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Sample records for specifications tower shielding

  1. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  2. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. BNCT filter design studies for the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in the United States has entered into a new phase with the initiation of clinical trials using neutron sources at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. If these trials are successful at demonstrating the efficacy of BNCT as a viable treatment for glioblastoma multiforme, then there will be an immediate demand for several additional neutron sources in order to treat the several thousand patients currently diagnosed with glioblastomas in the U.S. each year. However, the requirements for an acceptable neutron source for BNCT are rather severe in terms of the need to provide a sufficient number of epithermal neutrons to a patient-accessible location in a reasonable time with minimal thermal-neutron, fast- neutron, and gamma-ray background. A recent study of potential neutron sources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed, which concludes that the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF), also appears very well suited for BNCT. The light-water-cooled reactor is contained in an aluminum pressure vessel and located in a large concrete `bunker` referred to as the Big Beam Shield (BBS). The BBS contains a 77-cm-diameter beam collimator, which permits access to a broad beam neutron flux exceeding 4 x 10[sup ll] Cm[sup -2]s[sup- 1] at the operational power of 1 MW. The collimated beam emerges horizontally onto an unenclosed test pad area on which shield mockups were assembled. The appropriate beam filter and collimator system can be easily constructed in the expansive area previously used for the large shield mockups. Additional engineering of the beam shutter mechanism and the construction of treatment support facilities will be needed but can be easily accommodated on the remote dedicated site. The filter design analysis is provided.

  4. Drag-shield drop tower residual acceleration optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Fernandez De Pierola, M.; Duran, J.

    2016-07-01

    Among the forces that appear in drop towers for microgravity experiments, aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role in the residual acceleration. Buoyancy can also be critical, especially at the first instances of the drop when the low speed of the experimental platform makes the aerodynamic drag small compared with buoyancy. In this paper the perturbation method is used to formulate an analytical model which has been validated experimentally. The experimental test was conduced by undergraduate students of aerospace engineering at the Institute of Microgravity ‘Ignacio Da Riva’ of the Technical University of Madrid (IDR/UPM) microgravity tower. The test helped students to understand the influence of the buoyancy on the residual acceleration of the experiment platform. The objective of the students was to understand the physical process during the drop, identify the main parameters involved in the residual acceleration and determine the most suitable configuration for the next drop tower proposed to be built at UPM.

  5. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  6. Where have the neutrons gone: A history of the tower shielding facility

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J. )

    1992-01-01

    In 1946, the U.S. Air Force selected the Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation as the responsible organization for directing the Nuclear Energy for Propulsion of Aircraft (NEPA) project. At about this time, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was putting into operation a facility that used a beam hole through the graphite reactor shield as a source of neutrons into which shield samples could be inserted. Since the laboratory had this facility, it was asked to cooperate in NEPA's needs. As time passed, more and more NEPA personnel became involved in NEPA work occurring at the laboratory, and in September 1949, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) designated ORNL as the agency for continuing the AEC's share of a joint technical program that was established in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Defense and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The purpose of the program was to develop a nuclear-powered aircraft. The laboratory was asked to study the neutronics aspect of the project, which included the relatively new discipline of reactor shielding. Since the weight and distribution of the shields would substantially affect the shape and size of the plane, it was imperative that the shield design be accurate and timely. It was concluded that the surest, fastest, and most economical way to verify calculations was through the use of full-scale mock-ups. This decision led to the building of what has been known as the Tower Shielding Facility.

  7. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    S.Su

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M&O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations.

  8. Removal site evaluation report on the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report for the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Tower Shielding Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and if remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; a site inspection; and identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. Based an the findings of this removal site evaluation, adequate efforts are currently being made at the TSF to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances on site in order to protect human health and the environment No conditions requiring maintenance or removal actions to mitigate imminent or potential threats to human health and the environment were identified during this evaluation. Given the current conditions and status of the buildings associated with the TSF, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated according to the requirements for removal site evaluation termination.

  9. 77 FR 67678 - Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages AGENCY... Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2012-XX, ``Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B... Plan for Transport Packages for Radioactive Material,'' for the review of content specifications...

  10. 21 CFR 1000.50 - Recommendation for the use of specific area gonad shielding on patients during medical diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Food and Drugs... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Specific area gonad shielding covers an... that may cause genetic mutations during many medical x-ray procedures in which the gonads lie within...

  11. 21 CFR 1000.50 - Recommendation for the use of specific area gonad shielding on patients during medical diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Food and Drugs... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Specific area gonad shielding covers an... that may cause genetic mutations during many medical x-ray procedures in which the gonads lie within...

  12. 21 CFR 1000.50 - Recommendation for the use of specific area gonad shielding on patients during medical diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Food and Drugs... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Specific area gonad shielding covers an... that may cause genetic mutations during many medical x-ray procedures in which the gonads lie within...

  13. 21 CFR 1000.50 - Recommendation for the use of specific area gonad shielding on patients during medical diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Food and Drugs... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Specific area gonad shielding covers an... that may cause genetic mutations during many medical x-ray procedures in which the gonads lie within...

  14. 21 CFR 1000.50 - Recommendation for the use of specific area gonad shielding on patients during medical diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Food and Drugs... shielding on patients during medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Specific area gonad shielding covers an... that may cause genetic mutations during many medical x-ray procedures in which the gonads lie within...

  15. 78 FR 26090 - Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... this RIS as a draft for public comment on November 13, 2012 (77 FR 67678), for a 45-day comment period... COMMISSION Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages AGENCY... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2013-04, ``Content Specifications...

  16. You're a What?: Tower Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the role and functions of a tower technician. A tower technician climbs up the face of telecommunications towers to remove, install, test, maintain, and repair a variety of equipment--from antennas to light bulbs. Tower technicians also build shelters and radiofrequency shields for electronic equipment, lay…

  17. Phthalonitrile-Based Carbon Foam with High Specific Mechanical Strength and Superior Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Liu, Ming; Roy, Sunanda; Chu, Eng Kee; See, Kye Yak; Hu, Xiao

    2016-03-23

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) performance materials are urgently needed to relieve the increasing stress over electromagnetic pollution problems arising from the growing demand for electronic and electrical devices. In this work, a novel ultralight (0.15 g/cm(3)) carbon foam was prepared by direct carbonization of phthalonitrile (PN)-based polymer foam aiming to simultaneously achieve high EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) and deliver effective weight reduction without detrimental reduction of the mechanical properties. The carbon foam prepared by this method had specific compressive strength of ∼6.0 MPa·cm(3)/g. High EMI SE of ∼51.2 dB was achieved, contributed by its intrinsic nitrogen-containing structure (3.3 wt% of nitrogen atoms). The primary EMI shielding mechanism of such carbon foam was determined to be absorption. Moreover, the carbon foams showed excellent specific EMI SE of 341.1 dB·cm(3)/g, which was at least 2 times higher than most of the reported material. The remarkable EMI shielding performance combined with high specific compressive strength indicated that the carbon foam could be considered as a low-density and high-performance EMI shielding material for use in areas where mechanical integrity is desired.

  18. Tower counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  19. GCFR plenum shield design: exit shield experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the integral flux, energy spectra, and dose rate measurements made for the Exit Shield Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tower Shielding Facility as part of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor program. The source was the same mockup of fuel pins used in the previous Grid Plate Shield Experiment. Two mockups of the upper axial shield were studied: one with seven subassemblies prototypic of that portion of the Exit Shield without a control rod, and another that was representative of the shield region with a control rod. The experiment was performed to provide verification of: the shield design methods, the shield effectiveness of a prototypic mockup, the analytical ability to calculate streaming effects in the presence of a control rod, and the source term bias factors for the upper plenum.

  20. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  1. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  2. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  3. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  4. Ant Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlot, Nathan; Shinotsuka, Sho; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    Ants walk via adhesive drops of fluid extruded by their feet. They also use these drops as mortar to build structures such as rafts, bridges and towers, each composed of thousands of ants linked together. We investigate experimentally the construction of triangular ant towers braced by hydrophobic walls. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between tower height and contact angle hysteresis of the wall. We rationalize tower height according to ant adhesion, and tower shape according to the constraints on a column of constant strength.

  5. Short Duration Reduced Gravity Drop Tower Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, B.; Welch, C.

    The industrial and commercial development of space-related activities is intimately linked to the ability to conduct reduced gravity research. Reduced gravity experimentation is important to many diverse fields of research in the understanding of fundamental and applied aspects of physical phenomena. Both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial experimental facilities are currently available to allow researchers access to reduced gravity environments. This paper discusses two drop tower designs, a 2.0 second facility built in Australia and a proposed 2.2 second facility in the United Kingdom. Both drop towers utilise a drag shield for isolating the falling experiment from the drag forces of the air during the test. The design and development of The University of Queensland's (Australia) 2.0 second drop tower, including its specifications and operational procedures is discussed first. Sensitive aspects of the design process are examined. Future plans are then presented for a new short duration (2.2 sec) ground-based reduced gravity drop tower. The new drop tower has been designed for Kingston University (United Kingdom) to support teaching and research in the field of reduced gravity physics. The design has been informed by the previous UQ drop tower design process and utilises a catapult mechanism to increase test time and also incorporates features to allow participants for a variety of backgrounds (from high school students through to university researchers) to learn and experiment in reduced gravity. Operational performance expectations for this new facility are also discussed.

  6. Windmill tower

    SciTech Connect

    Schachle, C.; Schachle, E.C.; Schachle, J.R.; Schachle, P.J.

    1982-04-06

    A windmill tower supports a propeller and a platform that in turn supports a propeller feather control system and a generator system. The entire tower rotates at its base under changes in wind direction so the rotating propeller is constantly maintained upwind of the tower. The tower is a rigid structure that withstands cyclic thrust and torque loading sufficiently to reduce resonant vibrations of the tower as the propeller rotates under the influence of the wind. The resonant frequency of the tower can be higher than the passing frequency of the rotating propeller blades. The tower includes a pair of generally upright fore legs that converge upwardly toward a first apex on the propeller axis of rotation near the front of the platform immediately behind the propeller hub. A diagonal bracing strut extends downwardly from the first apex away from the plane of the fore legs and toward the rear of the tower. The bottoms of the fore legs and the diagonal bracing strut are rigidly interconnected by base plane truss members. A pair of upwardly converging aft legs extend diagonally upwardly from the bottoms of the fore legs toward a second apex aft of the first apex at the rear of the platform. At regular vertical intervals, stiffening trusses add rigidity to the main upright members of the tower structure. The natural frequency of the tower is raised by the fore legs and the diagonal bracing strut being interconnected in a rigid base plane truss. The diagonal bracing strut resists thrust loading on the tower, and the fore legs and aft legs resist torsional forces produced at the top of the tower.

  7. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  8. Collapsible Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA needed a means of orbiting a large radio telescope antenna. Astro Research Corporation developed a new structure that was strong, lightweight, folded into a small storage space, and could be erected by rotation. Later they adapted it to commercial use. Today the "Astromast" tower consists of tubular aluminum alloy and stainless steel members that deploy into small three-sided bays, each made rigid by six diagonal cables. All joints are flexible to permit folding and unfolding. Tower packs into container 5% of its height, can be erected without tools and is reusable. Tower has won "Design of the Year" award from Machine Design. Variations include portable emergency bridges and commercial scaffolding.

  9. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  10. Rapunzel's Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depp, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    Children's literature often inspires the author's lessons, and reading to her primary students motivates their participation. In this article, the author presents and describes her lesson which is based on the book "Falling for Rapunzel" by Leah Wilcox. Students created a fairy tale tower in this lesson, which took place over three class periods.…

  11. Specifications for the development of BUGLE-93: An ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross section library for LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Roussin, R.W.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses specifications which have been developed for a new multigroup cross section library based on ENDF/B-VI data for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The resulting broad-group library and an intermediate fine-group library are defined by the specifications provided in this report. Processing ENDF/B-VI into multigroup format for use in radiation transport codes will provide radiation shielding analysts with the most currently available nuclear data. it is expected that the general nature of the specifications will be useful in other applications such as reactor physics.

  12. 13. WEIGHING ROOM Fish were lifted up from tower by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. WEIGHING ROOM Fish were lifted up from tower by conveyor, controlled by buttons above the two sets of vertical electrical conduits. They entered the weighing room through the shielded window on the left (shielding missing from the window on the right), were weighed and then transported to the holding tanks. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  13. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  14. Successfully troubleshoot distillation towers

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbrouck, J.F. ); Kunesh, J.G. ); Smith, V.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Distillation dominates separation services in the chemical process industries. With this widespread use, not surprisingly, operating problems are common. Because distillation columns frequently are limiting factors in plant capacity or product quality, correcting these problems usually is urgent. The paper describes the steps to be taken to start to correct problems on distillation towers: understand the ground rules, understand the people and procedures, and understand the plant. Then observe the actual operation, monitor the system, collect required data, and analyze the data. The paper discusses how to determine the problem area, broadening the search, focusing on the distillation tower and its internals, confirming the specific problem, extending the troubleshooting activities, and dealing with tougher problems.

  15. Typical Mid Tower Elevation & Section, Typical Mid Tower Footing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Mid Tower Elevation & Section, Typical Mid Tower Footing Section & Elevation, South Tower Section & Elevation, and North Tower Sections & Elevation - Cape Arago Light Station Footbridge, Gregory Point, Charleston, Coos County, OR

  16. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  17. Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, V. J.; Narayanan, S. P.; Ganapathy, C.

    2010-06-01

    Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings, for better efficiency, turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate, the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today, more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines, offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases, the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore, turbines build father

  18. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  19. 9. BUILDING NO. 620B, FRICTION PENDULUM BUILDING. 29FOOT DROP TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING NO. 620-B, FRICTION PENDULUM BUILDING. 29-FOOT DROP TOWER SITS BEHIND BLAST SHIELD IN FRONT OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  20. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  1. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T. ); Ingersoll, J.K. )

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  2. Confusion at the Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Loretta F.

    2014-01-01

    This study will explore the omission of the Tower of Babel narrative from middle and secondary school world history, world studies, and world geography textbooks and will consider what might be learned from inclusion of the story in the curriculum. A total of 17 textbooks are analyzed. The Tower of Babel narrative is examined within the context of…

  3. Leaning Tower of PESA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John

    2009-01-01

    There is a certain similarity between the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA) and the leaning tower of Pisa. Both have a certain presence on the landscape: the tower has a commanding appearance on the Italian countryside while PESA has left its mark on the academic fabric of Australasia. Both are much loved: Pisa by visiting…

  4. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  5. Wind tower service lift

    DOEpatents

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  6. Debye Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    2011-10-01

    We usually expect that a biased electrode in contact with a plasma will effect only its immediate surroundings. The plasma will tend to shield itself from the applied electric potential, the characteristic shielding distance being the Debye length. This is not the case for biased gun electrodes which can project a nonneutral plasma beam relatively long distances across a magnetically confined plasma (Controlling the plasma potential across a magnetic field, Trans. Kansas Acad. Sci., vol 93, pg 125, R. Jones, 1990 and Plasma heating with electrically biased plasma guns, Trans. Kansas Acad. Sci., vol 97, pg 136, R. Jones, 1994) See also my website www.robert-w-jones.com and blog www.robertwilliamjones.blogspot.com.

  7. View of Nevada rim towers from Arizona side. Left tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Nevada rim towers from Arizona side. Left tower supports Circuit 6, middle tower supports Circuit 5, and right tower supports Circuits 4 and 15, view north - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  8. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  9. Tower Camera Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Moudry, D

    2005-01-01

    The tower camera in Barrow provides hourly images of ground surrounding the tower. These images may be used to determine fractional snow cover as winter arrives, for comparison with the albedo that can be calculated from downward-looking radiometers, as well as some indication of present weather. Similarly, during spring time, the camera images show the changes in the ground albedo as the snow melts. The tower images are saved in hourly intervals. In addition, two other cameras, the skydeck camera in Barrow and the piling camera in Atqasuk, show the current conditions at those sites.

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN,EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-48 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-21 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  12. Aquarius: Tower Rollback

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile service tower at NASA's Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California is being moved away from the ULA Delta II rocket with the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft atop, in preparati...

  13. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  14. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  15. Chiral shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Babukhadia, L.; Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Scadron, M. D.

    2000-08-01

    We demonstrate how a chiral soft pion theorem (SPT) shields the scalar meson ground-state isoscalar {sigma}(600-700) and isospinor {kappa}(800-900) from detection in a{sub 1}{yields}{pi}({pi}{pi}){sub swave}, {gamma}{gamma}{yields}2{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}n and K{sup -}p{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}n processes. While pseudoscalar meson PVV transitions are known to be determined by (only) quark loop diagrams, the above SPT also constrains scalar meson SVV transitions to be governed (only) by meson loop diagrams. We apply this latter SVV theorem to a{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and f{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decays. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER TWO, WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER TWO, WITH TOWERS THREE,FOUR, FIVE AND SIX IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  18. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  19. 26. STATIC TEST TOWER CONTROL PANELS AT REAR OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STATIC TEST TOWER CONTROL PANELS AT REAR OF TOWER UNDERNEATH SHED ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. 8. GENERAL VIEW OF TOWER 32, LEFT, AND TOWER 31, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL VIEW OF TOWER 32, LEFT, AND TOWER 31, RIGHT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH SHOWING AERIAL WIRE DESIGN WITH VERTICAL 'TOP HAT' WIRES IN CENTER. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  1. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket.

    PubMed

    Kubelka-Lange, André; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10(5) (87)Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article. PMID:27370420

  2. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket.

    PubMed

    Kubelka-Lange, André; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10(5) (87)Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  3. THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a water tank on the second floor that gravity fed water to the Kineth house and farm buildings. The one-story addition to the west of the tower provided workshop space. The hog shed is seen on the left of the image and the concrete foundation of the upright silo is in the foreground on the right. - Kineth Farm, Tower House, 19162 State Route 20, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  4. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  5. The TALE Tower Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, D. R.

    The TA Low Energy Extension will include a Tower FluorescenceDetector. Extensive air showers at the lowest usful energies for fluorescence detectors will in general be close to the detector. This requires viewing all elevation angles to be able to reconstruct showers. The TALE Tower Detector, operating in conjunction with other TALE detectors will view elevation angles up to above 70 degrees, with an azimuthal coverage of about 90 degrees. Results from a prototype mirror operated in conjunction with the HiRes detector will also be presented.

  6. Solar thermal power towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1984-07-01

    The solar thermal central receiver technology, known as solar power towers, is rapidly evolving to a state of near-term energy availability for electrical power generation and industrial process heat applications. The systems consist of field arrays of heliostat reflectors, a central receiver boiler, short term thermal storage devices, and either turbine-generators or heat exchangers. Fluid temperatures up to 550 C are currently achievable, and technology developments are underway to reach 1100 C. Six solar power towers are now under construction or in test operation in five countries around the world.

  7. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  8. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  10. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  11. Tower Mesonetwork Climatology and Interactive Display Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2004-01-01

    Forecasters at the 45th Weather Squadron and Spaceflight Meteorology Group use data from the tower network over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to evaluate Launch Commit Criteria, and issue and verify forecasts for ground operations. Systematic biases in these parameters could adversely affect an analysis, forecast, or verification. Also, substantial geographical variations in temperature and wind speed can occur under specific wind directions. To address these concerns, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a climatology of temperatures and winds from the tower network, and identified the geographical variation and significant tower biases. The mesoclimate is largely driven by the complex land-water interfaces across KSC/CCAFS. Towers with close proximity to water typically had much warmer nocturnal temperatures and higher wind speeds throughout the year. The strongest nocturnal wind speeds occurred from October to March whereas the strongest mean daytime wind speeds occurred from February to May. These results of this project can be viewed by forecasters through an interactive graphical user interface developed by the AMU. The web-based interface includes graphical and map displays of mean, standard deviation, bias, and data availability for any combination of towers, variables, months, hours, and wind directions.

  12. Ivory Basements and Ivory Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The metaphors of the ivory tower and ivory basement are used in this chapter to reflect how many women understand and experience the academy. The ivory tower signifies a place that is protected, a place of privilege and authority and a place removed from the outside world (and consequently the rigours of the market place). The ivory tower, by…

  13. Windmill tower shadow eliminator

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.J.

    1984-04-17

    In a wind driven propeller system an airfoil support for the shaft of a propeller having an even number of blades extends above and below the shaft a distance at least equal to the blade length and pivots with the propeller into the wind for substantially eliminating tower shadow effects on the propeller.

  14. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  15. The Ivory Tower Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chantler, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The corollary of the concept of the "ivory tower", as reflected in the writings of Plato and Newman amongst others, was, paradoxically, the vital importance of the university for wider society. Nevertheless from the mid-twentieth century, the esteem in which a "liberal" university education was held was diminished by rising…

  16. The Towers of Hanoi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, George C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an investigation carried out with a group of able mathematics students who were studying at a level 1 year in advance of their peers. The purpose was to investigate the extension of usual three peg Towers of Hanoi to four pegs and attempt to find a rule that could be used to predict the minimum number of moves required to…

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1435 - Tower cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... registered professional engineer familiar with the equipment must not be exceeded. (c) Signs. The size and location of signs installed on tower cranes must be in accordance with manufacturer specifications. Where... must approve in writing the size and location of any signs. (d) Safety devices. (1) Section...

  18. Drop tower with no aerodynamic drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Cooling air accelerated to match velocity of falling object eliminates drag. 3 meter drop tower with suction fan and specific geometry causes air to accelerate downward at 1 g. Although cooling of molten material released from top is slow because surrounding air moves with it, drop remains nearly spherical.

  19. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  20. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  1. Utility avoids cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    After more than four years of often rancorous debate, New Jersey late last month approved a plan that permits the state`s largest utility to reclaim and restore Delaware Bay marshland instead of constructing a costly cooling tower for two nuclear power units. Environmental interests say they`ll appeal the wetlands proposal, calling it an {open_quotes}unproven experiment{close_quotes} that violates Clean Water Act provisions.

  2. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  3. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  4. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  5. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-10-23

    Preliminary radiation shielding specifications are presented here for the 3 GeV BOOMERANG Australian synchrotron light source project. At this time the bulk shield walls for the storage ring and injection system (100 MeV Linac and 3 GeV Booster) are considered for siting purposes.

  6. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  7. Solar energy collection by the tower system

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, T.; Takemoto, M.

    1981-01-01

    Solar energy collecting tests were carried out under Japan's Sunshine Project, as part of the solar thermal electric power system. The total mirror area of the heliostats was increased by a factor of three to 300 sq m, making the dimensional ratio between the tower height and field diameter equivalent to that of the pilot plant, as well as achieving a similar heat flux magnitude as the pilot plant. The absorbing efficiency of the No. 4 receiver was studied and proven to be inferior to the No. 7 receiver, with its improved wind shield cavity, reducing reflection losses at higher wind velocities. The difference in convection heat losses between the two receivers in the solar energy collecting apparatus did not, however, directly correspond to the difference between them measured in the pilot plant. Thus, a heat loss test was applied to the No. 7 receiver, and fluctuations in the measured values of absorbing efficiencies were shown to be due to fluctuations of convection heat loss. Future plans include the design of external receivers suitable for low towers, with a lighter weight and a greater compactness for minimum heat loss potential.

  8. Penetration seals for TFTR shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Hondorp, H.L.

    1980-12-01

    The penetrations of the shielding provided for TFTR are required to be sealed to avoid radiation streaming. This report provides a discussion of the properties required for these penetration seals. Several alternate designs are discussed and evaluated and designs recommended for specific applications.

  9. The Physics of Shot Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-04-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height of the tower? In the process, we explain the basic technology underlying an important historical invention (the shot tower) and use simple physics (Newtonian mechanics and the thermodynamic laws of cooling) to model its operation.

  10. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720), and Auxiliary Building (PER624). Camera faces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720), and Auxiliary Building (PER-624). Camera faces north to show south facades. Oblong vertical structure at left of center is weather shield for stairway. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-10-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  12. Concrete radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to the aspects of nuclear physics relevant to concrete technology. It covers a variety of materials that may be used to produce concrete for radiation shielding. Details of the physical, mechanical, and nuclear properties of these concretes are provided, and their applications in nuclear waste storage, shelter design, and reactor shielding are described. Radiation shield design considerations are addressed.

  13. Effects of transmission towers on orchards and vineyards

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.S.

    1980-10-01

    Electric power transmission towers can pose problems for the farm operator in terms of the loss of productive area and interference with the movement of machinery. A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of transmission facilities on orchard and vineyard operations in Ontario, Canada. Economic losses to peach and grape crops were determined. Time loss varied greatly depending on the specific operation and tower location. Economic effects of transmission towers varied widely depending on location and orientation, and whether or not equipment can pass through the base area.

  14. Towers of hybrid mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Semay, Claude; Buisseret, Fabien; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2009-05-01

    A hybrid meson is a quark-antiquark pair in which, contrary to ordinary mesons, the gluon field is in an excited state. In the framework of constituent models, the interaction potential is assumed to be the energy of an excited string. An approximate, but accurate, analytical solution of the Schroedinger equation with such a potential is presented. When applied to hybrid charmonia and bottomonia, towers of states are predicted in which the masses are a linear function of a harmonic oscillator band number for the quark-antiquark pair. Such a formula could be a reliable guide for the experimental detection of heavy hybrid mesons.

  15. 2. Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view north, south sides - Kennebec River Light Station, South side of Doubling Point Road, off State Highway 127, 1.8 miles south of U.S. Route 1, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  16. Performance of Children With Developmental Dyslexia on Two Skill Learning Tasks-Serial Reaction Time and Tower of Hanoi Puzzle: A Test of the Specific Procedural Learning Difficulties Theory.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Eli; Lowe, Michal; Goldfus, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Among the various theories proposed to explain developmental dyslexia (DD), the theory of specific procedural learning difficulties has gained certain support and is the framework for the current research. This theory claims that an inability to achieve skill automaticity explains the difficulties experienced by individuals with DD. Previous research on automaticity and DD has exhibited methodological issues such as a failure to test a range of skills. The current study broadens previous findings by delineating various reading skills correlated with several aspects of skill acquisition. Furthermore, the study utilizes two nonverbal tasks that reflect distinct types of skills: Serial Reaction Time (SRT) and the Tower of Hanoi Puzzle (TOHP). A total of 53 children aged 11 to 13 participated in the study, of whom 23 were children with DD and 30 were controls. Participants completed a test battery that consisted of reading tests, the SRT, and the TOHP. Results show no differences in learning rate between individuals with or without DD, although individuals with DD performed both tasks at a slower rate. Correlations were identified between a number of reading measures and measures of skill acquisition, expressed primarily in individuals with DD. Implications are examined in the discussion. PMID:24153401

  17. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  18. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  19. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A.; Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  20. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  1. Historic American engineering record. Nevada national security site, Bren Tower Complex. Written historical and descriptive data and field records

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Susan R.; Goldenberg, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    The BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower Complex is significant for its role in the history of nuclear testing, radiation dosimetry studies, and early field testing of the Strategic Missile Defense System designs. At the time it was built in 1962, the 1,527 ft (465 m) BREN Tower was the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River and exceeded the height of the Empire State Building by 55 ft (17 m). It remains the tallest ever erected specifically for scientific purposes and was designed and built to facilitate the experimental dosimetry studies necessary for the development of accurate radiation dose rates for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The tower was a key component of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission’s (ABCC) mission to predict the health effects of radiation exposure. Moved to its current location in 1966, the crucial dosimetry studies continued with Operation HENRE (High Energy Neutron Reactions Experiment). These experiments and the data they generated became the basis for a dosimetry system called the Tentative 1965 Dose or more commonly the T65D model. Used to estimate radiation doses received by individuals, the T65D model was applied until the mid-1980s when it was replaced by a new dosimetry system known as DS86 based on the Monte Carlo method of dose rate calculation. However, the BREN Tower data are still used for verification of the validity of the DS86 model. In addition to its importance in radiation heath effects research, the BREN Tower Complex is also significant for its role in the Brilliant Pebbles research project, a major component of the Strategic Defense Initiative popularly known as the “Star Wars” Initiative. Instigated under the Reagan Administration, the program’s purpose was to develop a system to shield the United States and allies from a ballistic missile attack. The centerpiece of the Strategic Defense System was space-based, kinetic-kill vehicles. In 1991, BREN Tower was used for the tether tests

  2. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  3. Use of cooling tower blow down in ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, N; Singh, V; Panno, B; Wilcoxon, M

    2010-01-01

    Reducing water consumption in bioethanol production conserves an increasingly scarce natural resource, lowers production costs, and minimizes effluent management issues. The suitability of cooling tower blow down water for reuse in fermentation was investigated as a means to lower water consumption. Extensive chemical characterization of the blow down water revealed low concentrations of toxic elements and total dissolved solids. Fermentation carried out with cooling tower blow down water resulted in similar levels of ethanol and residual glucose as a control study using deionized water. The study noted good tolerance by yeast to the specific scale and corrosion inhibitors found in the cooling tower blow down water. This research indicates that, under appropriate conditions, reuse of blow down water from cooling towers in fermentation is feasible. PMID:21076211

  4. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  5. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  6. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  7. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  8. PBF Cooling Tower. Hot deck of Cooling Tower with fan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. Hot deck of Cooling Tower with fan motors in place. Fan's propeller blades (not in view) rotate within lower portion of vents. Inlet pipe is a left of view. Contractor's construction buildings in view to right. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: June 30, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3781 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  10. Radiation shielding for TFTR DT diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Johnson, D.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1994-07-01

    The authors illustrate the designs of radiation shielding for the TFTR DT diagnostics using the ACX and TVTS systems as specific examples. The main emphasis here is on the radiation transport analyses carried out in support of the designs. Initial results from the DT operation indicate that the diagnostics have been functioning as anticipated and the shielding designs are satisfactory. The experience accumulated in the shielding design for the TFTR DT diagnostics should be useful and applicable to future devices, such as TPX and ITER, where many similar diagnostic systems are expected to be used.

  11. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  12. The Physics of Shot Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: "How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height…

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  14. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  15. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  16. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  17. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  18. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this study is to analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States. The hub heights of modern turbines used for wind farm projects are now 70 meters (m) to 100 m above ground and some advanced turbines under development for deployment during the second half of this decade are rated at 2-5 megawatts of energy generation with rotor diameters near 100 m and hub heights of 100-120 m. These advanced turbines will take advantage of the higher wind speeds aloft to generate more wind energy. Specific knowledge of important wind shear characteristics near and at turbine hub height is needed to optimize turbine design and wind farm layout. Unfortunately, wind speed shear measurements at heights of 80-120 m were virtually nonexistent a few years ago and are still quite uncommon today. The Central Plains is a prime wind energy development region and knowledge about the wind shear characteristics will reduce uncertainty about the resource and enhance wind farm design. Previous analyses of tall tower data (Schwartz and Elliott, 2005) concentrated on data from specific states. The wind energy community has recognized the need to fill the gap of direct wind speed measurements at levels 70 m and higher above the ground. Programs instituted during the last 5 years at the state level and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) State Energy Program initiative have placed anemometers and vanes at several levels on existing tall (70 m+) communication towers. The Central Plains has a fairly high concentration of tall tower sites. The distribution of tall tower sites varies among the states in the Central Plains, because the tall tower program is new and the available state and federal funding to establish tall towers is variable. Our wind resource assessment group at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has obtained much of these necessary measurement data from both individual state sources and regional

  19. Deployable tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  20. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  1. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  2. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  3. iSHIELD - A Line Source Application of SHIELD11

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-27

    iSHIELD11 performs a line-source numerical integration of radiation source terms that are defined by the iSHIELD11 computer code[1] . An example is provided to demonstrate how one can use iSHIELD11 to perform a shielding analysis for a 250 GeV electron linear accelerator.

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  6. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  7. Structural concept studies for a horizontal cylindrical lunar habitat and a lunar guyed tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Paul K.

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual structural design of a horizontal cylindrical lunar habitat is presented. The design includes the interior floor framing, the exterior support structure, the foundation mat, and the radiation shielding. Particular attention was given on its efficiency in shipping and field erection, and on selection of structural materials. Presented also is a conceptual design of a 2000-foot lunar guyed tower. A special field erection scheme is implemented in the design. In order to analyze the over-all column buckling of the mast, where its axial compression includes its own body weight, a simple numerical procedure is formulated in a form ready for coding in FORTRAN. Selection of structural materials, effect of temperature variations, dynamic response of the tower to moonquake, and guy anchoring system are discussed. Proposed field erection concepts for the habitat and for the guyed tower are described.

  8. Radar tower frequency control and earthquake response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zeyu; Li, Yuhe; Wang, Fuming; Wang, Dongwei

    2010-04-01

    For the sake of avoiding the impact of surrounding buildings on the radar, radar tower is usually high, generally up to 100 meters. As the radar performance reasons, the required fundamental frequency of radar tower should not be less than 1Hz. For such a tall building, how to control the frequency of radar tower is an issue worth studying. Through a lot of calculations and analyses, paper reaches a number of laws to increase frequency: 1) Lowering center of gravity of the structure; 2) Setting leaning bracing; 3) Raising the thickness or number of shear walls. In the above structural frequencies adjustment methods, setting leaning bracing and reducing the top mass of the structure are the most obvious effects of all. At the same time, paper also discusses on the seismic response of radar tower. Analyses used for earthquake are response spectrum method, time history analysis method and random vibration analysis. Three methods of calculation results show: radar tower performance meets China's seismic code to regulate specifications of the story drift limits.

  9. View of first bank of circuit towers on Arizona side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of first bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of canyon. Left tower supports Circuit 12, second from left tower supports Circuit 11, middle tower supports Circuit 10, second from right tower supports Circuit 9, and right tower supports Circuit 8, view west - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  10. View of Arizona rim towers from top of power plant. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Arizona rim towers from top of power plant. Left tower supports Circuit 3, second tower from left supports Circuit 12, middle tower supports Circuit 10, second tower from right supports Circuit 9, and right tower supports Circuit 8, view southeast - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  11. 30 CFR 57.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tower guards. 57.10006 Section 57.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 57.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  12. 30 CFR 56.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tower guards. 56.10006 Section 56.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 56.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  13. 30 CFR 56.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tower guards. 56.10006 Section 56.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 56.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  14. 30 CFR 57.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tower guards. 57.10006 Section 57.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 57.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  15. 30 CFR 57.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tower guards. 57.10006 Section 57.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 57.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  16. 30 CFR 56.10006 - Tower guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tower guards. 56.10006 Section 56.10006 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 56.10006 Tower guards. Towers shall be suitably protected from swaying buckets....

  17. Induced flocculation of Pachysolen tannophilus using the tower fermentor

    SciTech Connect

    Deverell, K.F.; Clark, T.A.

    1985-12-01

    This article reports the induction of flocculation with Pachysolen tannophilus by the use of controlled aeration in a tower fermentor. The observed environmental and physiological conditions for flocculent growth are described. Although most studies with P. tannophilus have used oxylose as substrate, a synthetic glucose medium was chosen for this study as the faster growth rate of the organism on glucose was considered to favor more rapid selection of a flocculent strain. Due to flocculation, the concentration of yeast cells retained in the tower was up to 16 times greater than in the overflow. Ethanol yields approaching theoretical were achieved at low specific oxygen uptake rates, conditions which also favored maximum flocculation. Future work will involve continuous tower fermentation of sugar mixtures representative of the composition of wood hydrolysates.

  18. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  19. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Wilson, J. W.; Youngquist, R. C.

    For the success of NASA s new vision for space exploration to Moon Mars and beyond exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is a must solve problem The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions The exploration beyond low Earth orbit LEO to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation Galactic Cosmic Rays GCR and Solar Particle Events SPE and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies The full space radiation environment has been used for the first time to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons Conclusions will be drawn should the electrostatic shielding be successful for the future directions of space radiation protection

  20. A Meso-Climatology Study of the High-Resolution Tower Network Over the Florida Spaceport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2004-01-01

    Forecasters at the US Air Force 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) use wind and temperature data from the tower network over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to evaluate Launch Commit Criteria and to issue and verify temperature and wind advisories, watches, and warnings for ground operations. The Spaceflight Meteorology Group at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX also uses these data when issuing forecasts for shuttle landings at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Systematic biases in these parameters at any of the towers could adversely affect an analysis, forecast, or verification for all of these operations. In addition, substantial geographical variations in temperature and wind speed can occur under specific wind directions. Therefore, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU), operated by ENSCO Inc., was tasked to develop a monthly and hourly climatology of temperatures and winds from the tower network, and identify the geographical variation, tower biases, and the magnitude of those biases. This paper presents a sub-set of results from a nine-year climatology of the KSC/CCAFS tower network, highlighting the geographical variations based on location, month, times of day, and specific wind direction regime. Section 2 provides a description of the tower mesonetwork and instrumentation characteristics. Section 3 presents the methodology used to construct the tower climatology including QC methods and data processing. The results of the tower climatology are presented in Section 4 and Section 5 summarizes the paper.

  1. Plant Vogtle cooling tower studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Steen, L.

    2000-01-26

    Intensive ground-based field studies of plumes from two large, natural-draft cooling towers were conducted in support of the MTI modeling effort. Panchromatic imagery, IR imagery, meteorological data, internal tower temperatures and plant power data were collected during the field studies. These data were used to evaluate plume simulations, plume radioactive transfer calculations and plume volume estimation algorithms used for power estimation. Results from six field studies indicate that a 3-D atmospheric model at sufficient spatial resolution can effectively simulate a cooling tower plume if the plume is of sufficient size and the ambient meteorology is known and steady. Small plumes and gusty wind conditions degrade the agreement between the simulated and observed plumes. Thermal radiance calculations based on the simulated plumes produced maximum IR temperatures (near tower exit) which were in good agreement with measured IR temperatures for the larger plumes. For the smaller plumes, the calculated IR temperature was lower than the measured temperature by several degrees. Variations in maximum IR plume temperature with decreasing power (one reactor was undergoing a shutdown process), were clearly observed in the IR imagery and seen in the simulations. These temperature changes agreed with those calculated from an overall tower energy and momentum balance. Plume volume estimates based on camcorder images at three look angles were typically 20--30 percent larger than the plume volumes derived from the simulations, although one estimate was twice the simulated volume. Volume overestimation is expected and will have to be accounted for to some degree if plume volume is to be a useful diagnostic quantity in power estimation. Volume estimation with MTI imagery will require a large, stable plume and two looks in the visible bands (5m GSD) along with a solar shadow.

  2. The shape of the Eiffel Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, Joseph

    2002-02-01

    The distinctive shape of the Eiffel Tower is based on simple physics and is designed so that the maximum torque created by the wind is balanced by the torque due to the Tower's weight. We use this idea to generate an equation for the shape of the Tower. The solution depends only on the width of the base and the maximum wind pressure. We parametrize the wind pressure and reproduce the shape of the Tower. We also discuss some of the Tower's interesting history and characteristics.

  3. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  4. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  5. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  6. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  7. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  8. Shielding of relativistic protons.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, A; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Mancusi, D; Sihver, L; Rusek, A

    2007-06-01

    Protons are the most abundant element in the galactic cosmic radiation, and the energy spectrum peaks around 1 GeV. Shielding of relativistic protons is therefore a key problem in the radiation protection strategy of crewmembers involved in long-term missions in deep space. Hydrogen ions were accelerated up to 1 GeV at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York. The proton beam was also shielded with thick (about 20 g/cm2) blocks of lucite (PMMA) or aluminium (Al). We found that the dose rate was increased 40-60% by the shielding and decreased as a function of the distance along the axis. Simulations using the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) show that the dose increase is mostly caused by secondary protons emitted by the target. The modified radiation field after the shield has been characterized for its biological effectiveness by measuring chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed just behind the shield block, or to the direct beam, in the dose range 0.5-3 Gy. Notwithstanding the increased dose per incident proton, the fraction of aberrant cells at the same dose in the sample position was not significantly modified by the shield. The PHITS code simulations show that, albeit secondary protons are slower than incident nuclei, the LET spectrum is still contained in the low-LET range (<10 keV/microm), which explains the approximately unitary value measured for the relative biological effectiveness. PMID:17256178

  9. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  10. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  11. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  12. Meteorological Towers Display for Windows NT

    1999-05-20

    The Towers Display Program provides a convenient means of graphically depicting current wind speed and direction from a network of meteorological monitoring stations. The program was designed primarily for emergency response applications and, therefore, plots observed wind directions as a transport direction, i.e., the direction toward which the wind would transport a release of an atmospheric contaminant. Tabular summaries of wind speed and direction as well as temperature, relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence measured atmore » each monitoring station can be displayed. The current implementation of the product at SRS displays data from eight Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System meteorological towers at SRS, meteorological stations established jointly by SRS/WSRC and the Augusta/Richmond County Emergency Management Agency in Augusta, GA, and National Weather Service stations in Augusta, GA. Wind speed and direction are plotted in a Beaufort scale format at the location of the station on a geographic map of the area. A GUI provides for easy specification of a desired date and time for the data to be displayed.« less

  13. Model equations for the Eiffel Tower profile: historical perspective and new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick; Pinelis, Iosif

    2004-07-01

    Model equations for the shape of the Eiffel Tower are investigated. One model purported to be based on Eiffel's writing does not give a tower with the correct curvature. A second popular model not connected with Eiffel's writings provides a fair approximation to the tower's skyline profile of 29 contiguous panels. Reported here is a third model derived from Eiffel's concern about wind loads on the tower, as documented in his communication to the French Civil Engineering Society on 30 March 1885. The result is a nonlinear, integro-differential equation which is solved to yield an exponential tower profile. It is further verified that, as Eiffel wrote, "in reality the curve exterior of the tower reproduces, at a determined scale, the same curve of the moments produced by the wind". An analysis of the actual tower profile shows that it is composed of two piecewise continuous exponentials with different growth rates. This is explained by specific safety factors for wind loading that Eiffel & Company incorporated in the design of the free-standing tower. To cite this article: P. Weidman, I. Pinelis, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  14. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  15. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  16. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  17. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  18. Update on the Purdue University 2-second Drop Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collicott, Steven

    an update on progress for the micro-gravity community. The most noticeable current activity is testing of the air-bag decelerator. The tower is one that will use a free-falling experiment inside of a drag shield to avoid most aerodynamic drag. The airbag is designed from experiences of others yet the small, triangular room in which the tower terminates imposes challenges. The airbag is approximately 1.5m diameter and 1.5m tall. Initial testing led to a desire to increase vent area, and just this week the bag has returned from the shop that was modifying it. On-board computer, battery packs, lighting, and cameras have been acquired. Thanks to Lockheed Martin, one camera is 500 frames per second with 1.3 million 12-bit gray scale pixels per frame. The Spincraft company donated steel hemisphere-cylinders to serve as the nose of the drag shield. Wind tunnel and CFD modeling of the drag shield has been performed by Purdue undergraduate aerospace students. Currently the drag shield structure and experiment package structure are being design and analyzed. The experiment volume is approximately a cylinder 0.45m diameter and 0.6m tall. Tower operation is intended to commence in fall 2010 with inert package drops at full mass and full height. Developing the operations procedures, especially operational safety, are the goals of this work. First science is then expected in the winter. References 1. Y. Chen, "A Study of Capillary Flow in a Vane-wall Gap in Zero Gravity," Ph.D. thesis, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University. August 2003. 2. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Investigation of the Symmetric Wetting of a Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks," AIAA Journal, 42, No. 2, pp. 305-314, February 2004. 3. Y. Chen, and S. H. Collicott, "Experimental Study on the Capillary Flow in a Vane-Wall Gap Geometry," AIAA Journal, 43, No. 11, pp. 2395-2403, November, 2005. 4. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Study of Wetting in an Asymmetrical Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks

  19. Update on the Purdue University 2-second Drop Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collicott, Steven

    an update on progress for the micro-gravity community. The most noticeable current activity is testing of the air-bag decelerator. The tower is one that will use a free-falling experiment inside of a drag shield to avoid most aerodynamic drag. The airbag is designed from experiences of others yet the small, triangular room in which the tower terminates imposes challenges. The airbag is approximately 1.5m diameter and 1.5m tall. Initial testing led to a desire to increase vent area, and just this week the bag has returned from the shop that was modifying it. On-board computer, battery packs, lighting, and cameras have been acquired. Thanks to Lockheed Martin, one camera is 500 frames per second with 1.3 million 12-bit gray scale pixels per frame. The Spincraft company donated steel hemisphere-cylinders to serve as the nose of the drag shield. Wind tunnel and CFD modeling of the drag shield has been performed by Purdue undergraduate aerospace students. Currently the drag shield structure and experiment package structure are being design and analyzed. The experiment volume is approximately a cylinder 0.45m diameter and 0.6m tall. Tower operation is intended to commence in fall 2010 with inert package drops at full mass and full height. Developing the operations procedures, especially operational safety, are the goals of this work. First science is then expected in the winter. References 1. Y. Chen, "A Study of Capillary Flow in a Vane-wall Gap in Zero Gravity," Ph.D. thesis, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University. August 2003. 2. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Investigation of the Symmetric Wetting of a Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks," AIAA Journal, 42, No. 2, pp. 305-314, February 2004. 3. Y. Chen, and S. H. Collicott, "Experimental Study on the Capillary Flow in a Vane-Wall Gap Geometry," AIAA Journal, 43, No. 11, pp. 2395-2403, November, 2005. 4. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Study of Wetting in an Asymmetrical Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks

  20. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  1. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  2. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  3. A 365 foot tall stainless steel stack supported by a trussed A-36 steel tower: Design and construction aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.

    1995-10-01

    According to the requirements of the technical specifications prepared by A and E Neil and Gunter Inc. Custodis has designed a single-wall tower supported stack, with an 8 feet-0 inch I.D. stainless steel flue. The top of the stack was set at an elevation of 365 feet above grade. The stack is supported/suspended by a square A-36 steel trussed tower which reaches a height of 265 feet above grade. The breaching is set at approximately 100 feet above grade and the gas duct allows the stack to service two boilers, jointly or individually. The unusual design configuration required a trussed tower arrangement and details which allowed the gradual erection of the steel stack segments inside the tower`s square section, as well as the sequential lift of the stack segments toward their final elevation. This condition required careful selection of the tower vertical bracing and especially the horizontal bracing to provide a stable stack/tower structural system during both the erection phase and the final stage. The selected configuration allowed the stack segments to be assembled first, then lifted gradually within the tower`s square section along its entire height. Eventually, the stack was set at its final elevation and certain horizontal bracing trusses, which had initially been only partially erected, were completed to assure the tridirectional stability of the stack-tower final structural system. The overall construction was completed during the summer of 1993 and has performed successfully since, both operationally and structurally.

  4. 2004 Savannah River Cooling Tower Collection (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred; Parker, Matthew J.; Villa-Aleman, E.

    2005-05-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected ground truth in and around the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area cooling tower during the spring and summer of 2004. The ground truth data consisted of air temperatures and humidity inside and around the cooling tower, wind speed and direction, cooling water temperatures entering; inside adn leaving the cooling tower, cooling tower fan exhaust velocities and thermal images taken from helicopters. The F-Area cooling tower had six cells, some of which were operated with fans off during long periods of the collection. The operating status (fan on or off) for each of the six cells was derived from operations logbooks and added to the collection database. SRNL collected the F-Area cooling tower data to produce a database suitable for validation of a cooling tower model used by one of SRNL's customer agencies. SRNL considers the data to be accurate enough for use in a model validation effort. Also, the thermal images of the cooling tower decks and throats combined with the temperature measurements inside the tower provide valuable information about the appearance of cooling towers as a function of fan operating status and time of day.

  5. 'Towers in the Tempest' Computer Animation Submission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirah, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The following describes a computer animation that has been submitted to the ACM/SIGGRAPH 2008 computer graphics conference: 'Towers in the Tempest' clearly communicates recent scientific research into how hurricanes intensify. This intensification can be caused by a phenomenon called a 'hot tower.' For the first time, research meteorologists have run complex atmospheric simulations at a very fine temporal resolution of 3 minutes. Combining this simulation data with satellite observations enables detailed study of 'hot towers.' The science of 'hot towers' is described using: satellite observation data, conceptual illustrations, and a volumetric atmospheric simulation data. The movie starts by showing a 'hot tower' observed by NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft's three dimensional precipitation radar data of Hurricane Bonnie. Next, the dynamics of a hurricane and the formation of 'hot towers' are briefly explained using conceptual illustrations. Finally, volumetric cloud, wind, and vorticity data from a supercomputer simulation of Hurricane Bonnie are shown using volume techniques such as ray marching.

  6. 1. Light tower/keeper's house and abandoned light tower, view northwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Light tower/keeper's house and abandoned light tower, view northwest, south southeast and east northeast sides - Matinicus Rock Light Station, Matinicus Island, on Matinicus Rock, Matinicus, Knox County, ME

  7. 2. Abandoned light tower and keeper's house/light tower, view southeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Abandoned light tower and keeper's house/light tower, view southeast, north northwest and west southwest sides - Matinicus Rock Light Station, Matinicus Island, on Matinicus Rock, Matinicus, Knox County, ME

  8. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  9. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  10. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  11. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  12. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  13. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  14. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  15. Optimal Inflatable Space Towers of High Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Author provides theory and computations for building inflatable space towers up to a hundred km in height. These towers can be used for tourism; scientific observation of space, earth's surface, weather, top atmosphere, as well as for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch space ships and Earth satellites. These projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed from artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. Towers can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the earth's surface. The transport system for this tower consists a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the earth's surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanism in case of a damage. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in subsequent publications. The author is prepared to discuss these and other problems with serious organizations desiring to research and develop these projects.

  16. Optimal inflatable space towers of high height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Author suggested, developed theory, and computed some projects of an optimal inflatable space tower of the heights some hundreds km. These towers can be used for tourism, scientist observation of space, Earth surface, Earth weather, Earth top atmosphere, and for radio, TV, communication transmissions. These towers can be used for launching of the space ships and Earth s atellites. The computed projects not expensive, do not request rockets. They need only in thin strong films composed from the artificial fibers and fabricated by a current industry. Towers can be built by a current technology. Towers can be explored (for tourism, communication, etc.) in a time of the construction process and give a profit, self- financing for further constriction. They can permanent increase their height. The tower design does not request a work at the high altitudes. All construction works will be making at the Earth surface. Author suggests the transport system for this tower of a high capability, which does not request a power energy issue. The small engine (only for a friction compensation) is located at the Earth surface. The tower is separated on sections and has a special protection of a case of a damage. It is considered also the problems of security, control, repair, etc. of the suggested towers. The author has also solved additional problems, which appear in these projects and which can look as difficult for the given proposal and current technology. The author is prepared to discuss the problems with serious organizations, which want to research and develop these projects.

  17. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  18. A freely falling magneto-optical trap drop tower experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, T.; Brinkmann, W.; Göklü, E.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Dittus, H.; van Zoest, T.; Rasel, E. M.; Ertmer, W.; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W.; Schiemangk, M.; Peters, A.; Vogel, A.; Johannsen, G.; Wildfang, S.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.; Kajari, E.; Nandi, G.; Walser, R.; Schleich, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of preparing ultracold atoms in the environment of weightlessness at the earth-bound short-term microgravity laboratory Drop Tower Bremen, a facility of ZARM - University of Bremen. Our approach is based on a freely falling magneto-optical trap (MOT) drop tower experiment performed within the ATKAT collaboration (“Atom-Catapult”) as a preliminary part of the QUANTUS pilot project (“Quantum Systems in Weightlessness”) pursuing a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in microgravity at the drop tower [1, 2]. Furthermore we give a complete account of the specific drop tower requirements to realize a compact and robust setup for trapping and cooling neutral rubidium 87Rb atoms in microgravity conditions. We also present the results of the first realized freely falling MOT and further accomplished experiments during several drops. The goal of the preliminary ATKAT pilot project is to initiate a basis for extended atom-optical experiments which aim at realizing, observing and investigating ultracold quantum matter in microgravity.

  19. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  20. Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

  1. Shielding analysis of the LMR in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this paper were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present paper describes the 2- and 3-D calculations and results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program had a particular interest.

  2. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  3. European Sail Tower SPS concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seboldt, W.; Klimke, M.; Leipold, M.; Hanowski, N.

    2001-03-01

    Based on a DLR-study in 1998/99 on behalf of ESA/ESTEC called "System Concepts, Architectures and Technologies for Space Exploration and Utilization (SE&U)" a new design for an Earth-orbiting Solar Power Satellite (SPS) has been developed. The design is called "European Sail Tower SPS" and consists mainly of deployable sail-like structures derived from the ongoing DLR/ESA solar sail technology development activity. Such a SPS satellite features an extremely light-weight and large tower-like orbital system and could supply Europe with significant amounts of electrical power generated by photovoltaic cells and subsequently transmitted to Earth via microwaves. In order to build up the sail tower, 60 units - each consisting of a pair of square-shaped sails - are moved from LEO to GEO with electric propulsion and successively assembled in GEO robotically on a central strut. Each single sail has dimensions of 150m × 150 m and is automatically deployed, using four diagonal light-weight carbon fiber (CFRP) booms which are initially rolled up on a central hub. The electric thrusters for the transport to GEO could also be used for orbit and attitude control of the assembled tower which has a total length of about 15 km and would be mainly gravity gradient stabilized. Employing thin film solar cell technology, each sail is used as a solar array and produces an electric power in orbit of about 3.7 MW e. A microwave antenna with a diameter of 1 km transmits the power to a 10 km rectenna on the ground. The total mass of this 450 MW SPS is about 2100 tons. First estimates indicate that the costs for one kWh delivered in this way could compete with present day energy costs, if launch costs would decrease by two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, mass production and large numbers of installed SPS systems must be assumed in order to lower significantly the production costs and to reduce the influence of the expensive technology development. The paper presents the technical concept

  4. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  5. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  6. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOEpatents

    Fingersh, Lee Jay

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  7. View second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of canyon. Left tower supports Circuit 10 and right tower supports Circuit 11, view north - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  8. APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN FROM BELOW, SHOWING VALVE TOWER TO RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTH - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower Foot Bridge, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 157. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower City Development Office) TERMINAL TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION, STEEL FRAMEWORK OF THE SOUTHWEST WING, VIEW WEST TO EAST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  11. View of first bank of circuit towers on Arizona side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of first bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of canyon. Photograph taken from Nevada side of canyon. Left tower supports Circuit 8, second from left tower supports Circuit 9, middle tower supports Circuit 10, second from right tower supports Circuit 11, and right tower supports Circuit 12, view southeast. - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  12. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  13. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  14. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    SciTech Connect

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1994-09-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: Higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base.

  15. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  16. Collagen shield delivery of trifluorothymidine.

    PubMed

    Gussler, J R; Ashton, P; VanMeter, W S; Smith, T J

    1990-11-01

    Corneal and aqueous levels of topically applied trifluorothymidine (F3T) were compared with and without the collagen shield in normal and damaged rabbit eyes. Shields were presoaked in 1% F3T for 15 minutes prior to application. Rabbits received either a presoaked shield, 1% F3T drops every two hours, or both. Corneal and aqueous levels of F3T were measured at 30 minutes, two, four, and eight hours. If 5 mm epithelial defects were created, the collagen shield and topical F3T drops produced significantly higher levels of F3T than drops alone at all periods tested (P less than .05). A presoaked shield alone produced greater levels of F3T than drops alone at 30 minutes and two hours (P less than .05). Collagen shields did not enhance F3T levels in eyes with intact epithelium. Implications for treatment of herpetic keratouveitis are discussed.

  17. Removable cleanable antireflection shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    A replaceable anti-reflection shield for the glare surface beneath the windscreen an aircraft is described which comprises a flexible panel of light absorbing material, such as black cloth, velvet, canvas or plastic, of size and configuration corresponding to that of the glare surface for placement on and conformance to the contour of the glare surface beneath the windscreen, and peripheral attaching means such as adhesive strips, snaps. Velcro strips, suction cups, or similar devices, on the flexible panel for detachably securing the peripheral edges of the panel to the glare surface. Whereby the panel is easily removed for cleaning or replacement.

  18. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  19. Chiral Shielding Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Scadron, M. D.

    2008-08-31

    A model-independent chiral soft-pion theorem (SPT) shields the now observed scalar-meson ground-state isoscalar {sigma}(600) and isospinor {kappa}(800) resonances from detection in a{sub 1}{yields}{pi}({pi}{pi}){sub S-wave}, {gamma}{gamma}{yields}2{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup -}P{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}n, and K{sup -}P{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}n processes. Moreover, for pseudoscalar-to-vector-vector (PVV) decays, quark loops only are required.

  20. Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower and aircraft flux errors are larger with surface heterogeneity due to several independent effects. Surface heterogeneity may cause tower flux errors to increase with decreasing wind speed. Techniques to assess flux sampling error are reviewed. Such error estimates suffer various degrees of inapplicability in real geophysical time series due to nonstationarity of tower time series (or inhomogeneity of aircraft data). A new measure for nonstationarity is developed that eliminates assumptions on the form of the nonstationarity inherent in previous methods. When this nonstationarity measure becomes large, the surface energy imbalance increases sharply. Finally, strategies for obtaining adequate flux sampling using repeated aircraft passes and grid patterns are outlined.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  2. Strategies to design and place towers for long-term ecological observations at continental scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Loescher, H. W.; Ayres, E.; Clement, R.

    2010-12-01

    There are numerous tower-based measurements applied in ecological science worldwide. National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designing a tower-based method at 60 sites continental wide to measure abiotic drivers of ecological change, carbon and energy fluxes, and to specifically provide ecological connectively to measurements of organism ecology and connectively to remote sensed data products. Several issues come to bear when designing an infrastructure that has to accommodate different suites of measurements that have various requirements, i.e., micrometeorological, scalar flux measurements, atmospheric chemistry and boundary layer properties, and have to be objectively placed across the entire range of climate and ecosystem structures found in North America. Here, we present a comprehensive strategy that combines wind roses, footprint models, ecosystem structure, vegetation and soil maps, as well as ‘eyes on’ site visits to design and place a tower. This methodology is being used to examine the 60 preliminary tower designs in the largest ecological observatory in the world today to optimize the long-term representative measurements over the ecosystems of interests. We found that some preliminary site designs do not meet our tower science requirements due to an inadequate fetch for prevailing wind directions, extent of ecosystems boundaries, or concerns of edge effects. In these cases, the tower location shall be either micro-sited at the current locale, or moved and relocated to a different site altogether. After site specific characterization, we also found that some designed tower heights could not access the well mixed surface layer above canopy and had to be extended in design. Because wind comes from all direction at some sites, presents a particular challenge to orient a square tower. In all cases, we optimized the tower orientation to acquire the most amounts of valid data. To avoid the effects of flow distortion on measurements, the boom

  3. EXAMPLES OF RADIATION SHIELDING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Willison, J

    2006-07-27

    The attached pictures are examples of shielding models used by WSMS. The models were used in shielding evaluations for Tank 50 pump replacement. They show the relative location of shielding to radiation sources for pumps and pipes. None of the calculations that were associated with these models involved UCNI. The last page contains two pictures from a shielding calculation for the saltstone area. The upper picture is a conceptual drawing. The lower picture is an image copied from the website of a supplier for the project.

  4. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  5. Exposure and shielding from external radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This chapter opens with specific gamma ray constants and the mean attenuation coefficients for selected radionuclides important in radiation assessment and protection. The bulk of the material in this chapter deals with shielding information and practical values for the transmission of radiation through different materials from common radiation sources and x-ray machines. Parameters are given for shielding calculations (half-value layers for gamma and x-ray radiations at varying energies for various materials and buildup factors), as well as ranges of electrons, alpha particles and protons in various materials. Attenuation through lead, concrete and other materials is illustrated in tables and graphs for x-ray energies in the diagnostic and therapeutic range. Shielding requirements for primary and secondary barriers for three phase x-ray generators and for mammography units are presented. Similar tables are given for {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. Also included are percentage backscatter of x-rays from patients and calculated exposure rates from patients containing selected radionuclides at various distances. The chapter concludes with information on shielding for accelerator facilities, that is: broad beam transmission through lead, concrete and steel, and TVLs for bremsstrahlung.

  6. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  7. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  9. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  10. Seismic response of a full-scale wind turbine tower using experimental and numerical modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandil, Kamel Sayed Ahmad; Saudi, Ghada N.; Eltaly, Boshra Aboul-Anen; El-khier, Mostafa Mahmoud Abo

    2016-09-01

    based on AVT. Using advanced techniques in both the field testing and the numerical investigations produced reliable FEM specific for the tested tower, which can be further used in more advanced structural investigations for improving the design of such special structures.

  11. Blasting response of the Eiffel Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlyck, Lachlan; Hayes, Kieran; Caetano, Ryan; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    A finite element model of the Eiffel Tower was constructed using Strand7 software. The model replicates the existing tower, with dimensions justified through the use of original design drawings. A static and dynamic analysis was conducted to determine the actions of the tower under permanent, imposed and wind loadings, as well as under blast pressure loads and earthquake loads due to an explosion. It was observed that the tower utilises the full axial capacity of individual members by acting as a `truss of trusses'. As such, permanent and imposed loads are efficiently transferred to the primary columns through compression, while wind loads induce tensile forces in the windward legs and compressive forces in the leeward. Under blast loading, the tower experienced both ground vibrations and blast pressures. Ground vibrations induced a negligibly small earthquake loading into the structure which was ignored in subsequent analyses. The blast pressure was significant, and a dynamic analysis of this revealed that further research is required into the damping qualities of the structure due to soil and mechanical properties. In the worst case scenario, the blast was assumed to completely destroy several members in the adjacent leg. Despite this weakened condition, it was observed that the tower would still be able to sustain static loads, at least for enough time for occupant evacuation. Further, an optimised design revealed the structure was structurally sound under a 46% reduction of the metal tower's mass.

  12. Geology of Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Charles Sherwood

    1956-01-01

    Devils Tower is a steep-sided mass of igneous rock that rises above the surrounding hills and the valley of the Belle Fourche River in Crook County, Wyo. It is composed of a crystalline rock, classified as phonolite porphyry, that when fresh is gray but which weathers to green or brown. Vertical joints divide the rock mass into polygonal columns that extend from just above the base to the top of the Tower. The hills in the vicinity and at the base of the Tower are composed of red, yellow, green, or gray sedimentary rocks that consist of sandstone, shale, or gypsum. These rocks, in aggregate about 400 feet thick, include, from oldest to youngest, the upper part of the Spearfish formation, of Triassic age, the Gypsum Spring formation, of Middle Jurassic age, and the Sundance formation, of Late Jurassic age. The Sundance formation consists of the Stockade Beaver shale member, the Hulett sandstone member, the Lak member, and the Redwater shale member. The formations have been only slightly deformed by faulting and folding. Within 2,000 to 3.000 feet of the Tower, the strata for the most part dip at 3 deg - 5 deg towards the Tower. Beyond this distance, they dip at 2 deg - 5 deg from the Tower. The Tower is believed to have been formed by the intrusion of magma into the sedimentary rocks, and the shape of the igneous mass formed by the cooled magma is believed to have been essentially the same as the Tower today. Devils Tower owes its impressiveness to its resistance to erosion as compared with the surrounding sedimentary rocks, and to the contrast of the somber color of the igneous column to the brightly colored bands of sedimentary rocks.

  13. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  14. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  15. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  16. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  19. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  20. A comment on towers for windmills. [structural and economic criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budgen, H. P.

    1973-01-01

    Design considerations for windmill tower structures include the effects of normal wind forces on the rotor and on the tower. Circular tabular or masonry towers present a relatively simple aerodynamic solution. Economic factors establish the tubular tower as superior for small and medium sized windmills. Concrete and standard concrete block designs are cheaper than refabricated steel structures that have to be freighted.

  1. View of second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of canyon. Left tower supports Circuit 8, middle tower supports Circuit 9, and right tower supports Circuit 10, view northwest - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  2. View of Nevada rim towers from top of power plant. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Nevada rim towers from top of power plant. Left tower supports Circuits 7 and 14, middle tower supports Circuit 6, and right tower supports Circuit 5, view west - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  3. 17. VIEW OF THE TOP OF THE TOWER SHOWING BASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF THE TOP OF THE TOWER SHOWING BASE OF TOWER MAST AND WOOD DECKING ON SIGNAL TOWER ROOF. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Signal Tower, Corner of Seventh Street & Avenue D east of Drydock No. 1, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 5. View of south tower, facing northnortheast from south bank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of south tower, facing north-northeast from south bank of the Columbia River. Center tower and north tower in background, lower right. - Pasco-Kennewick Transmission Line, Columbia River Crossing Towers, Columbia Drive & Gum Street, Kennewick, Benton County, WA

  5. Preliminary design of magnetic shielding by FEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Takashi; Tagawa, Naoto; Herai, Toshiki; Tomita, Masaru

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the authors propose an optimization method for magnetic shielding. The main purpose is the weight reduction of shield material. Assuming that the permeability of shield material is infinite, they simplify the magnetic shielding problem. Under this assumption, they design optimal passage for magnetic flux through the shield. They apply this method to designing the magnetic shielding for Maglev and show the effectiveness of this method by experimental and numerical data.

  6. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  7. Using ozone to treat cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, L.

    1995-07-01

    Ozone is a controversial but promising alternative to chemicals for treating water in cooling towers. A powerful disinfectant, ozone can prevent biofouling of heat exchange surfaces, and may mitigate scale and corrosion. Ozone treatment of cooling towers can cut costs for energy, water, sewage, and regulatory compliance. Ozone treatment is an electrotechnology, but ozone equipment represents only a small electric load. Although ozone has provided excellent results in some cooling tower applications, its effectiveness has not been proven conclusively. Less than 1,000 cooling towers use ozone water treatment in the United States. Acceptance of this technology is increasing, however, as indicated by its use by such large firms as IBM, AT and T, DuPont, and Xerox, and by its adoption by some chemical water treatment suppliers. The energy efficiency implications of ozone treatment are being researched. Southern California Edison found that in some systems, ozone treatment improved chiller efficiency up to 20 percent due to cleaner heat exchange surfaces.

  8. Another Look at the Tower of Hanoi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shwarger, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Through the use of sequences, geometric progressions and permutations, the author investigates some interesting and unusual questions concerning the number of moves required by each disc in solving the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. (JT)

  9. Ozone inhibits corrosion in cooling towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, K. R.; Howe, R. D.; Humphrey, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially available corona discharge ozone generator, fitted onto industrial cooling tower, significantly reduces formation of scales (calcium carbonate) and corrosion. System also controls growth of algae and other microorganisms. Modification lowers cost and improves life of cooling system.

  10. An economical solution to cooling tower drift

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, G.C.; Lamkin, V.K.; Seich, M.

    1987-01-01

    Most processes one encounters in the refining and petrochemical industries require the rejection of waste heat. The most economical and effective means of accomplishing this is through the use of cooling towers. Heat is transferred by convection and evaporation (mass transfer) by the direct contact of the atmospheric air and water. This results in a major environmental concern of cooling towers - DRIFT, which is discussed in this paper.

  11. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  12. Refractory shield for superheater tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.E.; Johnson, D.K.; Woodruff, R.W.

    1987-07-28

    A refractory shield is described for protecting superheater tubes against attack by the products of combustion comprising: a pair of elongated molded and fired refractory half shields of predetermined identical interchangeable interlocking size and shape adapted when one of the half shields is rotated 180/sup 0/ and extends longitudinally relative to the other half shields to be slid axially together and interlocked together solely without additional fastening means, surround and shield the superheater tube. Each half shield has: an elongated refractory sidewall portion of predetermined axial length and thickness between opposite ends extending circumferentially between and to diametrically opposite refractory tongue and grooved side wall portions of predetermined axially engageable interlocking shape. An elongated tongue of predetermined shape, width and radial length projects radially outwardly from the tongue sidewall portion; and an elongated internal groove projects radially outward in the grooved side wall portion and of predetermined interlocking shape. Sufficient width and radial depth accept an elongated tongue of the other one of the pair of half shields assembled and locked together against relative rotation solely by axially inserting the tongues into the grooves.

  13. Potentially pathogenic amoeba-associated microorganisms in cooling towers and their control.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Merchat, Michèle; La Scola, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    Cooling towers provide a favorable environment for the proliferation of microorganisms. Cooling towers generate a biofilm and often aerosolize contaminated water, thereby increasing the risk of microorganism dissemination by human inhalation. This pathogen dissemination was first revealed by the epidemics of Legionnaires' disease that were directly related to the presence of cooling towers, and since then, the ecology of Legionella pneumophila has been well studied. Each country has specific standards regarding the acceptable amount of microorganisms in cooling tower systems. However, those standards typically only concern L. pneumophila, even though many other microorganisms can also be isolated from cooling towers, including protozoa, bacteria and viruses. Microbiological control of the cooling tower system can be principally achieved by chemical treatments and also by improving the system's construction. Several new treatments are being studied to improve the efficiency of disinfection. However, as most of these treatments continue to focus solely on L. pneumophila, reports of other types of pathogens continue to increase. Therefore, how their dissemination affects the human populous health should be addressed now. PMID:19492970

  14. Rock Creek Tower Painting Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1988-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) built a 500-kV line across Rock Creek, a Class I trout stream about 20 miles east of Missoula, MT. Two 190-foot towers rise on either side of the Rock Creek valley, and the line between is suspended 600 feet over the valley floor. The crossing poses a hazard to passing airplanes and disrupts the natural landscape. The area where the line crosses Rock Creek is prized for its scenic beauty. In response to public demand that BPA protect the visual beauty of this area, BPA painted the towers gray to blend them best in with their natural surroundings. The issue now is to decide between either two gray towers or two orange-and-white towers. The underlying need is to resolve the conflict of pilot safety against scenic intrusion. The proposed action is to paint the gray tower aeronautical orange and white. Alternatives are to paint the orange-and-white tower back to its original gray; or leave the dilemma unresolved (the ''no-action'' alternative). 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Stripping of phenols in model cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.; Moe, T.A.; Wentz, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cooling towers are used to remove waste heat from unit operations in chemical processing plants. Using cooling towers for wastewater treatment and disposal through internal recycling has become an important alternative because of stricter wastewater discharge standards, the expense of specialized wastewater treatment systems and the limited availability and cost of water in arid regions. Designs for synfuels plants must address the problem of wastewater disposal. Alternative systems under consideration usually include zero discharge designs that incorporate evaporative cooling towers in the system. The mechanisms for contaminant removal in cooling towers are biological oxidation, stripping and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitation is generally considered undesirable because of losses in heat transfer efficiency. Predicting whether stripping or biological oxidation will be the primary removal mechanism for phenolic compounds from coal conversion wastewaters used as makeup in cooling towers does not appear to be possible based on the results of these tests. The tests do indicate that the biological oxidation of phenol is possible in forced draft cooling towers.

  16. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  17. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  18. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  19. Four Operational Strategies For The Tower of Pisa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, F.

    allow the present inclination of the Tower to be maintained, its verticality to be restored, and in some cases also for the counter-inclination to be executed. They are contributions for safeguarding the Tower, but like any other idea, they may be refined, modified or ignored. Readers are invited to inform me of any impressions, criticisms and consequently also of any specific suggestions aimed at improving the techniques proposed.

  20. Static and Motion-Based Visual Features Used by Airport Tower Controllers: Some Implications for the Design of Remote or Virtual Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion B.

    2011-01-01

    Visual motion and other visual cues are used by tower controllers to provide important support for their control tasks at and near airports. These cues are particularly important for anticipated separation. Some of them, which we call visual features, have been identified from structured interviews and discussions with 24 active air traffic controllers or supervisors. The visual information that these features provide has been analyzed with respect to possible ways it could be presented at a remote tower that does not allow a direct view of the airport. Two types of remote towers are possible. One could be based on a plan-view, map-like computer-generated display of the airport and its immediate surroundings. An alternative would present a composite perspective view of the airport and its surroundings, possibly provided by an array of radially mounted cameras positioned at the airport in lieu of a tower. An initial more detailed analyses of one of the specific landing cues identified by the controllers, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers might detect and use it. Understanding other such cues will help identify the information that may be degraded or lost in a remote or virtual tower not located at the airport. Some initial suggestions how some of the lost visual information may be presented in displays are mentioned. Many of the cues considered involve visual motion, though some important static cues are also discussed.

  1. Heat Shield Flank Close Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features an up-close view of the flank piece of the rover's broken heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact. Overall, engineers were interested in evaluating the performance of the heat shield's thermal protection system.

    This is the the panormamic camera team's best current attempt at generating a 'true color' view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 3:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 331 (Dec. 28, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  2. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  3. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

  4. Tower Based Load Measurements for Individual Pitch Control and Tower Damping of Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. A.; Hugues-Salas, O.; Savini, B.; Keogh, W.

    2016-09-01

    The cost of IPC has hindered adoption outside of Europe despite significant loading advantages for large wind turbines. In this work we presented a method for applying individual pitch control (including for higher-harmonics) using tower-top strain gauge feedback instead of blade-root strain gauge feedback. Tower-top strain gauges offer hardware savings of approximately 50% in addition to the possibility of easier access for maintenance and installation and requiring a less specialised skill-set than that required for applying strain gauges to composite blade roots. A further advantage is the possibility of using the same tower-top sensor array for tower damping control. This method is made possible by including a second order IPC loop in addition to the tower damping loop to reduce the typically dominating 3P content in tower-top load measurements. High-fidelity Bladed simulations show that the resulting turbine spectral characteristics from tower-top feedback IPC and from the combination of tower-top IPC and damping loops largely match those of blade-root feedback IPC and nacelle- velocity feedback damping. Lifetime weighted fatigue analysis shows that the methods allows load reductions within 2.5% of traditional methods.

  5. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  6. Summary of tower designs for large horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, G. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Towers for large horizontal axis wind turbines, machines with a rotor axis height above 30 meters and rated at more than 500 kW, have varied in configuration, materials of construction, type of construction, height, and stiffness. For example, the U.S. large HAWTs have utilized steel truss type towers and free-standing steel cylindrical towers. In Europe, the trend has been to use only free-standing and guyed cylindrical towers, but both steel and reinforced concrete have been used as materials of construction. These variations in materials of construction and type of construction reflect different engineering approaches to the design of cost effective towers for large HAWTs. Tower designs are the NASA/DOE Mod-5B presently being fabricated. Design goals and requirements that influence tower configuration, height and materials are discussed. In particular, experiences with United States large wind turbine towers are elucidated. Finally, current trends in tower designs for large HAWTs are highlighted.

  7. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  8. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  9. Low-Power Magnetically Shielded Hall Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conversano, Ryan William

    tested. The performance of the first thruster, called the MaSMi 40, was characterized at an operating condition of 275 V and 325 W. A peak thrust of approximately 13 mN with a specific impulse of approximately 1,100 s at an anode efficiency of approximately 22% were measured at the nominal operating point. Observations of the near exit plasma discharge during operation, and the discharge channel after operation, suggested that the outer channel wall of the thruster was well shielded from ion bombardment while the inner channel wall appeared to be weakly shielded. Further analysis concluded that the MaSMi-40 generated a partially-magnetically shielded field topology. However, the shortcomings of the MaSMi-40's magnetic circuit design were investigated in detail and are now well understood. The second design iteration in the development of a low-power magnetically shielded Hall thruster was the MaSMi-60. Magnetic field measurements confirmed that a symmetric and fully shielded magnetic field topology was generated by this device across a wide range of possible operating conditions. At operating powers of 160 W to nearly 750 W, the key performance metrics of the MaSMi-60 included a measured thrust ranging from approximately 8 mN to over 33 mN with anode specific impulses of up to approximately 1370 s at anode efficiencies of over 28%. Downstream plume measurements identified the primary factors contributing to the low anode efficiency. Visual observations of the discharge plasma and channel walls during and after thruster operation offered strong evidence of magnetic shielding. Erosion rates of the channel were approximated using carbon backsputter measurements; the results suggested a 10x--100x decrease in wall erosion compared to unshielded Hall thrusters, corresponding to an equal increase in discharge channel lifetime compared to conventional miniature unshielded Hall thrusters. The physics and behaviors of the MaSMi-60's plasma discharge upstream of and in the near

  10. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  11. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  12. Tilts of the Master Equatorial Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G., Jr.; Gawronski, W.; Girdner, D.; Noskoff, E.; Sommerville, J. N.

    2000-07-01

    At the center of the DSS-14 antenna, a tower reaches to the focal point of the antenna dish. The master equatorial (ME) instrument is located at the top of the tower. This instrument precisely (with an accuracy that exceeds that of the antenna) follows the commanded trajectory. Through the optical coupling, the antenna focal point follows the ME. One factor of the antenna pointing precision is the movement of the ME base, i.e., the top of the tower. For this reason, measurements of the ME tower tilts have been taken in order to quantify the tilts, to determine possible causes of the tilting, and to update the antenna pointing budget. They were conducted under three antenna operating modes: during tracking, slewing, and antenna stowing. The measurements indicate that the ME tower tilts introduce significant pointing errors that exceed the required 32-GHz (Ka-band) pointing precision (estimated as 0.8 mdeg for a 0.1-dB gain loss). Four different sources of tilt were identified and require verification.

  13. Mycobacteria in Finnish cooling tower waters.

    PubMed

    Torvinen, Eila; Suomalainen, Sini; Paulin, Lars; Kusnetsov, Jaana

    2014-04-01

    Evaporative cooling towers are water systems used in, e.g., industry and telecommunication to remove excess heat by evaporation of water. Temperatures of cooling waters are usually optimal for mesophilic microbial growth and cooling towers may liberate massive amounts of bacterial aerosols. Outbreaks of legionellosis associated with cooling towers have been known since the 1980's, but occurrences of other potentially pathogenic bacteria in cooling waters are mostly unknown. We examined the occurrence of mycobacteria, which are common bacteria in different water systems and may cause pulmonary and other soft tissue infections, in cooling waters containing different numbers of legionellae. Mycobacteria were isolated from all twelve cooling systems and from 92% of the 24 samples studied. Their numbers in the positive samples varied from 10 to 7.3 × 10(4) cfu/L. The isolated species included M. chelonae/abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. intracellulare, M. lentiflavum, M. avium/nebraskense/scrofulaceum and many non-pathogenic species. The numbers of mycobacteria correlated negatively with the numbers of legionellae and the concentration of copper. The results show that cooling towers are suitable environments for potentially pathogenic mycobacteria. Further transmission of mycobacteria from the towers to the environment needs examination. PMID:23937212

  14. Cloud immersion building shielding factors for US residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario within a semi-infinite cloud of radioactive material. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement, as well for single-wide manufactured housing-units. PMID:25340542

  15. Cloud immersion building shielding factors for US residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario within a semi-infinite cloud of radioactive material. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement, as well for single-wide manufactured housing-units.

  16. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  17. Cooling tower water conditioning study. [using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    Successful elimination of cooling tower treatment chemicals was demonstrated. Three towers functioned for long periods of time with ozone as the only treatment for the water. The water in the systems was reused as much as 30 times (cycles of concentration) without deleterious effects to the heat exchangers. Actual system blow-down was eliminated and the only makeup water added was that required to replace the evaporation and mist entrainment losses. Minimum water savings alone are approximately 75.1 1/kg/year. Cost estimates indicate that a savings of 55 percent was obtained on the systems using ozone. A major problem experienced in the use of ozone for cooling tower applications was the difficulty of accurate concentration measurements. The ability to control the operational characteristics relies on easily and accurately determined concentration levels. Present methods of detection are subject to inaccuracies because of interfering materials and the rapid destruction of the ozone.

  18. Simple model of a cooling tower plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Cizek; Jiri, Nozicka

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses the possibilities in the area of modeling of the so called cooling tower plume emergent at operating evaporating cooling systems. As opposed to recent publication, this text focuses on the possibilities of a simplified analytic description of the whole problem where this description shall - in the future - form the base of a calculation algorithms enabling to simulate the efficiency of systems reducing this cooling tower plume. The procedure is based on the application of basic formula for the calculation of the velocity and concentration fields in the area above the cooling tower. These calculation is then used to determine the form and the total volume of the plume. Although this approach does not offer more exact results, it can provide a basic understanding of the impact of individual quantities relating to this problem.

  19. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. |

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  20. Lessons learned from the Lena guyed tower

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, L.D.; Maus, L.D.

    1984-10-01

    The design, fabrication, and installation of the Lena guyed tower required the development of new offshore technology in several areas. Lessons learned from this experience include an understanding of the consequences of major design decisions and insight into the interactive behavior of the structural components. The guyed tower is now a proven deepwater production platform concept for the Gulf of Mexico and is also judged to be applicable for a wide range of water depths and deck loads in the North Sea and other areas of the world.

  1. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  2. CFD MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR A-AREA AND H-AREA COOLING TOWERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Garrett, A.; Bollinger, J.

    2009-09-02

    Mechanical draft cooling towers are designed to cool process water via sensible and latent heat transfer to air. Heat and mass transfer take place simultaneously. Heat is transferred as sensible heat due to the temperature difference between liquid and gas phases, and as the latent heat of the water as it evaporates. Mass of water vapor is transferred due to the difference between the vapor pressure at the air-liquid interface and the partial pressure of water vapor in the bulk of the air. Equations to govern these phenomena are discussed here. The governing equations are solved by taking a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The purpose of the work is to develop a three-dimensional CFD model to evaluate the flow patterns inside the cooling tower cell driven by cooling fan and wind, considering the cooling fans to be on or off. Two types of the cooling towers are considered here. One is cross-flow type cooling tower located in A-Area, and the other is counterflow type cooling tower located in H-Area. The cooling tower located in A-Area is mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) consisting of four compartment cells as shown in Fig. 1. It is 13.7m wide, 36.8m long, and 9.4m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud without any flow communications between two adjacent cells. There are water distribution decks on both sides of the fan shroud. The deck floor has an array of about 25mm size holes through which water droplet falls into the cell region cooled by the ambient air driven by fan and wind, and it is eventually collected in basin area. As shown in Fig. 1, about 0.15-m thick drift eliminator allows ambient air to be humidified through the evaporative cooling process without entrainment of water droplets into the shroud exit. The H-Area cooling tower is about 7.3 m wide, 29.3 m long, and 9.0 m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud, but each of two corner cells has two panels to shield wind at the bottom of the cells. There is some

  3. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  4. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  5. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  6. 2. Light tower and keeper's house, view southwest, north northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower and keeper's house, view southwest, north northeast side of tower, northeast and northwest sides of keeper's house - Wood Island Light Station, East end of Wood Island, at mouth of Soo River, Biddeford Pool, York County, ME

  7. 1. Keeper's house and light tower, view north northeast, southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house and light tower, view north northeast, southwest and southeast sides of house, northwest and southwest sides of tower - Wood Island Light Station, East end of Wood Island, at mouth of Soo River, Biddeford Pool, York County, ME

  8. 1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  9. 2. Slacking Tower south side, view to the northnortheast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Slacking Tower south side, view to the north-northeast. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Slacking Tower, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  10. Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the central guard tower, facing southeast (note view also includes cell block ten (left) and cell block nine (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 1. General view of crossing gate tower, taken in 1916 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of crossing gate tower, taken in 1916 (courtesy of Erie Railroad Company) (photocopy) - Erie Railway, Crossing Gate Tower, West side of Lincoln Street, 100 feet South of Concord Street, Union City, Erie County, PA

  12. 39. View from top of Brooklyn Tower looking SW at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View from top of Brooklyn Tower looking SW at tower cornice, main cable and stay cables. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  13. 54. Angled view looking up at Brooklyn Tower showing juncture ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Angled view looking up at Brooklyn Tower showing juncture of deck superstructure with the tower and diagonal cables. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  14. 1. Keeper's house and light tower, view north, south and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house and light tower, view north, south and east sides of keeper's house, southwest and southeast sides of tower - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  15. 2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, northwest and northeast sides of tower, east and north sides of keeper's house and shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  16. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Steam sand dryer in northeast part of sand tower. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steam sand dryer in northeast part of sand tower. View to northeast - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Sand Tower, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  18. TOWER, WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING CONNECTION PIPES FOR TURNOUTS 22 (FOREGROUND) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER, WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING CONNECTION PIPES FOR TURNOUTS 22 (FOREGROUND) AND 24. NOTE “LAZY JACK” TEMPERATURE COMPENSATOR IN FOREGROUND. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Z Tower, State Route 46, Keyser, Mineral County, WV

  19. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  20. 29. Photocopy of 1921 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of 1921 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower Grove, Missouri Botanical Garden. ITALIAN GARDEN AND NEW PALM HOUSE (DEMOLISHED), LOOKING NORTHEAST - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. TOWER S389, MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. Naval Magazine Lualualei, West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER S389, MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. TOWER 450 WITH POLE. Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER 450 WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. S316, GUARD TOWER INTERIOR. Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    S316, GUARD TOWER INTERIOR. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Off Dent Road & on Kolekole Road near north boundary of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 8. LOOKING EAST FROM TOP OF WATER TOWER: VIEW SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LOOKING EAST FROM TOP OF WATER TOWER: VIEW SHOWS BUILDING #626 AND PORTION OF QUADRANGLE - Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio Depot, Water-Watch Tower, Grayson Street & New Braunfels Avenue, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  5. S316, GUARD TOWER ON KOLEKOLE PASS RD. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    S316, GUARD TOWER ON KOLEKOLE PASS RD. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Off Dent Road & on Kolekole Road near north boundary of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Interior of the mine observation tower building, showing the steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of the mine observation tower building, showing the steel compass ring in the tower. View facing east - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waipio Peninsula, Waipo Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 27. STATIC TEST TOWER CLOSEUP VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STATIC TEST TOWER CLOSE-UP VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL AT REAR OF TOWER UNDER SHED ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. 1. Keeper's house and light tower, view northwest, south and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house and light tower, view northwest, south and east sides of keeper's house, southwest and southeast sides of light tower - Curtis Island Light Station, Curtis Island, at entrance to Camden Harbor, Camden, Knox County, ME

  10. 3. View looking E from top of World Trade Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View looking E from top of World Trade Tower with World Trade Tower parapet in foreground. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  11. INTERIOR OF SA WETSIDE BUILDING. TOP OF CARBONATION TOWERS (SOLVAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SA WETSIDE BUILDING. TOP OF CARBONATION TOWERS (SOLVAY TOWERS) PROBABLY SAME LEVEL AS NY-300-D-6 BUT OPPOSITE VIEW. - Solvay Process Company, SA Wetside Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenue, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  12. 4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF TOWER ND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF TOWER ND SIGNAL BRIDGE No. 6 AND DWARF SIGNAL IN FOREGROUND - South Station Tower No. 1 & Interlocking System, Dewey Square, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower Foot Bridge, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. View of the southwest guard tower, cell blocks seven and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the southwest guard tower, cell blocks seven and eight, administration building west tower, and Fairmount Avenue, looking from the administration building facing west - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing thirty-acre irrigated field - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Weather Tower, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. Control tower northwest corner of building 29. View southward shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Control tower northwest corner of building 29. View southward shows tower and stairway built onto door outrigger structure. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Hangars, Roe Street, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  17. 5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing southeast - Cold Mountain Fire Lookout Station, Lookout Tower, Krassel District, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Dixie, Idaho County, ID

  18. View uphill of single chair lift, tower 15 in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View uphill of single chair lift, tower 15 in foreground, TOWERS 16 and 17 in the distance, LOOKING SOUTH. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  19. 50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NONEVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NON-EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS IN CENTER, AND EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER COOLING TOWERS ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  20. 2. Detail of tower foundation with lightning transfer wire, southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Detail of tower foundation with lightning transfer wire, southeast corner - Cold Mountain Fire Lookout Station, Lookout Tower, Krassel District, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Dixie, Idaho County, ID

  1. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    This thesis focuses on the study of low-cost steel and bamboo triangular lattice towers for small wind turbines. The core objective is to determine the material properties of bamboo and assess the feasibility of bamboo towers. Using the experimentally determined buckling resistance, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio, a 12 m high triangular lattice tower for a 500W wind turbine has been modeled as a tripod to formulate the analytical solutions for the stresses and tower deflections, which enables design of the tower based on buckling strength of tower legs. The tripod formulation combines the imposed loads, the base distance between the legs and tower height, and cross-sectional dimensions of the tower legs. The tripod model was used as a reference for the initial design of the bamboo tower and extended to finite element analysis. A 12 m high steel lattice tower was also designed for the same turbine to serve as a comparison to the bamboo tower. The primary result of this work indicates that bamboo is a valid structural material. The commercial software package ANSYS APDL was used to carry out the tower analysis, evaluate the validity of the tripod model, and extend the analysis for the tower design. For this purpose, a 12 m high steel lattice tower for a 500 W wind turbine was examined. Comparison of finite element analysis and analytical solution has shown that tripod model can be accurately used in the design of lattice towers. The tower designs were based on the loads and safety requirements of international standard for small wind turbine safety, IEC 61400-2. For connecting the bamboo sections in the lattice tower, a steel-bamboo adhesive joint combined with conventional lashing has been proposed. Also, considering the low durability of bamboo, periodic replacement of tower members has been proposed. The result of this study has established that bamboo could be used to construct cost-effective and lightweight lattice towers for wind turbines of 500 Watt

  2. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  3. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Creation of NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate database of meteorological data is essential for designing any aerospace vehicle and for preparing launch commit criteria. Meteorological instrumentation were recently placed on the three Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B), which provide a unique meteorological dataset existing at the launch complex over an extensive altitude range. Data records of temperature, dew point, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction are produced at 40, 78, 116, and 139 m at each tower. The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) received an archive that consists of one-minute averaged measurements for the period of record of January 2011 - April 2015. However, before the received database could be used EV44 needed to remove any erroneous data from within the database through a comprehensive quality control (QC) process. The QC process applied to the LPS towers' meteorological data is similar to other QC processes developed by EV44, which were used in the creation of meteorological databases for other towers at KSC. The QC process utilized in this study has been modified specifically for use with the LPS tower database. The QC process first includes a check of each individual sensor. This check includes removing any unrealistic data and checking the temporal consistency of each variable. Next, data from all three sensors at each height are checked against each other, checked against climatology, and checked for sensors that erroneously report a constant value. Then, a vertical consistency check of each variable at each tower is completed. Last, the upwind sensor at each level is selected to minimize the influence of the towers and other structures at LC-39B on the measurements. The selection process for the upwind sensor implemented a study of tower-induced turbulence. This paper describes in detail the QC process, QC results, and the attributes of the LPS towers meteorological

  4. LACBWR primary shield activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, L.L.; Lahti, G.P.; Johnson, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear power plants in the US are required to estimate the costs of decommissioning to ensure that adequate funds are accumulated during the useful life of the plant. A major component of the decommissioning cost is the disposal of radioactive material, including material near the reactor created by neutron activation. An accurate assessment of the residual radioactivity in the reactor`s primary shield is necessary to determine this portion of the decommissioning demolition and disposal cost. This paper describes the efforts used to determine the activation levels remaining in the primary shield of the LaCrosse boiling water reactor (LACBWR), owned and operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative.

  5. Utility Towers, Insulator Detail, Front Elevation, Side Elevation, Elevation, Double ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Towers, Insulator Detail, Front Elevation, Side Elevation, Elevation, Double Pole Tower, Single Pole Tower - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  6. 1. Slacking Tower north side, view to the southsouthwest. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Slacking Tower north side, view to the south-southwest. The tower was used for dredging the river downstream of the powerhouse. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Slacking Tower, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  7. 8. VIEW OF THE EAST BASE CONNECTION OF ANTENNA TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF THE EAST BASE CONNECTION OF ANTENNA TOWER S-111 FACING NORTHEAST. BUILDING 1 AND ANTENNA TOWER S-110 IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Lualualei Radio Transmitter, Edison & Tower Drives, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 78 FR 17183 - Information Collection: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Forest Service Information Collection: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... collection 0596- 0222, ``Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card'' with 0596-0226, ``Forest Service Generic.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card. OMB Number: 0596-0222. Expiration Date...

  9. 38. View from top of Brooklyn Tower showing man walking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. View from top of Brooklyn Tower showing man walking up main cable, stay cables radiating from top of tower and tower cornice. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  10. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  12. View of second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of second bank of circuit towers on Arizona side of canyon. Left tower supports Circuit 10 and right tower supports Circuit 11, view north - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  13. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS THREE AND FOUR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS THREE AND FOUR WITH TOWERS FIVE AND SIX IN THE DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE TWO INTACT CABLES RUNNING ALONG TOP OF THE TOWERS ARE FIXED. WHILE THE MOVING CABLE IS LYING SLACK ON THE GROUND. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. 3. View from former light tower to Cape Elizabeth Light ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from former light tower to Cape Elizabeth Light Tower, view northeast, southwest side of Cape Elizabeth Tower - Cape Elizabeth Light Station, Near Two Lights State Park at end of Two Lights Road, off State Highway 77, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

  15. CONCRETE PAD AND SUSPENSION BRIDGE TOWERS FOR CABLES FORMERLY SUPPORTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONCRETE PAD AND SUSPENSION BRIDGE TOWERS FOR CABLES FORMERLY SUPPORTING THE SUSPENSION BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower Foot Bridge, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed wi th respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the use ful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-thro ugh display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14 deg, 28 deg, and 47 deg) were examined to det ermine their effect on subjects# ability to detect aircraft maneuveri ng and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47 deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search perf ormance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display tech nique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  17. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14deg, 28deg, and 47deg) were examined to determine their effect on subjects ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  18. The Legacy of the Texas Tower Sniper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavergne, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the incident that happened at the University of Texas to the tragedy that took place at Virginia Tech. On August 1, 1966, Charles Joseph Whitman ascended the University of Texas Tower, in Austin, and in 96 minutes fired 150 high-powered rounds of ammunition down upon an unsuspecting university family. The…

  19. The Tower and Glass Marbles Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denman, Richard T.; Hailey, David; Rothenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Catseye Marble company tests the strength of its marbles by dropping them from various levels of their office tower, to find the highest floor from which a marble will not break. We find the smallest number of drops required and from which floor each drop should be made. We also find out how these answers change if a restriction is placed on…

  20. The Tower of Hanoi and Inductive Logic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the "Australian Curriculum," the concept of mathematical induction is first met in the senior secondary subject Specialist Mathematics. This article details an example, the Tower of Hanoi problem, which provides an enactive introduction to the inductive process before moving to more abstract and cognitively demanding representations.…

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1435 - Tower cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following brakes, which must automatically set in the event of pressure loss or power failure, are required: (A) A hoist brake on all hoists. (B) Swing brake. (C) Trolley brake. (D) Rail travel brake. (viii...) Hoist drum lower limiting device. Tower cranes manufactured after November 8, 2011 must be equipped...

  2. Tower Power: Producing Fuels from Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, M. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This article examines the use of power tower technologies for the production of synthetic fuels. This process overcomes the limitations of other processes by using a solar furnace to drive endothermic fuel producing reactions and the resulting fuels serve as a medium for storing solar energy. (BT)

  3. Balsa Tower Walls Brave "Big Buster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granlund, George

    2008-01-01

    Like many technology teachers, the author, a technology education teacher at Arthur Hill High School in Saginaw, Michigan, tries to stretch his budget by "milking" each student activity for maximum benefit. In the technology department, they use balsa wood towers to teach the basics of structural engineering. To get the most from their materials,…

  4. 75 FR 13079 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; MAHAN AIRWAYS; Mahan Airways, Mahan Tower, No. 21, Azadegan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Tower, No. 21, Azadegan St., M.A. Jenah Exp. Way, Tehran, Iran, Respondent; Order Renewing Order... to Iran three U.S.-origin aircraft, specifically Boeing 747s (``Aircraft 1-3''), items subject to the... involved in the attempted re-export of three additional U.S.-origin Boeing 747s (``Aircraft 4-6'') to...

  5. ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA-645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ON LEFT. AT LEFT OF VIEW, HIGH-BAY BUILDING IS ETR. ONE STORY ATTACHMENT IS ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING. STACK AT RIGHT IS ETR STACK; MTR STACK IS TOWARD LEFT. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3799. Jack L. Anderson, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  7. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  8. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  9. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

  10. SHELTER THROUGH ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, THE SHIELDING REQUIREMENTS INFLUENCE ON FORM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    FALLOUT PROTECTION CAN BE PROVIDED BY CAREFUL ARRANGEMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS WITHOUT SPECIFIC FACILITIES FOR THEIR PURPOSE AND WITHOUT INTERFERING WITH NORMAL SPACE USE. CHARACTERISTICS OF RADIATION ARE DISCUSSED AND ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES OF SHIELDING DESIGN WITH RESPECT TO DISTANCE, GEOMETRY, AND TIME ARE GIVEN. (JT)

  11. Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This second edition of the shielded metal arc pipe welding curriculum guide presents both basic and advanced pipe welding skills. All specifications for procedure and welder qualification are presented according to national standards. The standards also include the test position for both groove and fillet pipe welding. The guide contains three…

  12. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  13. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  15. Testing the effectiveness of small radiation shields for mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J Patrick; Chou, C K; Balzano, Quirino

    2003-01-01

    Nine small radiation shields made to adhere to the case of mobile phones were tested at 914 and 1880 MHz. Five popular products were tested because advertisements typically claim they are up to 99% effective in blocking radio frequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phones. Also, four other conceptually unusual products were tested because advertisements typically claim they emit oscillations that counteract the RF radiation from mobile phones. Each shield was tested on the same mobile phone, and measurements were made to compare the absorption of RF energy in the head with and without each shield attached to the phone. The phone was positioned against a head model, and an automated measurement process was used to determine specific absorption rate (SAR) in the same way it is used at Motorola to test the compliance of mobile phones with respect to human exposure limits. The location of the peak SAR was not observed to change with any of the shields attached to the phone, and the 1 g, peak spatial average SAR did not change by any statistically significant amount. These results indicate the small shields are ineffective in reducing the exposure of the head to RF energy emitted by a mobile phone. PMID:12483667

  16. Analyzing the possibility of achieving more efficient cooling of water in the evaporative cooling towers of the Armenian NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Yeghoyan, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The specific features of the service cooling water system used at the Armenian NPP and modifications made in the arrangement for supplying water to the water coolers in order to achieve more efficient cooling are presented. The mathematical model applied in carrying out the analyses is described, the use of which makes it possible to investigate the operation of parallel-connected cooling towers having different hydraulic and thermal loads. When the third standby cooling tower is put into operation (with the same flow rate of water supplied to the water coolers), the cooled water temperature is decreased by around 2-3°C in the range of atmospheric air temperatures 0-35°C. However, the introduced water distribution arrangement with a decreased spraying density has limitation on its use at negative outdoor air temperatures due to the hazard intense freezing of the fill in the cooling tower peripheral zone. The availability of standby cooling towers in the shutdown Armenian NPP power unit along with the planned full replacement of the cooling tower process equipment create good possibilities for achieving a deeper water cooling extent and better efficiency of the NPP. The present work was carried out with the aim of achieving maximally efficient use of existing possibilities and for elaborating the optimal cooling tower modernization version. Individual specific heat-andmass transfer processes in the chimney-type evaporative cooling towers are analyzed. An improved arrangement for distributing cooled water over the cooling tower spraying area (during its operation with a decreased flow rate) is proposed with the aim of cooling water to a deeper extent and preserving the possibility of using the cooling towers in winter. The main idea behind improving the existing arrangement is to exclude certain zones of the cooling tower featuring inefficient cooling from operation. The effectiveness of introducing the proposed design is proven by calculations (taking as an

  17. Circular radiation heat shields with temperature dependent emissivities: transient and steady-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Li, X.; Hu, S.; Li, Z.; Chen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation heat loss is an important type of heat loss in thermal systems. In this work, a numerical study of the transient response of two circular radiation heat shields inserted between two parallel and circular surfaces of emissivities ɛ1 and ɛ2 is presented. The same dimensions have been assumed for the two main radiating surfaces and the two radiation shields. The radiation shields are assumed to have different emissivities on their top (ɛ3 and ɛ5) and bottom ( ɛ4 and ɛ6) surfaces, and both are assumed to be different but linear functions of temperature. A specific configuration is investigated in detail to highlight the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system. Some new results for the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system such as the effect of shield location, shield emissivities, the temperature dependence of shield emissivities, system dimensions, temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces and emissivities of the hot and cold surfaces are presented for future references. It has been observed that increasing the temperature of the first radiation shield by changing a parameter such as surface emissivity or distance between the radiation shield or the temperature of the hot surface, will not necessarily decrease the temperature of the second radiation shield.

  18. ARC Control Tower: A flexible generic distributed job management framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, J. K.; Cameron, D.; Filipčič, A.

    2015-12-01

    While current grid middleware implementations are quite advanced in terms of connecting jobs to resources, their client tools are generally quite minimal and features for managing large sets of jobs are left to the user to implement. The ARC Control Tower (aCT) is a very flexible job management framework that can be run on anything from a single users laptop to a multi-server distributed setup. aCT was originally designed to enable ATLAS jobs to be submitted to the ARC CE. However, with the recent redesign of aCT where the ATLAS specific elements are clearly separated from the ARC job management parts, the control tower can now easily be reused as a flexible generic distributed job manager for other communities. This paper will give a detailed explanation how aCT works as a job management framework and go through the steps needed to create a simple job manager using aCT and show that it can easily manage thousands of jobs.

  19. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Process of Creating the NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The methodology and the results of the quality control (QC) process of the meteorological data from the Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B) are documented in this paper. Meteorological data are used to design a launch vehicle, determine operational constraints, and to apply defined constraints on day-of-launch (DOL). In order to properly accomplish these tasks, a representative climatological database of meteorological records is needed because the database needs to represent the climate the vehicle will encounter. Numerous meteorological measurement towers exist at KSC; however, the engineering tasks need measurements at specific heights, some of which can only be provided by a few towers. Other than the LPS towers, Tower 313 is the only tower that provides observations up to 150 m. This tower is located approximately 3.5 km from LC-39B. In addition, data need to be QC'ed to remove erroneous reports that could pollute the results of an engineering analysis, mislead the development of operational constraints, or provide a false image of the atmosphere at the tower's location.

  20. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  1. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  2. Kaluza-Klein towers on general manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Levin, Janna; Zukowski, Claire

    2014-04-01

    A higher dimensional universe with compactified extra dimensions admits a four-dimensional description consisting of an infinite Kaluza-Klein tower of fields. We revisit the problem of describing the free part of the complete Kaluza-Klein tower of gauge fields, p forms, gravity, and flux compactifications. In contrast to previous studies, we work with a generic internal manifold of any dimension, completely at the level of the action, in a gauge-invariant formulation and without resorting to the equations of motion or analysis of propagators. We demonstrate that the physical fields and Stückelberg fields are naturally described by ingredients of the Hodge decomposition and its analog for symmetric tensors. The spectrum of states and stability conditions, in terms of the eigenvalues of various Laplacians on the internal manifold, is easily read from the action.

  3. Optical study of solar tower power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddhibi, F.; Ben Amara, M.; Balghouthi, M.; Guizani, A.

    2015-04-01

    The central receiver technology for electricity generation consists of concentrating solar radiation coming from the solar tracker field into a central receiver surface located on the top of the tower. The heliostat field is constituted of a big number of reflective mirrors; each heliostat tracks the sun individually and reflects the sunlight to a focal point. Therefore, the heliostat should be positioned with high precision in order to minimize optical losses. In the current work, a mathematical model for the analysis of the optical efficiency of solar tower field power plant is proposed. The impact of the different factors which influence the optical efficiency is analyzed. These parameters are mainly, the shading and blocking losses, the cosine effect, the atmospheric attenuation and the spillage losses. A new method for the calculation of blocking and shadowing efficiency is introduced and validated by open literature.

  4. Dynamic analysis of the Milad Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Edwin; Ford, Mitchell; Coelho, Darren; Lawler, Lachlan; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Tahmasebinia, Faham

    2016-08-01

    This report involves the modelling of the Milad Tower using the finite element analysis program Strand7. A dynamic analysis was performed on the structure in order to understand the deflections and stresses as a result of earthquake and wind loading. In particular, Linear Static as well as Natural Frequency and Spectral Response solvers were used to determine the behaviour of the structure under loading. The findings of the report highlight that the structure was modelled accurately with the outputs representing realistic values. The report suggests that the design of the beams, columns, slabs and all structural members was sufficient enough to support the tower during maximum loading cases. The governing load case was earthquake loading.

  5. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOEpatents

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Rohsenow, Warren R.

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  6. New facility shield design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources.

  7. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  8. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  9. Blue Shield Plan Physician Participation

    PubMed Central

    Yett, Donald E.; Der, William; Ernst, Richard L.; Hay, Joel W.

    1981-01-01

    Many Blue Shield Plans offer participation agreements to physicians that are structurally similar to the participation provisions of Medicaid programs. This paper examines physicians' participation decisions in two such Blue Shield Plans where the participation agreements were on an all-or-nothing basis. The major results show that increases in the Plans' reasonable fees or fee schedules significantly raise the probability of participation, and that physicians with characteristics associated with “low quality” are significantly more likely to participate than are physicians with characteristics associated with “high quality.” In this sense the results highlight the tradeoff that must be faced in administering governmental health insurance policy. On the one hand, restricting reasonable and scheduled fees is the principal current tool for containing expenditures on physicians' services. Yet these restrictions tend to depress physicians' willingness to participate in government programs, thereby reducing access to high quality care by the populations those programs were designed to serve. PMID:10309468

  10. Design of magnets inside cylindrical superconducting shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The design of magnets inside closed, cylindrical, superconducting shields is discussed. The Green function is given for the magnetic vector potential for cylindrically symmetric currents inside such a shield. The magnetic field everywhere inside the shield can be obtained from this function, which includes the effects of the induced shield currents exactly. The field is given for a thin solenoid as an example and the convergence of the series solution for this case is discussed. The shield can significantly reduce the strength and improve the homogeneity of a magnet. The improvement in homogeneity is of particular importance in the design of correction coils. These effects, and the maximum field on the shield, are examined for a typical solenoid. The results given are also useful, although not exact, for long shields with one or two open ends.

  11. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  12. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  13. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  14. Aspects of cooling tower biocides and protozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Ashburn, R.J.; Ting, R.S.

    1998-12-31

    Previous work has shown that certain cooling tower amoebae and ciliated protozoa are resistant to several cooling tower biocides, even at the manufacturer`s recommended dosages. For the present study, an Acunthumoeba species was isolated from a cooling tower in Australia. Suspensions of the trophozoites (feeding stages) were exposed to isothiazolones. Cysts were tested separately. The minimum lethal concentration (MLC) for trophozoites was between 31-62 ppm of the biocide product, which is slightly less than the MLC for an amoebae species from the United States; and cyst forms were twofold more resistant than those of the US species, with a MLC of 62,500 ppm. A ciliate and an amoeba species were also exposed to bromochlorodimethylhydantoin. The MLC for the ciliate species was 1 ppm of the biocide product, and the MLC was 30--40 ppm for the amoeba trophozoites. Since amoebae can expel vesicles containing live Legionella, experiments were conducted to determine whether exposure of Acunthamoebu polyphugu to biocides influenced release of such potentially infectious particles. Vesicle release was not inhibited by any of the three biocides: quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), isothiazolones, and a thiocarbamate compound. These results suggest that amoebae from various sources are resistant to recommended levels of biocides, and the amoebae may continue to release potentially infectious vesicles in the presence of biocides.

  15. Legionella spp. in Puerto Rico cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Negron-Alvira, A.; Perez-Suarez, I.; Hazen, T.C. )

    1988-10-01

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, P.R., were assayed for various Legionella spp. and serogroups by using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured for each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species; its density reached 10{sup 5} cells per ml, which is within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (acridine orange direct count) were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems and that, without continuous biocide treatment, they may reach densities that present a health risk.

  16. Legionella in Puerto Rico cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Negron-Alviro, A.; Perez-Suarez, I.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, Puerto Rico were assayed for various species and serogroups of Legionella spp. using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured with each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila (1-6), L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species, reaching 10{sup 5} cells/ml, within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (AODC), were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems, and without continuous biocide treatment may reach densities that present a health risk.

  17. Droplet size of cooling tower fog.

    PubMed

    Rothman, T; Ledbetter, J O

    1975-01-01

    Fog from cooling towers causes problems of visibility and icing along roadways adjacent to the towers; moreover, the visible plume from the towers offers difficulty in that it is equated by much of the public with air pollution. It is desirable to know the size of the fog droplets in order to plan abatement procedures and to determine the airborne lifetimes of such fogs. The methodology involved capturing the droplets on slides coated with a vaseline-mineral oil mixture, making photomicrographs of the droplets, counting and sizing the droplets into eight droplet diameter increments; namely less than 5 mum, 5-10 mum, 10-20 mum, 20-40 mum, 40-60 mum, 60-80 mum, 80-100 mum, and greater than 100 mum. The resulting distribution was similar to that for natural fogs and clouds; i.e., it was bi-modal, the first mode at less than 5 mum containing the vast majority of the droplets, and the second at 20-40 mum. This study agrees with others that the size distribution of a fog in a saturated environment is continuously changing, with the smaller droplets tending to evaporate and the larger ones tending to grow, thus shifting the second mode toward larger sizes.

  18. Water-conserving cooling tower treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mathie, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Water conservation in cooling towers and evaporative coolers can finally become a reality. Also, fouled closed hot and chilled water systems can be restored to near original efficiency using the same technology. The barrier limiting the traditional water treatment industry from serious involvement in water conservation is the lack of a really good chemical to control scale. Poor scale inhibitors are the reason for a heavy bleed. Minerals concentrated by evaporation is wasted to the sewer while low solids make-up water fills the tower. Water conservation is important because of the increasing usable water shortage, the cost to add infrastructure to deliver increasing amounts of water to accommodate growth and the limitations imposed on disposal to the sewer. Now, due to innovations in chemical treatment, users of cooling towers and evaporative coolers can conserve water. In this presentation the author assumes the audience has some knowledge of traditional water treatment. Except for a few general references to establish common understanding, the author confines his remarks to discussing an advanced technology developed by DIAS, Inc., and the economics of its use.

  19. Legionella spp. in Puerto Rico cooling towers.

    PubMed Central

    Negrón-Alvíra, A; Pérez-Suarez, I; Hazen, T C

    1988-01-01

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, P.R., were assayed for various Legionella spp. and serogroups by using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured for each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species; its density reached 10(5) cells per ml, which is within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (acridine orange direct count) were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems and that, without continuous biocide treatment, they may reach densities that present a health risk. PMID:3202625

  20. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  1. [Stress shielding and fracture healing].

    PubMed

    Liu, J G; Xu, X X

    1994-08-01

    The influence of stress shielding after fracture fixation with plate on fracture healing was studied. The results of animal and biomechanical experiments as well as the clinical observations demonstrated that rigidity of the plate was not the only factor causing stress redistribution and stress shielding effects of bone. Either the internal fixation with different implants or external fixation with fixators all might lead to physical and chemical characteristic changes of bone tissue. In the early stage, the disturbance of blood supply and the bone structure remodeling may be the main reasons. Reaction to the implant was another cause in the middle stage. If the affected limb can take weight-bearing normally at late stage, the influences of plate on fracture healing mechanical properties of bone and the osteoporosis cause by stress shielding effects will become much less. The tissue of the affected limb was the most important factor which may cause osteoporosis and refracture. Osteoporosis, bone atrophy and immobilization syndrome of bone and joint can be prevented and treated by taking normal weight-bearing and overcoming infection and implant reaction. PMID:7994658

  2. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  3. Heat pipe thermionic reactor shield optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshishan, Vahé; Dix, Terry E.

    1992-01-01

    Shield optimization studies were conducted for a thermionic reactor, that uses heat pipes for both reactor heat removal and radiator. The radiator was placed on the opposite side of the payload to more efficiency reject the heat without affecting the LiH shadow shield. Neutron scattering off the radiator was an important consideration. The shield that was added to reduce the neutron scattering by itself became a source for scattering. By proper shield material selection, the radiator and radiator shield scattering contribution was reduced. A direct shield material selection trade study was performed, and tungsten was selected for the gamma ray shield. The direct shield mass was then optimized with respect to separation distance, using both the mass of the boom and electrical cables. A very important conclusion was that the optimum system mass depends on the boom structural criteria that is used. At a separation distance of 5 m the shield mass was calculated to be 1,445 kg. At 10 m, the shield mass drops to 700 kg; however, the additional electrical cable mass was 73 kg and the additional boom mass was 335 kg (or 67 kg/m) for a total mass of 1,108 kg. The boom minimum resonant structural frequency was 10 Hz.

  4. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  5. Characteristics of Winter Lightning that Occurred on a Windmill and its Lightning Protection Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Nobuyuki; Wang, Daohong

    We have obtained the electric current, electric field change, and optical image data or several tens of lightning that hit on a wind turbine and its lightning-protection tower during the past6 non-stop winter seasons from 2005 to 2010. By analyzing the data, we found that the upward lightning hitting on the high structures can be classified into self-initiated and other-triggered types according to whether there is a discharge activity prior to the upward lightning. We also found that although other-triggered upward lightning can start at a relatively lower wind speed, self-initiated upward lightning always started either from the stationary tower under a larger wind speed or from a rotating wind turbine blade. It appears that the wind and by inference the corona discharge shielding do have considerable effect in the initiation of an upward leader. Regarding the initial progression of a positive leader, we found a systematic difference in the speeds of the leaders from the structures that have remarkably different heights. Finally, we discussed the pulse discharges observed in the very initial stages of positive upward leaders and also how to forecast direct strike of upward lightning.

  6. A Single Tower Configuration of the Modular Gamma Box Counter System - 13392

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, K.; Nakazawa, D.; Francalangia, J.; Gonzalez, H.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra's Standard Gamma Box Counter System is designed to perform accurate quantitative assays of gamma emitting nuclides for a wide range of large containers including B-25 crates and ISO shipping containers. Using a modular building-block approach, the system offers tremendous flexibility for a variety of measurement situations with wide ranges of sample activities and throughput requirements, as well as the opportunity to modify the configuration for other applications at a later date. The typical configuration consists of two opposing towers each equipped with two high purity germanium detectors, and an automated container trolley. This paper presents a modified configuration, consisting of a single tower placed inside a measurement trailer with three detector assemblies, allowing for additional vertical segmentation as well as a viewing a container outside the trailer through the trailer wall. An automatic liquid nitrogen fill system is supplied for each of the detectors. The use of a forklift to move the container for horizontal segmentation is accommodated by creating an additional operational and calibration set-up in the NDA 2000 software to allow for the operator to rotate the container and assay the opposite side, achieving the same sensitivity as a comparable two-tower system. This Segmented Gamma Box Counter System retains the core technologies and design features of the standard configuration. The detector assemblies are shielded to minimize interference from environmental and plant background, and are collimated to provide segmentation of the container. The assembly positions can also be modified in height and distance from the container. The ISOCS calibration software provides for a flexible approach to providing the calibrations for a variety of measurement geometries. The NDA 2000 software provides seamless operation with the current configuration, handling the data acquisition and analysis. In this paper, an overview of this system is discussed

  7. 10. Photocopy of photograph of tower as constructed at Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph of tower as constructed at Cape Henlopen, Delaware, September 1926 (original photograph in National Archives and Records Service, Still Pictures Branch, RG 26, 26-LG-22-A), photographer G.W. Hitchens, September 10, 1926. "New Tower. Camera Station West 100 ft." - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  8. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  9. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jr., John E.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  10. 37. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. THIS VIEW SHOWS TWO MAJOR CHANGES TO THE STATIC TEST TOWER: THE ADDITION OF THE NASA LOGO TO THE FACADE AND THE ADDITION OF THE UPPER STAGES TO THE JUPITER MISSILE IN THE WEST POSITION ON THE TOWER TO REPRESENT THE JUNO II CONFIGURATION. 1961, PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U. S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. Optimal Inflatable Space Towers with 3 - 100 km Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Theory and computations are provided for building inflatable space towers up to one hundred kilometers in height. These towers can be used for tourism, scientific observation of space, observation of the Earth's surface, weather and upper atmosphere, and for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch space ships and Earth satellites. These projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed from artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. The towers can be built using present technology. The towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the Earth's surface. The transport system for a tower consists of a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the Earth's surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanisms in case of damage. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in other publications. The author is prepared to discuss these and other problems with serious organizations desiring to research and develop these projects.

  12. Interior detail of tower space; camera facing southwest. Mare ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of tower space; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Defense Electronics Equipment Operating Center, I Street, terminus west of Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. 93. TOWER STAIRHALL, SOUTH WALL, WEST TABERNACLE FRAME. DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. TOWER STAIRHALL, SOUTH WALL, WEST TABERNACLE FRAME. DETAIL OF DOG EAR AND TRUSS (BRACKET) - Independence Hall Complex, Independence Hall, 500 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 8. STATIC TEST TOWER NORTHWEST ELEVATION FROM THE POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. STATIC TEST TOWER - NORTHWEST ELEVATION FROM THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi-Nik, Farhad; Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid

    2008-07-08

    Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered.

  16. Detail of towers at southwest corner; camera facing northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of towers at southwest corner; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Hospital Wards, Cedar Avenue, eat side between Fourteenth Avenue & Cossey Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  17. View of commissary, central guard tower, and cell block five, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of commissary, central guard tower, and cell block five, looking from the chapel stairs, facing southeast - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Convective Cloud Towers and Precipitation Initiation, Frequency and Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vant-hull, B.; Mahani, S. E.; Autones, F.; Rabin, R.; Mecikalski, J. R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    : Geosynchronous satellite retrieval of precipitation is desirable because it would provide continuous observation throughout most of the globe in regions where radar data is not available. In the current work the distribution of precipitation rates is examined as a function of cloud tower area and cloud top temperature. A thunderstorm tracking algorithm developed at Meteo-France is used to track cumulus towers that are matched up with radar data at 5 minute 1 km resolution. It is found that roughly half of the precipitation occurs in the cloud mass that surrounds the towers, and when a tower is first detected the precipitation is already in progress 50% of the time. The average density of precipitation per area is greater as the towers become smaller and colder, yet the averaged shape of the precipitation intensity distribution is remarkably constant in all convective situations with cloud tops warmer than 220 K. This suggests that on average all convective precipitation events look the same, unaffected by the higher frequency of occurrence per area inside the convective towers. Only once the cloud tops are colder than 220 K does the precipitation intensity distribution become weighted towards higher instantaneous intensities. Radar precipitation shown in shades of green to blue, lightning in orange; black diamonds are coldest points in each tower. Ratio of number of pixels of given precipitation inside versus outside the convective towers, for various average cloud top temperatures. A flat plot indicates the distribution of rainfall inside and outside the towers has the same shape.

  19. 2. HI PAR (ACQUISITION RADAR) TOWER AND ENLISTED MEN (EM) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HI PAR (ACQUISITION RADAR) TOWER AND ENLISTED MEN (EM) BARRACKS WITH RADAR ATTACHED. - Nike Hercules Missile Battery Summit Site, Battery Control Administration & Barracks Building, Anchorage, Anchorage, AK

  20. Acoustic and Aero-Mixing Experimental Results for Fluid Shield Scale Model Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Mengle, V. G.; Shin, H. W.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    The principle objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of fluid shield nozzle concept and to assess Far 36, Stage 3 potential for fluid shield nozzle with Flade Cycle. Acoustic data for nine scale model nozzle configurations are obtained. The effects of simulated flight and geometric and aerothermodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the fluid shield are determined. The acoustic tests are aimed at studying the effect of: (1) shield thickness, (2) wrap angle, (3) mass flow and velocity ratios between shield and core streams at constant cycle specific thrust (i.e., mixed velocity), (4) porous plug, and (5) subsonic shield. Shadowgraphs of six nozzle configurations are obtained to understand the plume flowfield features. Static pressure data on suppressor chutes in the core stream (shielded and unshielded) sides and on plug surface are acquired to determine the impact of fluid shield on base drag of the 36-chute suppressor nozzle and the thrust augmentation due to the plug, respectively.

  1. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  2. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  3. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  4. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  5. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  6. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  7. Water-Powered Astronomical Clock Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The construction of water-powered astronomical instruments was a long tradition of instrument making that started in the second century AD with Zhang Heng's water-powered celestial globe. The technology reached a peak when, in the eleventh century, Su Song and his team constructed the Water-Powered Astronomical Clock Tower which combined the armillary sphere, the celestial globe, and the time-keeping mechanism into a large automatic structure. Su Song's instrument contained a mechanism for controlling the water-powered movements of its wheels that amounts to an "escapement mechanism" for a mechanical clock. A new reconstruction of the mechanism is introduced in this chapter.

  8. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  10. Nipple Shields: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nipple shields have become commonplace in the United States for a wide range of breastfeeding problems. This article is a summary of the current literature describing the evidence for nipple shield use. The authors reviewed all available articles on nipple shields and selected 13 studies for inclusion. The studies were organized into three categories: physiologic responses, premature infants, and mothers' experiences. This review concludes that current published research does not provide evidence for safety or effectiveness of contemporary nipple shield use. PMID:20807104

  11. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  12. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. 6. VIEW OF ANTENNA TOWER S111 FACING NORTHWEST. COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF ANTENNA TOWER S-111 FACING NORTHWEST. COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL LINK BUILDING (BLDG NO. 205) LOCATED JUST INFONT OF THE TOWER. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Lualualei Radio Transmitter, Edison & Tower Drives, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  15. Shielded radiation protection quantities beyond LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowdsley, M. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Nealy, J. E.

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recommended that the quantities used to evaluate health risk to astronauts due to radiation exposure be effective dose and gray-equivalent. The NCRP recommends that effective dose be the limiting quantity for prevention of stochastic effects. Effective dose is a measure of whole body exposure, a weighted average of dose equivalent to a number body tissues for which the NCRP has adopted tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). For deterministic effects, the NCRP has recommended that gray-equivalent be used. Gray-equivalent is evaluated for specific critical organs and is the weighted sum of absorbed dose from field components to that organ using the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) number for that field component. RBE numbers recommended by the NCRP are used. The NCRP has provided effective dose limits as well as limits for gray-equivalent to eyes, skin, and blood forming organs (BFO) for astronauts in low earth orbit (LEO). As yet, no such limits have been defined for astronaut operations beyond LEO. In this study, the radiation protection quantities, effective dose and gray-equivalent to the eyes, skin, and BFO, are calculated for several environments beyond LEO. The lunar surface and Martian environments are included. For each environment, these radiation protection quantities are calculated behind varying amounts of various types of shielding materials. The results are compared to the exposure limits for LEO, since limits have not yet been defined for interplanetary missions. The benefits of using shielding material containing hydrogen and choosing optimal mission times are discussed.

  16. The caracol tower at chichen itza: an ancient astronomical observatory?

    PubMed

    Aveni, A F; Gibbs, S L; Hartung, H

    1975-06-01

    platforms of the Caracol seem to have been laid out deliberately to point to horizon events involving the sun and the planet Venus. Of the lines taken through the windows, the Venus setting points seem most plausible to us in view of both the accuracy with which they fit the architecture and the historical evidence bearing upon the importance of Venus to the Mesoamerican people. A specific connection between the Venus calendar in the Dresden Codex and the sighting of the extreme positions of the planet along the horizon, however, is yet to be established. It is especially significant that alignments in both the base and the top of the tower relate to Venus. The solar equinox alignment in window I remains problematical, although the arrangement probably functioned as an approximate means of determining the first day of spring and the first day of autumn. Lines pointing to individual bright stars undoubtedly should be given lower value. If one is willing to carry the matching game to its ultimate completion, a stellar object can always be found which, although very obscure, will fit an alignment. In our consideration of the problem we have attempted to single out bright stars which appeared or disappeared on significant calendar dates. Other round structures resembling the Caracol exist in Mesoamerica (20), although there are comparatively few built by the Maya. Nearly all can be attributed to the cult of Quetzalcoatl (34). To our knowledge none have been carefully measured and analyzed for astronomical orientations. The ruined tower Q-152 at Mayapan bore distinct similarities to the Caracol, both in shape and structure. It probably contained only a single doorway which faced west. Both structures possessed circular corridors. A circular tower is still standing at Paalmul on the coast of Quintana Roo north of Tulum. Pollock (20, p. 115) states that it has a single room in the turret. A window similar to No. I in the Caracol faces northwest, the same direction as the base of

  17. Ecoregion Framework Facilitating Synthesis and Up-scaling of Tower CO2 Exchange Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.; Zhang, L.

    2015-12-01

    As the flux-tower studies of terrestrial CO2 exchange are currently approaching the stage of generalization and up-scaling, there is a growing need for an effective framework for these efforts facilitating comparative analysis and synthesis of flux tower data. Developed in the 1980s to denote a region with recurring patterns of ecosystems with similar climatic, vegetation, soil, and relief conditions, during the past decades the ecoregion concept was widely used as a tool combining modeling, GIS and remote sensing techniques in environmental and nature conservation project at the national and international scale. We describe application of the ecoregion approach to synthesis and up-scaling of the tower CO2 exchange measurements in the three major ecoregions of the Great Plains: Shortgrass steppe (SGS), Mixed prairie (MP), and Tallgrass prairie (TP). Original data of tower CO2 exchange (NEE) measurements during the 1996-2013 period covering 23 years at 6 sites in SGS, 86 years at 21 sites in MP, and 80 years at 24 sites in TP were partitioned into the gross photosynthesis (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) components using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. We present ecoregion-specific multivariate models relating gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and major ecosystem-scale ecophysiological parameters (photosynthetic capacity, apparent quantum yield, light-use efficiency, daytime respiration intensity) to on-site (climatic, plant, soil) and remotely sensed (NDVI) drivers of CO2 exchange. Superposition of these models on GIS layers of appropriate drivers was used to describe geographic patterns (maps) of photosynthesis, respiration, net CO2 exchange and ecophysiological parameters across the Great Plains. The source-sink activity at the ecoregion-scale was quantified by calculating spatial integrals of CO2 exchange characteristic over GIS pixels represented by the tower measurements.

  18. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  19. Development of the LSST raft tower modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, P.; Kotov, I.; Takacs, P. Z.; Frank, J. S.; Plate, S.; Van Berg, R.; Newcomer, M.; Antilogus, P.; Lebbolo, Hervé; Tocut, V.; Juramy, C.; Doherty, P.; Felt, N.

    2012-07-01

    The science focal plane of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is made up of 21 modules designated "raft towers". Each raft tower module (RTM) is an autonomous, fully-testable and serviceable 144 Mpixel imager consisting of nine highly-segmented CCDs with complete readout electronics chain. To minimize noise and obscuration the RTM is housed in a compact enclosure fully contained within the camera cryostat. The RTM is required to meet strict performance goals for image plane flatness, readout speed, noise, and power dissipation. Key components include the 4K × 4K fully-depleted CCDs with 16 outputs each, ceramic CCD support structure, and ASIC electronics for video processing and clock/bias generation. In addition to CCD signal handling, the RTM electronics also includes monitoring for temperature, voltage, and current, makeup heater control, ASIC configuration and readback, powerdown modes, and specialized diagnostic outputs. Digitized data are transmitted out of the camera cryostat over a single 3Gb/s serial link.

  20. 7. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF EAST PHOTO TOWER. CLOSED WINDOW ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF EAST PHOTO TOWER. CLOSED WINDOW ON WEST SIDE; ELECTRICAL POWER BOX ON EAST SIDE OF PHOTO TOWER. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. 13. View of Truss tower and pivot pier locking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Truss tower and pivot pier locking east. When the draw is open, the two arms of the truss act as cantilevers supported by the truss tower. A counterweight in the shorter of the bridge keeps the span in proper balance. - Center Street Swing Bridge, Southwest of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 5. Light tower and corner of keeper's house, view south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Light tower and corner of keeper's house, view south, northeast side and northwest front of tower, northeast side of house - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  3. 6. Light tower and corner of keeper's house, view northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Light tower and corner of keeper's house, view northeast, northwest front and southwest side of tower, southwest side of house - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  4. 3. Bell house, light tower and keeper's house, view west, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Bell house, light tower and keeper's house, view west, southeast side and northeast front of bell house, southeast sides of tower and keeper's house - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  5. 4. Keeper's house and light tower, view northeast, southwest side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Keeper's house and light tower, view northeast, southwest side of house, northwest front and southwest side of tower - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  6. 2. Light tower and oil house, view west, southeast and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower and oil house, view west, southeast and northeast sides of tower and south side of oil house - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  7. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  8. Legionella species isolated from cooling towers in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Y F; Tan, C H; Lim, S Y

    1992-03-01

    Three building complexes in Kuala Lumpur were surveyed for the presence of legionellae in cooling towers. The organisms were grown from 12 out of 46 samples of water collected from 30 towers. L. pneumophila serogroups 1 and 7 were the commonest serogroups isolated. None belonged to the Pontiac subgroup of L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  9. Cell block three and northeast guard tower (center), looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block three and northeast guard tower (center), looking from the central guard tower, facing northeast (note view also includes the baseball field (left), and cell blocks fourteen and eleven (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. NORTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE, HIGH ENCLOSED METAL OBSERVATION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE, HIGH ENCLOSED METAL OBSERVATION TOWER LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 1800 FEET SOUTH OF TRACK. Looking southeast - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Observation Tower, South of west end of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire rope wrapped around the base of the tower, which may have been used in an attempt to pull the submarine offshore. - Sub Marine Explorer, Located along the beach of Isla San Telmo, Pearl Islands, Isla San Telmo, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  12. Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) to left, Microwave Tower (associated with Building 5769) and Civil Engineering Storage Building (Building 5766) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  13. 1. Keeper's house, small boathouse, and light tower, view east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house, small boathouse, and light tower, view east, west and south sides of keeper's house, west side of boathouse and tower - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  14. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  15. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  16. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  17. 9. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWER. Note emergency bracing installed beneath collapsed tower, and crumpled vertical members at right and left. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  18. 36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER No. 1 AND TWO GAS COOLING TOWER SERVICE WATER PUMPS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  19. 2. Keeper's house, light tower and oil house, view north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Keeper's house, light tower and oil house, view north, south and east sides of keeper's house, south side of tower and oil house - Owl's Head Light Station, Off State Highway 73 just east of Rockland on Owl's Head Bay, Owls Head, Knox County, ME

  20. 18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at far right. Tower at center was used to convey material. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. View of lifting girder and tower support superstructure on Tensaw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of lifting girder and tower support superstructure on Tensaw River Bridge, looking north west. Showing rope connectors and welding cut from tower removal. - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  2. 1. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTHEAST SIDE AND SOUTHEAST FRONT OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTHEAST SIDE AND SOUTHEAST FRONT OF TOWER AND ORIGINAL LIGHTHOUSE - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  3. 25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas pipes between coke ovens and compressor building XX), coal conveyor to pulverizer building on right, water tank to left of quench tower. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  4. 8. SOUTH SIDE OF EAST PHOTO TOWER; ELECTRICAL POWER BOX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SOUTH SIDE OF EAST PHOTO TOWER; ELECTRICAL POWER BOX ON RIGHT. LEFT TO RIGHT IN BACKGROUND: A STORAGE SHED (BLDG. 776), METEOROLOGICAL TOWER, PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757), AND SLC-3W MST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. 84. INDIAN HOUSE TOWER, FROM THE EAST. ALSO SHOWS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. INDIAN HOUSE TOWER, FROM THE EAST. ALSO SHOWS THE BALCONY AND ARCADE OF THE WEST WING. THE TOWER WAS ADDED IN 1916. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-10. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  6. 10. View east from northwest (port) elevator tower to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View east from northwest (port) elevator tower to northeast (starboard) elevator tower. Muzzle of deck torpedo tube projects from wall at lower right. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  7. 32. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER WHILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER WHILE A JUPITER MISSILE IS BEING POSITIONED ONTO THE TEST TOWER. DATE AND PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. 8. INTERIOR VIEW OF ASSEMBLY ROOM (REAR FACADE), UNTANKING TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW OF ASSEMBLY ROOM (REAR FACADE), UNTANKING TOWER, SHOWING PREVIOUS MODIFICATIONS (INSTALLATION OF METAL ROLL-UP DOOR, LEFT FOREGROUND). 125-TON LIFTING CRANE (TOP FOREGROUND), AND ORIGINAL FLOOR-TO-CEILING MULTI-PANE, METAL-CASED WINDOWS - Bonneville Power Administration Chehalis Substation, Untanking Tower, State Route 603, West of Interstate 5, Napavine, Lewis County, WA

  9. Sequoias, Mavericks, Open Doors...Composing Joan Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2011-01-01

    This essay interview with Joan Tower is a meditation on the importance of composing, understood as a process larger than the making of new sound combinations or musical scores, suggesting that the compositional act is self-educative and self-forming. Tower's musical life, one of teaching and learning, one of composing and self-composing, is an…

  10. 34. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. MODIFICATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. MODIFICATIONS TO THE EAST SIDE OF THE TOWER ARE NEARING COMPLETION. NOTE THAT THE HORIZON HAS BEEN MODIFIED TO DISGUISE THE LOCATION. 1959, PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. 1. Oil house, keeper's house, Southern Light Tower and Northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oil house, keeper's house, Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view northwest, south and east sides - Kennebec River Light Station, South side of Doubling Point Road, off State Highway 127, 1.8 miles south of U.S. Route 1, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  12. 2. Barn, light tower and keeper's house, view southeast, west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Barn, light tower and keeper's house, view southeast, west and north sides of barn, northwest side of light tower, and west northwest and north northeast sides of keeper's house - Curtis Island Light Station, Curtis Island, at entrance to Camden Harbor, Camden, Knox County, ME

  13. 2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, northeast and northwest sides of shed, northeast side of tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  14. 3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view west, southeast side of viaduct, southeast and northeast sides of keeper's house, tower and shed - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  15. 1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view southwest, northeast side of shed, keeper's house and tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  16. 2. Fog signal house and light tower, view west southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Fog signal house and light tower, view west southwest, southeast and northeast sides of signal house, east and north sides of tower - Libby Island Light Station, At southern tip of Libby Island at entrance to Machias Bay, Machiasport, Washington County, ME

  17. 7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view north northeast, west and south sides of keeper's house and tower, southwest and southeast sides of fog signal house - West Quoddy Head Light Station, At eastern tip of West Quaddy Head, Lubec, Washington County, ME

  18. 1. Light tower and fog signal house, view south southeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Light tower and fog signal house, view south southeast, east and north sides of tower, northeast and northwest sides of signal house - Libby Island Light Station, At southern tip of Libby Island at entrance to Machias Bay, Machiasport, Washington County, ME

  19. OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP RAVINE,LOOKING SOUTH FROM BREAK OVER TOWER LOCATION. A SINGLE ORE BUCKET HANGS FROM THE CABLE AT CENTER. DEATH VALLEY'S FLOOR IS IN THE DISTANCE (TOP). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. Main photoautotrophic components of biofilms in natural draft cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Tomáš; Čapek, Petr; Böhmová, Petra

    2016-05-01

    While photoautotrophic organisms are an important component of biofilms that live in certain regions of natural draft cooling towers, little is known about these communities. We therefore examined 18 towers at nine sites to identify the general patterns of community assembly in three distinct tower parts, and we examined how community structures differ depending on geography. We also compared the newly acquired data with previously published data. The bottom sections of draft cooling towers are mainly settled by large filamentous algae, primarily Cladophora glomerata. The central portions of towers host a small amount of planktic algae biomass originating in the cooling water. The upper fourths of towers are colonized by biofilms primarily dominated by cyanobacteria, e.g., members of the genera Gloeocapsa and Scytonema. A total of 41 taxa of phototrophic microorganisms were identified. Species composition of the upper fourth of all towers was significantly affected by cardinal position. There was different species composition at positions facing north compared to positions facing south. West- and east-facing positions were transitory and highly similar to each other in terms of species composition. Biofilms contribute to the degradation of paint coatings inside towers. PMID:26508444

  1. 4. North elevation of Shell Interlocking Tower showing structure built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. North elevation of Shell Interlocking Tower showing structure built into slope of railroad right-of-way. - New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Shell Interlocking Tower, New Haven Milepost 16, approximately 100 feel east of New Rochelle Junction, New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY

  2. 13. Photocopy of circa 18751880 photograph. Original in Tower Grove ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of circa 1875-1880 photograph. Original in Tower Grove Park 'Entrance' file. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM ACROSS MAGNOLIA AVENUE, SHOWING, BEYOND NORTH GATE, ROOF OF GREENHOUSE (LEFT CENTER), CRENELATED STORAGE STRUCTURE (CENTER), AND ROOF OF 1863 GATEHOUSE DEMOLISHED IN 1913 (RIGHT CENTER) - Tower Grove Park, Superintendent's House, 4255 Arsenal Street, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  3. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF ASSEMBLY ROOM (REAR FACADE), UNTANKING TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF ASSEMBLY ROOM (REAR FACADE), UNTANKING TOWER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TRI-SECTION SLIDING ENTRANCE DOORWAY (RIGHT FOREGROUND), AND RAIL TRACKS IN FLOORING ENTERING THE STRUCTURE FROM THE SWITCHING YARD - Bonneville Power Administration Chehalis Substation, Untanking Tower, State Route 603, West of Interstate 5, Napavine, Lewis County, WA

  4. 15. Como gatehouse (outlet tower) and access bridge, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Como gatehouse (outlet tower) and access bridge, looking west from dam crest (Trash rack visible in reservoir pool behind and right of tower) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Como Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  5. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study. Instructor's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power output. The efficiency…

  6. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Problem Statement: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power…

  7. PBF Cooling Tower. View of stairway to fan deck. Vents ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. View of stairway to fan deck. Vents are made of redwood. Camera facing southwest toward north side of Cooling Tower. Siding is corrugated asbestos concrete. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: June 6, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3463 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note condition of slates on tower skirt roof, missing section of gutter at left side of skirt roof, missing window panes; note also knee braces carried on masonry ancons; view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  9. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-02-04

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs.

  10. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-02-01

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs.

  11. Solar-flare shielding with Regolith at a lunar-base site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The Langley high energy nucleon transport computer code BRYNTRN is used to predict time-integrated radiation dose levels at the lunar surface due to high proton flux from solar flares. The study addresses the shielding requirements for candidate lunar habitat configurations necessary to protect crew members from these large and unpredictable radiation fluxes. Three solar proton events have been analyzed, and variations in radiation intensity in a shield medium due to the various primary particle energy distributions are predicted. Radiation dose predictions are made for various slab thicknesses of a lunar soil model. Results are also presented in the form of dose patterns within specific habitat configurations shielded with lunar material.

  12. Shielding for the upgraded Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Vylet, V

    2005-01-01

    The Duke FEL Laboratory is undergoing a series of upgrades staggered over time that will greatly increase the capabilities of the machines and by the same token the importance of radiation safety issues. In this paper, we present the scope of the planned upgrades and provide several specific examples of shielding calculations. We also present our effort to correlate calculations with experimental measurements. PMID:16381713

  13. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  14. Sculpting sandcastles grain by grain: Self-assembled sand towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Vázquez, F.; Moreau, F.; Vandewalle, N.; Dorbolo, S.

    2012-11-01

    We study the spontaneous formation of granular towers produced when dry sand is poured on a wet sand bed. When the liquid content of the bed exceeds a threshold value W, the impacting grains have a nonzero probability to stick on the wet grains due to instantaneous liquid bridges created during the impact. The trapped grains become wet by the capillary ascension of water and the process continues, giving rise to stable narrow towers. The growth velocity is determined by the surface liquid content which decreases exponentially as the tower height augments. This self-assembly mechanism (only observed in the funicular and capillary regimes) could theoretically last while the capillary rise of water is possible; however, the structure collapses before reaching this limit. The collapse occurs when the weight of the tower surpasses the cohesive stress at its base. The cohesive stress increases as the liquid content of the bed is reduced. Consequently, the highest towers are found just above W.

  15. Bacterial aerosols produced from a cooling tower using wastewater effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.P.; Garbett, M.; Rees, H.B.; Lewis, B.G.

    1980-03-01

    A cooling tower, which receives make-up water from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, was studied. Wastewater effluent was super-chlorinated, then treated with lime and a commercial coagulant to remove phosphates, calcium, magnesium, and suspended solids before it was pumped into the cooling tower. The chlorination and coagulation described above were used to reduce deposition of scale and slime on the power plant condenser surfaces. Bacterial counts were made of the cooling tower basin waters and of the aerosols exiting the cooling tower vents. It was dicovered that 39% of bacteria exiting the cooling tower vents were of the genus Pseudomonas. A few pathogenic microbes were also found to be present in the aerosolized particles but their numbers were so low that they were considered insignificant.

  16. Remote monitoring and nondestructive evaluation of wind turbine towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Yu, Chih-Peng; Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Ke, Ying-Tzu; Shih, Yi-Ru

    2014-03-01

    Wind turbine towers are in need of condition monitoring so as to lower the cost of unexpected maintenance. Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines even the supporting towers. Monitoring of wind turbines in service using embedded data sensor arrays usually is not targeted at the turbine-tower interaction from the perspective of structural dynamics. In this study the remote monitoring of the tower supporting a horizontal-axis wind turbine was attempted using a microwave interferometer. The dominant frequency of one tower was found to be decreased by more than 20% in 16 months. Numerical modeling using spectral finite elements is in progress and should provide further information regarding frequency shift due to stiffness variation and added mass. Expected outcome will contribute to remote monitoring procedures and nondestructive evaluation techniques for local wind turbine structures during operation.

  17. Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson J. W. (Editor); Miller, J. (Editor); Konradi, A. (Editor); Cucinotta, F. A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A group of twenty-nine scientists and engineers convened a 'Workshop on Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration' at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The provision of shielding for a Mars mission or a Lunar base from the hazards of space radiations is a critical technology since astronaut radiation safety depends on it and shielding safety factors to control risk uncertainty appear to be great. The purpose of the workshop was to define requirements for the development and evaluation of high performance shield materials and designs and to develop ideas regarding approaches to radiation shielding. The workshop was organized to review the recent experience on shielding strategies gained in studies of the 'Space Exploration Initiative (SEI),' to review the current knowledge base for making shield assessment, to examine a basis for new shielding strategies, and to recommend a strategy for developing the required technologies for a return to the moon or for Mars exploration. The uniqueness of the current workshop arises from the expected long duration of the missions without the protective cover of the geomagnetic field in which the usually small and even neglected effects of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can no longer be ignored. It is the peculiarity of these radiations for which the inter-action physics and biological action are yet to be fully understood.

  18. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  19. Current status of methods for shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods used in shielding analysis and recent improvements in those methods are discussed. The status of methods development is discussed based on needs cited at the 1977 International Conference on Reactor Shielding. Additional areas where methods development is needed are discussed.

  20. Performance analysis of superconducting generator electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, D.; Xia, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the shielding performance of electromagnetic shielding systems is analyzed using the finite element method. Considering the non-iron-core rotor structure of superconducting generators, it is proposed that the stator alternating magnetic field generated under different operating conditions could decompose into oscillating and rotating magnetic field, so that complex issues could be greatly simplified. A 1200KW superconducting generator was analyzed. The distribution of the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field in rotor area, which are generated by stator winding currents, and the distribution of the eddy currents in electromagnetic shielding tube, which are induced by these stator winding magnetic fields, are calculated without electromagnetic shielding system and with three different structures of electromagnetic shielding system respectively. On the basis of the results of FEM, the shielding factor of the electromagnetic shielding systems is calculated and the shielding effect of the three different structures on the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field is compared. The method and the results in this paper can provide reference for optimal design and loss calculation of superconducting generators.

  1. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Stratigraphy of small shield volcanoes on Venus: Criteria for determining stratigraphic relationships and assessment of relative age and temporal abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2004-10-01

    Small volcanic edifices, shields with a diameter less than about 20 km, are common and sometimes very abundant features on the plains of Venus. Typically, they form tight or loose clusters of features known as shield fields. Small shields are interpreted to be formed due to small-scale eruptions through numerous and distinct sources, a mode of formation apparently significantly different from the mechanism thought to be responsible for the emplacement of the vast regional plains of Venus. Did the eruption style of small shields occur repeatedly throughout the visible part of the geologic record of Venus? Or was this style more concentrated in a specific epoch or epochs of geologic history? Do the clusters of shields represent localized development of sources over a thermal anomaly such as a plume, or do they represent exposures or kipukas of a more regional unit or units? A major step toward answering these questions is an understanding of small shield stratigraphy. Multiple criteria have been developed to assess the stratigraphic relationships of individual small shields and that of shield fields with the adjacent units. In our analysis, we expanded and developed the previous criteria and added detailed criteria to describe specific patterns of deformation within shield fields, cross-cutting, and embayment relationships between shield fields and surrounding units. We also used secondary characteristics of shield fields such as radar albedo difference, changes in shield density and size, etc. In our study, we applied these criteria and analyzed in detail stratigraphic relationships of shield fields in a random sample of features (64 fields) and in the global geotraverse along 30°N (77 fields). The total number of analyzed shield fields (141) represents about 22% of the general population of these features catalogued by Crumpler and Aubele [2000]. The majority of the fields (98, or ~69%) predate emplacement of material of vast regional plains with wrinkle ridges

  3. How Concentration Shields Against Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, John E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we outline our view of how concentration shields against distraction. We argue that higher levels of concentration make people less susceptible to distraction for two reasons. One reason is that the undesired processing of the background environment is reduced. For example, when people play a difficult video game, as opposed to an easy game, they are less likely to notice what people in the background are saying. The other reason is that the locus of attention becomes more steadfast. For example, when people are watching an entertaining episode of their favorite television series, as opposed to a less absorbing show, attention is less likely to be diverted away from the screen by a ringing telephone. The theoretical underpinnings of this perspective, and potential implications for applied settings, are addressed. PMID:26300594

  4. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  5. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-27

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  6. Hypervelocity impact on shielded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1993-01-01

    A ballistic limit equation for hypervelocity impact on thin plates is derived analytically. This equation applies to cases of impulsive impact on a plate that is protected by a multi-shock shield, and it is valid in the range of velocity above 6 km/s. Experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on square aluminum plates. Comparing the center deflections of these plates with the theoretical deflections of a rigid-plastic plate subjected to a blast load, one determines the dynamic yield strength of the plate material. The analysis is based on a theory for the expansion of the fragmented projectile and on a simple failure criterion. Curves are presented for the critical projectile radius versus the projectile velocity, and for the critical plate thickness versus the velocity. These curves are in good agreement with curves that have been generated empirically.

  7. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  8. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  9. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Ki Yeong; Kim, Taek Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Seong Wook; Kim, Joung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-11-16

    We report the first experimental results on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of monolayer graphene. The monolayer CVD graphene has an average SE value of 2.27 dB, corresponding to ~40% shielding of incident waves. CVD graphene shows more than seven times (in terms of dB) greater SE than gold film. The dominant mechanism is absorption rather than reflection, and the portion of absorption decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. Our modeling work shows that plane-wave theory for metal shielding is also applicable to graphene. The model predicts that ideal monolayer graphene can shield as much as 97.8% of EMI. This suggests the feasibility of manufacturing an ultrathin, transparent, and flexible EMI shield by single or few-layer graphene. PMID:23085718

  11. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  12. A practical application combining wireless sensor networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-07-30

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things.

  13. A Practical Application Combining Wireless Sensor Networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things. PMID:25196106

  14. Optical sampling of the flux tower footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to address the reasons and methods for conducting optical remote sensing within the flux tower footprint. Fundamental principles and conclusions gleaned from over two decades of proximal remote sensing at flux tower sites are reviewed. An organizing framework is the light-use efficiency (LUE) model, both because it is widely used, and because it provides a useful theoretical construct for integrating optical remote sensing with flux measurements. Multiple ways of driving this model, ranging from meteorological measurements to remote sensing, have emerged in recent years, making it a convenient conceptual framework for comparative experimental studies. New interpretations of established optical sampling methods, including the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF), are discussed within the context of the LUE model. Multi-scale analysis across temporal and spatial axes is a central theme, because such scaling can provide links between ecophysiological mechanisms detectable at the level of individual organisms and broad patterns emerging at larger scales, enabling evaluation of emergent properties and extrapolation to the flux footprint and beyond. Proper analysis of sampling scale requires an awareness of sampling context that is often essential to the proper interpretation of optical signals. Additionally, the concept of optical types, vegetation exhibiting contrasting optical behavior in time and space, is explored as a way to frame our understanding of the controls on surface-atmosphere fluxes. Complementary NDVI and PRI patterns across ecosystems are offered as an example of this hypothesis, with the LUE model and light-response curve providing an integrating framework. We conclude that experimental approaches allowing systematic exploration of plant optical behavior in the context of the flux tower network provides a unique way to improve our understanding of environmental constraints and

  15. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  16. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  17. FCXSEC: multigroup cross-section libraries for nuclear fuel cycle shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Webster, C.C.; Diggs, B.R.; Pevey, R.E.; Croff, A.G.

    1980-05-01

    Starting with the pseudo-composition-independent VITAMIN-C cross-sectin library, composition-dependent fine-(171n-36..gamma..) and broad-group (22n-21..gamma..) self-shielded AMPX master, broad-group microscopic ANISN-formatted, and broad-group macroscopic ANISN-formatted cross-section libraries were generated to be used for nuclear fuel cycle shielding calculations. The specifications for the data and the procedure used to prepare the libraries are described.

  18. Understanding Planning Ability Measured by the Tower of London: An Evaluation of Its Internal Structure by Latent Variable Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppenol-Gonzalez, Gabriela V.; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Boonstra, A. Marije

    2010-01-01

    The Tower of London (TOL) is a widely used instrument for assessing planning ability. Inhibition and (spatial) working memory are assumed to contribute to performance on the TOL, but findings about the relationship between these cognitive processes are often inconsistent. Moreover, the influence of specific properties of TOL problems on cognitive…

  19. Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-11

    HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

  20. Improved Spacecraft Materials for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tai, H.; Thibeault, S. A.; Simonsen, L. C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.

    1999-01-01

    In the execution of this proposal, we will first examine current and developing spacecraft materials and evaluate their ability to attenuate adverse biological mutational events in mammalian cell systems and reduce the rate of cancer induction in mice harderian glands as a measure of their protective qualities. The HZETRN code system will be used to generate a database on GCR attenuation in each material. If a third year of funding is granted, the most promising and mission-specific materials will be used to study the impact on mission cost for a typical Mars mission scenario as was planned in our original two year proposal at the original funding level. The most promising candidate materials will be further tested as to their transmission characteristics in Fe and Si ion beams to evaluate the accuracy of the HZETRN transmission factors. Materials deemed critical to mission success may also require testing as well as materials developed by industry for their radiation protective qualities (e.g., Physical Sciences Inc.) A study will be made of designing polymeric materials and composite materials with improved radiation shielding properties as well as the possible improvement of mission-specific materials.

  1. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; de Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini

    2014-01-01

    Objective Several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and Methods The percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results The authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion As expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. PMID:25741089

  2. PORFIDO on the NEMO Phase 2 tower

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaffoni, Orlando; Cordelli, Marco; Habel, Roberto; Martini, Agnese; Trasatti, Luciano

    2014-11-18

    We have designed and built an underwater measurement system, PORFIDO (Physical Oceanography by RFID Outreach) to gather oceanographic data from the Optical Modules of a neutrino telescope with a minimum of disturbance to the main installation. PORFIDO is composed of a sensor glued to the outside of an Optical Module, in contact with seawater, and of a reader placed inside the sphere, facing the sensor. Data are transmitted to the reader through the glass by RFID and to shore in real time for periods of years. The sensor gathers power from the radio frequency, thus eliminating the need for batteries or connectors through the glass. We have deployed four PORFIDO probes measuring temperatures with the NEMO-KM3Net-Italy Phase 2 tower in april 2013. The four probes are operative and are transmitting temperature data from 3500 m depth.

  3. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  4. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards of downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  5. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1999-03-30

    An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  6. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1998-03-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material. The apparatus consists of a tower bioreactor which has mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  7. Optimization of class 2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns the optimal mass-to-stiffness ratio design of class-2 tensegrity towers. For different loading scenarios, the procedure seeks the topology and geometry of the structure that yields an optimal design satisfying common constraints. The domain of feasible tensegrity geometries is defined by imposing tensegrity equilibrium conditions on both unloaded and loaded structure. Remaining constraints include strength constraints for all elements of the structure and buckling constraints for bars. The symmetry of the design is imposed by restricting the domain of geometric variables and element parameters. The static response of the structure is computed by using a nonlinear large displacement model. The problem is cast in the form of a nonlinear program. The influence of material parameters on the optimal shape of the structure is investigated.

  8. Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-09-01

    The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

  9. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  10. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF. PMID:26484984

  11. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  12. Caisson shield for arctic offshore production platform

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J. D.; Reusswig, G. H.

    1985-03-12

    A caisson shield for the protection of an offshore production platform and, more particularly, a caisson shield for use in an arctic environment for the protection of the offshore structure in iceberg-infested waters which is capable of absorbing the destructive forces of an impact produced by a large iceberg. The caisson shield consists of an essentially annular concrete structure encircling at least the submerged support section of the offshore production platform including vertically upstanding concentrically spaced, annular side walls, a horizontal slab base resting on the marine bottom on which the side walls are supported, and a slab top supported on the side walls, and including annularly spaced internal radial partition walls whereby the entire overall caisson shield structure provides a generally toroidal configuration incorporating a plurality of closed compartments. In one embodiment of the invention, located along the outer annular wall is a plurality of arcuate wall sections forming a series of arches and enclosed compartments between each arcuate wall section and the outer annular wall, which impart a ''scallop-like'' configuration to the outer circumference of the caisson shield. The ''scallop-like'' outer walls are capable of resisting and absorbing extremely high ice loads by being adapted to progressively crush the leading edge of an impacting iceberg and to thereby minimize the crush of the iceberg against the caisson shield before coming to rest against the shield.

  13. Graphitic heat shields for solar probe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using a graphitic heat-shield system on a solar probe going to within 4 solar radii of the center of the sun is investigated. An analysis of graphite vaporization, with commonly used vaporization coefficients, indicates that the maximum mass-loss rate from a conical shield as large as 4 m in diameter can be kept low enough to avoid interference with measurements of the solar environment. In addition to the mass-loss problem, the problem of protecting the payload from the high-temperature (up to 2300 K) primary shield must be solved. An analysis of radiation exchange between concentric disks provides a technique for designing the intermediate shielding. The technique is applied to the design of a system for the Starprobe spacecraft, and it is found that a system with 10 shields and a payload surface temperature of 600 K will have a payload diameter of 2.45 m. Since this is 61% of the 4-m diameter of the primary shield, it is concluded that a graphitic heat-shield system is feasible for the Starprobe mission.

  14. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  15. Determination of shielding requirements for mammography.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe; Ademoroti, Olalekan Albert

    2004-05-01

    Shielding requirements for mammography when considerations are to be given to attenuation by compression paddle, breast tissue, grid and image receptor (intervening materials) has been investigated. By matching of the attenuation and hardening properties, comparisons are made between shielding afforded by breast tissue materials (water, Lucite and 50%-50% adipose-glandular tissue) and some materials considered for shielding diagnostic x-ray beams, namely lead, steel and gypsum wallboard. Results show that significant differences exist between the thickness required to produce equal attenuation and that required to produce equal hardening of a given incident beam. While attenuation equivalent thickness produces equal exposure, it does not produce equal hardening. For shielding purposes, equivalence in exposure reduction without equivalence in penetrating power of an emerging beam does not amount to equivalence in shielding affordable by two different materials. Presented are models and results of sample calculations of additional shielding requirements apart from that provided by intervening materials. The shielding requirements for the integrated beam emerging from intervening materials are different from those for the integrated beam emerging from materials (lead/steel/gypsum wallboard) with attenuation equivalent thicknesses of these intervening materials. PMID:15191311

  16. Integrated shielding systems for manned interplanetary spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by manned interplanetary missions can have a severe impact on both vehicle design and mission performance. This study investigates the potential impact of radiation protection on interplanetary vehicle design for a manned Mars mission. A systems approach was used to investigate the radiation protection requirements of the sum interplanetary environment. Radiation budgets were developed which result in minimum integrated shielding system masses for both nuclear and non-nuclear powered missions. A variety of system configurations and geometries were assessed over a range of dose constraints. For an annual dose equivalent rate limit of 50 rem/yr, an environmental shielding system composed of a habitat shield and storm shelter was found to result in the lowest total mass. For a limit of 65 rem/yr, a system composed of a sleeping quarters shield was least massive, and resulted in significantly reduced system mass. At a limit of 75 rem/yr, a storm shelter alone was found to be sufficient, and exhibited a further mass reduction. Optimal shielding system results for 10 MWe nuclear powered missions were found to follow along similar lines, with the addition of a reactor shadow shield. A solar minimum galactic cosmic ray spectrum and one anomalously large solar particle event during the course of a two year mission were assumed. Water was assumed for environmental radiation shielding.

  17. Overview of HZETRN and BRNTRN Space Radiation Shielding Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.; Badavi, F. F.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Health Program has supported basic research over the last decade in radiation physics to develop ionizing radiation transport codes and corresponding data bases for the protection of astronauts from galactic and solar cosmic rays on future deep space missions. The codes describe the interactions of the incident radiations with shield materials where their content is modified by the atomic and nuclear reactions through which high energy heavy ions are fragmented into less massive reaction products and reaction products are produced as radiations as direct knockout of shield constituents or produced as de-excitation products in the reactions. This defines the radiation fields to which specific devices are subjected onboard a spacecraft. Similar reactions occur in the device itself which is the initiating event for the device response. An overview of the computational procedures and data base with some applications to photonic and data processing devices will be given.

  18. Concept for a next-generation drop tower system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Gierse, Andreas; Greif, Andreas; Lutz, Torsten; Mawn, Simon; Siemer, Jan; Eigenbrod, Christian; von Kampen, Peter; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-03-01

    The concept for a next-generation drop tower system is presented that is motivated by the scientific demand for much higher experiment repetition. This demand resulted in repetition rates of over 100 experiments per day which exceed the current capabilities of operating drop towers by far. High experiment repetition rates can for instance be realized through the novel application of a guided electro-magnetic linear drive system in a fully automatic drop tower operation. Such a new kind of drop tower system combines beneficial technologies of different free fall systems like freely falling drop capsules, capsule-in-capsule systems, and the vertical parabola method as already utilized in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system. This proposed next-generation drop tower system named GraviTower Bremen does not only enable experiments with an outstanding microgravity quality (10-6 g, where g is the Earth's gravitational acceleration) and a duration of 6 s but also novel experiments under partial gravity conditions (0.1 g to 0.4 g) matching those of Moon or Mars with durations of up to 8.5 s. Due to its linear drive system the GraviTower allows the same very low initial acceleration and following deceleration loads onto the experiment. These can be selected according to the experiment's needs with only 1.5 g or 4 g. The engine power of the linear drive system allows also large payload dimensions and masses. The features and capabilities of the proposed GraviTower Bremen combine all advantages of current drop towers and represent the next technological step forward in ground-based research under space conditions.

  19. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  20. Visual Features Involving Motion Seen from Airport Control Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion

    2010-01-01

    Visual motion cues are used by tower controllers to support both visual and anticipated separation. Some of these cues are tabulated as part of the overall set of visual features used in towers to separate aircraft. An initial analyses of one motion cue, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers detect and use it for spacing aircraft on or near the surface. Understanding cues like it will help determine if they can be safely used in a remote/virtual tower in which their presentation may be visually degraded.