Science.gov

Sample records for specific trpc6 channel

  1. Sensitizing the Slit Diaphragm with TRPC6 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Möller, Clemens C; Flesche, Jan; Reiser, Jochen

    2009-05-01

    Physiologic permeability of the glomerular capillary depends on the normal structure of podocyte foot processes forming a functioning slit diaphragm in between. Mutations in several podocyte genes as well as specific molecular pathways have been identified as the cause for progressive kidney failure with urinary protein loss. Podocyte injury is a hallmark of glomerular disease, which is generally displayed by the rearrangement of the podocyte slit diaphragm and the actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies demonstrate a unique role for the Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel protein TRPC6 as a regulator of glomerular ultrafiltration. In both genetic and acquired forms of proteinuric kidney disease, dysregulation of podocyte TRPC6 plays a pathogenic role. This article illustrates how recent findings add to emerging concepts in podocyte biology, particularly mechanosensation and signaling at the slit diaphragm.

  2. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Evan W.; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca2+]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca2+]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca2+]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca2+]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca2+]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca2+ channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca2+]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  3. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Weber, Evan W; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly; Muller, William A

    2015-10-19

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca(2+)]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca(2+)]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca(2+)]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca(2+)]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca(2+)]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca(2+) channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca(2+)]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  4. A common mechanism underlies stretch activation and receptor activation of TRPC6 channels

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Hewavitharana, Thamara; Xu, Wen; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gill, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The TRP family of ion channels transduce an extensive range of chemical and physical signals. TRPC6 is a receptor-activated nonselective cation channel expressed widely in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types. We report here that TRPC6 is also a sensor of mechanically and osmotically induced membrane stretch. Pressure-induced activation of TRPC6 was independent of phospholipase C. The stretch responses were blocked by the tarantula peptide, GsMTx-4, known to specifically inhibit mechanosensitive channels by modifying the external lipid-channel boundary. The GsMTx-4 peptide also blocked the activation of TRPC6 channels by either receptor-induced PLC activation or by direct application of diacylglycerol. The effects of the peptide on both stretch- and diacylglycerol-mediated TRPC6 activation indicate that the mechanical and chemical lipid sensing by the channel has a common molecular mechanism that may involve lateral-lipid tension. The mechanosensing properties of TRPC6 channels highly expressed in smooth muscle cells are likely to play a key role in regulating myogenic tone in vascular tissue. PMID:17056714

  5. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  6. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Soumya C; Kannan, Anbarasu; Gopal, Ashidha; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  7. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (20-HETE) Modulates Canonical Transient Receptor Potential-6 (TRPC6) Channels in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roshanravan, Hila; Kim, Eun Y.; Dryer, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The arachidonic acid metabolite 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) regulates renal function, including changes in glomerular function evoked during tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). This study describes the cellular actions of 20-HETE on cultured podocytes, assessed by whole-cell recordings from cultured podocytes combined with pharmacological and cell-biological manipulations of cells. Bath superfusion of 20-HETE activates cationic currents that are blocked by the pan-TRP blocker SKF-96365 and by 50 μM La3+, and which are attenuated after siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 subunits. Similar currents are evoked by a membrane-permeable analog of diacylgycerol (OAG), but OAG does not occlude responses to maximally-activating concentrations of 20-HETE (20 μM). Exposure to 20-HETE also increased steady-state surface abundance of TRPC6 subunits in podocytes as assessed by cell-surface biotinylation assays, and increased cytosolic concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS). TRPC6 activation by 20-HETE was eliminated in cells pretreated with TEMPOL, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimic. Activation of TRPC6 by 20-HETE was also blocked when whole-cell recording pipettes contained GDP-βS, indicating a role for either small or heterotrimeric G proteins in the transduction cascade. Responses to 20-HETE were eliminated by siRNA knockdown of podocin, a protein that organizes NADPH oxidase complexes with TRPC6 subunits in this cell type. In summary, modulation of ionic channels in podocytes may contribute to glomerular actions of 20-HETE.

  8. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (20-HETE) Modulates Canonical Transient Receptor Potential-6 (TRPC6) Channels in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roshanravan, Hila; Kim, Eun Y.; Dryer, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The arachidonic acid metabolite 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) regulates renal function, including changes in glomerular function evoked during tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). This study describes the cellular actions of 20-HETE on cultured podocytes, assessed by whole-cell recordings from cultured podocytes combined with pharmacological and cell-biological manipulations of cells. Bath superfusion of 20-HETE activates cationic currents that are blocked by the pan-TRP blocker SKF-96365 and by 50 μM La3+, and which are attenuated after siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 subunits. Similar currents are evoked by a membrane-permeable analog of diacylgycerol (OAG), but OAG does not occlude responses to maximally-activating concentrations of 20-HETE (20 μM). Exposure to 20-HETE also increased steady-state surface abundance of TRPC6 subunits in podocytes as assessed by cell-surface biotinylation assays, and increased cytosolic concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS). TRPC6 activation by 20-HETE was eliminated in cells pretreated with TEMPOL, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimic. Activation of TRPC6 by 20-HETE was also blocked when whole-cell recording pipettes contained GDP-βS, indicating a role for either small or heterotrimeric G proteins in the transduction cascade. Responses to 20-HETE were eliminated by siRNA knockdown of podocin, a protein that organizes NADPH oxidase complexes with TRPC6 subunits in this cell type. In summary, modulation of ionic channels in podocytes may contribute to glomerular actions of 20-HETE. PMID:27630573

  9. Activation of TRPC6 channels promotes endocannabinoid biosynthesis in neuronal CAD cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardell, Tamera K.; Barker, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium influx activates biosynthesis of the endogenous cannabinoids 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA). The calcium channel involved with endocannabinoid synthesis and release in neurons is still unknown. The canonical TRP (TRPC) channels are calcium-permeable channels that are a homology-based subdivision of the broader class of TRP channels. TRPC3, 6, and 7 are G-protein-gated nonselective cation channels that have been localized to lipid rafts and shown to colocalize with caveolin 1. Because endocannabinoid synthesis has been found to occur “on demand” in a calcium-dependent manner and has been linked to lipid rafts, we explored the potential role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in this process. Previously, we observed that after metabolism AEA and arachidonic acid (ArA) can be recycled into new endocannabinoid molecules. Consistent with these previous findings, we found that Cath.a differentiated (CAD) cells pretreated with radiolabeled ArA exhibited a robust increase in 2-AG release in response to TRPC stimulation with the diacylglycerol (DAG) analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG). Furthermore, cells pretreated with [3H]AEA produced a significant amount of AEA and 2-AG upon stimulation of TRPC channels. This process was not mediated through protein kinase C activation. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only TRPC6 was present in the CAD cells. siRNA-induced knockdown of TRPC6 in the CAD cells abolished OAG-stimulated production of the endocannabionids. This evidence suggests that TRPC6 may be capable of promoting endocannabinoid synthesis in neuronal cells. PMID:20466028

  10. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  11. Functional consequences of the over-expression of TRPC6 channels in HEK cells: impact on the homeostasis of zinc.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Jarvis, Louis; Harel, Amélie; Luche, Sylvie; Degot, Sébastien; Chapuis, Violaine; Boulay, Guylain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Bouron, Alexandre

    2014-07-01

    The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) protein is a non-selective cation channel able to transport essential trace elements like iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) through the plasma membrane. Its over-expression in HEK-293 cells causes an intracellular accumulation of Zn, indicating that it could be involved in Zn transport. This finding prompted us to better understand the role played by TRPC6 in Zn homeostasis. Experiments done using the fluorescent probe FluoZin-3 showed that HEK cells possess an intracellular pool of mobilisable Zn present in compartments sensitive to the vesicular proton pump inhibitor Baf-A, which affects endo/lysosomes. TRPC6 over-expression facilitates the basal uptake of Zn and enhances the size of the pool of Zn sensitive to Baf-A. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that TRPC6 over-expression does not affect the mRNA expression of Zn transporters (ZnT-1, ZnT-5, ZnT-6, ZnT-7, ZnT-9, Zip1, Zip6, Zip7, and Zip14); however it up-regulates the mRNA expression of metallothionein-I and -II. This alters the Zn buffering capacities of the cells as illustrated by the experiments done using the Zn ionophore Na pyrithione. In addition, HEK cells over-expressing TRPC6 grow slower than their parental HEK cells. This feature can be mimicked by growing HEK cells in a culture medium supplemented with 5 μM of Zn acetate. Finally, a proteomic analysis revealed that TRPC6 up-regulates the expression of the actin-associated proteins ezrin and cofilin-1, and changes the organisation of the actin cytoskeleton without changing the cellular actin content. Altogether, these data indicate that TRPC6 is participating in the transport of Zn and influences the Zn storage and buffering capacities of the cells. PMID:24733507

  12. TRPC6 specifically interacts with APP to inhibit its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduce Aβ production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Rui; Yang, Jian; Li, Hongyu; He, Zhuohao; Jing, Naihe; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in Alzheimer's disease involves cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase, a protease known to cleave several substrates, including Notch. Finding specific modulators for γ-secretase could be a potential avenue to treat the disease. Here, we report that transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 specifically interacts with APP leading to inhibition of its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduction in Aβ production. TRPC6 interacts with APP (C99), but not with Notch, and prevents C99 interaction with presenilin 1 (PS1). A fusion peptide derived from TRPC6 also reduces Aβ levels without effect on Notch cleavage. Crossing APP/PS1 mice with TRPC6 transgenic mice leads to a marked reduction in both plaque load and Aβ levels, and improvement in structural and behavioural impairment. Thus, TRPC6 specifically modulates γ-secretase cleavage of APP and preventing APP (C99) interaction with PS1 via TRPC6 could be a novel strategy to reduce Aβ formation. PMID:26581893

  13. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr99 or Tyr138 of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe99-CaM, or Phe138-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe138-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr99 also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr99 by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  14. A mutation in TRPC6 channels abolishes their activation by hypoosmotic stretch but does not affect activation by diacylglycerol or G protein signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cory; Dryer, Stuart E

    2014-05-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) channels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone, podocyte function, and a variety of processes in other cell types. The question of whether their gating is intrinsically mechanosensitive has been controversial. In this study we have examined activation of two alleles of TRPC6 transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells: the wild-type human TRPC6 channel, and TRPC6-N143S, an allele originally identified in a family with autosomal dominant familial focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We observed that both channel variants carried robust cationic currents that could be evoked by application of membrane-permeable analogs of diacylglycerol (DAG) or by the P2Y receptor agonist ATP. The amplitudes and characteristics of currents evoked by the DAG analog or ATP were indistinguishable in cells expressing the two TRPC6 alleles. By contrast, hypoosmotic stretch evoked robust currents in wild-type TRPC6 channels but had no discernible effect on currents in cells expressing TRPC6-N143S, indicating that the mutant form lacks mechanosensitivity. Coexpression of TRPC6-N143S with wild-type TRPC6 or TRPC3 channels did not alter stretch-evoked responses compared with when TRPC3 channels were expressed by themselves, indicating that TRPC6-N143S does not function as a dominant-negative. These data indicate that mechanical activation and activation evoked by DAG or ATP occur through fundamentally distinct biophysical mechanisms, and they provide support for the hypothesis that protein complexes containing wild-type TRPC6 subunits can be intrinsically mechanosensitive. PMID:24598806

  15. A mutation in TRPC6 channels abolishes their activation by hypoosmotic stretch but does not affect activation by diacylglycerol or G protein signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cory; Dryer, Stuart E

    2014-05-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) channels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone, podocyte function, and a variety of processes in other cell types. The question of whether their gating is intrinsically mechanosensitive has been controversial. In this study we have examined activation of two alleles of TRPC6 transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells: the wild-type human TRPC6 channel, and TRPC6-N143S, an allele originally identified in a family with autosomal dominant familial focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We observed that both channel variants carried robust cationic currents that could be evoked by application of membrane-permeable analogs of diacylglycerol (DAG) or by the P2Y receptor agonist ATP. The amplitudes and characteristics of currents evoked by the DAG analog or ATP were indistinguishable in cells expressing the two TRPC6 alleles. By contrast, hypoosmotic stretch evoked robust currents in wild-type TRPC6 channels but had no discernible effect on currents in cells expressing TRPC6-N143S, indicating that the mutant form lacks mechanosensitivity. Coexpression of TRPC6-N143S with wild-type TRPC6 or TRPC3 channels did not alter stretch-evoked responses compared with when TRPC3 channels were expressed by themselves, indicating that TRPC6-N143S does not function as a dominant-negative. These data indicate that mechanical activation and activation evoked by DAG or ATP occur through fundamentally distinct biophysical mechanisms, and they provide support for the hypothesis that protein complexes containing wild-type TRPC6 subunits can be intrinsically mechanosensitive.

  16. Cyclic GMP/PKG-dependent inhibition of TRPC6 channel activity and expression negatively regulates cardiomyocyte NFAT activation Novel mechanism of cardiac stress modulation by PDE5 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Rowell, Janelle; Zhang, Manling; Takimoto, Eiki; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Kass, David A

    2010-04-01

    Increased cyclic GMP from enhanced synthesis or suppressed catabolism (e.g. PDE5 inhibition by sildenafil, SIL) activates protein kinase G (PKG) and blunts cardiac pathological hypertrophy. Suppressed calcineurin (Cn)-NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) signaling appears to be involved, though it remains unclear how this is achieved. One potential mechanism involves activation of Cn/NFAT by calcium entering via transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (notably TRPC6). Here, we tested the hypothesis that PKG blocks Cn/NFAT activation by modifying and thus inhibiting TRPC6 current to break the positive feedback loop involving NFAT and NFAT-dependent TRPC6 upregulation. TRPC6 expression rose with pressure-overload in vivo, and angiotensin (ATII) or endothelin (ET1) stimulation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes in vitro. 8Br-cGMP and SIL reduced ET1-stimulated TRPC6 expression and NFAT dephosphorylation (activity). TRPC6 upregulation was absent if its promoter was mutated with non-functional NFAT binding sites, whereas constitutively active NFAT triggered TRPC6 expression that was not inhibited by SIL. PKG phosphorylated TRPC6, and both T70 and S322 were targeted. Both sites were functionally relevant, as 8Br-cGMP strongly suppressed current in wild-type TRPC6 channels, but not in those with phospho-silencing mutations (T70A, S322A or S322Q). NFAT activation and increased protein synthesis stimulated by ATII or ET1 was blocked by 8Br-cGMP or SIL. However, transfection with T70A or S322Q TRPC6 mutants blocked this inhibitory effect, whereas phospho-mimetic mutants (T70E, S322E, and both combined) suppressed NFAT activation. Thus PDE5-inhibition blocks TRPC6 channel activation and associated Cn/NFAT activation signaling by PKG-dependent channel phosphorylation.

  17. TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Dina, Olayinka A.; Chen, Xiaoje; Levine, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia of diverse etiologies, presumably as part of a mechanoreceptor signaling complex (Alessandri-Haber et al., 2008). To investigate the hypothesis that a functional interaction between TRPV4 and stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) is involved in this mechanical transduction mechanism, we used a selective SACs inhibitor, GsMTx-4. Intradermal injection of GsMTx-4 in the rat hind paw reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by intradermal injection of inflammatory mediators. In vivo single fiber recordings showed that GsMTx-4 reversed inflammatory mediator-induced decrease in mechanical threshold in half of sensitized C-fibers. Furthermore, GsMTx-4 reduced hyperalgesia to both mechanical and hypotonic stimuli in different models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain while it had no effect on baseline mechanical nociceptive thresholds. TRPC1 and TRPC6, two GsMTx-4-sensitive SACs are expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that messenger RNAs for TRPV4, TRPC1 and TRPC6 are frequently co-expressed in DRG neurons. Spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to TRPC1 and TRPC6, like that to TRPV4, reversed the hyperalgesia to mechanical and hypotonic stimuli induced by inflammatory mediators without affecting baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, antisense to TRPC6, but not to TRPC1, reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by a thermal injury or the TRPV4 selective agonist 4α-PDD. We conclude that TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 channels to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and primary afferent nociceptor sensitization although they may have distinctive roles. PMID:19439599

  18. PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis regulates activation and inactivation of TRPC6/7 channels.

    PubMed

    Itsuki, Kyohei; Imai, Yuko; Hase, Hideharu; Okamura, Yasushi; Inoue, Ryuji; Mori, Masayuki X

    2014-02-01

    Transient receptor potential classical (or canonical) (TRPC)3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 are a subfamily of TRPC channels activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) produced through the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) by phospholipase C (PLC). PI(4,5)P2 depletion by a heterologously expressed phosphatase inhibits TRPC3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 activity independently of DAG; however, the physiological role of PI(4,5)P2 reduction on channel activity remains unclear. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure PI(4,5)P2 or DAG dynamics concurrently with TRPC6 or TRPC7 currents after agonist stimulation of receptors that couple to Gq and thereby activate PLC. Measurements made at different levels of receptor activation revealed a correlation between the kinetics of PI(4,5)P2 reduction and those of receptor-operated TRPC6 and TRPC7 current activation and inactivation. In contrast, DAG production correlated with channel activation but not inactivation; moreover, the time course of channel inactivation was unchanged in protein kinase C-insensitive mutants. These results suggest that inactivation of receptor-operated TRPC currents is primarily mediated by the dissociation of PI(4,5)P2. We determined the functional dissociation constant of PI(4,5)P2 to TRPC channels using FRET of the PLCδ Pleckstrin homology domain (PHd), which binds PI(4,5)P2, and used this constant to fit our experimental data to a model in which channel gating is controlled by PI(4,5)P2 and DAG. This model predicted similar FRET dynamics of the PHd to measured FRET in either human embryonic kidney cells or smooth muscle cells, whereas a model lacking PI(4,5)P2 regulation failed to reproduce the experimental data, confirming the inhibitory role of PI(4,5)P2 depletion on TRPC currents. Our model also explains various PLC-dependent characteristics of channel activity, including limitation of maximum open probability, shortening of the peak time, and the bell-shaped response of total

  19. TRPC6 channel activation promotes neonatal glomerular mesangial cell apoptosis via calcineurin/NFAT and FasL/Fas signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Hitesh; Adebiyi, Adebowale

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cell (GMC) proliferation and death are involved in the pathogenesis of glomerular disorders. The mechanisms that control GMC survival are poorly understood, but may include signal transduction pathways that are modulated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) concentration. In this study, we investigated whether activation of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6 channels and successive [Ca2+]i elevation alter neonatal GMC survival. Hyperforin (HF)-induced TRPC6 channel activation increased [Ca2+]i concentration, inhibited proliferation, and triggered apoptotic cell death in primary neonatal pig GMCs. HF-induced neonatal GMC apoptosis was not associated with oxidative stress. However, HF-induced TRPC6 channel activation stimulated nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1). HF also increased cell death surface receptor Fas ligand (FasL) level and caspase-8 activity in the cells; effects mitigated by [Ca2+]i chelator BAPTA, calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor VIVIT, and TRPC6 channel knockdown. Accordingly, HF-induced neonatal GMC apoptosis was attenuated by BAPTA, VIVIT, Fas blocking antibody, and a caspase-3/7 inhibitor. These findings suggest that TRPC6 channel-dependent [Ca2+]i elevation and the ensuing induction of the calcineurin/NFAT, FasL/Fas, and caspase signaling cascades promote neonatal pig GMC apoptosis. PMID:27383564

  20. Calcium-sensing receptor activation contributed to apoptosis stimulates TRPC6 channel in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yi-hua; Li, Yong-quan; Feng, Shan-li; Li, Bao-xin; Pan, Zhen-wei; Xu, Chang-qing; Li, Ting-ting; Yang, Bao-feng

    2010-04-16

    Capacitative calcium entry (CCE) refers to the influx of calcium through plasma membrane channels activated on depletion of endoplasmic sarcoplasmic/reticulum (ER/SR) Ca{sup 2+} stores, which is performed mainly by the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and plays an important role in mediating cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, there are no data regarding the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart. In this study, in rat neonatal myocytes, by Ca{sup 2+} imaging, we found that the depletion of ER/SR Ca{sup 2+} stores by thapsigargin (TG) elicited a transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), followed by sustained increase depending on extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. But, TRP channels inhibitor (SKF96365), not L-type channels or the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger inhibitors, inhibited [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} relatively high. Then, we found that the stimulation of CaR with its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or by an increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+}([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) increased the concentration of intracelluar Ca{sup 2+}, whereas, the sustained elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of SKF96365. Similarly, the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Western blot analysis showed that GdCl{sub 3} increased the expression of TRPC6, which was reversed by SKF96365. Additionally, SKF96365 reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by GdCl{sub 3}. Our results suggested that CCE exhibited in rat neonatal myocytes and CaR activation induced Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cationic channels TRPCs to gate the CCE, for which TRPC6 was one of the most likely candidates. TRPC6 channel was functionally coupled with CaR to enhance the cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  1. Angiotensin II contributes to podocyte injury by increasing TRPC6 expression via an NFAT-mediated positive feedback signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Tom; Sloan, Alexis J; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Flesche, Jan; van Goor, Harry; Kistler, Andreas D; Bakker, Marinka; Bindels, Rene J M; de Boer, Rudolf A; Möller, Clemens C; Hamming, Inge; Navis, Gerjan; Wetzels, Jack F M; Berden, Jo H M; Reiser, Jochen; Faul, Christian; van der Vlag, Johan

    2011-10-01

    The transient receptor potential channel C6 (TRPC6) is a slit diaphragm-associated protein in podocytes involved in regulating glomerular filter function. Gain-of-function mutations in TRPC6 cause hereditary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and several human acquired proteinuric diseases show increased glomerular TRPC6 expression. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a key contributor to glomerular disease and may regulate TRPC6 expression in nonrenal cells. We demonstrate that AngII regulates TRPC6 mRNA and protein levels in cultured podocytes and that AngII infusion enhances glomerular TRPC6 expression in vivo. In animal models for human FSGS (doxorubicin nephropathy) and increased renin-angiotensin system activity (Ren2 transgenic rats), glomerular TRPC6 expression was increased in an AngII-dependent manner. TRPC6 expression correlated with glomerular damage markers and glomerulosclerosis. We show that the regulation of TRPC6 expression by AngII and doxorubicin requires TRPC6-mediated Ca(2+) influx and the activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin and its substrate nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Accordingly, calcineurin inhibition by cyclosporine decreased TRPC6 expression and reduced proteinuria in doxorubicin nephropathy, whereas podocyte-specific inducible expression of a constitutively active NFAT mutant increased TRPC6 expression and induced severe proteinuria. Our findings demonstrate that the deleterious effects of AngII on podocytes and its pathogenic role in glomerular disease involve enhanced TRPC6 expression via a calcineurin/NFAT positive feedback signaling pathway. PMID:21839714

  2. Phospholipase C Epsilon (PLCε) Induced TRPC6 Activation: A Common but Redundant Mechanism in Primary Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kalwa, Hermann; Storch, Ursula; Demleitner, Jana; Fiedler, Susanne; Mayer, Tim; Kannler, Martina; Fahlbusch, Meike; Barth, Holger; Smrcka, Alan; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Gudermann, Thomas; Dietrich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, activation of phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled membrane receptors by hormones leads to an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Catalytic activity of PLCs results in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) which opens DAG-sensitive classical transient receptor channels 3, 6, and 7 (TRPC3/6/7), initiating Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space. Patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) express gain-of-function mutants of TRPC6, while others carry loss-of-function mutants of PLCε, raising the intriguing possibility that both proteins interact and might work in the same signalling pathway. While TRPC6 activation by PLCβ and PLCγ isozymes was extensively studied, the role of PLCε in TRPC6 activation remains elusive. TRPC6 was co-immunoprecipitated with PLCε in a heterologous overexpression system in HEK293 cells as well as in freshly isolated murine podocytes. Receptor-operated TRPC6 currents in HEK293 cells expressing TRPC6 were reduced by a specific PLCε siRNA and by a PLCε loss-of-function mutant isolated from a patient with FSGS. PLCε-induced TRPC6 activation was also identified in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Gαq/11 proteins. Further analysis of the signal transduction pathway revealed a Gα12/13 Rho-GEF activation which induced Rho-mediated PLCε stimulation. Therefore, we identified a new pathway for TRPC6 activation by PLCε. PLCε-/- podocytes however, were undistinguishable from WT podocytes in their angiotensin II-induced formation of actin stress fibers and their GTPγS-induced TRPC6 activation, pointing to a redundant role of PLCε-mediated TRPC6 activation at least in podocytes. PMID:25521631

  3. Modeling non-syndromic autism and the impact of TRPC6 disruption in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Griesi-Oliveira, K; Acab, A; Gupta, A R; Sunaga, D Y; Chailangkarn, T; Nicol, X; Nunez, Y; Walker, M F; Murdoch, J D; Sanders, S J; Fernandez, T V; Ji, W; Lifton, R P; Vadasz, E; Dietrich, A; Pradhan, D; Song, H; Ming, G-L; Gu, X; Haddad, G; Marchetto, M C N; Spitzer, N; Passos-Bueno, M R; State, M W; Muotri, A R

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of genetic variants have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and the functional study of such variants will be critical for the elucidation of autism pathophysiology. Here, we report a de novo balanced translocation disruption of TRPC6, a cation channel, in a non-syndromic autistic individual. Using multiple models, such as dental pulp cells, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neuronal cells and mouse models, we demonstrate that TRPC6 reduction or haploinsufficiency leads to altered neuronal development, morphology and function. The observed neuronal phenotypes could then be rescued by TRPC6 complementation and by treatment with insulin-like growth factor-1 or hyperforin, a TRPC6-specific agonist, suggesting that ASD individuals with alterations in this pathway may benefit from these drugs. We also demonstrate that methyl CpG binding protein-2 (MeCP2) levels affect TRPC6 expression. Mutations in MeCP2 cause Rett syndrome, revealing common pathways among ASDs. Genetic sequencing of TRPC6 in 1041 ASD individuals and 2872 controls revealed significantly more nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD population, and identified loss-of-function mutations with incomplete penetrance in two patients. Taken together, these findings suggest that TRPC6 is a novel predisposing gene for ASD that may act in a multiple-hit model. This is the first study to use iPSC-derived human neurons to model non-syndromic ASD and illustrate the potential of modeling genetically complex sporadic diseases using such cells.

  4. Modeling non-syndromic autism and the impact of TRPC6 disruption in human neurons

    PubMed Central

    Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Acab, Allan; Gupta, Abha R.; Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Nicol, Xavier; Nunez, Yanelli; Walker, Michael F.; Murdoch, John D.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Ji, Weizhen; Lifton, Richard P.; Vadasz, Estevão; Dietrich, Alexander; Pradhan, Dennis; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Guoe, Xiang; Haddad, Gabriel; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Spitzer, Nicholas; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; State, Matthew W.; Muotri, Alysson R.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genetic variants have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and the functional study of such variants will be critical for the elucidation of autism pathophysiology. Here, we report a de novo balanced translocation disruption of TRPC6, a cation channel, in a non-syndromic autistic individual. Using multiple models, such as dental pulp cells, iPSC-derived neuronal cells and mouse models, we demonstrate that TRPC6 reduction or haploinsufficiency leads to altered neuronal development, morphology, and function. The observed neuronal phenotypes could then be rescued by TRPC6 complementation and by treatment with IGF1 or hyperforin, a TRPC6-specific agonist, suggesting that ASD individuals with alterations in this pathway might benefit from these drugs. We also demonstrate that MeCP2 levels affect TRPC6 expression. Mutations in MeCP2 cause Rett syndrome, revealing common pathways among ASDs. Genetic sequencing of TRPC6 in 1041 ASD individuals and 2872 controls revealed significantly more nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD population, and identified loss-of-function mutations with incomplete penetrance in two patients. Taken together, these findings suggest that TRPC6 is a novel predisposing gene for ASD that may act in a multiple-hit model. This is the first study to use iPSC-derived human neurons to model non-syndromic ASD and illustrate the potential of modeling genetically complex sporadic diseases using such cells. PMID:25385366

  5. The discovery of potent blockers of the canonical transient receptor channels, TRPC3 and TRPC6, based on an anilino-thiazole pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Washburn, David G; Holt, Dennis A; Dodson, Jason; McAtee, Jeff J; Terrell, Lamont R; Barton, Linda; Manns, Sharada; Waszkiewicz, Anna; Pritchard, Christina; Gillie, Dan J; Morrow, Dwight M; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Lozinskaya, Irina M; Guss, Jeffrey; Basilla, Jonathan B; Negron, Lorena Kallal; Klein, Michael; Willette, Robert N; Fries, Rusty E; Jensen, Timothy C; Xu, Xiaoping; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Marino, Joseph P

    2013-09-01

    Lead optimization of piperidine amide HTS hits, based on an anilino-thiazole core, led to the identification of analogs which displayed low nanomolar blocking activity at the canonical transient receptor channels 3 and 6 (TRPC3 & 6) based on FLIPR (carbachol stimulated) and electrophysiology (OAG stimulated) assays. In addition, the anilino-thiazole amides displayed good selectivity over other TRP channels (TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4), as well as against cardiac ion channels (CaV1.2, hERG, and NaV1.5). The high oxidation potential of the aliphatic piperidine and aniline groups, as well as the lability of the thiazole amide group contributed to the high clearance observed for this class of compounds. Conversion of an isoquinoline amide to a naphthyridine amide markedly reduced clearance for the bicyclic piperidines, and improved oral bioavailability for this compound series, however TRPC3 and TRPC6 blocking activity was reduced substantially. Although the most potent anilino-thiazole amides ultimately lacked oral exposure in rodents and were not suitable for chronic dosing, analogs such as 14-19, 22, and 23 are potentially valuable in vitro tool compounds for investigating the role of TRPC3 and TRPC6 in cardiovascular disease.

  6. TRPC6 G757D Loss-of-Function Mutation Associates with FSGS.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Marc; Büscher, Anja K; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Kaßmann, Mario; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Bräsen, Jan H; Nagel, Mato; Becker, Jan U; Winyard, Paul; Hoyer, Peter F; Preissner, Robert; Krautwurst, Dietmar; Gollasch, Maik; Weber, Stefanie; Harteneck, Christian

    2016-09-01

    FSGS is a CKD with heavy proteinuria that eventually progresses to ESRD. Hereditary forms of FSGS have been linked to mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 6 (TRPC6) gene encoding a nonselective cation channel. Most of these TRPC6 mutations cause a gain-of-function phenotype, leading to calcium-triggered podocyte cell death, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. We studied the molecular effect of disease-related mutations using tridimensional in silico modeling of tetrameric TRPC6. Our results indicated that G757 is localized in a domain forming a TRPC6-TRPC6 interface and predicted that the amino acid exchange G757D causes local steric hindrance and disruption of the channel complex. Notably, functional characterization of model interface domain mutants suggested a loss-of-function phenotype. We then characterized 19 human FSGS-related TRPC6 mutations, the majority of which caused gain-of-function mutations. However, five mutations (N125S, L395A, G757D, L780P, and R895L) caused a loss-of-function phenotype. Coexpression of wild-type TRPC6 and TRPC6 G757D, mimicking heterozygosity observed in patients, revealed a dominant negative effect of TRPC6 G757D. Our comprehensive analysis of human disease-causing TRPC6 mutations reveals loss of TRPC6 function as an additional concept of hereditary FSGS and provides molecular insights into the mechanism responsible for the loss-of-function phenotype of TRPC6 G757D in humans. PMID:26892346

  7. Expression of TRPC6 and BDNF in Cortical Lesions From Patients With Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Da-Hai; Guo, Wei; Sun, Fei-Ji; Xu, Guang-Zhen; Zang, Zhen-Le; Shu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) likely results from abnormal migration of neural progenitor cells originating from the subventricular zone. To elucidate the roles in molecules that are involved in neural migration pathway abnormalities in FCDs, we investigated the expression patterns of transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cortical lesions from FCD patients and in samples of normal control cortex. TRPC6 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels were increased in FCD lesions. By immunohistochemistry, they were strongly expressed in microcolumns, heterotopic neurons, dysmorphic neurons, and balloon cells (BCs). Colocalization assays revealed that most of the misshapen TRPC6-positive or heterotopic cells had a neuronal lineage with the exception of TRPC6-positive FCDiib patient BCs, which had both neuronal and glial features. Most TRPC6-positive cells were glutamatergic neurons. There was also greater expression of calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV), the downstream factor of TRPC6, in FCD lesions, suggesting that TRPC6 expression promoted dendritic growth and the development of dendritic spines and excitatory synapses via the CaMKIV-CREB pathway in FCD. Thus, overexpression of BDNF and TRPC6 and activation of the TRPC6 signal transduction pathway in cortical lesions of FCD patients may contribute to FC pathogenesis and epileptogenesis. PMID:27288906

  8. PKC-dependent Phosphorylation of the H1 Histamine Receptor Modulates TRPC6 Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Egly, Christian; Riley, Ashley M; Li, Wennan; Tewson, Paul; Hughes, Thomas E; Quinn, Anne Marie; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) is a cation selective, DAG-regulated, Ca2+-permeable channel activated by the agonists of Gq-protein-coupled heptahelical receptors. Dysfunctions of TRPC6 are implicated in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular and kidney conditions such as vasospasm and glomerulosclerosis. When stimulated by agonists of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), TRPC6 activity decays to the baseline despite the continuous presence of the agonist. In this study, we examined whether H1R desensitization contributes to regulating the decay rate of TRPC6 activity upon receptor stimulation. We employed the HEK expression system and a biosensor allowing us to simultaneously detect the changes in intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ca2+ concentrations. We found that the histamine-induced DAG response was biphasic, in which a transient peak was followed by maintained elevated plateau, suggesting that desensitization of H1R takes place in the presence of histamine. The application of PKC inhibitor Gö6983 slowed the decay rate of intracellular DAG concentration. Activation of the mouse H1R mutant lacking a putative PKC phosphorylation site, Ser399, responsible for the receptor desensitization, resulted in a prolonged intracellular DAG increase and greater Mn2+ influx through the TRPC6 channel. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PKC-dependent H1R phosphorylation leads to a reduced production of intracellular DAG that contributes to TRPC6 activity regulation.

  9. TRPC6 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Progression of Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hofstra, Julia M.; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M. V. A. P.; Berden, Jo H. M.; van der Vlag, Johan; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Nijenhuis, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Activating mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential channel C6 (TRPC6) cause autosomal dominant focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS). TRPC6 expression is upregulated in renal biopsies of patients with idiopathic membranous glomerulopathy (iMN) and animal models thereof. In iMN, disease progression is characterized by glomerulosclerosis. In addition, a context-dependent TRPC6 overexpression was recently suggested in complement-mediated podocyte injury in e.g. iMN. Hence, we hypothesized that genetic variants in TRPC6 might affect susceptibility to development or progression of iMN. Methods & Results Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 101 iMN patients and 292 controls. By direct sequencing of the entire TRPC6 gene, 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the iMN cohort, two of which were causing an amino acid substitution (rs3802829; Pro15Ser and rs36111323, Ala404Val). No statistically significant differences in genotypes or allele frequencies between patients and controls were observed. Clinical outcome in patients was determined (remission n = 26, renal failure n = 46, persistent proteinuria n = 29, follow-up median 80 months {range 51–166}). The 13 identified SNPs showed no association with remission or renal failure. There were no differences in genotypes or allele frequencies between patients in remission and progressors. Conclusions Our data suggest that TRPC6 polymorphisms do not affect susceptibility to iMN, or clinical outcome in iMN. PMID:25019165

  10. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  11. Gain-of-function Mutations in Transient Receptor Potential C6 (TRPC6) Activate Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2)*

    PubMed Central

    Chiluiza, David; Krishna, Sneha; Schumacher, Valérie A.; Schlöndorff, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) gene are a cause of autosomal dominant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The mechanisms whereby abnormal TRPC6 activity results in proteinuria remain unknown. The ERK1/2 MAPKs are activated in glomeruli and podocytes in several proteinuric disease models. We therefore examined whether FSGS-associated mutations in TRPC6 result in activation of these kinases. In 293T cells and cultured podocytes, overexpression of gain-of-function TRPC6 mutants resulted in increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect dependent upon channel function. Pharmacologic inhibitor studies implicated several signaling mediators, including calmodulin and calcineurin, supporting the importance of TRPC6-mediated calcium influx in this process. Through medium transfer experiments, we uncovered two distinct mechanisms for ERK activation by mutant TRPC6, a cell-autonomous, EGF receptor-independent mechanism and a non-cell-autonomous mechanism involving metalloprotease-mediated release of a presumed EGF receptor ligand. The inhibitors KN-92 and H89 were able to block both pathways in mutant TRPC6 expressing cells as well as the prolonged elevation of intracellular calcium levels upon carbachol stimulation seen in these cells. However, these effects appear to be independent of their effects on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA, respectively. Phosphorylation of Thr-70, Ser-282, and Tyr-31/285 were not necessary for ERK activation by mutant TRPC6, although a phosphomimetic TRPC6 S282E mutant was capable of ERK activation. Taken together, these results identify two pathways downstream of mutant TRPC6 leading to ERK activation that may play a role in the development of FSGS. PMID:23645677

  12. The contribution of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5 and TRPC6 to touch and hearing

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Jane E.; Desmonds, Terri; Quick, Kathryn; Taylor, Ruth; Abramowitz, Joel; Forge, Andy; Kros, Corné J.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Wood, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels have diverse roles in mechanosensation. Evidence is accumulating that members of the canonical subfamily of TRP channels (TRPC) are involved in touch and hearing. Characteristic features of TRP channels include their high structural homology and their propensity to form heteromeric complexes which suggests potential functional redundancy. We previously showed that TRPC3 and TRPC6 double knockout animals have deficits in light touch and hearing whilst single knockouts were apparently normal. We have extended these studies to analyse deficits in global quadruple TRPC1, 3, 5 and 6 null mutant mice. We examined both touch and hearing in behavioural and electrophysiological assays, and provide evidence that the quadruple knockout mice have larger deficits than the TRPC3 TRPC6 double knockouts. Mechano-electrical transducer currents of cochlear outer hair cells were however normal. This suggests that TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5 and TRPC6 channels contribute to cutaneous and auditory mechanosensation in a combinatorial manner, but have no direct role in cochlear mechanotransduction. PMID:26520460

  13. In silico analysis of functional nsSNPs in human TRPC6 gene associated with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhoomi B; Koringa, Prakash G; Mistry, Kinnari N; Patel, Amrut K; Gang, Sishir; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify functional non-synonymous SNPs of TRPC6 gene using various in silico approaches. These SNPs are believed to have a direct impact on protein stability through conformation changes. Transient receptor potential cation channel-6 (TRPC6) is one of the proteins that plays a key role causing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) associated with the steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome (SRNS). Data of TRPC6 was collected from dbSNP and further used to investigate a damaging effect using SIFT, PolyPhen, PROVEAN, and PANTHER. The comparative analysis predicted that two functional SNPs "rs35857503 at position N157T and rs36111323 at position A404V" showed a damaging effect (score of 0.096-1.00).We modeled the 3D structure of TRPC6 using a SWISS-MODEL workspace and validated it via PROCHECK to get a Ramachandran plot (83.0% residues in the most favored region, 12.7% in additionally allowed regions, 2.3% in a generously allowed region and 2.0% were in a disallowed region). QMEAN (0.311) and MUSTER (10.06) scores were under acceptable limits. Putative functional SNPs that may possibly undergo post-translation modifications were also identified in TRPC6 protein. It was found that mutation at N157T can lead to alteration in glycation whereas mutation at A404V was present at a ligand binding site. Additionally, I-Mutant showed a decrease in stability for these nsSNPs upon mutation, thus suggesting that the N157T and A404V variants of TRPC6 could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions causing functional deviations of protein to some extent. PMID:26127002

  14. In silico analysis of functional nsSNPs in human TRPC6 gene associated with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhoomi B; Koringa, Prakash G; Mistry, Kinnari N; Patel, Amrut K; Gang, Sishir; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify functional non-synonymous SNPs of TRPC6 gene using various in silico approaches. These SNPs are believed to have a direct impact on protein stability through conformation changes. Transient receptor potential cation channel-6 (TRPC6) is one of the proteins that plays a key role causing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) associated with the steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome (SRNS). Data of TRPC6 was collected from dbSNP and further used to investigate a damaging effect using SIFT, PolyPhen, PROVEAN, and PANTHER. The comparative analysis predicted that two functional SNPs "rs35857503 at position N157T and rs36111323 at position A404V" showed a damaging effect (score of 0.096-1.00).We modeled the 3D structure of TRPC6 using a SWISS-MODEL workspace and validated it via PROCHECK to get a Ramachandran plot (83.0% residues in the most favored region, 12.7% in additionally allowed regions, 2.3% in a generously allowed region and 2.0% were in a disallowed region). QMEAN (0.311) and MUSTER (10.06) scores were under acceptable limits. Putative functional SNPs that may possibly undergo post-translation modifications were also identified in TRPC6 protein. It was found that mutation at N157T can lead to alteration in glycation whereas mutation at A404V was present at a ligand binding site. Additionally, I-Mutant showed a decrease in stability for these nsSNPs upon mutation, thus suggesting that the N157T and A404V variants of TRPC6 could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions causing functional deviations of protein to some extent.

  15. Combined TRPC3 and TRPC6 blockade by selective small-molecule or genetic deletion inhibits pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kinya; Rainer, Peter P.; Shalkey Hahn, Virginia; Lee, Dong-ik; Jo, Su-Hyun; Andersen, Asger; Liu, Ting; Xu, Xiaoping; Willette, Robert N.; Lepore, John J.; Marino, Joseph P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Kass, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neurohormonal and mechanical stresses are central features of heart disease. Increasing evidence supports a role for the transient receptor potential canonical channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 in this pathophysiology. Channel expression for both is normally very low but is increased by cardiac disease, and genetic gain- or loss-of-function studies support contributions to hypertrophy and dysfunction. Selective small-molecule inhibitors remain scarce, and none target both channels, which may be useful given the high homology among them and evidence of redundant signaling. Here we tested selective TRPC3/6 antagonists (GSK2332255B and GSK2833503A; IC50, 3–21 nM against TRPC3 and TRPC6) and found dose-dependent blockade of cell hypertrophy signaling triggered by angiotensin II or endothelin-1 in HEK293T cells as well as in neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes. In vivo efficacy in mice and rats was greatly limited by rapid metabolism and high protein binding, although antifibrotic effects with pressure overload were observed. Intriguingly, although gene deletion of TRPC3 or TRPC6 alone did not protect against hypertrophy or dysfunction from pressure overload, combined deletion was protective, supporting the value of dual inhibition. Further development of this pharmaceutical class may yield a useful therapeutic agent for heart disease management. PMID:24453217

  16. Combined TRPC3 and TRPC6 blockade by selective small-molecule or genetic deletion inhibits pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kinya; Rainer, Peter P; Shalkey Hahn, Virginia; Lee, Dong-Ik; Jo, Su-Hyun; Andersen, Asger; Liu, Ting; Xu, Xiaoping; Willette, Robert N; Lepore, John J; Marino, Joseph P; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Kass, David A

    2014-01-28

    Chronic neurohormonal and mechanical stresses are central features of heart disease. Increasing evidence supports a role for the transient receptor potential canonical channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 in this pathophysiology. Channel expression for both is normally very low but is increased by cardiac disease, and genetic gain- or loss-of-function studies support contributions to hypertrophy and dysfunction. Selective small-molecule inhibitors remain scarce, and none target both channels, which may be useful given the high homology among them and evidence of redundant signaling. Here we tested selective TRPC3/6 antagonists (GSK2332255B and GSK2833503A; IC50, 3-21 nM against TRPC3 and TRPC6) and found dose-dependent blockade of cell hypertrophy signaling triggered by angiotensin II or endothelin-1 in HEK293T cells as well as in neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes. In vivo efficacy in mice and rats was greatly limited by rapid metabolism and high protein binding, although antifibrotic effects with pressure overload were observed. Intriguingly, although gene deletion of TRPC3 or TRPC6 alone did not protect against hypertrophy or dysfunction from pressure overload, combined deletion was protective, supporting the value of dual inhibition. Further development of this pharmaceutical class may yield a useful therapeutic agent for heart disease management.

  17. Stress-induced switch in Numb isoforms enhances Notch-dependent expression of subtype-specific transient receptor potential channel.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, George A; Belal, Cherine; Madan, Meenu; Taylor, David G; Wang, Jang; Wei, Zelan; Pattisapu, Jogi V; Chan, Sic L

    2010-02-26

    The Notch signaling pathway plays an essential role in the regulation of cell specification by controlling differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Numb is an intrinsic regulator of the Notch pathway and exists in four alternative splice variants that differ in the length of their phosphotyrosine-binding domain (PTB) and proline-rich region domains. The physiological relevance of the existence of the Numb splice variants and their exact regulation are still poorly understood. We previously reported that Numb switches from isoforms containing the insertion in PTB to isoforms lacking this insertion in neuronal cells subjected to trophic factor withdrawal (TFW). The functional relevance of the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms is not known. Here we provide evidence that the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms regulates Notch signaling strength and Notch target gene expression. PC12 cells stably overexpressing Numb isoforms lacking the PTB insertion exhibited higher basal Notch activity and Notch-dependent transcription of the transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) when compared with those overexpressing Numb isoforms with the PTB insertion. The differential regulation of TRPC6 expression is correlated with perturbed calcium signaling and increased neuronal vulnerability to TFW-induced death. Pharmacological inhibition of the Notch pathway or knockdown of TRPC6 function ameliorates the adverse effects caused by the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms. Taken together, our results indicate that Notch and Numb interaction may influence the sensitivity of neuronal cells to injurious stimuli by modulating calcium-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades.

  18. FK506 ameliorates podocyte injury in type 2 diabetic nephropathy by down-regulating TRPC6 and NFAT expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruixia; Liu, Liqiu; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Yanjuan; Song, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure, and podocyte injury plays a major role in the development of DN. In this study, we investigated whether tacrolimus (FK506), an immunosuppressor, can attenuate podocyte injury in a type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) rat model with DN. Transmission electron microcopy was used to morphologically evaluate renal injury. The urinary albumin (UAL), creatinine clearance rate (Ccr) and major biochemical parameters, including glucose, insulin, serum creatinine (Scr), urea nitrogen, total cholesterol (CHO) and triglyceride (TG), were examined 12 weeks after the administration of FK506. The expressions of the canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and nephrin were detected by Western blotting and qPCR. In the rat model of DN, the expressions of TRPC6 and NFAT were significantly elevated compared with the normal rat group; however, the treatment with FK506 normalized the increased expression of TRPC6 and NFAT and attenuated podocyte ultrastructure injury. UAL, Ccr and the biochemical parameters were also improved by the use of FK506. In cell experiments, FK506 improved the decreased expression of nephrin and suppressed the elevated expression of both TRPC6 and NFAT caused by high glucose in accordance with TRPC6 blocker U73122. Our results demonstrated that FK506 could ameliorate podocyte injury in T2DM, which may be related to suppressed expressions of TRPC6 and NFAT.

  19. MicroRNA-26a prevents endothelial cell apoptosis by directly targeting TRPC6 in the setting of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Longyin; Wu, Xianxian; Du, Ning; Hu, Yingying; Li, Xiaoguang; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Huan; Gao, Feng; Du, Zhimin; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, is the major cause of life-threatening complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial apoptosis plays a vital role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Although a subset of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as critical regulators of atherosclerosis, studies on their participation in endothelial apoptosis in atherosclerosis have been limited. In our study, we found that miR-26a expression was substantially reduced in the aortic intima of ApoE−/− mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) suppressed miR-26a expression. Forced expression of miR-26a inhibited endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by MTT assay and TUNEL staining results. Further analysis identified TRPC6 as a target of miR-26a, and TRPC6 overexpression abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of miR-26a. Moreover, the cytosolic calcium and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway were found to mediate the beneficial effects of miR-26a on endothelial apoptosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel role of miR-26a in endothelial apoptosis and indicates a therapeutic potential of miR-26a for atherosclerosis associated with apoptotic cell death. PMID:25801675

  20. MicroRNA-26a prevents endothelial cell apoptosis by directly targeting TRPC6 in the setting of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Longyin; Wu, Xianxian; Du, Ning; Hu, Yingying; Li, Xiaoguang; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Huan; Gao, Feng; Du, Zhimin; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, is the major cause of life-threatening complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial apoptosis plays a vital role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Although a subset of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as critical regulators of atherosclerosis, studies on their participation in endothelial apoptosis in atherosclerosis have been limited. In our study, we found that miR-26a expression was substantially reduced in the aortic intima of ApoE-/- mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) suppressed miR-26a expression. Forced expression of miR-26a inhibited endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by MTT assay and TUNEL staining results. Further analysis identified TRPC6 as a target of miR-26a, and TRPC6 overexpression abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of miR-26a. Moreover, the cytosolic calcium and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway were found to mediate the beneficial effects of miR-26a on endothelial apoptosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel role of miR-26a in endothelial apoptosis and indicates a therapeutic potential of miR-26a for atherosclerosis associated with apoptotic cell death.

  1. The change of spatial cognition ability in depression rat model and the possible association with down-regulated protein expression of TRPC6.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Liu, Chunhua; Qin, Xuan; Zhu, Minghui; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of researches have focused on the cognitive changes in depression patients. Here, we observed impaired cognitive ability in a rat depression model along with down-regulated expression of canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) protein. The cognitive defect could be rescued by treatment with hyperforin, which can invoke TRPC6 activation. This study was designed as following: rats were randomly divided into control, stressed and stressed+hyperforin groups. Chronic unpredictable stress combined with isolation rearing was applied on rats for three weeks, except for control group. Morris water maze was applied to evaluate spatial cognitive ability while long-term potentiation (LTP) was recorded to test the synaptic plasticity. Results showed that both spatial cognition and synaptic plasticity were impaired in stress group while improved after hyperforin treatment in stressed+hyperforin group, meanwhile, Western blot assay showed that TRPC6 expression was decreased in stressed group. The histological data also presented the decline of dendritic length, dendritic spine density and the number of excitatory synapses in stress group while they were increased in stressed+hyperforin group. These results suggest that there is a well potential of TRPC6 to become a new target for selecting promising new candidates as antidepressants with therapeutically effect on impaired cognition.

  2. The change of spatial cognition ability in depression rat model and the possible association with down-regulated protein expression of TRPC6.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Liu, Chunhua; Qin, Xuan; Zhu, Minghui; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of researches have focused on the cognitive changes in depression patients. Here, we observed impaired cognitive ability in a rat depression model along with down-regulated expression of canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) protein. The cognitive defect could be rescued by treatment with hyperforin, which can invoke TRPC6 activation. This study was designed as following: rats were randomly divided into control, stressed and stressed+hyperforin groups. Chronic unpredictable stress combined with isolation rearing was applied on rats for three weeks, except for control group. Morris water maze was applied to evaluate spatial cognitive ability while long-term potentiation (LTP) was recorded to test the synaptic plasticity. Results showed that both spatial cognition and synaptic plasticity were impaired in stress group while improved after hyperforin treatment in stressed+hyperforin group, meanwhile, Western blot assay showed that TRPC6 expression was decreased in stressed group. The histological data also presented the decline of dendritic length, dendritic spine density and the number of excitatory synapses in stress group while they were increased in stressed+hyperforin group. These results suggest that there is a well potential of TRPC6 to become a new target for selecting promising new candidates as antidepressants with therapeutically effect on impaired cognition. PMID:26248296

  3. Discovery and pharmacological characterization of a novel potent inhibitor of diacylglycerol-sensitive TRPC cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T; Follmann, M; Hessler, G; Kleemann, H-W; Hachtel, S; Fuchs, B; Weissmann, N; Linz, W; Schmidt, T; Löhn, M; Schroeter, K; Wang, L; Rütten, H; Strübing, C

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The cation channel transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 has been associated with several pathologies including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension and ischaemia reperfusion-induced lung oedema. We set out to discover novel inhibitors of TRPC6 channels and investigate the therapeutic potential of these agents. Experimental Approach A library of potential TRPC channel inhibitors was designed and synthesized. Activity of the compounds was assessed by measuring intracellular Ca2+ levels. The lead compound SAR7334 was further characterized by whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. The effects of SAR7334 on acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) and systemic BP were investigated. Key Results SAR7334 inhibited TRPC6, TRPC3 and TRPC7-mediated Ca2+ influx into cells with IC50s of 9.5, 282 and 226 nM, whereas TRPC4 and TRPC5-mediated Ca2+ entry was not affected. Patch-clamp experiments confirmed that the compound blocked TRPC6 currents with an IC50 of 7.9 nM. Furthermore, SAR7334 suppressed TRPC6-dependent acute HPV in isolated perfused lungs from mice. Pharmacokinetic studies of SAR7334 demonstrated that the compound was suitable for chronic oral administration. In an initial short-term study, SAR7334 did not change mean arterial pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Conclusions and Implications Our results confirm the role of TRPC6 channels in hypoxic pulmonary vasoregulation and indicate that these channels are unlikely to play a major role in BP regulation in SHR. SAR7334 is a novel, highly potent and bioavailable inhibitor of TRPC6 channels that opens new opportunities for the investigation of TRPC channel function in vivo. PMID:25847402

  4. Identification of TRPC6 as a possible candidate target gene within an amplicon at 11q21-q22.2 for migratory capacity in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic and gene expression analyses in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have allowed identification of genomic aberrations that may contribute to cancer pathophysiology. Nevertheless, the molecular consequences of numerous genetic alterations still remain unclear. Methods To identify novel genes implicated in HNSCC pathogenesis, we analyzed the genomic alterations present in five HNSCC-derived cell lines by array CGH, and compared high level focal gene amplifications with gene expression levels to identify genes whose expression is directly impacted by these genetic events. Next, we knocked down TRPC6, one of the most highly amplified and over-expressed genes, to characterize the biological roles of TRPC6 in carcinogenesis. Finally, real time PCR was performed to determine TRPC6 gene dosage and mRNA levels in normal mucosa and human HNSCC tissues. Results The data showed that the HNSCC-derived cell lines carry most of the recurrent genomic abnormalities previously described in primary tumors. High-level genomic amplifications were found at four chromosomal sites (11q21-q22.2, 18p11.31-p11.21, 19p13.2-p13.13, and 21q11) with associated gene expression changes in selective candidate genes suggesting that they may play an important role in the malignant behavior of HNSCC. One of the most dramatic alterations of gene transcription involved the TRPC6 gene (located at 11q21-q22.2) which has been recently implicated in tumour invasiveness. siRNA-induced knockdown of TRPC6 expression in HNSCC-derived cells dramatically inhibited HNSCC-cell invasion but did not significantly alter cell proliferation. Importantly, amplification and concomitant overexpression of TRPC6 was also found in HNSCC tumour samples. Conclusions Altogether, these data show that TRPC6 is likely to be a target for 11q21–22.2 amplification that confers enhanced invasive behavior to HNSCC cells. Therefore, TRPC6 may be a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of HNSCC

  5. K+ channels as targets for specific immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Chandy, K. George; Wulff, Heike; Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael; Gutman, George A.; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.3 channel and the Ca2+ -activated IKCa1 K+ channel are expressed in T cells in a distinct pattern that depends on the state of lymphocyte activation and differentiation. The channel phenotype changes during the progression from the resting to the activated cell state and from naïve to effector memory cells, affording promise for specific immunomodulatory actions of K+ channel blockers. In this article, we review the functional roles of these channels in both naïve cells and memory cells, describe the development of selective inhibitors of Kv1.3 and IKCa1 channels, and provide a rationale for the potential therapeutic use of these inhibitors in immunological disorders. PMID:15120495

  6. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  7. Interaction of Galphaq and Kir3, G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takeharu; Zhao, Peng; Floreani, Christina V; Nakajima, Yasuko; Kozasa, Tohru; Nakajima, Shigehiro

    2007-04-01

    Activation of substance P receptors, which are coupled to Galpha(q), inhibits the Kir3.1/3.2 channels, resulting in neuronal excitation. We have shown previously that this channel inactivation is not caused by reduction of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate level in membrane. Moreover, Galpha(q) immunoprecipitates with Kir3.2 (J Physiol 564:489-500, 2005), suggesting that Galpha(q) interacts with Kir3.2. Positive immunoprecipitation, however, does not necessarily indicate direct interaction between the two proteins. Here, the glutathione transferase pull-down assay was used to investigate interaction between Galpha(q) and the K(+) channels. We found that Galpha(q) interacted with N termini of Kir3.1, Kir3.2, and Kir3.4. However, Galpha(q) did not interact with the C terminus of any Kir3 or with the C or N terminus of Kir2.1. TRPC6 is regulated by the signal initiated by Galpha(q). Immunoprecipitation, however, showed that Galpha(q) did not interact with TRPC6. Thus, the interaction between Galpha(q) and the Kir3 N terminus is quite specific. This interaction occurred in the presence of GDP or GDP-AlF(-)(4). The Galpha(q) binding could take place somewhere between residues 51 to 90 of Kir3.2; perhaps the segment between 81 to 90 residues is crucial. Gbetagamma, which is known to bind to N terminus of Kir3, did not compete with Galpha(q) for the binding, suggesting that these two binding regions are different. These findings agree with the hypothesis (J Physiol 564:489-500, 2005) that the signal to inactivate the Kir3 channel could be mainly transmitted directly from Galpha(q) to Kir3. PMID:17296805

  8. Sustained activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in podoctyes leads to oxidative stress, mobilization of transient receptor potential canonical 6 channels, nuclear factor of activated T cells activation, and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Anderson, Marc; Dryer, Stuart E

    2012-10-01

    Atypical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are expressed in podocytes. Sustained (≥24 h) application of 50 to100 μM NMDA to immortalized mouse podocytes evoked a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species(ROS) such as H₂O₂. This effect of NMDA was associated with increased cell-surface expression of p47(phox), a cytosolic regulatory subunit of the NADPH oxidase NOX2. NMDA-evoked generation of ROS drove an increase in steady-state surface expression of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 channels, which was blocked by the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine(MK-801) and by a membrane-permeable scavenger of ROS. The effect of NMDA on TRPC6 was observed using cell surface biotinylation assays and also with whole-cell recordings made under conditions designed to facilitate detection of current through TRPC6. NMDA mobilization of TRPC6 channels was blocked by concurrent treatment with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and by a membrane-permeable scavenger ofROS. Mobilization of TRPC6 was also evoked by L-homocysteic acid. NMDA treatment also increased nuclear localization of endogenous nuclear factor of activated T cells, which could be blocked by MK-801, by scavenging ROS, by the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine, and by the TRPC channel inhibitor 1-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]ethyl]imidazole (SKF-96365). NMDA treatment also evoked robust activation of Rho but not Rac,consistent with previous studies of downstream effectors of TRPC6 activation. Exposing cells to NMDA for 24 h reduced total and cell surface expression of the podocyte markers nephrin and podocin, but there was no loss of cells. With longer NMDA exposure (72 h), we observed loss of cells associated with nuclear fragmentation and increased expression of caspase-3, caspase-6, and Bax, suggesting an apoptotic process.

  9. Link-specific adaptation in the luminance and chromatic channels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, S J; MacLeod, D I

    1993-11-01

    We present evidence that adaptation occurs in the separate links that connect the receptors to the luminance and the chromatic channels. The relative effectiveness of the L and M cone inputs to the luminance and red/green chromatic channels was determined by using, respectively, heterochromatic flicker photometry and a cancellation technique which maintained a pure yellow. The findings provide evidence for a link-specific adaptation model, wherein one receptor system provides two separate links to the luminance and chromatic channels and the outputs of an individual cone to these two postreceptoral channels can be separately attenuated or weighted at each of these links by colored adapting lights. One line of evidence for link-specific adaptation is that colored adapting fields selectively suppress L and M cone inputs to the red/green chromatic channel by a smaller factor than the luminance channel. A second line of evidence is that there is not only a magnitude difference but also a dynamic difference between adaptive processes operating in the luminance and chromatic channels: the luminance channel has a faster gain change and recovery from adaptation than does the chromatic channel. The results, together with other evidence, make it plausible that an important component of light adaptation in cone vision occurs at the cone-bipolar synapse.

  10. Production of a specific extracellular inhibitor of TRPM3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, J; Milligan, C J; Zeng, F; Jones, C; Beech, D J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Isoform-specific ion channel blockers are useful for target validation in drug discovery and can provide the basis for new therapeutic agents and aid in determination of physiological functions of ion channels. The aim of this study was to generate a specific blocker of human TRPM3 channels as a tool to help investigations of this member of the TRP cationic channel family. Experimental approach: A polyclonal antibody (TM3E3) was made to a conserved peptide of the third extracellular (E3) loop of TRPM3 and tested for binding and functional effect. Studies of channel activity were made by whole-cell planar patch-clamp and fura-2 intracellular Ca2+ measurement. Key results: Ionic current mediated by TRPM3 was inhibited partially by TM3E3 over a period of 5–10 min. Ca2+ entry in TRPM3-expressing cells was also partially inhibited by TM3E3 in a peptide-specific manner and independently of the type of agonist used to activate TRPM3. TM3E3 had no effect on TRPC5, TRPV4, TRPM2 or an endogenous ATP response. Conclusions and implications: The data show the successful development of a specific TRPM3 inhibitor and give further confidence in E3 targeting as an approach to producing isoform-specific ion channel blockers. PMID:18604232

  11. Substrate Specificity within a Family of Outer Membrane Carboxylate Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Liu, Jiaming; Cheneke, Belete R.; Touw, Debra S.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Indic, Mridhu; Movileanu, Liviu; van den Berg, Bert; Dutzler, Raimund

    2012-01-17

    Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM) that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  12. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  13. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  14. Sensing pressure in the cardiovascular system: Gq-coupled mechanoreceptors and TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Folgering, Joost H A; Bichet, Delphine; Duprat, Fabrice; Delmas, Patrick; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Despite the central physiological importance of cardiovascular mechanotransduction, the molecular identities of the sensors and the signaling pathways have long remained elusive. Indeed, how pressure is transduced into cellular excitation has only recently started to emerge. In both arterial and cardiac myocytes, the diacylglycerol-sensitive canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) subunits are proposed to underlie the stretch-activated depolarizing cation channels. An indirect mechanism of activation through a ligand-independent conformational switch of Gq-coupled receptors by mechanical stress is invoked. Such a mechanism involving the angiotensin type 1 receptor and TRPC6 is proposed to trigger the arterial myogenic response to intraluminal pressure. TRPC6 is also involved in load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In this review, we will focus on the molecular basis of pressure sensing in the cardiovascular system and associated disease states.

  15. Specification for wide channel bandwidth one-inch video tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    Standards and controls are established for the procurement of wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes for Very Long Base Interferometer (VLBI) system applications. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains three specifications for the Quality Products List (QPL) and acceptance testing of magnetic tapes. NASA-TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; NASA-TM-80599 is used for QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes; and NASA-TM-100702 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new IBM/IBM compatible 3480 magnetic tape cartridges. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes. The one inch video tapes used by the Jet Propulsion Lab., the Deep Space Network and the Haystack Observatory will be covered by this specification. These NASA stations will use the video tapes for their VLBI system applications. The VLBI system is used for the tracking of quasars and the support of interplanetary exploration.

  16. Micro-channel-based high specific power lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastinu, P.; Martın-Hernández, G.; Praena, J.; Gramegna, F.; Prete, G.; Agostini, P.; Aiello, A.; Phoenix, B.

    2016-11-01

    A micro-channel-based heat sink has been produced and tested. The device has been developed to be used as a Lithium target for the LENOS (Legnaro Neutron Source) facility and for the production of radioisotope. Nevertheless, applications of such device can span on many areas: cooling of electronic devices, diode laser array, automotive applications etc. The target has been tested using a proton beam of 2.8MeV energy and delivering total power shots from 100W to 1500W with beam spots varying from 5mm2 to 19mm2. Since the target has been designed to be used with a thin deposit of lithium and since lithium is a low-melting-point material, we have measured that, for such application, a specific power of about 3kW/cm2 can be delivered to the target, keeping the maximum surface temperature not exceeding 150° C.

  17. Specification of auditory sensitivity by Drosophila TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Martin C; Albert, Jörg T; Nadrowski, B; Kamikouchi, A

    2006-08-01

    Ears achieve their exquisite sensitivity by means of mechanical feedback: motile mechanosensory cells through their active motion boost the mechanical input from the ear. Examination of the auditory mechanics in Drosophila melanogaster mutants shows that the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel NompC is required to promote this feedback, whereas the TRP vanilloid (TRPV) channels Nan and Iav serve to control the feedback gain. The combined function of these channels specifies the sensitivity of the fly auditory organ. PMID:16819519

  18. Role of Src in C3 transient receptor potential channel function and evidence for a heterogeneous makeup of receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ entry channels.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Brian T; Liao, Yanhong; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2006-01-10

    Receptor-operated Ca2+ entry (ROCE) and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) are known to be inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and activation of C-type transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) isoform 3 (TRPC3), a cation channel thought to be involved in SOCE and/or ROCE, was recently shown to depend on src tyrosine kinase activity. What is not known is the step at which src acts on TRPC3 and whether the role for tyrosine kinases in ROCE or SOCE is a general phenomenon. Using in vitro and in cell protein-protein interaction assays we now report that src phosphorylates TRPC3 at Y226 and that formation of phospho-Y226 is essential for TRPC3 activation. This requirement is unique for TRPC3 because (i) mutation of the cognate tyrosines of the closely related TRPC6 and TRPC7 had no effect; (ii) TRPC6 and TRPC7 were activated in src-, yes-, and fyn-deficient cells; and (iii) src, but not yes or fyn, rescued TRPC3 activation in src-, yes-, and fyn-deficient cells. The Src homology 2 domain of src was found to interact with either the N or the C termini of all TRPCs, suggesting that other tyrosine kinases may play a role in ion fluxes mediated by TRPCs other than TRPC3. A side-by-side comparison of the effects of genistein (a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor) on endogenous ROCE and SOCE in mouse fibroblasts, HEK and COS-7 cells, and ROCE in HEK cells mediated by TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPC7, and TRPC5 showed differences that argue for ROCE and SOCE channels to be heterogeneous.

  19. Donor's position-specific channel interference in substituted biphenyl molecules.

    PubMed

    Mehboob Alam, Md

    2015-07-21

    The channel interference mechanism describes the two-photon absorption process in terms of the relative orientations of different transition dipole moment vectors (TDMVs) in a molecule. Controlling these interferences is a difficult but important task, because it can provide new information about such absorption/emission processes. The present contribution aims to explain the reversal in the nature of these interferences with the relative positions of the donor-acceptor groups in substituted biphenyl molecules. The results obtained from the linear and quadratic response theories indicate that having the donor at the para position leads to a constructive interference whereas having it at any of the other two positions results in a destructive interference. This is explained by a systematic analysis of the relative orientations of all the TDMVs involved in a three-state model.

  20. Structural basis of water-specific transport through the AQP1 water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Haixin; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Lee, John K.; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing K.

    2001-12-01

    Water channels facilitate the rapid transport of water across cell membranes in response to osmotic gradients. These channels are believed to be involved in many physiological processes that include renal water conservation, neuro-homeostasis, digestion, regulation of body temperature and reproduction. Members of the water channel superfamily have been found in a range of cell types from bacteria to human. In mammals, there are currently 10 families of water channels, referred to as aquaporins (AQP): AQP0-AQP9. Here we report the structure of the aquaporin 1 (AQP1) water channel to 2.2Å resolution. The channel consists of three topological elements, an extracellular and a cytoplasmic vestibule connected by an extended narrow pore or selectivity filter. Within the selectivity filter, four bound waters are localized along three hydrophilic nodes, which punctuate an otherwise extremely hydrophobic pore segment. This unusual combination of a long hydrophobic pore and a minimal number of solute binding sites facilitates rapid water transport. Residues of the constriction region, in particular histidine 182, which is conserved among all known water-specific channels, are critical in establishing water specificity. Our analysis of the AQP1 pore also indicates that the transport of protons through this channel is highly energetically unfavourable.

  1. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  2. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  3. Interactions of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.R.; Banning, J.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Cryptosin, a new cardenolide, was found to be a potent inhibitor of cardiac Na{sup +} and K{sup +} dependent Adenosinetri-phosphatase. In experiments with dog heart ex vivo, development of inotropic and toxic effect correlated with changes in the cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels as measured by the binding of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110. A significant change in the PN 200-110 binding was observed when guinea pig and dog heart sarcolemmal membranes were pre-incubated with cryptosin in vitro. Binding analysis of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110 (Isradipine), a 1,4-dihydropyridine analog with very specific calcium channel binding properties, in both in vitro and ex vivo studies were consistent and indicated a non-specific type of interaction of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac 1,4-dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels.

  4. A novel slow-inactivation-specific ion channel modulator attenuates neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael E; Smith, Paula L; Bladen, Chris; Eduljee, Cyrus; Xie, Jennifer Y; Chen, Lina; Fee-Maki, Molly; Doering, Clint J; Mezeyova, Janette; Zhu, Yongbao; Belardetti, Francesco; Pajouhesh, Hassan; Parker, David; Arneric, Stephen P; Parmar, Manjeet; Porreca, Frank; Tringham, Elizabeth; Zamponi, Gerald W; Snutch, Terrance P

    2011-04-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are implicated in pain sensation and transmission signaling mechanisms within both peripheral nociceptors and the spinal cord. Genetic knockdown and knockout experiments have shown that specific channel isoforms, including Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8 sodium channels and Ca(V)3.2 T-type calcium channels, play distinct pronociceptive roles. We have rationally designed and synthesized a novel small organic compound (Z123212) that modulates both recombinant and native sodium and calcium channel currents by selectively stabilizing channels in their slow-inactivated state. Slow inactivation of voltage-gated channels can function as a brake during periods of neuronal hyperexcitability, and Z123212 was found to reduce the excitability of both peripheral nociceptors and lamina I/II spinal cord neurons in a state-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that oral administration of Z123212 is efficacious in reversing thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in the rat spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain and also produces acute antinociception in the hot-plate test. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, Z123212 did not cause significant motor or cardiovascular adverse effects. Taken together, the state-dependent inhibition of sodium and calcium channels in both the peripheral and central pain signaling pathways may provide a synergistic mechanism toward the development of a novel class of pain therapeutics. PMID:21349638

  5. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  6. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Yeger, O.; Asher, C.

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable /sup 22/Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  7. Specific heat of liquid He-4 near the superfluid transition and confined in cylindrical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaroun, Tahar; Ahlers, Guenter

    2006-03-01

    We present new measurements of the specific heat near the lambda transition of liquid He-4 at saturated vapor pressure and confined in micro-channel plates containing cylindrical holes. We investigated two channels diameters: 1μm and 2μm. Our results for the scaling function near the specific-heat maximum are in reasonably good agreement with previous measurements on channels with a 1 μm x 1 μm square cross section and on cylindrical channels with a 0.26μm diameter. They also are consistent with the scaling function derived from Monte Carlo calculations. However, they suggest a size- dependent systematic departure from a unique scaling function that is consistent with earlier measurements^3 on cylindrical channels of 8μm diameter. M.O. Kimbal, K.P. Mooney, and F.M. Gasparini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 115301 (2004) J.A. Lipa, M. Coleman, and D.A. Stricker, J. Low Temp. Phys. 124, 443 (2001). N. Schultka and E. Manousakis, J. Low Temp. Phys. 111, 783 (1998)

  8. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Claudia M.; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target. PMID:26393923

  9. The involvement of medial septum 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors on ACPA-induced memory consolidation deficit: possible role of TRPC3, TRPC6 and TRPV2.

    PubMed

    Najar, Farzaneh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Haeri-Rohani, Seyed-Ali; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-11-01

    The present study evaluates the roles of serotonergic receptors of the medial septum on amnesia induced by arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA; as selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) in adult male Wistar rats. Cannulae were implanted in the medial septum of the brain of the rats. The animals were trained in a passive avoidance learning apparatus, and were tested 24 hours after training for step-through latency. Results indicated that post-training medial septum administration of CP94253 (5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist) and cinancerine (as 5-HT2 receptor antagonist) reduced the step-through latency showing an amnesic response, while GR127935 (5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist) and αm5htm (as 5-HT2A/2B/2D receptor agonist) did not alter memory consolidation by themselves. On continuing the test, the results showed that CP94253 increased and GR127935 did not alter ACPA (0.02 µg/rat)-induced memory impairment, respectively. Other data indicated that αm5htm induced a modulatory effect, while cinancerine restored ACPA-induced amnesia. Using SKF-96365 (inhibitor of transient receptor potential TRPC3/6 and TRPV2 channels) demonstrated that TRPC3, TRPC3 and TRPV2 channels have a significant role, according to our results. PMID:26464456

  10. Activation of Plant Plasma Membrane Ca2+-Permeable Channels by Race-Specific Fungal Elicitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gelli, A.; Higgins, V. J.; Blumwald, E.

    1997-01-01

    The response of plant cells to invading pathogens is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca2+ levels that are mediated by Ca2+-permeable channels located at the plasma membrane of the host cell. The mechanisms by which fungal elicitors can induce Ca2+ uptake by the host cell were examined by the application of conventional patch-clamp techniques. Whole-cell and single-channel experiments on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) protoplasts revealed a race-specific fungal elicitor-induced activation of a plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel. The presence of the fungal elicitor resulted in a greater probability of channel opening. Guanosine 5[prime]-[[beta]-thio]diphosphate, a GDP analog that locks heterotrimeric G-proteins into their inactivated state, abolished the channel activation induced by the fungal elicitor, whereas guanosine 5[prime][[gamma]-thio]triphosphate, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog that locks heterotrimeric G-proteins into their activated state, produced an effect similar to that observed with the fungal elicitor. Mastoparan, which stimulates GTPase activity, mimicked the effect of GTP[[gamma

  11. The low PLC-δ1 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells induces upregulation of TRPV6 channel activity.

    PubMed

    Vachel, Laura; Norez, Caroline; Jayle, Christophe; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2015-01-01

    Increase of Ca(2+) influx in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) cells has been reported to be related to Transient Receptor Potential Canonical (TRPC6) channel, which is implicated in a functional coupling with Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR). Several members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) channels family have already been described as emerging target for respiratory diseases. Two specific isoforms, TRPV5 and TRPV6 are of particular interest in the context of CF Ca(2+) homeostasis as they are highly selective toward Ca(2+) and constitutively activated. Thus, we investigated the involvement of these channels in Ca(2+) influx in CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial cell lines. 16HBE14o-, CFBE41o- cell lines, primary human airway epithelial cells (hAEC) and freshly isolated human airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF individuals were used. We showed that both channels are expressed in CF and non-CF cells and constitutive Ca(2+) influx was significantly higher (85%) in cells from CF individuals compared to cells from non-CF ones. Using the selective inhibitor of TRPV6 channel SOR-C27 and a siRNA strategy, our results revealed that TRPV6 was mostly involved in the increase of Ca(2+) influx. TRPV6 channel is negatively regulated by the PLC-PIP2 pathway. We measured the Ca(2+) influx in the presence of the non-specific PLC inhibitor, U73122, in non-CF human bronchial epithelial cells. Ca(2+) influx was increased by 33% with U73122 and this increase was largely reduced in the presence of SOR-C27. PLC inhibition in CF cells by U73122 had no effect on Ca(2+) influx. These results showed that PLC-PIP2 pathway is dysregulated in CF cells and leads to the increase of TRPV6 activity. The regulation of TRPV6 by PLC-PIP2 pathway implicates the specific PLC isoform, PLC-δ1. Immunoblot experiments revealed that expression of PLC-δ1 was decreased by 70% in CF cells. TRPV6 activity was normalized but not the level of expression of PLC-δ1

  12. Sildenafil prevents the up-regulation of transient receptor potential canonical channels in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kiso, Hironori; Ohba, Takayoshi; Iino, Kenji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Terata, Yutaka; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC1, 3 and 6) are up-regulated by ET-1. •Sildenafil inhibited hypertrophic responses (BNP, Ca entry, NFAT activation). •Sildenafil suppressed TRPC1, 3 and 6 expression. -- Abstract: Background: Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels are up-regulated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Sildenafil inhibits TRPC6 activation and expression, leading to the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the effects of sildenafil on the expression of other TRPCs remain unknown. We hypothesized that in addition to its effects of TRPC6, sildenafil blocks the up-regulation of other TRPC channels to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Methods and results: In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, a 48 h treatment with 10 nM endothelin (ET)-1 induced hypertrophic responses characterized by nuclear factor of activated T cells activation and enhancement of brain natriuretic peptide expression and cell surface area. Co-treatment with sildenafil (1 μM, 48 h) inhibited these ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses. Although ET-1 enhanced the gene expression of TRPCs, sildenafil inhibited the enhanced gene expression of TRPC1, C3 and C6. Moreover, co-treatment with sildenafil abolished the augmentation of SOCE in the hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions: These results suggest that sildenafil inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by suppressing the up-regulation of TRPC expression.

  13. Spermatogonial stem cells specific marker identification in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus and blue catfish, I. furcatus.

    PubMed

    Shang, Mei; Su, Baofeng; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Perera, Dayan A; Li, Chao; Qin, Zhenkui; Li, Yun; Dunn, David A; Cek, Sehriban; Peatman, Eric; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-12-01

    Testicular germ cells of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, and blue catfish, I. furcatus were separated into four layers with Percoll density gradient centrifugation, containing different cell types (40% in the first layer were spermatogonial stem cells, SSCs). Expression of seventeen genes was analyzed for cells from different layers by real-time quantitative PCR. Pfkfb4, Urod, Plzf, Integrin6, IntegrinV, Thy1 and Cdh1 genes showed the same expression change pattern in both channel and blue catfish as these genes were down-regulated in the spermatocytes and even more so in spermatids. Plzf and Integrin6 had especially high expression in SSCs and can be used as SSCs specific markers. Sox2 gene was up-regulated in spermatocytes and even more highly up-regulated in spermatids, which indicated it could be a spermatid marker. In contrast to channel catfish, Id4, Smad5 and Prdm14 gene expressions were strongly down-regulated in spermatocyte cells, but up-regulated in spermatid cells in blue catfish. Smad5 gene was down-regulated in spermatocytes, but up-regulated in both spermatogonia and spermatids, allowing identification as a marker for spermatocytes in blue catfish. Oct4, Id4, Gfrα2, Pum2 and Prdm14 genes showed different expression patterns in the testicular germ cells of channel and blue catfish. This may be a partial explanation to the differing responses of channel catfish and blue catfish to induced spawning technologies. The SSCs specific markers can be used for further SSCs labeling, which can increase the SSCs sorting efficiency and be applied in various studies involving SSCs and other germ cells. PMID:26251285

  14. Increased expression of TRPC4 channels associated with erectile dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sung, H H; Choo, S H; Ko, M; Kang, S J; Chae, M R; Kam, S C; Han, D H; So, I; Lee, S W

    2014-07-01

    In recent reports, an association between altered TRPC channel function and the development of various diabetic complications has drawn the attention of many investigators. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of TRPC4 channels of corpus smooth muscle (CSM) cells in diabetes, and to evaluate the association between erectile dysfunction (ED) and altered TRPC4 channel function. The expression of TRPC4 in the penile tissue of human, normal and diabetic rat was investigated using RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vivo gene transfer of dominant negative (DN) TRPC4 into the CSM of rat was conducted. In vivo pelvic nerve stimulation was performed to measure erectile function. Expression of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4 and TRPC6 in human and rat CSM tissues was confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot and IHC. In the diabetic rat, the expression levels of mRNA and protein of the TRPC4, and TRPC6 were significantly increased compared to control rats (p < 0.05). The change in TRPC4 expression in the diabetic rats was higher than those of the other TRPC subunits (p < 0.05). The IHC showed that only TRPC4 expression had a higher intensity in the diabetes compared to normal rats (p < 0.05). Gene transfection with TRPC4(DN) into the diabetic rats restored erectile function to levels similar to that of normal controls. Gene expression of TRPC4(DN) in CSM tissue was confirmed by RT-PCR 2 weeks after transfection. This study demonstrated that TRPC4 channel expression increased in the penile CSM cells of diabetic rats. The down-regulation of TRPC4 with DN form restored erectile function in the diabetic rats. The alteration of TRPC4 channel is one of pathophysiology of ED and could be a target for drug development for ED.

  15. Understanding the Cellular Function of TRPV2 Channel through Generation of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Huynh, Kevin W.; Cawley, Daniel; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel proposed to play a critical role in a wide array of cellular processes. Although TRPV2 surface expression was originally determined to be sensitive to growth factor signaling, regulated trafficking of TRPV2 has remained controversial. TRPV2 has proven difficult to study due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools to modulate channel activity; therefore, most studies of the cellular function of TRPV2 rely on immuno-detection techniques. Polyclonal antibodies against TRPV2 have not been properly validated and characterized, which may contribute to conflicting results regarding its function in the cell. Here, we developed monoclonal antibodies using full-length TRPV2 as an antigen. Extensive characterization of these antibodies and comparison to commonly used commercially available TRPV2 antibodies revealed that while monoclonal antibodies generated in our laboratory were suitable for detection of endogenous TRPV2 by western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, the commercially available polyclonal antibodies we tested were not able to recognize endogenous TRPV2. We used our newly generated and validated TRPV2 antibodies to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on TRPV2 surface expression in heterologous and endogenous expression systems. We found that IGF-1 had little to no effect on trafficking and plasma membrane expression of TRPV2. Overall, these new TRPV2 monoclonal antibodies served to dispel the controversy of the effects of IGF-1 on TRPV2 plasma membrane expression and will clarify the role TRPV2 plays in cellular function. Furthermore, our strategy of using full-length tetrameric TRP channels may allow for the generation of antibodies against other TRP channels of unclear function. PMID:24392006

  16. Recombinant Kv channels at the membrane of Escherichia coli bind specifically agitoxin2.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Oksana V; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Nazarova, Anna I; Feofanov, Alexey V; Korolkova, Yuliya V; Boldyreva, Elena F; Tagvei, Anna I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2009-03-01

    Potassium voltage-gated channels (Kv) are considered as molecular targets in a number of serious neuronal, immune, and cardiac disorders. Search for efficient low-molecular weight modulators of Kv channel function provides a basis for the development of an appropriate therapy for various Kv-mediated diseases. We report here on a new bacterial cell-based system, which is suitable for study of interactions between ligands and ligand-binding sites of eukaryotic Kv1.3 and Kv1.1 channels. To create this system, high-level expression of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1 hybrid proteins (ligand-binding sites of Kv1.3 or Kv1.1 fused with prokaryotic KcsA potassium channel) was achieved in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. An efficient procedure of E. coli conversion to intact spheroplasts was developed. We demonstrate that fluorescently labeled agitoxin 2 binds specifically to high-affinity and lower-affinity sites of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1, respectively, at the membrane of spheroplasts. Number of binding sites per cell is estimated to be (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) and (0.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) for KcsA-Kv1.3- and KcsA-Kv1.1-presenting cells, respectively, that allows reliable detection of ligand-receptor interactions by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This bacterial cell-based system is intended for screening of ligands to membrane-embedded pharmaceutical targets.

  17. Transient receptor potential channels and regulation of lung endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This review highlights our current knowledge regarding expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lung endothelium and evidence for their involvement in regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Six mammalian TRP families have been identified and organized on the basis of sequence homology: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPA (ankyrin). To date, only TRPC1/4, TRPC6, TRPV4, and TRPM2 have been extensively studied in lung endothelium. Calcium influx through each of these channels has been documented to increase lung endothelial permeability, although their channel-gating mechanisms, downstream signaling mechanisms, and impact on endothelial structure and barrier integrity differ. While other members of the TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM families may be expressed in lung endothelium, we have little or no evidence linking these to regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Further, neither the expression nor functional role(s) of any TRPML, TRPP, and TRPA family members has been studied in lung endothelium. In addition to this assessment organized by TRP channel family, we also discuss TRP channels and lung endothelial permeability from the perspective of lung endothelial heterogeneity, using outcomes of studies focused on TRPC1/4 and TRPV4 channels. The diversity within the TRP channel family and the relative paucity of information regarding roles of a number of these channels in lung endothelium make this field ripe for continued investigation. PMID:25006396

  18. Emerging evidence for specific neuronal functions of auxiliary calcium channel α2δ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Obermair, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    In nerve cells the ubiquitous second messenger calcium regulates a variety of vitally important functions including neurotransmitter release, gene regulation, and neuronal plasticity. The entry of calcium into cells is tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, which consist of a heteromultimeric complex of a pore forming α1, and the auxiliary β and α2δ subunits. Four genes (Cacna2d1-4) encode for the extracellular membrane-attached α2δ subunits (α2δ-1 to α2δ-4), out of which three isoforms (α2δ-1 to -3) are strongly expressed in the central nervous system. Over the years a wealth of studies has demonstrated the classical role of α2δ subunits in channel trafficking and calcium current modulation. Recent studies in specialized neuronal cell systems propose roles of α2δ subunits beyond the classical view and implicate α2δ subunits as important regulators of synapse formation. These findings are supported by the identification of novel human disease mutations associated with α2δ subunits and by the fact that α2δ subunits are the target of the anti-epileptic and anti-allodynic drugs gabapentin and pregabalin. Here we review the recently emerging evidence for specific as well as redundant neuronal roles of α2δ subunits and discuss the mechanisms for establishing and maintaining specificity. PMID:25504062

  19. Multiple genes, tissue specificity, and expression-dependent modulationcontribute to the functional diversity of potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Ward, J M; Kelly, W B; Ichida, A M; Gaber, R F; Anderson, J A; Uozumi, N; Schroeder, J I; Crawford, N M

    1995-01-01

    K+ channels play diverse roles in mediating K+ transport and in modulating the membrane potential in higher plant cells during growth and development. Some of the diversity in K+ channel functions may arise from the regulated expression of multiple genes encoding different K+ channel polypeptides. Here we report the isolation of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA (AKT2) that is highly homologous to the two previously identified K+ channel genes, KAT1 and AKT1. This cDNA mapped to the center of chromosome 4 by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and was highly expressed in leaves, whereas AKT1 was mainly expressed in roots. In addition, we show that diversity in K+ channel function may be attributable to differences in expression levels. Increasing KAT1 expression in Xenopus oocytes by polyadenylation of the KAT1 mRNA increased the current amplitude and led to higher levels of KAT1 protein, as assayed in western blots. The increase in KAT1 expression in oocytes produced shifts in the threshold potential for activation to more positive membrane potentials and decreased half-activation times. These results suggest that different levels of expression and tissue-specific expression of different K+ channel isoforms can contribute to the functional diversity of plant K+ channels. The identification of a highly expressed, leaf-specific K+ channel homolog in plants should allow further molecular characterization of K+ channel functions for physiological K+ transport processes in leaves. PMID:8552711

  20. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Kv8.1, a new neuronal potassium channel subunit with specific inhibitory properties towards Shab and Shaw channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hugnot, J P; Salinas, M; Lesage, F; Guillemare, E; de Weille, J; Heurteaux, C; Mattéi, M G; Lazdunski, M

    1996-01-01

    Outward rectifier K+ channels have a characteristic structure with six transmembrane segments and one pore region. A new member of this family of transmembrane proteins has been cloned and called Kv8.1. Kv8.1 is essentially present in the brain where it is located mainly in layers II, IV and VI of the cerebral cortex, in hippocampus, in CA1-CA4 pyramidal cell layer as well in granule cells of the dentate gyrus, in the granule cell layer and in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The Kv8.1 gene is in the 8q22.3-8q24.1 region of the human genome. Although Kv8.1 has the hallmarks of functional subunits of outward rectifier K+ channels, injection of its cRNA in Xenopus oocytes does not produce K+ currents. However Kv8.1 abolishes the functional expression of members of the Kv2 and Kv3 subfamilies, suggesting that the functional role of Kv8.1 might be to inhibit the function of a particular class of outward rectifier K+ channel types. Immunoprecipitation studies have demonstrated that inhibition occurs by formation of heteropolymeric channels, and results obtained with Kv8.1 chimeras have indicated that association of Kv8.1 with other types of subunits is via its N-terminal domain. Images PMID:8670833

  2. TRP channels: sensors and transducers of gasotransmitter signals

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kozai, Daisuke; Mori, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (trp) gene superfamily encodes cation channels that act as multimodal sensors for a wide variety of stimuli from outside and inside the cell. Upon sensing, they transduce electrical and Ca2+ signals via their cation channel activities. These functional features of TRP channels allow the body to react and adapt to different forms of environmental changes. Indeed, members of one class of TRP channels have emerged as sensors of gaseous messenger molecules that control various cellular processes. Nitric oxide (NO), a vasoactive gaseous molecule, regulates TRP channels directly via cysteine (Cys) S-nitrosylation or indirectly via cyclic GMP (cGMP)/protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies have revealed that changes in the availability of molecular oxygen (O2) also control the activation of TRP channels. Anoxia induced by O2-glucose deprivation and severe hypoxia (1% O2) activates TRPM7 and TRPC6, respectively, whereas TRPA1 has recently been identified as a novel sensor of hyperoxia and mild hypoxia (15% O2) in vagal and sensory neurons. TRPA1 also detects other gaseous molecules such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In this review, we focus on how signaling by gaseous molecules is sensed and integrated by TRP channels. PMID:22934072

  3. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed Central

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7542585

  4. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites. PMID:24698275

  5. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites.

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages specific to the channel catfish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primary cause of mortality in channel catfish raised commercially in aquaculture farms. Additional treatment and diagnostic regimes are needed for this enteric pathogen, motivating the discovery and characterization of bacteriophages specific to E. ictaluri. Results The genomes of three Edwardsiella ictaluri-specific bacteriophages isolated from geographically distant aquaculture ponds, at different times, were sequenced and analyzed. The genomes for phages eiAU, eiDWF, and eiMSLS are 42.80 kbp, 42.12 kbp, and 42.69 kbp, respectively, and are greater than 95% identical to each other at the nucleotide level. Nucleotide differences were mostly observed in non-coding regions and in structural proteins, with significant variability in the sequences of putative tail fiber proteins. The genome organization of these phages exhibit a pattern shared by other Siphoviridae. Conclusions These E. ictaluri-specific phage genomes reveal considerable conservation of genomic architecture and sequence identity, even with considerable temporal and spatial divergence in their isolation. Their genomic homogeneity is similarly observed among E. ictaluri bacterial isolates. The genomic analysis of these phages supports the conclusion that these are virulent phages, lacking the capacity for lysogeny or expression of virulence genes. This study contributes to our knowledge of phage genomic diversity and facilitates studies on the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of these phages. PMID:21214923

  7. Understanding transporter specificity and the discrete appearance of channel-like gating domains in transporters

    PubMed Central

    Diallinas, George

    2014-01-01

    Transporters are ubiquitous proteins mediating the translocation of solutes across cell membranes, a biological process involved in nutrition, signaling, neurotransmission, cell communication and drug uptake or efflux. Similarly to enzymes, most transporters have a single substrate binding-site and thus their activity follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Substrate binding elicits a series of structural changes, which produce a transporter conformer open toward the side opposite to the one from where the substrate was originally bound. This mechanism, involving alternate outward- and inward-facing transporter conformers, has gained significant support from structural, genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. Most transporters are specific for a given substrate or a group of substrates with similar chemical structure, but substrate specificity and/or affinity can vary dramatically, even among members of a transporter family that show high overall amino acid sequence and structural similarity. The current view is that transporter substrate affinity or specificity is determined by a small number of interactions a given solute can make within a specific binding site. However, genetic, biochemical and in silico modeling studies with the purine transporter UapA of the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans have challenged this dogma. This review highlights results leading to a novel concept, stating that substrate specificity, but also transport kinetics and transporter turnover, are determined by subtle intramolecular interactions between a major substrate binding site and independent outward- or cytoplasmically-facing gating domains, analogous to those present in channels. This concept is supported by recent structural evidence from several, phylogenetically and functionally distinct transporter families. The significance of this concept is discussed in relationship to the role and potential exploitation of transporters in drug action. PMID:25309439

  8. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Niksch, Paul D; Webber, Roxanna M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction.

  9. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  10. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Niksch, Paul D; Webber, Roxanna M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  11. Cartilage-Specific Knockout of the Mechanosensory Ion Channel TRPV4 Decreases Age-Related Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Conor, Christopher J; Ramalingam, Sendhilnathan; Zelenski, Nicole A; Benefield, Halei C; Rigo, Isaura; Little, Dianne; Wu, Chia-Lung; Chen, Di; Liedtke, Wolfgang; McNulty, Amy L; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative disease of articular cartilage and surrounding tissues, and is associated with both advanced age and joint injury. Biomechanical factors play a critical role in the onset and progression of OA, yet the mechanisms through which physiologic or pathologic mechanical signals are transduced into a cellular response are not well understood. Defining the role of mechanosensory pathways in cartilage during OA pathogenesis may yield novel strategies or targets for the treatment of OA. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) ion channel transduces mechanical loading of articular cartilage via the generation of intracellular calcium ion transients. Using tissue-specific, inducible Trpv4 gene-targeted mice, we demonstrate that loss of TRPV4-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction in adulthood reduces the severity of aging-associated OA. However, loss of chondrocyte TRPV4 did not prevent OA development following destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). These results highlight potentially distinct roles of TRPV4-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction in age-related and post-traumatic OA, and point to a novel disease-modifying strategy to therapeutically target the TRPV4-mediated mechanotransduction pathway for the treatment of aging-associated OA. PMID:27388701

  12. Cartilage-Specific Knockout of the Mechanosensory Ion Channel TRPV4 Decreases Age-Related Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    O’Conor, Christopher J.; Ramalingam, Sendhilnathan; Zelenski, Nicole A.; Benefield, Halei C.; Rigo, Isaura; Little, Dianne; Wu, Chia-Lung; Chen, Di; Liedtke, Wolfgang; McNulty, Amy L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative disease of articular cartilage and surrounding tissues, and is associated with both advanced age and joint injury. Biomechanical factors play a critical role in the onset and progression of OA, yet the mechanisms through which physiologic or pathologic mechanical signals are transduced into a cellular response are not well understood. Defining the role of mechanosensory pathways in cartilage during OA pathogenesis may yield novel strategies or targets for the treatment of OA. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) ion channel transduces mechanical loading of articular cartilage via the generation of intracellular calcium ion transients. Using tissue-specific, inducible Trpv4 gene-targeted mice, we demonstrate that loss of TRPV4-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction in adulthood reduces the severity of aging-associated OA. However, loss of chondrocyte TRPV4 did not prevent OA development following destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). These results highlight potentially distinct roles of TRPV4-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction in age-related and post-traumatic OA, and point to a novel disease-modifying strategy to therapeutically target the TRPV4-mediated mechanotransduction pathway for the treatment of aging-associated OA. PMID:27388701

  13. Quaternary ammonium compounds as water channel blockers. Specificity, potency, and site of action.

    PubMed

    Detmers, Frank J M; de Groot, Bert L; Müller, E Matthias; Hinton, Andrew; Konings, Irene B M; Sze, Mozes; Flitsch, Sabine L; Grubmüller, Helmut; Deen, Peter M T

    2006-05-19

    Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can be life-threatening and reversible AQP inhibitors are needed. Here, we determined the specificity, potency, and binding site of tetraethylammonium (TEA) to block Aquaporin water permeability. Using oocytes, externally applied TEA blocked AQP1/AQP2/AQP4 with IC50 values of 1.4, 6.2, and 9.8 microM, respectively. Related tetraammonium compounds yielded some (propyl) or no (methyl, butyl, or pentyl) inhibition. TEA inhibition was lost upon a Tyr to Phe amino acid switch in the external water pore of AQP1/AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding Tyr, was not blocked by TEA. Consistent with experimental data, multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations showed one stable binding site for TEA, but not tetramethyl (TMA), in AQP1, resulting in a nearly 50% water permeability inhibition, which was reduced in AQP1-Y186F due to effects on the TEA inhibitory binding region. Moreover, in the simulation TEA interacted with charged residues in the C (Asp128) and E (Asp185) loop, and the A(Tyr37-Asn42-Thr44) loop of the neighboring monomer, but not directly with Tyr186. The loss of TEA inhibition in oocytes expressing properly folded AQP1-N42A or -T44A is in line with the computationally predicted binding mode. Our data reveal that the molecular interaction of TEA with AQP1 differs and is about 1000-fold more effective on AQPs than on potassium channels. Moreover, the observed experimental and simulated similarities open the way for rational design and virtual screening for AQP-specific inhibitors, with quaternary ammonium compounds in general, and TEA in particular as a lead compound. PMID:16551622

  14. Purkinje cell-specific ablation of Cav2.1 channels is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Boyan; Kros, Lieke; Shyti, Reinald; Plak, Petra; Haasdijk, Elize D; Raike, Robert S; Frants, Rune R; Hess, Ellen J; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2012-03-01

    The Cacna1a gene encodes the α(1A) subunit of voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels that are involved in neurotransmission at central synapses. Ca(V)2.1-α(1)-knockout (α1KO) mice, which lack Ca(V)2.1 channels in all neurons, have a very severe phenotype of cerebellar ataxia and dystonia, and usually die around postnatal day 20. This early lethality, combined with the wide expression of Ca(V)2.1 channels throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei, prohibited determination of the contribution of particular cerebellar cell types to the development of the severe neurobiological phenotype in Cacna1a mutant mice. Here, we crossed conditional Cacna1a mice with transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase, driven by the Purkinje cell-specific Pcp2 promoter, to specifically ablate the Ca(V)2.1-α(1A) subunit and thereby Ca(V)2.1 channels in Purkinje cells. Purkinje cell Ca(V)2.1-α(1A)-knockout (PCα1KO) mice aged without difficulties, rescuing the lethal phenotype seen in α1KO mice. PCα1KO mice exhibited cerebellar ataxia starting around P12, much earlier than the first signs of progressive Purkinje cell loss, which appears in these mice between P30 and P45. Secondary cell loss was observed in the granular and molecular layers of the cerebellum and the volume of all individual cerebellar nuclei was reduced. In this mouse model with a cell type-specific ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels, we show that ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels restricted to Purkinje cells is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia. We demonstrate that spatial ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels may help in unraveling mechanisms of human disease.

  15. Sequence and structure-specific elements of HERG mRNA determine channel synthesis and trafficking efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sroubek, Jakub; Krishnan, Yamini; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-á-gogo-related gene (HERG) encodes a potassium channel that is highly susceptible to deleterious mutations resulting in susceptibility to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Most mutations adversely affect HERG channel assembly and trafficking. Why the channel is so vulnerable to missense mutations is not well understood. Since nothing is known of how mRNA structural elements factor in channel processing, we synthesized a codon-modified HERG cDNA (HERG-CM) where the codons were synonymously changed to reduce GC content, secondary structure, and rare codon usage. HERG-CM produced typical IKr-like currents; however, channel synthesis and processing were markedly different. Translation efficiency was reduced for HERG-CM, as determined by heterologous expression, in vitro translation, and polysomal profiling. Trafficking efficiency to the cell surface was greatly enhanced, as assayed by immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation, and surface labeling. Chimeras of HERG-NT/CM indicated that trafficking efficiency was largely dependent on 5′ sequences, while translation efficiency involved multiple areas. These results suggest that HERG translation and trafficking rates are independently governed by noncoding information in various regions of the mRNA molecule. Noncoding information embedded within the mRNA may play a role in the pathogenesis of hereditary arrhythmia syndromes and could provide an avenue for targeted therapeutics.—Sroubek, J., Krishnan, Y., McDonald, T V. Sequence- and structure-specific elements of HERG mRNA determine channel synthesis and trafficking efficiency. PMID:23608144

  16. G-protein beta-subunit specificity in the fast membrane-delimited inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    García, D E; Li, B; García-Ferreiro, R E; Hernández-Ochoa, E O; Yan, K; Gautam, N; Catterall, W A; Mackie, K; Hille, B

    1998-11-15

    We investigated which subtypes of G-protein beta subunits participate in voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. Calcium currents were recorded from cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons injected intranuclearly with DNA encoding five different G-protein beta subunits. Gbeta1 and Gbeta2 strongly mimicked the fast voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium channels produced by many G-protein-coupled receptors. The Gbeta5 subunit produced much weaker effects than Gbeta1 and Gbeta2, whereas Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 were nearly inactive in these electrophysiological studies. The specificity implied by these results was confirmed and extended using the yeast two-hybrid system to test for protein-protein interactions. Here, Gbeta1 or Gbeta2 coupled to the GAL4-activation domain interacted strongly with a channel sequence corresponding to the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II of a alpha1 subunit of the class B calcium channel fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. In this assay, the Gbeta5 subunit interacted weakly, and Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 failed to interact. Together, these results suggest that Gbeta1 and/or Gbeta2 subunits account for most of the voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels and that the linker between domains I and II of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit is a principal receptor for this inhibition. PMID:9801356

  17. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV channels function in a modality-specific pathway to regulate response to aberrant sensory signaling.

    PubMed

    Ezak, Meredith J; Hong, Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ferkey, Denise M

    2010-05-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  20. A family of fluoride-specific ion channels with dual-topology architecture

    PubMed Central

    Stockbridge, Randy B; Robertson, Janice L; Kolmakova-Partensky, Ludmila; Miller, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride ion, ubiquitous in soil, water, and marine environments, is a chronic threat to microorganisms. Many prokaryotes, archea, unicellular eukaryotes, and plants use a recently discovered family of F− exporter proteins to lower cytoplasmic F− levels to counteract the anion’s toxicity. We show here that these ‘Fluc’ proteins, purified and reconstituted in liposomes and planar phospholipid bilayers, form constitutively open anion channels with extreme selectivity for F− over Cl−. The active channel is a dimer of identical or homologous subunits arranged in antiparallel transmembrane orientation. This dual-topology assembly has not previously been seen in ion channels but is known in multidrug transporters of the SMR family, and is suggestive of an evolutionary antecedent of the inverted repeats found within the subunits of many membrane transport proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01084.001 PMID:23991286

  1. Mitragynine and its potential blocking effects on specific cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tay, Yea Lu; Teah, Yi Fan; Chong, Yoong Min; Jamil, Mohd Fadzly Amar; Kollert, Sina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Wahab, Habibah Abdul; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Tan, Mei Lan

    2016-08-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth is known for its euphoric properties and is frequently used for recreational purposes. Several poisoning and fatal cases involving mitragynine have been reported but the underlying causes remain unclear. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) encodes the cardiac IKr current which is a determinant of the duration of ventricular action potentials and QT interval. On the other hand, IK1, a Kir current mediated by Kir2.1 channel and IKACh, a receptor-activated Kir current mediated by GIRK channel are also known to be important in maintaining the cardiac function. This study investigated the effects of mitragynine on the current, mRNA and protein expression of hERG channel in hERG-transfected HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. The effects on Kir2.1 and GIRK channels currents were also determined in the oocytes. The hERG tail currents following depolarization pulses were inhibited by mitragynine with an IC50 value of 1.62μM and 1.15μM in the transfected cell line and Xenopus oocytes, respectively. The S6 point mutations of Y652A and F656A attenuated the inhibitor effects of mitragynine, indicating that mitragynine interacts with these high affinity drug-binding sites in the hERG channel pore cavity which was consistent with the molecular docking simulation. Interestingly, mitragynine does not affect the hERG expression at the transcriptional level but inhibits the protein expression. Mitragynine is also found to inhibit IKACh current with an IC50 value of 3.32μM but has no significant effects on IK1. Blocking of both hERG and GIRK channels may cause additive cardiotoxicity risks. PMID:27260674

  2. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Joseph D; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V; Belousov, Andrei B

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  3. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V.; Belousov, Andrei B.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  4. Diffusion of nitric oxide across cell membranes of the vascular wall requires specific connexin-based channels.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Xavier F; Lillo, Mauricio A; Gaete, Pablo S; Riquelme, Manuel A; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    NO is generated within cells and frequently must be transferred to responsive neighboring cells, as occurs in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of smooth muscle cells observed in blood vessels. It is thought that NO diffuses freely across cell membranes, but it may also permeate through low resistant membrane pathways. Here, we describe the participation of connexin (Cx)-formed channels in the NO transport across cell membranes and between endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We used a water-soluble NO donor of high molecular weight (S-nitrosylated albumin, BSA-NO) that does not permeate through cell membranes or Cx-based channels and the NO-sensitive dye 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to detect changes of intracellular NO concentration. We found that NO generated in the extracellular space was not detected intracellularly in Cx-deficient HeLa cells, suggesting that cell membrane represents a significant diffusion barrier for NO transfer. However, Cx-based channels provide efficient pathways for NO signaling because NO opened and permeated hemichannels expressed in HeLa cells transfected with Cx43, Cx40, or Cx37. In contrast, NO closed hemichannels of HeLa-Cx32 cells, which otherwise are permeable to NO if are opened by a divalent cation-free extracellular solution. Consistent with this, blockade of Cx-based channels abolished the myoendothelial NO transfer and associated NO-dependent vasodilation induced by acethylcholine. These results indicate that Cx-based channels play a key role in the NO-dependent tonic control of vascular function and may direct the NO signal to specific targets, which provides a novel mechanistic basis for the critical role of Cxs in cell-cell communication in the vessel wall. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'.

  5. Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels: Heterogeneous affinity in rat brain structures and cognitive modulation by specific blockers.

    PubMed

    Mpari, Bedel; Sreng, Leam; Regaya, Imed; Mourre, Christiane

    2008-07-28

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)2) generating the medium afterhyperpolarization seen after an action potential modulate the neuronal integration signal. The effects of two K(Ca)2 channel blockers, apamin, specific to K(Ca)2.2 and K(Ca)2.3 channels, and lei-Dab7, which binds to K(Ca)2.2 channels only, were compared to evaluate the involvement of K(Ca)2 channel subunits in behavior, spatial learning and memory in rats. Intracerebroventricular (9-5 ng) injections of lei-dab7 decreased locomotor activity, food intake and body weight in rats deprived of food. A dose of 3 ng lei-Dab7 had no effect on these types of behavior. We therefore used this dose for attention and memory tasks. No modification to attention or memory was observed in a spatial radial-arm maze task with rats given 3 ng lei-Dab7, whereas apamin (0.3 ng) improved reference memory and accelerated changes of strategy from egocentric to allocentric. These findings suggest that K(Ca)2.3 blockade improves memory in rats. Lei-Dab7 entirely outcompeted the binding of iodinated apamin to 64 brain structures (mean IC(50): 34.5 nM), although IC(50) values were highly variable. By contrast, overall IC(50) values for apamin were close to mean values (11.3 pM). The very low affinity of the hippocampus and neocortex for lei-Dab7 may account for the absence of a behavioral effect of this compound. The variability of IC(50) values suggests that K(Ca)2 channel composition varies considerably as a function of the brain structure considered. PMID:18561910

  6. Variants in Ion Channel Genes Link Phenotypic Features of Bipolar Illness to Specific Neurobiological Process Domains

    PubMed Central

    Balaraman, Yokesh; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Nurnberger, John I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome-wide association studies are pointing towards a major role for voltage-gated ion channels in neuropsychiatric disorders and, in particular, bipolar disorder (BD). The phenotype of BD is complex, with symptoms during mood episodes and deficits persisting between episodes. We have tried to elucidate the common neurobiological mechanisms associated with ion channel signaling in order to provide a new perspective on the clinical symptoms and possible endophenotypes seen in BD patients. We propose a model in which the multiple variants in genes coding for ion channel proteins would perturb motivational circuits, synaptic plasticity, myelination, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, circadian neuronal rhythms, and energy regulation. These changes in neurobiological mechanisms would manifest in endophenotypes of aberrant reward processing, white matter hyperintensities, deficits in executive function, altered frontolimbic connectivity, increased amygdala activity, increased melatonin suppression, decreased REM latency, and aberrant myo-inositol/ATP shuttling. The endophenotypes result in behaviors of poor impulse control, motivational changes, cognitive deficits, abnormal stress response, sleep disturbances, and energy changes involving different neurobiological process domains. The hypothesis is that these disturbances start with altered neural circuitry during development, following which multiple environmental triggers may disrupt the neuronal excitability balance through an activity-dependent molecular process, resulting in clinical mood episodes.

  7. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels.

    PubMed

    Rahim, H A; Abdulmalek, M; Soh, P J; Rani, K A; Hisham, N; Vandenbosch, G A E

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  8. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade.

  9. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels.

    PubMed

    Rahim, H A; Abdulmalek, M; Soh, P J; Rani, K A; Hisham, N; Vandenbosch, G A E

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade.

  10. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  11. Single Expressed Glycine Receptor Domains Reconstitute Functional Ion Channels without Subunit-specific Desensitization Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Meiselbach, Heike; Vogel, Nico; Langlhofer, Georg; Stangl, Sabine; Schleyer, Barbara; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg; Becker, Cord-Michael; Villmann, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Cys loop receptors are pentameric arrangements of independent subunits that assemble into functional ion channels. Each subunit shows a domain architecture. Functional ion channels can be reconstituted even from independent, nonfunctional subunit domains, as shown previously for GlyRα1 receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this reconstitution is not restricted to α1 but can be transferred to other members of the Cys loop receptor family. A nonfunctional GlyR subunit, truncated at the intracellular TM3–4 loop by a premature stop codon, can be complemented by co-expression of the missing tail portion of the receptor. Compared with α1 subunits, rescue by domain complementation was less efficient when GlyRα3 or the GABAA/C subunit ρ1 was used. If truncation disrupted an alternative splicing cassette within the intracellular TM3–4 loop of α3 subunits, which also regulates receptor desensitization, functional rescue was not possible. When α3 receptors were restored by complementation using domains with and without the spliced insert, no difference in desensitization was found. In contrast, desensitization properties could even be transferred between α1/α3 receptor chimeras harboring or lacking the α3 splice cassette proving that functional rescue depends on the integrity of the alternative splicing cassette in α3. Thus, an intact α3 splicing cassette in the TM3–4 loop environment is indispensable for functional rescue, and the quality of receptor restoration can be assessed from desensitization properties. PMID:25143388

  12. In Silico Structure and Sequence Analysis of Bacterial Porins and Specific Diffusion Channels for Hydrophilic Molecules: Conservation, Multimericity and Multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Vollan, Hilde S.; Tannæs, Tone; Vriend, Gert; Bukholm, Geir

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion channels are involved in the selective uptake of nutrients and form the largest outer membrane protein (OMP) family in Gram-negative bacteria. Differences in pore size and amino acid composition contribute to the specificity. Structure-based multiple sequence alignments shed light on the structure-function relations for all eight subclasses. Entropy-variability analysis results are correlated to known structural and functional aspects, such as structural integrity, multimericity, specificity and biological niche adaptation. The high mutation rate in their surface-exposed loops is likely an important mechanism for host immune system evasion. Multiple sequence alignments for each subclass revealed conserved residue positions that are involved in substrate recognition and specificity. An analysis of monomeric protein channels revealed particular sequence patterns of amino acids that were observed in other classes at multimeric interfaces. This adds to the emerging evidence that all members of the family exist in a multimeric state. Our findings are important for understanding the role of members of this family in a wide range of bacterial processes, including bacterial food uptake, survival and adaptation mechanisms. PMID:27110766

  13. Numerical characterization and modeling of subject-specific ultrawideband body-centric radio channels and systems for healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Qammer Hussain; Sani, Andrea; Alomainy, Akram; Hao, Yang

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents a subject-specific radio propagation study and system modeling in wireless body area networks using a simulation tool based on the parallel finite-difference time-domain technique. This technique is well suited to model the radio propagation around complex, inhomogeneous objects such as the human body. The impact of different digital phantoms in on-body radio channel and system performance was studied. Simulations were performed at the frequency of 3-10 GHz considering a typical hospital environment, and were validated by on-site measurements with reasonably good agreement. The analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of the on-body radio channel and system performance are subject-specific and are associated with human genders, height, and body mass index. Maximum variations of almost 18.51% are observed in path loss exponent due to change of subject, which gives variations of above 50% in system bit error rate performance. Therefore, careful consideration of subject-specific parameters are necessary for achieving energy efficient and reliable radio links and system performance for body-centric wireless network.

  14. Purification of charybdotoxine, a specific inhibitor of the high-conductance Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Phillips, M.; Miller, C.

    1986-11-05

    Charybdotoxim is a high-affinity specific inhibitor of the high-conductance Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channel found in the plasma membranes of many vertebrate cell types. Using Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channels reconstituted into planar lipid bilayer membranes as an assay, the authors have purified the toxin from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus by a two-step procedure involving chromatofocusing on SP-Sephadex, followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Charybdotoxin is shown to be a highly basic protein with a mass of 10 kDa. Under the standard assay conditions, the purified toxin inhibits the Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/ channel with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.5 nM. The protein is unusually stable, with inhibitory potency being insensitive to boiling or exposure to organic solvents. The toxin's activity is sensitive to chymotrypsin treatment and to acylation of lysine groups. The protein may be radioiodinated without loss of activity.

  15. Characterization of the omega-conotoxin target. Evidence for tissue-specific heterogeneity in calcium channel types

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, L.J.; Johnson, D.S.; Olivera, B.M.

    1987-02-10

    Omega-Conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx-VIA) is a 27 amino acid peptide from the venom of the fish-hunting snail, Conus geographus, that blocks voltage-activated Ca channels. The characterization of a biologically active, homogeneous /sup 125/I-labeled monoiodinated Tyr/sup 22/ derivative of omega-conotoxin GVIA and its use in binding and cross-linking studies are described. The /sup 125/I-labeled toxin is specifically cross-linked to a receptor protein with an apparent M/sub r/ of 135,000. The stoichiometry between omega-conotoxin and nitrendipine binding sites in different chick tissues was determined. Skeletal muscle has a high concentration of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding sites but no detectable omega-conotoxin sites. Brain microsomes have both binding sites, but omega-conotoxin targets are in excess. These results, combined with recent electrophysiological studies define four types of Ca channels in chick tissues, N, T, L/sub n/ (omega sensitive), and L/sub m/ (omega insensitive), and are consistent with the hypothesis that the ..cap alpha..-subunits of certain neuronal Ca/sup 2 +/ channels (L/sub n/, N) are the molecular targets of omega-conotoxin GVIA.

  16. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Anne-Cécile; Saubaméa, Bruno; Cisternino, Salvatore; Mignon, Virginie; Mazeraud, Aurélien; Jourdren, Laurent; Blugeon, Corinne; Cohen-Salmon, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction proteins Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30) allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ; Δ means deleted allele) we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB) organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (γ-SG), a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC) molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-SG, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions. PMID:25698924

  17. A 10-Gbps × 12-Channel Pluggable Parallel Optical Transceiver Based on CXP Interface Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Li, Zhihua; Li, Baoxia; Gao, Wei; Liu, Fengman; Song, Jian; Wan, Lixi

    2012-06-01

    A novel 10-Gbps × 12-channel pluggable parallel optical transceiver is designed and fabricated. Compared with other optical transceivers, this transceiver emphasizes small size, high-density, low power consumption, and high transmission speed. Most importantly, its optical coupling structure is simplified to promote cost-effective large-scale production. This transceiver is electrically pluggable and consists of transmitter and receiver modules linked by parallel multi-mode fibers. Each module consists of a six-layered high-speed, high-density printed circuit board, the size of which is 30 mm × 18 mm × 1 mm, packaged with optoelectronic devices and corresponding control chips. The printed circuit boards not only provide a high-speed electrical connection between the I/O interfaces and high-speed chips, but they also supply power and ground planes to those chips. End-to-end error-free transmission at 10.3125 Gbps was obtained for a 231 - 1 non-return-to-zero pseudo-random bit sequence.

  18. KCNE1 induces fenestration in the Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complex that allows for highly specific pharmacological targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Eva; Rothenberg, Ina; Krisp, Christoph; Hundt, Franziska; Fraenzel, Benjamin; Eckey, Karina; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Pott, Lutz; Pusch, Michael; Yang, Tao; Roden, Dan M.; Kurata, Harley T.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Wolters, Dirk; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2016-01-01

    Most small-molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated ion channels display poor subtype specificity because they bind to highly conserved residues located in the channel's central cavity. Using a combined approach of scanning mutagenesis, electrophysiology, chemical ligand modification, chemical cross-linking, MS/MS-analyses and molecular modelling, we provide evidence for the binding site for adamantane derivatives and their putative access pathway in Kv7.1/KCNE1 channels. The adamantane compounds, exemplified by JNJ303, are highly potent gating modifiers that bind to fenestrations that become available when KCNE1 accessory subunits are bound to Kv7.1 channels. This mode of regulation by auxiliary subunits may facilitate the future development of potent and highly subtype-specific Kv channel inhibitors. PMID:27731317

  19. KCNE1 induces fenestration in the Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complex that allows for highly specific pharmacological targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Eva; Rothenberg, Ina; Krisp, Christoph; Hundt, Franziska; Fraenzel, Benjamin; Eckey, Karina; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Pott, Lutz; Pusch, Michael; Yang, Tao; Roden, Dan M.; Kurata, Harley T.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Wolters, Dirk; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2016-10-01

    Most small-molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated ion channels display poor subtype specificity because they bind to highly conserved residues located in the channel's central cavity. Using a combined approach of scanning mutagenesis, electrophysiology, chemical ligand modification, chemical cross-linking, MS/MS-analyses and molecular modelling, we provide evidence for the binding site for adamantane derivatives and their putative access pathway in Kv7.1/KCNE1 channels. The adamantane compounds, exemplified by JNJ303, are highly potent gating modifiers that bind to fenestrations that become available when KCNE1 accessory subunits are bound to Kv7.1 channels. This mode of regulation by auxiliary subunits may facilitate the future development of potent and highly subtype-specific Kv channel inhibitors.

  20. The tobacco-specific carcinogen-operated calcium channel promotes lung tumorigenesis via IGF2 exocytosis in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Hye-Jin; Min, Hye-Young; Jang, Hyun-Ji; Yun, Hye Jeong; Smith, John Kendal; Jin, Quanri; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Liu, Diane; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Behrens, Carmen; Lee, J. Jack; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Lee, Euni; Hong, Waun Ki; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) binding to the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces Ca2+ signalling, a mechanism that is implicated in various human cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of NNK-mediated Ca2+ signalling in lung cancer formation. We show significant overexpression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in association with IGF-1R activation in human preneoplastic lung lesions in smokers. NNK induces voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-intervened calcium influx in airway epithelial cells, resulting in a rapid IGF2 secretion via the regulated pathway and thus IGF-1R activation. Silencing nAChR, α1 subunit of L-type VDCC, or various vesicular trafficking curators, including synaptotagmins and Rabs, or blockade of nAChR/VDCC-mediated Ca2+ influx significantly suppresses NNK-induced IGF2 exocytosis, transformation and tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Publicly available database reveals inverse correlation between use of calcium channel blockers and lung cancer diagnosis. Our data indicate that NNK disrupts the regulated pathway of IGF2 exocytosis and promotes lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27666821

  1. The Two-pore channel (TPC) interactome unmasks isoform-specific roles for TPCs in endolysosomal morphology and cell pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Keebler, Michael V; Hooper, Robert; Boulware, Michael J; Liu, Xiaolong; Churamani, Dev; Abood, Mary E; Walseth, Timothy F; Brailoiu, Eugen; Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2014-09-01

    The two-pore channels (TPC1 and TPC2) belong to an ancient family of intracellular ion channels expressed in the endolysosomal system. Little is known about how regulatory inputs converge to modulate TPC activity, and proposed activation mechanisms are controversial. Here, we compiled a proteomic characterization of the human TPC interactome, which revealed that TPCs complex with many proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis, trafficking, and membrane organization. Among these interactors, TPCs were resolved to scaffold Rab GTPases and regulate endomembrane dynamics in an isoform-specific manner. TPC2, but not TPC1, caused a proliferation of endolysosomal structures, dysregulating intracellular trafficking, and cellular pigmentation. These outcomes required both TPC2 and Rab activity, as well as their interactivity, because TPC2 mutants that were inactive, or rerouted away from their endogenous expression locale, or deficient in Rab binding, failed to replicate these outcomes. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-evoked Ca(2+) release was also impaired using either a Rab binding-defective TPC2 mutant or a Rab inhibitor. These data suggest a fundamental role for the ancient TPC complex in trafficking that holds relevance for lysosomal proliferative scenarios observed in disease.

  2. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. Methods We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Results Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT–PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1–2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6–7, TRPP1–2, and Piezo1–2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1–2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Conclusions Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury. PMID:26236150

  3. How much donor financing for health is channelled to global versus country-specific aid functions?

    PubMed

    Schäferhoff, Marco; Fewer, Sara; Kraus, Jessica; Richter, Emil; Summers, Lawrence H; Sundewall, Jesper; Yamey, Gavin; Jamison, Dean T

    2015-12-12

    The slow global response to the Ebola crisis in west Africa suggests that important gaps exist in donor financing for key global functions, such as support for health research and development for diseases of poverty and strengthening of outbreak preparedness. In this Health Policy, we use the International Development Statistics databases to quantify donor support for such functions. We classify donor funding for health into aid for global functions (provision of global public goods, management of cross-border externalities, and fostering of leadership and stewardship) versus country-specific aid. We use a new measure of donor funding that combines official development assistance (ODA) for health with additional donor spending on research and development (R&D) for diseases of poverty. Much R&D spending falls outside ODA--ie, the assistance that is conventionally reported through ODA databases of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. This expanded definition, which we term health ODA plus, provides a more comprehensive picture of donor support for health that could reshape how policy makers will approach their support for global health.

  4. How much donor financing for health is channelled to global versus country-specific aid functions?

    PubMed

    Schäferhoff, Marco; Fewer, Sara; Kraus, Jessica; Richter, Emil; Summers, Lawrence H; Sundewall, Jesper; Yamey, Gavin; Jamison, Dean T

    2015-12-12

    The slow global response to the Ebola crisis in west Africa suggests that important gaps exist in donor financing for key global functions, such as support for health research and development for diseases of poverty and strengthening of outbreak preparedness. In this Health Policy, we use the International Development Statistics databases to quantify donor support for such functions. We classify donor funding for health into aid for global functions (provision of global public goods, management of cross-border externalities, and fostering of leadership and stewardship) versus country-specific aid. We use a new measure of donor funding that combines official development assistance (ODA) for health with additional donor spending on research and development (R&D) for diseases of poverty. Much R&D spending falls outside ODA--ie, the assistance that is conventionally reported through ODA databases of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. This expanded definition, which we term health ODA plus, provides a more comprehensive picture of donor support for health that could reshape how policy makers will approach their support for global health. PMID:26178405

  5. Distinct Cell- and Layer-Specific Expression Patterns and Independent Regulation of Kv2 Channel Subtypes in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Hannah I.; Guan, Dongxu; Bocksteins, Elke; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Murray, Karl D.; Cobb, Melanie M.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Zito, Karen; Foehring, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kv2 family of voltage-gated potassium channel α subunits, comprising Kv2.1 and Kv2.2, mediate the bulk of the neuronal delayed rectifier K+ current in many mammalian central neurons. Kv2.1 exhibits robust expression across many neuron types and is unique in its conditional role in modulating intrinsic excitability through changes in its phosphorylation state, which affect Kv2.1 expression, localization, and function. Much less is known of the highly related Kv2.2 subunit, especially in forebrain neurons. Here, through combined use of cortical layer markers and transgenic mouse lines, we show that Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 are localized to functionally distinct cortical cell types. Kv2.1 expression is consistently high throughout all cortical layers, especially in layer (L) 5b pyramidal neurons, whereas Kv2.2 expression is primarily limited to neurons in L2 and L5a. In addition, L4 of primary somatosensory cortex is strikingly devoid of Kv2.2 immunolabeling. The restricted pattern of Kv2.2 expression persists in Kv2.1-KO mice, suggesting distinct cell- and layer-specific functions for these two highly related Kv2 subunits. Analyses of endogenous Kv2.2 in cortical neurons in situ and recombinant Kv2.2 expressed in heterologous cells reveal that Kv2.2 is largely refractory to stimuli that trigger robust, phosphorylation-dependent changes in Kv2.1 clustering and function. Immunocytochemistry and voltage-clamp recordings from outside-out macropatches reveal distinct cellular expression patterns for Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 in intratelencephalic and pyramidal tract neurons of L5, indicating circuit-specific requirements for these Kv2 paralogs. Together, these results support distinct roles for these two Kv2 channel family members in mammalian cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons within the neocortex are arranged in a laminar architecture and contribute to the input, processing, and/or output of sensory and motor signals in a cell- and layer-specific manner. Neurons of different

  6. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS. PMID:23139220

  7. Gene expressions of TRP channels in glioblastoma multiforme and relation with survival.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, M; Eroglu, S; Tutar, E; Sencan, S; Geyik, M A; Ulasli, M; Demiryurek, A T; Camci, C

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer in humans, with a median survival of 10 to 12 months. Glioblastoma is highly malignant since the cells are supported by a great number of blood vessels. Although new treatments have been developed by increasing knowledge of molecular nature of the disease, surgical operation remains the standard of care. The TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily consists of cation-selective channels that have roles in sensory physiology such as thermo- and osmosensation and in several complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and neuronal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of TRP channel genes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme and to evaluate the relationship between TRP gene expressions and survival of the patients. Thirty-three patients diagnosed with glioblastoma were enrolled to the study. The expression levels of 21 TRP genes were quantified by using qRT-PCR with dynamic array 48 × 48 chip (BioMark HD System, Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). TRPC1, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, and TRPV2 were found significantly higher in glioblastoma patients. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the overexpression of TRP genes and the survival of the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. PMID:26088448

  8. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of Shaker potassium channel transcripts results from distinct modes of regulating 3' splice choice.

    PubMed

    Iverson, L E; Mottes, J R; Yeager, S A; Germeraad, S E

    1997-05-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNA enables a single gene to encode multiple protein isoforms with different functional characteristics and tissue distributions. Differential splicing of Drosophila Shaker (Sh) gene transcripts regulates the tissue-specific expression of kinetically distinct potassium ion channels throughout development. Regulation of Sh alternative splicing is being examined in germline transformants using lacZ as a reporter gene. P-element constructs were generated in which one or both of the two mutually exclusive Sh 3' acceptor sites were positioned in the same translational reading frame as the lacZ coding sequences. The constructs were introduced into the germline and the transgenic animals examined for tissue-specific beta-galactosidase expression patterns. Some tissues exhibit "promiscuous" splicing; these tissues are competent to splice to either 3' acceptor even when both are present on the same pre-mRNA. In other tissues splice choice results from competition between the two 3' sites; these tissues can splice to either site when it is the only available 3' acceptor, but when given a choice will splice to only one of the two 3' acceptors. In some tissues, splicing occurs exclusively at only one of the 3' acceptor sites; these tissues are not competent to splice to one of the sites even if it is the only 3' acceptor present on the pre-mRNA. These results suggests that multiple, distinct regulatory modes are operating to control tissue-specific alternative splicing of Sh 3' domains and are discussed in terms of potential underlying mechanisms for regulating the tissue-specific expression of alternatively spliced genes.

  9. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Expression of UCP2b mRNA tended to be lower (P < 0.10) in fast growing fish in the middle of the study although levels were similar at the beginning and the end of the study. In the fed vs fasted study, expression of UCP2b mRNA in muscle was increased (P < 0.05) in fish assigned to 30 d of fasting. Our results suggest that, based on the nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities and tissue mRNA distribution, catfish UCP2b may be the analog to UCP3. Moreover, our results suggest selection toward growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms.

  10. Movements of Individual BKCa Channels in Live Cell Membrane Monitored by Site-Specific Labeling Using Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sehoon; Kim, Hae-Deun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Chul-Seung

    2010-01-01

    The movements of BKCa channels were investigated in live cells using quantum dots (QDs). The extracellular N-terminus was metabolically tagged with biotin, labeled with streptavidin-conjugated QDs and then monitored using real-time time-lapse imaging in COS-7 cells and cultured neurons. By tracking hundreds of channels, we were able to determine the characteristics of channel movements quantitatively. Channels in COS-7 cells exhibited a confined diffusion in an area of 1.915 μm2, with an initial diffusion coefficient of 0.033 μm2/s. In neurons, the channel movements were more heterogeneous and highly dependent on subcellular location. While the channels in soma diffused slowly without clear confinement, axodendritic channels showed more rapid and pseudo-one-dimensional movements. Intriguingly, the channel movement in somata was drastically increased by the neuronal β4 subunit, in contrast to the channels in the axodendritic area where the mobility were significantly decreased. Thus, our results demonstrate that the membrane mobility of BKCa channels can be greatly influenced by the expression system used, subunit composition, and subcellular location. This QD-based, single-molecule tracking technique can be utilized to investigate the cellular mechanisms that determine the mobility as well as the localization of various membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:21044582

  11. The interfacial lipid binding site on the potassium channel KcsA is specific for anionic phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Marius, Phedra; Alvis, Simon J; East, J Malcolm; Lee, Anthony G

    2005-12-01

    Lipid binding to the potassium channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans has been studied using quenching of the fluorescence of Trp residues by brominated phospholipids. It is shown that binding of phospholipids to nonannular lipid binding sites on KcsA, located one each at the four protein-protein interfaces in the tetrameric structure, is specific for anionic phospholipids, zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine being unable to bind at the sites. The binding constant for phosphatidylglycerol of 3.0 +/- 0.7 mol fraction(-1) means that in a membrane containing approximately 20 mol% phosphatidylglycerol, as in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, the nonannular sites will be approximately 37% occupied by phosphatidylglycerol. The binding constant for phosphatidic acid is similar to that for phosphatidylglycerol but binding constants for phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin are about double those for phosphatidylglycerol. Binding to annular sites around the circumference of the KcsA tetramer are different on the extracellular and intracellular faces of the membrane. On the extracellular face of the membrane the binding constants for anionic lipids are similar to those for phosphatidylcholine, the lack of specificity being consistent with the lack of any marked clusters of charged residues on KcsA close to the membrane on the extracellular side. In contrast, binding to annular sites on the intracellular side of the membrane shows a distinct structural specificity, with binding of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylglycerol being stronger than binding of phosphatidylcholine, whereas binding constants for phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin are similar to that for phosphatidylcholine. It is suggested that this pattern of binding follows from the pattern of charge distribution on KcsA on the intracellular side of the membrane. PMID:16199503

  12. The min K channel underlies the cardiac potassium current IKs and mediates species-specific responses to protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, M D; Busch, A E; Bond, C T; Maylie, J; Adelman, J P

    1993-01-01

    A clone encoding the guinea pig (gp) min K potassium channel was isolated and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The currents, gpIsK, exhibit many of the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties characteristic of gpIKs, the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Depolarizing commands evoke outward potassium currents that activate slowly, with time constants on the order of seconds. The currents are blocked by the class III antiarrhythmic compound clofilium but not by the sotalol derivative E4031 or low concentrations of lanthanum. Like IKs in guinea pig myocytes, gpIsK is modulated by stimulation of protein kinase A and protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast to rat and mouse IsK, which are decreased upon stimulation of PKC, myocyte IK and gpIsK in oocytes are increased after PKC stimulation. Substitution of an asparagine residue at position 102 by serine (N102S), the residue found in the analogous position of the mouse and rat min K proteins, results in decreased gpIsK in response to PKC stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that the min K protein underlies the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium current in ventricular myocytes and account for the species-specific responses to stimulation of PKC. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8265583

  13. Subcellular compartment-specific molecular diversity of pre- and postsynaptic GABAB-activated GIRK channels in Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Martín, Ricardo; Colón, José; Cabañero, María José; Gassmann, Martin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Wickman, Kevin; Bettler, Bernhard; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Activation of G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK or Kir3) channels by metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (B) (GABAB) receptors is an essential signalling pathway controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the brain. To investigate the relationship between GIRK channel subunits and GABAB receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells at post- and pre-synaptic sites, we used biochemical, functional and immunohistochemical techniques. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GIRK subunits are co-assembled with GABAB receptors in the cerebellum. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the subunit composition of GIRK channels in Purkinje cell spines is compartment-dependent. Thus, at extrasynaptic sites GIRK channels are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3, postsynaptic densities contain GIRK2/GIRK3 and dendritic shafts contain GIRK1/GIRK3. The postsynaptic association of GIRK subunits with GABAB receptors in Purkinje cells is supported by the subcellular regulation of the ion channel and the receptor in mutant mice. At presynaptic sites, GIRK channels localized to parallel fibre terminals are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3 and co-localize with GABAB receptors. Consistent with this morphological evidence we demonstrate their functional interaction at axon terminals in the cerebellum by showing that GIRK channels play a role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABAB receptors. The association of GIRK channels and GABAB receptors with excitatory synapses at both post- and presynaptic sites indicates their intimate involvement in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum. PMID:19558451

  14. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 2 is a member of the mitochondrial channel proteins that regulate the flow of hydrogen ions and ATP generation. The relationship between UCP2 and nutrient metabolism has been well-defined in humans but unclear in fish. We hypothesized that increased muscle growth in channel catf...

  15. Podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy: implications of angiotensin II – dependent activation of TRPC channels

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Levchenko, Vladislav; Lowing, Andrea; Shuyskiy, Leonid S.; Palygin, Oleg; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Injury to podocytes is considered a major contributor to diabetic kidney disease: their loss causes proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. Podocyte depletion may result from improper calcium handling due to abnormal activation of the calcium permeant TRPC (Transient Receptor Potential Canonical) channels. Angiotensin II (Ang II) levels are found to be elevated in diabetes; furthermore, it was reported that Ang II causes activation of TRPC6 in podocytes. We hypothesized here that Ang II-mediated calcium influx is aggravated in the podocytes under the conditions of type 1 diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetes was induced in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive rats by an injection of streptozotocin (STZ-SS). Eleven weeks post treatment was sufficient for the animals to develop hyperglycemia, excessive urination, weight loss, microalbuminuria, nephrinuria and display renal histological lesions typical for patients with DN. Patch-clamp electrophysiology performed on podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli showed enhanced basal TRPC channel activity in the STZ-SS rats, and increased response to Ang II; total calcium influx triggered by Ang II application was also augmented in podocytes of these rats. Our studies have a strong potential for advancing the understanding of TRPC-mediated effects on podocytopenia in DN initiation. PMID:26656101

  16. Pdx-1 activates islet α- and β-cell proliferation via a mechanism regulated by transient receptor potential cation channels 3 and 6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Heather L; Moss, Larry G; Schisler, Jonathan C; Haldeman, Jonathan M; Zhang, Zhushan; Rosenberg, Paul B; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2013-10-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pdx-1 has important roles in pancreatic development and β-cell function and survival. In the present study, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Pdx-1 in rat or human islets also stimulates cell replication. Moreover, cooverexpression of Pdx-1 with another homeodomain transcription factor, Nkx6.1, has an additive effect on proliferation compared to either factor alone, implying discrete activating mechanisms. Consistent with this, Nkx6.1 stimulates mainly β-cell proliferation, whereas Pdx-1 stimulates both α- and β-cell proliferation. Furthermore, cyclins D1/D2 are upregulated by Pdx-1 but not by Nkx6.1, and inhibition of cdk4 blocks Pdx-1-stimulated but not Nkx6.1-stimulated islet cell proliferation. Genes regulated by Pdx-1 but not Nkx6.1 were identified by microarray analysis. Two members of the transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel family, TRPC3 and TRPC6, are upregulated by Pdx-1 overexpression, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRPC3/6 or TRPC6 alone inhibits Pdx-1-induced but not Nkx6.1-induced islet cell proliferation. Pdx-1 also stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, an effect partially blocked by knockdown of TRPC3/6, and blockade of ERK1/2 activation with a MEK1/2 inhibitor partially impairs Pdx-1-stimulated proliferation. These studies define a pathway by which overexpression of Pdx-1 activates islet cell proliferation that is distinct from and additive to a pathway activated by Nkx6.1.

  17. Sensory neuron-specific sodium channel SNS is abnormally expressed in the brains of mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and humans with multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Joel A.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman; Baker, David; Newcombe, Jia; Cuzner, M. Louise; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2000-10-01

    Clinical abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS) have classically been considered to be caused by demyelination and/or axonal degeneration; the possibility of molecular changes in neurons, such as the deployment of abnormal repertoires of ion channels that would alter neuronal electrogenic properties, has not been considered. Sensory Neuron-Specific sodium channel SNS displays a depolarized voltage dependence, slower activation and inactivation kinetics, and more rapid recovery from inactivation than classical "fast" sodium channels. SNS is selectively expressed in spinal sensory and trigeminal ganglion neurons within the peripheral nervous system and is not expressed within the normal brain. Here we show that sodium channel SNS mRNA and protein, which are not present within the cerebellum of control mice, are expressed within cerebellar Purkinje cells in a mouse model of MS, chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. We also demonstrate SNS mRNA and protein expression within Purkinje cells from tissue obtained postmortem from patients with MS, but not in control subjects with no neurological disease. These results demonstrate a change in sodium channel expression in neurons within the brain in an animal model of MS and in humans with MS and suggest that abnormal patterns of neuronal ion channel expression may contribute to clinical abnormalities such as ataxia in these disorders.

  18. A Specific Subset of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-Type Channel Subunits in Caenorhabditis elegans Endocrine Cells Function as Mixed Heteromers to Promote Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.; Bany, I. Amy; Chase, Daniel L.; Koelle, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits form homotetramers that function in sensory transduction. Heteromeric channels also form, but their physiological subunit compositions and functions are largely unknown. We found a dominant-negative mutant of the C. elegans TRPV (vanilloid-type) subunit OCR-2 that apparently incorporates into and inactivates OCR-2 homomers as well as heteromers with the TRPV subunits OCR-1 and -4, resulting in a premature egg-laying defect. This defect is reproduced by knocking out all three OCR genes, but not by any single knockout. Thus a mixture of redundant heteromeric channels prevents premature egg laying. These channels, as well as the G-protein Gαo, function in neuroendocrine cells to promote release of neurotransmitters that block egg laying until eggs filling the uterus deform the neuroendocrine cells. The TRPV channel OSM-9, previously suggested to be an obligate heteromeric partner of OCR-2 in sensory neurons, is expressed in the neuroendocrine cells but has no detectable role in egg laying. Our results identify a specific set of heteromeric TRPV channels that redundantly regulate neuroendocrine function and show that a subunit combination that functions in sensory neurons is also present in neuroendocrine cells but has no detectable function in these cells. PMID:17057248

  19. Gating-pore currents demonstrate selective and specific modulation of individual sodium channel voltage-sensors by biological toxins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yucheng; Blumenthal, Kenneth; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical determinants of nerve and muscle excitability. Although numerous toxins and small molecules target sodium channels, identifying the mechanisms of action is challenging. Here we used gating-pore currents selectively generated in each of the voltage-sensors from the four α-subunit domains (DI-DIV) to monitor the activity of individual voltage-sensors and to investigate the molecular determinants of sodium channel pharmacology. The tarantula toxin huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), which inhibits sodium channel current, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DII voltage-sensor. By contrast, the tarantula toxin ProTx-II, which also inhibits sodium channel currents, altered the gating-pore currents in multiple voltage-sensors in a complex manner. Thus, whereas HWTX-IV inhibits central-pore currents by selectively trapping the DII voltage-sensor in the resting configuration, ProTx-II seems to inhibit central-pore currents by differentially altering the configuration of multiple voltage-sensors. The sea anemone toxin anthopleurin B, which impairs open-channel inactivation, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DIV voltage-sensor. This indicates that trapping the DIV voltage-sensor in the resting configuration selectively impairs open-channel inactivation. Furthermore, these data indicate that although activation of all four voltage-sensors is not required for central-pore current generation, activation of the DII voltage-sensor is crucial. Overall, our data demonstrate that gating-pore currents can determine the mechanism of action for sodium channel gating modifiers with high precision. We propose this approach could be adapted to identify the molecular mechanisms of action for gating modifiers of various voltage-gated ion channels.

  20. Gating-Pore Currents Demonstrate Selective and Specific Modulation of Individual Sodium Channel Voltage-Sensors by Biological Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yucheng; Blumenthal, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical determinants of nerve and muscle excitability. Although numerous toxins and small molecules target sodium channels, identifying the mechanisms of action is challenging. Here we used gating-pore currents selectively generated in each of the voltage-sensors from the four α-subunit domains (DI–DIV) to monitor the activity of individual voltage-sensors and to investigate the molecular determinants of sodium channel pharmacology. The tarantula toxin huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), which inhibits sodium channel current, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DII voltage-sensor. By contrast, the tarantula toxin ProTx-II, which also inhibits sodium channel currents, altered the gating-pore currents in multiple voltage-sensors in a complex manner. Thus, whereas HWTX-IV inhibits central-pore currents by selectively trapping the DII voltage-sensor in the resting configuration, ProTx-II seems to inhibit central-pore currents by differentially altering the configuration of multiple voltage-sensors. The sea anemone toxin anthopleurin B, which impairs open-channel inactivation, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DIV voltage-sensor. This indicates that trapping the DIV voltage-sensor in the resting configuration selectively impairs open-channel inactivation. Furthermore, these data indicate that although activation of all four voltage-sensors is not required for central-pore current generation, activation of the DII voltage-sensor is crucial. Overall, our data demonstrate that gating-pore currents can determine the mechanism of action for sodium channel gating modifiers with high precision. We propose this approach could be adapted to identify the molecular mechanisms of action for gating modifiers of various voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:24898004

  1. Gating-pore currents demonstrate selective and specific modulation of individual sodium channel voltage-sensors by biological toxins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yucheng; Blumenthal, Kenneth; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical determinants of nerve and muscle excitability. Although numerous toxins and small molecules target sodium channels, identifying the mechanisms of action is challenging. Here we used gating-pore currents selectively generated in each of the voltage-sensors from the four α-subunit domains (DI-DIV) to monitor the activity of individual voltage-sensors and to investigate the molecular determinants of sodium channel pharmacology. The tarantula toxin huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), which inhibits sodium channel current, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DII voltage-sensor. By contrast, the tarantula toxin ProTx-II, which also inhibits sodium channel currents, altered the gating-pore currents in multiple voltage-sensors in a complex manner. Thus, whereas HWTX-IV inhibits central-pore currents by selectively trapping the DII voltage-sensor in the resting configuration, ProTx-II seems to inhibit central-pore currents by differentially altering the configuration of multiple voltage-sensors. The sea anemone toxin anthopleurin B, which impairs open-channel inactivation, exclusively enhanced inward gating-pore currents through the DIV voltage-sensor. This indicates that trapping the DIV voltage-sensor in the resting configuration selectively impairs open-channel inactivation. Furthermore, these data indicate that although activation of all four voltage-sensors is not required for central-pore current generation, activation of the DII voltage-sensor is crucial. Overall, our data demonstrate that gating-pore currents can determine the mechanism of action for sodium channel gating modifiers with high precision. We propose this approach could be adapted to identify the molecular mechanisms of action for gating modifiers of various voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:24898004

  2. Synthesis, solution structure, and phylum selectivity of a spider delta-toxin that slows inactivation of specific voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Nahoko; Little, Michelle J; Nishio, Hideki; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Tytgat, Jan; Nicholson, Graham M; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-09-01

    Magi 4, now renamed delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a, is a 43-residue neurotoxic peptide from the venom of the hexathelid Japanese funnel-web spider (Macrothele gigas) with homology to delta-hexatoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders. It binds with high affinity to receptor site 3 on insect voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels but, unlike delta-hexatoxins, does not compete for the related site 3 in rat brain despite being previously shown to be lethal by intracranial injection. To elucidate differences in Na(V) channel selectivity, we have undertaken the first characterization of a peptide toxin on a broad range of mammalian and insect Na(V) channel subtypes showing that delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a selectively slows channel inactivation of mammalian Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.3, and Na(V)1.6 but more importantly shows higher affinity for insect Na(V)1 (para) channels. Consequently, delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a induces tonic repetitive firing of nerve impulses in insect neurons accompanied by plateau potentials. In addition, we have chemically synthesized and folded delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a, ascertained the bonding pattern of the four disulfides, and determined its three-dimensional solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Despite modest sequence homology, we show that key residues important for the activity of scorpion alpha-toxins and delta-hexatoxins are distributed in a topologically similar manner in delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a. However, subtle differences in the toxin surfaces are important for the novel selectivity of delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a for certain mammalian and insect Na(V) channel subtypes. As such, delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a provides us with a specific tool with which to study channel structure and function and determinants for phylum- and tissue-specific activity.

  3. Synthesis, Solution Structure, and Phylum Selectivity of a Spider δ-Toxin That Slows Inactivation of Specific Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Subtypes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Nahoko; Little, Michelle J.; Nishio, Hideki; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Tytgat, Jan; Nicholson, Graham M.; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Magi 4, now renamed δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a, is a 43-residue neurotoxic peptide from the venom of the hexathelid Japanese funnel-web spider (Macrothele gigas) with homology to δ-hexatoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders. It binds with high affinity to receptor site 3 on insect voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels but, unlike δ-hexatoxins, does not compete for the related site 3 in rat brain despite being previously shown to be lethal by intracranial injection. To elucidate differences in NaV channel selectivity, we have undertaken the first characterization of a peptide toxin on a broad range of mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes showing that δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a selectively slows channel inactivation of mammalian NaV1.1, NaV1.3, and NaV1.6 but more importantly shows higher affinity for insect NaV1 (para) channels. Consequently, δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a induces tonic repetitive firing of nerve impulses in insect neurons accompanied by plateau potentials. In addition, we have chemically synthesized and folded δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a, ascertained the bonding pattern of the four disulfides, and determined its three-dimensional solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Despite modest sequence homology, we show that key residues important for the activity of scorpion α-toxins and δ-hexatoxins are distributed in a topologically similar manner in δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a. However, subtle differences in the toxin surfaces are important for the novel selectivity of δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a for certain mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes. As such, δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a provides us with a specific tool with which to study channel structure and function and determinants for phylum- and tissue-specific activity. PMID:19592486

  4. Ion-Channel Genosensor for the Detection of Specific DNA Sequences Derived from Plum Pox Virus in Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1–8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10–50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal. PMID:25302809

  5. A specific two-pore domain potassium channel blocker defines the structure of the TASK-1 open pore.

    PubMed

    Streit, Anne K; Netter, Michael F; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2011-04-22

    Two-pore domain potassium (K(2P)) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K(2P) channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K(2P) channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K(2P) open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K(2P) channels.

  6. Specific labeling and permanent activation of the retinal rod cGMP-activated channel by the photoaffinity analog 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R L; Gerber, W V; Karpen, J W

    1993-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels play a key role in visual excitation and a variety of other signaling pathways. The photoaffinity probe 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP (APT-cGMP) has been developed for structural and functional studies of the cGMP-activated channel of retinal rod outer segments. Using this analog, we have demonstrated both specific labeling of the channel in a partially purified biochemical preparation from bovine rod outer segments and permanent activation of the channel current in excised membrane patches from salamander outer segments. After UV illumination, a 32P-labeled version of APT-cGMP was shown by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography to be covalently attached to the 63-kDa channel subunit. This incorporation was significantly reduced by 8-Br-cGMP but was not reduced by 5'-GMP. In patch-clamp experiments APT-cGMP was a potent activator of the channel; APT-cGMP typically opened half of the channels in a patch at a 10-fold lower concentration than cGMP. Exposure of membrane patches to UV light in the presence of APT-cGMP resulted in a persistent current observed in the absence of bath-applied nucleotide. This current increased with repeated exposure of the patch to both UV light and fresh APT-cGMP, approaching the maximum current originally evoked by saturating (500 microM) cGMP. At this point, addition of 500 microM cGMP caused a negligible increase in current. The persistent current had several other properties expected of current through cGMP-activated channels: it was outwardly rectifying; outward current was blocked > 90% by 2 mM internal Mg2+, whereas inward current was blocked much less efficiently; a low concentration of cGMP caused a larger increase in current atop a half-maximal persistent current than it did originally. We conclude that the persistent current was caused by the covalent tethering of cGMP moieties to channel binding sites, resulting in irreversible channel activation. APT-cGMP should prove useful for further studies of

  7. Glucocorticoids specifically enhance L-type calcium current amplitude and affect calcium channel subunit expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chameau, Pascal; Qin, Yongjun; Spijker, Sabine; Smit, August Benjamin; Smit, Guus; Joëls, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that corticosterone enhances whole cell calcium currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, through a pathway involving binding of glucocorticoid receptor homodimers to the DNA. We examined whether glucocorticoids show selectivity for L- over N-type of calcium currents. Moreover, we addressed the putative gene targets that eventually lead to the enhanced calcium currents. Electrophysiological recordings were performed in nucleated patches that allow excellent voltage control. Calcium currents in these patches almost exclusively involve N- and L-type channels. We found that L- but not N-type calcium currents were largely enhanced after treatment with a high dose of corticosterone sufficient to activate glucocorticoid receptors. Voltage dependency and kinetic properties of the currents were unaffected by the hormone. Nonstationary noise analysis suggests that the increased current is not caused by a larger unitary conductance, but rather to a doubling of the number of functional channels. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that transcripts of the Ca(v)1 subunits encoding for the N- or L-type calcium channels are not upregulated in the mouse CA1 area; instead, a strong, direct, and consistent upregulation of the beta4 subunit was observed. This indicates that the corticosteroid-induced increase in number of L-type calcium channels is not caused by a simple transcriptional regulation of the pore-forming subunit of the channels.

  8. Isoform-specific interaction of the alpha1A subunits of brain Ca2+ channels with the presynaptic proteins syntaxin and SNAP-25.

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, J; Sheng, Z H; Kim, D K; Hodson, C D; Snutch, T P; Catterall, W A

    1996-01-01

    Presynaptic Ca2+ channels are crucial elements in neuronal excitation-secretion coupling. In addition to mediating Ca2+ entry to initiate transmitter release, they are thought to interact directly with proteins of the synaptic vesicle docking/fusion machinery. Here we report isoform-specific, stoichiometric interaction of the BI and rbA isoforms of the alpha1A subunit of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels with the presynaptic membrane proteins syntaxin and SNAP-25 in vitro and in rat brain membranes. The BI isoform binds to both proteins, while only interaction with SNAP-25 can be detected in vitro for the rbA isoform. The synaptic protein interaction ("synprint") site involves two adjacent segments of the intracellular loop connecting domains II and III between amino acid residues 722 and 1036 of the BI sequence. This interaction is competitively blocked by the corresponding region of the N-type Ca2+ channel, indicating that these two channels bind to overlapping regions of syntaxin and SNAP-25. Our results provide a molecular basis for a physical link between Ca2+ influx into nerve terminals and subsequent exocytosis of neurotransmitters at synapses that have presynaptic Ca2+ channels containing alpha1A subunits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692999

  9. Recombinant production and solution structure of PcTx1, the specific peptide inhibitor of ASIC1a proton-gated cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Escoubas, Pierre; Bernard, Cédric; Lambeau, Gérard; Lazdunski, Michel; Darbon, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to be important ion channels, particularly for the perception of pain. Some of them may also contribute to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1), the first potent and specific blocker of the ASIC1a proton-sensing channel, has been successfully expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster S2 cell recombinant expression system used here for the first time to produce a spider toxin. The recombinant toxin was identical in all respects to the native peptide, and its three-dimensional structure in solution was determined by means of 1H 2D NMR spectroscopy. Surface characteristics of PcTx1 provide insights on key structural elements involved in the binding of PcTx1 to ASIC1a channels. They appear to be localized in the β-sheet and the β-turn linking the strands, as indicated by electrostatic anisotropy calculations, surface charge distribution, and the presence of residues known to be implicated in channel recognition by other inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) toxins. PMID:12824480

  10. Seeking structural specificity: direct modulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels by alcohols and general anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rebecca J; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Alcohols and other anesthetic agents dramatically alter neurologic function in a wide range of organisms, yet their molecular sites of action remain poorly characterized. Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, long implicated in important direct effects of alcohol and anesthetic binding, have recently been illuminated in renewed detail thanks to the determination of atomic-resolution structures of several family members from lower organisms. These structures provide valuable models for understanding and developing anesthetic agents and for allosteric modulation in general. This review surveys progress in this field from function to structure and back again, outlining early evidence for relevant modulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and the development of early structural models for ion channel function and modulation. We highlight insights and challenges provided by recent crystal structures and resulting simulations, as well as opportunities for translation of these newly detailed models back to behavior and therapy.

  11. Gamut expansion of consumer camera to the CIE XYZ color gamut using a specifically designed fourth sensor channel.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Dilip K

    2015-07-10

    This paper discusses the design of an additional spectral filter (i.e., a fourth channel) to be used with existing camera sensors such that the camera's modified color gamut overlaps almost the full CIE XYZ color gamut. The proposed approach leverages on the matrix-R theory that states that the space of metamerism of a sensor, known as the metameric black space, can be determined directly from the camera's spectral sensitivities. Using this metameric black space, a novel fourth channel has been designed on the sensor that can expand the camera's gamut. The effectiveness of this idea has been demonstrated for five commercial cameras, Munsell color chips, and images taken under various illuminations. It is shown that the designed fourth channel is very effective in fitting the camera's color gamuts to CIE XYZ color gamut, reducing CIE LAB colorimetric distances, as well as the color differences between the camera's XYZ images and the true CIE XYZ images.

  12. Interaction of propofol with voltage-gated human Kv1.5 channel through specific amino acids within the pore region.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Akiko; Ito, Yuki; Ding, Wei-Guang; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The intravenous anesthetic propofol affects the function of a diversity of ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels. However, there is little information as to whether propofol directly interacts with voltage-gated ion channel proteins to modulate their functions. The Kv1.5 channel is activated by membrane depolarization during action potentials and contributes to atrial repolarization in the human heart. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of propofol on voltage-gated human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) channel and to elucidate the underlying molecular determinants. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out through six amino acids that reside within the pore domain of hKv1.5 channel. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record membrane currents through the wild type and mutant hKv1.5 channels heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Propofol (≥5 μM) reversibly and concentration-dependently (IC50 of 49.3±9.4 μM; n=6) blocked hKv1.5 current. Propofol-induced block of hKv1.5 current gradually progressed during depolarizing voltage-clamp steps and was enhanced by higher frequency of activation, consistent with a preferential block of the channels in their open state. The degree of current block by propofol was significantly attenuated in T480A, I502A, I508A and V516A, but not in H463C and L510A mutants of hKv1.5 channel. Thus, several amino acids near the selectivity filter (Thr480) or within S6 (Ile502, Ile508 and Val516) are found to be critically involved in the blocking action of propofol. This study provides the first evidence suggesting that direct interaction with specific amino acids underlies the blocking action of propofol on voltage-gated hKv1.5 channel.

  13. Substitutions at the opening of the Rubisco central solvent channel affect holoenzyme stability and CO2/O 2 specificity but not activation by Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, M Gloria; Genkov, Todor; Nogueira, Ana S; Salvucci, Michael E; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the initial step of carbon metabolism in photosynthesis. The holoenzyme comprises eight large subunits, arranged as a tetramer of dimers around a central solvent channel that defines a fourfold axis of symmetry, and eight small subunits, arranged as two tetramers at the poles of the axis. The phylogenetically divergent small-subunit loops between β-strands A and B form the entrance to the solvent channel. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ile-58 from each of the four small-subunit βA-βB loops defines the minimal diameter of the channel opening. To understand the role of the central solvent channel in Rubisco function, directed mutagenesis and transformation of Chlamydomonas were employed to replace Ile-58 with Ala, Lys, Glu, Trp, or three Trp residues (I58W3) to close the entrance to the channel. The I58E, I58K, and I58W substitutions caused only small decreases in photosynthetic growth at 25 and 35 °C, whereas I58W3 had a substantial effect at both temperatures. The mutant enzymes had decreased carboxylation rates, but the I58W3 enzyme had decreases in both carboxylation and CO2/O2 specificity. The I58E, I58W, and I58W3 enzymes were inactivated at lower temperatures than wild-type Rubisco, and were degraded at slower rates under oxidative stress. However, these mutant enzymes were activated by Rubisco activase at normal rates, indicating that the structural transition required for carboxylation is not affected by altering the solvent channel opening. Structural dynamics alone may not be responsible for these distant effects on the Rubisco active site.

  14. Substrate specificity, substrate channeling, and allostery in BphJ: an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with the pyruvate aldolase BphI.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Carere, Jason; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2012-06-01

    BphJ, a nonphosphorylating acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalyzes the conversion of aldehydes to form acyl-coenzyme A in the presence of NAD(+) and coenzyme A (CoA). The enzyme is structurally related to the nonacylating aldehyde dehydrogenases, aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cys-131 was identified as the catalytic thiol in BphJ, and pH profiles together with site-specific mutagenesis data demonstrated that the catalytic thiol is not activated by an aspartate residue, as previously proposed. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme that had similar specificities for two- or three-carbon aldehydes, an I195A variant was observed to have a 20-fold higher catalytic efficiency for butyraldehyde and pentaldehyde compared to the catalytic efficiency of the wild type toward its natural substrate, acetaldehyde. BphJ forms a heterotetrameric complex with the class II aldolase BphI that channels aldehydes produced in the aldol cleavage reaction to the dehydrogenase via a molecular tunnel. Replacement of Ile-171 and Ile-195 with bulkier amino acid residues resulted in no more than a 35% reduction in acetaldehyde channeling efficiency, showing that these residues are not critical in gating the exit of the channel. Likewise, the replacement of Asn-170 in BphJ with alanine and aspartate did not substantially alter aldehyde channeling efficiencies. Levels of activation of BphI by BphJ N170A, N170D, and I171A were reduced by ≥3-fold in the presence of NADH and ≥4.5-fold when BphJ was undergoing turnover, indicating that allosteric activation of the aldolase has been compromised in these variants. The results demonstrate that the dehydrogenase coordinates the catalytic activity of BphI through allostery rather than through aldehyde channeling. PMID:22574886

  15. Diversity of expression of the sensory neuron-specific TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium ion channels SNS and SNS2.

    PubMed

    Amaya, F; Decosterd, I; Samad, T A; Plumpton, C; Tate, S; Mannion, R J; Costigan, M; Woolf, C J

    2000-04-01

    The differential distribution of two tetrodotoxin resistant (TTXr) voltage-gated sodium channels SNS (PN3) and SNS2 (NaN) in rat primary sensory neurons has been investigated. Both channels are sensory neuron specific with SNS2 restricted entirely to those small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers). SNS, in contrast, is expressed both in small C-fiber DRG cells and in 10% of cells with myelinated axons (A-fibers). All SNS expressing A-fiber cells are Trk-A positive and many express the vanilloid-like receptor VRL1. About half of C-fiber DRG neurons express either SNS or SNS2, and in most, the channels are colocalized. SNS and SNS2 are found both in NGF-responsive and GDNF-responsive C-fibers and many of these cells also express the capsaicin receptor VR1. A very small proportion of small DRG cells express either only SNS or only SNS2. At least four different classes of A- and C-fiber DRG neurons exist, therefore, with respect to expression of these sodium channels. PMID:10845770

  16. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  17. An Exquisitely Specific PDZ/Target Recognition Revealed by the Structure of INAD PDZ3 in Complex with TRP Channel Tail.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Liu, Wei; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-03-01

    The vast majority of PDZ domains are known to bind to a few C-terminal tail residues of target proteins with modest binding affinities and specificities. Such promiscuous PDZ/target interactions are not compatible with highly specific physiological functions of PDZ domain proteins and their targets. Here, we report an unexpected PDZ/target binding occurring between the scaffold protein inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channel in Drosophila photoreceptors. The C-terminal 15 residues of TRP are required for the specific interaction with INAD PDZ3. The INAD PDZ3/TRP peptide complex structure reveals that only the extreme C-terminal Leu of TRP binds to the canonical αB/βB groove of INAD PDZ3. The rest of the TRP peptide, by forming a β hairpin structure, binds to a surface away from the αB/βB groove of PDZ3 and contributes to the majority of the binding energy. Thus, the INAD PDZ3/TRP channel interaction is exquisitely specific and represents a new mode of PDZ/target recognitions.

  18. Regulation of expression of the sensory neuron-specific sodium channel SNS in inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Okuse, K; Chaplan, S R; McMahon, S B; Luo, Z D; Calcutt, N A; Scott, B P; Akopian, A N; Wood, J N

    1997-01-01

    Increased voltage-gated sodium channel activity may contribute to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. We examined the levels of the transcript encoding the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel SNS in dorsal root ganglion neurons in a range of inflammatory and neuropathic pain models in the rat. Local Freund's adjuvant or systemic nerve growth factor-induced inflammation did not substantially alter the total levels of SNS mRNA. When NGF-treated adult rat DRG neurons in vitro were compared with NGF-depleted control neurons, SNS total mRNA levels and the levels of membrane-associated immunoreactive SNS showed a small increase (17 and 25%, respectively), while CGRP levels increased fourfold. SNS expression is thus little dependent on NGF even though SNS transcript levels dropped by more than 60% 7-14 days after axotomy. In the streptozotocin diabetic rat SNS levels fell 25%, while in several manipulations of the L5/6 tight nerve ligation rat neuropathic pain model, SNS levels fell 40-80% in rat strains that are either susceptible or relatively resistant to the development of allodynia. Increased expression of SNS mRNA is thus unlikely to underlie sensory neuron hyperexcitability associated with inflammation, while lowered SNS transcript levels are associated with peripheral nerve damage. PMID:9532581

  19. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes: identification, phylogenetic and syntenic analysis, and specific induction in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Jiaren; Jiang, Yanliang; Li, Chao; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Li, Jiale; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-03-01

    Hemoglobins transport oxygen from gill to inner organs in fish, and this process is affected by temperature, one of the major environmental factors for fish. The hemoglobin gene clusters have been well studied in humans and several model fish species, but remain largely unknown in catfish. Here, eight α- and six β-hemoglobin genes were identified and characterized in channel catfish. Genomic synteny analysis showed that these hemoglobin genes were separated into two unlinked clusters, the MN cluster containing six α- and six β-hemoglobin genes, and the LA cluster consisting of two α-hemoglobin genes. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes were ubiquitously expressed in all the 10 tested tissues from healthy fish, but exhibited higher expression level in spleen, head kidney, and trunk kidney. In response to heat stress, hemoglobin genes, especially MN Hbα4, MN Hbα5, MN Hbα6, MN Hbβ4, MN Hbβ5, MN Hbβ6, LA Hbα1, and LA Hbα2, presumably the embryonic hemoglobin genes, were drastically up-regulated in the gill and head kidney of heat-tolerant fishes, but not in these tissues of the heat-intolerant fish, suggesting the importance of the embryonic hemoglobin genes in coping with the low oxygen conditions under heat stress.

  20. Expression in Pichia pastoris and characterization of APETx2, a specific inhibitor of acid sensing ion channel 3.

    PubMed

    Anangi, Raveendra; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Wen; Cheng, Yuan-Ren; Cheng, Chun-Ho; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chu, Yuan-Ping; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2010-12-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are family of proteins predominantly present in the central and peripheral nervous system. They are known to play important roles in the pathophysiology of pain and ischemic stroke. APETx2 is a potent and selective inhibitor of ASIC3-containing channels and was isolated from sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. To facilitate the study on the molecular determinants of ASIC3-ligand interactions, we expressed recombinant APETx2 in the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system and purified it to homogeneity. Recombinant APETx2 produced in P. pastoris inhibited the acid-evoked ASIC3 current with the IC(50) value of 37.3 nM. The potency of recombinant toxin is similar to that of native APETx2. The sequential assignment and structure analysis of APETx2 were obtained by 2D and 3D (15)N-edited NMR spectra. Our NMR data suggests that APETx2 produced in P. pastoris retained its native fold. The results presented here provide the first direct evidence that highly disulfide bonded peptide inhibitor of ASIC3, APETx2, can be expressed in P. pastoris with correct fold and high yield. We also showed that the R17A mutant exhibited a decrease in activity, suggesting the feasibility of the use of this expression system to study the interactions between APETx2 and ASIC3. These evidences may serve as the basis for understanding the selectivity and activity of APETx2. PMID:20813121

  1. Hyperforin: To Be or Not to Be an Activator of TRPC(6).

    PubMed

    Friedland, Kristina; Harteneck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Meantime, it is well accepted that hyperforin, the chemical instable phloroglucinol derivative of Hypericum perforatum, St. John's wort, is the pharmacophore of St. John's wort extracts. With the decline of this scientific discussion, another controversial aspect has been arisen, the question regarding the underlying mechanism leading to the pharmacological profile of the plant extract used in therapy of depression. We will summarize the different concepts described for hyperforin's antidepressive activity. Starting with unspecific protein-independent mechanisms due to changes in pH, we will summarize data of protein-based concepts beginning with concepts based on involvement of a variety of proteins and will finally present concepts based on the modulation of a single protein. PMID:26384487

  2. Regulation of the cellular localization and function of human transient receptor potential channel 1 by other members of the TRPC family.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Salgado; Benito, Ordaz; Alicia, Sampieri; Angélica, Zepeda; Patricia, Glazebrook; Diana, Kunze; Vaca, Luis; Luis, Vaca

    2008-04-01

    Members of the Canonical Transient Receptor Potential (TRPC) family of ionic channels are able to form homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Depending on the study, TRPC1 has been detected on both the surface and inside the cell, probably in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Likewise, TRPC1 has been described both as a store-operated channel and as one unable to function when forming a homotetramer. It is possible that the apparent differences in the expression and function of TRPC1 are due to its association with other proteins, possibly from the same TRPC family. In the present study we used confocal microscopy and a fluorescently tagged TRPC1 to examine the localization of this protein when co-expressed with other members of the TRPC family. Whole-cell and single channel electrophysiological recordings were conducted to study the function of TRPC1 expressed alone or co-expressed with other members of the TRPC family. A FRET-based calcium sensor fused to TRPC1 was used to assess the functionality of the intracellular TRPC1. Our results showed that TRPC4 and TRPC5 were able to increase the amount of membrane-expressed TRPC1 as evaluated by confocal microscopy and patch clamp recordings. The FRET-based calcium sensor fused to TRPC1 strongly suggests that this protein forms ER-expressed functional homotetrameric channels activated by agonists coupled to the IP(3) cascade. These results indicate that TRPC1 is a multifunctional protein able to form intracellular calcium release channels when expressed alone, and plasma membrane channels when co-expressed with TRPC4 or TRPC5, but not TRPC3 or TRPC6. Both (ER and plasma membrane) forms of the channel are activated upon addition of agonists coupled to the IP(3) cascade.

  3. Identification of the Sensory Neuron Specific Regulatory Region for the Mouse Gene Encoding the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are critical membrane components that participate in the electrical activity of excitable cells. The type one VGSC family includes the tetrodotoxin insensitive sodium channel, Nav1.8, encoded by the Scn10a gene. Nav1.8 expression is restricted to small and medium diameter nociceptive sensory neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and cranial sensory ganglia. In order to understand the stringent transcriptional regulation of the Scn10a gene, the sensory neuron specific promoter was functionally identified. While identifying the mRNA 5’ end, alternative splicing within the 5’ UTR was observed to create heterogeneity in the RNA transcript. Four kilobases of upstream genomic DNA was cloned and the presence of tissue specific promoter activity was tested by microinjection and adenoviral infection of fluorescent protein reporter constructs into primary mouse and rat neurons, and cell lines. The region contained many putative transcription factor binding sites and strong homology with the predicted rat ortholog. Homology to the predicted human ortholog was limited to the proximal end and several conserved cis elements were noted. Two regulatory modules were identified by microinjection of reporter constructs into DRG and superior cervical ganglia neurons: a neuron specific proximal promoter region between −1.6 and −0.2kb of the transcription start site cluster, and a distal sensory neuron switch region beyond −1.6kb that restricted fluorescent protein expression to a subset of primary sensory neurons. PMID:18466327

  4. Mode-specific multi-channel dynamics of the F- + CHD2Cl reaction on a global ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, István; Czakó, Gábor

    2016-10-01

    We report a detailed quasiclassical trajectory study for the dynamics of the ground-state and CH/CD stretching-excited F- + CHD2Cl(vCH/CD = 0, 1) → Cl- + CHD2F, HF + CD2Cl-, and DF + CHDCl- SN2, proton-, and deuteron-abstraction reactions using a full-dimensional global ab initio analytical potential energy surface. The simulations show that (a) CHD2Cl(vCH/CD = 1), especially for vCH = 1, maintains its mode-specific excited character prior to interaction, (b) the SN2 reaction is vibrationally mode-specific, (c) double inversion can occur and is enhanced upon CH/CD stretching excitations, (d) in the abstraction reactions the HF channel is preferred and the vCH/CD = 1 excitations significantly promote the HF/DF channels, (e) back-side rebound, back-side stripping, and front-side stripping are the dominant direct abstraction mechanisms based on correlated scattering- and attack-angle distributions, (f) the exact classical vibrational energy-based Gaussian binning (1GB) provides realistic mode-specific polyatomic product state distributions, (g) in the abstraction reactions CH and CD stretchings are not pure spectator modes and mainly ground-state products are produced, thus most of the initial energy transfers into product translation, and (h) the HF and DF product molecules are rotationally cold without any significant dependence on the reactant's and HF/DF vibrational states.

  5. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  6. Expression of background potassium channels in rat DRG is cell-specific and down-regulated in a neuropathic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pollema-Mays, Sarah L.; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Ashford, Crystle J.; Apkarian, A Vania; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is associated with hyperexcitability of DRG neurons. Despite the importance of leakage potassium channels for neuronal excitability, little is known about their cell-specific expression in DRGs and possible modulation in neuropathic pain. Multiple leakage channels are expressed in DRG neurons, including TASK1, TASK3, TRESK, TRAAK, TWIK1, TREK1 and TREK2 but little is known about their distribution among different cell types. Our immunohistochemical studies show robust TWIK1 expression in large and medium size neurons, without overlap with TRPV1 or IB4 staining. TASK1 and TASK3, on the contrary, are selectively expressed in small cells; TASK1 expression closely overlaps TRPV1-positive cells, while TASK3 is expressed in TRPV1- and IB4-negative cells. We also studied mRNA expression of these channels in L4-L5 DRGs in control conditions and up to 4 weeks after spared nerve injury lesion. We found that TWIK1 expression is much higher than TASK1 and TASK3 and is strongly decreased 1, 2 and 4 weeks after neuropathic injury. TASK3 expression, on the other hand, decreases 1 week after surgery but reverts to baseline by 2 weeks; TASK1 shows no significant change at any time point. These data suggest an involvement of TWIK1 in the maintenance of the pain condition. PMID:23994814

  7. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  8. Thellungiella halophila, a salt-tolerant relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, has specific root ion-channel features supporting K+/Na+ homeostasis under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Amtmann, Anna

    2006-11-01

    Thellungiella halophila is a salt-tolerant relative of Arabidopsis thaliana with high genetic and morphological similarity. In a saline environment, T. halophila accumulates less sodium and retains more potassium than A. thaliana. Detailed electrophysiological comparison of ion currents in roots of both species showed that, unlike A. thaliana, T. halophila exhibits high potassium/sodium selectivity of the instantaneous current. This current differs in its pharmacological profile from the current through inward- and outward-rectifying K(+) channels insofar as it is insensitive to Cs(+) and TEA(+), but resembles voltage-independent channels of glycophytes as it is inhibited by external Ca(2+). Addition of Cs(+) and TEA(+) to the growth medium confirmed the key role of the instantaneous current in whole-plant sodium accumulation. A negative shift in the reversal potential of the instantaneous current under high-salt conditions was essential for decreasing sodium influx to twofold lower than the corresponding value in A. thaliana. The lower overall sodium permeability of the T. halophila root plasma membrane resulted in a smaller membrane depolarization during salt exposure, thus allowing the cells to maintain their driving force for potassium uptake. Our data provide quantitative evidence that specific features of ion channels lead to superior sodium/potassium homeostasis in a halophyte compared with a closely related glycophyte. PMID:17052322

  9. In pursuit of small molecule chemistry for calcium-permeable non-selective TRPC channels -- mirage or pot of gold?

    PubMed

    Bon, Robin S; Beech, David J

    2013-10-01

    The primary purpose of this review is to address the progress towards small molecule modulators of human Transient Receptor Potential Canonical proteins (TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7). These proteins generate channels for calcium and sodium ion entry. They are relevant to many mammalian cell types including acinar gland cells, adipocytes, astrocytes, cardiac myocytes, cochlea hair cells, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, fibroblasts, hepatocytes, keratinocytes, leukocytes, mast cells, mesangial cells, neurones, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, platelets, podocytes, smooth muscle cells, skeletal muscle and tumour cells. There are broad-ranging positive roles of the channels in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, survival and turning, vascular permeability, hypertrophy, wound-healing, hypo-adiponectinaemia, angiogenesis, neointimal hyperplasia, oedema, thrombosis, muscle endurance, lung hyper-responsiveness, glomerular filtration, gastrointestinal motility, pancreatitis, seizure, innate fear, motor coordination, saliva secretion, mast cell degranulation, cancer cell drug resistance, survival after myocardial infarction, efferocytosis, hypo-matrix metalloproteinase, vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Known small molecule stimulators of the channels include hyperforin, genistein and rosiglitazone, but there is more progress with inhibitors, some of which have promising potency and selectivity. The inhibitors include 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, 2-aminoquinolines, 2-aminothiazoles, fatty acids, isothiourea derivatives, naphthalene sulfonamides, N-phenylanthranilic acids, phenylethylimidazoles, piperazine/piperidine analogues, polyphenols, pyrazoles and steroids. A few of these agents are starting to be useful as tools for determining the physiological and pathophysiological functions of TRPC channels. We suggest that the pursuit of small molecule modulators for TRPC channels is important but that it requires substantial additional effort and

  10. Organ-Specific Splice Variants of Aquaporin Water Channel AgAQP1 in the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Liu, Kun; Linser, Paul J.; Agre, Peter; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are important for water homeostasis in all organisms. Malaria transmission is dependent on Anopheles mosquitoes. Water balance is a major factor influencing mosquito survival, which may indirectly affect pathogen transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained full-length mRNA sequences for Anopheles gambiae aquaporin 1 (AgAQP1) and identified two splice variants for the gene. In vitro expression analysis showed that both variants transported water and were inhibited by Hg2+. One splice variant (AgAQP1A) was exclusively expressed in adult female ovaries indicating a function in mosquito reproduction. The other splice variant (AgAQP1B) was expressed in the midgut, malpighian tubules and the head in adult mosquitoes. Immunolabeling showed that in malpighian tubules, AgAQP1 is expressed in principal cells in the proximal portion and in stellate cells in the distal portion. Moreover, AgAQP1 is expressed in Johnston’s organ (the “ear”), which is important for courtship behavior. Conclusions And Significance These results suggest that AgAQP1 may play roles associated with mating (courtship) and reproduction in addition to water homeostasis in this important African malaria vector. PMID:24066188

  11. The simultaneous detection of free and total prostate antigen in serum samples with high sensitivity and specificity by using the dual-channel surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongxiu; Qin, Yun; Peng, Zhen; Chen, Shenghua; Chen, Shu; Deng, Chunyan; Xiang, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Free/total prostate antigen (f/t-PSA) ratio in serum as a promising parameter has been used to improve the differentiation of benign and malignant prostate disease. In order to obtain the accurate and reliable f/t-PSA ratio, the simultaneous detection of f-PSA and t-PSA with high sensitivity and specificity is required. In this work, the dual-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been employed to meet the requirement. In one channel, t-PSA was directly measured with a linear range from 1.0 to 20.0 ng/mL. In another channel, due to the low concentration of f-PSA in serum, the asynchronous competitive inhibition immunoassay with f-PSA@Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. As expected, the detection sensitivity of f-PSA was greatly enhanced, and a linear correlation with wider linear range from 0.010 to 0.40 ng/mL was also achieved. On the other hand, a simple method was explored for significantly reducing the non-specific adsorption of co-existing proteins. On basis of this, the f/t-PSA ratios in serum samples from prostate cancer (PCa) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were measured. And it was found that there was significant difference between the distributions of f/t-PSA ratio in BPH patients (16.44±1.77%) and those in PCa patients (24.53±4.97%). This present work provides an effective method for distinguishing PCa from BPH, which lays a potential foundation for the early diagnosis of PCa.

  12. Phospholipids Induce Conformational Changes of SecA to Form Membrane-Specific Domains: AFM Structures and Implication on Protein-Conducting Channels

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Liao, Meijiang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Pan, Xijian; Houghton, John E.; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2013-01-01

    SecA, an essential component of the Sec machinery, exists in a soluble and a membrane form in Escherichia coli. Previous studies have shown that the soluble SecA transforms into pore structures when it interacts with liposomes, and integrates into membranes containing SecYEG in two forms: SecAS and SecAM; the latter exemplified by two tryptic membrane-specific domains, an N-terminal domain (N39) and a middle M48 domain (M48). The formation of these lipid-specific domains was further investigated. The N39 and M48 domains are induced only when SecA interacts with anionic liposomes. Additionally, the N-terminus, not the C-terminus of SecA is required for inducing such conformational changes. Proteolytic treatment and sequence analyses showed that liposome-embedded SecA yields the same M48 and N39 domains as does the membrane-embedded SecA. Studies with chemical extraction and resistance to trypsin have also shown that these proteoliposome-embedded SecA fragments exhibit the same stability and characteristics as their membrane-embedded SecA equivalents. Furthermore, the cloned lipid-specific domains N39 and M48, but not N68 or C34, are able to form partial, but imperfect ring-like structures when they interact with phospholipids. These ring-like structures are characteristic of a SecA pore-structure, suggesting that these domains contribute part of the SecA-dependent protein-conducting channel. We, therefore, propose a model in which SecA alone is capable of forming a lipid-specific, asymmetric dimer that is able to function as a viable protein-conducting channel in the membrane, without any requirement for SecYEG. PMID:23977317

  13. Specific interactions between alkali metal cations and the KcsA channel studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Yuji; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Asai, Yusuke; Oiki, Shigetoshi; Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of KcsA, a eubacterial potassium channel, displays a selectivity filter composed of four parallel peptide strands. The backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms of these strands solvate multiple K+ ions. KcsA structures show different distributions of ions within the selectivity filter in solutions containing different cations. To assess the interactions of cations with the selectivity filter, we used attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Ion-exchange-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the spectrum of KcsA soaked in K+ solution from that obtained in Li+, Na+, Rb+, and Cs+ solutions. Large spectral changes in the amide-I and -II regions were observed upon replacing K+ with smaller-sized cations Li+ and Na+ but not with larger-sized cations Rb+ and Cs+. These results strongly suggest that the selectivity filter carbonyls coordinating Rb+ or Cs+ adopt a conformation similar to those coordinating K+ (cage configuration), but those coordinating Li+ or Na+ adopt a conformation (plane configuration) considerably different from those coordinating K+. We have identified a cation-type sensitive amide-I band at 1681 cm−1 and an insensitive amide-I band at 1659 cm−1. The bands at 1650, 1639, and 1627 cm−1 observed for Na+-coordinating carbonyls were almost identical to those observed in Li+ solution, suggesting that KcsA forms a similar filter structure in Li+ and Na+ solutions. Thus, we conclude that the filter structure adopts a collapsed conformation in Li+ solution that is similar to that in Na+ solution but is in clear contrast to the X-ray crystal structure of KcsA with Li+. PMID:27493853

  14. A family of transcripts encoding water channel proteins: tissue-specific expression in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, S; Katsuhara, M; Kelly, W B; Michalowski, C B; Bohnert, H J

    1995-01-01

    Seawater-strength salt stress of the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) initially results in wilting, but full turgor is restored within approximately 2 days. We are interested in a mechanistic explanation for this behavior and, as a requisite for in-depth biochemical studies, have begun to analyze gene expression changes in roots coincident with the onset of stress. cDNAs that suggested changes in mRNA amount under stress were found; their deduced amino acid sequences share homologies with proteins of the Mip (major intrinsic protein) gene family and potentially encode aquaporins. One transcript, MipB, was found only in root RNA, whereas two other transcripts, MipA and MipC, were detected in roots and leaves. Transcript levels of MipB were of low abundance. All transcripts declined initially during salt stress but later recovered to at least prestress level. The most drastic decline was in MipA and MipC transcripts. MipA mRNA distribution in roots detected by in situ hybridization indicated that the transcript was present in all cells in the root tip. In the expansion zone of the root where vascular bundles differentiate, MipA transcript amounts were most abundant in the endodermis. In older roots, which had undergone secondary growth, MipA was highly expressed in cell layers surrounding individual xylem strands. MipA was also localized in leaf vascular tissue and, in lower amounts, in mesophyll cells. Transcripts for MipB seemed to be present exclusively in the tip of the root, in a zone before and possibly coincident with the development of a vascular system. MipA- and MipB-encoded proteins expressed in Xenopus oocytes led to increased water permeability. mRNA fluctuations of the most highly expressed MipA and MipC coincided with turgor changes in leaves under stress. As the leaves regained turgor, transcript levels of these water channel proteins increased. PMID:7549476

  15. Molecular Modeling of the Structural and Dynamical Changes in Calcium Channel TRPV5 Induced by the African-Specific A563T Variation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyun; Holmes, Ross P; Peng, Ji-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channels, vanilloid subfamily, member 5 (TRPV5) plays a key role in active Ca(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. Variations in TRPV5 occur at high frequency in African populations and may contribute to their higher efficiency of Ca(2+) reabsorption. One of the African specific variations, A563T, exhibits increased Ca(2+) transport ability. However, it is unclear how this variation influences the channel pore. On the basis of the structure of TRPV1, a TRPV5 model was generated to simulate the structural and dynamical changes induced by the A563T variation. On the basis of this model, amino acid residue 563 interacts with V540, which is one residue away from the key residue, D542, involved in Ca(2+) selectivity and Mg(2+) blockade. The A563T variation increases secondary structure stability and reduces dynamical motion of D542. In addition, the A563T variation alters the electrostatic potential of the outer surface of the pore. Differences in contact between selective filter residues and residue 563 and in electrostatic potential between the two TRPV5 variants were also observed in another model derived from an alternative alignment in the selective filters between TRPV5 and TRPV1. These findings indicate that the A563T variation induces structural, dynamical, and electrostatic changes in the TRPV5 pore, providing structural insight into the functional alterations associated with the A563T variation. PMID:26837804

  16. Effects of tetrahydrohyperforin in mouse hippocampal slices: neuroprotection, long-term potentiation and TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Montecinos-Oliva, C; Schuller, A; Parodi, J; Melo, F; Inestrosa, N C

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydrohyperforin (IDN5706) is a semi-synthetic compound derived from hyperforin (IDN5522) and is the main active principle of St. John's Wort. IDN5706 has shown numerous beneficial effects when administered to wild-type and double transgenic (APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9) mice that model Alzheimer's disease. However, its mechanism of action is currently unknown. Toward this end, we analysed field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in mouse hippocampal slices incubated with IDN5706 and in the presence of the TRPC3/6/7 activator 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365, and neurotoxic amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers. To study spatial memory, Morris water maze (MWM) behavioural tests were conducted on wild-type mice treated with IDN5706 and SKF96365. In silico studies were conducted to predict a potential pharmacophore. IDN5706 and OAG had a similar stimulating effect on fEPSPs, which was inhibited by SKF96365. IDN5706 protected from reduced fEPSPs induced by Aβ oligomers. IDN5706 improved spatial memory in wild-type mice, an effect that was counteracted by co-administration of SKF96365. Our in silico studies suggest strong pharmacophore similarity of IDN5706 and other reported TRPC6 activators (IDN5522, OAG and Hyp9). We propose that the effect of IDN5706 is mediated through activation of the TRPC3/6/7 channel subfamily. The unveiling of the drug's mechanism of action is a necessary step toward the clinical use of IDN5706 in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25039785

  17. High-efficient photo-electron transport channel in SiC constructed by depositing cocatalysts selectively on specific surface sites for visible-light H2 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Peng, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Pan, Nanyan; Guo, Zhongnan; Yuan, Wenxia

    2016-04-01

    Control cocatalyst location on a metal-free semiconductor to promote surface charge transfer for decreasing the electron-hole recombination is crucial for enhancing solar energy conversion. Based on the findings that some metals have an affinity for bonding with the specific atoms of polar semiconductors at a heterostructure interface, we herein control Pt deposition selectively on the Si sites of a micro-SiC photocatalyst surface via in-situ photo-depositing. The Pt-Si bond forming on the interface constructs an excellent channel, which is responsible for accelerating photo-electron transfer from SiC to Pt and then reducing water under visible-light. The hydrogen production is enhanced by two orders of magnitude higher than that of bare SiC, and 2.5 times higher than that of random-depositing nano-Pt with the same loading amount.

  18. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively. PMID:25700471

  19. Ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Membrane ion channels are essential for cell proliferation and appear to have a role in the development of cancer. This has initially been demonstrated for potassium channels and is meanwhile also suggested for other cation channels and Cl- channels. For some of these channels, like voltage-gated ether à go-go and Ca2+-dependent potassium channels as well as calcium and chloride channels, a cell cycle-dependent function has been demonstrated. Along with other membrane conductances, these channels control the membrane voltage and Ca2+ signaling in proliferating cells. Homeostatic parameters, such as the intracellular ion concentration, cytosolic pH and cell volume, are also governed by the activity of ion channels. Thus it will be an essential task for future studies to unravel cell cycle-specific effects of ion channels and non-specific homeostatic functions. When studying the role of ion channels in cancer cells, it is indispensable to choose experimental conditions that come close to the in vivo situation. Thus, environmental parameters, such as low oxygen pressure, acidosis and exposure to serum proteins, have to be taken into account. In order to achieve clinical application, more studies on the original cancer tissue are required, and improved animal models. Finally, it will be essential to generate more potent and specific inhibitors of ion channels to overcome the shortcomings of some of the current approaches.

  20. Use of antibodies specific to defined regions of scorpion. cap alpha. -toxin to study its interaction with its receptor site on the sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ayeb, M.E.; Bahraoui, E.M.; Granier, C.; Rochat, H.

    1986-10-21

    Five antibody populations selected by immunoaffinity chromatography for the specificity toward various regions of toxin II of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector were used to probe the interaction of this protein with its receptor site on the sodium channel. These studies indicate that two antigenic sites, one located around the disulfide bridge 12-63 and one encompassing residues 50-59, are involved in the molecular mechanisms of toxicity neutralization. Fab fragments specific to the region around disulfide bridge 12-63 inhibit binding of the /sup 125/I-labeled toxin to its receptor site. Also, these two antigenic regions are inaccessible to the antibodies when the toxin is bound to its receptor site. In contrast, the two other antigenic sites encompassing the only ..cap alpha..-helix region (residues 23-32) and a ..beta..-turn structure (residues 32-35) are accessible to the respective antibodies when the toxin is bound to its receptor. Together, these data support the recent proposal that a region made of residues that are conserved in the scorpion toxin family is involved in the binding of the toxin to the receptor.

  1. Solution structure of Phrixotoxin 1, a specific peptide inhibitor of Kv4 potassium channels from the venom of the theraphosid spider Phrixotrichus auratus

    PubMed Central

    Chagot, Benjamin; Escoubas, Pierre; Villegas, Elba; Bernard, Cédric; Ferrat, Gilles; Corzo, Gerardo; Lazdunski, Michel; Darbon, Hervé

    2004-01-01

    Animal toxins block voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) either by occluding the conduction pore (pore blockers) or by modifying the channel gating properties (gating modifiers). Gating modifiers of Kv channels bind to four equivalent extracellular sites near the S3 and S4 segments, close to the voltage sensor. Phrixotoxins are gating modifiers that bind preferentially to the closed state of the channel and fold into the Inhibitory Cystine Knot structural motif. We have solved the solution structure of Phrixotoxin 1, a gating modifier of Kv4 potassium channels. Analysis of the molecular surface and the electrostatic anisotropy of Phrixotoxin 1 and of other toxins acting on voltage-dependent potassium channels allowed us to propose a toxin interacting surface that encompasses both the surface from which the dipole moment emerges and a neighboring hydrophobic surface rich in aromatic residues. PMID:15096626

  2. Gαi2- and Gαi3-Specific Regulation of Voltage-Dependent L-Type Calcium Channels in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dizayee, Sara; Kaestner, Sonja; Kuck, Fabian; Hein, Peter; Klein, Christoph; Piekorz, Roland P.; Meszaros, Janos; Matthes, Jan; Nürnberg, Bernd; Herzig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Two pertussis toxin sensitive Gi proteins, Gi2 and Gi3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous Gi isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of Gi proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC). Methods Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gαi2 (Gαi2−/−) or Gαi3 (Gαi3−/−). mRNA levels of Gαi/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gαi and Cavα1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. Results In cardiac tissue from Gαi2−/− mice, Gαi3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187±21% and 567±59%, respectively. In Gαi3−/− mouse hearts, Gαi2 mRNA (127±5%) and protein (131±10%) levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gαi2−/− mice was lowered (−7.9±0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05) compared to wild-type cells (−10.7±0.5 pA/pF, n = 22), whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gαi3−/− mice (−14.3±0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05). Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gαi2 (but not of Gαi3) and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gαi3−/−. The pore forming Cavα1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Cavα1 and Cavβ2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gαi2. Conclusion Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform-specific modulation of L-VDCC by G

  3. A model for the generation of localized transient [Na{sup +}] elevations in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Fameli, Nicola; Kuo, Kuo-Hsing; Breemen, Cornelis van

    2009-11-20

    We present a stochastic computational model to study the mechanism of signaling between a source and a target ionic transporter, both localized on the plasma membrane (PM). In general this requires a nanometer-scale cytoplasmic space, or nanodomain, between the PM and a peripheral organelle to reflect ions back towards the PM. Specifically we investigate the coupling between Na{sup +} entry via the transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX), a process which is essential for reloading the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}ATPase (SERCA) and maintaining Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in activated vascular smooth muscle. Having previously modeled the flow of Ca{sup 2+} between reverse NCX and SERCA during SR refilling, this quantitative approach now allows us to model the upstream linkage of Na{sup +} entry through TRPC6 to reversal of NCX. We have implemented a random walk (RW) Monte Carlo (MC) model with simulations mimicking a diffusion process originating at the TRPC6 within PM-SR junctions. The model calculates the average Na{sup +} in the nanospace and also produces profiles as a function of distance from the source. Our results highlight the necessity of a strategic juxtaposition of the relevant ion translocators as well as other physical structures within the nanospaces to permit adequate Na{sup +} build-up to initiate NCX reversal and Ca{sup 2+} influx to refill the SR.

  4. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the "carrier" snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th - 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide.

  5. Gliadin fragments and a specific gliadin 33-mer peptide close KATP channels and induce insulin secretion in INS-1E cells and rat islets of langerhans.

    PubMed

    Dall, Morten; Calloe, Kirstine; Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin; Larsen, Jesper; Schmitt, Nicole; Josefsen, Knud; Buschard, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, diabetes incidence is reduced by a gluten-free diet. Gluten peptides, such as the compound gliadin, can cross the intestinal barrier and may directly affect pancreatic beta cells. We investigated the effects of enzymatically-digested gliadin in NOD mice, INS-1E cells and rat islets. Six injections of gliadin digest in 6-week-old NOD mice did not affect diabetes development, but increased weight gain (20% increase by day 100). In INS-1E cells, incubation with gliadin digest induced a dose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, up to 2.5-fold after 24 hours. A similar effect was observed in isolated rat islets (1.6-fold increase). In INS-1E cells, diazoxide reduced the stimulatory effect of gliadin digest. Additionally, gliadin digest was shown to decrease current through KATP-channels. A specific gliadin 33-mer had a similar effect, both on current and insulin secretion. Finally, INS-1E incubation with gliadin digest potentiated palmitate-induced insulin secretion by 13% compared to controls. Our data suggest that gliadin fragments may contribute to the beta-cell hyperactivity observed prior to the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23785500

  6. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the "carrier" snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th - 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  7. Seasonal variations of marine protist community structure based on taxon-specific traits using the eastern English Channel as a model coastal system.

    PubMed

    Genitsaris, Savvas; Monchy, Sébastien; Viscogliosi, Eric; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Christaki, Urania

    2015-05-01

    Previous microscopy-based studies in the eastern English Channel have revealed it to be a productive meso-eutrophic coastal ecosystem, characterized by strong repeating patterns in microplankton succession. The present study examines the seasonal structure of the entire protistan community from March 2011 to July 2013, using tag pyrosequencing of the V2-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene. A total of 1242 OTUs and 28 high-level taxonomic groups, which included previously undetected taxa in the area, were identified. The detected OTUs were considered according to taxon-specific traits, which included their trophic role, abundance and specialization level. Taxa differentiation based on specialization level rather than abundance was more informative in describing community organization. While generalists were always abundant, numerous specialists that were either rare or absent in most samples, increased in abundance for short periods, appearing to be overall abundant. Statistical and network analyses showed that the protistan seasonal organization was influenced by environmental parameters. It also highlighted that in addition to grazers, fungi and parasites played potentially significant roles during phytoplankton blooms. Overall, while the protistan succession was mainly shaped by environmental variations, biotic interactions among co-occurring taxa were the main structural drivers of the temporal assemblages.

  8. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  9. The Ca{sup 2+} channel TRPML3 specifically interacts with the mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16 to regulate autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Suzy; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Split-ubiquitin MY2H screen identified GATE16 as an interacting protein of TRPML3. •TRPML3 specifically binds to a mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16, not to LC3B. •The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 facilitates autophagosome formation. •GATE16 is expressed in both autophagosome and extra-autophagosomal compartments. -- Abstract: TRPML3 is a Ca{sup 2+} permeable cation channel expressed in multiple intracellular compartments. Although TRPML3 is implicated in autophagy, how TRPML3 can regulate autophagy is not understood. To search interacting proteins with TRPML3 in autophagy, we performed split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MY2H) screening with TRPML3-loop as a bait and identified GATE16, a mammalian ATG8 homologue. GST pull-down assay revealed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop specifically bind to GATE16, not to LC3B. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments showed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop pull down only the lipidated form of GATE16, indicating that the interaction occurs exclusively at the organellar membrane. The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 and GATE16-positive vesicle formation were increased in starvation induced autophagy, suggesting that the interaction facilitates the function of GATE16 in autophagosome formation. However, GATE16 was not required for TRPML3 trafficking to autophagosomes. Experiments using dominant-negative (DN) TRPML3(D458K) showed that GATE16 is localized not only in autophagosomes but also in extra-autophagosomal compartments, by contrast with LC3B. Since GATE16 acts at a later stage of the autophagosome biogenesis, our results suggest that TRPML3 plays a role in autophagosome maturation through the interaction with GATE16, by providing Ca{sup 2+} in the fusion process.

  10. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth by Exposure to a Specific Time-Varying Electromagnetic Field Involves T-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Carly A.; Buckner, Alison L.; Koren, Stan A.; Persinger, Michael A.; Lafrenie, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels. Blocking Ca2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25875081

  11. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  12. REACH SPECIFIC CHANNEL STABILIZATION BASED ON COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF VALLEY FILL HISTORY, ALLUVIAL ARCHITECTURE AND GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY IN A MOUNTAIN STREAM IN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN, NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kingston meadow, located in the Toiyabe Range, is one of many wet meadow complexes threatened by rapid channel incision in the mountain ranges of the central Great Basin. Channel incision can lower the baselevel for groundwater discharge and de-water meadow complexes resulting in...

  13. Characterization of the driving force as a modulator of gating in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels - evidence for specific elementary properties.

    PubMed

    Benz, I; Haverkampf, K; Kohlhardt, M

    1998-09-01

    Single cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels and, comparatively, two other members of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel family, cardiac K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, were studied in the inside-out recording mode in order to analyze influence and significance of the electrochemical K+ gradient for open-state kinetics of these K+ channels. The conductive state of K+(ATP) channels was defined as a function of the electrochemical K+ gradient in that increased driving force correlates with shortened open-channel lifetime. Flux coupling of gating can be largely excluded as the underlying mechanism for two reasons: (i) tauopen proved identical in 23 pS, 56 pS and 80 pS channels; (ii) K+(ATP) channel protonation by an external pH shift from 9.5 to 5.5 reduced conductance without a concomitant detectable change of tauopen. Since gating continued to operate at EK, i.e., in the absence of K+ permeation through the pore, K+ driving force cannot be causally involved in gating. Rather the driving force acts to modulate the gating process similar to Rb+ whose interference with an externally located binding site stabilizes the open state. In K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, the open state is essentially independent on driving force meaning that their gating apparatus does not sense the electrochemical K+ gradient. Thus, K+(ATP) channels differ in an important functional aspect which may be tentatively explained by a structural peculiarity of their gating apparatus.

  14. Chronic Dysfunction of Astrocytic Inwardly Rectifying K+ Channels Specific to the Neocortical Epileptic Focus After Fluid Percussion Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Tessandra H.; Eastman, Clifford L.; Groblewski, Peter A.; Fender, Jason S.; Verley, Derek R.; Cook, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytic inwardly rectifying K+ currents (IKIR) have an important role in extracellular K+ homeostasis, which influences neuronal excitability, and serum extravasation has been linked to impaired KIR-mediated K+ buffering and chronic hyperexcitability. Head injury induces acute impairment in astroglial membrane IKIR and impaired K+ buffering in the rat hippocampus, but chronic spontaneous seizures appear in the perilesional neocortex—not the hippocampus—in the early weeks to months after injury. Thus we examined astrocytic KIR channel pathophysiology in both neocortex and hippocampus after rostral parasaggital fluid percussion injury (rpFPI). rpFPI induced greater acute serum extravasation and metabolic impairment in the perilesional neocortex than in the underlying hippocampus, and in situ whole cell recordings showed a greater acute loss of astrocytic IKIR in neocortex than hippocampus. IKIR loss persisted through 1 mo after injury only in the neocortical epileptic focus, but fully recovered in the hippocampus that did not generate chronic seizures. Neocortical cell-attached recordings showed no loss or an increase of IKIR in astrocytic somata. Confocal imaging showed depletion of KIR4.1 immunoreactivity especially in processes—not somata—of neocortical astrocytes, whereas hippocampal astrocytes appeared normal. In naïve animals, intracortical infusion of serum, devoid of coagulation-mediating thrombin activity, reproduces the effects of rpFPI both in vivo and at the cellular level. In vivo serum infusion induces partial seizures similar to those induced by rpFPI, whereas bath-applied serum, but not dialyzed albumin, rapidly silenced astrocytic KIR membrane currents in whole cell and cell-attached patch-clamp recordings in situ. Thus both acute impairment in astrocytic IKIR and chronic spontaneous seizures typical of rpFPI are reproduced by serum extravasation, whereas the chronic impairment in astroglial IKIR is specific to the neocortex that develops

  15. Specific Fusion of β-1,4-Endoglucanase and β-1,4-Glucosidase Enhances Cellulolytic Activity and Helps in Channeling of Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Nidhi; Sawant, Sneha; Anil, Annamma; Lali, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Identification and design of new cellulolytic enzymes with higher catalytic efficiency are a key factor in reducing the production cost of lignocellulosic bioalcohol. We report here identification of a novel β-glucosidase (Gluc1C) from Paenibacillus sp. strain MTCC 5639 and construction of bifunctional chimeric proteins based on Gluc1C and Endo5A, a β-1,4-endoglucanase isolated from MTCC 5639 earlier. The 448-amino-acid-long Gluc1C contained a GH superfamily 1 domain and hydrolyzed cellodextrin up to a five-sugar chain length, with highest efficiency toward cellobiose. Addition of Gluc1C improved the ability of Endo5A to release the reducing sugars from carboxymethyl cellulose. We therefore constructed six bifunctional chimeric proteins based on Endo5A and Gluc1C varying in the positions and sizes of linkers. One of the constructs, EG5, consisting of Endo5A-(G4S)3-Gluc1C, demonstrated 3.2- and 2-fold higher molar specific activities for β-glucosidase and endoglucanase, respectively, than Gluc1C and Endo5A alone. EG5 also showed 2-fold higher catalytic efficiency than individual recombinant enzymes. The thermal denaturation monitored by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy demonstrated that the fusion of Gluc1C with Endo5A resulted in increased thermostability of both domains by 5°C and 9°C, respectively. Comparative hydrolysis experiments done on alkali-treated rice straw and CMC indicated 2-fold higher release of product by EG5 than that by the physical mixture of Endo5A and Gluc1C, providing a rationale for channeling of intermediates. Addition of EG5 to a commercial enzyme preparation significantly enhanced release of reducing sugars from pretreated biomass, indicating its commercial applicability. PMID:22904050

  16. Learning Channels and Verbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fan-Yu; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the basics of learning channels and how specification of stimuli can help enhance verbal behavior. This article will define learning channels and the role of the ability matrix in training verbal behavior.

  17. Differences between Formal and Informal Communicative Channels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compares formal and informal organizational communication structures within a large, technically oriented midwestern state governmental agency, specifically focusing on salience, channel factors, and channel usage. Suggests that informal channels in this organization were more highly evaluated in general. (SR)

  18. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. Link to an... across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel, (GIWW mile 356.1) at Galveston, Texas,...

  19. Natural killer cells and single nucleotide polymorphisms of specific ion channels and receptor genes in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Huth, Teilah; Chacko, Anu; Johnston, Samantha; Smith, Pete; Staines, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this paper was to determine natural killer (NK) cytotoxic activity and if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotypes in transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels and acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) were present in isolated NK cells from previously identified myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients. Subjects and methods A total of 39 ME/CFS patients (51.69±2 years old) and 30 unfatigued controls (47.60±2.39 years old) were included in this study. Patients were defined according to the 1994 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Flow cytometry protocols were used to examine NK cytotoxic activity. A total of 678 SNPs from isolated NK cells were examined for 21 mammalian TRP ion channel genes and for nine mammalian AChR genes via the Agena Bioscience iPlex Gold assay. SNP association and genotype was determined using analysis of variance and Plink software. Results ME/CFS patients had a significant reduction in NK percentage lysis of target cells (17%±4.68%) compared with the unfatigued control group (31%±6.78%). Of the 678 SNPs examined, eleven SNPs for TRP ion channel genes (TRPC4, TRPC2, TRPM3, and TRPM8) were identified in the ME/CFS group. Five of these SNPs were associated with TRPM3, while the remainder were associated with TRPM8, TRPC2, and TRPC4 (P<0.05). Fourteen SNPs were associated with nicotinic and muscarinic AChR genes: six with CHRNA3, while the remainder were associated with CHRNA2, CHRNB4, CHRNA5, and CHRNE (P<0.05). There were sixteen genotypes identified from SNPs in TRP ion channels and AChRs for TRPM3 (n=5), TRPM8 (n=2), TRPC4 (n=3), TRPC2 (n=1), CHRNE (n=1), CHRNA2 (n=2), CHRNA3 (n=1), and CHRNB4 (n=1) (P<0.05). Conclusion We identified a number of SNPs and genotypes for TRP ion channels and AChRs from isolated NK cells in patients with ME/CFS, suggesting these SNPs and genotypes may be involved in changes in NK cell function and the development of ME/CFS pathology

  20. Identification and molecular characterization of three new K+-channel specific toxins from the Chinese scorpion Mesobuthus martensii Karsch revealing intronic number polymorphism and alternative splicing in duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian-Chun; Zhang, Lei; Nie, Yao; Luo, Xuesong

    2012-04-01

    K(+)-channel specific toxins from scorpions are powerful probes used in the structural and functional characterization of different subfamilies of K(+)-channels which are thought to be the most diverse ion channels. However, only a limited number of K(+)-channel toxins have been identified from scorpions so far; moreover, little is known about the mechanisms for the generation of a combinatorial peptide library in a venom gland of a scorpion. Here, we identified and characterized three new K(+)-channel toxin-like peptides from the scorpion Mesobuthus martensii Karsch, which were referred to as BmKcug1, BmKcug2 and BmKcugx, respectively. BmKcug1 and BmKcug2 are two new members of α-KTx1 subfamily, and have been classified as α-KTx1.14 and α-KTx1.15, respectively. BmKcugx represents a new subfamily of K(+)-channel specific toxins which was classified into α-KTx22. BmKcugx was thus classified as α-KTx22.1. Genomic analysis demonstrated that BmKcugx gene has two exons interrupted by an intron inserted in the signal peptide encoding region, whereas BmKcug1a (a close homologue of BmKcug1)/BmKcug2 gene was interrupted by two introns, located within the 5'UTR of the gene and in the signal peptide encoding region, respectively. Transcriptomic analysis for the venom glands of M. martensii Karsch indicated that the abundances of the transcripts of BmKcug1a and BmKcug2 are much higher than that of BmKcugx; it suggests that the intron in 5'UTR could markedly increase the expression level of the K(+)-channel toxins. Alignment of the genomic sequences of BmKcug1a and BmKcug2 revealed that an alternative splicing event occurred at the intron 1-exon 2 junction in the 5'UTR of BmKcug2 transcript.

  1. Biochemical and physiological characterization of a new Na(+)-channel specific peptide from the venom of the Argentinean scorpion Tityus trivittatus.

    PubMed

    Coronas, Fredy I V; Diego-García, Elia; Restano-Cassulini, Rita; de Roodt, Adolfo R; Possani, Lourival D

    2015-06-01

    A new peptide with 61 amino acids cross-linked by 4 disulfide bridges, with molecular weight of 6938.12Da, and an amidated C-terminal amino acid residue was purified and characterized. The primary structure was obtained by direct Edman degradation and sequencing its gene. The peptide is lethal to mammals and was shown to be similar (95% identity) to toxin Ts1 (gamma toxin) from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus; it was named Tt1g (from T. trivittatus toxin 1 gamma-like). Tt1g was assayed on several sub-types of Na(+)-channels showing displacement of the currents to more negative voltages, being the hNav1.3 the most affected channel. This toxin displays characteristics typical to the β-type sodium scorpion toxins. Lethality tests and physiological assays indicate that this peptide is probably the most important toxic component of this species of scorpion, known for causing human fatalities in the South American continent.

  2. Biochemical and physiological characterization of a new Na(+)-channel specific peptide from the venom of the Argentinean scorpion Tityus trivittatus.

    PubMed

    Coronas, Fredy I V; Diego-García, Elia; Restano-Cassulini, Rita; de Roodt, Adolfo R; Possani, Lourival D

    2015-06-01

    A new peptide with 61 amino acids cross-linked by 4 disulfide bridges, with molecular weight of 6938.12Da, and an amidated C-terminal amino acid residue was purified and characterized. The primary structure was obtained by direct Edman degradation and sequencing its gene. The peptide is lethal to mammals and was shown to be similar (95% identity) to toxin Ts1 (gamma toxin) from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus; it was named Tt1g (from T. trivittatus toxin 1 gamma-like). Tt1g was assayed on several sub-types of Na(+)-channels showing displacement of the currents to more negative voltages, being the hNav1.3 the most affected channel. This toxin displays characteristics typical to the β-type sodium scorpion toxins. Lethality tests and physiological assays indicate that this peptide is probably the most important toxic component of this species of scorpion, known for causing human fatalities in the South American continent. PMID:24862827

  3. Specification of skeletal muscle differentiation by repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST)-regulated Kv7.4 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Barrese, Vincenzo; Formisano, Luigi; Miceli, Francesco; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the expression of potassium (K+) channels is a pivotal event during skeletal muscle differentiation. In mouse C2C12 cells, similarly to human skeletal muscle cells, myotube formation increased the expression of Kv7.1, Kv7.3, and Kv7.4, the last showing the highest degree of regulation. In C2C12 cells, Kv7.4 silencing by RNA interference reduced the expression levels of differentiation markers (myogenin, myosin heavy chain, troponinT-1, and Pax3) and impaired myotube formation and multinucleation. In Kv7.4-silenced cells, the differentiation-promoting effect of the Kv7 activator N-(2-amino-4-(4-fluorobenzylamino)-phenyl)-carbamic acid ethyl ester (retigabine) was abrogated. Expression levels for the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) declined during myotube formation. Transcript levels for Kv7.4, as well as for myogenin, troponinT-1, and Pax3, were reduced by REST overexpression and enhanced upon REST suppression by RNA interference. Four regions containing potential REST-binding sites in the 5′ untranslated region and in the first intron of the Kv7.4 gene were identified by bioinformatic analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that REST binds to these regions, exhibiting a higher efficiency in myoblasts than in myotubes. These data suggest that Kv7.4 plays a permissive role in skeletal muscle differentiation and highlight REST as a crucial transcriptional regulator for this K+ channel subunit. PMID:23242999

  4. Design and characterization of a laterally mounted phased-array transducer breast-specific MRgHIFU device with integrated 11-channel receiver array

    PubMed Central

    Payne, A.; Merrill, R.; Minalga, E.; Vyas, U.; Bever, J. de; Todd, N.; Hadley, R.; Dumont, E.; Neumayer, L.; Christensen, D.; Roemer, R.; Parker, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the design and preliminary evaluation of a new laterally mounted phased-array MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) system with an integrated 11-channel phased-array radio frequency (RF) coil intended for breast cancer treatment. The design goals for the system included the ability to treat the majority of tumor locations, to increase the MR image’s signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) throughout the treatment volume and to provide adequate comfort for the patient. Methods: In order to treat the majority of the breast volume, the device was designed such that the treated breast is suspended in a 17-cm diameter treatment cylinder. A laterally shooting 1-MHz, 256-element phased-array ultrasound transducer with flexible positioning is mounted outside the treatment cylinder. This configuration achieves a reduced water volume to minimize RF coil loading effects, to position the coils closer to the breast for increased signal sensitivity, and to reduce the MR image noise associated with using water as the coupling fluid. This design uses an 11-channel phased-array RF coil that is placed on the outer surface of the cylinder surrounding the breast. Mechanical positioning of the transducer and electronic steering of the focal spot enable placement of the ultrasound focus at arbitrary locations throughout the suspended breast. The treatment platform allows the patient to lie prone in a face-down position. The system was tested for comfort with 18 normal volunteers and SNR capabilities in one normal volunteer and for heating accuracy and stability in homogeneous phantom and inhomogeneous ex vivo porcine tissue. Results: There was a 61% increase in mean relative SNR achieved in a homogeneous phantom using the 11-channel RF coil when compared to using only a single-loop coil around the chest wall. The repeatability of the system’s energy delivery in a single location was excellent, with less than 3% variability between repeated

  5. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  6. TRP channels in disease.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Ehrlich, B E

    2007-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of proteins with six main subfamilies termed the TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin) groups. The sheer number of different TRPs with distinct functions supports the statement that these channels are involved in a wide range of processes ranging from sensing of thermal and chemical signals to reloading intracellular stores after responding to an extracellular stimulus. Mutations in TRPs are linked to pathophysiology and specific diseases. An understanding of the role of TRPs in normal physiology is just beginning; the progression from mutations in TRPs to pathophysiology and disease will follow. In this review, we focus on two distinct aspects of TRP channel physiology, the role of TRP channels in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and their role in the transduction of painful stimuli in sensory neurons. PMID:18193640

  7. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  8. Learning in Tactile Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gescheider, George A.; Wright, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrotactile intensity-discrimination thresholds for sinusoidal stimuli applied to the thenar eminence of the hand declined as a function of practice. However, improvement was confined to the tactile information-processing channel in which learning had occurred. Specifically, improvements in performance with training within the Pacinian-corpuscle…

  9. A distal phenylalanine clamp in a hydrophobic channel controls the substrate specificity in the quorum-quenching metallo-γ-lactonase (AiiA) from Bacillus thuringiensis†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ce Feng; Liu, Dali; Momb, Jessica; Thomas, Pei W.; Lajoie, Ashley; Petsko, Gregory A.; Fast, Walter; Ringe, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    AiiA is a metal-dependent N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolase that displays broad substrate specificity, but shows preference for substrates with long N-acyl substitutions. Previously, crystal structures of AiiA in complex with the ring-opened product N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine revealed binding interactions near the metal center, but did not identify a binding pocket for the N-acyl chains of longer substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of an AiiA mutant, F107W, determined in the presence and absence of N-decanoyl-l-homoserine. F107 is located in a hydrophobic cavity adjacent to the previously identified ligand binding pocket, and F107W results in the formation of an unexpected interaction with the ring-opened product. Notably, the structure reveals a previously unidentified hydrophobic binding pocket for the substrate’s N-acyl chain. Two aromatic residues, F64 and F68 form a hydrophobic clamp, centered around the seventh carbon in the product-bound structure’s decanoyl chain, making an interaction that would also be available for longer substrates, but not for shorter substrates. Steady-state kinetics using substrates of various lengths with AiiA bearing mutations at the hydrophobic clamp, including insertion of a redox sensitive cysteine pair, confirms the importance of this hydrophobic feature for substrate preference. Identifying the specificity determinants of AiiA will aid the development of more selective quorum-quenching enzymes as tools and as potential therapeutics. PMID:23387521

  10. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  11. Measurement of the B0s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B0s → D-sμ+νX

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B0s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B0s → D-sμ+νX, with D–s → π– and Φ → K+K– (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1. We find a flavor-specific lifetime τfs(B0s) = 1.479 ± 0.010(stat) ± 0.021(syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B0 lifetime using the analogous B0 → D–μ+νX decay with D– → Φπ– and Φ → K+K–, yielding τ(B0) = 1.534 ± 0.019(stat) ± 0.021(syst) ps.more » Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B0s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. As a result, taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio τfs(B0s)/τ(B0) = 0.964 ± 0.013(stat) ± 0.007(syst).« less

  12. Measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-02-13

    We present an updated measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime using the semileptonic decays B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX, with D(s)(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-) (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at √[s]=1.96  TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4  fb(-1). We find a flavor-specific lifetime τ(fs)(B(s)(0))=1.479±0.010(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. This technique is also used to determine the B(0) lifetime using the analogous B(0)→D(-)μ(+)νX decay with D(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-), yielding τ(B(0))=1.534±0.019(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B(s)(0) lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio τ(fs)(B(s)(0))/τ(B(0))=0.964±0.013(stat)±0.007(syst).

  13. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain. PMID:24132796

  14. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  15. Permeation in potassium channels: implications for channel structure.

    PubMed

    Yellen, G

    1987-01-01

    any potassium channel by binding where potassium does, but too tightly. It seems more surprising that blockade by TEA+ and other quaternary ammonium ions is also well conserved. All three of the potassium channels considered here have a mouth that binds QA ions and that has a nearby hydrophobic pocket; the frog DR and the CaK channels also have a TEA+-specific site on the opposite side. The QA site might not be an obligatory feature of potassium channels, but rather a conserved evolutionary vestige.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  17. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl−) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl− channels have shown that Cl− channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl− channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl− channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl− channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl− channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl− channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  18. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3-4.9 W/cm(2)) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  19. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3–4.9 W/cm2) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  20. Clofilium inhibits Slick and Slack potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    de los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Stolpe, Kathleen; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance potassium channels have been recently discovered, and are found in the central nervous system and in the heart. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl−, and Slick channels are also inhibited by adenosine triphospate (ATP). An important role of setting the resting membrane potential and controlling the basal excitability of neurons has been suggested for these channels. In addition, no specific blockers for these channels are known up to the present. With the purpose of studying the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels, the effects of exposure to the antiarrhythmic compound clofilium were evaluated. Clofilium was able to modulate the activity of Slick and Slack channels effectively, with a stronger effect on Slack than Slick channels. In order to evaluate the pharmacological behavior of Slick and Slack channels further, 38 commonly used potassium channel blockers were tested. Screening of these compounds did not reveal any modulators of Slick and Slack channels, except for clofilium. The present study provides a first approach towards elucidating the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels and could be the basis for future studies aimed at developing potent and specific blockers and activators for these channels. PMID:23271893

  1. Requirements for signaling channel authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

  2. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs), are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV), Ca2+ (CaV), and K+ (KV) channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR), and the ATP-activated (P2XnR) receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+), whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−). In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers) of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific ion channel-linked disease (e

  3. Dense spermatozoa in stallion ejaculates contain lower concentrations of mRNAs encoding the sperm specific calcium channel 1, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha than less dense spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ing, N H; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2014-07-15

    Stallions are unique among livestock in that, like men, they commonly receive medical treatment for subfertility. In both species, about 15% of individuals have normal semen parameters but are subfertile, indicating a need for novel analyses of spermatozoa function. One procedure for improving fertilizing capability of stallions and men is isolation of dense spermatozoa from an ejaculate for use in artificial insemination. In the current study, dense and less dense spermatozoa were purified by density gradient centrifugation from individual ejaculates from seven reproductively normal adult stallions. The RNA isolated from the spermatozoa seemed to be naturally fragmented to an average length of 250 bases, consistent with reports of spermatozoa RNA from other species. The DNAse treatment of RNA prepared from spermatozoa removed any genomic DNA contamination, as assessed by PCR with intron spanning primers for the protamine 1 (PRM1) gene. Concentrations of seven mRNAs in spermatozoa, correlated with the fertility of men and bulls, were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in dense and less dense spermatozoa. Concentrations of four mRNAs were two- to four-fold lower in dense spermatozoa compared with less dense spermatozoa: Encoding the spermatozoa-specific calcium channel (P < 0.03), ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3 (P < 0.02), aromatase (P < 0.02), and estrogen receptor alpha (P < 0.08). In contrast, concentrations of three other mRNAs, encoding PRM1 and heat shock proteins HSPA8 and DNAJC4, were not different (P > 0.1). These results identify new differences in mRNA concentrations in populations of spermatozoa with dissimilar densities.

  4. Amiloride Selectively Blocks the Low Threshold (T) Calcium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Min; Presser, Fernando; Morad, Martin

    1988-04-01

    More than one type of voltage-gated calcium channel has been identified in muscle cells and neurons. Many specific organic and inorganic blockers of the conventional, slowly inactivating high threshold (L) calcium channel have been reported. No specific blockers of the low threshold (T) channel have been as yet identified. Amiloride, a potassium sparing diuretic, has now been shown to selectively block the low threshold calcium channel in mouse neuroblastoma and chick dorsal root ganglion neurons. The selective blockade of the T-type calcium channel will allow identification of this channel in different tissues and characterization of its specific physiological role.

  5. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  6. M channel enhancers and physiological M channel block.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Pettinger, Louisa; Huang, Dongyang; Gamper, Nikita

    2012-02-15

    M-type (Kv7, KCNQ) K(+) channels control the resting membrane potential of many neurons, including peripheral nociceptive sensory neurons. Several M channel enhancers were suggested as prospective analgesics, and targeting M channels specifically in peripheral nociceptors is a plausible strategy for peripheral analgesia. However, receptor-induced inhibition of M channels in nociceptors is often observed in inflammation and may contribute to inflammatory pain. Such inhibition is predominantly mediated by phospholipase C. We investigated four M channel enhancers (retigabine, flupirtine, zinc pyrithione and H(2)O(2)) for their ability to overcome M channel inhibition via two phospholipase C-mediated mechanisms, namely depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) and a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) (an action mediated by calmodulin). Data from overexpressed Kv7.2/Kv7.3 heteromers and native M currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons suggest the following conclusions. (i) All enhancers had a dual effect on M channel activity, a negative shift in voltage dependence and an increase of the maximal current at saturating voltages. The enhancers differed in their efficacy to produce these effects. (ii) Both PIP(2) depletion and Ca(2+)/calmodulin strongly reduced the M current amplitude; however, at voltages near the threshold for M channel activation (-60 mV) all enhancers were able to restore M channel activity to a control level or above, while at saturating voltages the effects were more variable. (iii) Receptor-mediated inhibition of M current in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons did not reduce the efficacy of retigabine or flupirtine to hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. In conclusion, we show that all four M channel enhancers tested could overcome both PIP(2) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-induced inhibition of Kv7.2/7.3 at voltages close to the threshold for action potential firing (-60 mV) but generally had reduced efficacy at a

  7. Quantum channels with a finite memory

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Garry; Mancini, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study quantum communication channels with correlated noise effects, i.e., quantum channels with memory. We derive a model for correlated noise channels that includes a channel memory state. We examine the case where the memory is finite, and derive bounds on the classical and quantum capacities. For the entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities it is shown that these bounds are attainable for certain classes of channel. Also, we show that the structure of any finite-memory state is unimportant in the asymptotic limit, and specifically, for a perfect finite-memory channel where no information is lost to the environment, achieving the upper bound implies that the channel is asymptotically noiseless.

  8. Cardiovascular KATP channels and advanced aging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua-Qian; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Coetzee, William A.

    2016-01-01

    With advanced aging, there is a decline in innate cardiovascular function. This decline is not general in nature. Instead, specific changes occur that impact the basic cardiovascular function, which include alterations in biochemical pathways and ion channel function. This review focuses on a particular ion channel that couple the latter two processes, namely the KATP channel, which opening is promoted by alterations in intracellular energy metabolism. We show that the intrinsic properties of the KATP channel changes with advanced aging and argue that the channel can be further modulated by biochemical changes. The importance is widespread, given the ubiquitous nature of the KATP channel in the cardiovascular system where it can regulate processes as diverse as cardiac function, blood flow and protection mechanisms against superimposed stress, such as cardiac ischemia. We highlight questions that remain to be answered before the KATP channel can be considered as a viable target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27733235

  9. The Novel KV7.2/KV7.3 Channel Opener ICA-069673 Reveals Subtype-Specific Functional Roles in Guinea Pig Detrusor Smooth Muscle Excitability and Contractility.

    PubMed

    Provence, Aaron; Malysz, John; Petkov, Georgi V

    2015-09-01

    The physiologic roles of voltage-gated KV7 channel subtypes (KV7.1-KV7.5) in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) are poorly understood. Here, we sought to elucidate the functional roles of KV7.2/KV7.3 channels in guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673 [N-(2-chloro-5-pyrimidinyl)-3,4-difluorobenzamide]. We employed a multilevel experimental approach using Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, isometric DSM tension recordings, fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging, and perforated whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Western blot experiments revealed the protein expression of KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits in DSM tissue. In isolated DSM cells, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy further confirmed protein expression for KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits, where they localize within the vicinity of the cell membrane. ICA-069673 inhibited spontaneous phasic, pharmacologically induced, and nerve-evoked contractions in DSM isolated strips in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of ICA-069673 on DSM spontaneous phasic and tonic contractions were abolished in the presence of the KV7 channel inhibitor XE991 [10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone dihydrochloride]. Under conditions of elevated extracellular K(+) (60 mM), the effects of ICA-069673 on DSM tonic contractions were significantly attenuated. ICA-069673 decreased the global intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DSM cells, an effect blocked by the L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor nifedipine. ICA-069673 hyperpolarized the membrane potential and inhibited spontaneous action potentials of isolated DSM cells, effects that were blocked in the presence of XE991. In conclusion, using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673, this study provides strong evidence for a critical role for the KV7.2- and KV7.3-containing channels in DSM function at both cellular and tissue levels.

  10. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  11. Channelized Optical Waveguides On Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, F. S.; Seaton, C. T.

    1987-02-01

    Silicon provides a natural substrate base for the development of channel waveguides and their integration with optoelectronic components. Using epitaxial growth, selective doping, and plasma etching, channel waveguides can be fabricated using single crystal silicon alone. Oxide layers of low optical index are readily formed by thermal means on silicon to provide a base upon which low-loss film waveguides can be formed by ion exchange and implantation, chemical vapor deposition, and physical vapor deposition. Thermally oxidized and nitrided layers provide a simple means for developing waveguides. The channel shape for ridge waveguides can be delineated by chemical etching and ion milling techniques. The anisotropic etch characteristics of silicon provide a natural channel for imbedding waveguides using organic and inorganic materials. This paper will review common semiconductor processing techniques used for the formation of channel waveguides on silicon and the performance results obtained to date. The use of channel waveguides for specific device developments will be described and the most promising areas for future development will be addressed.

  12. 33 CFR 117.1005 - Chincoteague Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chincoteague Channel. 117.1005 Section 117.1005 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1005 Chincoteague Channel. The draw...

  13. 33 CFR 117.1005 - Chincoteague Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chincoteague Channel. 117.1005 Section 117.1005 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1005 Chincoteague Channel. The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.1005 - Chincoteague Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chincoteague Channel. 117.1005 Section 117.1005 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1005 Chincoteague Channel. The draw...

  15. 33 CFR 117.1005 - Chincoteague Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chincoteague Channel. 117.1005 Section 117.1005 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1005 Chincoteague Channel. The draw...

  16. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  17. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  18. Age of Martian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The ages of large Martian channels have been studied by determining the relative abundances of craters superimposed on channels and adjacent terrains and by examining superposition relationships between channels and plains and mantle materials. The channels are extremely old, are spatially confined and temporally related to the ancient cratered terrain, and in many cases are related to the as yet poorly understood genetic processes of fretting and chaos formation. No evidence is found for recent channel activity.

  19. [Synopsis about the hypothesis of "information channel" of channel-collateral system].

    PubMed

    Chang, Xi-Lang

    2008-10-01

    The author of the present paper founded a theorem about the "incompleteness of single channel structure" (nerve, blood vessel, lymphatic, interspace, aperture, etc.) through quantitative and qualitative analysis about the economic information channel in the human body, which eliminates the probability of single channel structure in the information channel of channel (meridian)-collateral system. After comprehensive analysis on the current researches, the author puts forward a neodoxy, i.e., the body "information channel" structure of the channel-collateral system, mainly follows the distribution regularity of systemic statistics, and is not a single specific entity; various layers of the information channel in the main stems of the channel-collaterals are composed of optimized structure tissues. Hence, the structure of this information channel of channel-collateral system is an overall-optimized, sequential and compatible systemic structure. From this neodoxy, the author brings forward a working principle of channel-collaterals, which is supported theoretically by bio-auxology. The longitudinal distribution of the main stems of meridian-collaterals is considered to result from that in the process of the animal evolution, in the animals moving forward, the microscopic complicated movement of intracorporeal information and energy molecules is related to the forward macroscopic and non-uniform movement of organism in trans-measure. Its impulse and kinetic momentum forms a main vector in the longitudinal direction of the body (the direction of the main stem of channel-collaterals). In order to adapt to and utilize natural regularities, the main stems of the channel-collaterals gradually differentiate and evolve in the living organism, forming a whole system. The "hypothesis of biological origin of channel-collateral system" and "that of information channel of the channel-collaterals in the body" constitute a relatively complete theoretical system framework.

  20. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  1. Turbulent supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Richard; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    The effects of compressibility are studied in low Reynolds number turbulent supersonic channel flow via a direct numerical simulation. A pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which is cast in a characteristic, non-conservative form and allows one to specify exact wall boundary conditions, consistent with the field equations, is integrated using a fifth-order compact upwind scheme for the Euler part, a fourth-order Padé scheme for the viscous terms and a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta time integration method. Coleman et al fully developed supersonic channel flow at M?=?1.5 and Re?=?3000 is used to test the method. The nature of fluctuating variables is investigated in detail for the wall layer and the core region based on scatter plots. Fluctuations conditioned on sweeps and ejections in the wall layer are especially instructive, showing that positive temperature, entropy and total temperature fluctuations are mainly due to sweep events in this specific situation of wall cooling. The effect of compressibility on the turbulence structure is in many respects similar to that found in homogeneous shear turbulence and in mixing layers. The normal components of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor are increased due to compressibility, while the shear stress component is slightly reduced. Characteristic of the Reynolds stress transport is a suppression of the production of the longitudinal and the shear stress component, a suppression of all velocity-pressure-gradient correlations and most of the dissipation rates. Comparison with incompressible channel flow data reveals that compressibility effects manifest themselves in the wall layer only.

  2. Channel degradation in southeastern Nebraska Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Weiss, Linda S.; ,

    1995-01-01

    Many stream channels in southeastern Nebraska were dredged and straightened during 1904-15. The resulting channels were both shorter and steeper than the original channels. Tests for time trends were conducted using the nonparametric Kendall tau test to see if the channels have responded to these changes. Tests were conducted on the stages associated with specific discharges and on measurement characteristics at gaging stations. Tests also were conducted on hydrologic forcing variables (annual mean precipitation, annual peak discharges, annual mean discharge, and annual mean base flows). The null hypothesis (that the data were free from trend) was rejected for stages associated with the mean of the annual discharges for 6 of 7 gaging stations in the study area, but was accepted for all 3 gages on the main stem of the Missouri River. The trends at the 6 streamflow gaging stations were for decreasing stages (degrading channels) for specific discharges. The rates of change ranged from about 0.2 to 0.5 m per decade. Mean stream bed elevations computed for individual discharge measurements at these streamflow gaging stations confirmed that the channels are degrading. However, neither the precipitation nor flow variables show evidence of trends. The tendency for the channels to degrade thus cannot be attributed to changes in runoff characteristics and are assumed to be a response to the channel modifications in the early 1900's. Indications are that the channels presently are continuing to degrade.

  3. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  4. US U-25 channel performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.; Pan, Y. C.

    1980-07-01

    The results of an ANL computational analysis of the performance of the US U-25 MHD channel are presented. This channel has gone through several revisions. The major revision occurred after it had been decided by the DOE Office of MHD to operate the channel with platinum-clad copper electrodes (cold), rather than with ceramic electrodes (hot), as originally planned. This work has been performed at the request of the DOE Office of MHD and the US U-25 generator design Review Committee. The channel specifications and operating conditions are presented. The combustor temperature and thermodynamic and electrical properties of the plasma are computed, and the results are discussed. The MHD channel performance has been predicted for different operating conditions. Sensitivity studies have also been performed on the effects of mass flow rate, surface roughness, combustor temperatures, and loading on the channel performance.

  5. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  6. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  7. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  8. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  9. Energy, time, and channel evolution in catastrophically disturbed fluvial systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.

    1992-01-01

    Specific energy is shown to decrease nonlinearly with time during channel evolution and provides a measure of reductions in available energy at the channel bed. Data from two sites show convergence towards a minimum specific energy with time. Time-dependent reductions in specific energy at a point act in concert with minimization of the rate of energy dissipation over a reach during channel evolution as the fluvial systems adjust to a new equilibrium.

  10. 33 CFR 117.721 - Grassy Sound Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grassy Sound Channel. 117.721... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.721 Grassy Sound Channel. The draw of the Grassy Sound Channel Bridge, mile 1.0 in Middle Township, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8...

  11. 33 CFR 117.721 - Grassy Sound Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grassy Sound Channel. 117.721... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.721 Grassy Sound Channel. The draw of the Grassy Sound Channel Bridge, mile 1.0 in Middle Township, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8...

  12. 33 CFR 117.721 - Grassy Sound Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grassy Sound Channel. 117.721... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.721 Grassy Sound Channel. The draw of the Grassy Sound Channel Bridge, mile 1.0 in Middle Township, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8...

  13. 33 CFR 117.721 - Grassy Sound Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grassy Sound Channel. 117.721... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.721 Grassy Sound Channel. The draw of the Grassy Sound Channel Bridge, mile 1.0 in Middle Township, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8...

  14. 33 CFR 117.721 - Grassy Sound Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grassy Sound Channel. 117.721... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.721 Grassy Sound Channel. The draw of the Grassy Sound Channel Bridge, mile 1.0 in Middle Township, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8...

  15. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  16. Solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor agitoxin 2: caliper for probing channel geometry.

    PubMed Central

    Krezel, A. M.; Kasibhatla, C.; Hidalgo, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Wagner, G.

    1995-01-01

    The structure of the potassium channel blocker agitoxin 2 was solved by solution NMR methods. The structure consists of a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and a single helix covering one face of the beta-sheet. The cysteine side chains connecting the beta-sheet and the helix form the core of the molecule. One edge of the beta-sheet and the adjacent face of the helix form the interface with the Shaker K+ channel. The fold of agitoxin is homologous to the previously determined folds of scorpion venom toxins. However, agitoxin 2 differs significantly from the other channel blockers in the specificity of its interactions. This study was thus focused on a precise characterization of the surface residues at the face of the protein interacting with the Shaker K+ channel. The rigid toxin molecule can be used to estimate dimensions of the potassium channel. Surface-exposed residues, Arg24, Lys27, and Arg31 of the beta-sheet, have been identified from mutagenesis studies as functionally important for blocking the Shaker K+ channel. The sequential and spatial locations of Arg24 and Arg31 are not conserved among the homologous toxins. Knowledge on the details of the channel-binding sites of agitoxin 2 formed a basis for site-directed mutagenesis studies of the toxin and the K+ channel sequences. Observed interactions between mutated toxin and channel are being used to elucidate the channel structure and mechanisms of channel-toxin interactions. PMID:8520473

  17. Ion channels in plants

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  18. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  19. C. elegans TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  20. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  1. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  2. Herbal Compounds and Toxins Modulating TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Joris; Nilius, Bernd; Vennekens, Rudi

    2008-01-01

    Although the benefits are sometimes obvious, traditional or herbal medicine is regarded with skepticism, because the mechanism through which plant compounds exert their powers are largely elusive. Recent studies have shown however that many of these plant compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate the sensing mechanism of the human body. Especially members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels have drawn large attention lately as the receptors for plant-derived compounds such as capsaicin and menthol. TRP channels constitute a large and diverse family of channel proteins that can serve as versatile sensors that allow individual cells and entire organisms to detect changes in their environment. For this family, a striking number of empirical views have turned into mechanism-based actions of natural compounds. In this review we will give an overview of herbal compounds and toxins, which modulate TRP channels. PMID:19305789

  3. Modeling ion channels: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound enzymes whose catalytic sites are ion-conducting pores that open and close (gate) in response to specific environmental stimuli. Ion channels are important contributors to cell signaling and homeostasis. Our current understanding of gating is the product of 60 plus years of voltage-clamp recording augmented by intervention in the form of environmental, chemical, and mutational perturbations. The need for good phenomenological models of gating has evolved in parallel with the sophistication of experimental technique. The goal of modeling is to develop realistic schemes that not only describe data, but also accurately reflect mechanisms of action. This review covers three areas that have contributed to the understanding of ion channels: traditional Eyring kinetic theory, molecular dynamics analysis, and statistical thermodynamics. Although the primary emphasis is on voltage-dependent channels, the methods discussed here are easily generalized to other stimuli and could be applied to any ion channel and indeed any macromolecule. PMID:24935742

  4. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  5. Connexin channels and phospholipids: association and modulation

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Darren; Harris, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Background For membrane proteins, lipids provide a structural framework and means to modulate function. Paired connexin hemichannels form the intercellular channels that compose gap junction plaques while unpaired hemichannels have regulated functions in non-junctional plasma membrane. The importance of interactions between connexin channels and phospholipids is poorly understood. Results Endogenous phospholipids most tightly associated with purified connexin26 or connexin32 hemichannels or with junctional plaques in cell membranes, those likely to have structural and/or modulatory effects, were identified by tandem electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using class-specific interpretative methods. Phospholipids were characterized by headgroup class, charge, glycerol-alkyl chain linkage and by acyl chain length and saturation. The results indicate that specific endogenous phospholipids are uniquely associated with either connexin26 or connexin32 channels, and some phospholipids are associated with both. Functional effects of the major phospholipid classes on connexin channel activity were assessed by molecular permeability of hemichannels reconstituted into liposomes. Changes to phospholipid composition(s) of the liposome membrane altered the activity of connexin channels in a manner reflecting changes to the surface charge/potential of the membrane and, secondarily, to cholesterol content. Together, the data show that connexin26 and connexin32 channels have a preference for tight association with unique anionic phospholipids, and that these, independent of headgroup, have a positive effect on the activity of both connexin26 and connexin32 channels. Additionally, the data suggest that the likely in vivo phospholipid modulators of connexin channel structure-function that are connexin isoform-specific are found in the cytoplasmic leaflet. A modulatory role for phospholipids that promote negative curvature is also inferred. Conclusion This study is the first to

  6. MgtE From Rhizobium leguminosarum Is a Mg²⁺ Channel Essential for Growth at Low pH and N2 Fixation on Specific Plants.

    PubMed

    Hood, Graham; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Downie, J Allan; Poole, Philip

    2015-12-01

    MgtE is predicted to be a Rhizobium leguminosarum channel and is essential for growth when both Mg²⁺ is limiting and the pH is low. N₂was only fixed at 8% of the rate of wild type when the crop legume Pisum sativum was inoculated with an mgtE mutant of R. leguminosarum and, although bacteroids were present, they were few in number and not fully developed. R. leguminosarum MgtE was also essential for N₂fixation on the native legume Vicia hirsuta but not when in symbiosis with Vicia faba. The importance of MgtE and the relevance of the contrasting phenotypes is discussed. PMID:26422403

  7. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  8. How do mechanosensitive channels sense membrane tension?

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tim

    2016-08-15

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels provide protection against hypo-osmotic shock in bacteria whereas eukaryotic MS channels fulfil a multitude of important functions beside osmoregulation. Interactions with the membrane lipids are responsible for the sensing of mechanical force for most known MS channels. It emerged recently that not only prokaryotic, but also eukaryotic, MS channels are able to directly sense the tension in the membrane bilayer without any additional cofactor. If the membrane is solely viewed as a continuous medium with specific anisotropic physical properties, the sensitivity towards tension changes can be explained as result of the hydrophobic coupling between membrane and transmembrane (TM) regions of the channel. The increased cross-sectional area of the MS channel in the active conformation and elastic deformations of the membrane close to the channel have been described as important factors. However, recent studies suggest that molecular interactions of lipids with the channels could play an important role in mechanosensation. Pockets in between TM helices were identified in the MS channel of small conductance (MscS) and YnaI that are filled with lipids. Less lipids are present in the open state of MscS than the closed according to MD simulations. Thus it was suggested that exclusion of lipid fatty acyl chains from these pockets, as a consequence of increased tension, would trigger gating. Similarly, in the eukaryotic MS channel TRAAK it was found that a lipid chain blocks the conducting path in the closed state. The role of these specific lipid interactions in mechanosensation are highlighted in this review. PMID:27528747

  9. Specificity, affinity and efficacy of iota-conotoxin RXIA, an agonist of voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.2, 1.6 and 1.7

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Brian; Zhang, Min-Min; Buczek, Oga; Azam, Layla; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju

    2009-01-01

    The excitotoxic conopeptide ι-RXIA induces repetitive action potentials in frog motor axons and seizures upon intracranial injection into mice. We recently discovered that ι-RXIA shifts the voltage-dependence of activation of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.6 to a more hyperpolarized level. Here, we performed voltage-clamp experiments to examine its activity against rodent NaV1.1 through NaV1.7 co-expressed with the β1 subunit in Xenopus oocytes and NaV1.8 in dissociated mouse DRG neurons. The order of sensitivity to ι-RXIA was NaV1.6 > 1.2 > 1.7, and the remaining subtypes were insensitive. The time course of ι-RXIA-activity on NaV1.6 during exposure to different peptide concentrations were well fit by single-exponential curves that provided kobs. The plot of kobs versus [ι-RXIA] was linear, consistent with a bimolecular reaction with a Kd of ~3 μM, close to the steady-state EC50 of ~2 μM. ι-RXIA has an unusual residue, D-Phe, and the analog with an L-Phe instead, ι-RXIA[L-Phe44], had a two-fold lower affinity and two-fold faster off-rate than ι-RXIA on NaV1.6 and furthermore was inactive on NaV1.2. ι-RXIA induced repetitive action potentials in mouse sciatic nerve with conduction velocities of both A- and C-fibers, consistent with the presence of NaV1.6 at nodes of Ranvier as well as in unmyelinated axons. Sixteen peptides homologous to ι-RXIA have been identified from a single species of Conus, so these peptides represent a rich family of novel sodium channel-targeting ligands. PMID:18486102

  10. P/Q-type calcium channel modulators

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Gross, G

    2012-01-01

    P/Q-type calcium channels are high-voltage-gated calcium channels contributing to vesicle release at synaptic terminals. A number of neurological diseases have been attributed to malfunctioning of P/Q channels, including ataxia, migraine and Alzheimer's disease. To date, only two specific P/Q-type blockers are known: both are peptides deriving from the spider venom of Agelenopsis aperta, ω-agatoxins. Other peptidic calcium channel blockers with activity at P/Q channels are available, albeit with less selectivity. A number of low molecular weight compounds modulate P/Q-type currents with different characteristics, and some exhibit a peculiar bidirectional pattern of modulation. Interestingly, there are a number of therapeutics in clinical use, which also show P/Q channel activity. Because selectivity as well as the exact mode of action is different between all P/Q-type channel modulators, the interpretation of clinical and experimental data is complicated and needs a comprehensive understanding of their target profile. The situation is further complicated by the fact that information on potency varies vastly in the literature, which may be the result of different experimental systems, conditions or the splice variants of the P/Q channel. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of the compounds available that affect the P/Q-type channel and should help with the interpretation of results of in vitro experiments and animal models. It also aims to explain some clinical observations by implementing current knowledge about P/Q channel modulation of therapeutically used non-selective drugs. Chances and challenges of the development of P/Q channel-selective molecules are discussed. PMID:22670568

  11. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  12. Mechanosensitive channels in microbes.

    PubMed

    Kung, Ching; Martinac, Boris; Sukharev, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    All cells, including microbes, detect and respond to mechanical forces, of which osmotic pressure is most ancient and universal. Channel proteins have evolved such that they can be directly stretched open when the membrane is under turgor pressure. Osmotic downshock, as in rain, opens bacterial mechanosensitive (MS) channels to jettison osmolytes, relieving pressure and preventing cell lysis. The ion flux through individual channel proteins can be observed directly with a patch clamp. MS channels of large and small conductance (MscL and MscS, respectively) have been cloned, crystallized, and subjected to biophysical and genetic analyses in depth. They are now models to scrutinize how membrane forces direct protein conformational changes. Eukaryotic microbes have homologs from animal sensory channels of the TRP superfamily. The MS channel in yeast is also directly sensitive to membrane stretch. This review examines the key concept that proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer can respond to the changes in the mechanical environment the lipid bilayer provides.

  13. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  14. HIPPI and Fibre Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The High-Performance Parallel Interface (HIPPI) and Fibre Channel are near-gigabit per second data communications interfaces being developed in ANSI standards Task Group X3T9.3. HIPPI is the current interface of choice in the high-end and supercomputer arena, and Fibre Channel is a follow-on effort. HIPPI came from a local area network background, and Fibre Channel came from a mainframe to peripheral interface background.

  15. Symmetrization for redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulplue, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A plurality of redundant channels in a system each contain a global image of all the configuration data bases in each of the channels in the system. Each global image is updated periodically from each of the other channels via cross channel data links. The global images of the local configuration data bases in each channel are separately symmetrized using a voting process to generate a system signal configuration data base which is not written into by any other routine and is available for indicating the status of the system within each channel. Equalization may be imposed on a suspect signal and a number of chances for that signal to heal itself are provided before excluding it from future votes. Reconfiguration is accomplished upon detecting a channel which is deemed invalid. A reset function is provided which permits an externally generated reset signal to permit a previously excluded channel to be reincluded within the system. The updating of global images and/or the symmetrization process may be accomplished at substantially the same time within a synchronized time frame common to all channels.

  16. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  17. IBEX channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.E.; Frost, C.A.; Freeman, J.R.; Jojola, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Exploding wire experiments have been conducted to form a low-density channel for endoatmospheric channel-tracking experiments to be performed on the IBEX accelerator. Stainless steel and tungsten wires as small as six microns radius have been exploded using a 50 kJ, 200 kV fast capacitor bank designed and constructed for the purpose. Density channels have been produced. Preliminary results will be compared with a simple circuit model and hydrocode analysis. Efforts to diagnose the low-density channel are beginning. 5 refs.

  18. GPCR and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are transmembrane proteins that control nerve impulses and cell homeostasis. Signaling molecules that regulate ion channel activity and density at the plasma membrane must be specifically and efficiently coupled to these channels in order to control critical physiological functions such as action potential propagation. Although their regulation by G-protein receptor activation has been extensively explored, the assembly of ion channels into signaling complexes of GPCRs plays a fundamental role, engaging specific downstream -signaling pathways that trigger precise downstream effectors. Recent work has confirmed that GPCRs can intimately interact with ion channels and serve as -chaperone proteins that finely control their gating and trafficking in subcellular microdomains. This chapter aims to describe examples of GPCR-ion channel co-assembly, focusing mainly on signaling complexes between GPCRs and voltage-gated calcium channels.

  19. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  20. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  1. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  2. A computer program for analyzing channel geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, R.S.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Channel Geometry Analysis Program (CGAP) provides the capability to process, analyze, and format cross-sectional data for input to flow/transport simulation models or other computational programs. CGAP allows for a variety of cross-sectional data input formats through use of variable format specification. The program accepts data from various computer media and provides for modification of machine-stored parameter values. CGAP has been devised to provide a rapid and efficient means of computing and analyzing the physical properties of an open-channel reach defined by a sequence of cross sections. CGAP 's 16 options provide a wide range of methods by which to analyze and depict a channel reach and its individual cross-sectional properties. The primary function of the program is to compute the area, width, wetted perimeter, and hydraulic radius of cross sections at successive increments of water surface elevation (stage) from data that consist of coordinate pairs of cross-channel distances and land surface or channel bottom elevations. Longitudinal rates-of-change of cross-sectional properties are also computed, as are the mean properties of a channel reach. Output products include tabular lists of cross-sectional area, channel width, wetted perimeter, hydraulic radius, average depth, and cross-sectional symmetry computed as functions of stage; plots of cross sections; plots of cross-sectional area and (or) channel width as functions of stage; tabular lists of cross-sectional area and channel width computed as functions of stage for subdivisions of a cross section; plots of cross sections in isometric projection; and plots of cross-sectional area at a fixed stage as a function of longitudinal distance along an open-channel reach. A Command Procedure Language program and Job Control Language procedure exist to facilitate program execution on the U.S. Geological Survey Prime and Amdahl computer systems respectively. (Lantz-PTT)

  3. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  4. Generalized channeled polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Alenin, Andrey S; Tyo, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Channeled polarimeters measure polarization by modulating the measured intensity in order to create polarization-dependent channels that can be demodulated to reveal the desired polarization information. A number of channeled systems have been described in the past, but their proposed designs often unintentionally sacrifice optimality for ease of algebraic reconstruction. To obtain more optimal systems, a generalized treatment of channeled polarimeters is required. This paper describes methods that enable handling of multi-domain modulations and reconstruction of polarization information using linear algebra. We make practical choices regarding use of either Fourier or direct channels to make these methods more immediately useful. Employing the introduced concepts to optimize existing systems often results in superficial system changes, like changing the order, orientation, thickness, or spacing of polarization elements. For the two examples we consider, we were able to reduce noise in the reconstruction to 34.1% and 57.9% of the original design values. PMID:24979633

  5. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  6. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  7. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  8. Models of permeation in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyucak, Serdar; Sparre Andersen, Olaf; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2001-11-01

    Ion channels are formed by specific proteins embedded in the cell membrane and provide pathways for fast and controlled flow of selected ions down their electrochemical gradient. This activity generates action potentials in nerves, muscles and other excitable cells, and forms the basis of all movement, sensation and thought processes in living beings. While the functional properties of ion channels are well known from physiological studies, lack of structural knowledge has hindered development of realistic theoretical models necessary for understanding and interpretation of these properties. Recent determination of the molecular structures of potassium and mechanosensitive channels from x-ray crystallography has finally broken this impasse, heralding a new age in ion channel studies where study of structure-function relationships takes a central stage. In this paper, we present a critical review of various approaches to modelling of ion transport in membrane channels, including continuum theories, Brownian dynamics, and classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. Strengths and weaknesses of each approach are discussed and illustrated with applications to some specific ion channels.

  9. Single-Molecule Ion Channel Conformational Dynamics in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes regulate the function and dynamics of ion channels that are crucial for cell functions, neuronal signaling, and brain functions. Such complexity makes it difficult, if not impossible, to characterize ion channel dynamics using conventional electrical recording alone since that the measurement does not specifically interrogate the associated conformational changes but rather the consequences of the conformational changes. Recently, new technology developments on single-molecule spectroscopy, and especially, the combined approaches of using single ion channel patch-clamp electrical recording and single-molecule fluorescence imaging have provided us the capability of probing ion channel conformational changes simultaneously with the electrical single channel recording. By combining real-time single-molecule fluorescence imaging measurements with real-time single-channel electric current measurements in artificial lipid bilayers and in living cell membranes, we were able to probe single ion-channel-protein conformational changes simultaneously, and thus providing an understanding the dynamics and mechanism of ion-channel proteins at the molecular level. The function-regulating and site-specific conformational changes of ion channels are now measurable under physiological conditions in real-time, one molecule at a time. We will focus our discussion on the new development and results of real-time imaging of the dynamics of gramicidin, colicin, and NMDA receptor ion channels in lipid bilayers and living cells. Our results shed light on new perspectives of the intrinsic interplay of lipid membrane dynamics, solvation dynamics, and the ion channel functions.

  10. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  11. Can Nonprivate Channels Transmit Quantum Information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the power of quantum channels with little or no capacity for private communication. Because privacy is a necessary condition for quantum communication, one might expect that such channels would be of little use for transmitting quantum states. Nevertheless, we find strong evidence that there are pairs of such channels that, when used together, can transmit far more quantum information than the sum of their individual private capacities. Because quantum transmissions are necessarily private, this would imply a large violation of additivity for the private capacity. Specifically, we present channels which display either (1) a large joint quantum capacity but very small individual private capacities or (2) a severe violation of additivity for the Holevo information.

  12. Cross-channel variability in benthic habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vayssieres, Marc; Peterson, Heather

    2003-01-01

    The Interagency Ecological Program’s Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) has monitored benthic invertebrates since the mid-1970s. A recent review of the EMP found that the spatial study design of the benthos monitoring element was in need of a thorough reexamination through intense special studies and extensive historic data analyses. This article reports the results of preliminary analyses of historical EMP data focusing on cross-channel variability. Specific questions are: (1) do benthic habitats and community assemblages vary between positions across a river channel? (2) Are benthic samples taken at a single channel position sufficiently representative of benthos assemblages across the channel to characterize long term changes in the benthos community of a particular section of a river?

  13. Water channels in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) corresponds to the ultrasmall pore predicted by the modelization of peritoneal transport. Proof-of-principle studies have shown that up-regulation of the expression of AQP1 in peritoneal capillaries is reflected by increased water permeability and ultrafiltration, without affecting the osmotic gradient and the permeability for small solutes. Inversely, studies in Aqp1 mice have shown that haploinsufficiency in AQP1 is reflected by significant attenuation of water transport. Recent studies have identified lead compounds that could act as agonists of aquaporins, as well as putative binding sites and potential mechanisms of gating the water channel. By modulating water transport, these pharmacological agents could have clinically relevant effects in targeting specific tissues or disease states. These studies on the peritoneal membrane also provide an experimental framework to investigate the role of water channels in the endothelium and various cell types.

  14. Why are Channels Sinuous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, J. A.; Lazarus, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sinuosity is a ubiquitous property of channelized flow patterns on Earth and other planetary bodies. Sinuosity is typically discussed as an emergent consequence of migration processes in meandering rivers, but meandering rivers are only one type of sinuous channel: there are many examples that show little or no indication of meandering, such as bedrock river canyons, drainage channels in tidal mudflats, and volcanic rilles. In some of these patterns, sinuosity is described as "inherited" from a preexisting morphology, which elides an explanation for how the inherited sinuosity originated. Even in river meandering theory there is ongoing debate regarding how initial channel sinuosity arises. Comparing the results of a generalized flow-routing model to observations of natural flow patterns, we find that the ratio of floodplain resistance (R, representing topographic roughness, substrate erodibility, or vegetation density) relative to floodplain slope (m) produces a range of sinuous planforms with natural analogs. We offer a unifying theory for channel sinuosity in which this ratio of resistance to slope (R:m) exerts the primary landscape control on planform shape and predicts the range of sinuosity a floodplain may express. Resistance-dominated floodplains produce channels with higher sinuosity than those of slope-dominated floodplains because increased resistance impedes down-slope flow. Measurement of "relative resistance" (R:m) could inform how riparian restoration projects evaluate the floodplains of artificially straightened rivers. Our analysis suggests that if the sinuosity of a formerly natural channel derived from a high R:m, then even a channel redesigned to be sinuous will straighten if the relative resistance of its floodplain is suppressed or inherently low. (Alternatively, increasing floodplain resistance might foster a higher sinuosity than hydraulic geometry would forecast.) The explanation for sinuosity that we propose is universal enough to account

  15. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  16. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  17. Calcium Channel Signaling Complexes with Receptors and Channels.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are not only mediators of cell signalling events, but also are recipients of signalling inputs from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated second messenger pathways. The coupling of GPCRs to calcium channels is optimized through the formation of receptor-channel complexes. In addition, this provides a mechanism for receptorchannel co-trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. On the other hand, voltage-gated calcium channel activity affects other types of ion channels such as voltage-and calcium-activated potassium channels. Coupling efficiency between these two families of channels is also enhanced through the formation of channel-channel complexes. This review provides a concise overview of the current state of knowledge on the physical interactions between voltage-gated calcium channels and members of the GPCR family, and with other types of ion channels.

  18. Channel in Kasei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 November 2004 The Kasei Valles are a suite of very large, ancient outflow channels. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the youngest channel system in the Kasei Valles. Torrents of mud, rocks, and water carved this channel as flow was constricted through a narrow portion of the valley. Layers exposed by the erosion that created the channel can be seen in its walls. This 1.4 meters (5 feet) per pixel image is located near 21.1oN, 72.6oW. The picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  20. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  1. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goldschlager N. Cardiovascular toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ... SD. Calcium channel antagonists. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ...

  2. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  3. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  4. Variants in the 3′ untranslated region of the KCNQ1-encoded Kv7.1 potassium channel modify disease severity in patients with type 1 long QT syndrome in an allele-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ahmad S.; Giudicessi, John R.; Tijsen, Anke J.; Spanjaart, Anne M.; Reckman, Yolan J.; Klemens, Christine A.; Tanck, Michael W.; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Hofman, Nynke; Sinner, Moritz F.; Müller, Martina; Wijnen, Wino J.; Tan, Hanno L.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Creemers, Esther E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pinto, Yigal M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Heterozygous mutations in KCNQ1 cause type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1), a disease characterized by prolonged heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) and life-threatening arrhythmias. It is unknown why disease penetrance and expressivity is so variable between individuals hosting identical mutations. We aimed to study whether this can be explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNQ1's 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Methods and results This study was performed in 84 LQT1 patients from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and validated in 84 LQT1 patients from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. All patients were genotyped for SNPs in KCNQ1's 3′UTR, and six SNPs were found. Single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2519184, rs8234, and rs10798 were associated in an allele-specific manner with QTc and symptom occurrence. Patients with the derived SNP variants on their mutated KCNQ1 allele had shorter QTc and fewer symptoms, while the opposite was also true: patients with the derived SNP variants on their normal KCNQ1 allele had significantly longer QTc and more symptoms. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the expression of KCNQ1's 3′UTR with the derived SNP variants was lower than the expression of the 3′UTR with the ancestral SNP variants. Conclusion Our data indicate that 3′UTR SNPs potently modify disease severity in LQT1. The allele-specific effects of the SNPs on disease severity and gene expression strongly suggest that they are functional variants that directly alter the expression of the allele on which they reside, and thereby influence the balance between proteins stemming from either the normal or the mutant KCNQ1 allele. PMID:22199116

  5. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  6. TRPC4- and TRPC4-containing channels.

    PubMed

    Freichel, Marc; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr; Camacho-Londoño, Juan E

    2014-01-01

    TRPC4 proteins comprise six transmembrane domains, a putative pore-forming region, and an intracellularly located amino- and carboxy-terminus. Among eleven splice variants identified so far, TRPC4α and TRPC4β are the most abundantly expressed and functionally characterized. TRPC4 is expressed in various organs and cell types including the soma and dendrites of numerous types of neurons; the cardiovascular system including endothelial, smooth muscle, and cardiac cells; myometrial and skeletal muscle cells; kidney; and immune cells such as mast cells. Both recombinant and native TRPC4-containing channels differ tremendously in their permeability and other biophysical properties, pharmacological modulation, and mode of activation depending on the cellular environment. They vary from inwardly rectifying store-operated channels with a high Ca(2+) selectivity to non-store-operated channels predominantly carrying Na(+) and activated by Gαq- and/or Gαi-coupled receptors with a complex U-shaped current-voltage relationship. Thus, individual TRPC4-containing channels contribute to agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry directly or indirectly via depolarization and activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The differences in channel properties may arise from variations in the composition of the channel complexes, in the specific regulatory pathways in the corresponding cell system, and/or in the expression pattern of interaction partners which comprise other TRPC proteins to form heteromultimeric channels. Additional interaction partners of TRPC4 that can mediate the activity of TRPC4-containing channels include (1) scaffolding proteins (e.g., NHERF) that may mediate interactions with signaling molecules in or in close vicinity to the plasma membrane such as Gα proteins or phospholipase C and with the cytoskeleton, (2) proteins in specific membrane microdomains (e.g., caveolin-1), or (3) proteins on cellular organelles (e.g., Stim1). The diversity of TRPC4-containing channels

  7. Channel-tunnels.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Andersen, C; Hughes, C

    2001-08-01

    TolC and its many homologues comprise an alpha-helical transperiplasmic tunnel embedded in the bacterial outer membrane by a contiguous beta-barrel channel, providing a large exit duct for diverse substrates. The 'channel-tunnel' is closed at its periplasmic entrance, but can be opened by an 'iris-like' mechanism when recruited by substrate-engaged proteins in the cytosolic membrane.

  8. Molecular transport through channels and pores: Effects of in-channel interactions and blocking

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Wolfgang R.; Nadler, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Facilitated translocation of molecules through channels and pores is of fundamental importance for transmembrane transport in biological systems. Several such systems have specific binding sites inside the channel, but a clear understanding of how the interaction between channel and molecules affects the flow is still missing. We present a generic analytical treatment of the problem that relates molecular flow to the first passage time across and the number of particles inside the channel. Both quantities depend in different ways on the channel properties. For the idealized case of noninteracting molecules, we find an increased flow whenever there is a binding site in the channel, despite an increased first passage time. In the more realistic case that molecules may block the channel, we find an increase of flow only up to a certain threshold value of the binding strength and a dependence on the sign of the concentration gradient, i.e., asymmetric transport. The optimal binding strength in that case is analyzed. In all cases the reason for transport facilitation is an increased occupation probability of a particle inside the channel that overcomes any increase in the first passage time because of binding. PMID:16861303

  9. Molecular transport through channels and pores: effects of in-channel interactions and blocking.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2006-08-01

    Facilitated translocation of molecules through channels and pores is of fundamental importance for transmembrane transport in biological systems. Several such systems have specific binding sites inside the channel, but a clear understanding of how the interaction between channel and molecules affects the flow is still missing. We present a generic analytical treatment of the problem that relates molecular flow to the first passage time across and the number of particles inside the channel. Both quantities depend in different ways on the channel properties. For the idealized case of noninteracting molecules, we find an increased flow whenever there is a binding site in the channel, despite an increased first passage time. In the more realistic case that molecules may block the channel, we find an increase of flow only up to a certain threshold value of the binding strength and a dependence on the sign of the concentration gradient, i.e., asymmetric transport. The optimal binding strength in that case is analyzed. In all cases the reason for transport facilitation is an increased occupation probability of a particle inside the channel that overcomes any increase in the first passage time because of binding.

  10. Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Kanghyun

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels have a distinct structure and channel properties, and are involved in a background K+ current. The 15 members of the K2P channels are identified and classified into six subfamilies on the basis of their sequence similarities. The activity of the channels is dynamically regulated by various physical, chemical, and biological effectors. The channels are expressed in a wide variety of tissues in mammals in an isoform specific manner, and play various roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To function as channels, the K2P channels form dimers, and some isoforms form heterodimers that provide diversity in channel properties. In the brain, TWIK1, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK, TASK1, and TASK3 are predominantly expressed in various regions, including the cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, CA1-CA3, and granular layer of the cerebellum. TWIK1, TREK1, and TASK1 are highly expressed in astrocytes, where they play specific cellular roles. Astrocytes keep leak K+ conductance, called the passive conductance, which mainly involves TWIK1-TREK1 heterodimeric channel. TWIK1 and TREK1 also mediate glutamate release from astrocytes in an exocytosis-independent manner. The expression of TREK1 and TREK2 in astrocytes increases under ischemic conditions, that enhance neuroprotection from ischemia. Accumulated evidence has indicated that astrocytes, together with neurons, are involved in brain function, with the K2P channels playing critical role in these astrocytes. PMID:27790056

  11. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  12. Morphodynamics of Floodplain Chute Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. R.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain chute channel formation is a key process that can enable rivers to transition from single-thread to multi-thread planform geometries. Floodplain chute channels are usually incisional channels connecting topographic lows across point bars and in the floodplain. Surprisingly, it is still not clear what conditions promote chute channel formation and what governs their morphodynamic behavior. Towards this end we have initiated an empirical and theoretical study of floodplain chute channels in Indiana, USA. Using elevation models and satellite imagery we mapped 3064 km2 of floodplain in Indiana, and find that 37.3% of mapped floodplains in Indiana have extensive chute channel networks. These chute channel networks consist of two types of channel segments: meander cutoffs of the main channel and chute channels linking the cutoffs together. To understand how these chute channels link meander cutoffs together and eventually create floodplain channel networks we use Delft3D to explore floodplain morphodynamics. Our first modeling experiment starts from a generic floodplain prepopulated with meander cutoffs to test under what conditions chute channels form.We find that chute channel formation is optimized at an intermediate flood discharge. If the flood discharge is too large the meander cutoffs erosively diffuse, whereas if the floodwave is too small the cutoffs fill with sediment. A moderately sized floodwave reworks the sediment surrounding the topographic lows, enhancing the development of floodplain chute channels. Our second modeling experiments explore how floodplain chute channels evolve on the West Fork of the White River, Indiana, USA. We find that the floodplain chute channels are capable of conveying the entire 10 yr floodwave (Q=1330m3/s) leaving the inter-channel areas dry. Moreover, the chute channels can incise into the floodplain while the margins of channels are aggrading, creating levees. Our results suggest that under the right conditions

  13. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for..., (GIWW mile 356.1) at Galveston, Texas, must open on signal; except that, from 6:40 a.m. to 8:10 a.m.,...

  14. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for..., (GIWW mile 356.1) at Galveston, Texas, must open on signal; except that, from 6:40 a.m. to 8:10 a.m.,...

  15. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for..., (GIWW mile 356.1) at Galveston, Texas, must open on signal; except that, from 6:40 a.m. to 8:10 a.m.,...

  16. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  17. Ion permeation mechanism of the potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åqvist, Johan; Luzhkov, Victor

    2000-04-01

    Ion-selective channels enable the specific permeation of ions through cell membranes and provide the basis of several important biological functions; for example, electric signalling in the nervous system. Although a large amount of electrophysiological data is available, the molecular mechanisms by which these channels can mediate ion transport remain a significant unsolved problem. With the recently determined crystal structure of the representative K+ channel (KcsA) from Streptomyces lividans, it becomes possible to examine ion conduction pathways on a microscopic level. K+ channels utilize multi-ion conduction mechanisms, and the three-dimensional structure also shows several ions present in the channel. Here we report results from molecular dynamics free energy perturbation calculations that both establish the nature of the multiple ion conduction mechanism and yield the correct ion selectivity of the channel. By evaluating the energetics of all relevant occupancy states of the selectivity filter, we find that the favoured conduction pathway involves transitions only between two main states with a free difference of about 5 kcal mol-1. Other putative permeation pathways can be excluded because they would involve states that are too high in energy.

  18. Molecular characterization and functional expression of the DSC1 channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxiang; Liu, Zhiqi; Song, Weizhong; Du, Yuzhe; Dong, Ke

    2011-07-01

    Drosophila Sodium Channel 1 (DSC1) was predicted to encode a sodium channel based on a high sequence similarity with vertebrate and invertebrate sodium channel genes. However, BSC1, a DSC1 ortholog in Blattella germanica, was recently shown to encode a cation channel with ion selectivity toward Ca(2+). In this study, we isolated a total of 20 full-length cDNA clones that cover the entire coding region of the DSC1 gene from adults of Drosophila melanogaster by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Sequence analysis of the 20 clones revealed nine optional exons, four of which contain in-frame stop codons; and 13 potential A-to-I RNA editing sites. The 20 clones can be grouped into eight splice types and represent 20 different transcripts because of unique RNA editing. Three variants generated DSC1 currents when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Like the BSC1 channel, all three functional DSC1 channels are permeable to Ca(2+) and Ba(2+), and also to Na(+) in the absence of external Ca(2+). Furthermore, the DSC1 channel is insensitive to tetrodotoxin, a potent and specific sodium channel blocker. Our study shows that DSC1 encodes a voltage-gated cation channel similar to the BSC1 channel in B. germanica. Extensive alternative splicing and RNA editing of the DSC1 transcripts suggest the molecular and functional diversity of the DSC1 channel. PMID:21571069

  19. Organellar Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haoxing; Martinoia, Enrico; Szabo, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Decades of intensive research has led to the discovery of most plasma membrane ion channels and transporters and the characterization of their physiological functions. In contrast, although over 80% of transport processes occur inside the cells, the ion flux mechanisms across intracellular membranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) are difficult to investigate and remain poorly understood. Recent technical advances in super-resolution microscopy, organellar electrophysiology, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed a large step forward in the research of intracellular ion transport. Many new organellar channels are molecularly identified and electrophysiologically characterized. Additionally, molecular identification of many of these ion channels/transporters has made it possible to study their physiological functions by genetic and pharmacological means. For example, organellar channels have been shown to regulate important cellular processes such as programmed cell death and photosynthesis, and are involved in many different pathologies. This Special Issue (SI) on Organellar Channels and Transporters aims to provide a forum to discuss the recent advances and to define the standard and open questions in this exciting and rapidly-developing field. Along this line, a new Gordon Research Conference dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of intracellular membrane transport proteins will be launched this coming summer. PMID:25795199

  20. TRP Channels and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Louis S.; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-01-01

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control etc. PMID:22910182

  1. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  2. Channel Identification Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s) onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits. PMID:23227035

  3. 33 CFR 117.598 - Eel Pond Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eel Pond Channel. 117.598 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.598 Eel Pond Channel. The following requirements apply to the draw of Eel Pond (Water Street) drawbridge at mile 0.0 at...

  4. 33 CFR 117.598 - Eel Pond Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eel Pond Channel. 117.598 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.598 Eel Pond Channel. The following requirements apply to the draw of Eel Pond (Water Street) drawbridge at mile 0.0 at...

  5. 33 CFR 117.598 - Eel Pond Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eel Pond Channel. 117.598 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.598 Eel Pond Channel. The following requirements apply to the draw of Eel Pond (Water Street) drawbridge at mile 0.0 at...

  6. Notch Activation of Ca2+ Signaling in the Development of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kimberly A.; Voiriot, Guillaume; Tang, Haiyang; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Song, Shanshan; Yamamura, Hisao; Yamamura, Aya; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Jun; Pohl, Nicole M.; Tauseef, Mohammad; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Powell, Frank L.; Makino, Ayako; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important physiological response that optimizes the ventilation/perfusion ratio. Chronic hypoxia causes vascular remodeling, which is central to the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We have previously shown that Notch3 is up-regulated in HPH and that activation of Notch signaling enhances store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), an important mechanism that contributes to pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and contraction. Here, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in HPV and hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE. We examined SOCE in human PASMCs exposed to hypoxia and pulmonary arterial pressure in mice using the isolated perfused/ventilated lung method. Wild-type and canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6−/− mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia to induce HPH. Inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates hypoxia-enhanced SOCE in PASMCs and hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia activates Notch signaling and up-regulates TRPC6 channels. Additionally, treatment with a Notch ligand can mimic hypoxic responses. Finally, inhibition of TRPC6, either pharmacologically or genetically, attenuates HPV, hypoxia-enhanced SOCE, and the development of HPH. These results demonstrate that hypoxia-induced activation of Notch signaling mediates HPV and the development of HPH via functional activation and up-regulation of TRPC6 channels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and PASMC proliferation is critical to elucidation of the pathogenesis of HPH. Targeting Notch regulation of TRPC6 will be beneficial in the development of novel therapies for pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:25569851

  7. Dequantization Via Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    For a unital completely positive map {Φ} ("quantum channel") governing the time propagation of a quantum system, the Stinespring representation gives an enlarged system evolving unitarily. We argue that the Stinespring representations of each power {Φ^m} of the single map together encode the structure of the original quantum channel and provide an interaction-dependent model for the bath. The same bath model gives a "classical limit" at infinite time {mto∞} in the form of a noncommutative "manifold" determined by the channel. In this way, a simplified analysis of the system can be performed by making the large-m approximation. These constructions are based on a noncommutative generalization of Berezin quantization. The latter is shown to involve very fundamental aspects of quantum-information theory, which are thereby put in a completely new light.

  8. Chaos in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  9. Chaos in quantum channels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back upmore » our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.« less

  10. Dequantization Via Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For a unital completely positive map {Φ} ("quantum channel") governing the time propagation of a quantum system, the Stinespring representation gives an enlarged system evolving unitarily. We argue that the Stinespring representations of each power {Φ^m} of the single map together encode the structure of the original quantum channel and provide an interaction-dependent model for the bath. The same bath model gives a "classical limit" at infinite time {mto∞} in the form of a noncommutative "manifold" determined by the channel. In this way, a simplified analysis of the system can be performed by making the large- m approximation. These constructions are based on a noncommutative generalization of Berezin quantization. The latter is shown to involve very fundamental aspects of quantum-information theory, which are thereby put in a completely new light.

  11. Entanglement-saving channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lami, L.; Giovannetti, V.

    2016-03-01

    The set of Entanglement Saving (ES) quantum channels is introduced and characterized. These are completely positive, trace preserving transformations which when acting locally on a bipartite quantum system initially prepared into a maximally entangled configuration, preserve its entanglement even when applied an arbitrary number of times. In other words, a quantum channel ψ is said to be ES if its powers ψn are not entanglement-breaking for all integers n. We also characterize the properties of the Asymptotic Entanglement Saving (AES) maps. These form a proper subset of the ES channels that is constituted by those maps that not only preserve entanglement for all finite n but which also sustain an explicitly not null level of entanglement in the asymptotic limit n → ∞. Structure theorems are provided for ES and for AES maps which yield an almost complete characterization of the former and a full characterization of the latter.

  12. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  13. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  14. Sodium channels and pain.

    PubMed

    Habib, Abdella M; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse genetic studies have led to significant advances in our understanding of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pain pathways. In this chapter, we focus on Nav1.7, Nav1.8, Nav1.9 and Nav1.3 and describe the insights gained from the detailed analyses of global and conditional transgenic Nav knockout mice in terms of pain behaviour. The spectrum of human disorders caused by mutations in these channels is also outlined, concluding with a summary of recent progress in the development of selective Nav1.7 inhibitors for the treatment of pain. PMID:25846613

  15. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  16. Noise analysis of ionization kinetics in a protein ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    1993-08-01

    We observed excess current noise generated by the reversible ionization of sites in a transmembrane protein ion channel, which is analogous to current fluctuations found recently in solid state microstructure electronic devices. Specifically the current through fully open single channels formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin shows pH dependent fluctuations. We show that noise analysis of the open channel current can be used to evaluate the ionization rate constants, the number of sites participating in the ionization process, and the effect of recharging a single site on the channel conductance.

  17. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  18. Conductive Channel for Energy Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, Victor V.

    2011-11-01

    For many years the attempts to create conductive channels of big length were taken in order to study the upper atmosphere and to settle special tasks, related to energy transmission. There upon the program of creation of "Impulsar" represents a great interest, as this program in a combination with high-voltage high repetition rate electrical source can be useful to solve the above mentioned problems (N. Tesla ideas for the days of high power lasers). The principle of conductive channel production can be shortly described as follows. The "Impulsar"—laser jet engine vehicle—propulsion take place under the influence of powerful high repetition rate pulse-periodic laser radiation. In the experiments the CO2—laser and solid state Nd:YAG laser systems had been used. Active impulse appears thanks to air breakdown (<30 km) or to the breakdown of ablated material on the board (>30 km), placed in the vicinity of the focusing mirror-acceptor of the breakdown waves. With each pulse of powerful laser the device rises up, leaving a bright and dense trace of products with high degree of ionization and metallization by conductive nano-particles due to ablation. Conductive dust plasma properties investigation in our experiments was produced by two very effective approaches: high power laser controlled ablation and by explosion of wire. Experimental and theoretical results of conductive canal modeling will be presented. The estimations show that with already experimentally demonstrated figures of specific thrust impulse the lower layers of the Ionosphere can be reached in several ten seconds that is enough to keep the high level of channel conductivity and stability with the help of high repetition rate high voltage generator. Some possible applications for new technology are highlighted.

  19. Conductive Channel for Energy Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, Victor V.

    2011-11-10

    For many years the attempts to create conductive channels of big length were taken in order to study the upper atmosphere and to settle special tasks, related to energy transmission. There upon the program of creation of 'Impulsar' represents a great interest, as this program in a combination with high-voltage high repetition rate electrical source can be useful to solve the above mentioned problems (N. Tesla ideas for the days of high power lasers). The principle of conductive channel production can be shortly described as follows. The 'Impulsar' - laser jet engine vehicle - propulsion take place under the influence of powerful high repetition rate pulse-periodic laser radiation. In the experiments the CO{sub 2}-laser and solid state Nd:YAG laser systems had been used. Active impulse appears thanks to air breakdown (<30 km) or to the breakdown of ablated material on the board (>30 km), placed in the vicinity of the focusing mirror-acceptor of the breakdown waves. With each pulse of powerful laser the device rises up, leaving a bright and dense trace of products with high degree of ionization and metallization by conductive nano-particles due to ablation. Conductive dust plasma properties investigation in our experiments was produced by two very effective approaches: high power laser controlled ablation and by explosion of wire. Experimental and theoretical results of conductive canal modeling will be presented. The estimations show that with already experimentally demonstrated figures of specific thrust impulse the lower layers of the Ionosphere can be reached in several ten seconds that is enough to keep the high level of channel conductivity and stability with the help of high repetition rate high voltage generator. Some possible applications for new technology are highlighted.

  20. Oxidative Modulation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated K+ channels are a large family of K+-selective ion channel protein complexes that open on membrane depolarization. These K+ channels are expressed in diverse tissues and their function is vital for numerous physiological processes, in particular of neurons and muscle cells. Potentially reversible oxidative regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels by reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) represents a contributing mechanism of normal cellular plasticity and may play important roles in diverse pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Studies using various protocols of oxidative modification, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural and kinetic modeling provide a broader phenomenology and emerging mechanistic insights. Critical Issues: Physicochemical mechanisms of the functional consequences of oxidative modifications of voltage-gated K+ channels are only beginning to be revealed. In vivo documentation of oxidative modifications of specific amino-acid residues of various voltage-gated K+ channel proteins, including the target specificity issue, is largely absent. Future Directions: High-resolution chemical and proteomic analysis of ion channel proteins with respect to oxidative modification combined with ongoing studies on channel structure and function will provide a better understanding of how the function of voltage-gated K+ channels is tuned by ROS and the corresponding reducing enzymes to meet cellular needs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 933–952. PMID:24040918

  1. The theoretical limits of source and channel coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S. J.; Pollara, F.

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical relationship among signal power, distortion, and bandwidth for several source and channel models is presented. The work is intended as a reference for the evaluation of the performance of specific data compression algorithms.

  2. Ion channels enable electrical communication within bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Prindle, Arthur; Liu, Jintao; Asally, Munehiro; Ly, San; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of bacterial ion channels has provided fundamental insights into the structural basis of neuronal signaling. However, the native role of ion channels in bacteria has remained elusive. Here we show that ion channels conduct long-range electrical signals within bacterial biofilm communities through spatially propagating waves of potassium. These waves result from a positive feedback loop, in which a metabolic trigger induces release of intracellular potassium, which in turn depolarizes neighboring cells. Propagating through the biofilm, this wave of depolarization coordinates metabolic states among cells in the interior and periphery of the biofilm. Deletion of the potassium channel abolishes this response. As predicted by a mathematical model, we further show that spatial propagation can be hindered by specific genetic perturbations to potassium channel gating. Together, these results demonstrate a function for ion channels in bacterial biofilms, and provide a prokaryotic paradigm for active, long-range electrical signaling in cellular communities. PMID:26503040

  3. Mechanosensitivity of ion channels based on protein–lipid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Kenjiro; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Ion channels form a group of membrane proteins that pass ions through a pore beyond the energy barrier of the lipid bilayer. The structure of the transmembrane segment of membrane proteins is influenced by the charges and the hydrophobicity of the surrounding lipids and the pressure on its surface. A mechanosensitive channel is specifically designed to change its conformation in response to changes in the membrane pressure (tension). However, mechanosensitive channels are not the only group that is sensitive to the physical environment of the membrane: voltage-gated channels are also amenable to the lipid environment. In this article, we review the structure and gating mechanisms of the mechanosensitive channels and voltage-gated channels and discuss how their functions are affected by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. PMID:20356872

  4. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  5. Ion channels enable electrical communication in bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Prindle, Arthur; Liu, Jintao; Asally, Munehiro; Ly, San; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M

    2015-11-01

    The study of bacterial ion channels has provided fundamental insights into the structural basis of neuronal signalling; however, the native role of ion channels in bacteria has remained elusive. Here we show that ion channels conduct long-range electrical signals within bacterial biofilm communities through spatially propagating waves of potassium. These waves result from a positive feedback loop, in which a metabolic trigger induces release of intracellular potassium, which in turn depolarizes neighbouring cells. Propagating through the biofilm, this wave of depolarization coordinates metabolic states among cells in the interior and periphery of the biofilm. Deletion of the potassium channel abolishes this response. As predicted by a mathematical model, we further show that spatial propagation can be hindered by specific genetic perturbations to potassium channel gating. Together, these results demonstrate a function for ion channels in bacterial biofilms, and provide a prokaryotic paradigm for active, long-range electrical signalling in cellular communities. PMID:26503040

  6. Channels of Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule, J. Michael

    Defining propaganda as "efforts by special interests to win over the public covertly by infiltrating messages into various channels of public expression ordinarily viewed as politically neutral," this book argues that propaganda has become pervasive in American life. Pointing out that the 1990s society is inundated with propaganda from numerous…

  7. SK channels and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca(2+) signaling, free Ca(2+) levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca(2+) binding proteins transduce Ca(2+) signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca(2+) binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca(2+) ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca(2+)-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  8. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  9. Developments in relativistic channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy accelerator applications and particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used for accelerator extraction and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but have not yet been tried. 61 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  11. A BK (Slo1) channel journey from molecule to physiology.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Gustavo F; Castillo, Karen; Enrique, Nicolás; Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Milesi, Verónica; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Ferreira, Gonzalo; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels are key actors in cell physiology, both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells and tissues. Through negative feedback between intracellular Ca (2+) and membrane voltage, BK channels provide a damping mechanism for excitatory signals. Molecular modulation of these channels by alternative splicing, auxiliary subunits and post-translational modifications showed that these channels are subjected to many mechanisms that add diversity to the BK channel α subunit gene. This complexity of interactions modulates BK channel gating, modifying the energetic barrier of voltage sensor domain activation and channel opening. Regions for voltage as well as Ca (2+) sensitivity have been identified, and the crystal structure generated by the 2 RCK domains contained in the C-terminal of the channel has been described. The linkage of these channels to many intracellular metabolites and pathways, as well as their modulation by extracellular natural agents, has been found to be relevant in many physiological processes. This review includes the hallmarks of BK channel biophysics and its physiological impact on specific cells and tissues, highlighting its relationship with auxiliary subunit expression.

  12. A BK (Slo1) channel journey from molecule to physiology

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gustavo F; Castillo, Karen; Enrique, Nicolás; Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Milesi, Verónica; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Ferreira, Gonzalo; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels are key actors in cell physiology, both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells and tissues. Through negative feedback between intracellular Ca2+ and membrane voltage, BK channels provide a damping mechanism for excitatory signals. Molecular modulation of these channels by alternative splicing, auxiliary subunits and post-translational modifications showed that these channels are subjected to many mechanisms that add diversity to the BK channel α subunit gene. This complexity of interactions modulates BK channel gating, modifying the energetic barrier of voltage sensor domain activation and channel opening. Regions for voltage as well as Ca2+ sensitivity have been identified, and the crystal structure generated by the 2 RCK domains contained in the C-terminal of the channel has been described. The linkage of these channels to many intracellular metabolites and pathways, as well as their modulation by extracellular natural agents, has been found to be relevant in many physiological processes. This review includes the hallmarks of BK channel biophysics and its physiological impact on specific cells and tissues, highlighting its relationship with auxiliary subunit expression. PMID:24025517

  13. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967

  14. A 60 channel PCM-ADPCM converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, J.-M.; Bonnerot, G.; Jeandot, J.-L.; Lacroix, R.

    1982-04-01

    Coding techniques based on adaptive linear prediction and quantization are well suited to signals carried by telephone channels and can provide, with a per channel rate of 32 kbits/s, a level of quality compatible with the specifications of the conventional 64 kbit/s rate. The ADPCM technique described in this paper features a simple adaptive quantization scheme and a tenth-order linear prediction adaptive filter realized as a cascade of five second-order sections. Besides superior performance characteristics, the nonaccumulation of degradations in tandem connections is achieved. The implementation is a 60 channel PCM-ADPCM converter, called TMN 162. It is a fully digital equipment which offers a doubling of the capacity of digital links in telephone networks.

  15. Cohering and decohering power of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Azam; Karimipour, Vahid

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the concepts of cohering and decohering power of quantum channels. Using the axiomatic definition of the coherence measure, we show that the optimization required for calculations of these measures can be restricted to pure input states and hence greatly simplified. We then use two examples of this measure, one based on the skew information and the other based on the l1 norm; we find the cohering and decohering measures of a number of one-, two-, and n -qubit channels. Contrary to the view at first glance, it is seen that quantum channels can have cohering power. It is also shown that a specific property of a qubit unitary map is that it has equal cohering and decohering power in any basis. Finally, we derive simple relations between cohering and decohering powers of unitary qubit gates and their tensor products, results which have physically interesting implications.

  16. Majorization preservation of Gaussian bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels are majorization-preserving over the set of passive states of the harmonic oscillator. This means that comparable passive states under majorization are transformed into equally comparable passive states by any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. Our proof relies on a new preorder relation called Fock-majorization, which coincides with regular majorization for passive states but also induces another order relation in terms of mean boson number, thereby connecting the concepts of energy and disorder of a quantum state. The consequences of majorization preservation are discussed in the context of the broadcast communication capacity of Gaussian bosonic channels. Because most of our results are independent of the specific nature of the system under investigation, they could be generalized to other quantum systems and Hamiltonians, providing a new tool that may prove useful in quantum information theory and especially quantum thermodynamics.

  17. The TRPM4 channel inhibitor 9-phenanthrol

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, R; Hof, T; Del Negro, C A

    2014-01-01

    The phenanthrene-derivative 9-phenanthrol is a recently identified inhibitor of the transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 4 channel, a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel whose mechanism of action remains to be determined. Subsequent studies performed on other ion channels confirm the specificity of the drug for TRPM4. In addition, 9-phenanthrol modulates a variety of physiological processes through TRPM4 current inhibition and thus exerts beneficial effects in several pathological conditions. 9-Phenanthrol modulates smooth muscle contraction in bladder and cerebral arteries, affects spontaneous activity in neurons and in the heart, and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced cell death. Among promising potential applications, 9-phenanthrol exerts cardioprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and reduces ischaemic stroke injuries. In addition to reviewing the biophysical effects of 9-phenanthrol, here we present information about its appropriate use in physiological studies and possible clinical applications. PMID:24433510

  18. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bilal A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2011-02-01

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly “innocent” message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  19. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Bilal A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2011-02-15

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly ''innocent'' message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  20. CLC chloride channels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schriever, A M; Friedrich, T; Pusch, M; Jentsch, T J

    1999-11-26

    The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes six putative chloride channels (CeCLC-1 through CeCLC-6) that represent all three known branches of the mammalian CLC gene family. Using promoter fragments to drive the expression of the green fluorescent protein, CeCLC-2, -3, and -4 expression was studied in transgenic C. elegans. CeCLC-4 was specifically expressed in the large H-shaped excretory cell, where it was co-expressed with CeCLC-3, which is also expressed in other cells, including neurons, muscles, and epithelial cells. Also, CeCLC-2 was expressed in several cells of the nervous system, intestinal cells, and vulval muscle cells. Similar to mammalian CLC proteins, only two nematode CLC channels elicited detectable plasma membrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. CeCLC-3 currents were inwardly rectifying and were activated by positive prepulses. Its complex gating behavior can be explained by two gates, at least one of which depends on extracellular anions. In this respect it resembles some mammalian chloride channels with which it also shares a preference of chloride over iodide. C. elegans thus provides new opportunities to understand common mechanisms underlying structure and function in CLC channels and will allow for a genetic dissection of chloride channels in this simple model organism. PMID:10567397

  1. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  2. Quantum channels and their entropic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Holevo, A S; Giovannetti, V

    2012-04-01

    One of the major achievements of the recently emerged quantum information theory is the introduction and thorough investigation of the notion of a quantum channel which is a basic building block of any data-transmitting or data-processing system. This development resulted in an elaborated structural theory and was accompanied by the discovery of a whole spectrum of entropic quantities, notably the channel capacities, characterizing information-processing performance of the channels. This paper gives a survey of the main properties of quantum channels and of their entropic characterization, with a variety of examples for finite-dimensional quantum systems. We also touch upon the 'continuous-variables' case, which provides an arena for quantum Gaussian systems. Most of the practical realizations of quantum information processing were implemented in such systems, in particular based on principles of quantum optics. Several important entropic quantities are introduced and used to describe the basic channel capacity formulae. The remarkable role of specific quantum correlations-entanglement-as a novel communication resource is stressed.

  3. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  4. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  5. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  6. Athermal channeled spectropolarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven

    2015-12-08

    A temperature insensitive (athermal) channeled spectropolarimeter (CSP) is described. The athermal CSP includes a crystal retarder formed of a biaxial crystal. The crystal retarder has three crystal axes, wherein each axis has its own distinct index of refraction. The axes are oriented in a particular manner, causing an amplitude modulating carrier frequency induced by the crystal retarder to be thermally invariant. Accordingly, a calibration beam technique can be used over a relatively wide range of ambient temperatures, with a common calibration data set.

  7. 33 CFR 117.753 - Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor... SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.753 Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw of the S52 (Ship Channel) bridge, mile 0.5 between Somers Point and...

  8. 33 CFR 117.753 - Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor... SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.753 Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw of the S52 (Ship Channel) bridge, mile 0.5 between Somers Point and...

  9. 33 CFR 117.753 - Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor... SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.753 Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw of the S52 (Ship Channel) bridge, mile 0.5 between Somers Point and...

  10. 33 CFR 117.753 - Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor... SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.753 Ship Channel, Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw of the S52 (Ship Channel) bridge, mile 0.5 between Somers Point and...

  11. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  12. The human role in changing river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Direct consequences of the human role, where human activity affects river channels through engineering works including channelization, dam construction, diversion and culverting, have been long recognised [Marsh, G.P., 1864. Man and Nature or Physical Geography as Modified by Human Action. Charles Scribner, New York; Thomas Jr., W.L., (ed.) 1956. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.]. The less obvious indirect effects of point and reach changes occurring downstream and throughout the basin, however, are much more recently appreciated, dating from key contributions by Strahler [Strahler, A.N., 1956. The nature of induced erosion and aggradation. In W. L. Thomas (Ed.), Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 621-638.], Wolman [Wolman, M.G., 1967. A cycle of sedimentation and erosion in urban river channels. Geografiska Annaler 49A, 385-95.], Schumm [Schumm, S.A., 1969. River metamorphosis. Proceedings American Society of Civil Engineers, Journal Hydraulics Division 95, 255-73.], and Graf [Graf, W.L., 1977. The rate law in fluvial geomorphology. American Journal of Science, 277, 178-191.]. These are complemented by effects of alterations of land use, such as deforestation, intensive agriculture and incidence of fire, with the most extreme effects produced by building activity and urbanisation. Changing river channels are most evident in the channel cross-section where changes of size, shape and composition are now well-established, with up to tenfold increases or decreases illustrated by results from more than 200 world studies. In addition the overall channel planform, the network and the ecology have changed. Specific terms have become associated with changing river channels including enlargement, shrinkage and metamorphosis. Although the scope of adjustment has been established, it has not always been possible to predict what will happen in a particular location

  13. Ion channeling revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  14. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  15. Micro-channel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  16. Cascading blockages in channel bundles.

    PubMed

    Barré, C; Talbot, J

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of N(c) parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary N(c) and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary N(c) and N=1 for coupled channels. For N>1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N=1 but decreases for N>1. This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  17. Conductance of Ion Channels - Theory vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Mijajlovic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane ion channels mediate a number of essential physiological processes in a cell ranging from regulating osmotic pressure to transmission of neural signals. Kinetics and selectivity of ion transport is of critical importance to a cell and, not surprisingly, it is a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this presentation we will analyze in detail computer simulations of two simple channels from fungi - antiamoebin and trichotoxin. Each of these channels is made of an alpha-helical bundle of small, nongenomically synthesized peptides containing a number of rare amino acids and exhibits strong antimicrobial activity. We will focus on calculating ionic conductance defined as the ratio of ionic current through the channel to applied voltage. From molecular dynamics simulations, conductance can be calculated in at least two ways, each involving different approximations. Specifically, the current, given as the number of charges transferred through the channel per unit of time, can be obtained from the number of events in which ions cross the channel during the simulation. This method works well for large currents (high conductance values and/or applied voltages). If the number of crossing events is small, reliable estimates of current are difficult to achieve. Alternatively, conductance can be estimated assuming that ion transport can be well approximated as diffusion in the external potential given by the free energy profile. Then, the current can be calculated by solving the one-dimensional diffusion equation in this external potential and applied voltage (the generalized Nernst-Planck equation). To do so three ingredients are needed: the free energy profile, the position-dependent diffusion coefficient and the diffusive flux of ions into the channel. All these quantities can be obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. An important advantage of this method is that it can be used equally well to estimating large and small currents

  18. Potassium channel conductance as a control mechanism in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Buhl, A E; Conrad, S J; Waldon, D J; Brunden, M N

    1993-07-01

    The opening of intracellular potassium channels is a common mechanism of action for a set of anti-hypertensive drugs that includes the hair-growth-inducing agent minoxidil. Recent work suggests potassium channel openers (PCOs) also influence hair growth. Correlative studies demonstrate that a series of PCOs including minoxidil, pinacidil, P-1075, an active pinacidil analog, RP-49,356, cromakalim, and nicorandil maintain hair growth in cultured vibrissa follicles. Studies using balding stumptail macaques verify that minoxidil, P-1075, and cromakalim but not RP-49,356 stimulate hair growth. The definition of potassium channels and documentation of drug effects on these channels is classically done using electrophysiologic techniques. Such studies require the identification and isolation of target cells. Both these are among the unsolved problems in the area of hair biology. Estimating K+ flux using 86Rb+ as a K+ tracer is an accepted method of assessing potassium channel conductance in other organ systems. Both pinacidil and RP-49,356 induce measurable Rb+ flux in isolated vibrissa follicles and a hair epithelial cell line whereas neither minoxidil nor minoxidil sulfate had measurable effects. Potassium channels have been studied successfully in other organ systems using specific pharmacologic blockers for the various channel subtypes. Blockers including glyburide, tetraethylammonium, and procaine failed to inhibit minoxidil stimulation of cultured follicles. The current explosion of knowledge on potassium channel biology, cloning of channels, and continued progress in hair biology promise to clarify the role of K+ ions in the control of hair follicles.

  19. Hexadecameric structure of an invertebrate gap junction channel.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Atsunori; Matsuzawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-03-27

    Innexins are invertebrate-specific gap junction proteins with four transmembrane helices. These proteins oligomerize to constitute intercellular channels that allow for the passage of small signaling molecules associated with neural and muscular electrical activity. In contrast to the large number of structural and functional studies of connexin gap junction channels, few structural studies of recombinant innexin channels are reported. Here we show the three-dimensional structure of two-dimensionally crystallized Caenorhabditis elegans innexin-6 (INX-6) gap junction channels. The N-terminal deleted INX-6 proteins are crystallized in lipid bilayers. The three-dimensional reconstruction determined by cryo-electron crystallography reveals that a single INX-6 gap junction channel comprises 16 subunits, a hexadecamer, in contrast to chordate connexin channels, which comprise 12 subunits. The channel pore diameters at the cytoplasmic entrance and extracellular gap region are larger than those of connexin26. Two bulb densities are observed in each hemichannel, one in the pore and the other at the cytoplasmic side of the hemichannel in the channel pore pathway. These findings imply a structural diversity of gap junction channels among multicellular organisms. PMID:26883891

  20. Impacts of salt marsh plants on tidal channel initiation and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Ye, Q. H.; Wal, D.; Zhang, L. Q.; Bouma, T.; Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P. M. J.

    2014-02-01

    At the transition between mudflat and salt marsh, vegetation is traditionally regarded as a sustaining factor for previously incised mudflat channels, able to conserve the channel network via bank stabilization following plant colonization (i.e., vegetation-stabilized channel inheritance). This is in contrast to recent studies revealing vegetation as the main driver of tidal channel emergence through vegetation-induced channel erosion. We present a coupled hydrodynamic morphodynamic plant growth model to simulate plant expansion and channel formation by our model species (Spartina alterniflora) during a mudflat-salt marsh transition with various initial bathymetries (flat, shoal dense, shoal sparse, and deep dense channels). This simulated landscape development is then compared to remote sensing images of the Yangtze estuary, China, and the Scheldt estuary in Netherlands. Our results propose the existence of a threshold in preexisting mudflat channel depth, which favors either vegetation-stabilized channel inheritance or vegetation-induced channel erosion processes. The increase in depth of preexisting mudflat channels favors flow routing through them, consequently leaving less flow and momentum remaining for vegetation-induced channel erosion processes. This threshold channel depth will be influenced by field specific parameters such as hydrodynamics (tidal range and flow), sediment characteristics, and plant species. Hence, our study shows that the balance between vegetation-stabilized channel inheritance and vegetation-induced channel erosion depends on ecosystem properties.

  1. Noise analysis of antibiotic permeation through bacterial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Danelon, Christophe; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2003-05-01

    Statistical analysis of high-resolution current recordings from a single ion channel reconstituted into a planar lipid membrane allows us to study transport of antibiotics at the molecular detail. Working with the general bacterial porin, OmpF, we demonstrate that addition of zwitterionic β-lactam antibiotics to the membrane-bathing solution introduces transient interruptions in the small-ion current through the channel. Time-resolved measurements reveal that one antibiotic molecule blocks one of the monomers in the OmpF trimer for characteristic times from microseconds to hundreds of microseconds. Spectral noise analysis enables us to perform measurements over a wide range of changing parameters. In all cases studied, the residence time of an antibiotic molecule in the channel exceeds the estimated time for free diffusion by orders of magnitude. This demonstrates that, in analogy to substrate-specific channels that evolved to bind specific metabolite molecules, antibiotics have 'evolved' to be channel-specific. The charge distribution of an efficient antibiotic complements the charge distribution at the narrowest part of the bacterial porin. Interaction of these charges creates a zone of attraction inside the channel and compensates the penetrating molecule's entropy loss and desolvation energy. This facilitates antibiotic translocation through the narrowest part of the channel and accounts for higher antibiotic permeability rates.

  2. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  3. Ion selectivity in the ryanodine receptor and other calcium channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    Biological ion channels passively conduct ions across cell membranes, some with great specificity. Calcium channels are selective channels that range in their Ca^2+ affinity depending on the channel's physiological role. For example, the L-type calcium channel has micromolar affinity while the ryanodine receptor (RyR) has millimolar affinity. On the other hand, both of these channels have the chemically-similar EEEE and DDDD amino acid motifs in their selectivity filters. An electrodiffusion model of RyR that reproduces and predicts >50 data curves will be presented. In this model, ions are charged, hard spheres and the chemical potential is computed using density functional theory of fluids. Ion selectivity arises from a competition between the need for cations to screen the negative charges of the channel and the crowding of ions in the tiny space of the channel. Charge/space competition implies that selectivity increases as the channel volume decreases (thereby increasing the protein charge density), something that has recently been experimentally confirmed in mutant channels. Dielectric properties can also increase selectivity. In Monte Carlo simulations, Ca^2+ affinity is much higher when the channel protein has a low dielectric constant. This counterintuitive result occurs because calcium channel selectivity filters are lined with negatively-charged (acidic) amino acids (EEEE or DDDD). These permanent negative charges induce negative polarization charge at the protein/lumen interface. The total negative charge of the protein (polarization plus permanent) is increased, resulting in increased ion densities, increased charge/space competition, and there in increased Ca^2+ affinity. If no negative protein charges were present, cations would induce enough positive polarization charge to prevent flux.

  4. MscL: channeling membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Troy A.; Idigo, Chinenye A.; Herrera, Nadia; Rees, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels are integral components for the response of bacteria to osmotic shock. The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) responds to extreme turgor pressure increase that would otherwise lyse the cellular membrane. MscL has been studied as a model mechanosensitive channel using both structural and functional approaches. We will summarize the structural data and discuss outstanding questions surrounding the gating mechanism of this homo-oligomeric channel that has ∼3 nS conductance. Specifically we will explore: 1) the variability in oligomeric state that has been observed, 2) the open pore size measurements, and 3) the role of the C-terminal coiled coil domain for channel function. The oligomeric state of MscL has been characterized using various techniques, with a pentamer being the predominant form, however the presence of mixtures of oligomers in the membrane is still uncertain. In the absence of structural data for the open state of MscL, the diameter of the open state pore has been estimated by several different approaches, leading to a current estimate between 25 and 30 Å. While the C-terminal domain is highly conserved among MscL homologues, it is not required for activity in vivo or in vitro. This domain is likely to remain intact during the gating transition and perform a filtering function that retains valuable osmolytes in the cytosol. Overall, studies of MscL have provided significant insight to the field, and serve as a paradigm for the analysis of nonhomologous, eukaryotic mechanosensitive channel proteins. PMID:24859800

  5. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  6. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  7. Open-channel block by internally applied amines inhibits activation gate closure in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the action of several pore-blocking amines on voltage-dependent activation gating of batrachotoxin(BTX)-activated sodium channels, from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Although structurally simpler, the compounds studied show general structural features and channel-inhibiting actions that resemble those of lidocaine. When applied to the cytoplasmic end of the channel, these compounds cause a rapid, voltage-dependent, open-channel block seen as a reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude (companion paper). Internal application of phenylpropanolamine, phenylethylamine, phenylmethylamine, and diethylamine, as well as causing open-channel block, reduces the probability of channel closure, producing a shift of the steady-state activation curve toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. These gating effects were observed for both cardiac and skeletal muscle channels and were not evoked by addition of equimolar N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, suggesting a specific interaction of the blockers with the channel rather than a surface charge effect. Kinetic analysis of phenylpropanolamine action on skeletal muscle channels indicated that phenylpropanolamine reduced the closed probability via two separate mechanisms. First, mean closed durations were slightly abbreviated in its presence. Second, and more important, the frequency of the gating closures was reduced. This action was correlated with the degree, and the voltage dependence, of open-channel block, suggesting that the activation gate cannot close while the pore is occluded by the blocker. Such a mechanism might underlie the previously reported immobilization of gating charge associated with local anesthetic block of unmodified sodium channels. PMID:7811914

  8. Navigation study on improvements to existing federal navigation channels Arthur Kill Channel, Howland Hook Marine Terminal, Staten Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Improvements to the Arthur Kill Channel from the confluence of the Kill Van Kull Channel, the Arthur Kill Channel, and Newark Bay, along the Arthur Kill to the vicinity of Howland Hook Marine Terminal on Staten Island, New York are proposed. In addition, the study area was extended south from Howland Hook Terminal for approximately one mile in order to serve two oil terminals. The recommended improvements would include deepening to various depths down to 45 feet mean low water (MLW), widening the channel for unrestricted two-way traffic, and the creation of a turning basin. Specifically, a 41-foot MLW deep channel would be dredged in the previously authorized 35-foot MLW project in the Arthur Kill Channel from its confluence with the Newark Bay and Kill Van Kull channels to the Howland Hook Marine Terminal for a distance of approximately 2.1 miles. Also recommended are selected widenings and realignments of the channel at a depth of 41 feet in the interest of navigational safety. Additionally, a 40-foot MLW channel is proposed in the previously authorized 35-foot MLW project in the Arthur Kill Channel from the Howland Hook Marine Terminal to the Exxon Bayway and Gulfport facilities for a distance of approximately one mile. The channel would be selectively realigned to a 40-foot depth for navigational safety. No final determination has been made regarding the disposal of dredged material due to the uncertainty of available upland sites at this time. The turning basin would lie in the Kill Van Kull Channel at Bergen Point, where vessels turn from Kill Van Kull into Arthur Kill and Newark Bay. Total cost of the recommended plan is $49.4 million; the benefit-cost ratio is 4.35. The plan would take 4 years for completion and would have a projected life of 50 years.

  9. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  11. THE ROLE OF SODIUM CHANNELS IN CHRONIC PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Simon R.; Luo, Songjiang; Henry, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Here we review recent research into the mechanisms of chronic pain that has focused on neuronal sodium channels, a target of classic analgesic agents. We first discuss evidence that specific sodium channel isoforms are essential for the detection and conduction of normal acutely painful stimuli from nociceptors. We then review findings that show changes in sodium channel expression and localization in chronic inflammation and nerve injury in animal and human tissues. We conclude by discussing the role that myelination plays in organizing and maintaining sodium channel clusters at nodes of Ranvier in normal development and how inflammatory processes or nerve injury alter the characteristics of such clusters. Based on these findings, we suggest that chronic pain may in part result from partial demyelination of axons during chronic injury, which creates aberrant sodium channel clusters that serve as sites of ectopic sensitivity or spontaneous activity. PMID:22806363

  12. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

    PubMed

    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. PMID:18703053

  13. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  14. Ion Permeation and Mechanotransduction Mechanisms of Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Wu, Kun; Geng, Jie; Chi, Shaopeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Zhi, Peng; Zhang, Mingmin; Xiao, Bailong

    2016-03-16

    Piezo proteins have been proposed as the long-sought-after mechanosensitive cation channels in mammals that play critical roles in various mechanotransduction processes. However, the molecular bases that underlie their ion permeation and mechanotransduction have remained functionally undefined. Here we report our finding of the miniature pore-forming module of Piezo1 that resembles the pore architecture of other trimeric channels and encodes the essential pore properties. We further identified specific residues within the pore module that determine unitary conductance, pore blockage and ion selectivity for divalent and monovalent cations and anions. The non-pore-containing region of Piezo1 confers mechanosensitivity to mechano-insensitive trimeric acid-sensing ion channels, demonstrating that Piezo1 channels possess intrinsic mechanotransduction modules separate from their pore modules. In conclusion, this is the first report on the bona fide pore module and mechanotransduction components of Piezo channels, which define their ion-conducting properties and gating by mechanical stimuli, respectively.

  15. Kv1.3 potassium channels are localized in the immunological synapse formed between cytotoxic and target cells

    PubMed Central

    Panyi, G.; Vámosi, G.; Bacsó, Z.; Bagdány, M.; Bodnár, A.; Varga, Z.; Gáspár, R.; Mátyus, L.; Damjanovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    Membrane proteins of cytotoxic T cells specifically reorganize to form an immunological synapse (IS) on interaction with their specific target. In this paper, we investigated the redistribution of Kv1.3 channels, which are the dominant voltage-gated potassium channels, in the plasma membrane of allogen-activated human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on interacting with their specific target cells. Kv1.3 channels bearing a FLAG epitope were expressed in the CTLs and the cell-surface distribution of fluorescently labeled ion channels was determined from confocal laser-scanning microscopy images. FLAG epitope-tagged Kv1.3 channels showed a patchy distribution in CTLs not engaged with target cells, whereas the channels were accumulated in the IS formed between CTLs and specific target lymphocytes. Localization of Kv1.3 channels in the IS might open an unrevealed possibility in the regulation of ion channel activity by signaling molecules accumulated in the IS. PMID:14745040

  16. Covering a Crucible with Metal Containing Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    In a procedure that partly resembles the lost-wax casting process, a crucible made of a brittle material (ceramic, quartz, or glass) is covered with a layer of metal containing channels. The metal cover and the channels can serve any or all of several purposes, depending upon the application: Typically, the metal would serve at least partly to reinforce the crucible. The channels could be used as passages for narrow objects that could include thermocouples and heat-transfer strips. Alternatively or in addition, channels could be used as flow paths for liquid or gaseous coolants and could be positioned and oriented for position- or direction-selective cooling. In some cases, the channels could be filled with known gases and sealed so that failure of the crucibles could be indicated by instruments that detect the gases. The process consists of three main steps. In the first step, a pattern defining the channels is formed by wrapping or depositing a material in the desired channel pattern on the outer surface of the crucible. The pattern material can be a plastic, wax, low-ash fibrous material, a soluble material, or other suitable material that can subsequently be removed easily. In a proof-of-concept demonstration (see figure), the crucible was an alumina cylinder and the mold material was plastic tie-down tape. In the second step, the patterned crucible is coated with metal. In one variation of the second step, a very thin layer containing or consisting of an electrically conductive material (e.g., gold, silver, or carbon) is painted or otherwise deposited on the mold-covered crucible, then the covering metal required for the specific application is electrodeposited on the very thin conducting layer. In another variation of the second step, the metal coat is formed by chemical vapor deposition. In the proof-of-concept demonstration, a layer of nickel 0.003 in. ( 0.08 mm) thick was electrodeposited. In the third step, the patterned material is removed. This is

  17. Management of calcium channel antagonist overdose.

    PubMed

    Salhanick, Steven D; Shannon, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are used primarily for the treatment of hypertension and tachyarrhythmias. Overdose of calcium channel antagonists can be lethal. Calcium channel antagonists act at the L-type calcium channels primarily in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decreases in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy and chronotropy. The L-type calcium channel is a complex structure and is thus affected by a large number of structurally diverse antagonists. In the setting of overdose, patients may experience vasodilatation and bradycardia leading to a shock state. Patients may also be hyperglycaemic and acidotic due to the blockade of L-type calcium channels in the pancreatic islet cells that affect insulin secretion. Aggressive therapy is warranted in the setting of toxicity. Gut decontamination with charcoal, or whole bowel irrigation or multiple-dose charcoal in the setting of extended-release products is indicated. Specific antidotes include calcium salts, glucagon and insulin. Calcium salts may be given in bolus doses or may be employed as a continuous infusion. Care should be exercised to avoid the administration of calcium in the setting of concomitant digoxin toxicity. Insulin administration has been used effectively to increase cardiac inotropy and survival. The likely mechanism involves a shift to carbohydrate metabolism in the setting of decreased availability of carbohydrates due to decreased insulin secretion secondary to blockade of calcium channels in pancreatic islet cells. Glucose should be administered as well to maintain euglycaemia. Supportive care including the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, adrenergic agents, cardiac pacing, balloon pump or extracorporeal bypass is frequently indicated if antidotal therapy is not effective. Careful evaluation of asymptomatic patients, including and electrocardiogram and a period of observation, is indicated. Patients ingesting a nonsustained

  18. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Minio Vallis Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image is of the southern reach of Minio Vallis, a small fluvial channel located near the larger Mangala Vallis. Both channels are in the Tharsis region, in the area west of Arsia Mons and southeast of Medusae Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 208.1 East (151.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. DDT, pyrethrins, pyrethroids and insect sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Davies, T G E; Field, L M; Usherwood, P N R; Williamson, M S

    2007-03-01

    The long term use of many insecticides is continually threatened by the ability of insects to evolve resistance mechanisms that render the chemicals ineffective. Such resistance poses a serious threat to insect pest control both in the UK and worldwide. Resistance may result from either an increase in the ability of the insect to detoxify the insecticide or by changes in the target protein with which the insecticide interacts. DDT, the pyrethrins and the synthetic pyrethroids (the latter currently accounting for around 17% of the world insecticide market), act on the voltage-gated sodium channel proteins found in insect nerve cell membranes. The correct functioning of these channels is essential for normal transmission of nerve impulses and this process is disrupted by binding of the insecticides, leading to paralysis and eventual death. Some insect pest populations have evolved modifications of the sodium channel protein which prevent the binding of the insecticide and result in the insect developing resistance. Here we review some of the work (done at Rothamsted Research and elsewhere) that has led to the identification of specific residues on the sodium channel that may constitute the DDT and pyrethroid binding sites.

  1. HCN Channels Modulators: The Need for Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Novella Romanelli, Maria; Sartiani, Laura; Masi, Alessio; Mannaioni, Guido; Manetti, Dina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated current (If/Ih), are membrane proteins which play an important role in several physiological processes and various pathological conditions. In the Sino Atrial Node (SAN) HCN4 is the target of ivabradine, a bradycardic agent that is, at the moment, the only drug which specifically blocks If. Nevertheless, several other pharmacological agents have been shown to modulate HCN channels, a property that may contribute to their therapeutic activity and/or to their side effects. HCN channels are considered potential targets for developing drugs to treat several important pathologies, but a major issue in this field is the discovery of isoform-selective compounds, owing to the wide distribution of these proteins into the central and peripheral nervous systems, heart and other peripheral tissues. This survey is focused on the compounds that have been shown, or have been designed, to interact with HCN channels and on their binding sites, with the aim to summarize current knowledge and possibly to unveil useful information to design new potent and selective modulators. PMID:26975509

  2. Targeting the Channel Activity of Viroporins.

    PubMed

    To, Janet; Surya, Wahyu; Torres, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that certain small viral membrane proteins, collectively termed as viroporins, can permeabilize host cellular membranes and also behave as ion channels, attempts have been made to link this feature to specific biological roles. In parallel, most viroporins identified so far are virulence factors, and interest has focused toward the discovery of channel inhibitors that would have a therapeutic effect, or be used as research tools to understand the biological roles of viroporin ion channel activity. However, this paradigm is being shifted by the difficulties inherent to small viral membrane proteins, and by the realization that protein-protein interactions and other diverse roles in the virus life cycle may represent an equal, if not, more important target. Therefore, although targeting the channel activity of viroporins can probably be therapeutically useful in some cases, the focus may shift to their other functions in following years. Small-molecule inhibitors have been mostly developed against the influenza A M2 (IAV M2 or AM2). This is not surprising since AM2 is the best characterized viroporin to date, with a well-established biological role in viral pathogenesis combined the most extensive structural investigations conducted, and has emerged as a validated drug target. For other viroporins, these studies are still mostly in their infancy, and together with those for AM2, are the subject of the present review.

  3. The Earliest Ion Channels in Protocellular Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mijajlovic, Milan; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Wei, Chenyu

    2010-01-01

    indicates that their structures are unique and stable. In addition, it is also believed that the trichotoxin channel displays some selectivity between potassium and chloride ions. This makes trichotoxin and antiamoebin ideal models of the earliest ion channels that could provide insight into the origins of ion conductance and selectivity. In the absence of crystal structure of the trichotoxin and antiamoebin channels, we propose their molecular models based on experimentally determined number of monomers forming the bundles. We use molecular dynamics simulations to validate the models in terms of their conductance and selectivity. On the basis of our simulations we show that the emergence of channels built of small, alpha-helical peptides was protobiologically plausible and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences, which is a convenient evolutionary trait. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. To this end, we will discuss how the amino acid sequence and structure of primitive channels give rise to the phenomena of ionic conductance and selectivity across the earliest cell walls, which were essential functions for the emergence and early evolution of protocells. Furthermore, we will argue that even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  4. The earliest ion channels in protocellular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijajlovic, Milan; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Wei, Chenyu

    indicates that their structures are unique and stable. In addition, it is also believed that the trichotoxin channel displays some selectivity between potassium and chloride ions. This makes trichotoxin and antiamoebin ideal models of the earliest ion channels that could provide insight into the origins of ion conductance and selectivity. In the absence of crystal structure of the trichotoxin and antiamoebin channels, we propose their molecular models based on experimentally determined number of monomers forming the bundles. We use molecular dynamics simulations to validate the models in terms of their conductance and selectivity. On the basis of our simulations we show that the emergence of channels built of small, α-helical peptides was protobiologically plausible and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences, which is a convenient evolutionary trait. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. To this end, we will discuss how the amino acid sequence and structure of primitive channels give rise to the phenomena of ionic conductance and selectivity across the earliest cell walls, which were essential functions for the emergence and early evolution of protocells. Furthermore, we will argue that even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  5. Sarcolemmal KATP channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Baczkó, I; Husti, Z; Lang, V; Leprán, I; Light, P E

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause underlying 1) the development of ventricular fibrillation that results in sudden cardiac death and 2) atrial fibrillation that can lead to heart failure and stroke. Current pharmacological agents for the treatment of ventricular and atrial arrhythmias exhibit limited effectiveness and many of these agents can cause serious adverse effects - including the provocation of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels (sarcK(ATP)) couple cellular metabolism to membrane excitability in a wide range of tissues. In the heart, sarcK(ATP) are activated during metabolic stress including myocardial ischemia, and both the opening of sarcK(ATP) and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels protect the ischemic myocardium via distinct mechanisms. Myocardial ischemia leads to a series of events that promote the generation of arrhythmia substrate eventually resulting in the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. In this review, the possible mechanisms of the anti- and proarrhythmic effects of sarcK(ATP) modulation as well as the influence of pharmacological K(ATP) modulators are discussed. It is concluded that in spite of the significant advances made in this field, the possible cardiovascular therapeutic utility of current sarcK(ATP) channel modulators is still hampered by the lack of chamber-specific selectivity. However, recent insights into the chamber-specific differences in the molecular composition of sarcKATP in addition to already existing cardioselective sarcK(ATP) channel modulators with sarcK(ATP) isoform selectivity holds the promise for the future development of pharmacological strategies specific for a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  6. Building Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The building in the top photo is the new home of the National Permanent Savings Bank in Washington, D.C., designed by Hartman-Cox Architects. Its construction was based on a money-saving method of preparing building specifications which derived from NASA technology developed to obtain quality construction while holding down cost of launch facilities, test centers and other structures. Written technical specifications spell out materials and components to be used on construction projects and identify the quality tests each item must pass. Specifications can have major impact on construction costs. Poorly formulated specifications can lead to unacceptable construction which must be replaced, unnecessarily high materials costs, safety hazards, disputes and often additional costs due to delays and litigation. NASA's Langley Research Center developed a novel approach to providing accurate, uniform, cost-effective specifications which can be readily updated to incorporate new building technologies. Called SPECSINTACT, it is a computerized - system accessible to all NASA centers involved in construction programs. The system contains a comprehensive catalog of master specifications applicable to many types of construction. It enables designers of any structure to call out relevant sections from computer storage and modify them to fit the needs of the project at hand. Architects and engineers can save time by concentrating their efforts on needed modifications rather than developing all specifications from scratch. Successful use of SPECSINTACT has led to a number of spinoff systems. One of the first was MASTERSPEC, developed from NASA's experience by Production Systems for Architects and Engineers, Inc., an organization established by the American Institute of Architects. MASTERSPEC, used in construction of the bank building pictured, follows the same basic format as SPECSINTACT and can be used in either automated or manual modes. The striking appearance of the bank

  7. Claudin-21 Has a Paracellular Channel Role at Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroo; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Kashihara, Hiroka; Yamazaki, Yuji; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Claudin protein family members, of which there are at least 27 in humans and mice, polymerize to form tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells, in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. Claudins have a paracellular barrier function. In addition, certain claudins function as paracellular channels for small ions and/or solutes by forming selective pores at the TJs, although the specific claudins involved and their functional mechanisms are still in question. Here we show for the first time that claudin-21, which is more highly expressed in the embryonic than the postnatal stages, acts as a paracellular channel for small cations, such as Na+, similar to the typical channel-type claudins claudin-2 and -15. Claudin-21 also allows the paracellular passage of larger solutes. Our findings suggest that claudin-21-based TJs allow the passage of small and larger solutes by both paracellular channel-based and some additional mechanisms. PMID:26729464

  8. Modulation of TRP ion channels by venomous toxins.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Jan; Hanack, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Venoms are evolutionarily fine-tuned mixtures of small molecules, peptides, and proteins-referred to as toxins-that have evolved to specifically modulate and interfere with the function of diverse molecular targets within the envenomated animal. Many of the identified toxin targets are membrane receptors and ion channels. Due to their high specificity, toxins have emerged as an invaluable tool set for the molecular characterization of ion channels, and a selected group of toxins even have been developed into therapeutics. More recently, TRP ion channels have been included as targets for venomous toxins. In particular, a number of apparently unrelated peptide toxins target the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 to produce inflammatory pain. These toxins have turned out to be invaluable for structural and functional characterizations of the capsaicin receptor. If toxins will serve similar roles for other TRP ion channels, only future will tell.

  9. Specifying Specification.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    This paper tackles the accusation that applied ethics is no serious academic enterprise because it lacks theoretical bracing. It does so in two steps. In the first step I introduce and discuss a highly acclaimed method to guarantee stability in ethical theories: Henry Richardson's specification. The discussion shows how seriously ethicists take the stability of the connection between the foundational parts of their theories and their further development as well as their "application" to particular problems or cases. A detailed scrutiny of specification leads to the second step, where I use insights from legal theory to inform the debate around stability from that point of view. This view reveals some of specification's limitations. I suggest that, once specification is sufficiently specified, it appears astonishingly similar to deduction as used in legal theory. Legal theory also provides valuable insight into the functional range of deduction and its relation to other forms of reasoning. This leads to a richer understanding of stability in normative theories and to a smart division of labor between deduction and other forms of reasoning. The comparison to legal theory thereby provides a framework for how different methods such as specification, deduction, balancing, and analogy relate to one another. PMID:27157109

  10. Specifying Specification.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    This paper tackles the accusation that applied ethics is no serious academic enterprise because it lacks theoretical bracing. It does so in two steps. In the first step I introduce and discuss a highly acclaimed method to guarantee stability in ethical theories: Henry Richardson's specification. The discussion shows how seriously ethicists take the stability of the connection between the foundational parts of their theories and their further development as well as their "application" to particular problems or cases. A detailed scrutiny of specification leads to the second step, where I use insights from legal theory to inform the debate around stability from that point of view. This view reveals some of specification's limitations. I suggest that, once specification is sufficiently specified, it appears astonishingly similar to deduction as used in legal theory. Legal theory also provides valuable insight into the functional range of deduction and its relation to other forms of reasoning. This leads to a richer understanding of stability in normative theories and to a smart division of labor between deduction and other forms of reasoning. The comparison to legal theory thereby provides a framework for how different methods such as specification, deduction, balancing, and analogy relate to one another.

  11. Direct Regulation of Prokaryotic Kir Channel by Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Nichols, Colin G.; Enkvetchakul, Decha; Levitan, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Our earlier studies have shown that channel activity of Kir2 subfamily of inward rectifiers is strongly suppressed by the elevation of cellular cholesterol. The goal of this study is to determine whether cholesterol suppresses Kir channels directly. To achieve this goal, purified prokaryotic Kir (KirBac1.1) channels were incorporated into liposomes of defined lipid composition, and channel activity was assayed by 86Rb+ uptake. Our results show that 86Rb+ flux through KirBac1.1 is strongly inhibited by cholesterol. Incorporation of 5% (mass cholesterol/phospholipid) cholesterol into the liposome suppresses 86Rb+ flux by >50%, and activity is completely inhibited at 12–15%. However, epicholesterol, a stereoisomer of cholesterol with similar physical properties, has significantly less effect on KirBac-mediated 86Rb+ uptake than cholesterol. Furthermore, analysis of multiple sterols suggests that cholesterol-induced inhibition of KirBac1.1 channels is mediated by specific interactions rather than by changes in the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. In contrast to the inhibition of KirBac1.1 activity, cholesterol had no effect on the activity of reconstituted KscA channels (at up to 250 μg/mg of phospholipid). Taken together, these observations demonstrate that cholesterol suppresses Kir channels in a pure protein-lipid environment and suggest that the interaction is direct and specific. PMID:19740741

  12. A novel potassium channel in skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Skalska, Jolanta; Piwońska, Marta; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wieczorek, Rafal; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela; Zielińska, Joanna; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Dołowy, Krzysztof; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Szewczyk, Adam; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2008-01-01

    In this work we provide evidence for the potential presence of a potassium channel in skeletal muscle mitochondria. In isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, Ca(2+) was able to depolarize the mitochondrial inner membrane and stimulate respiration in a strictly potassium-dependent manner. These potassium-specific effects of Ca(2+) were completely abolished by 200 nM charybdotoxin or 50 nM iberiotoxin, which are well-known inhibitors of large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca) channel). Furthermore, NS1619, a BK(Ca)-channel opener, mimicked the potassium-specific effects of calcium on respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential. In agreement with these functional data, light and electron microscopy, planar lipid bilayer reconstruction and immunological studies identified the BK(Ca) channel to be preferentially located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of rat skeletal muscle fibers. We propose that activation of mitochondrial K(+) transport by opening of the BK(Ca) channel may be important for myoprotection since the channel opener NS1619 protected the myoblast cell line C2C12 against oxidative injury.

  13. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase show apparent specificity for a specific ribulose 5-phosphate species.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E

    1987-02-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase appear to show specificity for a particular ribulose 5-phosphate species. The effect of this specificity will be channeling of ribulose 5-phosphate from the isomerase to the kinase during photosynthesis.

  14. The origin and early evolution of membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A

    2005-02-01

    The origin and early evolution of ion channels are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly greater complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  15. Potassium Versus Sodium Selectivity in Monovalent Ion Channel Selectivity Filters.

    PubMed

    Lim, Carmay; Dudev, Todor

    2016-01-01

    Transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions across the cell membrane is carried out by specialized pore-forming ion channel proteins, which exert tight control on electrical signals in cells by regulating the inward/outward flow of the respective cation. As Na(+) and K(+) ions are both present in the body fluids, their respective ion channels should discriminate with high fidelity between the two competing metal ions, conducting the native cation while rejecting its monovalent contender (and other ions present in the cellular/extracellular milieu). Indeed, monovalent ion channels are characterized by remarkable metal selectivity. This striking ion selectivity of monovalent ion channels is astonishing in view of the close similarity between Na(+) and K(+): both are spherical alkali cations with the same charge, analogous chemical and physical properties, and similar ionic radii. The monovalent ion channel selectivity filters (SFs), which dictate the selectivity of the channel, differ in oligomericity, composition, overall charge, pore size, and solvent accessibility. This diversity of SFs raises the following intriguing questions: (1) What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs? (2) Which of these factors are exploited in achieving K(+) or Na(+) selectivity in the different types of monovalent channel SFs? These questions are addressed herein by summarizing results from recent studies. The results show that over billions of years of evolution, the SFs of potassium and sodium ion channels have adapted to the specific physicochemical properties of the cognate ion, using various strategies to enable them to efficiently select the native ion among its contenders.

  16. Molecular Modeling of Mechanosensory Ion Channel Structural and Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-01-01

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex. PMID:20877470

  17. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-09-16

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  18. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  19. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  20. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are activated by stimuli as diverse as heat, cold, noxious chemicals, mechanical forces, hormones, neurotransmitters, spices, and voltage. Besides their presumably similar general architecture, probably the only common factor regulating them is phosphoinositides. The regulation of TRP channels by phosphoinositides is complex. There is a large number of TRP channels where phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2], acts as a positive cofactor, similarly to many other ion channels. In several cases however, PI(4,5)P2 inhibits TRP channel activity, sometimes even concurrently with the activating effect. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on regulation of TRP channels by membrane phosphoinositides. PMID:24961984

  1. Molecular Mechanism of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cellular sensors for a wide spectrum of physical and chemical stimuli. They are involved in the formation of sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste, temperature, and pain sensation. TRP channels also play fundamental roles in cell signaling and allow the host cell to respond to benign or harmful environmental changes. As TRP channel activation is controlled by very diverse processes and, in many cases, exhibits complex polymodal properties, understanding how each TRP channel responds to its unique forms of activation energy is both crucial and challenging. The past two decades witnessed significant advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie TRP channels activation. This review focuses on our current understanding of the molecular determinants for TRP channel activation. PMID:23720286

  2. Peptide models for membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Peptides may be synthesized with sequences corresponding to putative transmembrane domains and/or pore-lining regions that are deduced from the primary structures of ion channel proteins. These can then be incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes for structural and functional studies. In addition to the ability to invoke ion channel activity, critical issues are the secondary structures adopted and the mode of assembly of these short transmembrane peptides in the reconstituted systems. The present review concentrates on results obtained with peptides from ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels, as well as proton-conducting channels. These are considered within the context of current molecular models and the limited data available on the structure of native ion channels and natural channel-forming peptides. PMID:8615800

  3. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  4. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yanyan; Magleby, Karl L.

    2014-01-01

    Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1) channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM) models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD) attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD) and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD), also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with five closed states on the upper tier and five open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states) to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states. PMID:25653620

  5. Single-channel prototype terahertz endoscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil; Giles, Robert

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the design and development of an innovative single-channel terahertz (THz) prototype endoscopic imaging system based on flexible metal-coated THz waveguides and a polarization specific detection technique. The continuous-wave (CW) THz imaging system utilizes a single channel to transmit and collect the reflected intrinsic THz signal from the sample. Since the prototype system relies on a flexible waveguide assembly that is small enough in diameter, it can be readily integrated with a conventional optical endoscope. This study aims to show the feasibility of waveguide enabled THz imaging. We image various objects in transmission and reflection modes. We also image normal and cancerous colonic tissues in reflectance mode using a polarization specific imaging technique. The resulting cross-polarized THz reflectance images showed contrast between normal and cancerous colonic tissues at 584 GHz. The level of contrast observed using endoscopic imaging correlates well with contrast levels observed in ex vivo THz reflectance studies of colon cancer. This indicates that the single-channel flexible waveguide-based THz endoscope presented here represents a significant step forward in clinical endoscopic application of THz technology to aid in in vivo cancer screening.

  6. Specific Suspicion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a recent case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court which highlights the importance of having specific suspicions of misbehavior before conducting a strip search. The case involves an eighth-grade female student who was being strip-searched by a middle school assistant principal, a school nurse, and an administrative assistant…

  7. Flag flapping in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  8. Designed membrane channels and pores.

    PubMed

    Bayley, H

    1999-02-01

    Advances in the synthesis and assembly of designed membrane channels and pores include addressable template-assisted synthetic protein (TASP) syntheses of helix bundles, the production of a new class of nanotubes and the ability to purify hetero-oligomeric pores. Channels and pores with altered functional properties and with built-in triggers and switches have been prepared. Progress in applications has been greatest in sensor technology, where sensor elements based on ligand activation, channel selectivity and channel block have been made. Structural information about natural membrane proteins is emerging to inspire new designs.

  9. Demystifying Mechanosensitive Piezo Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-06-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate touch, hearing, proprioception, and blood pressure regulation. Piezo proteins, including Piezo1 and Piezo2, represent a new class of mechanosensitive channels that have been reported to play key roles in most, if not all, of these modalities. The structural architecture and molecular mechanisms by which Piezos act as mechanosensitive channels, however, remain mysterious. Two new studies have now provided critical insights into the atomic structure and molecular basis of the ion permeation and mechano-gating properties of the Piezo1 channel.

  10. Engineered ion channels as emerging tools for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2013-12-17

    Over the last 25 years, researchers have developed exogenously expressed, genetically engineered, semi-synthetic, and entirely synthetic ion channels. These structures have sufficient fidelity to serve as unique tools that can reveal information about living organisms. One of the most exciting success stories is optogenetics: the use of light-gated channels to trigger action potentials in specific neurons combined with studies of the response from networks of cells or entire live animals. Despite this breakthrough, the use of molecularly engineered ion channels for studies of biological systems is still in its infancy. Historically, researchers studied ion channels in the context of their own function in single cells or in multicellular signaling and regulation. Only recently have researchers considered ion channels and pore-forming peptides as responsive tools to report on the chemical and physical changes produced by other biochemical processes and reactions. This emerging class of molecular probes has a number of useful characteristics. For instance, these structures can greatly amplify the signal of chemical changes: the binding of one molecule to a ligand-gated ion channel can result in flux of millions of ions across a cell membrane. In addition, gating occurs on sub-microsecond time scales, resulting in fast response times. Moreover, the signal is complementary to existing techniques because the output is ionic current rather than fluorescence or radioactivity. And finally, ion channels are also localized at the membrane of cells where essential processes such as signaling and regulation take place. This Account highlights examples, mostly from our own work, of uses of ion channels and pore-forming peptides such as gramicidin in chemical biology. We discuss various strategies for preparing synthetically tailored ion channels that range from de novo designed synthetic molecules to genetically engineered or simply exogenously expressed or reconstituted wild

  11. The Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Sebring, T. A.; Smith, B. W.; de Kock, M.; Wiecha, O.

    2004-11-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2-m telescope to be built at a new site near Happy Jack, Arizona. The DCT features a large prime focus mosaic CCD camera with a 2-degree-diameter field of view especially designed for surveys of KBOs, Centaurs, NEAs and other moving or time-variable targets. The telescope can be switched quickly to a Ritchey-Chretien configuration for optical/IR spectroscopy or near-IR imaging. This flexibility allows timely follow-up physical studies of high priority objects discovered in survey mode. The ULE (ultra-low-expansion) meniscus primary and secondary mirror blanks for the telescope are currently in fabrication by Corning Glass. Goodrich Aerospace, Vertex RSI, M3 Engineering and Technology Corp., and e2v Technologies have recently completed in-depth conceptual design studies of the optics, mount, enclosure, and mosaic focal plane, respectively. The results of these studies were subjected to a formal design review in July, 2004. Site testing at the 7760-ft altitude Happy Jack site began in 2001. Differential image motion observations from 117 nights since January 1, 2003 gave median seeing of 0.84 arcsec FWHM, and the average of the first quartile was 0.62 arcsec. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for securing long-term access to this site on the Coconino National Forest is nearing completion and ground breaking is expected in the spring of 2005. The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately undertaken with the DCT. An additional partner can be accommodated in the project. Interested parties should contact the lead author.

  12. Ubiquitylation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cédric J; Decosterd, Isabelle; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are regulated by different types of posttranslational modifications. The focus of this review is the regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) upon their ubiquitylation. The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) was the first ion channel shown to be regulated upon ubiquitylation. This modification results from the binding of ubiquitin ligase from the Nedd4 family to a protein-protein interaction domain, known as the PY motif, in the ENaC subunits. Many of the Navs have similar PY motifs, which have been demonstrated to be targets of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitylation, tagging them for internalization from the cell surface. The role of Nedd4-dependent regulation of the Nav membrane density in physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Two recent studies have provided evidence that Nedd4-2 is downregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in both rat and mouse models of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Using two different mouse models, one with a specific knockout of Nedd4-2 in sensory neurons and another where Nedd4-2 was overexpressed with the use of viral vectors, it was demonstrated that the neuropathy-linked neuronal hyperexcitability was the result of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 overexpression due to Nedd4-2 downregulation. These studies provided the first in vivo evidence of the role of Nedd4-2-dependent regulation of Nav channels in a disease state. This ubiquitylation pathway may be involved in the development of symptoms and diseases linked to Nav-dependent hyperexcitability, such as pain, cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, migraine, and myotonias. PMID:24737239

  13. Integrin receptors and ligand-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Morini, Raffaella; Becchetti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plastic expression of different integrin subunits controls the different stages of neural development, whereas in the adult integrins regulate synaptic stability. Evidence of integrin-channel crosstalk exists for ionotropic glutamate receptors. As is often the case in other tissues, integrin engagement regulates channel activity through complex signaling pathways that often include tyrosine phosphorylation cascades. The specific pathways recruited by integrin activation depend on cerebral region and cell type. In turn, ion channels control integrin expression onto the plasma membrane and their ligand binding affinity. The most extensive studies concern the hippocampus and suggest implications for neuronal circuit plasticity. The physiological relevance of these findings depends on whether adhesion molecules, aside from determining tissue stability, contribute to synaptogenesis and the responsiveness of mature synapses, thus contributing to long-term circuit consolidation. Little evidence is available for other ligand-gated channels, with the exception of nicotinic receptors. These exert a variety of functions in neurons and non neural tissue, both in development and in the adult, by regulating cell cycle, synaptogenesis and synaptic circuit refinement. Detailed studies in epidermal keratinocytes have shed some light on the possible mechanisms through which ACh can regulate cell motility, which may be of general relevance for morphogenetic processes. As to the control of mature synapses, most results concern the integrinic control of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular junction. Following this lead, a few studies have addressed similar topics in adult cerebral synapses. However, pursuing and interpreting these results in the brain is especially difficult because of the complexity of the nicotinic roles and the widespread contribution of nonsynaptic, paracrine transmission. From a pathological point of view, considering the well-known contribution of both

  14. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posson, David J.; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2015-09-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K+ channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca2+-activated K+ channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K+. Thus, Ca2+-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  15. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Posson, David J; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S; Nimigean, Crina M

    2015-01-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K(+) channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K(+). Thus, Ca(2+)-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  16. Littoral steering of deltaic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-11-01

    The typically single-threaded channels on wave-influenced deltas show striking differences in their orientations, with some channels oriented into the incoming waves (e.g., Ombrone, Krishna), and others oriented away from the waves (e.g., Godavari, Sao Francisco). Understanding the controls on channel orientation is important as the channel location greatly influences deltaic morphology and sedimentology, both subaerially and subaqueously. Here, we explore channel orientation and consequent feedbacks with local shoreline dynamics using a plan-form numerical model of delta evolution. The model treats fluvial sediment delivery to a wave-dominated coast in two ways: 1) channels are assumed to prograde in a direction perpendicular to the local shoreline orientation and 2) a controlled fraction of littoral sediment transport can bypass the river mouth. Model results suggest that channels migrate downdrift when there is a significant net littoral transport and alongshore transport bypassing of the river mouth is limited. In contrast, river channels tend to orient themselves into the waves when fluvial sediment flux is relatively large, causing the shoreline of the downdrift delta flank to attain the orientation of maximum potential sediment transport for the incoming wave climate. Using model results, we develop a framework to estimate channel orientations for wave-influenced deltas that shows good agreement with natural examples. An increase in fluvial sediment input can cause a channel to reorient itself into incoming waves, behavior observed, for example, in the Ombrone delta in Italy. Our results can inform paleoclimate studies by linking channel orientation to fluvial sediment flux and wave energy. In particular, our approach provides a means to quantify past wave directions, which are notoriously difficult to constrain.

  17. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  18. A computational design approach for virtual screening of peptide interactions across K+ channel families☆

    PubMed Central

    Doupnik, Craig A.; Parra, Katherine C.; Guida, Wayne C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels represent a large family of membrane proteins with many being well established targets in pharmacotherapy. The ‘druggability’ of heteromeric channels comprised of different subunits remains obscure, due largely to a lack of channel-specific probes necessary to delineate their therapeutic potential in vivo. Our initial studies reported here, investigated the family of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels given the availability of high resolution crystal structures for the eukaryotic constitutively active Kir2.2 channel. We describe a ‘limited’ homology modeling approach that can yield chimeric Kir channels having an outer vestibule structure representing nearly any known vertebrate or invertebrate channel. These computationally-derived channel structures were tested ""in silico for ‘docking’ to NMR structures of tertiapin (TPN), a 21 amino acid peptide found in bee venom. TPN is a highly selective and potent blocker for the epithelial rat Kir1.1 channel, but does not block human or zebrafish Kir1.1 channel isoforms. Our Kir1.1 channel-TPN docking experiments recapitulated published in vitro ""findings for TPN-sensitive and TPN-insensitive channels. Additionally, in silico site-directed mutagenesis identified ‘hot spots’ within the channel outer vestibule that mediate energetically favorable docking scores and correlate with sites previously identified with in vitro thermodynamic mutant-cycle analysis. These ‘proof-of-principle’ results establish a framework for virtual screening of re-engineered peptide toxins for interactions with computationally derived Kir channels that currently lack channel-specific blockers. When coupled with electrophysiological validation, this virtual screening approach may accelerate the drug discovery process, and can be readily applied to other ion channels families where high resolution structures are available. PMID:25709757

  19. Ion selectivity strategies of sodium channel selectivity filters.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Sodium ion channels selectively transport Na(+) cations across the cell membrane. These integral parts of the cell machinery are implicated in regulating the cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, nerve impulses, salt and water homeostasis, as well as pain and taste perception. Their malfunction often results in various channelopathies of the heart, brain, skeletal muscles, and lung; thus, sodium channels are key drug targets for various disorders including cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack, stroke, migraine, epilepsy, pain, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. The ability of sodium channels to discriminate the native Na(+) among other competing ions in the surrounding fluids is crucial for proper cellular functions. The selectivity filter (SF), the narrowest part of the channel's open pore, lined with amino acid residues that specifically interact with the permeating ion, plays a major role in determining Na(+) selectivity. Different sodium channels have different SFs, which vary in the symmetry, number, charge, arrangement, and chemical type of the metal-ligating groups and pore size: epithelial/degenerin/acid-sensing ion channels have generally trimeric SFs lined with three conserved neutral serines and/or backbone carbonyls; eukaryotic sodium channels have EKEE, EEKE, DKEA, and DEKA SFs with an invariant positively charged lysine from the second or third domain; and bacterial voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels exhibit symmetrical EEEE SFs, reminiscent of eukaryotic voltage-gated calcium channels. How do these different sodium channel SFs achieve high selectivity for Na(+) over its key rivals, K(+) and Ca(2+)? What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs and which of these factors are exploited to achieve Na(+) selectivity in the different sodium channel SFs? The free energies for replacing K(+) or Ca(2+) bound inside different model SFs with Na(+), evaluated by a combination of density functional theory and continuum dielectric

  20. Calcium Channels and Associated Receptors in Malignant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Fernanda B; Gehring, Marina P; Nicoletti, Natália F

    2016-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are highly lethal and aggressive. Despite recent advances in the current therapies, which include the combination of surgery and radio/chemotherapy, the average survival rate remains poor. Altered regulation of ion channels is part of the neoplastic transformation, which suggests that ion channels are involved in cancer. Distinct classes of calcium-permeable channels are abnormally expressed in cancer and are likely involved in the alterations underlying malignant growth. Specifically, cytosolic Ca(2+) activity plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, and Ca(2+) signaling is altered in proliferating tumor cells. A series of previous studies emphasized the importance of the T-type low-voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in different cancer types, including gliomas, and remarkably, pharmacologic inhibition of T-type VGCC caused antiproliferative effects and triggered apoptosis of human glioma cells. Other calcium permeable channels, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, contribute to changes in Ca(2+) by modulating the driving force for Ca(2+) entry, and some TRP channels are required for proliferation and migration in gliomas. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. Likewise, the purinergic P2X7 receptor acts as a direct conduit for Ca(2+)-influx and an indirect activator of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel. Evidence also shows that P2X7 receptor activation is linked to elevated expression of inflammation promoting factors, tumor cell migration, an increase in intracellular mobilization of Ca(2+), and membrane depolarization in gliomas. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent findings on calcium channels and associated receptors as potential targets to treat malignant gliomas. PMID:27418672

  1. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  2. The EMBL-EBI channel.

    PubMed

    McEntyre, Jo; Birney, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    This editorial introduces the EMBL-EBI channel in F1000Research. The aims of the channel are to present EMBL-EBI outputs and collate research published on F1000Research contributed, in whole or in part, EMBL-EBI researchers. PMID:26913196

  3. A channel simulator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devito, D. M.; Goutmann, M. M.; Harper, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    A propagation path simulator was designed for the channel between a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite in geostationary orbit and a user spacecraft orbiting the earth at an altitude between 200 and 4000 kilometers. The simulator is required to duplicate the time varying parameters of the propagation channel.

  4. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  5. Ion channels in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic function in the brain. Recent evidence suggests that ion channels expressed by neurons within the brain are responsible for regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. In addition, the central effects of neurotransmitters and hormones are at least in part achieved by modifications of ion channel activity. This review focuses on ion channels and their neuronal functions followed by a discussion of the identified roles for specific ion channels in the central pathways regulating food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose balance. PMID:23734095

  6. Young Channel, Old Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    This daytime IR image was collected on February 3, 2003 during the northern summer season. This image shows a younger channel cutting through an older crater.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 30.8, Longitude 19 East (341 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System

  7. Channel Floor Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  8. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  9. Targeting potassium channels in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are pore-forming transmembrane proteins that regulate a multitude of biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Aberrant potassium channel functions contribute to diseases such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and neuromuscular symptoms collectively known as channelopathies. Increasing evidence suggests that cancer constitutes another category of channelopathies associated with dysregulated channel expression. Indeed, potassium channel–modulating agents have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. Potassium channels regulate cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation and migration through both canonical ion permeation–dependent and noncanonical ion permeation–independent functions. Given their cell surface localization and well-known pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target potassium channel could prove to be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:25049269

  10. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  11. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  12. Methods of channeling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    Many computer simulation programs have been used to interpret experiments almost since the first channeling measurements were made. Certain aspects of these programs are important in how accurately they simulate ions in crystals; among these are the manner in which the structure of the crystal is incorporated, how any quantity of interest is computed, what ion-atom potential is used, how deflections are computed from the potential, incorporation of thermal vibrations of the lattice atoms, correlations of thermal vibrations, and form of stopping power. Other aspects of the programs are included to improve the speed; among these are table lookup, importance sampling, and the multiparameter method. It is desirable for programs to facilitate incorporation of special features of interest in special situations; examples are relaxations and enhanced vibrations of surface atoms, easy substitution of an alternate potential for comparison, change of row directions from layer to layer in strained-layer lattices, and different vibration amplitudes for substitutional solute or impurity atoms. Ways of implementing all of these aspects and features and the consequences of them will be discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Single-Channel Recording of Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-01-01

    Single-channel recordings reveal the microscopic properties of individual ligand-gated ion channels. Such recordings contain much more information than measurements of ensemble behavior and can yield structural and functional information about the receptors that participate in fast synaptic transmission in the brain. With a little care, a standard patch-clamp electrophysiology setup can be adapted for single-channel recording in a matter of hours. Thenceforth, it is a realistic aim to record single-molecule activity with microsecond resolution from arbitrary cell types, including cell lines and neurons. PMID:27480725

  14. The functional network of ion channels in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Michael D.; Chandy, K. George

    2011-01-01

    Summary For more than 25 years, it has been widely appreciated that Ca2+ influx is essential to trigger T-lymphocyte activation. Patch clamp analysis, molecular identification, and functional studies using blockers and genetic manipulation have shown that a unique contingent of ion channels orchestrates the initiation, intensity, and duration of the Ca2+ signal. Five distinct types of ion channels – Kv1.3, KCa3.1, Orai1+ stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1) [Ca2+-release activating Ca2+ (CRAC) channel], TRPM7, and Clswell – comprise a network that performs functions vital for ongoing cellular homeostasis and for T-cell activation, offering potential targets for immunomodulation. Most recently, the roles of STIM1 and Orai1 have been revealed in triggering and forming the CRAC channel following T-cell receptor engagement. Kv1.3, KCa3.1, STIM1, and Orai1 have been found to cluster at the immunological synapse following contact with an antigen-presenting cell; we discuss how channels at the synapse might function to modulate local signaling. Immuno-imaging approaches are beginning to shed light on ion channel function in vivo. Importantly, the expression pattern of Ca2+ and K+ channels and hence the functional network can adapt depending upon the state of differentiation and activation, and this allows for different stages of an immune response to be targeted specifically. PMID:19754890

  15. Intramembrane congestion effects on lysenin channel voltage-induced gating

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Eric; Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Clark, Tyler; Hanna, Charles; Pink, David; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    All cell membranes are packed with proteins. The ability to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of protein channels in experimental conditions mimicking their congested native environment is crucial for understanding the environmental physicochemical cues that may fundamentally contribute to their functionality in natural membranes. Here we report on investigations of the voltage-induced gating of lysenin channels in congested conditions experimentally achieved by increasing the number of channels inserted into planar lipid membranes. Typical electrophysiology measurements reveal congestion-induced changes to the voltage-induced gating, manifested as a significant reduction of the response to external voltage stimuli. Furthermore, we demonstrate a similar diminished voltage sensitivity for smaller populations of channels by reducing the amount of sphingomyelin in the membrane. Given lysenin’s preference for targeting lipid rafts, this result indicates the potential role of the heterogeneous organization of the membrane in modulating channel functionality. Our work indicates that local congestion within membranes may alter the energy landscape and the kinetics of conformational changes of lysenin channels in response to voltage stimuli. This level of understanding may be extended to better characterize the role of the specific membrane environment in modulating the biological functionality of protein channels in health and disease. PMID:26695013

  16. Sodium channels in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.M. ); Black, J.A.; Waxman, S.G. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven, CT ); Angelides, K.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Immunoblotting, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, and tritiated saxitoxin (({sup 3}H)STX) binding experiments were used to study sodium channel localization in Schwann cells. Polyclonal antibody 7493, which is directed against purifed sodium channels from rat brain, specifically recognized a 260-kDa protein corresponding to the {alpha} subunit of the sodium channel in immunoblots of crude glycoproteins from rat sciatic nerve. Electron microscopic localization of sodium channel immunoreactivity within adult rat sciatic nerves reveals heavy staining of the axon membrane at the node of Ranvier, in contrast to the internodal axon membrane, which does not stain. Schwann cells including perinodal processes also exhibit antibody 7493 immunoreactivity, localized within both the cytoplasm and the plasmalemma of the Schwann cell. To examine further the possibility that sodium channels are localized within Schwann cell cytoplasm, ({sup 3}H)STX binding was studied in cultured rabbit Schwann cells, both intact and after homogenization. Saturable binding of STX was singificantly higher in homogenized Schwann cells than in intact Schwann cells. Moreover, the equilibrium dissociation constant was higher for homogenized preparations (1.77 {plus minus} 0.37 nM) than for intact Schwann cells (1.06 {plus minus} 0.29 nM). These data suggest the presence of an intracellular pool of sodium channels or channel presursors in Schwann cells.

  17. Emerging concepts in the pharmacogenomics of arrhythmias: ion channel trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Harkcom, William T; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2010-01-01

    Continuous, rhythmic beating of the heart requires exquisite control of expression, localization and function of cardiac ion channels – the foundations of the cardiac myocyte action potential. Disruption of any of these processes can alter the shape of the action potential, predisposing to cardiac arrhythmias. These arrhythmias can manifest in a variety of ways depending on both the channels involved and the type of disruption (i.e., gain or loss of function). As much as 1% of the population of developed countries is affected by cardiac arrhythmia each year, and a detailed understanding of the mechanism of each arrhythmia is crucial to developing and prescribing the proper therapies. Many of the antiarrhythmic drugs currently on the market were developed before the underlying cause of the arrhythmia was known, and as a result lack specificity, causing side effects. The majority of the available drugs target the conductance of cardiac ion channels, either by blocking or enhancing current through the channel. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that specific targeting of ion channel conductance may not be the most effective means for treatment. Here we review increasing evidence that suggests defects in ion channel trafficking play an important role in the etiology of arrhythmias, and small molecule approaches to correct trafficking defects will likely play an important role in the future of arrhythmia treatment. PMID:20670193

  18. A role for BK channels in heart rate regulation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Imlach, Wendy L; Finch, Sarah C; Miller, John H; Meredith, Andrea L; Dalziel, Julie E

    2010-01-14

    The heart generates and propagates action potentials through synchronized activation of ion channels allowing inward Na(+) and Ca(2+) and outward K(+) currents. There are a number of K(+) channel types expressed in the heart that play key roles in regulating the cardiac cycle. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) ion channels are not thought to be directly involved in heart function. Here we present evidence that heart rate can be significantly reduced by inhibiting the activity of BK channels. Agents that specifically inhibit BK channel activity, including paxilline and lolitrem B, slowed heart rate in conscious wild-type mice by 30% and 42%, respectively. Heart rate of BK channel knock-out mice (Kcnma1(-/-)) was not affected by these BK channel inhibitors, suggesting that the changes to heart rate were specifically mediated through BK channels. The possibility that these effects were mediated through BK channels peripheral to the heart was ruled out with experiments using isolated, perfused rat hearts, which showed a significant reduction in heart rate when treated with the BK channel inhibitors paxilline (1 microM), lolitrem B (1 microM), and iberiotoxin (0.23 microM), of 34%, 60%, and 42%, respectively. Furthermore, paxilline was shown to decrease heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. These results implicate BK channels located in the heart to be directly involved in the regulation of heart rate.

  19. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  20. Multi-carrier Communications over Time-varying Acoustic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aval, Yashar M.

    Acoustic communication is an enabling technology for many autonomous undersea systems, such as those used for ocean monitoring, offshore oil and gas industry, aquaculture, or port security. There are three main challenges in achieving reliable high-rate underwater communication: the bandwidth of acoustic channels is extremely limited, the propagation delays are long, and the Doppler distortions are more pronounced than those found in wireless radio channels. In this dissertation we focus on assessing the fundamental limitations of acoustic communication, and designing efficient signal processing methods that cam overcome these limitations. We address the fundamental question of acoustic channel capacity (achievable rate) for single-input-multi-output (SIMO) acoustic channels using a per-path Rician fading model, and focusing on two scenarios: narrowband channels where the channel statistics can be approximated as frequency- independent, and wideband channels where the nominal path loss is frequency-dependent. In each scenario, we compare several candidate power allocation techniques, and show that assigning uniform power across all frequencies for the first scenario, and assigning uniform power across a selected frequency-band for the second scenario, are the best practical choices in most cases, because the long propagation delay renders the feedback information outdated for power allocation based on the estimated channel response. We quantify our results using the channel information extracted form the 2010 Mobile Acoustic Communications Experiment (MACE'10). Next, we focus on achieving reliable high-rate communication over underwater acoustic channels. Specifically, we investigate orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) as the state-of-the-art technique for dealing with frequency-selective multipath channels, and propose a class of methods that compensate for the time-variation of the underwater acoustic channel. These methods are based on multiple

  1. Acute exposure of methylglyoxal leads to activation of KATP channels expressed in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Konduru, Anuhya S; Cui, Ningren; Yu, Lei; Trower, Timothy C; Shi, Weiwei; Shi, Yun; Jiang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Highly reactive carbonyl methylglyoxal (MGO) is one of the metabolites excessively produced in diabetes. We have showed that prolonged exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells to MGO leads to instability of the mRNA encoding ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. In the present study we investigated the effects of MGO on the activity of KATP channels. Methods: Kir6.1/ SUR2B, Kir6.2/SUR2B or Kir6.2Δ36 (a truncated Kir6.2 isoform) alone was expressed in HEK293 cells. Whole-cell currents were recorded in the cells with an Axopatch 200B amplifier. Macroscopic currents and single-channel currents were recorded in giant inside-out patches and normal inside-out patches, respectively. Data were analyzed using Clampfit 9 software. Results: The basal activity of Kir6.1/SUR2B channels was low. The specific KATP channel opener pinacidil (10 μmol/L) could fully activate Kir6.1/SUR2B channels, which was inhibited by the specific KATP channel blocker glibenclamide (10 μmol/L). MGO (0.1-10 mmol/L) dose-dependently activated Kir6.1/SUR2B channels with an EC50 of 1.7 mmol/L. The activation of Kir6.1/SUR2B channels by MGO was reversible upon washout, and could be inhibited completely by glibenclamide. Kir6.2Δ36 channels expressed in HEK293 cells could open automatically, and the channel activity was enhanced in the presence of MGO (3 mmol/L). Single channel recordings showed that MGO (3 mmol/L) markedly increased the open probability of Kir6.1/SUR2B channels, leaving the channel conductance unaltered. Conclusion: Acute application of MGO activates KATP channels through direct, non-covalent and reversible interactions with the Kir6 subunits. PMID:24122011

  2. Bedrock channel reaches morphology: examples from the Northern Marche Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, V.; di Agostino, V.; Troiani, F.; Nesci, O.; Savelli, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Northern Marche rivers, on account of a significant variability of their catchment geology, geodynamics and geomorphology, can be regarded as excellent natural laboratories for the study of the morphology, dynamics and evolution of bedrock channel reaches. Hence a geomorphologic study has been carried on in order to map and describe -from qualitative and quantitative point of view- some bedrock channel types of this area, to detect morphological controls at different scales (from the local scale up to the catchment one), and to assess human perturbations on the drainage systems. The study is based on detailed field surveying concerning channel shape and dynamics, floodplain configurations, slope geomorphologic processes, bedrock structure and composition. In addiction, a good aero photograph documentation dating back to the 1955 allowed a reliable reconstruction of the main evolution trends of bedrock channel reaches in the latest past. In the reported rivers the bedrock channel reaches vary in length from a few tens to hundreds of meters, and alternate with alluvial and mixed bedrock-alluvial channel reaches. In many cases specific numerical relations among geometric parameters of bedrock channels have been discovered and some similarities in both morphology and dynamics of rock-cut channels with alluvial channel reaches have been pointed out. Specifically, with regard of their morphologic arrangement, geometric parameters, and flow dynamics several bedrock channels are quite similar to step pool channels found along gravelly channel reaches. Nonetheless, along a given segment of the hydrographical network where an individual alluvial-channel pattern (e.g. a wandering) is found both upstream and downstream a rock-cut channel reach, the occurrence of this latter (e.g. planar bedrock-floored channel) simply breaks the along-stream continuity of the alluvial-bed morphology.

  3. Information geometry of Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-06-15

    We define a local Riemannian metric tensor in the manifold of Gaussian channels and the distance that it induces. We adopt an information-geometric approach and define a metric derived from the Bures-Fisher metric for quantum states. The resulting metric inherits several desirable properties from the Bures-Fisher metric and is operationally motivated by distinguishability considerations: It serves as an upper bound to the attainable quantum Fisher information for the channel parameters using Gaussian states, under generic constraints on the physically available resources. Our approach naturally includes the use of entangled Gaussian probe states. We prove that the metric enjoys some desirable properties like stability and covariance. As a by-product, we also obtain some general results in Gaussian channel estimation that are the continuous-variable analogs of previously known results in finite dimensions. We prove that optimal probe states are always pure and bounded in the number of ancillary modes, even in the presence of constraints on the reduced state input in the channel. This has experimental and computational implications. It limits the complexity of optimal experimental setups for channel estimation and reduces the computational requirements for the evaluation of the metric: Indeed, we construct a converging algorithm for its computation. We provide explicit formulas for computing the multiparametric quantum Fisher information for dissipative channels probed with arbitrary Gaussian states and provide the optimal observables for the estimation of the channel parameters (e.g., bath couplings, squeezing, and temperature).

  4. Ion Channels in Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Sezgin, Efe C.; Eckert, Franziska; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma exhibit a high metastatic tropism to the brain. Development of brain metastases severely worsens the prognosis of cancer patients and constrains curative treatment options. Metastasizing to the brain by cancer cells can be dissected in consecutive processes including epithelial–mesenchymal transition, evasion from the primary tumor, intravasation and circulation in the blood, extravasation across the blood–brain barrier, formation of metastatic niches, and colonization in the brain. Ion channels have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in tumor cells where they regulate neoplastic transformation, malignant progression or therapy resistance. Moreover, many ion channel modulators are FDA-approved drugs and in clinical use proposing ion channels as druggable targets for future anti-cancer therapy. The present review article aims to summarize the current knowledge on the function of ion channels in the different processes of brain metastasis. The data suggest that certain channel types involving voltage-gated sodium channels, ATP-release channels, ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and gap junction-generating connexins interfere with distinct processes of brain metastazation. PMID:27618016

  5. ATP release through pannexon channels.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed 'pannexon'. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  6. Ion Channels in Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Lukas; Sezgin, Efe C; Eckert, Franziska; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma exhibit a high metastatic tropism to the brain. Development of brain metastases severely worsens the prognosis of cancer patients and constrains curative treatment options. Metastasizing to the brain by cancer cells can be dissected in consecutive processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, evasion from the primary tumor, intravasation and circulation in the blood, extravasation across the blood-brain barrier, formation of metastatic niches, and colonization in the brain. Ion channels have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in tumor cells where they regulate neoplastic transformation, malignant progression or therapy resistance. Moreover, many ion channel modulators are FDA-approved drugs and in clinical use proposing ion channels as druggable targets for future anti-cancer therapy. The present review article aims to summarize the current knowledge on the function of ion channels in the different processes of brain metastasis. The data suggest that certain channel types involving voltage-gated sodium channels, ATP-release channels, ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and gap junction-generating connexins interfere with distinct processes of brain metastazation. PMID:27618016

  7. Microbial Senses and Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Ching; Zhou, Xin-Liang; Su, Zhen-Wei; Haynes, W. John; Loukin, Sephan H.; Saimi, Yoshiro

    The complexity of animals and plants is due largely to cellular arrangement. The structures and activities of macromolecules had, however, evolved in early microbes long before the appearance of this complexity. Among such molecules are those that sense light, heat, force, water, and ligands. Though historically and didactically associated with the nervous system, ion channels also have deep evolutionary roots. For example, force sensing with channels, which likely began as water sensing through membrane stretch generated by osmotic pressure, must be ancient and is universal in extant species. Extant microbial species, such as the model bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are equipped with stretch-activated channels. The ion channel proteins MscL and MscS show clearly that these bacterial channels receive stretch forces from the lipid bilayer. TRPY1, the mechanosensitive channel in yeast, is being developed towards a similar basic understanding of channels of the TRP (transientreceptor- potential) superfamily. TRPY1 resides in the vacuolar membrane and releases Ca2+ from the vacuole to the cytoplasm upon hyperosmotic shock. Unlike in most TRP preparations from animals, the mechanosensitivity of TRPY1 can be examined directly under patch clamp in either whole-vacuole mode or excised patch mode. The combination of direct biophysical examination in vitro with powerful microbial genetics in vivo should complement the study of mechanosensations of complex animals and plants.

  8. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  9. Ribbon channel plate rotating drum DNA sequencing device.

    PubMed

    Douthart, R J; Welt, M; Walling, L

    1996-01-01

    A new design DNA sequencing electrophoresis device is described. The device, called the ribbon channeled plate rotating drum (rprd), consists of two major components, the plate assembly and the drum assembly. The plate assembly contains a machined or etched plate of individual micro-channels called the ribbon channeled plate. The ribbon channeled plate and other components of the plate assembly combine the advantages of thin gels and capillary arrays in a single unit with few of the disadvantages. The other major component of rprd is the drum assembly, which facilitates direct blotting onto deposition membranes affixed to a large plastic drum. The drum with attached membrane and deposited electrophoretically resolved ladders is easily moved to special units facilitating downstream processing and detection. The drum unit, although versatile, is specifically designed to be used with multiplex sequencing. PMID:8907517

  10. Potassium channels in cell cycle and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Tomczak, Adam P.; Zahed, Farrah; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cell-cycle progression is a crucial task for every multicellular organism, as it determines body size and shape, tissue renewal and senescence, and is also crucial for reproduction. On the other hand, dysregulation of the cell-cycle progression leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation is the hallmark of cancer. Therefore, it is not surprising that it is a tightly regulated process, with multifaceted and very complex control mechanisms. It is now well established that one of those mechanisms relies on ion channels, and in many cases specifically on potassium channels. Here, we summarize the possible mechanisms underlying the importance of potassium channels in cell-cycle control and briefly review some of the identified channels that illustrate the multiple ways in which this group of proteins can influence cell proliferation and modulate cell-cycle progression. PMID:24493742

  11. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  12. Alpha Channeling in a Rotating Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2008-09-23

    The wave-particle α-channeling effect is generalized to include rotating plasma. Specifically, radio frequency waves can resonate with α particles in a mirror machine with E × B rotation to diffuse the α particles along constrained paths in phase space. Of major interest is that the α-particle energy, in addition to amplifying the RF waves, can directly enhance the rotation energy which in turn provides additional plasma confinement in centrifugal fusion reactors. An ancillary benefit is the rapid removal of alpha particles, which increases the fusion reactivity.

  13. Acid-sensing ion channels and transient-receptor potential ion channels in zebrafish taste buds.

    PubMed

    Levanti, M; Randazzo, B; Viña, E; Montalbano, G; Garcia-Suarez, O; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Abbate, F

    2016-09-01

    Sensory information from the environment is required for life and survival, and it is detected by specialized cells which together make up the sensory system. The fish sensory system includes specialized organs that are able to detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. In particular, taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of others. In fish taste receptor cells, different classes of ion channels have been detected which, like in mammals, presumably participate in the detection and/or transduction of chemical gustatory signals. However, since some of these ion channels are involved in the detection of additional sensory modalities, it can be hypothesized that taste cells sense stimuli other than those specific for taste. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge on the presence of transient-receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing (ASIC) ion channels in the taste buds of teleosts, especially adult zebrafish. Up to now ASIC4, TRPC2, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV4 ion channels have been found in the sensory cells, while ASIC2 was detected in the nerves supplying the taste buds. PMID:27513962

  14. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  15. Intent Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1995-01-01

    We have been investigating the implications of using abstractions based on intent rather than the aggregation and information-hiding abstractions commonly used in software en- gineering: Cognitive psychologists have shown that intent abstraction is consistent with human problem-solving processes. We believe that new types of specifications and designs based on this concept can assist in understanding and specifying requirements, capturing the most important design rationale information in an efficient and economical way, and supporting the process of identifying and analyzing required changes to minimize the introduction of errors. The goal of hierarchical abstraction is to allow both top-down and bottom-up reasoning about a complex system. In computer science, we have made much use of (1) part-whole abstractions where each level of a hierarchy represents an aggregation of the components at a lower level and of (2) information-hiding abstractions where each level contains the same conceptual information but hides some details about the concepts, that is, each level is a refinement of the information at a higher level.

  16. Electrostatic tuning of permeation and selectivity in aquaporin water channels.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten Ø; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-11-01

    Water permeation and electrostatic interactions between water and channel are investigated in the Escherichia coli glycerol uptake facilitator GlpF, a member of the aquaporin water channel family, by molecular dynamics simulations. A tetrameric model of the channel embedded in a 16:0/18:1c9-palmitoyloleylphosphatidylethanolamine membrane was used for the simulations. During the simulations, water molecules pass through the channel in single file. The movement of the single file water molecules through the channel is concerted, and we show that it can be described by a continuous-time random-walk model. The integrity of the single file remains intact during the permeation, indicating that a disrupted water chain is unlikely to be the mechanism of proton exclusion in aquaporins. Specific hydrogen bonds between permeating water and protein at the channel center (at two conserved Asp-Pro-Ala "NPA" motifs), together with the protein electrostatic fields enforce a bipolar water configuration inside the channel with dipole inversion at the NPA motifs. At the NPA motifs water-protein electrostatic interactions facilitate this inversion. Furthermore, water-water electrostatic interactions are in all regions inside the channel stronger than water-protein interactions, except near a conserved, positively charged Arg residue. We find that variations of the protein electrostatic field through the channel, owing to preserved structural features, completely explain the bipolar orientation of water. This orientation persists despite water translocation in single file and blocks proton transport. Furthermore, we find that for permeation of a cation, ion-protein electrostatic interactions are more unfavorable at the conserved NPA motifs than at the conserved Arg, suggesting that the major barrier against proton transport in aquaporins is faced at the NPA motifs. PMID:14581193

  17. Base of the thumb domain modulates epithelial sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shujie; Ghosh, D Dipon; Okumura, Sora; Carattino, Marcelo D; Kashlan, Ossama B; Sheng, Shaohu; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2011-04-29

    The activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is modulated by multiple external factors, including proteases, cations, anions and shear stress. The resolved crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1), a structurally related ion channel, and mutagenesis studies suggest that the large extracellular region is involved in recognizing external signals that regulate channel gating. The thumb domain in the extracellular region of ASIC1 has a cylinder-like structure with a loop at its base that is in proximity to the tract connecting the extracellular region to the transmembrane domains. This loop has been proposed to have a role in transmitting proton-induced conformational changes within the extracellular region to the gate. We examined whether loops at the base of the thumb domains within ENaC subunits have a similar role in transmitting conformational changes induced by external Na(+) and shear stress. Mutations at selected sites within this loop in each of the subunits altered channel responses to both external Na(+) and shear stress. The most robust changes were observed at the site adjacent to a conserved Tyr residue. In the context of channels that have a low open probability due to retention of an inhibitory tract, mutations in the loop activated channels in a subunit-specific manner. Our data suggest that this loop has a role in modulating channel gating in response to external stimuli, and are consistent with the hypothesis that external signals trigger movements within the extracellular regions of ENaC subunits that are transmitted to the channel gate. PMID:21367859

  18. Infinitely many kinds of quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    We define the ability of a quantum channel to simulate another by means of suitable encoding and decoding operations. While classical channels have only two equivalence classes under simulation (channels with non-vanishing capacity and those with vanishing capacity), we show that there are an uncountable infinity of different equivalence classes of quantum channels using the example of the quantum erasure channel. Our results also imply a kind of 'Matthew principle' for error correction on certain channels.

  19. Mitochondrial small conductance SK2 channels prevent glutamate-induced oxytosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dolga, Amalia M; Netter, Michael F; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-04-12

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/K(Ca)2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K(+) currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Noise control of subsonic cavity flows using plasma actuated receptive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Arnob; Roy, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a passive receptive rectangular channel at the trailing edge of an open rectangular cavity to reduce the acoustic tones generated due to coherent shear layer impingement. The channel is numerically tested at Mach 0.3 using an unsteady three-dimensional large eddy simulation. Results show reduction in pressure fluctuations in the cavity due to which sound pressure levels are suppressed. Two linear dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators are placed inside the channel to enhance the flow through it. Specifically, acoustic suppression of 7 dB was obtained for Mach 0.3 flow with the plasma actuated channel. Also, the drag coefficient for the cavity reduced by over three folds for the channel and over eight folds for the plasma actuated channel. Such a channel can be useful in noise and drag reduction for various applications, including weapons bay, landing gear and branched piping systems.

  1. Probing conformational changes of gramicidin ion channels by single-molecule patch-clamp fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Gregory S.; Orr, Galya; Montal, Mauricio; Thrall, Brian D.; Colson, Steve D.; Lu, H Peter

    2003-09-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes often regulate the dynamics of ion channels. Such inhomogeneity makes it difficult, if not impossible; to be characterized not only by ensemble-averaged experiments by also by single-channel patch recording that does not specifically probe the associated conformational changes. Here, we report on our work using a new approach combining single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and single-channel patch recording to investigate conformational changes of individual gramicidin ion channels. We observed fluorescence self-quenching and single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) from dye-labeled gramicidin dimmers within the channel was open. We also observed that the efficiency of self-quenching and spFRETS is widely distributed when the channel is closed. Our results strongly suggest a hitherto undetectable correlation of multiple conformational states of the gramicidin channel associated with closed and open states under physiologically-related conditions.

  2. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  3. Structural Biology of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins remain challenging targets for structural biologists, despite recent technical developments regarding sample preparation and structure determination. We review recent progress towards a structural understanding of TRP channels and the techniques used to that end. We discuss available low-resolution structures from electron microscopy (EM), X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and review the resulting insights into TRP channel function for various subfamily members. The recent high-resolution structure of TRPV1 is discussed in more detail in Chapter X. We also consider the opportunities and challenges of using the accumulating structural information on TRPs and homologous proteins for deducing full-length structures of different TRP channel subfamilies, such as building homology models. Finally, we close by summarizing the outlook of the “holy grail” of understanding in atomic detail the diverse functions of TRP channels. PMID:24961976

  4. Aquaglyceroporins: ancient channels for metalloids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; Rosen, Barry P

    2008-11-07

    The identification of aquaglyceroporins as uptake channels for arsenic and antimony shows how these toxic elements can enter the food chain, and suggests that food plants could be genetically modified to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon.

  5. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  6. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  7. Protonophore properties of hyperforin are essential for its pharmacological activity

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Thomas S.; Belkacemi, Thabet; Flockerzi, Veit; Beck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperforin is a pharmacologically active component of the medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort), recommended as a treatment for a range of ailments including mild to moderate depression. Part of its action has been attributed to TRPC6 channel activation. We found that hyperforin induces TRPC6-independent H+ currents in HEK-293 cells, cortical microglia, chromaffin cells and lipid bilayers. The latter demonstrates that hyperforin itself acts as a protonophore. The protonophore activity of hyperforin causes cytosolic acidification, which strongly depends on the holding potential, and which fuels the plasma membrane sodium-proton exchanger. Thereby the free intracellular sodium concentration increases and the neurotransmitter uptake by Na+ cotransport is inhibited. Additionally, hyperforin depletes and reduces loading of large dense core vesicles in chromaffin cells, which requires a pH gradient in order to accumulate monoamines. In summary the pharmacological actions of the “herbal Prozac” hyperforin are essentially determined by its protonophore properties shown here. PMID:25511254

  8. Protonophore properties of hyperforin are essential for its pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Sell, Thomas S; Belkacemi, Thabet; Flockerzi, Veit; Beck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperforin is a pharmacologically active component of the medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort), recommended as a treatment for a range of ailments including mild to moderate depression. Part of its action has been attributed to TRPC6 channel activation. We found that hyperforin induces TRPC6</