is an important parameter in this model, but it is not normally available for motors. The assumptions that we made in creating the Beam worksheet were verified by comparing the calculated results with those from a VAX computer program, BEAM IV. The Beam worksheet was applied to several contactor designs for which we have experimental data and found to work well.

  14. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  15. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  16. Spaceborne centrifugal relays for spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzidane, Malika

    1991-01-01

    Acceleration using centrifugal relays is a recently discovered method for the acceleration of spaceborne payloads to high velocity at high thrust. Centrifugal relays are moving rotors which progressively accelerate reaction mass to higher velocities. One important engineering problem consists of accurately tracking the position of the projectiles and rotors and guiding each projectile exactly onto the appropriate guide tracks on each rotor. The topics of this research are the system kinematics and dynamics and the computerized guidance system which will allow the projectile to approach each rotor with exact timing with respect to the rotor rotation period and with very small errors in lateral positions. Kinematics studies include analysis of rotor and projectile positions versus time and projectile/rotor interactions. Guidance studies include a detailed description of the tracking mechanism (interrupt of optical beams) and the aiming mechanism (electromagnetic focusing) including the design of electromagnetic deflection coils and the switching circuitry.

  17. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  18. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

  19. Stable isotope enrichment using a plasma centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; Madden, Robert

    2012-10-01

    A primary goal of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (Isotope Program) within the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is to produce isotopes that are in short supply in the U.S. and of which there exists no or insufficient domestic commercial production capability. A vacuum arc plasma centrifuge is a rigid rotor column of metal plasma in which centrifugal forces re-distribute ions radially according to their mass/charge ratio. Early work demonstrated rotation at 2 million rpm and separation of various stable isotopes. The spinning plasma column had a Gaussian flux profile, peaked on the rigid rotor axis. This work adopts a more efficient approach, with the plasma created as a hollow column, wherein the flux is concentrated at larger radii where the centrifugal action is highest. By tailoring the vacuum arc discharge geometry, the rotation rate can also be increased to ˜10 million rpm. Data from Cu, Al and other metal plasmas will be presented and discussed in light of enriched stable isotopes needed for research and medicine.

  20. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  1. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species. PMID:20613707

  2. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  3. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  4. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    1992-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  5. Effects of Individualized Centrifugation Training on Orthostatic Tolerance in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Nandu; Evans, Joyce; Schneider, Stefan; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Mulder, Edwin; Rössler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Blaber, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Exposure to artificial gravity (AG) at different G loads and durations on human centrifuges has been shown to improve orthostatic tolerance in men. However, the effects on women and of an individual-specific AG training protocol on tolerance are not known. Methods We examined the effects of 90 minutes of AG vs. 90 minutes of supine rest on the orthostatic tolerance limit (OTL), using head up tilt and lower body negative pressure until presyncope of 7 men and 5 women. Subjects were placed in the centrifuge nacelle while instrumented and after one-hour they underwent either: 1) AG exposure (90 minutes) in supine position [protocol 1, artificial gravity exposure], or 2) lay supine on the centrifuge for 90 minutes in supine position without AG exposure [protocol 2, control]. The AG training protocol was individualized, by first determining each subject’s maximum tolerable G load, and then exposing them to 45 minutes of ramp training at sub-presyncopal levels. Results Both sexes had improved OTL (14 minutes vs 11 minutes, p < 0.0019) following AG exposure. When cardiovascular (CV) variables at presyncope in the control test were compared with the CV variables at the same tilt-test time (isotime) during post-centrifuge, higher blood pressure, stroke volume and cardiac output and similar heart rates and peripheral resistance were found post-centrifuge. Conclusions These data suggest a better-maintained central circulating blood volume post-centrifugation across gender and provide an integrated insight into mechanisms of blood pressure regulation and the possible implementation of in-flight AG countermeasure profiles during spaceflights. PMID:26020542

  6. Critical speed measurements in the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  7. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  8. Dynamic Modeling of Starting Aerodynamics and Stage Matching in an Axi-Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Kevin; OBrien, Walter F.; Owen, A. Karl

    1996-01-01

    A DYNamic Turbine Engine Compressor Code (DYNTECC) has been modified to model speed transients from 0-100% of compressor design speed. The impetus for this enhancement was to investigate stage matching and stalling behavior during a start sequence as compared to rotating stall events above ground idle. The model can simulate speed and throttle excursions simultaneously as well as time varying bleed flow schedules. Results of a start simulation are presented and compared to experimental data obtained from an axi-centrifugal turboshaft engine and companion compressor rig. Stage by stage comparisons reveal the front stages to be operating in or near rotating stall through most of the start sequence. The model matches the starting operating line quite well in the forward stages with deviations appearing in the rearward stages near the start bleed. Overall, the performance of the model is very promising and adds significantly to the dynamic simulation capabilities of DYNTECC.

  9. Enhanced centrifuge-based approach to powder characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Myles Calvin

    Many types of manufacturing processes involve powders and are affected by powder behavior. It is highly desirable to implement tools that allow the behavior of bulk powder to be predicted based on the behavior of only small quantities of powder. Such descriptions can enable engineers to significantly improve the performance of powder processing and formulation steps. In this work, an enhancement of the centrifuge technique is proposed as a means of powder characterization. This enhanced method uses specially designed substrates with hemispherical indentations within the centrifuge. The method was tested using simulations of the momentum balance at the substrate surface. Initial simulations were performed with an ideal powder containing smooth, spherical particles distributed on substrates designed with indentations. The van der Waals adhesion between the powder, whose size distribution was based on an experimentally-determined distribution from a commercial silica powder, and the indentations was calculated and compared to the removal force created in the centrifuge. This provided a way to relate the powder size distribution to the rotational speed required for particle removal for various indentation sizes. Due to the distinct form of the data from these simulations, the cumulative size distribution of the powder and the Hamaker constant for the system were be extracted. After establishing adhesion force characterization for an ideal powder, the same proof-of-concept procedure was followed for a more realistic system with a simulated rough powder modeled as spheres with sinusoidal protrusions and intrusions around the surface. From these simulations, it was discovered that an equivalent powder of smooth spherical particles could be used to describe the adhesion behavior of the rough spherical powder by establishing a size-dependent 'effective' Hamaker constant distribution. This development made it possible to describe the surface roughness effects of the entire

  10. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetric Flow Control-Part I: Non-Axisymmetrical Flow in Centrifugal Compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyang; Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki; Huenteler, Joern; Li, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    This is Part I of a two-part paper documenting the development of a novel asymmetric flow control method to improve the stability of a high-pressure-ratio turbocharger centrifugal compressor. Part I focuses on the nonaxisymmetrical flow in a centrifugal compressor induced by the nonaxisymmetrical geometry of the volute while Part II describes the development of an asymmetric flow control method to avoid the stall on the basis of the characteristic of nonaxisymmetrical flow. To understand the asymmetries, experimental measurements and corresponding numerical simulation were carried out. The static pressure was measured by probes at different circumferential and stream-wise positions to gain insights about the asymmetries. The experimental results show that there is an evident nonaxisymmetrical flow pattern throughout the compressor due to the asymmetric geometry of the overhung volute. The static pressure field in the diffuser is distorted at approximately 90 deg in the rotational direction of the volute tongue throughout the diffuser. The magnitude of this distortion slightly varies with the rotational speed. The magnitude of the static pressure distortion in the impeller is a function of the rotational speed. There is a significant phase shift between the static pressure distributions at the leading edge of the splitter blades and the impeller outlet. The numerical steady state simulation neglects the aforementioned unsteady effects found in the experiments and cannot predict the phase shift, however, a detailed asymmetric flow field structure is obviously obtained.

  11. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetric Flow Control-Part I: Non-Axisymmetrical Flow in Centrifugal Compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyang; Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki; Huenteler, Joern; Li, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    This is Part I of a two-part paper documenting the development of a novel asymmetric flow control method to improve the stability of a high-pressure-ratio turbocharger centrifugal compressor. Part I focuses on the nonaxisymmetrical flow in a centrifugal compressor induced by the nonaxisymmetrical geometry of the volute while Part II describes the development of an asymmetric flow control method to avoid the stall on the basis of the characteristic of nonaxisymmetrical flow. To understand the asymmetries, experimental measurements and corresponding numerical simulation were carried out. The static pressure was measured by probes at different circumferential and stream-wise positions to gain insights about the asymmetries. The experimental results show that there is an evident nonaxisymmetrical flow pattern throughout the compressor due to the asymmetric geometry of the overhung volute. The static pressure field in the diffuser is distorted at approximately 90 deg in the rotational direction of the volute tongue throughout the diffuser. The magnitude of this distortion slightly varies with the rotational speed. The magnitude of the static pressure distortion in the impeller is a function of the rotational speed. There is a significant phase shift between the static pressure distributions at the leading edge of the splitter blades and the impeller outlet. The numerical steady state simulation neglects the aforementioned unsteady effects found in the experiments and cannot predict the phase shift, however, a detailed asymmetric flow field structure is obviously obtained. PMID:24891757

  12. Antithrombogenic properties of a monopivot magnetic suspension centrifugal pump for circulatory assist.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Chida, Takahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzaki, Mio; Shigeta, Osamu; Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2008-06-01

    The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) monopivot magnetic suspension centrifugal pump (MC105) was developed for open-heart surgery and several weeks of circulatory assist. The monopivot centrifugal pump has a closed impeller of 50 mm in diameter, supported by a single pivot bearing, and is driven through a magnetic coupling to widen the fluid gap. Design parameters such as pivot length and tongue radius were determined through flow visualization experiments, and the effectiveness was verified in preliminary animal experiments. The maximum overall pump efficiency reached 18%, and the normalized index of hemolysis tested with bovine blood was as low as 0.0013 g/100 L. Animal experiments with MC105 were conducted in sheep for 3, 15, 29, and 35 days in a configuration of left ventricle bypass. No thrombus was formed around the pivot bearing except when the pump speed was reduced by 20% of normal operational speed, which reduced the pump flow by 40% to avoid inlet suction. Subsequently, the antithrombogenic design was verified in animal experiments for 5 weeks at a minimum rotational speed of greater than 1500 rpm and a minimum pump flow greater than 1.0 L/min; no thrombus formation was observed under these conditions.

  13. Monitoring the centrifugal recovery of recombinant protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Middelberg, A P; O'Neill, B K

    1991-04-01

    The industrial processing of proteins expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies employs a reasonably standard sequence of unit operations. One of these is centrifugation, which serves to concentrate the inclusion bodies after disruption of the host microorganism, and also separates the inclusion bodies from other cellular debris. Monitoring the performance of the centrifuge is essential if excessive product and hence financial loss is to be avoided and a reasonable separation obtained. The analytical disc centrifuge may be used to monitor the centrifugation. This instrument returns the sample size distribution with high resolution and without fouling. By obtaining size distributions of the centrifuge feed, supernatant and concentrate, the fractional collection efficiency of the centrifuge may be determined as a function of the Stokes diameter, and a mass balance constructed. PMID:1367325

  14. 40 CFR 63.5810 - What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... centrifugal casting, or site-specific organic HAP emissions factors discussed in § 63.5796. The emission... to this subpart, or a site-specific emissions factor, is multiplied by the add-on control factor to... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are my options for meeting...

  15. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  16. Laminar flow effects in the coil planet centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge designed by Ito employs flow of a single liquid phase, through a rotating coiled tube in a centrifugal force field, to provide a separation of particles based on sedimentation rates. Mathematical solutions are derived for the linear differential equations governing particle behavior in the coil planet centrifuge device. These solutions are then applied as the basis of a model for optimizing particle separations.

  17. Arched-outer-race ball-bearing analysis considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A first-order thrust load analysis that considers centrifugal forces but which neglects gyroscopics, elastohydrodynamics, and thermal effects was performed. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm-bore angular-contact ball bearing. Fatigue life, contact loads, and contact angles are shown for conventional and arched bearings. The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high-speed applications. In particular, at an applied load of 4448 n (1000 lb) and a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) the arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing.

  18. Investigation of the jet-wake flow of a highly loaded centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, D.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations, aimed at developing a better understanding of the complex flow field in high performance centrifugal compressors were performed. Newly developed measuring techniques for unsteady static and total pressures as well as flow directions, and a digital data analysis system for fluctuating signals were thoroughly tested. The loss-affected mixing process of the distorted impeller discharge flow was investigated in detail, in the absolute and relative system, at impeller tip speeds up to 380 m/s. A theoretical analysis proved good coincidence of the test results with the DEAN-SENOO theory, which was extended to compressible flows.

  19. High-yield resin fractionation using a liquid/liquid centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanat, Stan F.; Rahman, M. D.; Narasimhan, Balaji; McKenzie, Douglas S.; Cook, Michelle M.

    2000-06-01

    Resins used in photoresist manufacturing are often relatively expensive once processing steps (fractionation e.g.) and yield losses are factored into the net cost. We have previously reported on the merits of using an economically more attractive fractionation process using a liquid/liquid centrifuge. Further refinements of this method indicate that waste streams could be reduced by recycling the extractant phase and that lower molecular weight fractions removed from the starting resin might be used in making other resist ingredients [speed enhancers, photoactive compound (PAC) backbones e.g.]. Both of these improvements would reduce the overall manufacturing costs of making resist raw materials and the final products made with them.

  20. [Design and optimization of a centrifugal pump for CPCR].

    PubMed

    Pei, J; Tan, X; Chen, K; Li, X

    2000-06-01

    Requirements for an optimal centrifugal pump, the vital component in the equipment for cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation(CPCR), have been presented. The performance of the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns, Inc./3M, Ann arbor, MI, U.S.A) was tested. The preliminarily optimized model for CPCR was designed according to the requirements of CPCR and to the comparison and analysis of several clinically available centrifugal pumps. The preliminary tests using the centrifugal pump made in our laboratory(Type CPCR-I) have confirmed the design and the optimization.

  1. Autobalancing and FDIR for a space-based centrifuge prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Mah, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes centrifuge-related work performed at the Smart Systems Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center's Computational Sciences Division from 1995 through 2003. The goal is to develop an automated system that will sense an imbalance (both static and dynamic3) in a centrifuge and issue control commands to drive counterweights to eliminate the effects of the imbalance. This autobalancing development began when the ISS centrifuge design was not yet finalized, and was designed to work with the SSRL Centrifuge laboratory prototype, constructed in 1993-1995. Significant differences between that prototype and the current International Space Station (ISS) Centrifuge design are that: the spin axis for the SSRL Centrifuge prototype can translate freely in x and y, but not wobble, whereas the ISS centrifuge spin axis has 3 translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, supported by a vibration 34. The imbalance sensors are strained gauges both in the rotor and the stator, measuring the imbalance forces, whereas the ISS centrifuge uses eddy current displacement sensors to measure the displacements resulting from imbalance. High fidelity autobalancing and FDIR systems (for both counterweights and strain gauges) are developed and tested in MATLAB simulation, for the SSRL Centrifuge configuration. Hardware implementation of the autobalancing technology was begun in 1996, but was terminated due to lack of funding. The project lay dormant until 2001-2002 when the FDIR capability was added.

  2. Lube oil centrifuge saves Odeco $360,000/year

    SciTech Connect

    Closs, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Purifying centrifuges were installed in the offshore drilling operation diesel engines of the Odeco Co. of New Orleans. The centrifuges extend filter life fourfold, eliminate the need to change oil at all, and defer the need for costly overhauls indefinitely. The Alfa-Laval built centrifuges were placed on 23 mobile rigs that Odeco has working in the Gulf of Mexico, and they paid for their cost twice over during the first year of operation. Originally, a lubricant centrifuge was tested aboard the Ocean Tempest. The results were so remarkable that similar installations were placed on all other vessels in the domestic drilling division.

  3. Effects of centrifugation on gonadal and adrenocortical steroids in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakihana, R.; Butte, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Many endocrine systems are sensitive to external changes in the environment. Both the pituitary adrenal and pituitary gonadal systems are affected by stress including centrifugation stress. The effect of centrifugation on the pituitary gonadal and pituitary adrenocortical systems was examined by measuring the gonadal and adrenal steroids in the plasma and brain following different duration and intensity of centrifugation stress in rats. Two studies were completed and the results are presented. The second study was carried out to describe the developmental changes of brain, plasma and testicular testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in Sprague Dawley rats so that the effect of centrifugation stress on the pituitary gonadal syatem could be better evaluated in future studies.

  4. Effects of Prolonged Centrifugation on Orthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M..; Hargens, A. R.; Yates, B. J.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A feasibility study conducted on the Ames 20-G Human Centrifuge examined how well humans can maintain orthostatic tolerance during and after prolonged exposures to hypergravity. Three adult males lived for periods of 22 hours in the centrifuge while it was at rest (1.00 G), and while it rotated at 9.38 RPM to provide 1.25 G-total at the mean radius of 7.62 m. Two participants also experienced 22-hour habitation sessions at 11.46 RPM, which provided 1.50 G-total. Both before and after each habitation session, the participants were given gradual onset rate (GOR) acceleration profiles at 0.067 G/sec to determine their Gz tolerance. In addition, cardiovascular responses were compared while subjects were supine, siting, and standing at various times during the habitation (stand test), and cardiovascular responsiveness was determined using a lower body negative pressure tilt table (LBNPTT) at the beginning of the experiment and after each session. Post-Pre changes in G tolerance were -0.33 (mean) +/- 0.11 (std. error) Gz for habitation at 1.00 G, -0.02 +/- 0.12 Gz for habitation at 1.25 G, and +0.41 +/- 0.13 Gz for habitation at 1.50 G. Performance on the stand test generally improved with duration of habitation in hypergravity. Our results suggest that habitation in a confined chamber at 1.00 G reduces G tolerance and leads to lowered LBNPTT tolerance. Exposure to increased G in the centrifuge leads to enhanced performance on the stand test, and to increased GOR acceleration tolerance, but only when fluid balance is maintained; when motion sickness and negative fluid balance were observed, G tolerance was reduced. The data indicate that enhanced G tolerance can result from prolonged exposure to hypergravity, but that these changes are complex and depend on multiple underlying physiological processes.

  5. Scaled centrifugal compressor, collector and running gear program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenehan, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Scaled Centrifugal Compressor, Collector and Running gear Program was conducted in support of an overall NASA strategy to improve small-compressor performance, durability, and reliability while reducing initial and life-cycle costs. Accordingly, Garrett designed and provided a test rig, gearbox coupling, and facility collector for a new NASA facility, and provided a scaled model of an existing, high-performance impeller for evaluation scaling effects on aerodynamic performance and for obtaining other performance data. Test-rig shafting was designed to operate smoothly throughout a speed range up to 60,000 rpm. Pressurized components were designed to operate at pressures up to 300 psia and at temperatures to 1000 F. Nonrotating components were designed to provide a margin-of-safety of 0.05 or greater; rotating components, for a margin-of-safety based on allowable yield and ultimate strengths. Design activities were supported by complete design analysis, and the finished hardware was subjected to check-runs to confirm proper operation. The test rig will support a wide range of compressor tests and evaluations.

  6. Sound generation by a centrifugal pump at blade passing frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenroth, M.; Weaver, D.S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study of the pressure pulsations produced by a centrifugal volute pump at its blade passing frequency and their amplification by acoustic resonance in a connected piping system. Detailed measurements were made of the pressure fluctuations in the piping as a function of pump speed and flow rate. A semi-empirical model was used to separate acoustic standing waves from hydraulic pressure fluctuations. The effects of modifying the cut-water geometry were also studied, including the use of flow visualization to observe the flow behavior at the cut-water. The results suggest that the pump may act as an acoustic pressure or velocity source, depending on the flow rate. At conditions of acoustic resonance, the pump acted as an open termination of the piping, i.e., as a node in the acoustic pressure standing waves. Rounding the cut-water had the effect of reducing the amplitude of acoustic resonance, apparently because of the ability of the stagnation point to move and thereby reduce the vorticity generated. A notable example of this acoustic resonance in the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system at Ontario Hydro`s Darlington nuclear power station.

  7. Isolation of Methoxyfuranocoumarins From Ammi majus by Centrifugal Partition Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bartnik, Magdalena; Mazurek, Anna Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Pure methoxyfuranocoumarins were isolated from Ammi majus L. by use of low-pressure column chromatography (LPCC) followed by centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC). The concentrated petroleum ether extract from fruits of A. majus was fractionated on a silica gel column using a gradient of ethyl acetate in dichloromethane (0-80%, v/v). Coumarin-rich fractions were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD). Xanthotoxin (8-MOP) and isopimpinellin (isoP), structurally similar compounds, were isolated in one fraction (FR6). To avoid multistep and long-lasting TLC preparation, optimization of CPC conditions has been performed. In one run, an effective separation of 8-MOP and isoP was achieved. The two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (10 : 8 : 10 : 9; v/v) in an ascending mode (the aqueous phase was a stationary phase, and the organic phase was a mobile phase), with flow rate 3 mL/min and rotation speed 1,600 r.p.m., was used. The identification and high purities of isolated 8-MOP (98.7%) and isoP (100%) were confirmed by HPLC/DAD assay, when compared with standards. The developed CPC method could be applied to the effective isolation of 8-MOP and isoP from plant extracts. The high purity of obtained compounds makes possible further exploitation of these components in biological studies.

  8. Development of a novel centrifugal pump: magnetic rotary pump.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, S; Yambe, T; Sonobe, T; Kobayashi, S; Nitta, S

    1997-07-01

    The rotational axis of the centrifugal pump has some associated problems such as blood destruction and sealing between the axis and pump housing. To improve upon these deficits we have developed a new type of blood pump, the magnetic rotary pump (MRP). The MRP has an original design with no rotational axis and no impellers. We made a prototype MRP and examined its hemodynamics in mock circulation. The prototype MRP flow rate is only 1.0 L/min with an afterload of 30 mm Hg, and we have made some modifications in the size and drive mechanisms from these results. The modified MRP can achieve high flow rates and rotational speeds (6.0 L/min with an afterload of 100 mm Hg, 2,000 rpm) in a mock circuit, and the modified MRP was used for left heart assistance in an acute animal experiment. The MRP could maintain the hemodynamics of an anesthetized adult goat. These results suggest that the MRP needs to be improved in several areas, but the MRP may be useful as a blood pump. PMID:9212950

  9. Evaluation of floating impeller phenomena in a Gyro centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ikuya; Ichikawa, S; Mikami, M; Ishitoya, H; Motomura, T; Kawamura, M; Linneweber, J; Glueck, J; Shinohara, T; Nosé, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Gyro centrifugal pump developed as a totally implantable artificial heart was designed with a free impeller, in which the rotational shaft (male bearing) of the impeller was completely separated from the female bearing. For this type of pump, it is very important to keep the proper magnet balance (impeller-magnet and actuator-magnet) in order to prevent thrombus formation and/or bearing wear. When the magnet balance is not proper, the impeller is jerked down into the bottom bearing. On the other hand, if magnet balance is proper, the impeller lifted off the bottom of the pump housing within a certain range of pumping conditions. In this study, this floating phenomenon was investigated in detail. The floating phenomenon was proved by observation of the impeller behavior using a transparent acrylic pump. The impeller floating phenomenon was mapped on a pump performance curve. The impeller floating phenomenon is affected by the magnet-magnet coupling distance and rotational speed of the impeller. In order to keep the proper magnet balance and to maintain the impeller floating phenomenon at the driving condition of right and left pump, the magnet-magnet coupling distance was altered by a spacer which was installed between the pump and actuator. It became clear that the same pump could handle different conditions (right and left ventricular assist), by just changing the thickness of the spacer. When magnet balance is proper, the floating impeller phenomenon occurs automatically in response to the impeller rev. It is called "the dynamic RPM suspension".

  10. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  11. Artificial gravity in space: Vestibular tolerance assessed by human centrifuge spinning on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonutto, G.; Linnarsson, D.; Sundberg, C. J.; di Prampero, P. E.

    Artificial gravity created by the astronauts themselves, without any external power supply, by pedalling on a coupled of couterrotating bicycles along the inner wall of the space module (Twin Bikes System, TBS), was previously suggested (Antonutto et al., 1991) to prevent musculo-skeletal decay and cardiovascular deconditioning during long term space flights. To investigate whether this unusual rotating environment would determine abnormal stimulations of the vestibular system due to Coriolis cross coupled accelerations, thus leading to acute motion sickness (AMS), the conditions of a rotating environment were reproduced in a human centrifuge. A cycloergometer was fixed to the arm of the centrifuge, the rotation speed of which was equal to that yielding 1 g at the feet level in the TBS (i.e. ranging from 19 to 21 RPM). The ergometer position was such that the combination of the horizontal and gravitational acceleration vectors was 1.414 at the inner ear level and was aligned along the head to feet axis. Three subjects, pedalling at 50 W on a cycloergometer during centrifuge's spinning, were asked to move the head following an AMS' provocation protocol. None of them developed any AMS symptoms. This supports the look of the TBS as tool for avoiding musculo-skeletal and cardiovascular deconditioning during long term space flights.

  12. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26736252

  13. Measurement and analysis of the noise radiated by low Mach numbers centrifugal blowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, D. M.; Lauchle, G. C.

    1987-11-01

    The broad band, aerodynamically generated noise in low tip-speed Mach number, centrifugal air moving devices is investigated. An interdisciplinary approach was taken which involved investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic fields, and their mutual relationship. The noise generation process was studied using two experimental vehicles: (1) a scale model of a homologous family of centrifugal blowers typical of those used to cool computer and business equipment, and (2) a single blade from a centrifugal blower impeller which was placed in a known, controllable flow field. The radiation characteristics of the model blower were investigated by measuring the acoustic intensity distribution near the blower inlet and comparing it with the intensity near the inlet to an axial flow fan. Aerodynamic studies of the flow field in the inlet and at the discharge to the rotating impeller were used to assess the mean flow distribution through the impeller blade channels and to identify regions of excessive turbulence near the rotating blade row. New frequency-domain expressions for the correlation area and dipole source strength per unit area on a surface immersed in turbulence were developed which can be used to characterize the noise generation process over a rigid surface immersed in turbulence. An investigation of the noise radiated from the single, isolated airfoil (impeller blade) was performed using modern correlation and spectral analysis techniques.

  14. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  15. A fluorescence-based centrifugal microfluidic system for parallel detection of multiple allergens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. L.; Ho, H. P.; Cheung, K. L.; Kong, S. K.; Suen, Y. K.; Kwan, Y. W.; Li, W. J.; Wong, C. K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports a robust polymer based centrifugal microfluidic analysis system that can provide parallel detection of multiple allergens in vitro. Many commercial food products (milk, bean, pollen, etc.) may introduce allergy to people. A low-cost device for rapid detection of allergens is highly desirable. With this as the objective, we have studied the feasibility of using a rotating disk device incorporating centrifugal microfluidics for performing actuationfree and multi-analyte detection of different allergen species with minimum sample usage and fast response time. Degranulation in basophils or mast cells is an indicator to demonstrate allergic reaction. In this connection, we used acridine orange (AO) to demonstrate degranulation in KU812 human basophils. It was found that the AO was released from granules when cells were stimulated by ionomycin, thus signifying the release of histamine which accounts for allergy symptoms [1-2]. Within this rotating optical platform, major microfluidic components including sample reservoirs, reaction chambers, microchannel and flow-control compartments are integrated into a single bio-compatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The flow sequence and reaction time can be controlled precisely. Sequentially through varying the spinning speed, the disk may perform a variety of steps on sample loading, reaction and detection. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using centrifugation as a possible immunoassay system in the future.

  16. Comparison of rotordynamic fluid forces in axial inducers and centrifugal turbopump impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Agostino, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The paper illustrates and compares the results of the experimental campaigns carried out in the Cavitating Pump Rotordynamic Test Facility (CPRTF) at Alta, Italy, under ESA funding for the characterization of the lateral rotordynamic fluid forces acting on high-head axial inducers and centrifugal turbopump impellers for space propulsion applications. The configurations presented here refer to a three-bladed tapered-hub, variable-pitch, inducer (DAPROT3) and a single-stage centrifugal pump (VAMPIRE) with vaneless diffuser and single spiral volute. Both the centrifugal pump and the inducer have been designed by means of reduced order models specifically developed by the author and his collaborators for the geometric definition and performance prediction of this kind of hydraulic turbomachinery. Continuous spectra of the rotordynamic forces acting on the impellers as functions of the whirl frequency have been obtained by means of the novel technique recently developed and demonstrated at Alta. The influence of the rotor whirl motion, flow rate, cavitating conditions, and liquid temperature (thermal cavitation effects) on the rotordynamic fluid forces is illustrated and the observed differences in their behavior in axial inducers and centrifugal turbpumps are discussed and interpreted in the light of the outcome of recent cavitation visualization experiments carried out by the Chemical Propulsion Team at Alta.

  17. X-ray microtomography analysis of soil structure deformation caused by centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Leuther, Frederic; Vogler, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Centrifugation provides a fast method to measure soil water retention curves over a wide moisture range. However, deformation of soil structure may occur at high angular velocities in the centrifuge. The objective of this study was to capture these changes in soil structure with X-ray microtomography and to measure local deformations via digital volume correlation. Two samples were investigated that differ in texture and rock content. A detailed analysis of the pore space reveals an interplay between shrinkage due to drying and soil compaction due to compression. Macroporosity increases at moderate angular velocity because of crack formation due to moisture release. At higher angular velocities, corresponding to capillary pressure of <-100kPa, macroporosity decreases again because of structure deformation due to compression. While volume changes due to swelling clay minerals are immanent to any drying process, the compaction of soil is a specific drawback of the centrifugation method. A new protocol for digital volume correlation was developed to analyze the spatial heterogeneity of deformation. In both samples the displacement of soil constituents is highest in the top part of the sample and exhibits high lateral variability explained by the spatial distribution of macropores in the sample. Centrifugation should therefore only be applied after the completion of all other hydraulic or thermal experiments, or any other analysis that depends on the integrity of soil structure.

  18. X-ray microtomography analysis of soil structure deformation caused by centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Leuther, F.; Vogler, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Centrifugation provides a fast method to measure soil water retention curves over a wide moisture range. However, deformation of soil structure may occur at high angular velocities in the centrifuge. The objective of this study was to capture these changes in soil structure with X-ray microtomography and to measure local deformations via digital volume correlation. Two samples were investigated that differ in texture and rock content. A detailed analysis of the pore space reveals an interplay between shrinkage due to drying and soil compaction due to compression. Macroporosity increases at moderate angular velocity because of crack formation due to moisture release. At higher angular velocities, corresponding to capillary pressure of ψ < -100 kPa, macroporosity decreases again because of structure deformation due to compression. While volume changes due to swelling clay minerals are immanent in any drying process, the compaction of soil is a specific drawback of the centrifugation method. A new protocol for digital volume correlation was developed to analyze the spatial heterogeneity of deformation. In both samples the displacement of soil constituents is highest in the top part of the sample and exhibits high lateral variability explained by the spatial distribution of macropores in the sample. Centrifugation should therefore only be applied after the completion of all other hydraulic or thermal experiments, or any other analysis that depends on the integrity of soil structure.

  19. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  20. Centrifugation of coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Murray; Weiss, Milton L.; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1980-06-01

    The application of the continuous solid bowl centrifuge to the removal of solids from coal liquefaction products was investigated. The centrifuge removed from 23 to 88% of the input ash from 8 to 73% of the input organic benzene insolubles while flow rates, viscosities, and dam heights were varied. Viscosity ..mu.., effluent liquid rate Q/sub e/, and Ambler's geometric parameter ..sigma.. were graphically correlated with attained separations. The separation was relatively insensitive to the variables, as a 50-fold increase in Q/sub e//..sigma.. corresponded to a decrease in ash removal only from 84% to 60% and to a decrease in organic solids removal only from 77% to 22%. Organic solids removal was poorer and more erratic than ash removal because of the lesser density differences and greater size variability of the organics. Ancillary studies demonstrated that coal liquefaction products may behave as a Bingham Plastic fluid, and that this results in an absolute limit on the attainable solids separation. Additional studies showed that little difference in density may exist between the organic solids and liquids, and that effects of aging may threaten the validity of viscosity measurements.

  1. Some aversive characteristics of centrifugally generated gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F.

    1973-01-01

    The effective weight of rats was manipulated by centrifugation. Two effective weight levels were obtained. In three escape avoidance conditions a lever press produced a change from a base level of 2.1 g to a response level of 1.1 g. In a punishment condition a response produced a change from a 1.1 g level to a 2.1 g level and in an extinction condition responses had no effect on the 2.1 g effective weight level present. All changes took 30 sec and were maintained for an additional 10 sec before a return to base level was initiated. When responses occurred closer together than the 40 sec, they delayed the return to base level by 40 sec. This 40 sec interval is referred to as response-contingent-time. The response rate and amount of response-contingent-time served as the data. The results confirmed previous data that centrifugation is aversive. The results are interpreted as indicating that the aversiveness is attributable to the increase in effective weight, and that rats can discriminate the different angular velocity-radius of rotation combinations used.

  2. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  3. A review of centrifugal testing of gasoline contamination and remediation.

    PubMed

    Meegoda, Jay N; Hu, Liming

    2011-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced.

  4. A review of centrifugal testing of gasoline contamination and remediation.

    PubMed

    Meegoda, Jay N; Hu, Liming

    2011-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced. PMID:21909320

  5. A Review of Centrifugal Testing of Gasoline Contamination and Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Meegoda, Jay N.; Hu, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced. PMID:21909320

  6. Reversible thermo-pneumatic valves on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Rothan, Hussin A; Yusof, Rohana; Madou, Marc

    2015-08-21

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems utilize a conventional spindle motor to automate parallel biochemical assays on a single microfluidic disk. The integration of complex, sequential microfluidic procedures on these platforms relies on robust valving techniques that allow for the precise control and manipulation of fluid flow. The ability of valves to consistently return to their former conditions after each actuation plays a significant role in the real-time manipulation of fluidic operations. In this paper, we introduce an active valving technique that operates based on the deflection of a latex film with the potential for real-time flow manipulation in a wide range of operational spinning speeds. The reversible thermo-pneumatic valve (RTPV) seals or reopens an inlet when a trapped air volume is heated or cooled, respectively. The RTPV is a gas-impermeable valve composed of an air chamber enclosed by a latex membrane and a specially designed liquid transition chamber that enables the efficient usage of the applied thermal energy. Inputting thermo-pneumatic (TP) energy into the air chamber deflects the membrane into the liquid transition chamber against an inlet, sealing it and thus preventing fluid flow. From this point, a centrifugal pressure higher than the induced TP pressure in the air chamber reopens the fluid pathway. The behaviour of this newly introduced reversible valving system on a microfluidic disk is studied experimentally and theoretically over a range of rotational frequencies from 700 RPM to 2500 RPM. Furthermore, adding a physical component (e.g., a hemispherical rubber element) to induce initial flow resistance shifts the operational range of rotational frequencies of the RTPV to more than 6000 RPM. An analytical solution for the cooling of a heated RTPV on a spinning disk is also presented, which highlights the need for the future development of time-programmable RTPVs. Moreover, the reversibility and gas impermeability of the RTPV in the

  7. View of new centrifuge at Flight Acceleration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of the new centrifuge at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), located in the Flight Acceleration Facility, bldg 29. The 50-ft. arm can swing the three man gondola to create g-forces astronauts will experience during controlled flight and during reentry. The centrifuge was designed primarily for training Apollo astronauts.

  8. Coil planet centrifugation as a means for small particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge uses a centrifugal force field to provide separation of particles based on differences in sedimentation rates by flow through a rotating coiled tube. Three main separations are considered: (1) single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes, (2) single phase fixed heep and human erythrocytes, and (3) electrophoretically enhanced single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes.

  9. Zonal centrifuge purification of human rabies vaccine obtained on bovine fetal kidney cells. Biological results.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Tsiang, H; Reculard, P; Aguilon, F; Lavergne, M; Adamovicz, P

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated human rabies vaccine prepared on bovine fetal kidney cells is concentrated and purified by zonal centrifugation. The peak of rabies particles is monitored by hemagglutination. Immunogenicity of the purified particles was evaluated by titration of specific antibodies from vaccinated animals. Protective activity of the vaccine was assayed on guinea pigs challenged with street rabies. Biological results were compared with those obtained with other tissue culture vaccines.

  10. Trajectory and terminal distribution of single centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas in the rat olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, S

    2010-08-11

    The olfactory bulb receives a large number of centrifugal fibers whose functions remain unclear. To gain insight into the function of the bulbar centrifugal system, the morphology of individual centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas was examined in detail. An anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, was injected into rat olfactory cortical areas, including the pars lateralis of the anterior olfactory nucleus (lAON) and the anterior part of the piriform cortex (aPC). Reconstruction from serial sections revealed that the extrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons from the lAON and those from the aPC had distinct trajectories: the former tended to innervate the pars externa of the AON before entering the olfactory bulb, while the latter had extrabulbar collaterals that extended to a variety of targets. In contrast to the extrabulbar segments, no clear differences were found between the intrabulbar segments of axons from the lAON and from the aPC. The intrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons were mainly found in the granule cell layer but a few axons extended into the external plexiform and glomerular layer. Approximately 40% of centrifugal axons innervated both the medial and lateral aspects of the olfactory bulb. The number of boutons found on single intrabulbar segments was typically less than 1000. Boutons tended to aggregate and form complex terminal tufts with short axonal branches. Terminal tufts, no more than 10 in single axons from ipsilateral cortical areas, were localized to the granule cell layer with varying intervals; some tufts formed patchy clusters and others were scattered over areas that extended for a few millimeters. The patchy, widespread distribution of terminals suggests that the centrifugal axons are able to couple the activity of specific subsets of bulbar neurons even when the subsets are spatially separated.

  11. The development of the International Space Station centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamotsu

    2004-11-01

    Gravitational biology research facility "Centrifuge" is currently under development for the International Space Station. Research in the Complex Organism Biology, indispensable to the progress in Health Science, is only possible in the Centrifuge aboard the station. So, on-orbit 1 G controls for various specimens including small mammals, fish, and higher plants will be rigorously done in the Centrifuge. This facility is also capable of providing "reduced gravity" likely on the Moon or on Mars. Thus, it will play a key role in creating knowledge of space fundamental biology. As part of the offset of NASA's Shuttle launch services for the Japanese Experiment Module, JAXA is developing the Centrifuge Rotor (CR), the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and the Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM). Critical Design Review (CDR) of LSG was conducted on July 2004, while the system CDRs of the CAM and CR are scheduled for December 2004 and August 2005, respectively. Their launch schedules are under review.

  12. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  13. Measuring and balancing dynamic unbalance of precision centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Huo, Xin

    2008-10-01

    A precision centrifuge is used to test and calibrate accelerometer model parameters. Its dynamic unbalance may cause the perturbation of the centrifuge to deteriorate the test and calibration accuracy of an accelerometer. By analyzing the causes of dynamic unbalance, the influences on precision centrifuge from static unbalance and couple unbalance are developed. It is considered measuring and balancing of static unbalance is a key to resolving a dynamic unbalance problem of precision centrifuge with a disk in structure. Measuring means and calculating formulas of static unbalance amount are given, and balancing principle and method are provided. The correctness and effectiveness of this method are confirmed by experiments on a device under tuning, thereby the accurate and high-effective measuring and balancing method of dynamic unbalance of this precision centrifuge was provided.

  14. Quantitative centrifugation to extract benthic protozoa from freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Starink, M; Bär-Gilissen, M J; Bak, R P; Cappenberg, T E

    1994-01-01

    TWO METHODS FOR EXTRACTING PROTISTS FROM FRESHWATER SEDIMENT ARE DESCRIBED: (i) an adapted isopycnic centrifugation technique for sandy and gyttja-like sediments and (ii) a rate zonal centrifugation technique for sediments rich in particulate organic material (litter-like sediments). The recoveries of protists during isopycnic centrifugation in media of several densities were compared. No significant losses in sodium diatrizoate and Percoll were recorded. After known amounts of nanoflagellates were added to azoic sediments, the protists were extracted and counted. For sandy sediments, we found 100% recovery, and for the gyttja-like sediments we found a maximum recovery of 94%. The recovery of protozoa extracted from litter-like sediments, characteristic of littoral systems, depends on a given centrifugal force, on time, and on the dimensions of the flagellates. A recovery model which takes into account cell dimensions and centrifugation characteristics gives the minimum expected recovery.

  15. Effect of science laboratory centrifuge of space station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searby, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that it is essential to have a centrifuge operating during manned space station operations. Background information and a rationale for the research centrifuge are given. It is argued that we must provide a controlled acceleration environment for comparison with microgravity studies. The lack of control groups in previous studies throws into question whether the obseved effects were the result of microgravity or not. The centrifuge could be used to provide a 1-g environment to supply specimens free of launch effects for long-term studies. With the centrifuge, the specimens could be immediately transferred to microgravity without undergoing gradual acclimation. Also, the effects of artificial gravity on humans could be investigated. It is also argued that the presence of the centrifuge on the space station will not cause undo vibrations or other disturbing effects.

  16. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  17. Simulation of Shuttle launch G forces and acoustic loads using the NASA Ames Research Center 20G centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, T. L.; Corliss, J. M.; Gundo, D. P.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Breit, G. A.; Griffith, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The high cost and long times required to develop research packages for space flight can often be offset by using ground test techniques. This paper describes a space shuttle launch and reentry simulating using the NASA Ames Research Center's 20G centrifuge facility. The combined G-forces and acoustic environment during shuttle launch and landing were simulated to evaluate the effect on a payload of laboratory rates. The launch G force and acoustic profiles are matched to actual shuttle launch data to produce the required G-forces and acoustic spectrum in the centrifuge test cab where the rats were caged on a free-swinging platform. For reentry, only G force is simulated as the aero-acoustic noise is insignificant compared to that during launch. The shuttle G-force profiles of launch and landing are achieved by programming the centrifuge drive computer to continuously adjust centrifuge rotational speed to obtain the correct launch and landing G forces. The shuttle launch acoustic environment is simulated using a high-power, low-frequency audio system. Accelerometer data from STS-56 and microphone data from STS-1 through STS-5 are used as baselines for the simulations. This paper provides a description of the test setup and the results of the simulation with recommendations for follow-on simulations.

  18. A Finite-Difference Numerical Method for Onsager's Pancake Approximation for Fluid Flow in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    de Stadler, M; Chand, K

    2007-11-12

    Gas centrifuges exhibit very complex flows. Within the centrifuge there is a rarefied region, a transition region, and a region with an extreme density gradient. The flow moves at hypersonic speeds and shock waves are present. However, the flow is subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. The analysis may be simplified by treating the flow as a perturbation of wheel flow. Wheel flow implies that the fluid is moving as a solid body. With the very large pressure gradient, the majority of the fluid is located very close to the rotor wall and moves at an azimuthal velocity proportional to its distance from the rotor wall; there is no slipping in the azimuthal plane. The fluid can be modeled as incompressible and subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. By treating the centrifuge as long, end effects can be appropriately modeled without performing a detailed boundary layer analysis. Onsager's pancake approximation is used to construct a simulation to model fluid flow in a gas centrifuge. The governing 6th order partial differential equation is broken down into an equivalent coupled system of three equations and then solved numerically. In addition to a discussion on the baseline solution, known problems and future work possibilities are presented.

  19. Simulated Stand Tests on Earth, Moon, and Mars and Centrifuge Parameters to Prevent Cardiovascular Deconditioning During Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Brandon W.; Sharp, M. Keith

    2008-06-01

    Postflight Orthostatic Intolerance (POI) results from cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight and affects a significant fraction of astronauts returning to earth after missions that are merely a couple of weeks in duration and may be even more prevalent after longer missions, such as those to the moon and Mars. To prevent cardiovascular deconditioning a centrifuge may be utilized to induce gravity-like stresses within the body. The current investigation allows insight into the mechanisms of POI by simulating stand tests on Earth, the moon, and Mars while predicting centrifuge spin rates that sufficiently mimic each constant gravity reference. It was found that the modeled nonfinishing male & female astronaut would become presyncopal in about 4&7min, 32&56min, 104&182min while losing 160&280mL, 512&896mL, 692&1211mL of blood volume (BV) at the onset of presyncope in each case for Earth, Mars, and the moon, respectively. The modeled finishing male astronaut endured the length of the stand test in every case, but lost only 100mL, 320, and 432mL BV by the end of each stand test. Centrifuge speeds for equivalent times to presyncope for female and finishing & nonfinishing male astronauts loaded the body with G loads at heart level for Earth, Mars, and the moon cases consistently less than the constant gravity reference level for both the NASA short & long arm centrifuges.

  20. Effects of the pulsatile flow settings on pulsatile waveforms and hemodynamic energy in a PediVAS centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test different pulsatile flow settings of the PediVAS centrifugal pump to seek an optimum setting for pulsatile flow to achieve better pulsatile energy and minimal backflow. The PediVAS centrifugal pump and the conventional pediatric clinical circuit, including a pediatric membrane oxygenator, arterial filter, arterial cannula, and 1/4 in circuit tubing were used. The circuit was primed with 40% glycerin water mixture. Postcannula pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. The experiment was conducted at 800 ml/min of pump flow with a modified pulsatile flow setting at room temperature. Pump flow and pressure readings at preoxygenator and precannula sites were simultaneously recorded by a data acquisition system. The results showed that backflows appeared at flow rates of 200-800 ml/min (200 ml/min increments) with the default pulsatile flow setting and only at 200 ml/min with the modified pulsatile flow setting. With an increased rotational speed difference ratio and a decreased pulsatile width, the pulsatility increased in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and precannula sites. Backflows seemed at preoxygenator and precannula sites at a 70% of rotational speed difference ratio. The modified pulsatile flow setting was better than the default pulsatile flow setting in respect to pulsatile energy and backflow. The pulsatile width and the rotational speed difference ratio significantly affected pulsatility. The parameter of the rotational speed difference ratio can automatically increase pulsatility with increased rotational speeds. Further studies will be conducted to optimize the pulsatile flow setting of the centrifugal pump.

  1. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Nick Mann; Jack Law; Terry Todd

    2007-09-01

    Annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) are being evaluated for process-scale solvent extraction operations in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) separations goals. Process-scale annular centrifugal contactors have the potential for high stage efficiency if properly employed and optimized for the application. Hydraulic performance issues related to flow instability and classical flooding are likely unimportant, especially for units with high throughputs. However, annular mixing increases rapidly with increasing rotor diameter while maintaining a fixed g force at the rotor wall. In addition, for engineering/process-scale contactors, elevated rotor speeds and/or throughput rates, can lead to organic phase foaming at the rotor discharge collector area. Foam buildup in the upper rotor head area can aspirate additional vapor from the contactor housing resulting in a complete loss of separation equilibrium. Variable speed drives are thus desirable to optimize and balance the operating parameters to help ensure acceptable performance. Proper venting of larger contactors is required to balance pressures across individual stages and prevent vapor lock due to foam aspiration.

  2. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model.

  3. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    DOEpatents

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  4. Task 9 - centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Moe, T.A.; Collings, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report assesses a centrifugal membrane filtration technology developed by SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. The Tank Waste Focus Area was chosen for study. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{mu}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. The performance of the unit was evaluated with a statistical test design that determined the effect of temperature, pressure, membrane rotational speed, and solids loading on permeate flux. All four variables were found to be statistically significant, with the magnitude of the effect in the order of temperature, solids loading, rotor speed, and pressure. Temperature, rotor speed, and pressure had an increasing effect on flux with increasing value, while increases in solids loading showed a decrease in permeate flux. Significant interactions between rotor speed and solids loading and pressure and solids loading were also observed. The regression equation derived from test data had a correlation coefficient of 0.934, which represents a useful predictive capability for integrating the technology into DOE cleanup efforts. An extended test run performed on surrogate waste showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  5. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  6. Analysis of centrifugal convection in rotating pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, Vladimir; Zimin, Valery; Hussain, Fazle

    2001-08-01

    New exact solutions, obtained for centrifugal convection of a compressible fluid in pipes and annular pipes, explain axially elongated counterflow and energy separation—poorly understood phenomena occurring in vortex devices, e.g., hydrocyclones and Ranque tubes. Centrifugal acceleration (which can be up to 106 times gravity in practical vortex tubes), combined with an axial gradient of temperature (even small), induces an intense flow from the cold end to the hot end along the pipe wall and a backflow near the axis. To account for large density variations in vortex devices, we use the axial temperature gradient as a small parameter instead of the Boussinesq approximation. For weak pipe rotation, the swirl is of solid-body type and solutions are compact: vz/vza=1-4y2+3y4 and (T-Tw)/(Ta-Tw)=(1-y2)3; where y=r/rw, the subscripts w and a denote values of axial velocity vz, temperature T, and radial distance r, at the wall and on the axis. The axial gradient of pressure, being proportional to 3y2-1, has opposite directions near the wall, y=1, and near the axis, y=0; this explains the counterflow. With increasing pipe rotation, the flow starts to converge to the axis. This causes important new effects: (i) the density and swirl velocity maxima occur away from the wall (vortex core formation), (ii) the temperature near the axis becomes lower than near the wall (the Ranque effect), (iii) the axial gradient of temperature drops from the wall to the axis, and (iv) the total axial heat flux (Nu) reaches its maximum Numax≈4000 and then decreases as swirl increases. These features can be exploited for the development of a micro-heat-exchanger, e.g., for cooling computer chips.

  7. Miniature high speed compressor having embedded permanent magnet motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Lei (Inventor); Zheng, Liping (Inventor); Chow, Louis (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta S. (Inventor); Wu, Thomas X. (Inventor); Kota, Krishna M. (Inventor); Li, Xiaoyi (Inventor); Acharya, Dipjyoti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed centrifugal compressor for compressing fluids includes a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) having a hollow shaft, the being supported on its ends by ball bearing supports. A permanent magnet core is embedded inside the shaft. A stator with a winding is located radially outward of the shaft. The PMSM includes a rotor including at least one impeller secured to the shaft or integrated with the shaft as a single piece. The rotor is a high rigidity rotor providing a bending mode speed of at least 100,000 RPM which advantageously permits implementation of relatively low-cost ball bearing supports.

  8. Unwinding of a carbon nanoscroll due to high speed rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hang; Cai, Kun

    2015-10-01

    A carbon nanoscroll (CNS) can be formed easily by rolling a graphene sheet around a carbon nanotube (CNT) [Zhang and Li, 2010, APL, 97, 081909]. When the CNS is driven by the rotary CNT to rotate at a high speed, the attractive interaction within the CNS or between the CNS and CNT is crippled by the centrifugal force on the CNS. The unwinding of CNS is triggered when the kinetic energy increment approaches to the variation of interaction energy of the system during CNS formation. Numerical experiments also indicate that the unwinding of CNS happens earlier when the CNT has a higher rotational speed or the system is at a higher temperature.

  9. Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Wade, C E

    2000-07-01

    Changes in gravitational load have been shown to alter renal function, which could potentially affect water balance. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of chronic centrifugation on water balance. Eight Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged (12 days at 2 G), and eight rats were used as a control group. Water balance over the course of the study was determined by quantifying the percentage (%) of total body water [TBW; (TBW/body mass)] and water flux (water consumption - urine volume). TBW was estimated, by means of deuterium oxide dilution, before the study and after 3 days of centrifugation and by means of desiccation after 12 days of centrifugation. %TBW did not change in the centrifuged rats from initial levels or relative to controls over the course of the study. Differences between the sum of water consumption and sum of urine volume for the 12-day period were the same in both groups. Although an initial period of negative water balance was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12 days of centrifugation suggests that water balance is not negatively affected as a result of centrifugation at 2 G.

  10. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  11. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100–500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2–20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  12. Isolation of Methoxyfuranocoumarins From Ammi majus by Centrifugal Partition Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bartnik, Magdalena; Mazurek, Anna Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Pure methoxyfuranocoumarins were isolated from Ammi majus L. by use of low-pressure column chromatography (LPCC) followed by centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC). The concentrated petroleum ether extract from fruits of A. majus was fractionated on a silica gel column using a gradient of ethyl acetate in dichloromethane (0-80%, v/v). Coumarin-rich fractions were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD). Xanthotoxin (8-MOP) and isopimpinellin (isoP), structurally similar compounds, were isolated in one fraction (FR6). To avoid multistep and long-lasting TLC preparation, optimization of CPC conditions has been performed. In one run, an effective separation of 8-MOP and isoP was achieved. The two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (10 : 8 : 10 : 9; v/v) in an ascending mode (the aqueous phase was a stationary phase, and the organic phase was a mobile phase), with flow rate 3 mL/min and rotation speed 1,600 r.p.m., was used. The identification and high purities of isolated 8-MOP (98.7%) and isoP (100%) were confirmed by HPLC/DAD assay, when compared with standards. The developed CPC method could be applied to the effective isolation of 8-MOP and isoP from plant extracts. The high purity of obtained compounds makes possible further exploitation of these components in biological studies. PMID:26209576

  13. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100-500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2-20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  14. Electro-location, tomography and porosity measurements in geotechnical centrifuge models based on electrical resistivity concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhihua

    This research was focused on the development of electrical techniques for soil characterization and soil dynamic behavior assessment. The research carried out mainly includes (1) development of a needle probe tool for assessment of soil spatial variability in terms of porosity with high-resolution in the centrifuge testing; (2) development of an electro-location technique to accurately detect buried objects' movements inside the soil during dynamic events; (3) collaborative development of a new electrode switching system to implement electrical resistivity tomography, and electro-location with high speed and high resolution. To assess soil spatial variability with high-resolution, electrical needle probes with different tip shapes were developed to measure soil electrical resistivity. After normalizing soil resistivity by pore fluid resistivity, this information can be correlated to soil porosity. Calibrations in laboratory prepared soils were conducted. Loosening due to insertion of needle probes was evaluated. A special needle probe tool, along with data acquisition and data processing tools were developed to be operated by the new NEES robot on the centrifuge. The needle probes have great potential to resolve interfaces between soil layers and small local porosity variations with a spatial resolution approximately equal to the spacing between electrodes (about half of the probe diameter). A new electrode switching system was developed to accurately detect buried objects' movements using a new electro-location scheme. The idea was to establish an electromagnetic field in a centrifuge model by injecting low-frequency alternating currents through pairs of boundary electrodes. The locations of buried objects are related to the potentials measured on them. A closed form expression for the electric field in a rectangular specimen with insulated boundaries was obtained based on the method of images. Effects of sampling parameters on spatial resolution and tradeoffs

  15. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Drive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Winiarski, David W.

    2002-08-18

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) technologies have the ability to precisely control motor sytems output and produce a numbr of benefits including energy and demand savings. This report examines the performance and cost effectiveness of a specific class of ASDs called magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drives (MC-ASD) which use the strength of a magnetic field to control the amount of torque transferred between motor and drive shaft. The MagnaDrive Adjustable Speed Coupling System uses fixed rare-earth magnets and varies the distance between rotating plates in the assembly. the PAYBACK Variable Speed Drive uses an electromagnet to control the speed of the drive

  16. Development of space motion sickness in a ground-based human centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albery, William B.; Martin, Eric T.

    1996-05-01

    Adaptation of the vestibular system, specifically the otolith organs, to a non-terrestrial environment can result in space motion sickness-like symptoms when the human is reintroduced to the normal, 1 Gz, terrestrial environment. This premise was investigated by exposing nine subjects to 90 min of sustained 2 Gz acceleration in a human centrifuge and then observing and evaluating them at 1 Gz. Five of the subjects developed slight SMS symptoms, three developed moderate, and one developed frank sickness. Postural instabilities in two of the most affected subjects were also observed using the Equitest System post exposure. Long duration exposure to a non-terrestrial G(2Gz) appears to be a potential means for developing SMS-like symptoms in a ground-based human centrifuge.

  17. Enhancing radiolytic stability upon concentration of tritium-labeled pharmaceuticals utilizing centrifugal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rosemary; Helmy, Roy; Waterhouse, David

    2015-05-30

    Tritium radiopharmaceuticals are often used in drug development because of their desirable specific activity. The inherent instability of these radioactive tracers often leads to a requirement to purify prior to use. Purification methodologies such as preparative chromatography and solid/liquid extractions often utilize water as a solvent, which is not suitable for long-term storage and necessitates removal. Rotary evaporation has traditionally been utilized for the removal of this unwanted solvent, however, this method has been shown to lead to decomposition of the tritium species in some cases. Centrifugal evaporation is a milder concentration method which has been demonstrated to effectively remove solvents. In this study, we show that centrifugal evaporation leads to effective concentration of tritium samples without the decomposition typically observed by rotary evaporation.

  18. Modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) for the analysis of centrifugally assisted TiC-Fe-Al2O3 combustion synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, M

    2014-01-01

    A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamic (MSPH) computational technique was utilized to simulate molten particle motion and infiltration speed on multi-scale analysis levels. The radial velocity and velocity gradient of molten alumina, iron infiltration in the TiC product and solidification rate, were predicted during centrifugal self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) simulation, which assisted the coating process by MSPH. The effects of particle size and temperature on infiltration and solidification of iron and alumina were mainly investigated. The obtained results were validated with experimental microstructure evidence. The simulation model successfully describes the magnitude of iron and alumina diffusion in a centrifugal thermite SHS and Ti + C hybrid reaction under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:24430621

  19. Modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) for the analysis of centrifugally assisted TiC-Fe-Al2O3 combustion synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, M. A.; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, M.

    2014-01-01

    A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamic (MSPH) computational technique was utilized to simulate molten particle motion and infiltration speed on multi-scale analysis levels. The radial velocity and velocity gradient of molten alumina, iron infiltration in the TiC product and solidification rate, were predicted during centrifugal self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) simulation, which assisted the coating process by MSPH. The effects of particle size and temperature on infiltration and solidification of iron and alumina were mainly investigated. The obtained results were validated with experimental microstructure evidence. The simulation model successfully describes the magnitude of iron and alumina diffusion in a centrifugal thermite SHS and Ti + C hybrid reaction under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:24430621

  20. Magnetically driven solid sample preparation for centrifugal microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Duford, David A; Peng, Dan D; Salin, Eric D

    2009-06-01

    A prototype for solid sample preparation on centrifugal microfluidic devices has been designed and characterized. The system uses NdFeB magnets in both the centrifugal device and a fixed base. As the centrifugal device rotates, the magnets move and spin in their chambers creating a pulverizing mechanical motion. This technique was successfully applied to the dissolution of potassium ferricyanide (K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)]), a hard colored crystal. A 0.10 g sample was completely dissolved in 3 s in 1.0 mL of water while rotating at 1000 rpm. This is a 300-fold improvement over static dissolution. PMID:19422186

  1. 27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T.T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. With the inner basket of the centrifugal revolving at 1200 rpm molasses flew outward from the granulated sugar, through the holes in the brass lining, and into the stationary outer basket. The molasses drained through the spout at the right and into molasses storage pits below the floor. The centrifugals were underdriven with a belt connected to the pulley beneath the basket. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  2. Centrifugal Size-Separation Sieve for Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Dreyer, Christopher (Inventor); Riedel, Edward (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A centrifugal sieve and method utilizes centrifugal force in rapidly-rotated cylindrical or conical screens as the primary body force contributing to size segregation. Within the centrifugal acceleration field, vibration and/or shearing flows are induced to facilitate size segregation and eventual separation of the fines from the coarse material. Inside a rotating cylindrical or conical screen, a separately-rotated screw auger blade can be used to transport material along the rotating cylinder or conical wall and to induce shearing in the material.

  3. Ocular counterrolling induced by centrifugation during orbital space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. T.; Clement, G.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 Neurolab mission (STS-90), four astronauts were exposed to interaural centripetal accelerations (Gy centrifugation) of 0.5 g and 1 g during rotation on a centrifuge, both on Earth and during orbital space flight. Subjects were oriented either left-ear out or right-ear out, facing or back to motion. Binocular eye movements were measured in three dimensions using a video technique. On Earth, tangential centrifugation that produces 1 g of interaural linear acceleration combines with gravity to tilt the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA) vector 45 degrees in the roll plane relative to the head vertical, generating a summed vector of 1.4 g. Before flight, this elicited mean ocular counterrolling (OCR) of 5.7 degrees. Due to the relative absence of gravity during flight, there was no linear acceleration along the dorsoventral axis of the head. As a result, during in-flight centrifugation, gravitoinertial acceleration was strictly aligned with the centripetal acceleration along the interaural axis. There was a small but significant decrease (mean 10%) in the magnitude of OCR in space (5.1 degrees). The magnitude of OCR during postflight 1 g centrifugation was not significantly different from preflight OCR (5.9 degrees). Findings were similar for 0.5 g centrifugation, but the OCR magnitude was approximately 60% of that induced by centrifugation at 1 g. OCR during pre- and postflight static tilt was not significantly different and was always less than OCR elicited by centrifugation of Earth for an equivalent interaural linear acceleration. In contrast, there was no difference between the OCR generated by in-flight centrifugation and by static tilt on Earth at equivalent interaural linear accelerations. These data support the following conclusions: (1) OCR is generated predominantly in response to interaural linear acceleration; (2) the increased OCR during centrifugation on Earth is a response to the head dorsoventral 1 g linear acceleration component, which

  4. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  5. A pseudo-cryptococcal artefact derived from leucocytes in wet India ink mounts of centrifuged cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvan, N; Wuu, K Y; Arseculeratne, S N; Ashraful-Haq, J

    1998-03-01

    Wet India ink mounts of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are useful in the laboratory diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. Pseudo-cryptococcal artefacts in such mounts have been attributed to leucocytes in CSF but their mode of formation has not been explained. This report describes the reproduction of such an artefact in cryptococcus free CSF-leucocyte mixtures that had been subjected to high speed centrifugation. The viscosity of DNA that could provide a morphological pseudo-capsule, and the yellow-green fluorescence of the pseudo-capsular material on staining with acridine-orange, suggest that lymphocytic nuclear DNA, which possibly leaked out after damage to the lymphocyte membrane by centrifugation, was responsible for this artefact.

  6. High speed centrifugal separator for rapid on-line sample clarification in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Richardson, P; Molloy, J; Ravenhall, R; Holwill, I; Hoare, M; Dunnill, P

    1996-08-20

    Sample clarification is a common operation in biochemical analytical methods for removing interfering or unwanted particulates from an analyte sample. Filtration provides one option for removal of particulates. However, in many cases the loss of soluble protein due to filter adsorption is unacceptable and an alternative must be sought. In this paper a microcentrifuge designed to automatically sample, spin, deliver supernatant to an analyser and wash out solids from the bowl is described. The performance of the system is assessed in terms of its clarification efficiency and the time required to achieve satisfactory clarification. Additionally, the effects of different protein precipitating agents on yeast homogenate samples separated using the microcentrifuge are studied where the system is used to deliver supernatant to a flow injection analyser. The paper demonstrates that the microcentrifuge may be used to separate rapidly such samples on a time scale between 10-60 s depending upon the type and size of sample and be successfully used as a component of an at-line monitoring system.

  7. Bovine splenic nerve: characterization of noradrenaline-containing vesicles and other cell organelles by density gradient centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Hörtnagl, H.; Hörtnagl, Heide; Winkler, H.

    1969-01-01

    1. Homogenates of bovine splenic nerves were subjected to differential and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. From the low-speed supernatant a high-speed sediment (mitochondria, lysosomes, microsomes and noradrenaline (NA) vesicles) was obtained. By density gradient centrifugation of this sediment it was shown that NA vesicles are slightly less dense than mitochondria, but denser than microsomes. 2. In further experiments a mitochondrial and a microsomal sediment were obtained. The mitochondrial sediment was fractionated with a short centrifugation time over a density gradient ranging from 0·6 to 1·2 M sucrose. Mitochondria (fumarase and succinate-dehydrogenase) and lysosomes (acid ribonuclease and deoxyribonuclease) sedimented to the bottom of the tube. The highest concentration of NA vesicles was found in a medium position. There was only a small amount of microsomes (glucose-6-phosphatase) present. 3. The microsomal sediment was centrifuged for 150 min over a density gradient ranging from 0·8 to 1·4 M sucrose. The microsomes remained on the top of the gradient. There were also some mitochondria and lysosomes present. The NA vesicles were found in highest concentration in the middle of the gradient (at about 1·2 M sucrose). 4. With the use of these two density gradients, the subcellular distribution of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, monoamine oxidase and ATPase was studied. Dopamine-β-hydroxylase was found to be localized in the NA vesicles. Monoamine oxidase was mainly recovered in mitochondria; a small part of the enzyme appeared to be microsomal. ATPase was present in microsomal elements. PMID:4310509

  8. 8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR MOUNTED ON STONE SPINDLE, VERY SHORT STEELYARD - Windmill at Water Mill, Montauk Highway & Halsey Lane, Water Mill, Suffolk County, NY

  9. 25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Iron Works, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: After sugar was granulated and cooled it had to be dried and drained, completely separating the sugar crystals from the molasses. Revolving at 1200 rpm the inner basket drove the molasses outward into the stationary outer basket leaving dried sugar behind. The steam engine counter-shaft at the left was belt driven and belts running from the counter-shaft pulleys to the centrifugals' base-pulleys provided the necessary power. Part of the clutch system which moved the belt from a moving to a stationary pulley, thus turning the centrifugals on and off, is seen in Between the counter-shaft and the centrifugals. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  10. Centrifuge modeling of LNAPL transport in partially saturated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Allersma, H.G.B.; Selvadurai, A.P.S.

    1999-12-01

    Model tests were performed at the Geotechnical Centrifuge Facility of Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, to examine the mechanics of light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) movement in a partially saturated porous granular medium. The experiment simulated a 2D spill of LNAPL in an unsaturated sand prepared at two values of porosity. The duration of the centrifuge model tests corresponded to a prototype equivalent of 110 days. The choice of modeling a 2D flow together with the use of a transparent container enabled direct visual observation of the experiments. Scaling laws developed in connection with other centrifuge modeling studies were used to support the test results. Tests were conducted at two different centrifuge accelerations to verify, by means of the modeling of models technique, the similitude between the different experiments. The paper presents details of the experimental methodologies and the measuring techniques used to evaluate the final distribution of water and LNAPL content in the soils.

  11. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-06-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude.

  12. Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in Red Room within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  13. Blood culture technique based on centrifugation: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, G L; Burson, G G; Haynes, J R

    1976-01-01

    A total of 1,000 blood samples from patients suspected of having a bacteremia were analyzed concurrently, where possible, by three methods: (i) Trypticase soy broth with sodium polyanethol sulfonate and a CO2 atmosphere: (ii) pour plates with either brain heart infusion agar or Sabouraud dextrose agar; and (iii) centrifugation of the suspected organism in a hypertonic solution. There were 176 positive cultures. The centrifugation technique recovered 73% of the positive cultures. The broth and pour plate techniques recovered 38 and 49%, respectively. The centrifugation technique showed an increased isolation rate for Pseudomonas, fungi, and gram-positive cocci. In general, for each organism the time required for the detection of a positive culture was shortest for the centrifugation technique. PMID:1270591

  14. 15. FLOOR 1; CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR TENTERS BOTH PAIR OF MILLSTONES; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FLOOR 1; CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR TENTERS BOTH PAIR OF MILLSTONES; STEELYARD RUNNING TO END OF NORTH BRIDGE TREE CAN BE SEEN - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  15. 15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  17. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RETECH'S PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  18. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. 19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND OIL TANK, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  20. Centrifugally-assisted combustion synthesis of functionally-graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W.; Munir, Z.A.; McCoy, B.J.; Risbud, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM`s) have been prepared by a variety of techniques, including combustion synthesis, and the use of a centrifugal force in this method of synthesis has been demonstrated previously. However, in the earlier work, a centrifugal force was applied to investigate the changes in the dynamics of self-propagating combustion waves or to deposit coatings on the inside surfaces of pipes. The use of a centrifugal force to investigate the formation of FGM`s has not been reported previously and is the focus of this communication. In this work, the authors have chosen thermite reactions to investigate the feasibility of FGM formation by centrifugally-assisted combustion synthesis.

  1. 16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  2. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  3. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:27645396

  4. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  5. Centrifuge Facility for the International Space Station Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility planned for the International Space Station Alpha has under-one considerable redesign over the past year, primarily because the Station is now viewed as a 10 year mission rather than a 30 year mission and because of the need to simply the design to meet budget constraints and a 2000 launch date. The basic elements of the Centrifuge Facility remain the same, i.e., a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge, a micro-g holding unit, plant and animal habitats, a glovebox and a service unit. The centrifuge will still provide the full range of artificial gravity from 0.01 a to 2 - as originally planned; however, the extractor to permit withdrawal of habitats from the centrifuge without stopping the centrifuge has been eliminated. The specimen habitats have also been simplified and are derived from other NASA programs. The Plant Research Unit being developed by the Gravitational Biology Facility will be used to house plants in the Centrifuge Facility. Although not as ambitious as the Centrifuge Facility plant habitat, it will provide much better environmental control and lighting than the current Shuttle based Plant Growth Facility. Similarly, rodents will be housed in the Advanced Animal Habitat being developed for the Shuttle program. The Centrifuge Facility and ISSA will provide the opportunity to perform repeatable, high quality science. The long duration increments available on the Station will permit multigeneration studies on both plants and animals which have not previously been possible. The Centrifuge Facility will accommodate sufficient number of specimens to permit statistically significant sampling of specimens to investigate the time course of adaptation to altered gravity environments. The centrifuge will for the first time permit investigators to use gravity itself as a tool to investigate fundamental processes, to investigate the intensity and duration of gravity to maintain normal structure and function, to separate the effects of micro-g from

  6. Modifying a Commercial Centrifuge to Reduce Electromagnetic Interference and Evaluating Functionality of Ultrasound Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greening, Gage J.

    2016-01-01

    meet our specifications and to understand what needs to be done in lab to the new centrifuge. Our modifications will provide a standard for readying centrifuges for future missions. Once the new modified centrifuge arrives by the vendor, it will need to undergo EMI testing again for validation. The centrifuge is also in the process of compatibility testing with a custom stowage drawer, which is an ongoing project in SF4. Both of these items will be payloads on future missions to the ISS for various research purposes. Ultrasound: ISS currently has an onboard ultrasound (Ultrasound 2 system) for research and medical purposes. Every piece of medical flight hardware has an equivalent ground-unit so instrumentation can be routinely evaluated and transported to the ISS if necessary. The ground-unit ultrasound equipment must be evaluated every six months using a task performance sheet (TPS). A TPS is a document, written by the appropriate scientists and engineers, which describes how to run equipment and is written in such a way that astronauts with unspecialized training can follow the tasks. I was responsible for performing six TPSs on a combination of three ultrasounds and two video power converters (VPCs). Performing a TPS involves checking out and computationally documenting each piece of equipment removed from storage locations, setting up hardware and software, performing tasks to verify functionality, returning equipment, and logging items back into the computerized system. My work revealed all ground-unit ultrasounds were functioning properly. Because of proper function, a discrepancy report (DR) did not have to be opened. The TPS was then passed along to the Quality Engineering (QE) for review and ultimately given to Quality Assurance (QA). Other projects: In addition to my main projects, I participated in other tasks including troubleshooting an EEG headband, volunteering for an ultrasound training research study, and conformal coating printed circuit boards. My

  7. Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Safeguards System Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Elayat, H A; O'Connell, W J; Boyer, B D

    2006-06-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in developing tools and methods for potential U.S. use in designing and evaluating safeguards systems used in enrichment facilities. This research focuses on analyzing the effectiveness of the safeguards in protecting against the range of safeguards concerns for enrichment plants, including diversion of attractive material and unauthorized modes of use. We developed an Extend simulation model for a generic medium-sized centrifuge enrichment plant. We modeled the material flow in normal operation, plant operational upset modes, and selected diversion scenarios, for selected safeguards systems. Simulation modeling is used to analyze both authorized and unauthorized use of a plant and the flow of safeguards information. Simulation tracks the movement of materials and isotopes, identifies the signatures of unauthorized use, tracks the flow and compilation of safeguards data, and evaluates the effectiveness of the safeguards system in detecting misuse signatures. The simulation model developed could be of use to the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, enabling the IAEA to observe and draw conclusions that uranium enrichment facilities are being used only within authorized limits for peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It will evaluate improved approaches to nonproliferation concerns, facilitating deployment of enhanced and cost-effective safeguards systems for an important part of the nuclear power fuel cycle.

  8. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  9. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  10. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  11. Xurography actuated valving for centrifugal flow control.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, David J; Early, Philip L; Vembadi, Abhishek; MacNamara, Eoghan; Kilcawley, Niamh A; Glennon, Thomas; Diamond, Dermot; Brabazon, Dermot; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-09-21

    We introduce a novel instrument controlled valving scheme for centrifugal platforms which is based upon xurography. In a first approach, which is akin to previously presented event-triggered flow control, the valves are composed of a pneumatic chamber sealed by a dissolvable film (DF) and by a pierceable membrane. Liquid is initially prevented from wetting the DF by the counter pressure of a trapped gas. Via a channel, this pocket is pneumatically connected to a vent, sealed by the pierceable membrane, located on the top surface of the disc. By scouring the top surface of the disc, along a pre-defined track by a robotic knife-cutter, the trapped gas is released and so the liquid can wet and disintegrate the DF. In order to automate assay protocols without the need to integrate DFs, we extend this xurography-based flow control concept by selective venting of chambers subjected to pneumatic over-pressure or vacuum suction. Unlike most instrument controlled flow-control mechanisms, in this approach to valve actuation can occur during disc rotation. To demonstrate the potential of this flow control approach, we designed a disc architecture to automate the liquid handling as the backbone of a biplex liver assay panel. We demonstrate valve actuation during rotation, using the robotic arm, using this disc with visualisation via dyed water. We then demonstrate the biplex liver assay, using calibration reagent, by stopping the disc and manually piercing the membrane to actuate the same valves. PMID:27523628

  12. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  13. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression.

  14. Apparatus for high speed rotation of electrically operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Keith E.; Rogus, Arnold J.

    1976-10-26

    Most high speed centrifuges employ a relatively small diameter elongate flexible drive shaft, sometimes called a "quill" shaft. These relatively slender shafts are flexible to absorb vibration as the assembly passes through speeds of resonance and to permit re-alignment of the axis of rotation of the shaft and the rotor driven thereby in the event the center of mass of the rotor and shaft assembly is displaced from the nominal axis of the rotation. To use such an apparatus for testing electrical devices and components, electrical conductors for wires are passed from a slip ring assembly located at an end of the quill shaft remote from the rotor and longitudinally alongside the quill shaft to the electrical device mounted on the rotor. The longitudinally extending conductors are supported against the radially outward directed centrifugal forces by a plurality of strong, self-lubricating, slightly compressible wafers or washers co-axially stacked on the slender shaft and provided with radially offset longitudinally aligned openings to support the longitudinally extending conductors. The conductors are supported against the centrifugal forces and thus protected from rupture or other damage without restricting or constraining the essential flexure or bending of the drive shaft.

  15. Transport modes during crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Carlson, Frederick; Chait, Arnon; Regel', Liia L.

    1992-01-01

    Flow modes arising under average acceleration in centrifugal crystal growth, the gradient of acceleration, and the Coriolis force are investigated using a fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical model for a centrifugal crystal growth experiment. The analysis focuses on an examination of the quasi-steady state flow modes. The importance of the gradient acceleration is determined by the value of a new nondimensional number, Ad.

  16. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  17. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  18. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  19. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-03-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  20. Liquid Metering Centrifuge Sticks (LMCS): A Centrifugal Approach to Metering Known Sample Volumes for Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Clarke, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Phase separation is one of the most significant obstacles encountered during the development of analytical methods for water quality monitoring in spacecraft environments. Removing air bubbles from water samples prior to analysis is a routine task on earth; however, in the absence of gravity, this routine task becomes extremely difficult. This paper details the development and initial ground testing of liquid metering centrifuge sticks (LMCS), devices designed to collect and meter a known volume of bubble-free water in microgravity. The LMCS uses centrifugal force to eliminate entrapped air and reproducibly meter liquid sample volumes for analysis with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE). C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform that is being developed as a potential spacecraft water quality monitoring system. C-SPE utilizes solid phase extraction membranes impregnated with analyte-specific colorimetric reagents to concentrate and complex target analytes in spacecraft water samples. The mass of analyte extracted from the water sample is determined using diffuse reflectance (DR) data collected from the membrane surface and an analyte-specific calibration curve. The analyte concentration can then be calculated from the mass of extracted analyte and the volume of the sample analyzed. Previous flight experiments conducted in microgravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft demonstrated that the inability to collect and meter a known volume of water using a syringe was a limiting factor in the accuracy of C-SPE measurements. Herein, results obtained from ground based C-SPE experiments using ionic silver as a test analyte and either the LMCS or syringes for sample metering are compared to evaluate the performance of the LMCS. These results indicate very good agreement between the two sample metering methods and clearly illustrate the potential of utilizing centrifugal forces to achieve phase separation and metering of water samples in microgravity.

  1. High speed handpieces.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-02-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2.

  2. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  3. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-11-04

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics.

  4. Rheological and physical characteristics of crustal-scaled materials for centrifuge analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waffle, Lindsay; Godin, Laurent; Harris, Lyal B.; Kontopoulou, M.

    2016-05-01

    We characterize a set of analogue materials used for centrifuge analogue modelling simulating deformation at different levels in the crust simultaneously. Specifically, we improve the rheological characterization in the linear viscoelastic region of materials for the lower and middle crust, and cohesive synthetic sands without petroleum-binding agents for the upper crust. Viscoelastic materials used in centrifuge analogue modelling demonstrate complex dynamic behaviour, so viscosity alone is insufficient to determine if a material will be an effective analogue. Two series of experiments were conducted using an oscillating bi-conical plate rheometer to measure the storage and loss moduli and complex viscosities of several modelling clays and silicone putties. Tested materials exhibited viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviour. The silicone putties and some modelling clays demonstrated viscous-dominant behaviour and reached Newtonian plateaus at strain rates < 0.5 × 10-2 s-1, while other modelling clays demonstrated elastic-dominant power-law relationships. Based on these results, the elastic-dominant modelling clay is recommended as an analogue for basement cratons. Inherently cohesive synthetic sands produce fine-detailed fault and fracture patterns, and developed thrust, strike-slip, and extensional faults in simple centrifuge test models. These synthetic sands are recommended as analogues for the brittle upper crust. These new results increase the accuracy of scaling analogue models to prototype. Additionally, with the characterization of three new materials, we propose a complete lithospheric profile of analogue materials for centrifuge modelling, allowing future studies to replicate a broader range of crustal deformation behaviours.

  5. Rheological and physical characteristics of crustal-scaled materials for centrifuge analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waffle, Lindsay; Godin, Laurent; Harris, Lyal B.; Kontopoulou, M.

    2016-05-01

    We characterize a set of analogue materials used for centrifuge analogue modelling simulating deformation at different levels in the crust simultaneously. Specifically, we improve the rheological characterization in the linear viscoelastic region of materials for the lower and middle crust, and cohesive synthetic sands without petroleum-binding agents for the upper crust. Viscoelastic materials used in centrifuge analogue modelling demonstrate complex dynamic behaviour, so viscosity alone is insufficient to determine if a material will be an effective analogue. Two series of experiments were conducted using an oscillating bi-conical plate rheometer to measure the storage and loss moduli and complex viscosities of several modelling clays and silicone putties. Tested materials exhibited viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviour. The silicone putties and some modelling clays demonstrated viscous-dominant behaviour and reached Newtonian plateaus at strain rates < 0.5 × 10-2 s-1, while other modelling clays demonstrated elastic-dominant power-law relationships. Based on these results, the elastic-dominant modelling clay is recommended as an analogue for basement cratons. Inherently cohesive synthetic sands produce fine-detailed fault and fracture patterns, and developed thrust, strike-slip, and extensional faults in simple centrifuge test models. These synthetic sands are recommended as analogues for the brittle upper crust. These new results increase the accuracy of scaling analogue models to prototype. Additionally, with the characterization of three new materials, we propose a complete lithospheric profile of analogue materials for centrifuge modelling, allowing future studies to replicate a broader range of crustal deformation behaviours.

  6. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to

  7. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S.; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  8. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis. PMID:27587129

  9. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  10. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  11. Subchronic use of the St. Jude centrifugal pump as a mechanical assist device in calves.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J; Wagner-Mann, C; Mann, F; Demmy, T; Walls, J; Turk, J

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump on hemodynamic and hematologic parameters and the incidence of postmortem findings in a subchronic ex vivo left ventricular assist animal model. Five calves were implanted with the pump as a left ventricular assist device (left atrial to thoracic aorta bypass) and studied for 96 h of continuous pumping under identical conditions. Heparin (100 IU/kg) was administered only in the initial saline pump prime. Throughout the protocol, mean arterial and central venous pressures averaged 102.1 +/- 4.6 and 3.4 +/- 2.2 mm Hg, respectively. Pump flow was 47.8 +/- 8.4 ml/kg/min at a mean pump speed of 1,676.3 +/- 106.1 rpm. No clinical abnormalities or mechanical malfunctions attributable to the pump were detected during the 96 h of continuous pumping for each calf. Mean plasma-free hemoglobin after 96 h was 3.9 +/- 3.7 mumol/L (p = 0.337 compared to baseline). At post mortem, renal infarctions were detected in 1 calf. No other pump-associated lesions were detected in any of the other calves. We have concluded that the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump functions reliably during 96 h of continuous left heart bypass in a calf model.

  12. Comparison of the compressive yield response of aggregated suspensions: Pressure filtration, centrifugation, and osmotic consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.T.; Melant, R.M.; Zukoski, C.F.

    1996-10-01

    The compressive rheological responses of suspensions containing flocculated kaolin, alumina (average particle sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 {micro}m), and hydrous zirconia (average particle sizes of 8, 57, and 139 nm) particles have been measured using three different techniques: pressure filtration, volume fraction profile during centrifugation, and sediment height during centrifugation at multiple spinning speeds. While the volume fraction profile technique appears to be experimentally most robust, equivalent responses are found using the different techniques, indicating that the compressive yield stress is a material property of a given suspension. The compressive yield stress of each suspension increases rapidly with volume fraction but cannot be generally described using simple power-law or exponential fits. The compressive yield stress also increases with the inverse square of particle size. The packing behavior of the suspensions undergoing osmotic consolidation is compared with the mechanical compressive yield response. Some suspensions exhibited the same packing behavior as in the mechanical techniques, while others consistently packed to higher densities during osmotic consolidation. Although equivalent osmotic and mechanical loads do not always result in the same volume fractions, the similar increases in volume fraction with applied driving force suggest that both the osmotic and mechanical techniques are controlled by the force needed to rearrange the particle network.

  13. Design and optimization of a single stage centrifugal compressor for a solar dish-Brayton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Kai; Tong, Zhiting; Lin, Feng; Nie, Chaoqun; Engeda, Abraham

    2013-10-01

    According to the requirements of a solar dish-Brayton system, a centrifugal compressor stage with a minimum total pressure ratio of 5, an adiabatic efficiency above 75% and a surge margin more than 12% needs to be designed. A single stage, which consists of impeller, radial vaned diffuser, 90° crossover and two rows of axial stators, was chosen to satisfy this system. To achieve the stage performance, an impeller with a 6:1 total pressure ratio and an adiabatic efficiency of 90% was designed and its preliminary geometry came from an in-house one-dimensional program. Radial vaned diffuser was applied downstream of the impeller. Two rows of axial stators after 90° crossover were added to guide the flow into axial direction. Since jet-wake flow, shockwave and boundary layer separation coexisted in the impeller-diffuser region, optimization on the radius ratio of radial diffuser vane inlet to impeller exit, diffuser vane inlet blade angle and number of diffuser vanes was carried out at design point. Finally, an optimized centrifugal compressor stage fulfilled the high expectations and presented proper performance. Numerical simulation showed that at design point the stage adiabatic efficiency was 79.93% and the total pressure ratio was 5.6. The surge margin was 15%. The performance map including 80%, 90% and 100% design speed was also presented.

  14. CFD Ventilation Study for the Human Powered Centrifuge at the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The Human Powered Centrifuge (HPC) is a hyper gravity facility that will be installed on board the International Space Station (ISS) to enable crew exercises under the artificial gravity conditions. The HPC equipment includes a bicycle for long-term exercises of a crewmember that provides power for rotation of HPC at a speed of 30 rpm. The crewmember exercising vigorously on the centrifuge generates the amount of carbon dioxide of several times higher than a crewmember in ordinary conditions. The goal of the study is to analyze the airflow and carbon dioxide distribution within Pressurized Multipurpose Module (PMM) cabin. The 3D computational model included PMM cabin. The full unsteady formulation was used for airflow and CO2 transport modeling with the so-called sliding mesh concept is considered in the rotating reference frame while the rest of the cabin volume is considered in the stationary reference frame. The localized effects of carbon dioxide dispersion are examined. Strong influence of the rotating HPC equipment on the CO2 distribution is detected and discussed.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Ventilation Study for the Human Powered Centrifuge at the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    The Human Powered Centrifuge (HPC) is a facility that is planned to be installed on board the International Space Station (ISS) to enable crew exercises under the artificial gravity conditions. The HPC equipment includes a "bicycle" for long-term exercises of a crewmember that provides power for rotation of HPC at a speed of 30 rpm. The crewmember exercising vigorously on the centrifuge generates the amount of carbon dioxide of about two times higher than a crewmember in ordinary conditions. The goal of the study is to analyze the airflow and carbon dioxide distribution within Pressurized Multipurpose Module (PMM) cabin when HPC is operating. A full unsteady formulation is used for airflow and CO2 transport CFD-based modeling with the so-called sliding mesh concept when the HPC equipment with the adjacent Bay 4 cabin volume is considered in the rotating reference frame while the rest of the cabin volume is considered in the stationary reference frame. The rotating part of the computational domain includes also a human body model. Localized effects of carbon dioxide dispersion are examined. Strong influence of the rotating HPC equipment on the CO2 distribution detected is discussed.

  16. Centrifuge model tests of rainfall-induced slope failures for the investigation of the initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matziaris, Vasileios; Marshall, Alec; Yu, Hai-Sui

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are very common natural disasters which cause damage to properties and infrastructure and may result in the loss of human lives. These phenomena often take place in unsaturated soil slopes and are triggered by the saturation of the soil profile, due to rain infiltration, which leads to a loss of shear strength. The aim of this study is to determine rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides under different initial conditions. Model tests of rainfall-induced landslides are conducted in the Nottingham Centre for Geomechanics 50g-T geotechnical centrifuge. Initially unsaturated plane-strain slope models made with fine silica sand are prepared at varying densities at 1g and accommodated within a climatic chamber which provides controlled environmental conditions. During the centrifuge flight at 60g, rainfall events of varying intensity and duration are applied to the slope models causing the initiation of slope failure. The impact of soil state properties and rainfall characteristics on the landslide initiation process are discussed. The variation of pore water pressures within the slope before, during and after simulated rainfall events is recorded using miniature pore pressure transducers buried in the soil model. Slope deformation is determined by using a high-speed camera and digital image analysis techniques.

  17. Liquid flow on a rotating disk prior to centrifugal atomization and spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Jacobs, M. H.; Dowson, A. L.

    1998-12-01

    Video observations of the flow patterns that develop on a rotating disk during centrifugal atomization and spray deposition, and subsequent metallographic studies conducted on solid skulls removed from the disk after processing, have indicated a circular discontinuity or hydraulic jump, which is manifested by a rapid increase in the thickness of the liquid metal and by a corresponding decrease in the radial velocity. A mathematical model has been developed that is capable of predicting both the occurrence and location of the jump, and the associated changes in the thickness profile and in the radial and tangential velocities of the liquid metal. Good correlations have been observed between model predictions and the flow patterns observed on the skull after atomization, and the effects of changes in material and operational parameters such as kinematic viscosity, volume flow rate, metallostatic head, and disk rotation speed have been quantified. Liquid metal flow is controlled primarily by the volume flow rate and by the metallostatic head prior to the hydraulic jump and by the centrifugal forces after the jump. The implications of these observations in terms of the atomization process are discussed.

  18. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests.

  19. Temperature control in a 30 stage, 5-cm Centrifugal Contactor Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz

    2009-09-01

    Temperature profile testing was performed using a 30 stage 5-cm centrifugal contactor pilot plant. These tests were performed to evaluate the ability to control process temperature by adjusting feed solution temperatures. This would eliminate the need for complex jacketed heat exchanger installation on the centrifugal contactors. Thermocouples were installed on the inlet and outlets of each stage, as well as directly in the mixing zone of several of the contactor stages. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 with nitric acid were the solution feeds for the temperature profile testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total throughputs and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems were collected with selected profiles. The total throughput ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Inlet solution temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50 °C were tested. Results of the two-phase temperature profile testing are detailed

  20. Solvent Carryover Characterization and Recovery for a 10-inch Single Stage Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, R.D.; Stephens, A.B.; Leung, D.T.; Baffling, K.E.; Harmon, H.D.; Suggs, P.C.

    2006-07-01

    A test program has been performed to characterize the organic solvent carryover and recovery from centrifugal contactors in the Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. CSSX is the baseline design for removing cesium from salt solutions for Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility. CSSX uses a custom solvent to extract cesium from the salt solution in a series of single stage centrifugal contactors. Meeting the Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Defense Waste Processing Facility and Saltstone, as well as plant economics, dictate that solvent loss should be kept to a minimum. Solvent droplet size distribution in the aqueous outlet streams of the CSSX contactors is of particular importance to the design of solvent recovery equipment. Because insufficient solvent droplet size data existed to form a basis for the recovery system design, DOE funded the CSSX Solvent Carryover Characterization and Recovery Test (SCCRT). This paper presents the droplet size distribution of solvent and concentration in the contactor aqueous outlet streams as a function of rotor speed, bottom plate type, and flow rate. It also presents the performance data of a prototype coalescer. (authors)

  1. Relocation and repair of the National Geotechnical Centrifuge. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    In January of 1984, the large geotechnical centrifuge located at NASA Ames Research Center, was in the first stages of operational checkout when the main thrust bearing of the large D.C. drive motor failed. After many months of investigation and proposals for repair of the facility, it became evident that it would be far more advantageous to the engineering community to remove those components of the centrifuge that were undamaged to the Davis campus and replace the drive system completely. The large centrifuge had cost over 2 million dollars to build, and it would have been irresponsible to simply scrap it. Recognizing this fact, funds were solicited and received from various sources, and Beam Engineering Inc. was contracted to design and construct the centrifuge at its new location. The University of California contributed a quarter of a million dollars and Tyndall Air Force Base, through Los Alamos National Laboratory, contributed $140,000. There were funds also contributed by LANL, LLNL, US Navy and NSF. The first stage in the phased development of the newly located centrifuge is nearing completion, which prompts the writing of this report. By the time that this report reaches the reader the first runs of the centrifuge will have been completed. The present report describes the present capability of the centrifuge and the plans for upgrading as time goes on. Several pilot studies were carried out. The experiments involved (1) the effects of nearby explosions on buried thin walled containers and (2) the advection and dispersion of toxic waste water through soils.

  2. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  3. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  4. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  5. Single-layer centrifugation through PureSperm® 80 selects improved quality spermatozoa from frozen-thawed dog semen.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Alcaraz, L; Gálvez, M J; Acha, D; Ortiz, I; Urbano, M; Hidalgo, M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether single-layer centrifugation (SLC) with PureSperm® 80 could select good quality spermatozoa, including those with specific motility patterns, from doses of frozen dog semen. Semen from 5 dogs was collected and cryopreserved following a standard protocol. After thawing, semen samples were divided into two aliquots: one of them was used as control and the other one processed by SLC. Assessment of sperm motility (assessed by computer-assisted semen analysis), morphology (Diff-Quick staining) and viability (triple fluorescent stain of propidium iodine/isothiocyanate-labeled peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin/Rhodamine 123), were performed on aliquots of fresh semen, frozen-thawed control and frozen-thawed SLC treated samples. A multivariate clustering procedure separated 26,051 motile spermatozoa into three subpopulations (sP): sP1 consisting of highly active but non-progressive spermatozoa (40.3%), sP2 consisting of spermatozoa with high velocity and progressive motility (30.0%), and sP3 consisting of poorly active and non-progressive spermatozoa (29.7%). SLC with PureSperm® 80 yielded sperm suspensions with improved motility, morphology, viability and acrosome integrity (P<0.001). The frozen-thawed SLC treated samples were enriched in sP2, reaching a proportion of 44.1% of the present spermatozoa. From these results, we concluded that SLC with PureSperm® 80 may be an alternative and successful method for improving the quality of frozen-thawed dog spermatozoa. Moreover, sP2 (high-speed and progressive spermatozoa) was more frequently observed after SLC. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the general motile sperm structure present in dogs remained constant despite the effect caused by either cryopreservation or separation by SLC through PureSperm® 80.

  6. [Comparison between the centrifugation on MPA C10 (Roche Diagnostics) and the centrifugation according recommendations of GEHT (Groupe d'étude de l'hémostase et de la thrombose) for the daily hemostasis assays].

    PubMed

    Flamant, Fabrice; Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne; Lenormand, Bernard; Le Cam-Duchez, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Actually, many laboratories tend to acquire pre analytic automates to prepare specimens for analysis. For haemostasis, these pre analytical modules are not always in agreement with the recommendations from the Groupe d'étude de l'hémostase et de la thrombose (GEHT). For example in the MPA C10 module (Roche Diagnostics) the speed of centrifugation was not rather fast compared with the GEHT recommandations. Then, to be able to use this automate for routine coagulation assays, we compared results of Quick time, activated partial prothombin time, fibrinogen, factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor X and antithrombin levels and unfractioned heparin anti-Xa activity measurement after MPA (1,885 g - 999 sec) or GEHT (2,500 g - 900 sec) protocol of centrifugation. First, we verified platelet counts: in 82% of specimens, the platelet counts were under 10.10(9)/L after centrifugation on MPA module. Moreover, a good correlation was observed in all comparisons. Then we concluded the MPA C10 module was usable for routine coagulation tests.

  7. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  8. Measurement and Analysis of the Noise Radiated by Low Mach Number Centrifugal Blowers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, David Marvin

    An investigation was performed of the broad band, aerodynamically generated noise in low tip-speed Mach number, centrifugal air moving devices. An interdisciplinary experimental approach was taken which involved investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic fields, and their mutual relationship. The noise generation process was studied using two experimental vehicles: (1) a scale model of a homologous family of centrifugal blowers typical of those used to cool computer and business equipment, and (2) a single blade from a centrifugal blower impeller placed in a known, controllable flow field. The radiation characteristics of the model blower were investigated by measuring the acoustic intensity distribution near the blower inlet and comparing it with the intensity near the inlet to an axial flow fan. Results showed that the centrifugal blower is a distributed, random noise source, unlike an axial fan which exhibited the effects of a coherent, interacting source distribution. Aerodynamic studies of the flow field in the inlet and at the discharge to the rotating impeller were used to assess the mean flow distribution through the impeller blade channels and to identify regions of excessive turbulence near the rotating blade row. Both circumferential and spanwise mean flow nonuniformities were identified along with a region of increased turbulence just downstream of the scroll cutoff. The fluid incidence angle, normally taken as an indicator of blower performance, was estimated from mean flow data as deviating considerably from an ideal impeller design. An investigation of the noise radiated from the single, isolated airfoil was performed using modern correlation and spectral analysis techniques. Radiation from the single blade in flow was characterized using newly developed expressions for the correlation area and the dipole source strength per unit area, and from the relationship between the blade surface pressure and the incident turbulent flow field. Results

  9. Centrifugation Effects on Estrous Cycling, Mating Success and Pregnancy Outcome in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.; Rushing, Linda S.; Tou, Janet; Wade, Charles E.; Baer, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of 2-g centrifugation on estrous cycling, mating success and pregnancy outcome in rats. Sexually mature female and male rats were assigned to either 2-g centrifuge or non-centrifuge conditions, and to non-breeding or breeding conditions. In non-breeding females, estrous cycles were analyzed by examining vaginal cytology before and for 35 days during centrifugation. Breeding females were time-mated following 7 days of adaptation to centrifugation. Following adaptation to centrifugation, estrous cycle duration over a five-cycle period was similar in centrifuged and non-centrifuged females. Identical numbers of centrifuged and non-centrifuged females conceived, however centrifuged females took four-times longer than controls to achieve conception. Births occurred at the normal gestational length. Pup birth weight and postnatal survival were p<0.05 reduced in centrifuged as compared to non-centrifuged groups. In conclusion, 2-g centrifugation had no effect on estrous cycle length or the probably of becoming pregnant but delayed conception and diminished pregnancy outcome.

  10. Boundary-value problem for plasma centrifuge at arbitrary magnetic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.; Hong, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    We solve in closed form the boundary-value problem for the partial differential equations which describe the (azimuthal) rotation velocity and induced magnetic fields in a cylindrical plasma centrifuge with ring electrodes of different radii and an external, axial magnetic field. The electric field, current density, and velocity distributions are discussed in terms of the Hartmann number H and the magnetic Reynolds number R. For small Hall coefficients, the induced magnetic field does not affect the plasma rotation. As a result of the Lorentz forces, the plasma rotates with speeds as high as 100,000 cm/sec around its axis of symmetry at typical conditions, so that the lighter (heavier) ion and atom components are enriched at (off) the center of the discharge cylinder.

  11. Application of Feedforward Adaptive Active-Noise Control for Reducing Blade Passing Noise in Centrifugal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, J.-D.; BAI, M. R.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes two configurations of feedforward adaptive active-noise control (ANC) technique for reducing blade passing noise in centrifugal fans. In one configuration, the control speaker is installed at the cut-off region of the fan, while in the other configuration at the exit duct. The proposed ANC system is based on the filtered-x least-mean-squares (FXLMS) algorithm with multi-sine synthesized reference signal and frequency counting and is implemented by using a digital signal processor (DSP). Experiments are carried out to evaluate the proposed system for reducing the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics at various flow speeds. The results of the experiment indicated that the ANC technique is effective in reducing the blade passing noise for two configurations by using the feedforward adaptive control.

  12. 'Coriolis resonance' within a rotating duct. [flow induced vibrations in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurosaka, M.; Caruthers, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the unsteady disturbances of a fixed frequency within a radial duct rotating at a set speed is presented. The flow is assumed to be compressible, inviscid, and of a fluid which is a perfect gas. Equations are developed for the steady and the unsteady parts of the flow in cylindrical coordinates. The unsteady disturbances are expressed by Fourier decomposition in angular position, distance into the duct, and in time. It is found that a resonance is possible when the frequency of flow disturbances is twice the shaft-rotation frequency, considering only the radial and tangential disturbances and not the radial and circumferential disturbances. The particular point at which the resonance occurs indicates the occurrence is due to the Coriolis force, which is only present in the radial and tangential directions. It is noted that the Coriolis force can only be present in open-ended ducts, such as those found in centrifugal compressors.

  13. Effect of centrifugal force on natural frequency of lateral vibration of rotating shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad, M.; Bastami, A. R.

    2004-07-01

    This paper investigates the effect of shaft rotation on its natural frequency. Apart from gyroscopic effect, the axial force originated from centrifugal force and the Poisson effect results in change of shaft natural frequency. D'Alembert principle for shaft in cylindrical co-ordinate system, along with the stress-strain relation, gives the non-homogenous linear differential equation, which can be used to calculate axial stress in the shaft. Numerical results of this study show that axial stress produced by shaft rotation has a major effect on the natural frequency of long high-speed shafts, while shaft diameter has no influence on the results. In addition, change in lateral natural frequency due to gyroscopic effect is compared with the results of this study.

  14. FORTRAN program for predicting off-design performance of centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvas, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating the off-design performance of centrifugal compressors with channel diffusers is presented. Use of the program requires complete knowledge of the overall impeller and diffuser geometries. Individual losses are computed using analytical equations and empirical correlations which relate loss levels to velocity diagram characteristics and overall geometry. On a given speed line compressor performance is calculated for a range of inlet velocity levels. At flow rates between surge and choke, individual efficiency decrements, compressor overall efficiency, and compressor total pressure ratio are tabulated. An example case of performance comparison with a compressor built by a commercial engine manufacturer is presented to demonstrate the correlation with limited experimental data.

  15. Computational modeling of structure of metal matrix composite in centrifugal casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagórski, Roman

    2007-04-01

    The structure of alumina matrix composite reinforced with crystalline particles obtained during centrifugal casting process are studied. Several parameters of cast process like pouring temperature, temperature, rotating speed and size of casting mould which influent on structure of composite are examined. Segregation of crystalline particles depended on other factors such as: the gradient of density of the liquid matrix and reinforcement, thermal processes connected with solidifying of the cast, processes leading to changes in physical and structural properties of liquid composite are also investigated. All simulation are carried out by CFD program Fluent. Numerical simulations are performed using the FLUENT two-phase free surface (air and matrix) unsteady flow model (volume of fluid model — VOF) and discrete phase model (DPM).

  16. Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C.; Capart, H.; Crone, T. J.; Grinspum, E.; Hsu, L.; Kaufman, D.; Li, L.; Ling, H.; Reitz, M. D.; Smith, B.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments. However, running experiments big enough to generate realistic boundary forces is a logistical challenge to say the least [1]. One alternative is to run table-top simulations with unnaturally weak but fast-eroding pseudo-bedrock, another is to extrapolate from micro-erosion of natural substrates driven by unnaturally weak impacts; hybrid-scale experiments have also been conducted [2]. Here we take a different approach in which we scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge [3]. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum [2] spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking [4], and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. The force structures and their fluctuations within the granular mass and at the boundaries are explored with contact dynamics numerical simulations that mimic the lab experimental conditions [5]. In this presentation we summarize these results and discuss how they can contribute to the formulation of debris-flow erosion law. [1] Major, J. J. (1997), Journal of Geology 105: 345-366, doi:10.1086/515930 [2] Hsu, L. (2010), Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Berkeley [3] Brucks, A., et al (2007), Physical Review E 75, 032301, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.75.032301 [4] Spinewine, B., et al (2011), Experiments in Fluids 50: 1507-1525, doi: 10.1007/s00348

  17. Theory and practice of centrifugal elutriation (CE). Factors influencing the separation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Figdor, C G; Leemans, J M; Bont, W S; de Vries, J E

    1983-06-01

    Centrifugal elutriation (CE) is currently a widely used preparative cell separation technique. In order to optimize the separation of cells that show only small differences in sedimentation velocity, several conditions that might influence the resolution capacity, such as rotor speed, counterflow, jetstream, cell load, density, and viscosity of the elutriation medium, were analyzed. Experiments carried out with human red blood cells (rbc) indicated that selective losses of rbc from the rotor caused by the jetstream, could be prevented if the separations were carried out at high rotor speeds, as predicted by the theory. In addition, high cell loads (5 X 10(8) rbc) resulted in better separations than low cell loads (5 X 10(7) rbc). Human monocytes were separated into subpopulations that differed only about 0.003 g/mL in density, but have virtually the same size. The separation was carried out either by increasing the density or viscosity of the elutriation medium or by decreasing the rotor speed. In all cases similar results were obtained. These results indicated that under optimal conditions CE can be applied for the separation of cells that differ only slightly in sedimentation velocity. PMID:6197173

  18. Experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump in postcardiotomy ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Schmaltz, R; Boley, T M; Nawarawong, W; Landreneau, R J

    1992-09-01

    The reported clinical use of the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns, Inc./3M, Ann Arbor, Mich.) as a cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy ventricular failure is limited. During a 25-month period ending November 1988, we used 40 Sarns centrifugal pumps as univentricular or biventricular cardiac assist devices in 27 patients who could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass despite maximal pharmacologic and intraaortic balloon support. Eighteen men and nine women with a mean age of 60.4 years (28 to 83) required assistance. Left ventricular assist alone was used in 12 patients, right ventricular assist in 2, and biventricular assist in 13. The duration of assist ranged from 2 to 434 hours (median 45). Centrifugal assist was successful in weaning 100% of the patients. Ten of 27 patients (37%) improved hemodynamically, allowing removal of the device(s), and 5 of 27 (18.5%) survived hospitalization. Survival of patients requiring left ventricular assist only was 33.3% (4/12). Complications were common and included renal failure, hemorrhage, coagulopathy, ventricular arrhythmias, sepsis, cerebrovascular accident, and wound infection. During 3560 centrifugal pump hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. The Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective assist device when used to salvage patients who otherwise cannot be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Statistical analysis of preoperative patient characteristics, operative risk factors, and postoperative complications failed to predict which patients would be weaned from cardiac assist or which would survive.

  19. A fuzzy controlled three-phase centrifuge for waste separation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.J.; Smith, R.E.; Miller, N.

    1998-02-01

    The three-phase centrifuge technology discussed in this paper was developed by Neal Miller, president of Centech, Inc. The three-phase centrifuge is an excellent device for cleaning up oil field and refinery wastes which are typically composed of hydrocarbons, water, and solids. The technology is unique. It turns the waste into salable oil, reusable water, and landfill-able solids. No secondary waste is produced. The problem is that only the inventor can set up and run the equipment well enough to provide an optimal cleanup. Demand for this device has far exceeded a one man operation. There is now a need for several centrifuges to be operated at different locations at the same time. This has produced a demand for an intelligent control system, one that could replace a highly skilled operator, or at least supplement the skills of a less experienced operator. The control problem is ideally suited to fuzzy logic, since the centrifuge is a highly complicated machine operated entirely by the skill and experience of the operator. A fuzzy control system was designed for and used with the centrifuge.

  20. Development of a Feeder for Uninterrupted Centrifugation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Vasques, Marilyn F.; Gundo, Daniel P.; Griffith, Jon B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A specialized paste diet feeder was developed in support of a hypergravity (2G) centrifuge study. The centrifuge study was to be compared to a previously flown Russian Cosmos spaceflight so experimental parameters of the 14 day spaceflight had to be duplicated. In order to duplicate at hyper G an experiment that took place in weightlessness, all other conditions must be as identical as possible. Stopping the centrifuge to provide maintenance for the animals causes unacceptable changes in experimental research results. Thus the experimental protocol required the delivery of a designated amount of paste diet at regular intervals for a two week period without stopping the centrifuge. A centrifuge and a stationary control cage, each containing 10 laboratory rats, were fitted with feeders that were calibrated to provide 140 plus or minus 2g of paste diet every 6 hours. This paper describes development of the feeder design and results of its operation over the two week experiment. The design philosophy and details of the feeder system are provided with recommendations for future such devices.

  1. On-chip preparation of calcium alginate particles based on droplet templates formed by using a centrifugal microfluidic technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Sun, Xiao-Ting; Yang, Chun-Guang; Xu, Zhang-Run

    2016-03-15

    A novel chip-based approach for the fabrication of oblate spheriodal calcium alginate particles was developed by combining the droplet template method and the centrifugal microfluidic strategy. Circular chips with multiple radial channels were designed. Sodium alginate solutions in radial channels were flung into CaCl2 solutions in the form of droplets under centrifugal force, and the droplets transformed into particles through cross-linking reaction. The size and morphology of particles could be controlled by regulating the centrifugal force, the channel geometry and the distance between the channel outlet and the CaCl2 solution. The throughput of particle production was evidently enhanced by increasing the number of radial channels to 48 and 64. The coefficients of variation of particle sizes were in the range of 5.2-5.6%, which indicated the monodisperse particles could be prepared by using the present method. With the chip configuration readily modified, the same platform could be used to produce Janus particles. The Janus particles showed clear interfaces owing to the high flight speed and the rapid gelling process of the droplets. This method would be capable of generating particles with complicated morphology and multifunction from diverse polymeric materials.

  2. Evaluation of hydraulic radial forces on the impeller by the volute in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Boehning, Fiete; Timms, Daniel L; Amaral, Felipe; Oliveira, Leonardo; Graefe, Roland; Hsu, Po-Lin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    In many state-of-the-art rotary blood pumps for long-term ventricular assistance, the impeller is suspended within the casing by magnetic or hydrodynamic means. For the design of such suspension systems, profound knowledge of the acting forces on the impeller is crucial. Hydrodynamic bearings running at low clearance gaps can yield increased blood damage and magnetic bearings counteracting high forces consume excessive power. Most current rotary blood pump devices with contactless bearings are centrifugal pumps that incorporate a radial diffuser volute where hydraulic forces on the impeller develop. The yielding radial forces are highly dependent on impeller design, operating point and volute design. There are three basic types of volute design--singular, circular, and double volute. In this study, the hydraulic radial forces on the impeller created by the volute in an investigational centrifugal blood pump are evaluated and discussed with regard to the choice of contactless suspension systems. Each volute type was tested experimentally in a centrifugal pump test setup at various rotational speeds and flow rates. For the pump's design point at 5 L/min and 2500 rpm, the single volute had the lowest radial force (∼0 N), the circular volute yielded the highest force (∼2 N), and the double volute possessed a force of approx. 0.5 N. Results of radial force magnitude and direction were obtained and compared with a previously performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study.

  3. [Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed. Speeding is a major issue of road safety].

    PubMed

    Montoro González, Luis; Roca Ruiz, Javier; Lucas-Alba, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Extending and updating our knowledge concerning drivers' motivational and cognitive processes is of essential importance if we are to apply policies with long-lasting effects. This study presents data from a representative national survey analyzing the Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed, the risks of speeding, the degree of violation of speed-limits and the reasons for speeding. Results indicate that Spanish drivers rate speeding as a serious offence, yet not among the most dangerous ones. All in all, they claim to comply mostly with the speed limits. However, some interesting violation patterns emerge: observance is lower for generic speed limits according to road type (vs. specific limits shown by certain road signs), and particularly in motorways (vs. single carriageways and urban areas). Risk perception and reasons for speeding emerge as the main factors predicting the levels of speed violations reported. Results suggest that any effective intervention strategy should consider such factors, namely the link between speed, road safety, and drivers' specific reasons for speeding.

  4. Quantitation of haptens by homogeneous immunoprecipitation. 2. Centrifugal analysis for tobramycin, phenobarbital, and theophylline in serum.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Bunyagidj, C; Hoskin, S; Riebe, S M; Aucker, J; White, K; O'Neill, S P

    1983-08-01

    Our homogeneous immunoprecipitation inhibition assay (Clin. Chem. 28:659-661, 1982) is applied here to tobramycin, phenobarbital, and theophylline. Only 10-50 microL of test sample is needed. No sample treatment, dilution, or extraction is required. A test serum sample is simultaneously mixed with a drug conjugate and its specific antiserum in a centrifugal analyzer. The subsequent reaction and the measurement are completed in 3 min. Within-run and between-run CVs for clinically relevant concentrations were well below 10%. Results for patients' samples correlated well with those by enzyme immunoassay.

  5. Numerical performance evaluation of design modifications on a centrifugal pump impeller running in reverse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Chrysovergis, Marios; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris; Charalampopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the effect of impeller design variations on the performance of a centrifugal pump running as turbine is presented. Numerical simulations were performed after introducing various modifications in the design for various operating conditions. Specifically, the effects of the inlet edge shape, the meridional channel width, the number of blades and the addition of splitter blades on impeller performance was investigated. The results showed that, an increase in efficiency can be achieved by increasing the number of blades and by introducing splitter blades.

  6. Temperature Profile Measurements in a Newly Constructed 30-Stage 5 cm Centrifugal Contactor pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Dave H. Meikrantz; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2008-09-01

    An annular centrifugal contactor pilot plant incorporating 30 stages of commercial 5 cm CINC V-02 units has been built and operated at INL during the past year. The pilot plant includes an automated process control and data acquisitioning system. The primary purpose of the pilot plant is to evaluate the performance of a large number of inter-connected centrifugal contactors and obtain temperature profile measurements within a 30-stage cascade. Additional solvent extraction flowsheet testing using stable surrogates is also being considered. Preliminary hydraulic testing was conducted with all 30 contactors interconnected for continuous counter-current flow. Hydraulic performance and system operational tests were conducted successfully but with higher single-stage rotor speeds found necessary to maintain steady interstage flow at flowrates of 1 L/min and higher. Initial temperature profile measurements were also completed in this configuration studying the performance during single aqueous and two-phase counter-current flow at ambient and elevated inlet solution temperatures. Temperature profile testing of two discreet sections of the cascade required additional feed and discharge connections. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 were the solution feeds for all the testing described in this report. Numerous temperature profiles were completed using a newly constructed 30-stage centrifugal contactor pilot plant. The automated process control and data acquisition system worked very well throughout testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total flowrates (FT) and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems have been collected with selected profiles and comparisons reported. Total flowrates (FT) ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Solution inlet temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50° C were tested. Ambient temperature testing shows that a

  7. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gabriel D; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration. PMID:25615189

  8. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A.

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration.

  9. Cause of kinematic differences during centrifugal and centripetal saccades.

    PubMed

    Koene, Ansgar R; Erkelens, Casper J

    2002-06-01

    Measurements of eye movements have shown that centrifugal movements (i.e. away from the primary position) have a lower maximum velocity and a longer duration than centripetal movements (i.e. toward the primary position) of the same size. In 1988 Pelisson proposed that these kinematic differences might be caused by differences in the neural command signals, oculomotor mechanics or a combination of the two. By using the result of muscle force measurements that were made in recent years (Orbit 1.8 Gaze mechanics simulation, Eidactics, San Francisco, 1999) we simulated the muscle forces during centrifugal and centripetal saccades. Based on these simulations we show that the cause of the kinematic differences between the centrifugal and centripetal saccades is the non-linear force-velocity relationship (i.e. muscle viscosity) of the muscles. PMID:12127111

  10. Passively Shunted Piezoelectric Damping of Centrifugally-Loaded Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Min, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating shunted piezoelectric circuits as potential damping treatments for turbomachinery rotor blades. This effort seeks to determine the effects of centrifugal loading on passively-shunted piezoelectric - damped plates. Passive shunt circuit parameters are optimized for the plate's third bending mode. Tests are performed both non-spinning and in the Dynamic Spin Facility to verify the analysis, and to determine the effectiveness of the damping under centrifugal loading. Results show that a resistive shunt circuit will reduce resonant vibration for this configuration. However, a tuned shunt circuit will be required to achieve the desired damping level. The analysis and testing address several issues with passive shunt circuit implementation in a rotating system, including piezoelectric material integrity under centrifugal loading, shunt circuit implementation, and tip mode damping.

  11. Space Station Centrifuge: A Requirement for Life Science Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arthur H.; Fuller, Charles A.; Johnson, Catherine C.; Winget, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge with the largest diameter that can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom is required to conduct life science research in the microgravity environment of space. (This was one of the findings of a group of life scientists convened at the University of California, Davis, by Ames Research Center.) The centrifuge will be used as a research tool to understand how gravity affects biological processes; to provide an on-orbit one-g control; and to assess the efficacy of using artificial gravity to counteract the deleterious biological effect of space flight. The rationale for the recommendation and examples of using ground-based centrifugation for animal and plant acceleration studies are presented. Included are four appendixes and an extensive bibliography of hypergravity studies.

  12. Liquid density effect on burst frequency in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Joseph, Karunan; Mohktar, Mas S; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms are widely used in various advanced processes such as biomedical diagnostics, chemical analysis and drug screening. This paper investigates the effect of liquid density on the burst frequency of the centrifugal microfluidic platform. This effect is experimentally investigated and compared to theoretical values. It is found that increasing the liquid density results in lower burst frequency and it is in agreement with theoretical calculations. Moreover, in this study we proposed the use of the microfluidic CD platform as an inexpensive and simple sensor for liquid density measurements. The proposed liquid sensor requires much less liquid volume (in the range of microliters) compared to conventional density meters. This study presents fundamental work which allows for future advance studies with the aim of designing and fabricating centrifugal microfluidic platforms for more complex tasks such as blood analysis.

  13. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  14. Operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric- centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatikov, P. N.; Kozyrev, I. N.; Deeva, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the method to improve the operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric-centrifugal pump. Some of the best ways to extend the electric-centrifugal pumps operating lifetime is using today's techniques as well as additional protective equipment as a part of the electric-centrifugal pump. In paper it is shown that high corrosiveness of formation fluid (a multi-component medium composed of oil, produced water, free and dissolved gases) is a major cause of failures of downhole equipment. Coil tubing is the most efficient technology to deal with this problem. The experience of coil tubing operations has proved that high-quality bottom hole cleaning saving the cost of operation due to a decreased failure rate of pumps associated with ejection of mechanical impurity.

  15. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    PubMed

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  16. An in-line spectrophotometer on a centrifugal microfluidic platform for real-time protein determination and calibration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaoxiong; Zhang, Dongying; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Minghui; Dong, Yumin; Zhang, Yixin; Ho, Ho-Pui; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, an in-line, low-cost, miniature and portable spectrophotometric detection system is presented and used for fast protein determination and calibration in centrifugal microfluidics. Our portable detection system is configured with paired emitter and detector diodes (PEDD), where the light beam between both LEDs is collimated with enhanced system tolerance. It is the first time that a physical model of PEDD is clearly presented, which could be modelled as a photosensitive RC oscillator. A portable centrifugal microfluidic system that contains a wireless port in real-time communication with a smartphone has been built to show that PEDD is an effective strategy for conducting rapid protein bioassays with detection performance comparable to that of a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The choice of centrifugal microfluidics offers the unique benefits of highly parallel fluidic actuation at high accuracy while there is no need for a pump, as inertial forces are present within the entire spinning disc and accurately controlled by varying the spinning speed. As a demonstration experiment, we have conducted the Bradford assay for bovine serum albumin (BSA) concentration calibration from 0 to 2 mg mL(-1). Moreover, a novel centrifugal disc with a spiral microchannel is proposed for automatic distribution and metering of the sample to all the parallel reactions at one time. The reported lab-on-a-disc scheme with PEDD detection may offer a solution for high-throughput assays, such as protein density calibration, drug screening and drug solubility measurement that require the handling of a large number of reactions in parallel. PMID:27531134

  17. An in-line spectrophotometer on a centrifugal microfluidic platform for real-time protein determination and calibration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaoxiong; Zhang, Dongying; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Minghui; Dong, Yumin; Zhang, Yixin; Ho, Ho-Pui; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, an in-line, low-cost, miniature and portable spectrophotometric detection system is presented and used for fast protein determination and calibration in centrifugal microfluidics. Our portable detection system is configured with paired emitter and detector diodes (PEDD), where the light beam between both LEDs is collimated with enhanced system tolerance. It is the first time that a physical model of PEDD is clearly presented, which could be modelled as a photosensitive RC oscillator. A portable centrifugal microfluidic system that contains a wireless port in real-time communication with a smartphone has been built to show that PEDD is an effective strategy for conducting rapid protein bioassays with detection performance comparable to that of a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The choice of centrifugal microfluidics offers the unique benefits of highly parallel fluidic actuation at high accuracy while there is no need for a pump, as inertial forces are present within the entire spinning disc and accurately controlled by varying the spinning speed. As a demonstration experiment, we have conducted the Bradford assay for bovine serum albumin (BSA) concentration calibration from 0 to 2 mg mL(-1). Moreover, a novel centrifugal disc with a spiral microchannel is proposed for automatic distribution and metering of the sample to all the parallel reactions at one time. The reported lab-on-a-disc scheme with PEDD detection may offer a solution for high-throughput assays, such as protein density calibration, drug screening and drug solubility measurement that require the handling of a large number of reactions in parallel.

  18. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  19. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  20. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  1. Experimental performance of a 13.65-centimeter-tip-diameter tandem-bladed sweptback centrifugal compressor designed for a pressure ratio of 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, H. A.; Wood, J. R.; Schumann, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A 13.65 cm tip diameter backswept centrifugal impeller having a tandem inducer and a design mass flow rate of 0.907 kg/sec was experimentally investigated to establish stage and impeller characteristics. Tests were conducted with both a cascade diffuser and a vaneless diffuser. A pressure ratio of 5.9 was obtained near surge for the smallest clearance tested. Flow range at design speed was 6.3 percent for the smallest clearance test. Impeller exit to shroud axial clearance at design speed was varied to determine the effect on stage and impeller performance.

  2. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  3. Vehicle speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, D.; Tanno, T.; Fukunaga, T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a vehicle speed control system for performing vehicle speed control by controlling the displacement of at least one of a hydraulic pump and a hydraulic motor of a hydraulic transmission through an electric servo device, comprising: vehicle speed setting means for generating a voltage signal corresponding to a vehicle speed to be set; compensating means interposed between the vehicle speed setting means and the electric servo device, the compensating means comprising a first delay element; and second delay element having a response characteristic slower than that of the first delay element. A selecting means for judging as to whether a voltage signal changed by the operation of the vehicle speed setting means represents an acceleration command or a deceleration command and for selecting the first delay element when the voltage signal represents an acceleration command and for selecting the second delay element when the voltage signal represents a deceleration command.

  4. Artificial gravity studies and design considerations for Space Station centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Brown, A. H.; Fuller, C. A.; Oyama, J.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements to and capabilities of a Space Station biological facility centrifuge are discussed on the basis of an assessment of the objectives and subjects of future microgravity biological experiments. It is argued that the facility should be capable of both acute and extended chronic exposure of test subjects and biological materials to altered-g loading. In addition, the experimental approaches and equipment for microgravity studies on a Space Station are outlined. Finally, the engineering requirements of such a centrifuge are examined, with consideration of radial gravity gradients, size, and physical access to animals.

  5. Sharp nonlinear stability for centrifugal filtration convection in magnetizable media.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, S; Brindha, D

    2011-11-01

    A nonlinear stability theory is adopted to study centrifugal thermal convection in a magnetic-fluid-saturated and differentially heated porous layer placed in a zero-gravity environment. The axis of rotation of the layer is placed within its boundaries that leads to an alternating direction of the centrifugal body force. An analysis through the variational principles is made to find the unconditional and sharp nonlinear limits. The compound matrix method is employed to solve the eigenvalue problems of the nonlinear and corresponding linear theories. The importance of nonlinear theory is established by demonstrating the failure of the linear theory in capturing the physics of the onset of convection. PMID:22181509

  6. The use of centrifugation to study early Drosophila embryogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, M. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    By the end of 10th nuclear cycle, the somatic nuclei of the Drosophila embryo have migrated to the periphery of the egg. Centrifugation of embryos did not result in the displacement of these nuclei, since cytoskeletal elements anchor them to the cortex. But, mild centrifugal forces displace the centrally located, nascent yolk nuclei. If this increased sensitivity to hypergravity occurs before the beginning of nuclear differentiation during cycle 8, when the nascent yolk and somatic nuclei physically separate, then it would mark the earliest functional difference between these two lineages.

  7. 24. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugal inner basket, 1879. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugal inner basket, 1879. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Iron Works, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879. View: After sugar was granulated and cooled it was dried and drained, completely separating the sugar crystals from the molasses, in the centrifugal. Revolving at 1200 rpm the sugar charge was forced outward with the molasses flying through the holes in the brass lining. Dried sugar was left behind in the inner basket and was dug out by hand. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  8. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise.

  9. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  10. Centrifugation applied to drilling fluids and sludge pit cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Grichar, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Solid bowl decanting centrifuges are an indispensible part of a well-designed, modern oilfield solids control system. They have application throughout the entire drilling process and during the post-drilling sludge pit cleanup operation. As drilling costs rise further, and as environmental regulations become stricter, the decanting centrifuge will become even more important and contribute more heavily to the overall cost effectiveness of the drilling process. The significance of this technology as applied to drilling fluids and sludge pit cleanup is emphasized in this paper.

  11. Isolation of Early and Late Endosomes by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Mariana E G; Lamberti, Giorgia; Huber, Lukas A

    2015-11-01

    Density gradient centrifugation is a common method for separating intracellular organelles. During centrifugation, organelles float or sediment until they reach their isopycnic position within the gradient. The density of an organelle depends on its content, size, shape, and the lipid:protein ratio. The degree of separation between different organelles will therefore be highly dependent on how different their isopycnic points are in a given buffer. Separation will also depend on the medium used to prepare the gradient, whether it is sucrose (the most common) or an alternative. Here we describe the use of both continuous and discontinuous (step) gradients to isolate endocytic organelles. PMID:26527762

  12. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  13. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  14. Apparatus and method for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellinger, John C. (Inventor); Ormsby, Rachel A. (Inventor); Kennedy, David J. (Inventor); Thomas, Nathan A. (Inventor); Shulthise, Leo A. (Inventor); Kurk, Michael A. (Inventor); Metz, George W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of specimen samples, including incubating eggs, and uses thereof are provided. The device may advantageously be used for the incubation of avian, reptilian or any type of vertebrate eggs. The apparatus comprises a mechanism for holding samples individually, rotating them individually, rotating them on a centrifuge collectively, injecting them individually with a fixative or other chemical reagent, and maintaining them at controlled temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric composition. The device is applicable to experiments involving entities other than eggs, such as invertebrate specimens, plants, microorganisms and molecular systems.

  15. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  16. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  17. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  18. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  19. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  20. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.; Maram, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV), etc., have throttling capabilities that require real-time, closed-loop control systems of engine propellant flows, combustion temperatures and pressures, and turbopump rotary speeds. In the case of the SSME, there are four turbopumps that require real-time measurement and control of their rotary speeds. Variable-reluctance magnetic speed sensors were designed, fabricated, and tested for all four turbopumps, resulting in the successful implementation and operation of three of these speed sensors during each of the 12 Shuttle flights.